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Sample records for disease self-help groups

  1. Role of Self-help Group in Substance Addiction Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prangya Paramita Priyadarshini

    2012-11-01

    Background: The Narcotics Anonymous (NA)/Alcoholic Anonymous(AA) is based on the philosophy of self-help, where the former addicts and recovering addicts share experiences, provide emotional support and do active monitoring through mentoring. In mentoring, a former addict with longer duration of drug-free life acts as a guide to the newly recovering addict. Objective: The objective was to study the effect of involvement in self help group upon addictís level of depression, functional social support, and anxiety. Method: The size of the sample was 60. 30 addicts were taken from rehabilitation centre and 30 were taken from self-help groups. ANOVA was used to analyze the result. Result: In all the criteria it was found that there exists a significant impact of Self-help group. Conclusion: Self-help group provide clients with a social network of individuals with similar problems and experiences, since most of these individuals may be isolated from society due to the social stigma attached to their addictions. The transition from being help recipients to being helpers enables recovering addicts to build their self-confidence and feelings of being wanted and desired in society, which facilitates their self-confidence and positive self-esteem.

  2. A qualitative study of breast cancer self-help groups.

    PubMed

    Gray, R; Fitch, M; Davis, C; Phillips, C

    1997-12-01

    This study reports on the experience of women in four community breast cancer self-help groups in Ontario, Canada. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 women, asking them about benefits and limitations of their group involvement, and about their perspectives on group processes and structures. Overall, participants reported their group involvement to be extremely helpful for navigating the short and long-term impact of breast cancer. Emotional support benefits included connecting with other breast cancer survivors, feeling understood and sharing experiences, providing hope, and sharing healing laughter. Informational and practical support benefits included sharing of important information and learning how to get what you want. Even where there were concerns about limitations or tensions of group experience, these occurred against a backdrop of appreciation and commitment. From the discussion of group processes and structures, a number of issues were identified as problematic. Most notable were how to deal with deaths of group members and how to balance the group's primary purpose of providing mutual support with secondary goals of dealing with group business and engaging in meaningful advocacy.

  3. Group Development in Self-Help Groups for College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuehrer, Ann E.; Keys, Christopher B.

    Research on mutual-aid groups has begun to examine reasons for joining and outcomes, but few investigations have focused on the processes of group development or interaction. The applicability of a therapy-group development model to student mutual-aid groups was examined to determine the extent to which specified formal group structure and…

  4. Responding to local needs. Self-help groups.

    PubMed

    Jayaseelan, J

    1993-01-01

    Pink Triangle, the only community-based group in Malaysia which works with men who have sex with men, took initial steps in August 1992 to establish a self-help project for people who are HIV-seropositive. Supporting people who are HIV-positive and fighting for their rights is new in Malaysia. The group has thus far been publicized through its public education events, hospitals, and other nongovernmental organizations. For the first time, information is being published specifically by and for people living with HIV/AIDS. The project also has a phone line to allow people to speak anonymously with someone who shares their experience. Many callers are men who have sex with men in the social context of intense prejudice and discrimination. Afraid to openly acknowledge their sexuality with strangers, the callers have yet to accede to meeting each other face-to-face in a group setting. The author notes in closing that Pink Triangle must be realistic about what can be achieved in Malaysia and allow the group to develop according to people's needs and not on the basis of a model imported from outside of the country.

  5. Illness and Prevention: Self-Help Groups for Families Faced with Scoliosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichsen, Gregory A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine what kinds of people are motivated to join a medical self-help group and whether and in what areas of psychological and social functioning such self-help groups have positive benefits for adolescents and their families. Extensive survey questionnaires were sent throughout the United States to all former…

  6. Adolescent Substance-Use Frequency following Self-Help Group Attendance and Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangi, Jennifer; Darling, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the heterogeneity of posttreatment outcomes, the likelihood of relapse is often dependent on several factors, including participation in continuing care services such as self-help groups. However, few studies have examined the use of self-help groups among adolescent outpatients. Therefore, in this study, investigators examined self-help…

  7. Dimensions and predictions of professional involvement in self-help groups: a view from within.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Adital Tirosh

    2002-05-01

    This article focuses on an analysis of how members of self-help groups perceived professional involvement and what they defined as the dimensions of such involvement. Models to predict these identified dimensions are also suggested. The instrument developed for the study consisted of two parts: (1) demographic question and (2) 12 statements concerning self-help group members' attitudes toward professional involvement. Based on responses from 183 members of self-help groups, three categories were identfied according to their main focus: groups dealing with health issues, groups dealing with alternative lifestyles, and groups based on the 12-step model. Analysis yielded two conceptually different constructs influencing group members' attitudes: collaboration and duality.

  8. Dimensions and Predictions of Professional Involvement in Self-Help Groups: A View from Within.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Ari, Adital Tirosh

    2002-01-01

    Discusses analysis of how members of self-help groups perceived professional involvement and dimensions of such involvement. Three categories were identified according to their main focus: groups dealing with health issues, groups dealing with alternative lifestyles, and groups based on the 12-step model. Analysis yielded two conceptually…

  9. Padres Maltratadores: Grupos de Autoayuda (Abusive Parents: Self-Help Groups).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intebi, Irene V.; Groisman, Adriana E.

    1991-01-01

    Causes of child abuse by parents are discussed. A therapy program in Buenos Aires (Argentina) for abusive parents is described. The program utilizes self-help groups as part of the therapeutic plan and has found them to be promising. Referral, types of interactions with the groups, and short-, medium-, and long-term objectives are discussed. (BRM)

  10. Measurement of Attitudes of Rural Women towards Self-Help Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meena, M. S.; Jain, Dilip; Meena, H. R.

    2008-01-01

    Self-help groups (SHGs) have emerged as an effective mechanism of empowerment and development of women as well as being on efficient mode of promoting group action and technology dissemination. Initiatives were undertaken at the Central Institute of Post-Harvest Engineering and Technology (CIPHET), Ludhiana to facilitate the formation of women's…

  11. Beyond the therapeutic: A Habermasian view of self-help groups' place in the public sphere.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sarah; Avis, Mark; Munn-Giddings, Carol

    2013-02-01

    Self-help groups in the United Kingdom continue to grow in number and address virtually every conceivable health condition, but they remain the subject of very little theoretical analysis. The literature to date has predominantly focused on their therapeutic effects on individual members. And yet they are widely presumed to fulfil a broader civic role and to encourage democratic citizenship. The article uses Habermas' model of the public sphere as an analytical tool with which to reconsider the literature on self-help groups in order to increase our knowledge of their civic functions. In doing this it also aims to illustrate the continuing relevance of Habermas' work to our understanding of issues in health and social care. We consider, within the context of current health policies and practices, the extent to which self-help groups with a range of different forms and functions operate according to the principles of communicative rationality that Habermas deemed key to democratic legitimacy. We conclude that self-help groups' civic role is more complex than is usually presumed and that various factors including groups' leadership, organisational structure and links with public agencies can affect their efficacy within the public sphere.

  12. Beyond the therapeutic: A Habermasian view of self-help groups' place in the public sphere

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Sarah; Avis, Mark; Munn-Giddings, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Self-help groups in the United Kingdom continue to grow in number and address virtually every conceivable health condition, but they remain the subject of very little theoretical analysis. The literature to date has predominantly focused on their therapeutic effects on individual members. And yet they are widely presumed to fulfil a broader civic role and to encourage democratic citizenship. The article uses Habermas' model of the public sphere as an analytical tool with which to reconsider the literature on self-help groups in order to increase our knowledge of their civic functions. In doing this it also aims to illustrate the continuing relevance of Habermas' work to our understanding of issues in health and social care. We consider, within the context of current health policies and practices, the extent to which self-help groups with a range of different forms and functions operate according to the principles of communicative rationality that Habermas deemed key to democratic legitimacy. We conclude that self-help groups' civic role is more complex than is usually presumed and that various factors including groups' leadership, organisational structure and links with public agencies can affect their efficacy within the public sphere. PMID:23326207

  13. The Benefits of Parenting Self-Help Groups for Rural Latino Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wituk, Scott; Commer, Amy; Lindstrom, Julie; Meisen, Greg

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 118 rural, mostly female, Latino participants in Parents Helping Parents (PHP)--a Kansas network of parenting self-help groups--found high satisfaction with PHP. PHP provided support and information concerning child rearing and child development, improved family communication, and increased the use of alternative means of discipline.…

  14. An Ethnographic-Discursive Approach to Parental Self-Help Groups: The Case of ADHD.

    PubMed

    Frigerio, Alessandra; Montali, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    Mutual aid groups have become a common form of help in the mental health field. Although self-help groups are associated with a range of health and social benefits, they remain poorly understood in terms of the dynamics of their interactions. Adopting an ethnographic-discursive approach, we conducted a 6-month observation of the meetings of a self-help group of parents with children diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to analyze the discursive dynamics of the interactions that characterized the group. Using a set of discursive strategies and practices, the parents promoted a homogeneity of viewpoints and experiences within the group and constructed a shared and consensual narrative to endorse a specific understanding of ADHD. The production of both homogeneity within the group and a shared narrative served to absolve parents of guilt, helped parents to signify their experience within a blaming social context, and preserved their identities as "good parents."

  15. Intervention to enhance empowerment in breast cancer self-help groups.

    PubMed

    Stang, Ingun; Mittelmark, Maurice B

    2010-03-01

    As arduous psychological reactions and loss of control almost inevitably represent a challenge for women diagnosed and treated for breast cancer, a participatory intervention study was initiated that aimed to enhance empowerment in breast cancer self-help groups. Women newly diagnosed with breast cancer were invited to participate. The intervention encompassed three professionally led self-help groups running sequentially, each group for approximately 4 months. Each group of five to seven participants met weekly. Several empowerment strategies were initiated by two professional facilitators, aiming to promote empowerment processes and to manage stress. The participants experienced group participation as both empowering and as a valuable source of support, and although the group processes developed very differently, a strong sense of fellowship developed in all three groups. The discussion highlights the findings in relation to several theoretical perspectives including social capital, social cohesion, risky agreements, helper-therapy and power/empowerment. We conclude that empowerment strategies that are implemented in professionally led breast cancer self-help groups can contribute to participant empowerment and function as an important source of re-discovery and confirmation of the participants' strengths and abilities.

  16. The Structure of Social Exchange in Self-Help Support Groups: Development of a Measure

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Louis D.; Tang, Xiaohui; Hollman, Ruth L.

    2014-01-01

    Self-help support groups are indigenous community resources designed to help people manage a variety of personal challenges, from alcohol abuse to xeroderma pigmentosum. The social exchanges that occur during group meetings are central to understanding how people benefit from participation. This paper examines the different types of social exchange behaviors that occur during meetings, using two studies to develop empirically distinct scales that reliably measure theoretically important types of exchange. Resource theory informed the initial measurement development efforts. Exploratory factor analyses from the first study led to revisions in the factor structure of the social exchange scales. The revised measure captured the exchange of emotional support, experiential information, humor, unwanted behaviors, and exchanges outside meetings. Confirmatory factor analyses from a follow-up study with a different sample of self-help support groups provided good model fit, suggesting the revised structure accurately represented the data. Further, the scales demonstrated good convergent and discriminant validity with related constructs. Future research can use the scales to identify aspects of social exchange that are most important in improving health outcomes among self-help support group participants. Groups can use the scales in practice to celebrate strengths and address weaknesses in their social exchange dynamics. PMID:24398622

  17. The Efficacy of Self-Help Group Treatment and Therapist-Led Group Treatment for Binge Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Carol B.; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this investigation was to compare three types of treatment for binge eating disorder to determine the relative efficacy of self-help group treatment compared to therapist-led and therapist-assisted group cognitive-behavioral therapy. Method A total of 259 adults diagnosed with binge eating disorder were randomized to wait-list or 20 week group treatment that was therapist-led, therapist-assisted, or self-help. Binge eating as measured by the Eating Disorder Examination was assessed at baseline, post-treatment, 6- and 12 month follow-up and outcome was determined using logistic regression and analysis of covariance (intention-to-treat). Results At end of treatment, the therapist-led (51.7%) and the therapist-assisted (33.3%) conditions had higher binge eating abstinence rates than the self-help (17.9%) and wait-list (10.1%) conditions. No differences in abstinence rates were observed at either follow-up assessment. The therapist-led condition also showed more reductions in binge eating at post-treatment and follow-up compared to the self-help condition, and treatment completion rates were higher in the therapist-led (88.3%) and wait-list (81.2%) conditions than the therapist-assisted (68.3%) and the self-help (59.7%) conditions. Conclusions Therapist-led group cognitive-behavioral treatment for binge eating disorder led to higher binge eating abstinence rates, greater reductions in binge eating frequency, and lower attrition at the end of treatment compared to group self-help treatment. Although these findings indicate that therapist delivery of group treatment is associated with better short-term outcome and less attrition than self-help treatment, the lack of group differences at follow-up suggests that self-help group treatment may be a viable alternative to therapist-led interventions. (Clinical Trials Registration: Treatment of Binge Eating Disorder, #NCT00041743; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00041743?term=00041743&rank=1

  18. Personality and alcohol/substance-use disorder patient relapse and attendance at self-help group meetings.

    PubMed

    Janowsky, D S; Boone, A; Morter, S; Howe, L

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of personality in the short-term outcome of alcohol/substance-use disorder patients. Detoxifying alcohol/substance-use disorder patients were administered the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ), the Michigan Alcohol Screening Test (MAST), the CAGE Questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). These patients were subsequently evaluated over a 1-month period for relapse and attendance at self-help group meetings. High TPQ Persistence scale scores predicted abstinence. When the Thinking and Feeling groups were considered separately, and when these two groups were combined into a single group, high scores for the individual groups and the combined group (i.e. Thinking and Feeling types together) predicted abstinence. High TPQ Persistence scale scores and low Shyness with Strangers and Fear of Uncertainty subscale scores predicted attendance at self-help group meetings. High MBTI Extroversion and high MBTI Thinking scores also predicted attendance at self-help group meetings. When the Extroverted and Introverted types and the Thinking and Feeling types respectively were combined, as with abstinence, high scores predicted attendance at self-help group meetings. Age, gender, CAGE, MAST, and BDI scores did not predict outcome. The above information suggests that specific personality variables may predict abstinence and attendance at self-help group meetings in recently detoxified alcoholics, and this may have prognostic and therapeutic significance.

  19. Social support, organizational characteristics, psychological well-being, and group appraisal in three self-help group populations.

    PubMed

    Maton, K I

    1988-02-01

    This study examined the relationship of three social support and three organizational variables to two well-being and two group appraisal variables among 144 members of Compassionate Friends, Multiple Sclerosis, and Overeaters Anonymous self-help groups. An anonymous questionnaire was the major research instrument. Receiving social support was not significantly related to depression or anxiety but was positively related to perceived group benefits and group satisfaction. Providing social support and friendship were each positively related to one well-being and one group appraisal variable. Bidirectional supporters (i.e., individuals high on both receiving and providing support) reported more favorable well-being and group appraisal than Receivers, Providers, and Low Supporters. At the group level of analysis (n = 15 groups), groups with higher levels of role differentiation, greater order and organization, and in which leaders were perceived as more capable contained members who reported more positive well-being and group appraisal. The implications for future research and professional consultation to self-help groups are discussed.

  20. Against many odds: the dilemmas of women's self-help groups in Mbeere, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mwaniki, N

    1986-01-01

    This article uses data collected through questionnaires and formal interviews to analyze women's self-help groups in Mbeere, Kenya. The discussion begins with a description of the geographic setting, which has low and unpredictable rainfall leading to periodic droughts and famine, and socioeconomic aspects of life in Mbeere, where women's status is defined by men who control important economic aspects of their lives, such as land tenure. In 1982, there were 140 women's groups in Mbeere with memberships ranging from below 10 to over 60 (most 30-50). The groups are formally organized, with a leader, a secretary, and a treasurer. Most of the women in the groups are from the poor peasant socioeconomic class, and residence in the same neighborhood is an important membership criteria. All of the women surveyed were married and had children. The work schedules of the groups depend on the type of project and amount of work to be done. Activities fall into the categories of raising money (general work, cotton farming, basket making); generating income (raising livestock; building stores, lodgings, or social halls; or buying equipment like a truck or grain mill); and general development (water extension, homestead improvements, buying cows or goats for members, or building schools). Of 25 groups sampled, 20 had a cash-crop garden cultivated on borrowed land. Groups gave members financial assistance (all members get equal treatment), labor assistance, and assistance in social matters through the dissemination of information and informal discussions. Groups face internal constraints in terms of the heavy burden women face to uphold their domestic and agricultural responsibilities, food shortages, water scarcity, and inadequate nutrition, poor organization, weak leadership, large allowances demanded by some group leaders, lack of support from husbands, criticisms from outside the groups, and an inability to identify the most viable projects. External constraints include lack of

  1. Professional Support of Self-Help Groups: A Support Group Project for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsen, Benedicte

    2003-01-01

    Study follows a collaborative support group project between a team of health professionals and a Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients' group. While advantageous for professionals to decide upon the aim of a joint intervention in dialogue with participants, simply asking participants what their aims are does not guarantee actual agreement. Case study…

  2. Can Addiction-Related Self-Help/Mutual Aid Groups Lower Demand for Professional Substance Abuse Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Keith

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the potential of self-help/mutual-aid groups as a way to reduce the demand for professional substance-abuse treatment and proposes a model that combines the two approaches for cost-effective and therapeutically effective networks of services. (SLD)

  3. Physician and consumer attitudes and behaviors regarding self-help health support groups as an adjunct to traditional medical care.

    PubMed

    Fridinger, F; Goodwin, G; Chng, C L

    1992-01-01

    This study assessed the creditability of self-help health support groups as an adjunct to traditional medical care among a sampling of physicians (N = 120) and group members (N = 73) located in the Dallas/Ft. Worth Metropolitan area. Findings suggest a general lack of awareness of local groups among physicians, referral to only a few select groups, as well as little communication between health care professionals and their patients. Physicians in group practice, surgical specialties, and having never referred patients to support groups responded less favorably. Several benefits were reported by the group members, although for a majority their patient-physician relationship remained relatively unchanged.

  4. Promoting household water treatment through women's self help groups in Rural India: assessing impact on drinking water quality and equity.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Matthew C; Trinies, Victoria; Boisson, Sophie; Mak, Gregory; Clasen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Household water treatment, including boiling, chlorination and filtration, has been shown effective in improving drinking water quality and preventing diarrheal disease among vulnerable populations. We used a case-control study design to evaluate the extent to which the commercial promotion of household water filters through microfinance institutions to women's self-help group (SHG) members improved access to safe drinking water. This pilot program achieved a 9.8% adoption rate among women targeted for adoption. Data from surveys and assays of fecal contamination (thermotolerant coliforms, TTC) of drinking water samples (source and household) were analyzed from 281 filter adopters and 247 non-adopters exposed to the program; 251 non-SHG members were also surveyed. While adopters were more likely than non-adopters to have children under 5 years, they were also more educated, less poor, more likely to have access to improved water supplies, and more likely to have previously used a water filter. Adopters had lower levels of fecal contamination of household drinking water than non-adopters, even among those non-adopters who treated their water by boiling or using traditional ceramic filters. Nevertheless, one-third of water samples from adopter households exceeded 100 TTC/100ml (high risk), and more than a quarter of the filters had no stored treated water available when visited by an investigator, raising concerns about correct, consistent use. In addition, the poorest adopters were less likely to see improvements in their water quality. Comparisons of SHG and non-SHG members suggest similar demographic characteristics, indicating SHG members are an appropriate target group for this promotion campaign. However, in order to increase the potential for health gains, future programs will need to increase uptake, particularly among the poorest households who are most susceptible to disease morbidity and mortality, and focus on strategies to improve the correct, consistent

  5. A neoliberalisation of civil society? Self-help groups and the labouring class poor in rural South India.

    PubMed

    Pattenden, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This paper notes the prominence of self-help groups (SHGs) within current anti-poverty policy in India, and analyses the impacts of government- and NGO-backed SHGs in rural North Karnataka. It argues that self-help groups represent a partial neoliberalisation of civil society in that they address poverty through low-cost methods that do not challenge the existing distribution of power and resources between the dominant class and the labouring class poor. It finds that intra-group savings and loans and external loans/subsidies can provide marginal economic and political gains for members of the dominant class and those members of the labouring classes whose insecure employment patterns currently provide above poverty line consumption levels, but provide neither material nor political gains for the labouring class poor. Target-oriented SHG catalysts are inattentive to how the social relations of production reproduce poverty and tend to overlook class relations and socio-economic and political differentiation within and outside of groups, which are subject to interference by dominant class local politicians and landowners.

  6. Importance of hemodialysis-related outcomes: comparison of ratings by a self-help group, clinicians, and health technology assessment authors with those by a large reference group of patients

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Inger M; Scheibler, Fueloep; Gerhardus, Ansgar

    2016-01-01

    Background The selection of important outcomes is a crucial decision for clinical research and health technology assessment (HTA), and there is ongoing debate about which stakeholders should be involved. Hemodialysis is a complex treatment for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and affects many outcomes. Apart from obvious outcomes, such as mortality, morbidity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), others such as, concerning daily living or health care provision, may also be important. The aim of our study was to analyze to what extent the preferences for patient-relevant outcomes differed between various stakeholders. We compared preferences of stakeholders normally or occasionally involved in outcome prioritization (patients from a self-help group, clinicians and HTA authors) with those of a large reference group of patients. Participants and methods The reference group consisted of 4,518 CKD patients investigated previously. We additionally recruited CKD patients via a regional self-help group, nephrologists via an online search and HTA authors via an expert database or personal contacts. All groups assessed the relative importance of the 23 outcomes by means of a discrete visual analog scale. We used descriptive statistics to rank outcomes and compare the results between groups. Results We received completed questionnaires from 49 self-help group patients, 19 nephrologists and 18 HTA authors. Only the following 3 outcomes were ranked within the top 7 outcomes by all 4 groups: safety, HRQoL and emotional state. The ratings by the self-help group were generally more concordant with the reference group ratings than those by nephrologists, while HTA authors showed the least concordance. Conclusion Preferences of CKD patients from a self-help group, nephrologists and HTA authors differ to a varying extent from those of a large reference group of patients with CKD. The preferences of all stakeholders should form the basis of a transparent approach so as to generate a

  7. Group vs. Individual Training on a Self-Help Skill with the Profoundly Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elium, Michael D.; McCarver, Ronald B.

    The study compared the results of group and individual training methods on the acquisition of a roll-on-deodorant self care skill by 16 profoundly retarded adults residing at a residential institution for the mentally retarded. The deodorant skill was divided into 11 teaching steps and an initial performance baseline was obtained for each subject.…

  8. Burnout in the Helping Professions: Mutual Aid Groups as Self-Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicuzza, Frank J.; De Voe, Marianne W.

    1982-01-01

    Offers some insight and understanding of the stress-producing components of counseling practice. Discusses some of the physical symptoms of burnout and examines why the syndrome is prevalent in the human services. Proposes the development of mutual aid groups as one solution to prevent or minimize burnout. (Author/RC)

  9. Cognitive-behavioural group therapy versus guided self-help for compulsive buying disorder: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Müller, A; Arikian, A; de Zwaan, M; Mitchell, J E

    2013-01-01

    Compulsive buying (CB) is defined as extreme preoccupation with buying/shopping and frequent buying that causes substantial negative psychological, social, occupational and financial consequences. There exists preliminary evidence that group cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective in the treatment of CB. The present pilot study made a first attempt to compare group CBT for CB with telephone-guided self-help (GSH). Fifty-six patients were allocated randomly to one of the three conditions: (1) group CBT (n = 22); (2) GSH (n = 20); and (3) a waiting list condition (n = 14). The results indicate that face-to-face group CBT is superior not only to the waiting list condition but also to GSH. Patients who received GSH tended to have more success in overcoming CB compared with the waiting list controls. Given the sample size, the results must be considered as preliminary and further research is needed to address the topic whether GSH also could be a helpful intervention in reducing CB.

  10. Effect of combining a health program with a microfinance-based self-help group on health behaviors and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Saha, S.; Kermode, M.; Annear, P.L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Women's participation in microfinance-based self-help groups (SHGs) and the resultant social capital may provide a basis to address the gap in health attainment for poor women and their children. We investigated the effect of combining a health program designed to improve health behaviours and outcomes with a microfinance-based SHG program. Design A mixed method study was conducted among 34 villages selected from three blocks or district subdivisions of India; one in Gujarat, two in Karnataka. Methods A set of 17 villages representing new health program areas were pair-matched with 17 comparison villages. Two rounds of surveys were conducted with a total of 472 respondents, followed by 17 key informant interviews and 17 focus group discussions. Results Compared to a matched comparison group, women in SHGs that received the health program had higher odds of delivering their babies in an institution (OR: 5.08, 95% CI 1.21–21.35), feeding colostrum to their newborn (OR: 2.83, 95% CI 1.02–5.57), and having a toilet at home (OR: 1.53, 95% CI 0.76–3.09). However, while the change was in the expected direction, there was no statistically significant reduction in diarrhoea among children in the intervention community (OR: 0.86, 95% CI 0.42–1.76), and the hypothesis that the health program would result in decreased out-pocket expenditures on treatment was not supported. Conclusion Our study found evidence that health programs implemented with microfinance-based SHGs is associated with improved health behaviours. With broad population coverage of SHGs and the social capital produced by their activities, microfinance-based SHGs may provide an avenue for addressing the health needs of poor women. PMID:26304181

  11. Weight-loss history as a predictor of obesity treatment outcome: prospective, long-term results from behavioral, group self-help treatment.

    PubMed

    Latner, Janet D; Ciao, Anna C

    2014-02-01

    Weight-loss history was examined as a predictor of outcome in group self-help obesity treatment. Participants (n = 128; 83% women; mean body mass index = 34.2 kg/m(2); mean age = 47.2 years) in self-help, group behavioral weight-loss treatment reported a mean of 5.1 prior weight-loss attempts and lost 13.8 percent of initial weight in current treatment. A greater number of past attempts independently predicted greater 6-month, 18-month, and intent-to-treat weight losses. Greater magnitude of largest past loss predicted greater 18-month weight loss. In contrast to studies on professional treatment, group self-help participants might benefit from repeated weight-loss efforts despite previous failures.

  12. Internet-Based Self-Help with Therapist Feedback and in Vivo Group Exposure for Social Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Holmstrom, Annelie; Sparthan, Elisabeth; Furmark, Tomas; Nilsson-Ihrfelt, Elisabeth; Buhrman, Monica; Ekselius, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Sixty-four individuals with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) were assigned to a multimodal cognitive-behavioral treatment package or to a waiting list control group. Treatment consisted of a 9-week, Internet-delivered, self-help program that was combined with 2 group exposure sessions in real life and minimal therapist contact via e-mail.…

  13. Self Help and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, Alan

    1976-01-01

    Suggests that the single most important common denominator of the various types of self-help groups examined may be that the role of the person who has already lived through the experience is critical for helping others. (Author/AM)

  14. Self-Help Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert H.

    1973-01-01

    The author believes that there is a distinct need for professionals to become competent in providing materials for self-help lay efforts. Colleges and universities must provide for the facilitation of personal growth through self administered procedures by either a clinical approach (in counseling centers) or a didactic one (in classes as, for…

  15. Mutual Aid and Self-Help Groups in Minority Communities: A Preliminary Essay on Their Significance for High School United States History Classes Accompanied by Classroom Materials and Lesson Plans. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Steve

    The values of private association and self-help through individual effort have been a compelling aspect of the American philosophy. Reaffirming Americanism was not the only reason that immigrant or minority groups created mutual aid or self-help societies, however, since immediate economic and social goals were significant motivations for such…

  16. A Controlled Comparison of Cognitive Therapy and Self-Help Support Groups in the Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Annette; Blanchard, Edward B.

    1995-01-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (n=34) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment conditions for 8 weeks: individualized cognitive treatment, support group, or control. Results indicated significantly greater reductions in gastrointestinal symptoms and amelioration of depression and anxiety for the cognitive therapy group, and these results…

  17. Improving Self-Help E-Therapy for Depression and Anxiety Among Sexual Minorities: An Analysis of Focus Groups With Lesbians and Gay Men

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Anthony; Pitts, Marian; Mitchell, Anne; Christensen, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Background E-therapies for depression and anxiety rarely account for lesbian and gay users. This is despite lesbians and gay men being at heightened risk of mood disorders and likely to benefit from having access to tailored self-help resources. Objective We sought to determine how e-therapies for depression and anxiety could be improved to address the therapeutic needs of lesbians and gay men. Methods We conducted eight focus groups with lesbians and gay men aged 18 years and older. Focus groups were presented with key modules from the popular e-therapy “MoodGYM”. They were asked to evaluate the inclusiveness and relevance of these modules for lesbians and gay men and to think about ways that e-therapies in general could be modified. The focus groups were analyzed qualitatively using a thematic analysis approach to identify major themes. Results The focus groups indicated that some but not all aspects of MoodGYM were suitable, and suggested ways of improving e-therapies for lesbian and gay users. Suggestions included avoiding language or examples that assumed or implied users were heterosexual, improving inclusiveness by representing non-heterosexual relationships, providing referrals to specialized support services and addressing stigma-related stress, such as “coming out” and experiences of discrimination and harassment. Focus group participants suggested that dedicated e-therapies for lesbians and gay men should be developed or general e-therapies be made more inclusive by using adaptive logic to deliver content appropriate for a user’s sexual identity. Conclusions Findings from this study offer in-depth guidance for developing e-therapies that more effectively address mental health problems among lesbians and gay men. PMID:25761775

  18. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... by the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  19. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... by the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  20. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... by the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  1. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... by the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  2. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  3. An Empowerment Approach for Elders Living With Diabetes: A Pilot Study of a Community-Based Self-Help Group--the Diabetes Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn A.; George, Lori

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a disabling, deadly disease, affecting one in five of adults over 65. Unfortunately, for the few elders that receive diabetes self-care training it is often taught using traditional didactic methods that are insensitive to their unique needs and immersed in the traditional medical paradigm. Integrating diabetes self-care into…

  4. A written self-help intervention for depressed adults comparing behavioural activation combined with physical activity promotion with a self-help intervention based upon behavioural activation alone: study protocol for a parallel group pilot randomised controlled trial (BAcPAc)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Challenges remain to find ways to support patients with depression who have low levels of physical activity (PA) to overcome perceived barriers and enhance the perceived value of PA for preventing future relapse. There is an evidence-base for behavioural activation (BA) for depression, which focuses on supporting patients to restore activities that have been avoided, but practitioners have no specific training in promoting PA. We aimed to design and evaluate an integrated BA and PA (BAcPAc) practitioner-led, written, self-help intervention to enhance both physical and mental health. Methods/design This study is informed by the Medical Research Council Complex Intervention Framework and describes a protocol for a pilot phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the feasibility and acceptability of the trial methods to inform a definitive phase III RCT. Following development of the augmented written self-help intervention (BAcPAc) incorporating behavioural activation with physical activity promotion, depressed adults are randomised to receive up to 12 sessions over a maximum of 4 months of either BAcPAc or behavioural activation alone within a written self-help format, which represents treatment as usual. The study is located within two ‘Improving Access to Psychological Therapies’ services in South West England, with both written self-help interventions supported by mental health paraprofessionals. Measures assessed at 4, 9, and 12 month follow-up include the following: CIS-R, PHQ-9, accelerometer recorded (4 months only) and self-reported PA, body mass index, blood pressure, Insomnia Severity Index, quality of life, and health and social care service use. Process evaluation will include analysis of recorded support sessions and patient and practitioner interviews. At the time of writing the study has recruited 60 patients. Discussion The feasibility outcomes will inform a definitive RCT to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the

  5. Cults and zealous self-help movements: a psychiatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Galanter, M

    1990-05-01

    Modern cults and zealous self-help movements exercise an intense group influence and can have a major impact on their members' psychiatric status. On the basis of research findings, the author describes the charismatic group, a generic model for such cohesive, intensely ideological movements. He examines the psychological forces they tap and the way they can both relieve and exacerbate psychopathology. The model is then used to explain the operation of zealous self-help programs that address psychiatric syndromes; these are directed at problems of the medically ill, substance abusers, and relatives of psychiatric patients.

  6. [Development, situation and perspective of self-help support in Germany].

    PubMed

    Geene, R; Huber, E; Hundertmark-Mayser, J; Möller-Bock, B; Thiel, W

    2009-01-01

    Self-help groups and self-help associations are an important part of the social security system. In Germany, self-help contact points, senior citizen centers, volunteer agencies, citizen centers and multi-generation houses combine citizen participation with innovative professional services. Unfortunately, there is no guarantee of continuous financial support for these important, locally administered institutions. There are about 280 self-help contact points and more than 400 federal self-help associations that support and promote self-help in Germany. Healthy communities, healthy workplaces and healthy people need a decentralized system of self-help programs operated at local and regional levels, in districts and towns. Thereby, professional support systems that operate self-help programs and promote citizen participation in the self-help programs must be managed in a similar regional format. New forms of cooperation from the regional and local governments, private companies, and citizen engagement already exist. Additionally, regional projects of integrated maintenance systems with the regional health maintenance institutions have been established. Currently, the central challenges of the self-help programs are quality development, inclusion of people with social disadvantages and of people with migrational background. The essential prerequisites for this work are continuous financial support and a politically supported infrastructure, which is in fact an important health investment.

  7. Employee self-help smoking cessation programs: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Windsor, R A; Bartlett, E E

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a review of the literature on employee self-help smoking cessation programs. Included in this discussion are: (1) a rationale for self-help smoking cessation interventions; (2) a synopsis of their applicability to occupational settings; (3) a rational and description of the self-help smoking cessation interventions selected for a large group of employees; and (4) several methodological issues faced in conducting evaluations of smoking cessation programs.

  8. Cyber-Porn Dependence: Voices of Distress in an Italian Internet Self-Help Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaglion, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes narratives of cyber-porn users and defines major patterns of distress as self-reported by contributors to a self-help group in the Internet. It applies narrative analysis methodology to 2000 messages sent by 302 members of an Italian self-help Internet community for cyber-porn dependents ("noallapornodipendenza").…

  9. Self-Help and Health in Europe. New Approaches in Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Stephen, Ed.; Kickbusch, Ilona, Ed.

    This book brings together 24 contributions (from 13 European countries) about the role of self-help in the overall pattern of health care, dealing with both the practical and the theoretical: (1) "A Reorientation of Health Care?" (Ilona Kickbusch and Stephen Hatch); (2) "Self-help Groups in Primary Health Care" (David…

  10. Effectiveness of bibliotherapy self-help for depression with varying levels of telephone helpline support.

    PubMed

    Bilich, Linda L; Deane, Frank P; Phipps, Andrew B; Barisic, Marcella; Gould, Grahame

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural bibliotherapy self-help package, with varied levels of telephone support, delivered through a mental health telephone service was examined with 84 mildly to moderately depressed adults. The study compared the changes in depressive symptoms of three groups: control, self help with minimal contact and self-help with telephone assistance. Both the minimal contact and the assisted self-help groups had significant reductions in their levels of depression compared with the control group. Treatment gains were maintained at a 1-month follow-up. The potential of self-help resources such as this to be successfully disseminated and delivered through a national mental health telephone information service is discussed.

  11. Self-help: What future role in health care for low and middle-income countries?

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, KR; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Razum, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    In the debate on 'Third options' for health care delivery in low- and middle-income countries it is proposed that self-help should play a larger role. Self-help is expected to contribute towards improving population health outcomes and reducing government health care expenditure. We review scope and limitations of self-help groups in Europe and South Asia and assess their potential role in health care within the context of health sector reform. Self-help groups are voluntary unions of peers, formed for mutual assistance in accomplishing a health-related purpose. In Europe, self-help groups developed out of dissatisfaction with a de-personalised health care system. They successfully complement existing social and health services but cannot be instrumentalized to improve health outcomes while reducing health expenditure. In South Asia, with its hierarchical society, instrumental approaches towards self-help prevail in Non-governmental Organizations and government. The utility of this approach is limited as self-help groups are unlikely to be sustainable and effective when steered from outside. Self-help groups are typical for individualistic societies with developed health care systems – they are less suitable for hierarchical societies with unmet demand for regulated health care. We conclude that self-help groups can help to achieve some degree of synergy between health care providers and users but cannot be prescribed to partially replace government health services in low-income countries, thereby reducing health care expenditure and ensuring equity in health care. PMID:15084250

  12. Microcomputer Applications in Self-Help Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas H.

    1984-01-01

    The trend towards self-help healthcare is a social current which appears to run counter to the increasing technological complexity and sophistication of modern medical care. Yet it is the development of consumer-oriented high-tech medical devices which is facilitating this trend and which will permit the development of an electronics-based self-care system within the next ten years. Data on the present status of computer-assisted self-care was obtained from several sources, including a survey of homecomputer owners. Several useful software applications programs are currently in the marketplace; however, a data-integrating advice and referral program remains to be written. This development is seen as the last major technological impediment to the introduction of a complete microcomputer-based self-care system.

  13. Speaking Out for Yourself: A Self-Help Guide

    MedlinePlus

    Speaking Out for Yourself—A Self-Help Guide Acknowledgements This publication was funded by the U.S. Department ... In Closing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Further Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 SMA-3719 Speaking Out for Yourself—A Self-Help Guide Page ...

  14. Salivary Cortisol Levels and Depressive Symptomatology in Consumers and Nonconsumers of Self-Help Books: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Catherine; Marin, Marie-France; Hand, Anne; Sindi, Shireen; Juster, Robert-Paul; Lupien, Sonia J.

    2016-01-01

    The self-help industry generates billions of dollars yearly in North America. Despite the popularity of this movement, there has been surprisingly little research assessing the characteristics of self-help books consumers, and whether this consumption is associated with physiological and/or psychological markers of stress. The goal of this pilot study was to perform the first psychoneuroendocrine analysis of consumers of self-help books in comparison to nonconsumers. We tested diurnal and reactive salivary cortisol levels, personality, and depressive symptoms in 32 consumers and nonconsumers of self-help books. In an explorative secondary analysis, we also split consumers of self-help books as a function of their preference for problem-focused versus growth-oriented self-help books. The results showed that while consumers of growth-oriented self-help books presented increased cortisol reactivity to a psychosocial stressor compared to other groups, consumers of problem-focused self-help books presented higher depressive symptomatology. The results of this pilot study show that consumers with preference for either problem-focused or growth-oriented self-help books present different physiological and psychological markers of stress when compared to nonconsumers of self-help books. This preliminary study underlines the need for additional research on this issue in order to determine the impact the self-help book industry may have on consumers' stress. PMID:26839713

  15. Salivary Cortisol Levels and Depressive Symptomatology in Consumers and Nonconsumers of Self-Help Books: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Catherine; Marin, Marie-France; Hand, Anne; Sindi, Shireen; Juster, Robert-Paul; Lupien, Sonia J

    2016-01-01

    The self-help industry generates billions of dollars yearly in North America. Despite the popularity of this movement, there has been surprisingly little research assessing the characteristics of self-help books consumers, and whether this consumption is associated with physiological and/or psychological markers of stress. The goal of this pilot study was to perform the first psychoneuroendocrine analysis of consumers of self-help books in comparison to nonconsumers. We tested diurnal and reactive salivary cortisol levels, personality, and depressive symptoms in 32 consumers and nonconsumers of self-help books. In an explorative secondary analysis, we also split consumers of self-help books as a function of their preference for problem-focused versus growth-oriented self-help books. The results showed that while consumers of growth-oriented self-help books presented increased cortisol reactivity to a psychosocial stressor compared to other groups, consumers of problem-focused self-help books presented higher depressive symptomatology. The results of this pilot study show that consumers with preference for either problem-focused or growth-oriented self-help books present different physiological and psychological markers of stress when compared to nonconsumers of self-help books. This preliminary study underlines the need for additional research on this issue in order to determine the impact the self-help book industry may have on consumers' stress.

  16. [Integration of self-help associations into the quality management of outpatient and inpatient health care].

    PubMed

    Trojan, A; Werner, S; Bobzien, M; Nickel, S

    2009-01-01

    The idea of introducing a special label for "self-help-friendly" institutions was first developed for hospitals. A demonstration project (BKK BV, the German Federal Association of Company Health Insurance Funds) was launched and organized by the local contact point for self-help groups in Hamburg. Shortly thereafter, a group of experienced self-help supporters started to implement self-help friendliness in quality management systems for ambulatory care. These endeavours, presented in this article, prove that not only professional but also user-based quality standards are becoming more and more common in quality development processes of health care services. The general legislative and political conditions for these developments have considerably improved over the past few years. This will be the foundation for a new quality of the doctor-patient relationship.

  17. Reading self-help literature in Russia: governmentality, psychology and subjectivity.

    PubMed

    Salmenniemi, Suvi; Vorona, Mariya

    2014-03-01

    Self-help has become a booming business over the past decades and an increasingly visible part of popular media culture worldwide. The paper analyzes the arrival and effects of this cultural technology in post-Soviet Russia after more than seventy years of socialism. It examines how Russians are engaging with popular psychology self-help as a technology of the self and how they are making it meaningful in their lives. Drawing on a set of one-to-one and focus group interviews conducted with self-help readers, it examines how these individuals negotiate the new ethics and the normative models of personhood put forward by the self-help genre. It argues that popular psychology has offered a new language for making sense of the self and the social world, and highlights how the readers critically engage with the normalizing power of popular psychology by drawing on a number of local historically sedimented discourses.

  18. Self-Help and Community Education. Courier No. 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1983

    1983-01-01

    This journal consists of eight articles dealing with self-help and community education. Included in the volume are the following articles: "An Uphill Struggle--Self-Help in Bangladesh," by S. Harrison and Judy Saul; "How Not to Help a Local Community: A Case from South India," by Nora Sammut and Maria Theresa; "The High…

  19. Guided self-help for functional (psychogenic) symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J.; Williams, C.; Stone, J.; Cavanagh, J.; Murray, G.; Butcher, I.; Duncan, R.; Smith, S.; Carson, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Functional (psychogenic or somatoform) symptoms are common in neurology clinics. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) can be an effective treatment, but there are major obstacles to its provision in practice. We tested the hypothesis that adding CBT-based guided self-help (GSH) to the usual care (UC) received by patients improves outcomes. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 2 neurology services in the United Kingdom. Outpatients with functional symptoms (rated by the neurologist as “not at all” or only “somewhat” explained by organic disease) were randomly allocated to UC or UC plus GSH. GSH comprised a self-help manual and 4 half-hour guidance sessions. The primary outcome was self-rated health on a 5-point clinical global improvement scale (CGI) at 3 months. Secondary outcomes were measured at 3 and 6 months. Results: In this trial, 127 participants were enrolled, and primary outcome data were collected for 125. Participants allocated to GSH reported greater improvement on the primary outcome (adjusted common odds ratio on the CGI 2.36 [95% confidence interval 1.17–4.74; p = 0.016]). The absolute difference in proportion “better” or “much better” was 13% (number needed to treat was 8). At 6 months the treatment effect was no longer statistically significant on the CGI but was apparent in symptom improvement and in physical functioning. Conclusions: CBT-based GSH is feasible to implement and efficacious. Further evaluation is indicated. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that CBT-based GSH therapy improves self-reported general health, as measured by the CGI, in patients with functional neurologic symptoms. PMID:21795652

  20. Self-Help in Research and Development Relating to Assessment: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yorke, Mantz; Barnett, Greg; Evanson, Peter; Haines, Chris; Jenkins, Don; Knight, Peter; Scurry, Dave; Stowell, Marie; Woolf, Harvey

    2004-01-01

    This article briefly chronicles nearly a decade of research and development activity undertaken in the area of assessment by a group of committed volunteers, "The Student Assessment and Classification Working Group" (SACWG). However, greater attention is given to demonstrating what a self-help approach can achieve in respect of research…

  1. Self-help treatment of anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis and meta-regression of effects and potential moderators.

    PubMed

    Haug, Thomas; Nordgreen, Tine; Öst, Lars Göran; Havik, Odd E

    2012-07-01

    Self-help treatments have the potential to increase the availability and affordability of evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders. Although promising, previous research results are heterogeneous, indicating a need to identify factors that moderate treatment outcome. The present article reviews the literature on self-help treatment for anxiety disorders among adults, with a total sample of 56 articles with 82 comparisons. When self-help treatment was compared to wait-list or placebo, a meta-analysis indicated a moderate to large effect size (g=0.78). When self-help treatment was compared to face-to-face treatment, results indicated a small effect that favored the latter (g=-0.20). When self-help was compared to wait-list or placebo, subgroup analyses indicated that self-help treatment format, primary anxiety diagnosis and procedures for recruitment of subjects were related to treatment outcome in bivariate analyses, but only recruitment procedures remained significant in a multiple meta-regression analysis. When self-help was compared to face-to-face treatment, a multiple meta-regression indicated that the type of comparison group, treatment format and gender were significantly related to outcome. We conclude that self-help is effective in the treatment of anxiety disorders, and should be offered as part of stepped care treatment models in community services. Implications of the results and future directions are discussed.

  2. Health Status of Homeless and Marginally Housed Users of Mental Health Self-Help Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Steven P.; Gomory, Tomi; Silverman, Carol J.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the health status of 310 homeless and marginally housed people to determine the usefulness of mental health self-help agencies (SHAs) in addressing their physical health needs. Findings indicated that frequencies of health problems among respondents were similar to those of other homeless or marginally housed groups and that the study…

  3. Evaluation of a DVD-based self-help program in highly socially anxious individuals--pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mall, Anna K; Mehl, Annette; Kiko, Sonja; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Salize, Hans-Joachim; Hermann, Christiane; Hoffmann, Torsten; Bohus, Martin; Steil, Regina

    2011-09-01

    High social anxiety is a risk factor for the incidence of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Early diagnosis and intervention may prevent more severe psychiatric courses. Self-help programs may be a convenient, accessible, and effective intervention. This study examined the efficacy of a newly developed self-help program for SAD in individuals with subthreshold social anxiety. A total of 24 highly socially anxious individuals were randomly assigned to a DVD-based self-help program or to a wait-list control group. The self-help program is based on the cognitive model according to Clark and Wells (1995; adapted to German by Stangier, Clark, & Ehlers, 2006) and comprises eight sessions. ANOVAs based on an intention-to-treat model were used for data analyses. The self-help program was well accepted; just one person withdrew during the intervention. There were significant Time× Group interactions on all primary outcome measures. For the intervention group moderate to high within-groups effect sizes up to Cohen's d = 1.05 were obtained. Between-groups effect sizes ranged from 0.24 to 0.65 in favor of the active intervention. The newly developed DVD-based self-help program seems to be a promising intervention for highly socially anxious individuals as it reduces social anxiety symptoms.

  4. Self-Help Audiocassette Tapes: Adjunct to Psychological Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamauchi, Kent T.

    1987-01-01

    Argues that use of self-help audiocassette tapes in psychological counseling can accelerate the introduction of therapeutic ideas, promote continuity of counseling between sessions, and reinforce behavioral and attitudinal changes. Discussed rationale and description of a program in which this approach is used in brief counseling of college…

  5. The Story of Self-Help Enterprises [SHE]. A History of Self-Help Housing in the San Joaquin Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unwin, Richard

    SHE is a rural California home building corporation founded on the principles of self-help. Lacking sufficient capital to purchase or finance a home by conventional means, a low-income family may elect to "self-construct with SHE". A participant family agrees to invest its labor, up to 1,500 hours, in the supervised construction of its…

  6. Effects of a Cognitive Behavioral Self-Help Program on Emotional Problems for People with Acquired Hearing Loss: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garnefski, Nadia; Kraaij, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine whether a cognitive-behavioral self-help program was effective in improving depressed mood and anxiety in people with acquired deafness. Participants were 45 persons with acquired deafness, randomly allocated to the Cognitive-Behavioral Self-help (CBS) group or the Waiting List Control (WLC) group. Depression…

  7. Revisioning the Self: A Phenomenological Investigation into Self-Help Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruneau, Laura; Bubenzer, Donald L.; McGlothlin, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The helpfulness of self-help reading was explored through interviews with 6 female self-help readers. Themes derived through phenomenological data analysis suggested that there is a distinct structure to the self-help reading experience, including self-help reading as a medium for revisioning of self. Implications for counseling practice and…

  8. Self-help interventions for depressive disorders and depressive symptoms: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Amy J; Jorm, Anthony F

    2008-01-01

    Background Research suggests that depressive disorders exist on a continuum, with subthreshold symptoms causing considerable population burden and increasing individual risk of developing major depressive disorder. An alternative strategy to professional treatment of subthreshold depression is population promotion of effective self-help interventions that can be easily applied by an individual without professional guidance. The evidence for self-help interventions for depressive symptoms is reviewed in the present work, with the aim of identifying promising interventions that could inform future health promotion campaigns or stimulate further research. Methods A literature search for randomised controlled trials investigating self-help interventions for depressive disorders or depressive symptoms was performed using PubMed, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Reference lists and citations of included studies were also checked. Studies were grouped into those involving participants with depressive disorders or a high level of depressive symptoms, or non-clinically depressed participants not selected for depression. A number of exclusion criteria were applied, including trials with small sample sizes and where the intervention was adjunctive to antidepressants or psychotherapy. Results The majority of interventions searched had no relevant evidence to review. Of the 38 interventions reviewed, the ones with the best evidence of efficacy in depressive disorders were S-adenosylmethionine, St John's wort, bibliotherapy, computerised interventions, distraction, relaxation training, exercise, pleasant activities, sleep deprivation, and light therapy. A number of other interventions showed promise but had received less research attention. Research in non-clinical samples indicated immediate beneficial effects on depressed mood for distraction, exercise, humour, music, negative air ionisation, and singing; while potential for helpful longer-term effects

  9. Self-help books for depression: how can practitioners and patients make the right choice?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Liz; Lewis, Glyn; Araya, Ricardo; Elgie, Rodney; Harrison, Glynn; Proudfoot, Judy; Schmidt, Ulrike; Sharp, Deborah; Weightman, Alison; Williams, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Background Depression is a common and important public health problem most often treated by GPs. A self-help approach is popular with patients, yet little is known about its effectiveness. Aim Our primary aim was to review and update the evidence for the clinical effectiveness of bibliotherapy in the treatment of depression. Our secondary aim was to identify which of these self-help materials are generally available to buy and to examine the evidence specific to these publications. Method Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CCTR, PsiTri and the National Research Register were searched for randomised trials that evaluated self-help books for depression which included participants aged over 16 years with a diagnosis or symptoms of depression. Clinical symptoms, quality of life, costs or acceptability to users were the required outcome measures. Papers were obtained and data extracted independently by two researchers. A meta-analysis using a random effects model was carried out using the mean score and standard deviation of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression at the endpoint of the trial. Results Eleven randomised controlled trials were identified. None fulfilled CONSORT guidelines and all were small, with the largest trial having 40 patients per group. Nine of these evaluated two current publications, Managing Anxiety and Depression (UK) and Feeling Good (US). A meta-analysis of 6 trials evaluating Feeling Good found a large treatment effect compared to delayed treatment (standardised mean difference = −1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] = −1.76 to −0.96). Five self-help books were identified as being available and commonly bought by members of the public in addition to the two books that had been evaluated in trials. Conclusion There are a number of self-help books for the treatment of depression readily available. For the majority, there is little direct evidence for their effectiveness. There is weak evidence that suggests that bibliotherapy, based on a

  10. A self-help book is better than sleep hygiene advice for insomnia: a randomized controlled comparative study.

    PubMed

    Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Fiske, Eldbjørg; Pallesen, Ståle

    2011-12-01

    The objective was to compare the effects of two types of written material for insomnia in a randomized trial with follow-up after three months. Insomniacs were recruited through newspaper advertisements to a web-based survey with validated questionnaires about sleep, anxiety, depression, and use of sleep medications. A self-help book focusing on cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia was compared to standard sleep hygiene advice; 77 and 78 participants were randomized to self-help book or sleep hygiene advice, respectively. The response rate was 81.9%. The self-help book gave significantly better scores on the sleep questionnaires compared to sleep hygiene advice. The proportion using sleep medications was reduced in the self-help book group, whereas it was increased in the sleep hygiene group. Compared to pre-treatment, the self-help book improved scores on the sleep (effect sizes 0.61-0.62) and depression (effect size 0.18) scales, whereas the sleep hygiene advice improved scores on some sleep scales (effect sizes 0.24-0.28), but worsened another (effect size -0.36). In addition, sleep hygiene advice increased the number of days per week where they took sleep medications (effect size -0.50). To conclude, in this randomized controlled trial, the self-help book improved sleep and reduced the proportion using sleep medications compared to sleep hygiene advice. The self-help book is an efficient low-threshold intervention, which is cheap and easily available for patients suffering from insomnia. Sleep hygiene advice also improved sleep at follow-up, but increased sleep medication use. Thus, caution is warranted when sleep hygiene advice are given as a single treatment.

  11. A cost-effectiveness analysis of self-help smoking cessation methods for pregnant women.

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, R A; Warner, K E; Cutter, G R

    1988-01-01

    Estimates of the cost effectiveness and cost benefit of health promotion-health education methods for pregnant smokers designed to increase birth weight are not available. This paper presents the results of a cost-effectiveness analysis from a recently completed randomized trial to evaluate the effectiveness of self-help smoking cessation methods for pregnant women in public health maternity clinics. The study population--309 pregnant smokers from 3 prenatal clinics--were randomly assigned, during their first clinic visit, to 1 of 3 groups: (a) group 1 received the standard clinic information and advice to quit smoking, (b) group 2 received the standard clinic information and advice to quit plus the manual "Freedom From Smoking in 20 Days" by the American Lung Association, and (c) group 3 received the standard clinic information and advice to quit plus the pregnancy-specific manual "A Pregnant Woman's Self-Help Guide to Quit Smoking." The quit rates by the end of pregnancy were 2 percent for group 1, 6 percent for group 2, and 14 percent for group 3. Analyses also indicated that the method used for group 3 was the most cost effective: group 3 achieved smoking cessation at less than half the cost experienced by the other two groups. Although additional studies are needed concerning the behavioral impact, cost effectiveness, and cost benefit of self-help health education methods for smoking cessation, the methods tested in this trial are promising as solutions to part of the problem of low birth weight among infants of smoking mothers in the United States. PMID:3124203

  12. Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive Behavior Therapy Guided Self-Help Program for Mexican American Women with Binge Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Munyi; Cachelin, Fary; Uribe, Luz; Striegel, Ruth H.; Thompson, Douglas; Wilson, G. Terence

    2012-01-01

    Data on the compatibility of evidence-based treatment in ethnic minority groups are limited. This study utilized focus group interviews to elicit Mexican American women's (N = 12) feedback on a cognitive behavior therapy guided self-help program for binge eating disorders. Findings revealed 6 themes to be considered during the cultural adaptation…

  13. Privacy-preserving self-helped medical diagnosis scheme based on secure two-party computation in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Wen, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Yudong; Li, Wenmin

    2014-01-01

    With the continuing growth of wireless sensor networks in pervasive medical care, people pay more and more attention to privacy in medical monitoring, diagnosis, treatment, and patient care. On one hand, we expect the public health institutions to provide us with better service. On the other hand, we would not like to leak our personal health information to them. In order to balance this contradiction, in this paper we design a privacy-preserving self-helped medical diagnosis scheme based on secure two-party computation in wireless sensor networks so that patients can privately diagnose themselves by inputting a health card into a self-helped medical diagnosis ATM to obtain a diagnostic report just like drawing money from a bank ATM without revealing patients' health information and doctors' diagnostic skill. It makes secure self-helped disease diagnosis feasible and greatly benefits patients as well as relieving the heavy pressure of public health institutions.

  14. Privacy-Preserving Self-Helped Medical Diagnosis Scheme Based on Secure Two-Party Computation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Yudong; Li, Wenmin

    2014-01-01

    With the continuing growth of wireless sensor networks in pervasive medical care, people pay more and more attention to privacy in medical monitoring, diagnosis, treatment, and patient care. On one hand, we expect the public health institutions to provide us with better service. On the other hand, we would not like to leak our personal health information to them. In order to balance this contradiction, in this paper we design a privacy-preserving self-helped medical diagnosis scheme based on secure two-party computation in wireless sensor networks so that patients can privately diagnose themselves by inputting a health card into a self-helped medical diagnosis ATM to obtain a diagnostic report just like drawing money from a bank ATM without revealing patients' health information and doctors' diagnostic skill. It makes secure self-helped disease diagnosis feasible and greatly benefits patients as well as relieving the heavy pressure of public health institutions. PMID:25126107

  15. [Self-help on the internet. Chances and risks of communication in electronic networks].

    PubMed

    Podoll, K; Mörth, D; Sass, H; Rudolf, H

    2002-01-01

    The worldwide web is used for self-help purposes by an increasing number of patients with a variety of mental disorders. The benefits and dangers of applying the internet in psychiatry are discussed based on a case report concerning a female with post traumatic stress and multiple personality disorders who visited a chat-room in the internet with two of her 48 supernumerary identities. During one stage of her history, she displayed an excessive use of the internet which must be considered a symptom of mental disorder rather than a distinct disease entity, viz. "internet addiction".

  16. 77 FR 71609 - Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) Grant Monitoring

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) Grant Monitoring AGENCY: Office of... following information: Title of Proposed: Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP)...

  17. Constructing and testing a self-help intervention program for high blood pressure control in Korean American seniors--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miyong T; Han, Hae-Ra; Park, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Hwayun; Kim, Kim B

    2006-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in the reduction of overall cardiovascular risk factors in the United States during the last decade, controlling high blood pressure (HBP) remains a difficult task for many individuals. In particular, socially disadvantaged groups, such as new immigrants, and ethnic minority groups, such as Korean Americans, continue to struggle with this chronic disease and suffer unnecessary complications. We conducted a quasi-experimental study to test the efficacy of a self-help intervention program for HBP control in first-generation Korean American seniors with HBP. The intervention consisted of 3 concurrently administered components: (1) structured behavioral education on HBP management, (2) home blood pressure (BP) monitoring, and (3) monthly support groups facilitated by a bilingual nurse. Of the 49 Korean American seniors (> or =60 years old) who agreed to participate, 31 received the intervention and completed the follow-up interviews at 6 months. Final analysis of BP outcomes using repeated measures and postintervention data suggested that the self-help intervention was effective in significantly improving the proportion of individuals who achieved BP control (<140/90 mm Hg) and in lowering both systolic and diastolic BP in the sample. Specifically, the BP control rate, which was 29% at baseline, increased at 6 months to 69%. Likewise, the mean systolic and diastolic BP values of 142.7 and 87.1 mm Hg at baseline decreased to 129.3 and 75.3 mm Hg, respectively, after 6 months of follow-up. This improvement of the HBP control rate in the sample highlights the clinical efficacy of the self-help intervention for this traditionally underserved immigrant group.

  18. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement A... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. A Exhibit A to Subpart I of Part 1944—Self-Help...

  19. Public Pedagogy, Private Lives: Self-Help Books and Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Self-help literature has become an important domain of adult learning in North America. Self-help books offer readers advice on how to take charge of their lives and achieve goals such as prosperity, love, happiness, wellness, and self-actualization. Despite the popularity of self-help books, there has been little research about them from scholars…

  20. A randomised controlled trial of face to face versus pure online self-help cognitive behavioural treatment for perfectionism.

    PubMed

    Egan, Sarah J; van Noort, Emily; Chee, Abby; Kane, Robert T; Hoiles, Kimberley J; Shafran, Roz; Wade, Tracey D

    2014-12-01

    Previous research has shown cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) to be effective in reducing perfectionism. The present study investigated the efficacy of two formats of CBT for perfectionism (CBT-P), face-to-face and pure online self-help, in reducing perfectionism and associated psychological symptoms. Participants were randomly allocated to face-to-face CBT-P (n = 18), pure online self-help CBT-P (n = 16), or a waitlist control period (n = 18). There was no significant change for the waitlist group on any of the outcome measures at the end of treatment. Both the face-to-face and pure online self-help groups reported significant reductions at the end of treatment for the perfectionism variables which were maintained at the 6-month follow-up. The face-to-face group also reported significant reductions over this time in depression, anxiety, and stress, and a significant pre-post increase in self-esteem, all of which were maintained at the 6-month follow-up. In contrast, the pure online self-help group showed no significant changes on these outcomes. The face-to-face group was statistically superior to the pure online self-help group at follow-up on the perfectionism measures, concern over mistakes and personal standards. The results show promising evidence for CBT for perfectionism, especially when offered face to face, where sustained benefit across a broad range of outcomes can be expected.

  1. Nicotine Gum and Self-Help Behavioral Treatment for Smoking Relapse Prevention: Results from a Trial Using Population-Based Recruitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortmann, Stephen P.; Killen, Joel D.

    1995-01-01

    Smokers were randomized using a factorial design to compare nicotine gum use to no gum use, and self-help materials to no materials. Compared with the no-gum group, relapse occurred at a significantly lower rate in the gum group for the entire 12 months of follow-up. There was no significant main effect for the self-help materials and no…

  2. A small-scale randomized controlled trial of the self-help version of the New Forest Parent Training Programme for children with ADHD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Daley, David; O'Brien, Michelle

    2013-09-01

    The efficacy of a self-help parent training programme for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was evaluated. The New Forest Parenting Programme Self-help (NFPP-SH) is a 6-week written self-help psychological intervention designed to treat childhood ADHD. Forty-three children were randomised to either NFPP-SH intervention or a waiting list control group. Outcomes were child ADHD symptoms measured using questionnaires and direct observation, self-reported parental mental health, parenting competence, and the quality of parent-child interaction. Measures of child symptoms and parental outcomes were assessed before and after the intervention. ADHD symptoms were reduced, and parental competence was increased by self-help intervention. Forty-five percent of intervention children showed clinically significant reductions in ADHD symptoms. Self-help intervention did not lead to improvements in parental mental health or parent-child interaction. Findings provide support for the efficacy of self-help intervention for a clinical sample of children with ADHD symptoms. Self-help may provide a potentially cost-effective method of increasing access to evidence-based interventions for clinical populations.

  3. Analyzing Self-Help Forums with Ontology-Based Text Mining: An Exploration in Kidney Space.

    PubMed

    Burckhardt, Philipp; Padman, Rema

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has emerged as a popular source for health-related information. More than eighty percent of American Internet users have searched for health topics online. Millions of patients use self-help online forums to exchange information and support. In parallel, the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases has become a financial burden for the healthcare system demanding new, cost-effective interventions. To provide such interventions, it is necessary to understand patients' preferences of treatment options and to gain insights into their experiences as patients. We introduce a text-processing algorithm based on semantic ontologies to allow for finer-grained analyses of online forums compared to standard methods. We have applied our method in an analysis of two major Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) forums. Our results suggest that the analysis of forums may provide valuable insights on daily issues patients face, their choice of different treatment options and interactions between patients, their relatives and clinicians.

  4. Self-help treatment for insomnia: bibliotherapy with and without professional guidance.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, V; Morin, C M

    1999-08-01

    Fifty-four adults with primary insomnia were randomly assigned to a self-help treatment (cognitive-behavioral bibliotherapy [BT]), BT with weekly phone consultations, or a waiting-list control (WL) group. Treated participants were mailed 6 treatment booklets at the rate of 1 booklet per week; 1/2 of them also received minimal professional guidance through a 15-min weekly phone consultation. The WL group members continued to monitor their sleep during this period. Participants in both treatment conditions improved significantly on the main outcome variables (total wake time and sleep efficiency) at posttreatment, whereas WL participants remained unchanged. The addition of weekly phone calls slightly enhanced improvements at posttreatment. However, both treatment conditions were comparable at follow-up. These results suggest that BT, with or without minimal professional guidance, is an effective approach for treating primary insomnia.

  5. Motivational concordance: an important mechanism in self-help therapeutic rituals involving inert (placebo) substances.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Michael E; Whalley, Ben

    2008-11-01

    We tested the contribution of two mechanisms, response expectancy and motivational concordance, to reported psychological benefit from a popular, biologically inactive, self-help, complementary therapy (a placebo). Flower essences were taken by 251 people for self-selected symptoms and were randomized to receive three different kinds of information. When the flower essence was presented as a spiritual therapy, then baseline spirituality (beta=.35, P=.01) and expectancy (beta=.25, P=.03) independently predicted outcome. When flower essences were presented as an affirmation (i.e., nonspiritual) therapy, then spirituality negatively (beta=-.27, P=.03) and expectancy (beta=.33, P=.01) predicted outcome. For both groups, expectancy predicted outcome after controlling for spirituality and compliance, but did not after controlling for ease of task completion. Expectancy failed to predict outcome in the nonenhanced ritual group. The results suggest that motivational concordance is an important therapeutic mechanism for real-life placebos.

  6. A space for suffering? Communicating breast cancer in an online self-help context.

    PubMed

    Sandaunet, Anne-Grete

    2008-12-01

    In this article, I explore the communication in an online self-help group for Norwegian women with breast cancer, aiming to add further knowledge to the question of whether the online context functions as a "liberating realm" for alternative discourses about illness. My analysis is conducted within an action-oriented framework and is based on participant observation of the online communication and qualitative interviews of women who participated in the group. Based on the analysis, I argue that proposals of a replication of dominating offline discourses in online communication are affirmed. More precisely, I argue that a "socially desirable" story about the cancer "hero" was further circulated in this online context, and that experiences of resignation and meaninglessness were not woven into the communication. Offering some reflections on this process, I suggest that it has active and voluntary aspects that need attention in further research.

  7. Efficacy of a self-help manual in increasing resilience in carers of adults with depression in Thailand.

    PubMed

    McCann, Terence V; Songprakun, Wallapa; Stephenson, John

    2016-02-01

    Caring for a person with a mental illness can have adverse effects on caregivers; however, little is known about how best to help such caregivers. The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of a cognitive behaviour therapy-guided self-help manual in increasing resilience in caregivers of individuals with depression, in comparison to caregivers who receive routine support only. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted, following CONSORT guidelines, with 54 caregivers allocated to parallel intervention (self-help manual) (n = 27) or control (standard support) (n = 27) groups. Resilience was assessed at baseline, post-test (week 8), and follow up (week 12). Intention-to-treat analyses were undertaken. Repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a significant difference in resilience scores between the three time points, showing a large effect. Pairwise comparisons between intervention and control groups indicated resilience to be significantly different between baseline and post-test, and between baseline and follow up, but not between post-test and follow up. Overall, the intervention group showed a slightly greater increase in resilience over time than the control group; however, the time-group interaction was not significant. Guided self-help is helpful in improving caregivers' resilience and could be used as an adjunct to the limited support provided to carers by mental health nurses and other clinicians.

  8. Preliminary evaluation of a “formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help (fCBT-GSH)” for crisis and transitional case management clients

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Farooq; Johal, Rupinder K; Mckenna, Claire; Calancie, Olivia; Munshi, Tariq; Hassan, Tariq; Nasar, Amina; Ayub, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Background Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is found to be effective for common mental disorders and has been delivered in self-help and guided self-help formats. Crisis and transitional case management (TCM) services play a vital role in managing clients in acute mental health crises. It is, therefore, an appropriate setting to try CBT in guided self-help format. Methods This was a preliminary evaluation of a formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help. Thirty-six (36) consenting participants with a diagnosis of nonpsychotic illness, attending crisis and the TCM services in Kingston, Canada, were recruited in this study. They were randomly assigned to the guided self-help plus treatment as usual (TAU) (treatment group) or to TAU alone (control group). The intervention was delivered over 8–12 weeks. Assessments were completed at baseline and 3 months after baseline. The primary outcome was a reduction in general psychopathology, and this was done using Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure. The secondary outcomes included a reduction in depression, measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and reduction in disability, measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. Findings Participants in the treatment group showed statistically significant improvement in overall psychopathology (P<0.005), anxiety and depression (P<0.005), and disability (P<0.005) at the end of the trial compared with TAU group. Conclusion A formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help was feasible for the crisis and TCM clients and can be effective in improving mental health, when compared with TAU. This is the first report of a trial of guided self-help for clients attending crisis and TCM services. PMID:28331328

  9. Effects of a Smokers' Hotline: Results of a 10-County Self-Help Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ossip-Klein, Deborah J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Evaluated effect of smokers' hotline as adjunct to self-help manuals. Subjects (n=1,813), assigned to manual only or manual plus hotline condition, were followed over 18 months. Results showed consistent, significant hotline effect across outcome measures and follow-up periods. Findings suggest effectiveness of hotline in enhancing self-help quit…

  10. Solution-Focused Self-Help for Improving University Students' Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakrosnis, Rytis; Cepukiene, Viktorija

    2015-01-01

    Along with positive developments in psychology, the self-help movement is becoming widespread, based on the belief that people are capable of growing and achieving positive change with only minimal help. This article addresses the potential of a solution-focused self-help tool to improve university students' well-being by comparing its outcome to…

  11. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part...

  12. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part...

  13. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part...

  14. With or without a Therapist: Self-Help Reading for Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To address a critical gap in health education scholarship by exploring the contexts in which self-help reading takes place, the motivations of self-help readers and the processes through which such readers engage with books on mental health. Design: Structured, in-depth interviews conducted with participants recruited through online…

  15. 76 FR 80377 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Self-Help Homeownership...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP... from Ms. Pollard. Title of Proposal: Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP). OMB Approval...-2995, HUD-9601, HUD-96011. Description of the Information Collection and Its Proposed Use: The...

  16. Self-Help Conferences for People Who Stutter: A Qualitative Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trichon, Mitchell; Tetnowski, John

    2011-01-01

    Self-help activities for people who stutter (PWS) have been gaining in popularity; however, there is a scarcity of evidence to support their utility in stuttering management. The purpose of this investigation was to understand the lived experience of individuals who attended a self-help conference(s) for PWS from the perspective of a PWS to learn…

  17. A randomized clinical trial of self-help intervention for smoking cessation: research design, interventions, and baseline data.

    PubMed

    Unrod, Marina; Simmons, Vani N; Sutton, Steven K; Meltzer, Lauren R; Harrell, Paul T; Meade, Cathy D; Craig, Benjamin M; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Brandon, Thomas H

    2014-07-01

    Tobacco smoking is the leading preventable cause of mortality and morbidity. Although behavioral counseling combined with pharmacotherapy is the most effective approach to aiding smoking cessation, intensive treatments are rarely chosen by smokers, citing inconvenience. In contrast, minimal self-help interventions have the potential for greater reach, with demonstrated efficacy for relapse prevention, but not for smoking cessation. This paper summarizes the design and methods used for a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a minimal self-help smoking cessation intervention that consists of a set of booklets delivered across time. Baseline participant recruitment data are also presented. Daily smokers were recruited nationally via multimedia advertisements and randomized to one of three conditions. The Usual Care (UC) group received a standard smoking-cessation booklet. The Standard Repeated Mailings (SRM) group received 8 booklets mailed over a 12-month period. The Intensive Repeated Mailings (IRM) group received 10 booklets and additional supplemental materials mailed monthly over 18months. A total of 2641 smokers were screened, 2349 were randomized, and 1874 provided data for analyses. Primary outcomes will be self-reported abstinence at 6-month intervals up to 30months. If the self-help booklets are efficacious, this minimal, low cost intervention can be widely disseminated and, hence, has the potential for significant public health impact with respect to reduction in smoking-related illness and mortality.

  18. Primary care in the village. An approach to village self-help health programmes.

    PubMed

    Suyadi, A; Sadjimin, T; Rohde, J E

    1977-07-01

    The health clinic run in Kalirandu, Indonesia, by Foster Parents Plan, a private philanthropic welfare organization is described. In 1974 the Plan was serving 3000 families through 4 clinics, providing general curative services, pre- and postnatal services, family planning, dental care, and referral to the local urban hospital where needed. Each clinic treated about 100 patients per day at a cost of $1 per client family per month. However, few inocculations were given and few preventive health checks were requested. When the number of Plan families grew to 9500 while the population of the served communities grew to 400,000 with no increase in clinic budget, a different approach was tried. Instead of serving only the families helped direactly by the Plan, a total community service was developed. Plan personnel began to encourage use of the government health clinics. A rural health insurance system was developed which entitles the families to preventive health services. Plan medical staff and the local health center trained volunteers from Kalirandu in the use of a few simple medicines. The volunteers were selected by the village headmen and generally have elementary school education and a position of responsibility. This health "kader" works without payment and has 10-15 families living near him for whom he is responsible. At the time of writing there were over 500 kaders trained. Inservice courses are conducted to keep them up-to-date. An acceptors club was formed to motivate use of family planning. Seeking a more active role in village life, the acceptors club then took on child nutrition as a project, weighing children and reminding mothers of inoculations. The self-help momentum is spreading to housing and better farming practices, which is providing more vegetable gardens and better sources of Vitamin A. It is emphasized that this type of group responsibility cannot be imposed from outside. It is community leaders within that provide the motivation for self-help

  19. Acceptability and Cultural Appropriateness of Self-Help Booklets for Smoking Cessation in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Menzie, Nicole S.; Simmons, Vani N.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Diaz, Diana B.; Piñeiro, Barbara; Jimenez, Julio; Castro, Eida; Brandon, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with a range of cancers and is related to five of seven leading causes of death in Puerto Rico. Minimal self-help interventions have shown promising results in reaching participants and preventing relapse from smoking. Specifically, a collection of 8 self-help booklets has demonstrated efficacy (Brandon et al., 2000; 2004). Those booklets have been transcreated into Spanish, with efforts to make them culturally appropriate across a range of Hispanic cultures. We conducted a pilot study in Ponce, Puerto Rico, to evaluate the Spanish version of our smoking relapse-prevention booklets. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 current and former smokers. Interviews were conducted to elicit feedback regarding the booklet’s content, cultural appropriateness, dissemination, and perceived availability of smoking cessation resources in Puerto Rico. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded using content analysis, with a priori codes based on the interview guide. Emergent themes were examined. Overall, participants liked the booklets’ content, perceived them to be culturally appropriate, easy to read and understand. Regarding dissemination, it was recommended that the booklets be disseminated by physicians and advertised through television. Most importantly, participants reported the best way to distribute and complement the booklets would be through support groups. Participants also reported having limited knowledge about resources provided in the community to aid smoking cessation. Overall, this pilot study was able to show the cultural acceptability of the booklets and highlights the need for the dissemination of these materials among current and former smokers in Puerto Rico. PMID:25219544

  20. One-year follow-up of guided self-help for parents of preschool children with externalizing behavior.

    PubMed

    Ise, Elena; Kierfeld, Frauke; Döpfner, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    Self-help programs are an effective intervention for parents of children with externalizing behavior. A number of studies have shown that self-administered parent training has positive short-term effects on a child's behavior, but there is little research done on long-term outcomes. This paper reports results from a 1-year follow-up of a randomized controlled prevention trial of self-administered parent training with minimal therapist contact. In the initial prevention trial, we randomly assigned 48 preschool children with elevated levels of externalizing behavior to either a treatment group (TG) or a waitlist control group (WLC). The intervention consisted of written material and brief weekly telephone consultations. Thirty-six families (25 TG families, 11 WLC families) completed the self-help program. Twenty-five of these participated in a follow-up assessment 1 year after the intervention. There were no significant changes from post-test to follow-up on measures of child behavior (e.g., Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder symptom rating scales) and parental mental health, indicating that gains achieved post-intervention were maintained for at least 1 year. Moreover, the percentage of children with substantial behavior problems was reduced from pre-intervention to follow-up. These findings provide evidence that telephone-assisted self-help programs can be effective in the prevention of disruptive behavior problems.

  1. Awareness, Access and Use of Internet Self-Help Websites for Depression by University Students

    PubMed Central

    Kowalenko, Nick; Tennant, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background University students have a higher prevalence rate of depression than the average 18 to 24 year old. Internet self-help has been demonstrated to be effective in decreasing self-rated measures of depression in this population, so it is important to explore the awareness, access and use of such self-help resources in this population. Objective The objective of this study is to explore university students’ awareness, access and use of Internet self-help websites for depression and related problems. Methods A total of 2691 university students were surveyed at 3 time points. Results When asked about browsing behavior, 69.6% (1494/2146) of students reported using the Internet for entertainment. Most students were not familiar with self-help websites for emotional health, although this awareness increased as they completed further assessments. Most students considered user-friendliness, content and interactivity as very important in the design of a self-help website. After being exposed to a self-help website, more students reported visiting websites for emotional health than those who had not been exposed. Conclusions More students reported visiting self-help websites after becoming aware of such resources. Increased awareness of depression and related treatment resources may increase use of such resources. It is important to increase public awareness with the aim of increasing access to targeted strategies for young people. PMID:27789425

  2. Complaint-Directed Mini-Interventions for Depressive Complaints: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Unguided Web-Based Self-Help Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sommers-Spijkerman, Marion; van der Poel, Agnes; Smit, Filip; Boon, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Background Prevention of depression is important due to the substantial burden of disease associated with it. To this end, we developed a novel, brief, and low-threshold Web-based self-help approach for depressive complaints called complaint-directed mini-interventions (CDMIs). These CDMIs focus on highly prevalent complaints that are demonstrably associated with depression and have a substantial economic impact: stress, sleep problems, and worry. Objective The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Web-based self-help CDMIs in a sample of adults with mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms compared to a wait-list control group. Methods A two-armed randomized controlled trial was conducted. An open recruitment strategy was used. Participants were randomized to either the Web-based CDMIs or the no-intervention wait-list control group. The CDMIs are online, unguided, self-help interventions, largely based on cognitive behavioral techniques, which consist of 3 to 4 modules with up to 6 exercises per module. Participants are free to choose between the modules and exercises. Assessments, using self-report questionnaires, took place at baseline and at 3 and 6 months after baseline. The control group was given access to the intervention following the 3-month assessment. The primary goal of the CDMIs is to reduce depressive complaints. The primary outcome of the study was a reduction in depressive complaints as measured by the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (IDS-SR). Secondary outcomes included reductions in stress, worry, sleep problems, and anxiety complaints, and improvements in well-being. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models. Results In total, 329 participants enrolled in the trial, of which 165 were randomized to the intervention group and 164 to the control group. Approximately three-quarters of the intervention group actually created an account. Of these participants, 91.3% (116/127) logged into their chosen CDMI at least once during

  3. Self-Help for Weight Loss in Overweight and Obese Adults: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jebb, Susan A.; Fletcher, Ben R.; Aveyard, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis investigating the components and effectiveness of self-help weight-loss interventions and their applicability to less-advantaged populations. We searched (November 2013) for randomized controlled trials comparing self-help interventions with each other or with minimal controls in overweight and obese adults, with 6 months or longer follow-up. We calculated mean difference between intervention and control for 6- and 12-month weight change. Twenty-three studies met the inclusion criteria (9632 participants; 39 intervention arms). Intervention participants lost significantly more weight than controls at 6 months (mean difference −1.85 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI] = −2.86, −0.83; 7 studies). No significant effect was detected at 12 months but results were sensitive to the inclusion of 1 study at high risk of bias. Interactive programs appeared more effective than standard ones at 6 months (mean difference −0.94 kg; 95% CI = −1.50, −0.38). Evidence is insufficient to reach conclusions on effectiveness in socioeconomically disadvantaged people, but suggests self-help interventions may be less effective in this group. PMID:25602873

  4. Taking care of business: self-help and sleep medicine in american corporate culture.

    PubMed

    Brown, Megan

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that corporate management in the United States has expanded its scope beyond office walls and encompasses many aspects of workers' daily lives. One new element of corporate training is the micromanagement of sleep; self-help books, newspaper reports, magazine articles, and consulting firms currently advise workers and supervisors on optimizing productivity by cultivating certain sleep habits. Although consultants and self-help books make specific recommendations about sleep, most medical research is inconclusive about sleep's benefits for human performance. Using the ideas of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze as a philosophical backdrop, this article examines the complex and often contradictory links between self-help, medicine, and corporate governance.

  5. Online Cognitive-Restructuring Self-Help: www.SelfHelpSocialAnxiety.com a New Application for Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to develop an online self-help treatment program for Social Anxiety Disorder, focused on cognitive restructuring. It can be difficult getting socially anxious individuals to commit to treatment since therapy is typically a face to face social interaction (the feared stimulus). Recent research suggests…

  6. Internet administered guided self-help versus individualized e-mail therapy: A randomized trial of two versions of CBT for major depression.

    PubMed

    Vernmark, Kristofer; Lenndin, Jan; Bjärehed, Jonas; Carlsson, Mattias; Karlsson, Johan; Oberg, Jörgen; Carlbring, Per; Eriksson, Thomas; Andersson, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    Internet-delivered psychological treatment of major depression has been investigated in several trials, but the role of personalized treatment is less investigated. Studies suggest that guidance is important and that automated computerized programmes without therapist support are less effective. Individualized e-mail therapy for depression has not been studied in a controlled trial. Eighty-eight individuals with major depression were randomized to two different forms of Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), or to a waiting-list control group. One form of Internet treatment consisted of guided self-help, with weekly modules and homework assignments. Standard CBT components were presented and brief support was provided during the treatment. The other group received e-mail therapy, which was tailored and did not use the self-help texts i.e., all e-mails were written for the unique patient. Both treatments lasted for 8 weeks. In the guided self-help 93% completed (27/29) and in the e-mail therapy 96% (29/30) completed the posttreatment assessment. Results showed significant symptom reductions in both treatment groups with moderate to large effect sizes. At posttreatment 34.5% of the guided self-help group and 30% of the e-mail therapy group reached the criteria of high-end-state functioning (Beck Depression Inventory score below 9). At six-month follow-up the corresponding figures were 47.4% and 43.3%. Overall, the difference between guided self-help and e-mail therapy was small, but in favour of the latter. These findings indicate that both guided self-help and individualized e-mail therapy can be effective.

  7. Action Planning for Prevention and Recovery: A Self-Help Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... everything, from really easily accessible things, like taking deep breaths, to things you only do once in ... self-help books that help you relax through deep breathing and focusing your attention on cer- tain ...

  8. Successful weight loss with self-help: A stepped-care approach

    PubMed Central

    Wott, Carissa B.; Young, Kathleen M.; Gumble, Amanda; Darby, Lynn A.; Oehlhof, Marissa Wagner; Harper, Jessica; Koball, Afton

    2012-01-01

    In a stepped-care approach to treatment, patients are transitioned to more intensive treatments when less intensive treatments fail to meet treatment goals. Self-help programs are recommended as an initial, low intensity treatment phase in stepped-care models. This investigation examined the effectiveness of a self-help, stepped-care weight loss program. Fifty-eight overweight/obese adults (BMI ≥ 27 kg/m2) participated in a weight loss program. Participants were predominately Caucasian (93.1%) and female (89.7%) with a mean BMI of 36.6 (SD = 7.1). Of those completing the program, 57% of participants (N = 21) who remained in self-help maintained an 8% weight loss at follow-up. Participants who were stepped-up self-monitored fewer days and reported higher daily caloric intake than self-help participants. Once stepped-up, weight loss outcomes were equivalent between individuals who remained in self-help compared to those who were stepped-up. Individuals who were stepped-up benefited from early intensive intervention when unsuccessful at losing weight with self-help. PMID:19521759

  9. Food and survival in Lusaka's self-help townships.

    PubMed

    Ledogar, R J

    1978-01-01

    Zambia, formerly 1 of the more prosperous of developing nations, has fallen on hard times due to political problems of its neighbors and the depressed market price of copper, its main export product and largely the basis for its prosperity. The country is currently (1978) trying to shift its economic base to agriculture -- meaning that surplus crops go to export rather than to the crowded urban areas of Zambia itself (35 to 40% of the population). Zambian squatter settlements, traditionally self-reliant, are the target of a pilot project planned by UNICEF and The American Friends Service Committee, which hopes to encourage this self reliant tradition by expanding the practice of urban agriculture. The project hopes to develop ways to raise the productivity of urban agricultural areas by finding the most suitable crops and creating irrigation so that agriculture can be practised year round. This is the start of a planned "Urban Agriculture and Nutrition Service" to be funded by the above groups, with the Zambian government and, hopefully, other agencies, aimed at providing: 1) Kitchen gardens on residential plots. 2) Cultivation of road reserves, green belts, and other reserved areas throughout the city and on its outskirts. 3) Rainy season cultivation of all idle land in the urban area. 4) Raising of poultry, rabbits and other small livestock on residential and communal plots. 5) Cultivation of small holdings in the urban periphery by low income residents on a cooperative basis. 6) Eventual resettlement of some urban residents on farms in the urban periphery. There will be, in addition, a small-loan fund, 1st for individuals and later for cooperative ventures, and a program to improve technical skills. It is hoped that by 1980, when the pilot project is completed, the service will be self-supporting.

  10. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  11. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  12. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  13. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  14. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  15. Social Development: Self Help Skills. A Performance-Based Early Childhood-Special Education Teacher Preparation Program. Monograph 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Lynne

    This monograph presents the self-help skills module of the social development curriculum portion of the Early Childhood-Special Education Teacher Preparation Program. Included are: (1) an ontogeny of self-help skills (feeding, dressing, toileting, and grooming) in young children; (2) a brief discussion of the relevance of self-help skills to the…

  16. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart I of... - Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944—Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants Evaluation for Quarter...

  17. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart I of... - Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944—Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants Evaluation for Quarter...

  18. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart I of... - Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944—Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants Evaluation for Quarter...

  19. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart I of... - Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944—Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants Evaluation for Quarter...

  20. Government interventions to aid choice: Help to self-help or paternalism?

    PubMed

    Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Kjær, Trine

    2015-07-01

    A random sample of Danish respondents was asked in which aspects of every-day life they find it more difficult to adhere to behavioural patterns that they believe are best for them and their family. Individuals report high degrees of lack of self-control in specific areas of everyday life, suggesting that individuals are not consistently exhibiting utility optimising behaviour, a finding that accords with behavioural economics and the expected prevalence of irrational behaviour. We observe greater self-perceived self-control problems amongst individuals from the lower economic strata. Thus, to the extent that self-control relates to environmental factors, there is justification for introducing government interventions targeting such factors to improve equity in health and to increase utility levels amongst those with lower incomes and lower levels of education. Further, the public's preferences for a range of government interventions targeting different facets of life-style were elicited. Individuals who were the target of interventions were less supportive of these interventions. Individuals in the target group whose self-perceived self-control was low tended to be more supportive, but still less so than those who were not targeted. Since support was shown to come mainly from those not targeted by the intervention, and especially from those who feel in control of their lives, our results indicate that the interventions cannot be justified on the grounds of libertarianism (help to self-help).

  1. Self-help interventions for adjustment disorder problems: a randomized waiting-list controlled study in a sample of burglary victims.

    PubMed

    Bachem, Rahel; Maercker, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Adjustment disorders (AjD) are among the most frequent mental disorders yet often remain untreated. The high prevalence, comparatively mild symptom impairment, and transient nature make AjD a promising target for low-threshold self-help interventions. Bibliotherapy represents a potential treatment for AjD problems. This study investigates the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral self-help manual specifically directed at alleviating AjD symptoms in a homogenous sample of burglary victims. Participants with clinical or subclinical AjD symptoms following experience of burglary were randomized to an intervention group (n = 30) or waiting-list control group (n = 24). The new explicit stress response syndrome model for diagnosing AjD was applied. Participants received no therapist support and assessments took place at baseline, after the one-month intervention, and at three-month follow-up. Based on completer analyses, group by time interactions indicated that the intervention group showed more improvement in AjD symptoms of preoccupation and in post-traumatic stress symptoms. Post-intervention between-group effect sizes ranged from Cohen's d = .17 to .67 and the proportion of participants showing reliable change was consistently higher in the intervention group than in the control group. Engagement with the self-help manual was high: 87% of participants had worked through at least half the manual. This is the first published RCT of a bibliotherapeutic self-help intervention for AjD problems. The findings provide evidence that a low-threshold self-help intervention without therapist contact is a feasible and effective treatment for symptoms of AjD.

  2. Efficacy of a Multicomponent Positive Psychology Self-Help Intervention: Study Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Drossaert, Constance HC; Pieterse, Marcel E; Walburg, Jan A; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T

    2015-01-01

    Background Positive psychology interventions have been found to enhance well-being and decrease clinical symptomatology. However, it is still unknown how flourishing can also be increased. Although multicomponent interventions seem to be necessary for this purpose, different formats can be used. A cost-effective approach could be a positive psychology-based self-help book with tailored email support to reach large target groups and to prevent dropout. Objective This study will evaluate the efficacy of a comprehensive multicomponent self-help intervention with or without email support on well-being and flourishing, and will seek to determine the working mechanisms underlying the intervention. Methods In this 3-armed, parallel, randomized controlled trial, 396 participants with low or moderate levels of well-being and without clinical symptomatology will be randomly assigned to (1) a self-help book condition with weekly email support, (2) a self-help book condition without email support but with a weekly information email, or (3) a waiting list control condition. Online measurements will be assessed at baseline, at post-test (3 months after baseline), and at 6 and 12 months after baseline. Results The primary outcomes are well-being and flourishing (ie, high levels of well-being). Secondary outcomes are the well-being components included in the intervention: positive emotion, use of strengths, optimism, self-compassion, resilience, and positive relations. Other measures include depressive and anxiety symptoms, personality traits, direct medical and non-medical costs, life-events, and client satisfaction. Conclusions This study will add knowledge to the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a multicomponent positive psychology intervention. We will also explore who can benefit most from this intervention. If the intervention is found to be effective, our results will be especially relevant for public mental health services, governments, and primary care. Trial

  3. Investigation of self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Enderlin, W I; Downing, J P; Enderlin, C W; Sanquist, T F; Pope, W S

    1992-06-01

    The US Coast Guard commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct this study of 45 self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment for oceangoing tankers and inland tank barges to assess the potential effectiveness of the proposed countermeasure categories. This study considers the hypothetical outflow of oil in the case of side damage and bottom damage to single-hull designs. The results will be considered by the Coast Guard in drafting regulations pertaining to the requirement for tanker vessels to carry oil pollution response equipment (i.e., in response to the oil Pollution Act of 1990). PNL's approach to this investigation included: assessing time-dependent oil outflow in the cases of collision and grounding of both tankers and barges; identifying environmental constraints on self-help countermeasure operation; identifying human factor issues, such as crew performance, safety, and training requirements for the self-help countermeasures considered; and assessing each self-help countermeasure with respect to its potential for minimizing oil loss to the environment. Results from the time-dependent oil outflow, environmental limitations, and human factors requirements were input into a simulation model.

  4. Examination of Predictors and Moderators for Self-Help Treatments of Binge-Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masheb, Robin M.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2008-01-01

    Predictors and moderators of outcomes were examined in 75 overweight patients with binge-eating disorder (BED) who participated in a randomized clinical trial of guided self-help treatments. Age variables, psychiatric and personality disorder comorbidity, and clinical characteristics were tested as predictors and moderators of treatment outcomes.…

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Guided Self-Help Treatment for Recurrent Binge Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Frances L.; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Dickerson, John F.; Perrin, Nancy; DeBar, Lynn; Wilson, G. Terence; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Adoption of effective treatments for recurrent binge-eating disorders depends on the balance of costs and benefits. Using data from a recent randomized controlled trial, we conducted an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of a cognitive-behavioral therapy guided self-help intervention (CBT-GSH) to treat recurrent binge eating…

  6. Getting out of Depression: Teens' Self-Help Interventions to Relieve Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisdom, Jennifer P.; Barker, Ellen C.

    2006-01-01

    Most depressed adolescents do not access medical care for symptoms, yet many improve without professional intervention. While several self-help interventions have empirical support, teens' non-directed efforts to reduce symptoms are not documented. We reviewed 14 depressed adolescents' reports of attempts to reduce depressive symptoms. Results…

  7. Parents' Training: Effects of the Self-Help Skills Programme with Down's Syndrome Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz, Maria Teresa; Menendez, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews studies evaluating the effectiveness of two types of early intervention programmes for babies with Down's syndrome (DS). Evaluation of self-help early intervention programmes was done with two types of training with the parents: in the first the parents learned the training programme from observing the clinician, and in the…

  8. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agreement D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part 1944—Self-Help... § 1944.410(d) of 7 CFR part 1944, subpart I, as necessary, to develop a complete program for a...

  9. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Agreement D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part 1944—Self-Help... § 1944.410(d) of 7 CFR part 1944, subpart I, as necessary, to develop a complete program for a...

  10. Music for Elementary Teachers; Self-Help Guide (MUS 370). Adams State College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Cloyce

    This self-help guide for the music teacher is one of a series of eight Teacher Education Modules developed by Adams State College Teacher Corps Program. The guide itself consists of 11 modules, the first five of which focus on the mathematical and scientific aspects of music--pitch, tempo, furation, time, and key. These five modules are…

  11. Specific Psychosocial and Behavioral Outcomes from the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Self-Help Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, Carrie Jo; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Data from 104 participants in the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Self-Help Course showed that patients had significant increases in enabling skills and use of relaxation/exercise and decreases in depression. Amount of time spent in class was correlated with significant changes over time. (SK)

  12. Telepsychology and Self-Help: The Treatment of Fear of Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botella, Cristina; Guillen, Veronica; Banos, Rosa M.; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Gallego, Maria J.; Alcaniz, Mariano

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a self-help, Internet-based telepsychology program for the treatment of public speaking fears. The system is comprised of 3 parts: The "assessment protocol" gives the patient information about his or her problem (i.e., amount of interference it creates in his or her life, severity, degree of fear and avoidance). The…

  13. The Effectiveness of a Computerized Self-Help Stress Coping Program with Adult Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James J.

    1987-01-01

    Examined whether computerized self-help stress coping program was effective in reducing stress among 30 adult male juvenile counselors. Compared to controls, subjects who participated in program showed decreases in personal strain and state anxiety and increases in personal resources. Concluded that program could provide relief for situational…

  14. Public Pedagogy from the Learner's Perspective: Women Reading Self-Help Relationship Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapell, Brandi M.; McLean, Scott

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of public pedagogy has increasingly influenced the study of continuing education, drawing attention to ways in which adults access resources from popular culture and learn without the involvement of educational institutions. Reading relationship self-help books has become a prominent component of popular culture. There…

  15. Institution Building Through Self-Help in Rural Developing Areas: An Integrated Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi, Yair

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of regional community development through self-help programs in rural developing areas presents the need for a diversified system of institutions to ensure a developmental process based on qualitative rather than quantitative criteria. Available from: Editorial and Business Offices, Piazza Cavalieri di Malta, 2, 00153 Rome, Italy. (EA)

  16. The Acceptability of an Internet-Based Self-Help Treatment for Fear of Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botella, C.; Gallego, M. J.; Garcia-Palacios, A.; Banos, R. M.; Quero, S.; Alcaniz, M.

    2009-01-01

    Several randomised controlled studies have shown the efficacy of Internet-based self-help treatments. These studies have centred their attention on axis I (efficacy) of the Guidelines for Empirically Validated Treatments, although there are a few studies that also take into account axis II (effectiveness). The aim of the present work was to test…

  17. "Transform Your Child's Behaviour Now": Parent Education as Self-Help Culture and Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widding, Ulrika

    2011-01-01

    Parents in the Western world today are often said to feel unsure and inadequate and as a consequence there are a plethora of self-help products on the market as well as parent education programmes. This article explores the kinds of research questions that are raised by this state of affairs. The discussion is mainly based on existing studies of…

  18. Behavioral Bibliotherapy: A Review of Self-Help Behavior Therapy Manuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasgow, Russell E.; Rosen, Gerald M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the organizing concepts and strategies for the development and evaluation of self-help behavioral treatment manuals. Reviews programs that have been published or empirically tested for the treatment of phobias, smoking, obesity, sexual dysfunction, assertiveness, child behavior problems, study skills, and physical fitness, as well as…

  19. Hypnotic Taper with or without Self-Help Treatment of Insomnia: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belleville, Genevieve; Guay, Catherine; Guay, Bernard; Morin, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a minimal intervention focusing on hypnotic discontinuation and cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for insomnia. Fifty-three adult chronic users of hypnotics were randomly assigned to an 8-week hypnotic taper program, used alone or combined with a self-help CBT. Weekly hypnotic use decreased in both…

  20. Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for the Treatment of Recurrent Binge Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Wilson, G. Terence; DeBar, Lynn; Perrin, Nancy; Lynch, Frances; Rosselli, Francine; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Despite proven efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating eating disorders with binge eating as the core symptom, few patients receive CBT in clinical practice. Our blended efficacy-effectiveness study sought to evaluate whether a manual-based guided self-help form of CBT (CBT-GSH), delivered in 8 sessions in a health…

  1. Comparison of Six- and Eight-Session Cognitive Guided Self-Help for Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furber, Gareth; Steele, Anna; Wade, Tracey D.

    2004-01-01

    A previous case-series evaluation of a six-session guided self-help (GSH) approach with 15 people with bulimia nervosa (BN) showed significant reductions across all measures, including binge eating, self-induced vomiting, weight concern, shape concern and dietary restraint. However, the reduction of binge eating and self-induced vomiting was…

  2. From Hospital to Community: A Self-Help Program to Promote the Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutner, Bernard; And Others

    Vocational placement, social needs, and the lack of proper transportation for disabled persons are major problems to be solved if physically handicapped people are to function in community life. Mobilization for Maturity was a 3-year research and demonstration project which utilized a self-help approach to help disabled people to re-enter…

  3. Project Self Help: A First-Year Evaluation of a Family Literacy Program. Report No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Lawrence J.

    This report describes the first year evaluation of the implementation and effects of the Project SELF HELP, a family literacy program located in two urban elementary schools and run by a community organization. The program was available to 15 adults from each site who had lower than a fifth grade reading level and whose children were experiencing…

  4. A feminist analysis of self-help bestsellers for improving relationships: a decade review.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, T S; Holm, K E; Starrels, M E

    2001-04-01

    Self-help literature is pervasive and influential in the United States. A critical analysis of self-help books would help therapists to determine their utility for the therapeutic process and assist them in making reading recommendations to clients. In this study, a content analysis was conducted of the top 11 relationship self-help books on the New York Times Bestseller List over a period of 10 years (1988-1998) to determine the degree to which these books support a feminist approach to therapy. This study yielded three major findings. First, the number of feminist books, the number of nonfeminist books, and those falling in the middle across four components of feminist family therapy are about equal. However, the second major finding was that the top-selling books are more likely to be nonfeminist than feminist. The third finding is that most best-selling self-help books appear to have become less compatible with a feminist approach to relationships over time. This analysis encourages therapists to think critically about these best-selling books; it will also allow therapists to consider this methodology as a model for critically analyzing other books that they recommend to clients or use in their own professional development.

  5. A Feminist Analysis of Self-Help Bestsellers for Improving Relationships: A Decade Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Holm, Kristen E.; Starrels, Marjorie E.

    2001-01-01

    Content analysis was conducted of the top eleven relationship self help books on the New York Times Bestseller List over ten years to determine the degree to which they support a feminist approach to therapy. Results indicated the number of feminist and nonfeminist approach books is about equal and that bestsellers have become less feminist…

  6. An Evaluation of the Stepfamily Self-Help Literature for Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    Reviews and critiques 11 stepfamily self-help books for children and adolescents. Codes books on dimensions of appropriate audience, author background, issues, advice, and strengths. Rates general interest and quality of writing of books and assigns categories of recommendation. Discusses use of the books as an adjunct to therapy. (Author/NB)

  7. The Uses of Juvenile Fiction and Self-Help Books with Stepfamilies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence H.

    1990-01-01

    Advocates use of bibliotherapy as an adjunct to counseling with stepchildren and remarried adults. Information to guide the selection and use of fiction and self-help books for children and adolescents is provided. Also mentioned are other audiences and uses for the adolescent fiction. (Author)

  8. The current status and future direction of self-help treatments for problem gamblers.

    PubMed

    Raylu, Namrata; Oei, Tian P S; Loo, Jasmine

    2008-12-01

    The self-help treatment (SHT) studies for other psychological problems significantly outweigh those for problem gambling. Currently, very little is published about the application and efficacy of various forms of SHTs for problem gambling. Thus, this paper reviews the self-help literature (using the PsycINFO database--all years up to April 2008) to stimulate further research in this area for problem gambling. The findings show that SHTs in problem gambling are still in their infancy. Although the problem gambling literature has mainly reported on two forms of SHTs with problem gamblers (i.e. use of self-help manuals and audiotapes), the review discuss utilizing a wide range of SHTs with problem gamblers. These include written materials (e.g. self-help books and treatment manuals), audiotapes, videotapes, computer-based SHTs implemented on palmtop computers, desktop computers, via telephone (Interactive Voice Response systems--IVR) or via the Internet and virtual reality applications. These SHTs would suit those problem gamblers who are not accessing professional treatment due to shame, guilt, fear of stigma, privacy concerns or financial difficulties, as well as those living in rural areas or with less severe gambling problems. The review also suggest future protocols for conducting further research in this area with problem gamblers, highlighting a need for a cohesive theory to guide research.

  9. Can mindfulness and acceptance be learnt by self-help?: a systematic review and meta-analysis of mindfulness and acceptance-based self-help interventions.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Kate; Strauss, Clara; Forder, Lewis; Jones, Fergal

    2014-03-01

    There is growing evidence that mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions have positive consequences for psychological and physical health. The most well-established of these interventions typically involve relatively large resource commitments, in terms of both the provider and participant. A number of recent studies have begun to explore whether the benefits of such interventions can be generalised to less intensive methods. Methods include pure and guided self-help utilising resources such as books and workbooks, computer programmes and applications and audio-visual materials. This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that have evaluated the effectiveness and acceptability of low-intensity interventions including mindfulness and acceptance-based components. Fifteen RCTs (7 ACT-based, 4 mindfulness-based and 4 multi-component interventions including elements of mindfulness and/or acceptance) were identified and reviewed. Interventions that included mindfulness and/or acceptance-based components produced significant benefits in comparison to control conditions on measures of mindfulness/acceptance, depression and anxiety with small to medium effect sizes. Engagement with the self-help interventions varied but on average two-thirds of participants completed post-intervention measures. Emerging research into low-intensity mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions is hopeful. Recommendations for research and practice are presented.

  10. Self-Care and Self-Help Groups for the Elderly: A Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This document notes that, as health care costs continue to rise, the elderly are monitoring themselves as a means of cost containment, and as a way of enhancing their sense of well-being and their ability to lead active lives. It points out that more and more organizations are sponsoring health programs that promote the concept of self-care and…

  11. Women's Empowerment and Education: Panchayats and Women's Self-Help Groups in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Ratna; Chakravarti, Paromita; Mansi, Kumari

    2015-01-01

    While women have made many advances, their inferior status to men continues to be a global phenomenon. At a time of unprecedented economic growth, India is experiencing a dramatic intensification of violence against women and the majority of girls are still not getting equal educational opportunity. In one of the most important steps for the…

  12. "Nothing about me, without me": participatory action research with self-help/mutual aid organizations for psychiatric consumer/survivors.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G; Ochocka, J; Griffin, K; Lord, J

    1998-12-01

    Participatory action research with self-help/mutual aid organizations for psychiatric consumer/survivors is reviewed. We begin by tracing the origins of and defining both participatory action research and self-help/mutual aid. In so doing, the degree of correspondence between the assumptions/values of participatory action research and those of self-help/mutual aid for psychiatric consumer/survivors is examined. We argue that participatory action research and self-help/mutual aid share four values in common: (a) empowerment, (b) supportive relationships, (c) social change, and (d) learning as an ongoing process. Next, selected examples of participatory action research with psychiatric consumer/survivor-controlled self-help/mutual aid organizations which illustrate these shared values are provided. We conclude with recommendations of how the key values can be promoted in both the methodological and substantive aspects of future participatory action research with self-help/mutual aid organizations for psychiatric consumer/survivors.

  13. Making Self-Help More Helpful: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Impact of Augmenting Self-Help Materials with Implementation Intentions on Promoting the Effective Self-Management of Anxiety Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varley, Rachel; Webb, Thomas L.; Sheeran, Paschal

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The effectiveness of self-help materials may be constrained by failures to undertake recommended exercises or to deploy the techniques that one has learned at the critical moment. The present randomized controlled trial investigated whether augmenting self-help materials with if-then plans (or implementation intentions) could overcome…

  14. A comparison of online versus workbook delivery of a self-help positive parenting program.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Matthew R; Dittman, Cassandra K; Farruggia, Susan P; Keown, Louise J

    2014-06-01

    A noninferiority randomized trial design compared the efficacy of two self-help variants of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program: an online version and a self-help workbook. We randomly assigned families of 193 children displaying early onset disruptive behavior difficulties to the online (N = 97) or workbook (N = 96) interventions. Parents completed questionnaire measures of child behavior, parenting, child maltreatment risk, personal adjustment and relationship quality at pre- and post-intervention and again at 6-month follow up. The short-term intervention effects of the Triple P Online program were not inferior to the workbook on the primary outcomes of disruptive child behavior and dysfunctional parenting as reported by both mothers and fathers. Both interventions were associated with significant and clinically meaningful declines from pre- to post-intervention in levels of disruptive child behavior, dysfunctional parenting styles, risk of child maltreatment, and inter-parental conflict on both mother and father report measures. Intervention effects were largely maintained at 6-month follow up, thus supporting the use of self-help parenting programs within a comprehensive population-based system of parenting support to reduce child maltreatment and behavioral problems in children.

  15. Evaluation of a DVD-Based Self-Help Program in Highly Socially Anxious Individuals--Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mall, Anna K.; Mehl, Annette; Kiko, Sonja; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Salize, Hans-Joachim; Hermann, Christiane; Hoffmann, Torsten; Bohus, Martin; Steil, Regina

    2011-01-01

    High social anxiety is a risk factor for the incidence of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Early diagnosis and intervention may prevent more severe psychiatric courses. Self-help programs may be a convenient, accessible, and effective intervention. This study examined the efficacy of a newly developed self-help program for SAD in individuals with…

  16. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart I of... - Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help...-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement This Agreement dated, 19__ between a nonprofit...

  17. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart I of... - Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help...-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement This Agreement dated, 19__ between a nonprofit...

  18. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart I of... - Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help...-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement This Agreement dated, 19__ between a nonprofit...

  19. Usability and Utility of a Computerized Cognitive-Behavioral Self-Help Program for Public Speaking Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Page; Zimand, Elana; Schmertz, Stefan K.; Ferrer, Mirtha

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the use of a cognitive-behavioral computer-administered self-help program with minimal therapist contact for public speaking anxiety. Participants (N = 10) with social phobia, as measured by a structured clinical interview, completed the self-help program in an open clinical trial. The program was delivered via a CD-ROM during…

  20. Development policy and the evaluation of community self-help: the Harambee school movement in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Keller, E J

    1983-01-01

    This attempt to objectively assess the costs and benefits of involvement in the harambee education movement for individuals and families is directed at policymakers and is an exercise in policy analysis. Evaluative studies of this nature are essential to the improvement of the of the overall quality of policymaking. Despite general agreement that harambee education projects involving secondary schools differ in many ways from types of self-help projects, few attempts have been made to assess the long-term social impact of the harambee education movement. For nearly 2 decades Kenya's harambee movement has flourished and has been largely viewed as a positive contribution to national development. Between 1969-79, the total value of contributions to self-help projects rose from around $6 million to almost $27 million, demostrating the substantial inputs of local communities to the economic growth of the country as a whole. Policymakers, after initial reservations about independent self-help, in recent years have come to rely on such activities as complementary to the government's efforts. Self-help activities aimed at expanding educational opportunity are the most significant in terms of both monetary resources expended and the scope of human involvement. Benefits are difficult to extimate. The growing number of students in harambee schools does not necessarly indicate that the majority of these students are acquiring marketable skills or that their consequent levels of academic training will prepare them to complete successfully in the job market with the average student educated in government-sponsored schools. The evidence, in fact, clearly points in the opposite direction. Yet, politicians, policymakers, and citizens continue to regard harambee activities for expanding educational opportunities atall levels as necessary contributions to Kenya's development program and to individual achievement. The direct cost to government for harambee education can be compared

  1. One-session computer-based exposure treatment for spider-fearful individuals--efficacy of a minimal self-help intervention in a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Müller, Birgit H; Kull, Sandra; Wilhelm, Frank H; Michael, Tanja

    2011-06-01

    Computer-based self-help treatments have been proposed to provide greater access to treatment while requiring minimum input from a therapist. The authors employed a randomised controlled trial to investigate the efficacy of one-session computer-based exposure (CBE) as a self-help treatment for spider-fearful individuals. Spider-fearful participants in a CBE group underwent one 27-min session of standardised exposure to nine fear-eliciting spider pictures. Treatment outcome was compared to spider-fearful control participants exposed to nine neutral pictures. Fear reduction was quantified on a subjective level by the Fear of Spiders Questionnaire (FSQ) and complemented with a behavioural approach test (BAT). Results demonstrate that compared to control participants, CBE participants showed greater fear reduction from pre- to posttreatment on both the subjective level (FSQ) and the behavioural level (BAT). Moreover, in contrast to the control group, the obtained subjective fear reduction effect remained stable in the CBE group at 1-month follow-up. These findings highlight the role of computer-based self-help as a minimal but effective intervention to reduce fear of spiders.

  2. A Web-Based Self-Help Intervention With and Without Chat Counseling to Reduce Cannabis Use in Problematic Cannabis Users: Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Andreas; Berg, Oliver; Beck, Thilo; Stark, Lars; Buehler, Eveline; Haug, Severin

    2015-01-01

    Background After alcohol and tobacco, cannabis is the most widely used psychoactive substance in many countries worldwide. Although approximately one in ten users develops serious problems of dependency, only a minority attend outpatient addiction counseling centers. A Web-based intervention could potentially reach those users who hesitate to approach such treatment centers. Objective To test the efficacy of a Web-based self-help intervention with and without chat counseling—Can Reduce—in reducing the cannabis use of problematic cannabis users as an alternative to outpatient treatment services. Methods Altogether, 436 participants were recruited by various online and offline media for the Web-based trial. A total of 308 of these were eligible for study participation and were randomly allocated in an unblinded manner to either self-help with chat (n=114), self-help without chat (n=101), or a waiting list control group (n=93). The fully automated self-help intervention consisted of eight modules designed to reduce cannabis use, and was based on the principles of motivational interviewing, self-control practices, and methods of cognitive behavioral therapy. Additional individual chat counseling sessions were based on the same therapeutic principles. The sessions were conducted by trained counselors and addressed participants' personal problems. The main outcomes were the frequency (number of days) and quantity of cannabis use (number of standardized joints) per week, as entered into the consumption diary at baseline and at the 3-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included self-reported symptoms of cannabis use disorder, severity of cannabis dependence, risky alcohol use, and mental health symptoms. Intervention participation and retention were extracted from the user progress data and the consumption diary, respectively. Results Can Reduce participants were older (U=2.296, P=.02) and reported a greater number of cannabis use days at baseline than patients who

  3. Investigation of Self-Help Oil-Spill Response Techniques and Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    results of the research performed on bioremediation do not conclusively indicate what the proper application ratio for the bioprod- ucts should be...AD-A260 881 Report No. CG-D-21-92 1, jjr II . I’ !,lI, INVESTIGATION OF SELF-HELP OIL-SPILL RESPONSE TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT Walter I. Enderlin John...Springfield, Virginia 22161 JAN 2 2 1993 -" E Prepared for: . U.S. Coast Guard Research and Development Center 1082 Shennecossett Road Groton

  4. Do grief self-help books convey contemporary perspectives on grieving?

    PubMed

    Dennis, Michael Robert

    2012-01-01

    Grief therapy and psychology literatures of the modern Western world conceptualized bereavement and grief as processes to be "worked through" so that other relationships could be pursued. In the last decade or so, however, grief theorists have endorsed the value of attaining new meaning(s) and continuing bonds with our lost loved ones instead of "moving on from," "letting go of" or "achieving closure from" them. This article tracks the evolution of thought pertaining to this shift and examines its relevance to grief self-help books that may offer Americans guidance in the ways of grieving.

  5. Amount of information on case illustrations in self-help psychology books.

    PubMed

    Forest, J J

    1998-12-01

    40 books on self-help psychology were examined in a 2 x 2 multivariate analysis of covariance design for the number of case illustrations, number of lines of text about case illustrations, and average number of lines per case illustration. The covariate was pages per book and the independent variables were status of the book (bestseller or nonbestseller) and decade of publication (1970-1979 or 1980-1989). It was hypothesized that bestsellers would contain more case illustrations and lines of text describing case illustrations than nonbestsellers. Case illustrations per book in nonbestsellers increased significantly in number over the two decades when compared to bestsellers.

  6. Self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Ho, Fiona Yan-Yee; Chung, Ka-Fai; Yeung, Wing-Fai; Ng, Tommy H; Kwan, Ka-Shing; Yung, Kam-Ping; Cheng, Sammy K

    2015-02-01

    Self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an increasingly popular treatment option for insomnia. The objective of this meta-analysis was to compile an up-to-date evaluation on the efficacy, adherence, acceptability and dropout rate of self-help CBT for insomnia. We systematically searched six key electronic databases up until May 2013. Two researchers independently selected relevant publications, extracted data, and evaluated methodological quality according to the Cochrane criteria. Twenty randomized controlled trials were included; 10 of which were published after the last review up until January 2007. Meta-analysis of self-help CBT vs. waiting-list, routine care or no treatment was performed. Results showed that self-help CBT improved sleep, sleep-related cognitions and anxiety and depressive symptoms. Effect sizes for sleep-diary-derived sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, and wake after sleep onset at immediate posttreatment were 0.80, 0.66, and 0.55, respectively. The average dropout rate of self-help CBT at immediate posttreatment was 14.5%, which was not significantly different from the 16.7% in therapist-administered CBT. Subgroup analyses supported the added benefit of telephone consultation. In conclusion, self-help CBT is efficacious and acceptable as an entry level of a stepped care model for insomnia. In places where face-to-face treatments are unavailable or too costly, self-help CBT can be considered as a compromise.

  7. Self-Help Booklets for Preventing Postpartum Smoking Relapse: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Vani Nath; Meade, Cathy D.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Lopez Khoury, Elena N.; Sutton, Steven K.; Lee, Ji-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We tested a series of self-help booklets designed to prevent postpartum smoking relapse. Methods. We recruited 700 women in months 4 through 8 of pregnancy, who quit smoking for their pregnancy. We randomized the women to receive either (1) 10 Forever Free for Baby and Me (FFB) relapse prevention booklets, mailed until 8 months postpartum, or (2) 2 existing smoking cessation materials, as a usual care control (UCC). Assessments were completed at baseline and at 1, 8, and 12 months postpartum. Results. We received baseline questionnaires from 504 women meeting inclusion criteria. We found a main effect for treatment at 8 months, with FFB yielding higher abstinence rates (69.6%) than UCC (58.5%). Treatment effect was moderated by annual household income and age. Among lower income women (< $30 000), treatment effects were found at 8 and 12 months postpartum, with respective abstinence rates of 72.2% and 72.1% for FFB and 53.6% and 50.5% for UCC. No effects were found for higher income women. Conclusions. Self-help booklets appeared to be efficacious and offered a low-cost modality for providing relapse-prevention assistance to low-income pregnant and postpartum women. PMID:22994170

  8. A quantitative review of self-help research with the severely and profoundly mentally retarded.

    PubMed

    Konarski, E A; Diorio, M S

    1985-01-01

    Eighty-seven studies published since 1964 through 1982 on training self-help skills to severely and profoundly mentally retarded persons were analyzed according to 19 parameters reflecting their methodological details. The results showed a steady interest in this research area over time, but 63% of the studies focused on toileting and feeding with fewer studies looking at other self-help skills. Package treatments composed primarily of accelerative techniques were most frequently used to train these skills. Methodologically, it was found that these studies typically involved profoundly mentally retarded people (33% of studies) who were trained by residential staff (69% of studies) in institutional settings (63% of studies). The results also indicated an increase over time in the number of studies rated acceptable on the reliability and design parameters. Finally, very few studies reported assessments of generalization, maintenance, or social validity. It was concluded that, (a) researchers need to broaden their interests in terms of settings, trainers, and behaviors studied to best meet the needs of this population, (b) the experimental quality of this literature is improving, and (c) the social impact of observed behavior changes has yet to be fully explored.

  9. Hypnotic taper with or without self-help treatment of insomnia: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Belleville, Geneviève; Guay, Catherine; Guay, Bernard; Morin, Charles M

    2007-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a minimal intervention focusing on hypnotic discontinuation and cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for insomnia. Fifty-three adult chronic users of hypnotics were randomly assigned to an 8-week hypnotic taper program, used alone or combined with a self-help CBT. Weekly hypnotic use decreased in both conditions, from a nearly nightly use at baseline to less than once a week at posttreatment. Nightly dosage (in lorazepam equivalent) decreased from 1.67 mg to 0.12 mg. Participants who received CBT improved their sleep efficiency by 8%, whereas those who did not remained stable. Total wake time decreased by 52 min among CBT participants and increased by 13 min among those receiving the taper schedule alone. Total sleep time remained stable throughout withdrawal in both CBT and taper conditions. The present findings suggest that a systematic withdrawal schedule might be sufficient in helping chronic users stop their hypnotic medication. The addition of a self-help treatment focusing on insomnia, a readily available and cost-effective alternative to individual psychotherapy, produced greater sleep improvement.

  10. How to implement the Science Fair Self-Help Development Program in schools

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, D.

    1994-01-01

    This manual is intended to act as a working guide for setting up a Science Fair Volunteer Support Committee at your school. The Science Fair Volunteer Support Committee, or SFVSC, is the key component of the Science Fair Self-Help program, which was developed by Sandia National Laboratories and is designed to support a school`s science activities. The SFVSC is a team of parents and community volunteers who work in concert with a school`s teaching staff to assist and manage all areas of a school Science and Engineering Fair. The main advantage of creating such a committee is that it frees the science teachers from the organizational aspects of the fair and lets them concentrate on their job of teaching science. This manual is based on information gained through a Self-Help Development pilot program that was developed by Sandia National Laboratories during the 1991--92 school year at three Albuquerque, NM, middle schools. The manual describes the techniques that were successful in the pilot program and discusses how these techniques might be implemented in other schools. This manual also discusses problems that may be encountered, including suggestions for how they might be resolved.

  11. Mexican American women's perspectives on a culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy guided self-help program for binge eating.

    PubMed

    Shea, Munyi; Cachelin, Fary M; Gutierrez, Guadalupe; Wang, Sherry; Phimphasone, Phoutdavone

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) among Latinas is comparable to those of the general population; however, few interventions and treatment trial research have focused on this group. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for binge eating related disorders. CBT-based guided self-help (CBTgsh)-a low-cost minimal intervention-has also been shown effective in improving binge eating related symptom, but the effectiveness of the CBTgsh among ethnic minority women is not well understood. Cultural adaptation of evidence-based treatments can be an important step for promoting treatment accessibility and engagement among underserved groups. This qualitative study was part of a larger investigation that examined the feasibility and efficacy of a culturally adapted CBTgsh program among Mexican American women with binge eating disorders. Posttreatment focus groups were conducted with 12 Mexican American women with BN or BED who participated in the intervention. Data were analyzed with the grounded theory methodology (Corbin & Strauss, 2008). Three themes emerged from the data: (a) eating behavior and body ideals are socially and culturally constructed, (b) multifaceted support system is crucial to Mexican American women's treatment engagement and success, and (c) the culturally adapted CBTgsh program is feasible and relevant to Mexican American women's experience, but it can be strengthened with increased family and peer involvement. The findings provide suggestions for further adaptation and refinement of the CBTgsh, and implications for future research as well as early intervention for disordered eating in organized care settings.

  12. Self-help, mutual aid and chronic patients' clubs in Croatia, Yugoslavia: discussion paper.

    PubMed Central

    Kulcar, Z

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the clubs for patients with hypertension which have operated effectively in parts of Croatia and Slovenia (Yugoslavia) for more than 15 years, with many thousands of patients enrolling voluntarily. Based on the principle of self-help, yet involving the regular participation of members of a patient's own primary health team, they increase compliance with long-term treatment regimens and improve the quality of life. Such programmes are capable of reducing the amount of time devoted by a medical practitioner while increasing the effectiveness of treatments. If they are to succeed, it is essential to ensure regular club meetings, social activities and encouragement to each individual member to find a role and to continue attending for as long as possible. A new life style and consequent benefits to health are obtained only through long membership. PMID:2041007

  13. 41 CFR 102-75.595 - What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance use... Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.595 What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or...

  14. 41 CFR 102-75.555 - Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance for low-income individuals or... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.555 Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or...

  15. 41 CFR 102-75.595 - What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance use... Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.595 What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or...

  16. 41 CFR 102-75.555 - Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance for low-income individuals or... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.555 Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or...

  17. 41 CFR 102-75.600 - What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? 102-75.600 Section 102... Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.600 What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? In the absence of...

  18. 41 CFR 102-75.560 - Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance purposes is... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.560 Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help...

  19. 41 CFR 102-75.555 - Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance for low-income individuals or... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.555 Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or...

  20. 41 CFR 102-75.595 - What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance use... Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.595 What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or...

  1. 41 CFR 102-75.560 - Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance purposes is... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.560 Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help...

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.595 - What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance use... Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.595 What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or...

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.600 - What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? 102-75.600 Section 102... Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.600 What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? In the absence of...

  4. 41 CFR 102-75.595 - What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance use... Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.595 What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or...

  5. 41 CFR 102-75.560 - Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance purposes is... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.560 Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help...

  6. 41 CFR 102-75.600 - What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? 102-75.600 Section 102... Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.600 What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? In the absence of...

  7. 41 CFR 102-75.600 - What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? 102-75.600 Section 102... Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.600 What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? In the absence of...

  8. 41 CFR 102-75.600 - What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? 102-75.600 Section 102... Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.600 What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? In the absence of...

  9. 41 CFR 102-75.555 - Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance for low-income individuals or... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.555 Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or...

  10. 41 CFR 102-75.560 - Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance purposes is... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.560 Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help...

  11. 41 CFR 102-75.560 - Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance purposes is... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.560 Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help...

  12. 7 CFR Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of... - Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants B Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B-1 Exhibit B-1... Assistance Grants Exhibit B will be used by all Technical Assistance (TA) Grantees obtaining self-help...

  13. Development and preliminary testing of a web-based, self-help application for disaster-affected families.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Erica K; Gros, Kirstin; Welsh, Kyleen E; McCauley, Jenna; Resnick, Heidi S; Danielson, Carla K; Price, Matthew; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

    2016-09-01

    Technology-based self-help interventions have the potential to increase access to evidence-based mental healthcare, especially for families affected by natural disasters. However, development of these interventions is a complex process and poses unique challenges. Usability testing, which assesses the ability of individuals to use an application successfully, can have a significant impact on the quality of a self-help intervention. This article describes (a) the development of a novel web-based multi-module self-help intervention for disaster-affected adolescents and their parents and (b) a mixed-methods formal usability study to evaluate user response. A total of 24 adolescents were observed, videotaped, and interviewed as they used the depressed mood component of the self-help intervention. Quantitative results indicated an above-average user experience, and qualitative analysis identified 120 unique usability issues. We discuss the challenges of developing self-help applications, including design considerations and the value of usability testing in technology-based interventions, as well as our plan for widespread dissemination.

  14. Development and preliminary testing of a web-based, self-help application for disaster-affected families

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Erica K; Gros, Kirstin; Welsh, Kyleen E; McCauley, Jenna; Resnick, Heidi S; Danielson, Carla K; Price, Matthew; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Technology-based self-help interventions have the potential to increase access to evidence-based mental healthcare, especially for families affected by natural disasters. However, development of these interventions is a complex process and poses unique challenges. Usability testing, which assesses the ability of individuals to use an application successfully, can have a significant impact on the quality of a self-help intervention. This article describes (a) the development of a novel web-based multi-module self-help intervention for disaster-affected adolescents and their parents and (b) a mixed-methods formal usability study to evaluate user response. A total of 24 adolescents were observed, videotaped, and interviewed as they used the depressed mood component of the self-help intervention. Quantitative results indicated an above-average user experience, and qualitative analysis identified 120 unique usability issues. We discuss the challenges of developing self-help applications, including design considerations and the value of usability testing in technology-based interventions, as well as our plan for widespread dissemination. PMID:25933798

  15. The Effect of a Community-Based Self-Help Intervention Korean Americans With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Miyong T.; Kim, Kim B.; Huh, Boyun; Nguyen, Tam; Han, Hae-Ra; Bone, Lee R.; Levine, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Korean Americans are one of the most underserved ethnic/linguistic minority groups owing to cultural and institutional barriers; there is an urgent need for culturally competent diabetes management programs in the Korean American community for those with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a community-based, culturally tailored, multimodal behavioral intervention program in an ethnic/linguistic minority group with type 2 diabetes. Design A RCT with waitlist comparison based on the Predisposing, Reinforcing, and Enabling Constructs in Education/environmental Diagnosis and Evaluation (PRECEDE)–Policy, Regulatory, and Organizational Constructs in Educational and Environmental Development (PROCEED) and self-help models. Data were collected between September 2010 and June 2013 and were analyzed in August–December 2014. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Setting/participants In a naturally occurring community setting, a total of 250 Korean Americans with type 2 diabetes were randomized into an intervention group (n=120) or a control group (n=130). Intervention The intervention consisted of key self-management skill-building activities through 12 hours of group education sessions, followed by integrated counseling and behavioral coaching by a team of RNs and community health workers. Main outcome measures Primary (clinical) outcomes were hemoglobin A1c, glucose, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein at baseline and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Secondary (psychosocial and behavioral) outcomes included diabetes-related quality of life, self-efficacy, adherence to diabetes management regimen, and health literacy. Results During the 12-month project, the intervention group demonstrated 1.0%–1.3% (10.9–14.2 mmol/mol) reductions in hemoglobin A1c, whereas the control group achieved reductions of 0.5%–0.7% (5.5–7.7 mmol/mol). The differences between the two groups were statistically significant. The

  16. Community self-help and the homeless poor in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Balchin, P

    2002-06-01

    Finding realistic housing solutions that are able to respond to the realities of poverty in the developing, or newly industrializing, world are frequently distinct from those suited to the developed world due to levels of poverty and differing welfare regimes. This requires a different understanding of the concept of housing and shelter for developing and developed countries. Population increase and emerging habitation patterns in parts of Latin America have required that policy-makers review traditional 'top down' approaches to the way the homeless poor are treated and how self-help or 'bottom up' schemes are increasingly seen as a sustainable way forward in providing affordable housing options to both governments and communities. Over the last decades, mass in-migration to cities has put pressure on governments to provide public housing--but two major problems arose: firstly, governments found it difficult to finance the increasing demand for public housing, and secondly, the nature of employment and the informal economy in the developing world meant that this new housing was often too costly for the urban poor, in some cases increasing homelessness still further. Recent policy developments tend to favour supporting what the poor are and have been able to achieve for themselves, with appropriate government support. Upgrading shack settlements is now recognised as a community driven and cost-effective response that can, if appropriately supported, offer an initial and sustainable solution to urban housing need by tapping into additional non-governmental sources of funding. In the absence of a major public sector housing stock to meet demand, governments are also recognising that self-help housing schemes for families able to access funding and resources offer a further innovative approach to meeting housing need. The nature of housing and shelter in the developing world requires a unique response so that it remains attainable and affordable to the poor. Neo

  17. Overcoming Perfectionism: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial of an Internet-Based Guided Self-Help Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Intervention

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Perfectionism is elevated across, and increases risk for, a range of psychological disorders as well as having a direct negative effect on day-to-day function. A growing body of evidence shows that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) reduces perfectionism and psychological disorders, with medium to large effect sizes. Given the increased desire for Web-based interventions to facilitate access to evidence-based therapy, Internet-based CBT self-help interventions for perfectionism have been designed. Existing Web-based interventions have not included personalized guidance which has been shown to improve outcome rates. Objective To assess the efficacy of an Internet-based guided self-help CBT intervention for perfectionism at reducing symptoms of perfectionism and psychological disorders posttreatment and at 6-month follow-up. Methods A randomized controlled trial method is employed, comparing the treatment arm (Internet-based guided self-help CBT) with a waiting list control group. Outcomes are examined at 3 time points, T1 (baseline), T2 (postintervention at 12 weeks), T3 (follow-up at 24 weeks). Participants will be recruited through universities, online platforms, and social media and if eligible will be randomized using an automatic randomizer. Results Data will be analyzed to estimate the between group (intervention, control) effect on perfectionism, depression, and anxiety. Completer and intent-to-treat analyses will be conducted. Additional analysis will be conducted to investigate whether the number of modules completed is associated with change. Data collection should be finalized by December 2016, with submission of results for publication expected in mid-year 2017. Results will be reported in line with recommendations in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials Statement for Randomized Controlled Trials of Electronic and Mobile Health Applications and Online TeleHealth (CONSORT-EHEALTH). Conclusions Findings will contribute to the

  18. Sustaining mother tongue medium education: An inter-community self-help framework in Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiatoh, Blasius A.

    2011-12-01

    Advocating mother tongue education implies recognising the centrality of linguistic and cultural diversity in quality and accessible education planning and delivery. In minority linguistic settings, this need becomes particularly urgent. Decades of exclusive promotion of foreign languages have rendered the educational system incapable of guaranteeing maximum quality, accessibility and equity. Also, due to long periods of marginalisation and disempowerment, most indigenous communities are unable to undertake viable self-reliant educational initiatives. As a result, planning and management of education is not adapted to the needs and realities of target populations. What such an educational approach has succeeded in achieving is to cultivate a culture of near-total dependence and consumerism. In minority language situations where mother tongue education is still primarily in the hands of private institutions and individuals, successful planning also means influencing the perceptions and attitudes of indigenous people and systematically integrating them into the educational process. This paper discusses grass-roots mother tongue education in Cameroon. It focuses on the inter-community self-help initiative as a local response framework and argues that this initiative is a strong indication of the desire of communities to learn and promote learning in their own languages.

  19. Expanding the limits of bibliotherapy for panic disorder: randomized trial of self-help without support but with a clear deadline.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Sara; Carlbring, Per; Cuijpers, Pim; Andersson, Gerhard

    2010-09-01

    Cognitive behavioral bibliotherapy for panic disorder has been found to be less effective without therapist support. In this study, participants were randomized to either unassisted bibliotherapy (n=20) with a scheduled follow-up telephone interview or to a waiting list control group (n=19). Following a structured psychiatric interview, participants in the treatment group were sent a self-help book consisting of 10 chapters based on cognitive behavioral strategies for the treatment of panic disorder. No therapist contact of any kind was provided during the treatment phase, which lasted for 10 weeks. Results showed that the treatment group had, in comparison to the control group, improved on all outcome measures at posttreatment and at 3-month follow-up. The tentative conclusion drawn from these results is that pure bibliotherapy with a clear deadline can be effective for people suffering from panic disorder with or without agoraphobia.

  20. A report on the WHO working group on Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Janca, A

    1999-01-01

    In order to raise awareness of the public health importance of Parkinson's disease, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has recently established a Working Group on Parkinson's Disease and included it in the framework of the WHO Global Initiative on Neurology and Public Health. The first meeting of this international expert group produced a set of recommendations covering the following aspects of Parkinson's disease: epidemiology; organisation of services and treatment; education, training and information, and direct and indirect costs of care. An independent international research project entitled Global Parkinson's Disease Survey has recently been launched in response to the recommendations of the WHO Working Group on Parkinson's Disease. This paper summarises the recommendations of this WHO Working Group and outlines objectives, methods and preliminary pilot results of the Global Parkinson's Disease Survey.

  1. 75 FR 62849 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... investment of $15,000 per dwelling unit. Low-income homebuyers contribute a minimum of 100 hours of sweat... self-help housing program. Sweat equity can include, but is not limited to, assisting in the painting... administrative tasks. Donated volunteer labor is also required. The SHOP funds together with the sweat equity...

  2. 76 FR 48876 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... investment of $15,000 per dwelling unit. Low-income homebuyers contribute a minimum of 100 hours of sweat... self-help housing program. Sweat equity can include, but is not limited to, assisting in the painting... administrative tasks. Donated volunteer labor is also required. The SHOP funds together with the sweat equity...

  3. Randomized Controlled Trial Examining the Effectiveness of a Tailored Self-Help Smoking-Cessation Intervention for Postsecondary Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Heather E.; Lawrance, Kelli-an G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Between September 2002 and February 2003, the authors assessed the effectiveness of a new, age-tailored, self-help smoking-cessation program for college students. Participants: College student smokers (N = 216) from 6 Ontario universities participated. Methods: The researchers used a randomized controlled trial with a 3-month telephone…

  4. Reliability and Validity of the SAINT: A Guided Self-Help Tool for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Eddie; Chester, Rebecca; Tsakanikos, Elias; McCarthy, Jane; Craig, Tom; Bouras, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the main psychometric properties of the Self Assessment and Intervention (SAINT), a unique and recently developed Guided Self-Help tool for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Fifty-four adults with ID identified with symptoms of anxiety and/or depression completed the study. They were between 18 and 77 years old…

  5. Internet-Based Self-Help Career Assessments and Interventions: Challenges and Implications for Evidence-Based Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gati, Itamar; Asulin-Peretz, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    A major characteristic of the 21st century with significant implications on career decision making is the growing prevalence of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). Challenges involving ICT-based self-assessment and self-help interventions aimed at facilitating career decision making are discussed. Specifically, this article focuses…

  6. A Review of Treatments for Deficits in Social Skills and Self-Help Skills in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Lorna; Healy, Olive

    2012-01-01

    Deficits in social skills and self-help skills present significant challenges for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Much research in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has been devoted to treatments for deficits in social skills and there exist a number of extensive reviews on the research in this area. Some research has…

  7. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart I of... - Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (TA) Grants B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944...) ________, 19__ 1. a. Name of Grantee:(2) ___ b. Address:(3) ___ c. Area the grant serves:(4) ___ 2. Date...

  8. Self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy with minimal therapist contact for social phobia: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Jonathan S; Moore, Elizabeth L; Braddock, Autumn E; Harrington, Diana L

    2009-03-01

    Due to treatment accessibility and cost issues, interest in self-help programs (e.g., bibliotherapy, telehealth) for common psychological disorders is growing. Research supporting the efficacy of such a program for social anxiety, however, is limited. The present study examined the efficacy of an 8-week self-directed cognitive behavioral treatment with minimal therapist involvement for social phobia based on a widely available self-help book. Twenty-one adults with social phobia initially received either treatment (i.e. assigned readings in the workbook with limited therapist contact) or were wait-listed. Wait-listed patients eventually received the same self-directed treatment. Results revealed that the self-help/minimal therapist contact treatment was superior to wait-list on most outcome measures. Across the entire sample, reductions in social anxiety, global severity, general anxiety, and depression were observed at posttest and 3-month follow-up. These findings provide preliminary support for using this self-help workbook for individuals with mild to moderate social anxiety in conjunction with infrequent therapist visits to reinforce the treatment principles. Study limitations and future directions are discussed.

  9. A Decade of Advice for Women and Men in the Best-Selling Self-Help Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Holm, Kristen E.; Haddock, Shelley A.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a content analysis of the top ten self-help books on the New York Times best-seller list over a ten year period to determine the degree to which the books empower individuals to resist gender-based socialization messages. The four best sellers contained advice for both genders to behave consistently with traditional gender socialization,…

  10. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart I of... - Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement C Exhibit C to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. C Exhibit C to Subpart I of Part 1944—Amendment to...

  11. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart I of... - Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement C Exhibit C to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. C Exhibit C to Subpart I of Part 1944—Amendment to...

  12. The Feasibility, Acceptability, and Efficacy of Delivering Internet-Based Self-Help and Guided Self-Help Interventions for Generalized Anxiety Disorder to Indian University Students: Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Michelle G; Ruzek, Josef I; Kuhn, Eric; Manjula, M; Jones, Megan; Thomas, Neil; Abbott, Jo-Anne M; Sharma, Smita; Taylor, C. Barr

    2015-01-01

    Background Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most common mental disorders among university students; however, many students go untreated due to treatment costs, stigma concerns, and limited access to trained mental health professionals. These barriers are heightened in universities in India, where there are scant mental health care services and severe stigma surrounding help seeking. Objective To evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of Internet-based, or “online,” cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)-based unguided and guided self-help interventions (using the programs GAD Online and Lantern, respectively) to reduce GAD symptoms in students with clinical and subthreshold GAD and, ultimately, reduce the prevalence and incidence of GAD among the student population. Methods Students will be recruited via 3 colleges in Hyderabad, India, and referred for a campus-wide online screening. Self-report data will be collected entirely online. A total of 300 qualifying students will be randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive GAD Online, Lantern, or to be in a wait-list control condition, stratified by clinical and subthreshold GAD symptomatology. Students will complete a postintervention assessment after 3 months and a follow-up assessment 6 months later, at which point students in the wait-list control condition will receive one of the programs. The primary outcome is GAD symptom severity at 3 months postintervention. Secondary outcomes include GAD caseness at 9 months, other anxiety and depression symptoms, self-efficacy, and functional measures (eg, sleep, social functioning) at 3 and 9 months, respectively. Primary analyses will be differences between each of the intervention groups and the wait-list control group, analyzed on an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis using mixed-design ANOVA. Results The study commenced in February 2015. The sample was recruited over a 3-week period at each college. The trial is expected to end in December 2015

  13. Living Confidently With HIV - A Self-Help Book for People Living With HIV Shaw Liz Living Confidently With HIV - A Self-Help Book for People Living With HIV 270pp Blue Stallion Publications 9781904127093 1904127096 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2010-08-11

    Many self-help books are written by people who have little or no experience of the subject. Fortunately this book does not fall into that category. The authors are four clinical psychologists with extensive experience of working with people who are HIV positive. Their book is a guide for those newly diagnosed with HIV, giving information on what to expect and what to do.

  14. Redefining meaningful age groups in the context of disease.

    PubMed

    Geifman, Nophar; Cohen, Raphael; Rubin, Eitan

    2013-12-01

    Age is an important factor when considering phenotypic changes in health and disease. Currently, the use of age information in medicine is somewhat simplistic, with ages commonly being grouped into a small number of crude ranges reflecting the major stages of development and aging, such as childhood or adolescence. Here, we investigate the possibility of redefining age groups using the recently developed Age-Phenome Knowledge-base (APK) that holds over 35,000 literature-derived entries describing relationships between age and phenotype. Clustering of APK data suggests 13 new, partially overlapping, age groups. The diseases that define these groups suggest that the proposed divisions are biologically meaningful. We further show that the number of different age ranges that should be considered depends on the type of disease being evaluated. This finding was further strengthened by similar results obtained from clinical blood measurement data. The grouping of diseases that share a similar pattern of disease-related reports directly mirrors, in some cases, medical knowledge of disease-age relationships. In other cases, our results may be used to generate new and reasonable hypotheses regarding links between diseases.

  15. Infectious Disease and Grouping Patterns in Mule Deer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Infectious disease dynamics are determined, to a great extent, by the social structure of the host. We evaluated sociality, or the tendency to form groups, in Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus) from a chronic wasting disease (CWD) endemic area in Saskatchewan, Canada, to better understand factors that may affect disease transmission. Using group size data collected on 365 radio-collared mule deer (2008–2013), we built a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) to evaluate whether factors such as CWD status, season, habitat and time of day, predicted group occurrence. Then, we built another GLMM to determine factors associated with group size. Finally, we used 3 measures of group size (typical, mean and median group sizes) to quantify levels of sociality. We found that mule deer showing clinical signs of CWD were less likely to be reported in groups than clinically healthy deer after accounting for time of day, habitat, and month of observation. Mule deer groups were much more likely to occur in February and March than in July. Mixed-sex groups in early gestation were larger than any other group type in any season. Groups were largest and most likely to occur at dawn and dusk, and in open habitats, such as cropland. We discuss the implication of these results with respect to sociobiology and CWD transmission dynamics. PMID:27007808

  16. Feasibility of Group Voice Therapy for Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searl, Jeff; Wilson, Kristel; Haring, Karen; Dietsch, Angela; Lyons, Kelly; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose was to demonstrate the feasibility of executing treatment tasks focused on increasing loudness in a group format for individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). A second purpose was to report preliminary pre-to-post treatment outcomes for individuals with PD immediately after they complete the group program. Methods:…

  17. Feasibility of guided cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) self-help for childhood anxiety disorders in primary care.

    PubMed

    Creswell, Cathy; Hentges, Francoise; Parkinson, Monika; Sheffield, Paul; Willetts, Lucy; Cooper, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Anxiety disorders in childhood are common, disabling and run a chronic course. Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is effective but expensive and trained therapists are scarce. Guided self-help treatments may be a means of widening access to treatment. This study aimed to examine the feasibility of guided CBT self-help in primary care for childhood anxiety disorders, specifically in terms of therapist adherence, patient and therapist satisfaction and clinical gain.Participants were children aged between five and 12 years referred to two primary child and adolescent mental health services (PCAMHSs) in Oxfordshire, UK, who met diagnostic criteria for a primary anxiety disorder. Of the 52 eligible children, 41 anxious children were assessed for anxiety severity and interference before and after receiving CBT self-help delivered via a parent (total therapy time = five hours) by primary mental health workers (PMHWs). Therapy sessions were rated for treatment adherence and parents and PMHWs completed satisfaction questionnaires after treatment completion. Over 80% of therapy sessions were rated at a high level of treatment adherence. Parents and PMHWs reported high satisfaction with the treatment. Sixty-one percent of the children assessed no longer met the criteria for their primary anxiety disorder diagnosis following treatment, and 76% were rated as 'much'/'very much' improved on the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. There were significant reductions on parent and child report measures of anxiety symptoms, interference and depression. Preliminary exploration indicated that parental anxiety was associated with child treatment outcome. The findings suggest that guided CBT self-help represents a promising treatment for childhood anxiety in primary care.

  18. Using Personal Ads and Online Self-Help Groups to Teach Content Analysis in a Research Methods Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Jerry; Dillon, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes methods for teaching content analysis as part of the Research sequence in social work education. Teaching content analysis is used to develop research skills as well as to promote students' knowledge and critical thinking and about new information technology resources that are being increasingly used by the general public. The…

  19. 41 CFR 102-75.620 - What happens if property that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance use requirement is found to be... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.620 What happens if property that was transferred to meet a...

  20. 41 CFR 102-75.620 - What happens if property that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance use requirement is found to be... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.620 What happens if property that was transferred to meet a...

  1. 41 CFR 102-75.620 - What happens if property that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance use requirement is found to be... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.620 What happens if property that was transferred to meet a...

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.620 - What happens if property that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance use requirement is found to be... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.620 What happens if property that was transferred to meet a...

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.620 - What happens if property that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance use requirement is found to be... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.620 What happens if property that was transferred to meet a...

  4. 7 CFR Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of... - Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to Subpart I of Part 1944—Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants B Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture...

  5. 7 CFR Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of... - Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to Subpart I of Part 1944—Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants B Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture...

  6. 7 CFR Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of... - Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to Subpart I of Part 1944—Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants B Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture...

  7. 7 CFR Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of... - Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to Subpart I of Part 1944—Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants B Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture...

  8. Bayesian inference for disease prevalence using negative binomial group testing

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Nicholas A.; Tebbs, Joshua M.

    2011-01-01

    Group testing, also known as pooled testing, and inverse sampling are both widely used methods of data collection when the goal is to estimate a small proportion. Taking a Bayesian approach, we consider the new problem of estimating disease prevalence from group testing when inverse (negative binomial) sampling is used. Using different distributions to incorporate prior knowledge of disease incidence and different loss functions, we derive closed form expressions for posterior distributions and resulting point and credible interval estimators. We then evaluate our new estimators, on Bayesian and classical grounds, and apply our methods to a West Nile Virus data set. PMID:21259308

  9. Evaluating the effectiveness and efficacy of unguided internet-based self-help intervention for the prevention of depression: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lintvedt, Ove K; Griffiths, Kathleen M; Sørensen, Kristian; Østvik, Andreas R; Wang, Catharina E A; Eisemann, Martin; Waterloo, Knut

    2013-01-01

    The Internet has the potential to increase the capacity and accessibility of mental health services. This study aimed to investigate whether an unguided Internet-based self-help intervention delivered without human support or guidance can reduce symptoms of depression in young people at risk of depression. The study also aimed to explore the usage of such sites in a real-life setting, to estimate the effects of the intervention for those who received a meaningful intervention dose and to evaluate user satisfaction. Young adults were recruited by means of a screening survey sent to all students at the University of Tromsø. Of those responding to the survey, 163 students (mean age 28.2 years) with elevated psychological distress were recruited to the trial and randomized to an Internet intervention condition or the waiting list control group. The Internet condition comprised a depression information website and a self-help Web application delivering automated cognitive behavioural therapy. The participants in the waiting list condition were free to access formal or informal help as usual. Two-thirds of the users who completed the trial initially reported an unmet need for help. The findings demonstrated that an unguided intervention was effective in reducing symptoms of depression and negative thoughts and in increasing depression literacy in young adults. Significant improvements were found at 2-month follow up. Internet-based interventions can be effective without tracking and thus constitute a minimal cost intervention for reaching a large number of people. User satisfaction among participants was high.

  10. FYI: Services to Poor Families; Controlling Infectious Diseases; Parent Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Today, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Discusses services and resources available for families, parents, and child care providers. Describes a National Resource Center for Children in Poverty; a guide for controlling infectious diseases among young children in day care; a directory of parent support groups; and reports of a link between household pesticides and childhood leukemia. (BB)

  11. Men's experience of a guided self-help intervention for hot flushes associated with prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Grunfeld, E A; Hunter, M S; Yousaf, O

    2017-04-01

    Up to 80% of men who receive androgen deprivation therapy report hot flushes and for many these are associated with reduced quality of life. However it is recognised that there are a number of barriers to men's engagement with support to manage symptoms and improve quality of life. This qualitative study was embedded within a larger randomised controlled trial (MANCAN) of a guided self-help cognitive behavioural intervention to manage hot flushes resulting among men receiving androgen deprivation therapy. The study aimed to explore the engagement and experiences with the guided self-help intervention. Twenty men recruited from the treatment arm of the MANCAN trial participated in a semi-structured interview exploring acceptability of the intervention, factors affecting engagement and perceived usefulness of the intervention. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a Framework approach. Over two thirds of respondents (69%) reported reading the intervention booklet in full and over 90% reporting practising the relaxation CD at least once a week. Analysis of the interviews identified three super-ordinate themes and these related to changes in hot flush symptomatology (learned to cope with hot flushes in new ways), the skills that participants had derived from the intervention (promoting relaxation and reducing stressors), and to a broader usefulness of the intervention (broader impact of the intervention and skills). The present study identified positive engagement with a guided self-help intervention and that men applied the skills developed through the intervention to help them undertake general lifestyle changes. Psycho-educational interventions (e.g. cognitive behaviour therapy, relaxation, and positive lifestyle elements) offer the potential to be both effective and well received by male cancer survivors.

  12. Effects of a sleep education program with self-help treatment on sleeping patterns and daytime sleepiness in Japanese adolescents: A cluster randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Norihisa; Tanaka, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Subjective insufficient sleep and delayed sleep-wake patterns have been reported as the primary causes for daytime sleepiness, a reasonably significant and prevalent problem for adolescents worldwide. Systematic reviews have indicated that the success of sleep education programs has thus far been inconsistent, due to the lack of a tailored approach that allows for evaluation of individual differences in behavior patterns. One way to resolve this problem is to assess the individual sleep behaviors of adolescents by using a checklist containing the recommended behaviors for promoting sleep health. Such self-help education programs have already been implemented for elementary school children, school nurses and the elderly. The present study aimed to verify the effects of a sleep education program with supplementary self-help treatment, based on a checklist of sleep-promoting behaviors, in addition to evaluation of changes in sleeping patterns, sleep-promoting behaviors and daytime sleepiness in adolescents. A cluster randomized controlled trial involving 5 Japanese junior high schools was conducted, and 243 students (sleep education: n = 122; waiting list: n = 121; 50.6% female; 7th grade) were included in the final analysis. The sleep education group was provided with information on proper sleep health and sleep-promoting behaviors. The students in this group were asked to practice one sleep-promoting behavior as a goal for 2 weeks and to monitor their practice using sleep diaries. Both pre- and post-treatment questionnaires were administered to students in order to assess knowledge of sleep-promoting behaviors, sleeping patterns and daytime functioning. Students in the sleep education group showed significant improvement in their knowledge of sleep health (F1,121 = 648.05, p < 0.001) and in their sleep-promoting behaviors (F1,121 = 55.66, p < 0.001). Bedtime on both school nights (F1,121 = 50.86, p < 0.001) and weekends (F1,121 = 15.03, p < 0.001), sleep

  13. A self-help behavioral activation treatment for geriatric depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Moss, Kathryn; Scogin, Forrest; Di Napoli, Elizabeth; Presnell, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated behavioral activation (BA) bibliotherapy as a treatment for late-life depressive symptoms. BA bibliotherapy was administered using Addis and Martell's Overcoming depression one step at a time as a stand-alone treatment that was completed by participants (N=26) over a 4-week period [Addis, M.E., & Martell, C.R. (2004). Overcoming depression one step at a time. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.]. Results of an immediate intervention group were compared with those of a delayed treatment control group and treatment response for both groups was evaluated at 1-month follow-up. Primary outcome results showed that symptoms on a clinician-rated measure of depressive symptoms, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, were significantly lower at post-treatment for those who received immediate BA bibliotherapy compared with those who were in the delayed treatment control condition. However, self-reported depressive symptoms (a secondary outcome measured via the Geriatric Depression Scale), were not significantly different at this period. Because study control was lost after the delayed treatment group received the intervention, within-subjects analyses examining both treatment groups combined showed that clinician-rated depressive symptoms significantly decreased from pre-treatment to both post-treatment and 1-month follow-up. Self-reported depressive symptoms were significantly lower from pre-treatment to 1-month follow-up. These findings suggest that BA may be useful in treating mild or subthreshold depressive symptoms in an older adult population.

  14. Disease Manifestations and Pathogenic Mechanisms of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Timothy C.; McArthur, Jason D.; Cole, Jason N.; Gillen, Christine M.; Henningham, Anna; Sriprakash, K. S.; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L.; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), causes mild human infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo and serious infections such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Furthermore, repeated GAS infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, including acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, acute rheumatic fever, and rheumatic heart disease. Combined, these diseases account for over half a million deaths per year globally. Genomic and molecular analyses have now characterized a large number of GAS virulence determinants, many of which exhibit overlap and redundancy in the processes of adhesion and colonization, innate immune resistance, and the capacity to facilitate tissue barrier degradation and spread within the human host. This improved understanding of the contribution of individual virulence determinants to the disease process has led to the formulation of models of GAS disease progression, which may lead to better treatment and intervention strategies. While GAS remains sensitive to all penicillins and cephalosporins, rising resistance to other antibiotics used in disease treatment is an increasing worldwide concern. Several GAS vaccine formulations that elicit protective immunity in animal models have shown promise in nonhuman primate and early-stage human trials. The development of a safe and efficacious commercial human vaccine for the prophylaxis of GAS disease remains a high priority. PMID:24696436

  15. Effectiveness of a Web-Based Guided Self-help Intervention for Outpatients With a Depressive Disorder: Short-term Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cuijpers, Pim; Beekman, Aartjan; van Straten, Annemieke

    2016-01-01

    Background Research has convincingly demonstrated that symptoms of depression can be reduced through guided Internet-based interventions. However, most of those studies recruited people form the general population. There is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness when delivered in routine clinical practice in outpatient clinics. Objective The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to study patients with a depressive disorder (as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Disorders, fourth edition), as assessed by trained interviewers with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, who registered for treatment at an outpatient mental health clinic. We aimed to examine the effectiveness of guided Internet-based self-help before starting face-to-face treatment. Methods We recruited 269 outpatients, aged between 18 and 79 years, from outpatient clinics and randomly allocated them to Internet-based problem solving therapy (n=136), with weekly student support, or to a control condition, who remained on the waitlist with a self-help booklet (control group; n=133). Participants in both conditions were allowed to take up face-to-face treatment at the outpatient clinics afterward. We measured the primary outcome, depressive symptoms, by Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D). Secondary outcome measures were the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Anxiety subscale (HADS-A), Insomnia Severity Index questionnaire (ISI), and EuroQol visual analog scale (EQ-5D VAS). All outcomes were assessed by telephone at posttest (8 weeks after baseline). Results Posttest measures were completed by 184 (68.4%) participants. We found a moderate to large within-group effect size for both the intervention (d=0.75) and the control (d=0.69) group. However, the between-group effect size was very small (d=0.07), and regression analysis on posttreatment CES-D scores revealed no significant differences between the groups (b=1.134, 95% CI –2

  16. Re-Evaluation Co-Counseling: A Method of Peer Self Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockman, Ilene F.

    The college and university counseling center traditionally employs standard techniques in helping students, faculty, and staff in overcoming problems of mental stress (Berman, 1972). A technique suitable to both individual and group sessions, but rarely utilized is Re-Evaluation Co-Counseling or R.C. For the past twenty years, R.C. has gained an…

  17. How to treat the untreated: effectiveness of a self-help metacognitive training program (myMCT) for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Steffen; Jelinek, Lena; Hauschildt, Marit; Naber, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in the understanding and treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), many patients undergoing interventions display incomplete symptom reduction. Our research group has developed a self-help manual entitled “My Metacognitive Training for OCD” (myMCT) aimed at raising patients' awareness about cognitive biases that seem to subserve OCD. The training is particularly intended for patients currently unable or unwilling to attend standard therapy, or in cases where such a treatment option is not available. For the present study, 86 individuals suffering from OCD were recruited over the Internet. Following the initial assessment participants were either immediately emailed the myMCT manual or allocated to a waitlist group. After 4 weeks, a second assessment was performed. The myMCT group showed significantly greater improvement for OCD symptoms according to the Y-BOCS total score compared with the waitlist group (d =.63), particularly for obsessions (d=.69). Medium to strong differences emerged for the OCI-R (d =.70) and the BDI-SF (d =.50). The investigation provides the first evidence for the effectiveness of the myMCT for OCD. PMID:20623925

  18. Internet-based guided self-help for university students with anxiety, depression and stress: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Day, Victor; McGrath, Patrick J; Wojtowicz, Magdalena

    2013-07-01

    Anxiety, depression and stress, often co-occurring, are the psychological problems for which university students most often seek help. Moreover there are many distressed students who cannot, or choose not to, access professional help. The present study evaluated the efficacy of an internet-based guided self-help program for moderate anxiety, depression and stress. The program was based on standard cognitive behavior therapy principles and included 5 core modules, some of which involved options for focusing on anxiety and/or depression and/or stress. Trained student coaches provided encouragement and advice about using the program via e-mail or brief weekly phone calls. Sixty-six distressed university students were randomly assigned to either Immediate Access or a 6-week Delayed Access condition. Sixty-one percent of Immediate Access participants completed all 5 core modules, and 80% of all participants completed the second assessment. On the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales-21, Immediate Access participants reported significantly greater reductions in depression (ηp(2)=. 07), anxiety (ηp(2)=. 08) and stress (ηp(2)=. 12) in comparison to participants waiting to do the program, and these improvements were maintained at a six month follow-up. The results suggest that the provision of individually-adaptable, internet-based, self-help programs can reduce psychological distress in university students.

  19. Culturally Adapted Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for Binge Eating: A Feasibility Study with Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Cachelin, Fary M.; Shea, Munyi; Phimphasone, Phoutdavone; Wilson, G. Terence; Thompson, Douglas R.; Striegel, Ruth H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective was to test feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral self-help program to treat binge eating and related problems in Mexican Americans. Participants were 31 women recruited from the Los Angeles area and diagnosed with binge eating disorder, recurrent binge eating or bulimia nervosa. Participants completed a culturally adapted version of a CBT-based self-help program with 8 guidance sessions over a 3-month period. Treatment efficacy was evaluated in terms of binge eating, psychological functioning, and weight loss. Intent-to-treat analyses revealed 35.5% abstinence from binge eating at post-treatment and 38.7% diagnostic remission. Results indicated significant pre-treatment to post-treatment improvement on distress level, BMI, eating disorder psychopathology, and self-esteem. Satisfaction with the program was high. Findings demonstrate that the program is acceptable, feasible, and efficacious in reducing binge eating and associated symptoms for Mexican American women. Study provides “proof of concept” for implementation of culturally adapted forms of evidence-based programs. PMID:25045955

  20. Handheld Devices and Video Modeling to Enhance the Learning of Self-Help Skills in Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Joseph E; Morgan, Michele; Barnett, Veronica; Spreat, Scott

    2015-04-01

    The viewing of videos is a much-studied intervention to teach self-help, social, and vocational skills. Many of the studies to date looked at video modeling using televisions, computers, and other large screens. This study looked at the use of video modeling on portable handheld devices to teach hand washing to three adolescent students with an autism spectrum disorder. Three students participated in this 4-week study conducted by occupational therapists. Baseline data were obtained for the first student for 1 week, the second for 2 weeks, and the third for 3 weeks; videos were introduced when the participants each finished the baseline phase. Given the cognitive and motor needs of the participants, the occupational therapist set the player so that the participants only had to press the play button to start the video playing. The participants were able to hold the players and view at distances that were most appropriate for their individual needs and preferences. The results suggest that video modeling on a handheld device improves the acquisition of self-help skills.

  1. Modeling Disease Progression via Fused Sparse Group Lasso

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiayu; Liu, Jun; Narayan, Vaibhav A.; Ye, Jieping

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder associated with aging. Understanding how the disease progresses and identifying related pathological biomarkers for the progression is of primary importance in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of Alzheimer’s disease. In this paper, we develop novel multi-task learning techniques to predict the disease progression measured by cognitive scores and select biomarkers predictive of the progression. In multi-task learning, the prediction of cognitive scores at each time point is considered as a task, and multiple prediction tasks at different time points are performed simultaneously to capture the temporal smoothness of the prediction models across different time points. Specifically, we propose a novel convex fused sparse group Lasso (cFSGL) formulation that allows the simultaneous selection of a common set of biomarkers for multiple time points and specific sets of biomarkers for different time points using the sparse group Lasso penalty and in the meantime incorporates the temporal smoothness using the fused Lasso penalty. The proposed formulation is challenging to solve due to the use of several non-smooth penalties. One of the main technical contributions of this paper is to show that the proximal operator associated with the proposed formulation exhibits a certain decomposition property and can be computed efficiently; thus cFSGL can be solved efficiently using the accelerated gradient method. To further improve the model, we propose two non-convex formulations to reduce the shrinkage bias inherent in the convex formulation. We employ the difference of convex (DC) programming technique to solve the non-convex formulations. We have performed extensive experiments using data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed progression models in comparison with existing methods for disease progression. We also perform

  2. Randomized trial of internet-delivered self-help with telephone support for pathological gamblers.

    PubMed

    Carlbring, Per; Smit, Filip

    2008-12-01

    Although effective therapies for pathological gambling exist, their uptake is limited to 10% of the target population. To lower the barriers for help seeking, the authors tested an online alternative in a randomized trial (N = 66). The participants were pathological gamblers not presenting with severe comorbid depression. A wait-list control was compared with an 8-week Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy program with minimal therapist contact via e-mail and weekly telephone calls of less than 15 min. Average time spent on each participant, including phone conversations, e-mail, and administration, was 4 hr. The Internet-based intervention resulted in favorable changes in pathological gambling, anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Composite between-group effect size (Cohen's d) at posttreatment was 0.83. Follow-ups carried out in the treatment group at 6, 18, and 36 months indicated that treatment effects were sustained (ds = 2.58, 1.96, and 1.98). This evidence is in support of Internet-delivered treatment for pathological gamblers. However, it is not clear how effective the treatment is for more severely depressed individuals.

  3. Scurvy in pediatric age group - A disease often forgotten?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Shaharyar, Abbas; Kumar, Anubrat; Bhat, Mohd Shafi; Mishra, Madhusudan

    2015-06-01

    Scurvy is caused by prolonged severe dietary deficiency of vitamin C. Being rare as compared to other nutritional deficiencies, it is seldom suspected and this frequently leads to delayed recognition of this disorder. Children with abnormal dietary habits, mental illness or physical disabilities are prone to develop this disease. The disease spectrum of scurvy is quite varied and includes dermatological, dental, bone and systemic manifestations. Subperiosteal hematoma, ring epiphysis, metaphyseal white line and rarefaction zone along with epiphyseal slips are common radiological findings. High index of suspicion, detailed history and bilateral limb radiographs aids physician in diagnosing this eternal masquerader. We searched Pubmed for recent literature (2009-2014) with search terms "scurvy" "vitamin C deficiency" "ascorbic acid deficiency" "scurvy and children" "scurvy and pediatric age group". There were a total of 36 articles relevant to pediatric scurvy in children (7 reviews and 29 case reports) which were retrieved. The review briefly recapitulates the role of vitamin C, the various disease manifestations and the treatment of scurvy to create awareness of the disease which still is reported from our country, although sporadically. The recent advances related to scurvy and its management in pediatric age group are also incorporated.

  4. To Receive from the Rich or the Poor: Effects on the Recipient’s Self Esteem and Subsequent Self-Help Behavior.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    to self - esteem inherent in aid and subsequent self -help is discussed in terms of self - esteem theory. (Modified author abstract)...A 2 (aid vs. no aid) x 2 (high vs. low resource potential donor) factorial design tested the effects of aid and donor resources on recipient self ...perceptions and subsequent self -help behavior. The results were characterized by interactions between the two factors. The relationship between threat

  5. Challenges in reducing group B Streptococcus disease in African settings

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Yo; Dangor, Ziyaad; French, Neil; Madhi, Shabir; Heyderman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis in high-income settings and is associated with high rates of neonatal mortality and morbidity. There is now increasing evidence to suggest that there is a high GBS disease burden in resource-limited countries, and it is therefore critically important to identify suitable and practical preventive strategies. In Europe and North America, intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) has led to a dramatic reduction of early-onset GBS disease. However, the methods for identifying pregnant women who should receive IAP and how to reduce late-onset GBS disease are not without controversy and are challenging for most sub-Saharan African countries. GBS vaccines are approaching phase III trials but are still under development. This review aims to explore the current evidence related to strategies for reducing invasive GBS disease in an African setting, the development of a GBS vaccine and whether preventative measures against GBS disease can be practically implemented. PMID:27831912

  6. An Internet-based self-help treatment for fear of public speaking: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Botella, C; Gallego, M J; Garcia-Palacios, A; Guillen, V; Baños, R M; Quero, S; Alcañiz, M

    2010-08-01

    This study offers data about the efficacy of "Talk to Me," an Internet-based telepsychology program for the treatment of fear of public speaking that includes the most active components in cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for social phobia (exposure and cognitive therapies). One hundred twenty-seven participants with social phobia were randomly assigned to three experimental conditions: (a) an Internet-based self-administered program; (b) the same program applied by a therapist; (c) a waiting-list control group. Results showed that both treatment conditions were equally efficacious. In addition, Talk to Me and the same treatment applied by a therapist were more efficacious than the waiting-list condition. Treatment gains were maintained at 1-year follow-up. The results from this study support the utility of Internet-delivered CBT programs in order to reach a higher number of people who could benefit from CBT. Internet-delivered CBT programs could also play a valuable role in the dissemination of CBT.

  7. Client Self-Management: Promoting Self-Help for Parents of Children in Foster-Care

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Bjørn Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Drawing upon Foucault's concepts of power, this article shows how a course given to parents whose children are in foster-care encourages a particular form of self-management—most notably, that their internal dialogues must be altered so that the parents can view themselves as people in control of their behaviour who are in a position to choose new behaviour. The article is based on a qualitative study conducted in Norway and centres on the support and development of participants in the course. Study results show increased self-confidence and self-respect in the participants, both as individuals and as parents. In addition, significant benefits were stated as finding that they could verbalise and describe difficult events and emotions, experiencing being ‘normal’ within a group and receiving feedback. From the perspective of child protective services, dialogue with parents is central, as it not only commits clients to specific behaviours, but—more importantly—commits them to a particular inner dialogue about parenthood. The course can be seen as a management tool in which the parent's ‘self’ becomes the central object, seeking to contradict the conventional conception of parents with children in foster-care as having nothing to contribute to their children's upbringing. PMID:27559212

  8. Treatment of binge eating disorder in racially and ethnically diverse obese patients in primary care: randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of self-help and medication.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Carlos M; Masheb, Robin M; White, Marney A; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Barnes, Rachel D; Walsh, B Timothy; McKenzie, Katherine C; Genao, Inginia; Garcia, Rina

    2014-07-01

    The objective was to determine whether treatments with demonstrated efficacy for binge eating disorder (BED) in specialist treatment centers can be delivered effectively in primary care settings to racially/ethnically diverse obese patients with BED. This study compared the effectiveness of self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy (shCBT) and an anti-obesity medication (sibutramine), alone and in combination, and it is only the second placebo-controlled trial of any medication for BED to evaluate longer-term effects after treatment discontinuation. 104 obese patients with BED (73% female, 55% non-white) were randomly assigned to one of four 16-week treatments (balanced 2-by-2 factorial design): sibutramine (N = 26), placebo (N = 27), shCBT + sibutramine (N = 26), or shCBT + placebo (N = 25). Medications were administered in double-blind fashion. Independent assessments were performed monthly throughout treatment, post-treatment, and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups (16 months after randomization). Mixed-models analyses revealed significant time and medication-by-time interaction effects for percent weight loss, with sibutramine but not placebo associated with significant change over time. Percent weight loss differed significantly between sibutramine and placebo by the third month of treatment and at post-treatment. After the medication was discontinued at post-treatment, weight re-gain occurred in sibutramine groups and percent weight loss no longer differed among the four treatments at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. For binge-eating, mixed-models revealed significant time and shCBT-by-time interaction effects: shCBT had significantly lower binge-eating frequency at 6-month follow-up but the treatments did not differ significantly at any other time point. Demographic factors did not significantly predict or moderate clinical outcomes. Our findings suggest that pure self-help CBT and sibutramine did not show long-term effectiveness relative to placebo for treating BED in

  9. How effective is bibliotherapy-based self-help cognitive behavioral therapy with Internet support in clinical settings? Results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Högdahl, Louise; Birgegård, Andreas; Björck, Caroline

    2013-03-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy-based guided self-help (CBT-GSH) via the Internet has been shown to be effective in the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN) and similar eating disorders (EDs), but it is rarely offered, and little is known about the effects, in clinical settings. The present study investigated the effects of a bibliotherapy-based CBT-GSH with Internet support in a clinical setting. Participants were 48 adult outpatients who were recruited without randomization from a specialized ED clinic, diagnosed with BN or similar eating disorder. Forty-eight patients in an intensive day patient program (DPP) were used as comparison group. The Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and the Eating Disorder Inventory 2 measured pre- and post treatment symptoms. Results showed that both groups attained significant improvements in core- as well as related ED symptoms in both instruments. As expected, treatment effects were larger in the more intensive DPP. Nonetheless, bibliotherapy CBT-GSH appears to be a cost-effective treatment that represents a new way to provide more CBT in clinical settings.

  10. Scurvy in pediatric age group – A disease often forgotten?

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anil; Shaharyar, Abbas; Kumar, Anubrat; Bhat, Mohd Shafi; Mishra, Madhusudan

    2015-01-01

    Scurvy is caused by prolonged severe dietary deficiency of vitamin C. Being rare as compared to other nutritional deficiencies, it is seldom suspected and this frequently leads to delayed recognition of this disorder. Children with abnormal dietary habits, mental illness or physical disabilities are prone to develop this disease. The disease spectrum of scurvy is quite varied and includes dermatological, dental, bone and systemic manifestations. Subperiosteal hematoma, ring epiphysis, metaphyseal white line and rarefaction zone along with epiphyseal slips are common radiological findings. High index of suspicion, detailed history and bilateral limb radiographs aids physician in diagnosing this eternal masquerader. We searched Pubmed for recent literature (2009–2014) with search terms “scurvy” “vitamin C deficiency” “ascorbic acid deficiency” “scurvy and children” “scurvy and pediatric age group”. There were a total of 36 articles relevant to pediatric scurvy in children (7 reviews and 29 case reports) which were retrieved. The review briefly recapitulates the role of vitamin C, the various disease manifestations and the treatment of scurvy to create awareness of the disease which still is reported from our country, although sporadically. The recent advances related to scurvy and its management in pediatric age group are also incorporated. PMID:25983516

  11. Assessing the Availability and Quality of Online Self-Help Videos: A Pilot Study with a Focus on Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Julia; Rennie, Brandon; Seekins, Tom; O'Donnell, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The Internet and other electronic media may provide one part of a solution for reducing disparities in the availability of medical services. From a patient-centred perspective, an individual with a chronic, degenerative condition may ask what information is available that I can use to manage changes in my functional capacity over time,…

  12. International Work Group criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Dubois, Bruno; Molinuevo, José L; Scheltens, Philip

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer-type biomarker changes are identifiable in asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic predementia phases of Alzheimer disease (AD) and AD dementia. The International Work Group (IWG) guidelines for diagnosis identify a unified spectrum of 3 phases. The classic clinical feature that indicates AD is an episodic memory defect of the amnestic type. IWG criteria require biomarker support for the diagnoses of AD at any clinical stage. Pathophysiologic and topographic biomarkers are recognized. These criteria are proposed to allow highly specific diagnosis of AD and assist in identifying patients for clinical trials of AD-related treatments and other types of AD research.

  13. BOLD delay times using group delay in sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloigner, Julie; Vu, Chau; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2016-03-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder that effects red blood cells, which can lead to vasoocclusion, ischemia and infarct. This disease often results in neurological damage and strokes, leading to morbidity and mortality. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique for measuring and mapping the brain activity. Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD) signals contain also information about the neurovascular coupling, vascular reactivity, oxygenation and blood propagation. Temporal relationship between BOLD fluctuations in different parts of the brain provides also a mean to investigate the blood delay information. We used the induced desaturation as a label to profile transit times through different brain areas, reflecting oxygen utilization of tissue. In this study, we aimed to compare blood flow propagation delay times between these patients and healthy subjects in areas vascularized by anterior, middle and posterior cerebral arteries. In a group comparison analysis with control subjects, BOLD changes in these areas were found to be almost simultaneous and shorter in the SCD patients, because of their increased brain blood flow. Secondly, the analysis of a patient with a stenosis on the anterior cerebral artery indicated that signal of the area vascularized by this artery lagged the MCA signal. These findings suggest that sickle cell disease causes blood propagation modifications, and that these changes could be used as a biomarker of vascular damage.

  14. Mexican American Women’s Perspectives on a Culturally Adapted Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Guided Self-Help Program for Binge Eating

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Munyi; Cachelin, Fary M.; Gutierrez, Guadalupe; Wang, Sherry; Phimphasone, Phoutdavone

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) among Latinas is comparable to those of the general population; however, few interventions and treatment trial research have focused on this group. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for binge eating related disorders. CBT-based guided self-help (CBTgsh)—a low-cost minimal intervention—has also been shown effective in improving binge eating related symptom, but the effectiveness of the CBTgsh among ethnic minority women is not well understood. Cultural adaptation of evidence-based treatments can be an important step for promoting treatment accessibility and engagement among underserved groups. This qualitative study was part of a larger investigation that examined the feasibility and efficacy of a culturally adapted CBTgsh program among Mexican American women with binge eating disorders. Post-treatment focus groups were conducted with 12 Mexican American women with BN or BED who participated in the intervention. Data were analyzed with the grounded theory methodology (Corbin & Strauss, 2008). Three themes emerged from the data: 1) eating behavior and body ideals are socially and culturally constructed, 2) multifaceted support system is crucial to Mexican American women’s treatment engagement and success, and 3) the culturally adapted CBTgsh program is feasible and relevant to Mexican American women’s experience, but it can be strengthened with increased family and peer support. The findings provide suggestions for further adaptation and refinement of the CBTgsh, and implications for future research as well as early intervention for disordered eating in organized care settings. PMID:26462112

  15. Out-Group Mating Threat and Disease Threat Increase Implicit Negative Attitudes Toward the Out-Group Among Men

    PubMed Central

    Klavina, Liga; Buunk, Abraham P.; Pollet, Thomas V.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated if perceiving an out-group as a threat to one's mating opportunities enhanced the implicit negative attitudes toward that out-group. In addition, we examined the moderating effect of disease threat on the relationship between an out-group mating threat and implicit negative attitudes toward that out-group. In Experiment 1, an out-group mating threat led to stronger implicit negative out-group attitudes as measured by the Implicit Association Test, but only for men with high chronic perceived vulnerability to disease. No such effects were found among women. In Experiment 2, men in the out-group mating threat condition who were primed with disease prevalence showed significantly stronger implicit negative attitudes toward the out-group than controls. Findings are discussed with reference to the functional approach to prejudice and sex-specific motivational reactions to different out-group threats. PMID:21687447

  16. Predicting Successful Treatment Outcome of Web-Based Self-help for Problem Drinkers: Secondary Analysis From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Jeannet; Keuken, Max; Smit, Filip; Schippers, Gerard; Cuijpers, Pim

    2008-01-01

    Background Web-based self-help interventions for problem drinking are coming of age. They have shown promising results in terms of cost-effectiveness, and they offer opportunities to reach out on a broad scale to problem drinkers. The question now is whether certain groups of problem drinkers benefit more from such Web-based interventions than others. Objective We sought to identify baseline, client-related predictors of the effectiveness of Drinking Less, a 24/7, free-access, interactive, Web-based self-help intervention without therapist guidance for problem drinkers who want to reduce their alcohol consumption. The intervention is based on cognitive-behavioral and self-control principles. Methods We conducted secondary analysis of data from a pragmatic randomized trial with follow-up at 6 and 12 months. Participants (N = 261) were adult problem drinkers in the Dutch general population with a weekly alcohol consumption above 210 g of ethanol for men or 140 g for women, or consumption of at least 60 g (men) or 40 g (women) one or more days a week over the past 3 months. Six baseline participant characteristics were designated as putative predictors of treatment response: (1) gender, (2) education, (3) Internet use competence (sociodemographics), (4) mean weekly alcohol consumption, (5) prior professional help for alcohol problems (level of problem drinking), and (6) participants’ expectancies of Web-based interventions for problem drinking. Intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses, using last-observation-carried-forward (LOCF) data, and regression imputation (RI) were performed to deal with loss to follow-up. Statistical tests for interaction terms were conducted and linear regression analysis was performed to investigate whether the participants’ characteristics as measured at baseline predicted positive treatment responses at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Results At 6 months, prior help for alcohol problems predicted a small, marginally significant positive treatment

  17. Empowerment and Peer Support: Structure and Process of Self-Help in a Consumer-Run Center for Individuals with Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutt, Russell K.; Rogers, E. Sally

    2009-01-01

    Personal empowerment is a guiding philosophy of many mental health service programs, but there has been little empirical research on the empowerment process in these programs. The authors examine social processes and consumer orientations within a self-help drop-in center for individuals with psychiatric disabilities, using intensive interviews…

  18. Development and Testing of a Science and Engineering Fair Self-Help Development Program: Results of the Pilot Program in Three Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menicucci, David F.

    In seven chapters, this report details the Science Fair Self-Help Development Program, which was initiated in a pilot project at three middles schools in Albuquerque, New Mexico, during school year 1991-1992. The purpose of the program was to provide guidance to schools in developing their own parental and community resources into a sustainable…

  19. 41 CFR 102-75.555 - Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance for low-income individuals or... assistance for low-income individuals or families? The head of the disposal agency, or designee, may...

  20. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Novel Self-Help Technique for Impulse Control Disorders: A Study on Nail-Biting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moritz, Steffen; Treszl, Andras; Rufer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Nail-biting is currently classified as an impulse control disorder not otherwise specified. Although seldom targeted as a primary symptom, nail-biting is often associated with somatic complications and decreased quality of life. The present study assessed the effectiveness of an innovative self-help technique, titled decoupling (DC). DC aims at…

  1. Positive Psychological Wellbeing Is Required for Online Self-Help Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Chronic Pain to be Effective.

    PubMed

    Trompetter, Hester R; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Lamers, Sanne M A; Schreurs, Karlein M G

    2016-01-01

    -based self-help ACT may not be allocated to chronic pain sufferers experiencing low levels of mental resilience resources such as self-acceptance, goals in life, and environmental mastery. Other subgroups are identified that potentially need specific tailoring of (web-based) ACT. Emotional and psychological wellbeing should receive much more attention in subsequent studies on chronic pain and illness.

  2. Positive Psychological Wellbeing Is Required for Online Self-Help Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Chronic Pain to be Effective

    PubMed Central

    Trompetter, Hester R.; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T.; Lamers, Sanne M. A.; Schreurs, Karlein M. G.

    2016-01-01

    -based self-help ACT may not be allocated to chronic pain sufferers experiencing low levels of mental resilience resources such as self-acceptance, goals in life, and environmental mastery. Other subgroups are identified that potentially need specific tailoring of (web-based) ACT. Emotional and psychological wellbeing should receive much more attention in subsequent studies on chronic pain and illness. PMID:27014159

  3. Global oral health inequalities: task group--periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Jin, L J; Armitage, G C; Klinge, B; Lang, N P; Tonetti, M; Williams, R C

    2011-05-01

    Periodontal diseases constitute one of the major global oral health burdens, and periodontitis remains a major cause of tooth loss in adults worldwide. The World Health Organization recently reported that severe periodontitis exists in 5-20% of adult populations, and most children and adolescents exhibit signs of gingivitis. Likely reasons to account for these prevalent diseases include genetic, epigenetic, and environmental risk factors, as well as individual and socio-economic determinants. Currently, there are fundamental gaps in knowledge of such fundamental issues as the mechanisms of initiation and progression of periodontal diseases, which are undefined; inability to identify high-risk forms of gingivitis that progress to periodontitis; lack of evidence on how to prevent the diseases effectively; inability to detect disease activity and predict treatment efficacy; and limited information on the effects of integration of periodontal health as a part of the health care program designed to promote general health and prevent chronic diseases. In the present report, 12 basic, translational, and applied research areas have been proposed to address the issue of global periodontal health inequality. We believe that the oral health burden caused by periodontal diseases could be relieved significantly in the near future through an effective global collaboration.

  4. Invasive Meningococcal Disease in Scotland, 1994 to 1999, with Emphasis on Group B Meningococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kyaw, Moe H.; Clarke, Stuart C.; Christie, Peter; Jones, Ian G.; Campbell, Harry

    2002-01-01

    A review was carried out on 774 invasive meningococcal isolates reported to the active meningococcal surveillance system in Scotland from 1994 to 1999. This showed that serogroups B (51.7%) and C (39.2%) caused the majority of disease. The six common PorB proteins (4, 1, 15, 2B, 12, and 21) and PorA proteins (serosubtypes) (P1.4, P1.15, P1.9, P1.14, P1.7, and P1.16) accounted for 50 and 51% of all group B isolates, respectively, during the study period. PMID:11980971

  5. Emergence of a unique group of necrotizing mycobacterial diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Dobos, K. M.; Quinn, F. D.; Ashford, D. A.; Horsburgh, C. R.; King, C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Although most diseases due to pathogenic mycobacteria are caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, several other mycobacterial diseases-caused by M. ulcerans (Buruli ulcer), M. marinum, and M. haemophilum-have begun to emerge. We review the emergence of diseases caused by these three pathogens in the United States and around the world in the last decade. We examine the pathophysiologic similarities of the diseases (all three cause necrotizing skin lesions) and common reservoirs of infection (stagnant or slow-flowing water). Examination of the histologic and pathogenic characteristics of these mycobacteria suggests differences in the modes of transmission and pathogenesis, though no singular mechanism for either characteristic has been definitively described for any of these mycobacteria. PMID:10341173

  6. Platelet mitochondrial function in Parkinson's disease. The Royal Kings and Queens Parkinson Disease Research Group.

    PubMed

    Krige, D; Carroll, M T; Cooper, J M; Marsden, C D; Schapira, A H

    1992-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that defective function of the mitochondrial enzyme NADH CoQ reductase (complex I) is involved not only in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) toxicity, but also in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Complex I deficiency has been identified in PD substantia nigra and appears to be disease-specific and selective for the substantia nigra within the central nervous system. We describe a method for preparation of an enriched mitochondrial fraction from 60 mL blood. Using this technique, we analyzed respiratory chain function in 25 patients with PD and 15 matched control subjects. We confirm a previous report of a specific complex I deficiency in PD platelet mitochondria. Although there was a statistically significant decrease in complex I activity in the PD group compared with the control group (p = 0.005), the defect was mild (16%); it was not possible to distinguish PD from control values on an individual basis. This deficiency is not detectable in platelet whole-cell homogenates, presumably reflecting the relative insensitivity of this preparation and the limited decrease in complex I activity in PD. The presence of a mild complex I defect in platelets together with a more severe defect in substantia nigra suggests either that the pharmacological characteristics shared by these two tissues render them susceptible to a particular toxin or toxins, or that the defect is widely distributed and other biochemical events enhance the deficiency in substantia nigra.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. [Eating disorders on the internet: an experimental study on the effects of pro-eating disorders websites and self-help websites].

    PubMed

    Theis, Florian; Wolf, Markus; Fiedler, Peter; Backenstrass, Matthias; Kordy, Hans

    2012-02-01

    Pro-eating disorders (ED) websites are assumed to have a negative impact on internet users because these sites promote ED as a lifestyle, and present an extreme thin ideal as well as extreme weight loss measures. We tested the impact of reading pro-ED contents in a sample of 421 women. The participants were randomly assigned to one of 3 conditions in which they were exposed to either a pro-ED blog, a self-help blog, or a neutral control blog. Post-exposure negative affect was higher in participants of the pro-ED and the self-help conditions compared to the neutral blog condition. Participants with an elevated risk for developing an ED had a lower appearance self esteem after exposure to the pro-ED, or the self-help blog. According to the study, a subgroup of high risk individuals might be affected by ED-related internet content. The implications of this study are discussed in the context of the ongoing controversy around pro-ED websites.

  8. Chronic Diseases in the Pediatric Age Group. Matrix No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Michael

    This paper briefly outlines current problems associated with chronic diseases in children and youth and provides indications for the types of future research and analysis needed to facilitate the development of solutions. In general, these problems are associated with the following: malignancies, hereditary anemias, cystic fibrosis, other chronic…

  9. Cost-effectiveness of nurse-led self-help for recurrent depression in the primary care setting: design of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Major Depressive Disorder is a leading cause of disability, tends to run a recurrent course and is associated with substantial economic costs due to increased healthcare utilization and productivity losses. Interventions aimed at the prevention of recurrences may reduce patients' suffering and costs. Besides antidepressants, several psychological treatments such as preventive cognitive therapy (PCT) are effective in the prevention of recurrences of depression. Yet, many patients find long-term use of antidepressants unattractive, do not want to engage in therapy sessions and in the primary care setting psychologists are often not available. Therefore, it is important to study whether PCT can be used in a nurse-led self-help format in primary care. This study sets out to test the hypothesis that usual care plus nurse-led self-help for recurrent depression in primary care is feasible, acceptable and cost-effective compared to usual care only. Design Patients are randomly assigned to ‘nurse-led self-help treatment plus usual care’ (134 participants) or ‘usual care’ (134 participants). Randomisation is stratified according to the number of previous episodes (2 or 3 previous episodes versus 4 or more). The primary clinical outcome is the cumulative recurrence rate of depression meeting DSM-IV criteria as assessed by the Structured-Clinical-Interview-for-DSM-IV- disorders at one year after completion of the intervention. Secondary clinical outcomes are quality of life, severity of depressive symptoms, co-morbid psychopathology and self-efficacy. As putative effect-moderators, demographic characteristics, number of previous episodes, type of treatment during previous episodes, age of onset, self-efficacy and symptoms of pain and fatigue are assessed. Cumulative recurrence rate ratios are obtained under a Poisson regression model. Number-needed-to-be-treated is calculated as the inverse of the risk-difference. The economic evaluation is conducted from a

  10. Prevention of Early-onset Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marió, M. J. Soto; Valenzuela, I; Vásquez, A. E; Illanes, S. E

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, also known as Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of up to 50% of healthy adults and newborns; it is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Early detection can be used to establish the use of antibiotic prophylaxis to significantly reduce neonatal sepsis. This article reviews methods of detection and prevention of GBS infection in the neonate. PMID:24358406

  11. African American Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease: Support Groups and Psychological Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Marilyn M.; Telfair, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    Studied the impact of support groups on the psychological well-being of adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD). Response of 79 adolescent SCD group members show that psychological well-being was best predicted by fewer physical symptoms and greater satisfaction with the group. Findings suggest the beneficial effects of SCD support groups. (SLD)

  12. Development of a Self-Help Web-Based Intervention Targeting Young Cancer Patients With Sexual Problems and Fertility Distress in Collaboration With Patient Research Partners

    PubMed Central

    Obol, Claire Micaux; Lampic, Claudia; Eriksson, Lars E; Pelters, Britta; Wettergren, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Background The Internet should be suitable for delivery of interventions targeting young cancer patients. Young people are familiar with the technologies, and this patient group is small and geographically dispersed. Still, only few psycho-educational Web-based interventions are designed for this group. Young cancer patients consider reproductive health, including sexuality, an area of great importance and approximately 50% report sexual problems and fertility-related concerns following cancer treatment. Therefore, we set out to develop a self-help Web-based intervention, Fex-Can, to alleviate such problems. To improve its quality, we decided to involve patients and significant others as research partners. The first 18 months of our collaboration are described in this paper. The intervention will subsequently be tested in a feasibility study followed by a randomized controlled trial. Objective The study aims to describe the development of a Web-based intervention in long-term collaboration with patient research partners (PRPs). Methods Ten former cancer patients and two significant others participated in building the Web-based intervention, using a participatory design. The development process is described according to the design step in the holistic framework presented by van Gemert-Pijnen et al and evaluates the PRPs’ impact on the content, system, and service quality of the planned intervention. Results The collaboration between the research group and the PRPs mainly took place in the form of 1-day meetings to develop the key components of the intervention: educational and behavior change content, multimedia (pictures, video vignettes, and audios), interactive online activities (eg, self-monitoring), and partial feedback support (discussion forum, tailored feedback from experts). The PRPs influenced the intervention’s content quality in several ways. By repeated feedback on prototypes, the information became more comprehensive, relevant, and understandable

  13. 75 FR 55793 - Cooperative Agreement to Support the Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... capacity found nowhere else. As part of the implementation of the WHO Global Strategy for Food Safety, WHO... to Estimate the Global Burden of Foodborne Diseases--Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference... global foodborne disease epidemiology. FERG consists of the following groups: a Core (or Steering)...

  14. Iron deficiency anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: National Consultant for Gastroenterology Working Group Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Bartnik, Witold; Gonciarz, Maciej; Kłopocka, Maria; Linke, Krzysztof; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Radwan, Piotr; Reguła, Jarosław; Rydzewska, Grażyna

    2014-01-01

    Anaemia is a common complication associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). It substantially impairs quality of life, makes therapy more complicated, and increases costs of treatment. It seems that anaemia therapy is suboptimal in this group of patients in the Polish population. The recommendations presented below provide iron deficiency anaemia management clues in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25395998

  15. The association between blood group and the risk of vascular disease in Quebec blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Claudia; Germain, Marc; Delage, Gilles; Grégoire, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between antigens A and B and arterial thrombosis, such as coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease or peripheral vascular disease, is still unclear. We evaluated the association between blood groups and thrombotic events in a cohort of blood donors from the province of Quebec, Canada. Material and methods Among all whole blood donors aged ≥18 years in Quebec between June 1990 and March 2009, a study sample with known blood groups was linked with the provincial hospitalisation and death records to count vascular events. All hospital admissions and deaths with codes for primary and relevant secondary diagnoses of coronary, cerebrovascular or peripheral diseases, including coronary heart disease interventions, were included. Cox regression was used to evaluate the hazard ratio associated between blood groups and these events adjusted for other baseline characteristics. Results Among the blood donors, 64,686 had a known blood group and were linked with the provincial health databases. The mean age of these donors was 38 years. The Cox multivariate adjusted hazard ratio for coronary, cerebrovascular or peripheral diseases was 1.19 (95% confidence interval: 1.01–1.40) for subjects with blood group AB compared to those with blood group O. There were no statistically significant associations with other blood groups. Only among women aged ≥40 years did those with blood group A have a higher hazard ratio for coronary heart disease (1.40 [1.01–1.92]) than those with blood group O, after adjusting for other characteristics. Discussion When compared to blood group O, only blood group AB was associated with a higher risk of hospitalisation or death because of thrombotic events such as coronary, cerebrovascular or peripheral diseases. However, the associations differed according to age and sex because only females aged ≥40 years with blood group A had a higher risk of coronary heart disease. PMID:27177404

  16. Immune Response to Invasive Group B Streptococcus Disease in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rench, Marcia A.; Rinaudo, C. Daniela; Fabbrini, Monica; Tuscano, Giovanna; Buffi, Giada; Bartolini, Erika; Bonacci, Stefano; Baker, Carol J.; Margarit, Immaculada

    2016-01-01

    Immunization of nonpregnant adults could help prevent invasive group B Streptococcus (GBS) infections, but adult immune responses have not been investigated. We defined capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and pilus island (PI) surface antigen distribution and expression and immune responses to GBS infection in nonpregnant adults. Prospective surveillance from 7 hospitals in Houston, Texas, USA, identified 102 adults with GBS bacteremia; 43% had skin/soft tissue infection, 16% bacteremia without focus, and 12% osteomyelitis. CPS-specific IgG was determined by ELISA and pilus-specific IgG by multiplex immunoassay. CPS types were Ia (24.5%), Ib (12.7%), II (9.8%), III (16.7%), IV (13.7%), and V (12.7%); 9.8% were nontypeable by serologic methods. Pili, expressed by 89%, were most often PI-2a. CPS and pilus-specific IgG increased during convalescence among patients with strains expressing CPS or PI. All GBS expressed CPS or PI; 79% expressed both. Increased antibodies to CPS and PI during recovery suggests that GBS bacteremia in adults is potentially vaccine preventable. PMID:27767008

  17. Internet Therapy versus Internet Self-Help versus No Treatment for Problematic Alcohol Use: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankers, Matthijs; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Schippers, Gerard M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Problematic alcohol use is the third leading contributor to the global burden of disease, partly because the majority of problem drinkers are not receiving treatment. Internet-based alcohol interventions attract an otherwise untreated population, but their effectiveness has not yet been established. The current study examined the…

  18. INTERBED: internet-based guided self-help for overweight and obese patients with full or subsyndromal binge eating disorder. A multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Binge eating disorder (BED) is a prevalent clinical eating disorder associated with increased psychopathology, psychiatric comorbidity, overweight and obesity, and increased health care costs. Since its inclusion in the DSM-IV, a few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have suggested efficacy of book-based self-help interventions in the treatment of this disorder. However, evidence from larger RCTs is needed. Delivery of self-help through new technologies such as the internet should be investigated in particular, as these approaches have the potential to be more interactive and thus more attractive to patients than book-based approaches. This study will evaluate the efficacy of an internet-based guided self-help program (GSH-I) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), which has been proven in several studies to be the gold standard treatment for BED, in a prospective multicenter randomized trial. Methods The study assumes the noninferiority of GSH-I compared to CBT. Both treatments lasted 4 months, and maintenance of outcome will be assessed 6 and 18 months after the end of treatment. A total of 175 patients with BED and a body mass index between 27 and 40 kg/m2 were randomized at 7 centers in Germany and Switzerland. A 20% attrition rate was assumed. As in most BED treatment trials, the difference in the number of binge eating days over the past 28 days is the primary outcome variable. Secondary outcome measures include the specific eating disorder psychopathology, general psychopathology, body weight, quality of life, and self-esteem. Predictors and moderators of treatment outcome will be determined, and the cost-effectiveness of both treatment conditions will be evaluated. Results The methodology for the INTERBED study has been detailed. Conclusions Although there is evidence that CBT is the first-line treatment for BED, it is not widely available. As BED is still a recent diagnostic category, many cases likely remain undiagnosed, and a large number of

  19. Barriers to Community Participation in Development Planning: Lessons from the Mutengene (Cameroon) Self-Help Water Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Njoh, Ambe J.

    2002-01-01

    A community water supply project in Cameroon illustrates the following constraints on community participation in development: paternalistic authorities, prescriptive role of the state, selective participation, bias toward "hard" issues, inattention to negative results, group conflicts, gatekeeping, pressure for immediate results,…

  20. Minimal Residual Disease and Childhood Leukemia: Standard of Care Recommendations From the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario MRD Working Group.

    PubMed

    Athale, Uma H; Gibson, Paul J; Bradley, Nicole M; Malkin, David M; Hitzler, Johann

    2016-06-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) is an independent predictor of relapse risk in children with leukemia and is widely used for risk-adapted treatment. This article summarizes current evidence supporting the use of MRD, including clinical significance, current international clinical practice, impact statement, and recommended indications. The proposed MRD recommendations have been endorsed by the MRD Working Group of the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario and provide the foundation for a strategy that aims at equitable access to MRD evaluation for children with leukemia.

  1. Evaluation of an ongoing psychoeducational inflammatory bowel disease support group in an adult outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    McMaster, Kristin; Aguinaldo, Laika; Parekh, Nimisha K

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies assessing efficacy of support groups for patients with inflammatory bowel disease showed mixed results in terms of attendance and overall effectiveness. In this study, researchers evaluated the use of an ongoing open psychoeducational support group for adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease in an outpatient tertiary setting. The sample consisted of 18 adults who have attended more than 2 meetings of the support group. Topics addressed in the support group include complementary medicine, diet and nutrition, the psychological impact of inflammatory bowel disease, medication and side effects, and insurance/disability. Participants were asked to complete the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire, Multidimensional Support Scale, 11 general demographic questions, and a brief open-ended qualitative questionnaire developed by the researchers. Results demonstrated that participants reported very high satisfaction with the support group and rated the adequacy of peer support from others with inflammatory bowel disease higher than support from family/friends and professionals. A majority of group members reported joining the group for mutual support and education; this expectation was met through the psychoeducational structure of the group. This study demonstrates the potential for success of an ongoing psychoeducational inflammatory bowel disease support group for adult patients and their caregivers.

  2. Group III Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Lung Disease: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Klinger, James R

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with chronic lung disease (WHO group 3) is the second leading cause of PH and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is usually moderate and correlates with severity of lung disease. In a small minority, PAP may approach that seen in WHO group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Current medications for treating PAH have not shown benefit in controlled trials of group 3 PH and their routine use is discouraged. Patients with severe group 3 PH should be considered for referral to expert centers or entry into clinical trials.

  3. A Web-Disseminated Self-Help and Peer Support Program Could Fill Gaps in Mental Health Care: Lessons From a Consumer Survey

    PubMed Central

    Banschback, Kaitlin; Santorelli, Gennarina D; Constantino, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Background Self-guided mental health interventions that are disseminated via the Web have the potential to circumvent barriers to treatment and improve public mental health. However, self-guided interventions often fail to attract consumers and suffer from user nonadherence. Uptake of novel interventions could be improved by consulting consumers from the beginning of the development process in order to assess their interest and their preferences. Interventions can then be tailored using this feedback to optimize appeal. Objective The aim of our study was to determine the level of public interest in a new mental health intervention that incorporates elements of self-help and peer counseling and that is disseminated via a Web-based training course; to identify predictors of interest in the program; and to identify consumer preferences for features of Web-based courses and peer support programs. Methods We surveyed consumers via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk to estimate interest in the self-help and peer support program. We assessed associations between demographic and clinical characteristics and interest in the program, and we obtained feedback on desired features of the program. Results Overall, 63.9% (378/592) of respondents said that they would try the program; interest was lower but still substantial among those who were not willing or able to access traditional mental health services. Female gender, lower income, and openness to using psychotherapy were the most consistent predictors of interest in the program. The majority of respondents, although not all, preferred romantic partners or close friends as peer counselors and would be most likely to access the program if the training course were accessed on a stand-alone website. In general, respondents valued training in active listening skills. Conclusions In light of the apparent public interest in this program, Web-disseminated self-help and peer support interventions have enormous potential to fill gaps in

  4. Immunoconglutinin levels in normal and diseased population groups in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Watson, K. C.

    1971-01-01

    Immunoconglutinin (I-K) levels were measured in adult blood donors of European and African origin and in patients with the following diseases: acute typhoid fever, amoebic liver abscess, chronic liver disease and primary hepatoma. The lowest levels were found in the white donor group and the highest in those with chronic liver disease and those with primary hepatoma. African donors had levels higher than white donors which may relate to chronic infection and particularly chronic parasitic infestation. There was poor correlation between `O' and `H' antibodies and I-K levels in the typhoid group. In those with chronic liver disease there was some correlation between I-K levels and total γ-globulin and also with raised IgM and IgA levels but not with raised IgG. PMID:4103887

  5. Forming a support group for people affected by inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Swarup, Nidhi; Nayak, Saumya; Lee, Jessie; Pai Raikar, Srinivas; Hou, David; Sockalingam, Senthil; Lee, Ken J

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) – primarily Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis – is a debilitating lifelong condition with significant health and economic costs. From diagnosis to management, IBD can cause huge psychosocial concerns to patients and their caregivers. This study reports an experience of a Crohn’s patient, leading to the formation of the first IBD patient support group in Singapore and how this group has evolved in the last 4 years in supporting other IBD patients. IBD patient advocacy and/or support groups facilitate open conversations on patients’ fears, concerns, preferences and needs, and may potentially improve disease knowledge and quality of life for individuals with the condition or their families. PMID:28255233

  6. Vaccines for Prevention of Group B Meningococcal Disease: Not Your Father's Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Lee H

    2015-12-01

    For decades, there was no licensed vaccine for prevention of endemic capsular group B meningococcal disease, despite the availability of vaccines for prevention of the other most common meningococcal capsular groups. Recently, however, two new vaccines have been licensed for prevention of group B disease. Although immunogenic and considered to have an acceptable safety profile, there are many scientific unknowns about these vaccines, including effectiveness against antigenically diverse endemic meningococcal strains; duration of protection; whether they provide any herd protection; and whether there will be meningococcal antigenic changes that will diminish effectiveness over time. In addition, these vaccines present societal dilemmas that could influence how they are used in the U.S., including high vaccine cost in the face of a historically low incidence of meningococcal disease. These issues are discussed in this review.

  7. Vaccines for prevention of group B meningococcal disease: Not your father's vaccines.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Lee H

    2015-11-27

    For decades, there was no licensed vaccine for prevention of endemic capsular group B meningococcal disease, despite the availability of vaccines for prevention of the other most common meningococcal capsular groups. Recently, however, two new vaccines have been licensed for prevention of group B disease. Although immunogenic and considered to have an acceptable safety profile, there are many scientific unknowns about these vaccines, including effectiveness against antigenically diverse endemic meningococcal strains; duration of protection; whether they provide any herd protection; and whether there will be meningococcal antigenic changes that will diminish effectiveness over time. In addition, these vaccines present societal dilemmas that could influence how they are used in the U.S., including high vaccine cost in the face of a historically low incidence of meningococcal disease. These issues are discussed in this review.

  8. WHO scientific group meeting on cardiovascular disease and steroid hormone contraceptives.

    PubMed

    1997-11-28

    More than 100 million women worldwide are thought to use steroid hormone contraceptive methods, with an estimated 93 million women using combined oral contraceptives (COCs). The composition and use of these contraceptive preparations, especially those of COCs, have changed dramatically over the years. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened a Scientific Group Meeting on Cardiovascular Disease and Steroid Hormone Contraception during November 3-7, 1997, to review current scientific data on the use of steroid hormone contraception as they relate to the risk of myocardial infarction, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and venous thromboembolic disease. The group also reviewed the incidence of cardiovascular disease among women of reproductive age in general, how the effect of risk factors for cardiovascular disease may be changed using hormonal contraceptives, and whether different compositions of COCs have different cardiovascular risk profiles. The group was comprised of the authors of background papers prepared for the meeting and experts from around the world. The scientific group's conclusions are presented. The incidence and mortality rates of all cardiovascular diseases are very low among reproductive-age women. For women who do not smoke, who have their blood pressure checked, and who do not have hypertension or diabetes, the risk of myocardial infarction in COC users is not increased regardless of age. While current users of COCs have a low absolute risk of venous thromboembolism, their risk is still 3-6 times greater than that of nonusers, with the risk probably being highest during the first year of use.

  9. Organizational technologies of chronic disease management programs in large rural multispecialty group practice systems.

    PubMed

    Gamm, Larry; Bolin, Jane Nelson; Kash, Bita A

    2005-01-01

    Four large rural multispecialty group practice systems employ a mix of organizational technologies to provide chronic disease management with measurable impacts on their patient populations and costs. Four technologies-administrative, clinical, information, and social-are proposed as key dimensions for examining disease management programs. The benefits of disease management are recognized by these systems despite marked variability in the organization of the programs. Committees spanning health plans and clinics in the 4 systems and electronic medical records and/or other disease management information systems are important coordinating mechanisms. Increased reliance on nurses for patient education and care coordination in all 4 systems reflects significant extension of clinical and social technologies in the management of patient care. The promise of disease management as offered by these systems and other auspices are considered.

  10. Immunizing against prejudice: effects of disease protection on attitudes toward out-groups.

    PubMed

    Huang, Julie Y; Sedlovskaya, Alexandra; Ackerman, Joshua M; Bargh, John A

    2011-12-01

    Contemporary interpersonal biases are partially derived from psychological mechanisms that evolved to protect people against the threat of contagious disease. This behavioral immune system effectively promotes disease avoidance but also results in an overgeneralized prejudice toward people who are not legitimate carriers of disease. In three studies, we tested whether experiences with two modern forms of disease protection (vaccination and hand washing) attenuate the relationship between concerns about disease and prejudice against out-groups. Study 1 demonstrated that when threatened with disease, vaccinated participants exhibited less prejudice toward immigrants than unvaccinated participants did. In Study 2, we found that framing vaccination messages in terms of immunity eliminated the relationship between chronic germ aversion and prejudice. In Study 3, we directly manipulated participants' protection from disease by having some participants wash their hands and found that this intervention significantly influenced participants' perceptions of out-group members. Our research suggests that public-health interventions can benefit society in areas beyond immediate health-related domains by informing novel, modern remedies for prejudice.

  11. Perspectives of People with a Chronic Disease on Participating in Work: A Focus Group Study.

    PubMed

    Vooijs, Marloes; Leensen, Monique C J; Hoving, Jan L; Wind, Haije; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2017-01-18

    Purpose To explore solutions that people with a chronic disease use to overcome difficulties they experience regarding participating in work, and the support they require to identify or implement these solutions. Methods Focus groups were held to explore solutions and support requirements of people with a chronic disease. Participants were recruited through a research institution's patient panel, a patient federation and personal networks. Analysis was conducted by means of open and selective coding, using the MAXQDA software package. Results Five focus groups were held with 19 participants with different chronic diseases. Solutions that were identified included learning to accept and cope with the disease, which is frequently supported by family and friends. Disclosing the disease to employers and colleagues, identifying active ways to help with duties, and implementing adaptations to the work environment were all effective solutions with the help, empathy and understanding of people in the work environment. Solutions mostly supported by patient associations included providing sufficient information about the disease, relevant help and protective legal regulations regarding work participation. Finally, health professionals could support solutions such as incorporating periods of rest, promoting self-efficacy and gaining insight into an individual's ability to participate in work. Conclusions People with a chronic disease suggested various solutions that can help overcome difficulties surrounding participating in work. Support from friends and family, patient associations, employers, colleagues and occupational health professionals is needed to help identify and implement suitable solutions.

  12. Graded Exercise Therapy Guided Self-Help Trial for Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (GETSET): Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial and Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    McCrone, Paul; Ridge, Damien; Cheshire, Anna; Vergara-Williamson, Mario; Pesola, Francesca; White, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME), is characterized by chronic disabling fatigue and other symptoms, which are not explained by an alternative diagnosis. Previous trials have suggested that graded exercise therapy (GET) is an effective and safe treatment. GET itself is therapist-intensive with limited availability. Objective While guided self-help based on cognitive behavior therapy appears helpful to patients, Guided graded Exercise Self-help (GES) is yet to be tested. Methods This pragmatic randomized controlled trial is set within 2 specialist CFS/ME services in the South of England. Adults attending secondary care clinics with National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)-defined CFS/ME (N=218) will be randomly allocated to specialist medical care (SMC) or SMC plus GES while on a waiting list for therapist-delivered rehabilitation. GES will consist of a structured booklet describing a 6-step graded exercise program, supported by up to 4 face-to-face/telephone/Skype™ consultations with a GES-trained physiotherapist (no more than 90 minutes in total) over 8 weeks. The primary outcomes at 12-weeks after randomization will be physical function (SF-36 physical functioning subscale) and fatigue (Chalder Fatigue Questionnaire). Secondary outcomes will include healthcare costs, adverse outcomes, and self-rated global impression change scores. We will follow up all participants until 1 year after randomization. We will also undertake qualitative interviews of a sample of participants who received GES, looking at perceptions and experiences of those who improved and worsened. Results The project was funded in 2011 and enrolment was completed in December 2014, with follow-up completed in March 2016. Data analysis is currently underway and the first results are expected to be submitted soon. Conclusions This study will indicate whether adding GES to SMC will benefit patients who often spend many months

  13. A content analysis of chronic diseases social groups on Facebook and Twitter.

    PubMed

    De la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Díaz-Pernas, Francisco Javier; Antón-Rodríguez, Míriam

    2012-01-01

    Research on the use of social networks for health-related purposes is limited. This study aims to characterize the purpose and use of Facebook and Twitter groups concerning colorectal cancer, breast cancer, and diabetes. We searched in Facebook ( www.facebook.com ) and Twitter ( www.twitter.com ) using the terms "colorectal cancer," "breast cancer," and "diabetes." Each important group has been analyzed by extracting its network name, number of members, interests, and Web site URL. We found 216 breast cancer groups, 171 colorectal cancer groups, and 527 diabetes groups on Facebook and Twitter. The largest percentage of the colorectal cancer groups (25.58%) addresses prevention, similarly to breast cancer, whereas diabetes groups are mainly focused on research issues (25.09%). There are more social groups about breast cancer and diabetes on Facebook (around 82%) than on Twitter (around 18%). Regarding colorectal cancer, the difference is less: Facebook had 62.23%, and Twitter 31.76%. Social networks are a useful tool for supporting patients suffering from these three diseases. Regarding the use of these social networks for disease support purposes, Facebook shows a higher usage rate than Twitter, perhaps because Twitter is newer than Facebook, and its use is not so generalized.

  14. Community-based group exercise for persons with Parkinson disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Combs, Stephanie A; Diehl, M Dyer; Chrzastowski, Casey; Didrick, Nora; McCoin, Brittany; Mox, Nicholas; Staples, William H; Wayman, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare group boxing training to traditional group exercise on function and quality of life in persons with Parkinson disease (PD). A convenience sample of adults with PD (n = 31) were randomly assigned to boxing training or traditional exercise for 24-36 sessions, each lasting 90 minutes, over 12 weeks. Boxing training included: stretching, boxing (e.g. lateral foot work, punching bags), resistance exercises, and aerobic training. Traditional exercise included: stretching, resistance exercises, aerobic training, and balance activities. Participants were tested before and after completion of training on balance, balance confidence, mobility, gait velocity, gait endurance, and quality of life. The traditional exercise group demonstrated significantly greater gains in balance confidence than the boxing group (p < 0.025). Only the boxing group demonstrated significant improvements in gait velocity and endurance over time with a medium between-group effect size for the gait endurance (d = 0.65). Both groups demonstrated significant improvements with the balance, mobility, and quality of life with large within-group effect sizes (d ≥ 0.80). While groups significantly differed in balance confidence after training, both groups demonstrated improvements in most outcome measures. Supporting options for long-term community-based group exercise for persons with PD will be an important future consideration for rehabilitation professionals.

  15. Research agenda for understanding Alzheimer disease in diverse populations: work group on cultural diversity, Alzheimer's association.

    PubMed

    Shadlen, Marie-Florence; McCormick, Wayne C; Larson, Eric B

    2002-01-01

    The emerging evidence of ethnic variations in apolipoprotein polymorphism and Alzheimer disease risk shows that one cannot generalize findings based on a single cultural group too broadly ( Tang et al., 2001). Presence of one apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele is a stronger risk factor for Alzheimer disease in whites and Asians than in blacks ( Farrer et al., 1997). Environmental or genetic cofactors may modulate the effects of epsilon 4 on beta-amyloid metabolism differently in different subpopulations ( Shadlen, 1998). Recognizing this, the Alzheimer's Association has extended its goals to strengthen the scientific information base on the interactions of population diversity and Alzheimer disease heterogeneity ( NIA, 1998). This new focus is timely since minority elderly are the most rapidly increasing segment of the elderly population ( Lilienfeld and Perl, 1994, Brookmeyer et al., 1998). In this article, the authors highlight recent progress in research on Alzheimer disease among culturally diverse populations with a special emphasis on gaps in the knowledge base. The authors recommend four priorities for future Alzheimer disease research: (1) determine whether genetic causative factors interact differently in different populations; (2) reexamine the nature and role of cerebral ischemia and infarction and variations in symptom severity of Alzheimer disease; (3) explore the interaction of genes and environmental influences that are protective against Alzheimer disease; and (4) recruit and enroll ethnically diverse subjects in Alzheimer disease clinical trials.

  16. Estimating the contribution of genetic variants to difference in incidence of disease between population groups.

    PubMed

    Moonesinghe, Ramal; Ioannidis, John P A; Flanders, W Dana; Yang, Quanhe; Truman, Benedict I; Khoury, Muin J

    2012-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic susceptibility variants to several complex human diseases. However, risk-genotype frequency at loci showing robust associations might differ substantially among different populations. In this paper, we present methods to assess the contribution of genetic variants to the difference in the incidence of disease between different population groups for different scenarios. We derive expressions for the contribution of a single genetic variant, multiple genetic variants, and the contribution of the joint effect of a genetic variant and an environmental factor to the difference in the incidence of disease. The contribution of genetic variants to the difference in incidence increases with increasing difference in risk-genotype frequency, but declines with increasing difference in incidence between the two populations. The contribution of genetic variants also increases with increasing relative risk and the contribution of joint effect of genetic and environmental factors increases with increasing relative risk of the gene-environmental interaction. The contribution of genetic variants to the difference in incidence between two populations can be expressed as a function of the population attributable risks of the genetic variants in the two populations. The contribution of a group of genetic variants to the disparity in incidence of disease could change considerably by adding one more genetic variant to the group. Any estimate of genetic contribution to the disparity in incidence of disease between two populations at this stage seems to be an elusive goal.

  17. Procedures for prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal diseases: a multicenter questionnaire survey of hospitals in the Kyoto Neonatal Disease Study Group, Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kousaku; Kawai, Masahiko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Kato, Fumihide; Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Yamakawa, Masaru; Hashimoto, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Seiichi; Maeda, Shinji; Okumura, Mitsuyoshi; Kanaoka, Hiroo

    2007-02-01

    To explore clinical protocols for the prevention of early-onset group B Streptococcus (EOGBS) disease of the newborn in Japan, we conducted a multicenter questionnaire survey. Of 32 regional centers participating in the Kyoto Neonatal Study Group, 28 provided usable data concerning prevention practices undertaken between 2000 and 2004. Twenty-three (82%) of the 28 hospitals implemented bacteriological screening to identify maternal GBS carriage, and all 23 hospitals administered intrapartum antibiotics to all screening-positive pregnant women. There were no institutes that used risk-based strategies. In the 23 hospitals, bacteriological screening was conducted mostly by lower vaginal swab alone (n = 18). Eighteen hospitals performed screening once during pregnancy, either before 34 weeks' gestation (n = 6) or between 35 and 37 weeks' gestation (n = 12). Oral antepartum antibiotics, when carriage was identified, were administered at 12 (52%) hospitals. Twenty institutes used penicillins for intrapartum prophylaxis. However, the loading dose for chemoprophylaxis ranged from 0.5 to 2 g, and the interval between repeat administrations ranged from 4 to 12 h. Although the results indicated that more than 80% of the hospitals surveyed had introduced some screening-based prevention practices, the timing of the bacteriological screening during the pregnancy, the number of screenings, and the screening sites, as well as the antibiotics used, and their dosage, varied widely. Because of these highly variable methods, the efficacy of the implementation of preventive practices could not be determined. This study is the first to have described preventive practices for EOGBS disease in Japan in the era of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. In light of the above results, a larger study under a unifying protocol would be warranted.

  18. Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study Using Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeney, Farah; Egan, Sarah; Gasson, Natalie

    2005-01-01

    Depression and anxiety affect up to 50% of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) (Marsh, 2000; Murray, 1996), however, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological treatment. This study examined the effectiveness of group cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in treating depression and anxiety in PD. Four participants, aged between 56…

  19. Group B Streptococcus Sequence Type 283 Disease Linked to Consumption of Raw Fish, Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Rajendram, Priyanka; Mar Kyaw, Win; Ho, Hanley; Chen, Wen Kai; Lin, Raymond; Pratim, De Partha; Badaruddin, Hishamuddin; Ang, Brenda; Barkham, Timothy; Chow, Angela

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of invasive group B Streptococcus (GBS) disease occurred in Singapore in mid-2015. We conducted a case–control study of 22 adults with invasive GBS infections during June 21–November 21, 2015. Consumption of raw fish was strongly associated with invasive sequence type 283 infections, but not with non–sequence type 283 infections. PMID:27767905

  20. Synonymy of strains of Center for Disease Control group DF-1 with species of Capnocytophaga.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, B L; Hollis, D; Holdeman, L V

    1979-01-01

    Of eight strains of Center for Disease Control group DF-1 examined, seven had 62 to 87% deoxyribonucleic acid homology with the neotype strain of Capnocytophaga ochracea and one had 72% deoxyribonucleic acid homology with the type strain of C. gingivalis. Deoxyribonucleic acid homology of four strains of Bacteroides ochraceus with the neotype strain of C. ochrecea was 76 to 86%. PMID:528685

  1. Serotype IV Sequence Type 468 Group B Streptococcus Neonatal Invasive Disease, Minnesota, USA

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Ferrieri, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    To further understand the emergence of serotype IV group B Streptococcus (GBS) invasive disease, we used whole-genome sequencing to characterize 3 sequence type 468 strains isolated from neonates in Minnesota, USA. We found that strains of tetracycline-resistant sequence type 468 GBS have acquired virulence genes from a putative clonal complex 17 GBS donor by recombination. PMID:27767922

  2. Prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease--revised guidelines from CDC, 2010.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McGee, Lesley; Schrag, Stephanie J

    2010-11-19

    Despite substantial progress in prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal (GBS) disease since the 1990s, GBS remains the leading cause of early-onset neonatal sepsis in the United States. In 1996, CDC, in collaboration with relevant professional societies, published guidelines for the prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease (CDC. Prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease: a public health perspective. MMWR 1996;45[No. RR-7]); those guidelines were updated and republished in 2002 (CDC. Prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease: revised guidelines from CDC. MMWR 2002;51[No. RR-11]). In June 2009, a meeting of clinical and public health representatives was held to reevaluate prevention strategies on the basis of data collected after the issuance of the 2002 guidelines. This report presents CDC's updated guidelines, which have been endorsed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Nurse-Midwives, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the American Society for Microbiology. The recommendations were made on the basis of available evidence when such evidence was sufficient and on expert opinion when available evidence was insufficient. The key changes in the 2010 guidelines include the following: • expanded recommendations on laboratory methods for the identification of GBS, • clarification of the colony-count threshold required for reporting GBS detected in the urine of pregnant women, • updated algorithms for GBS screening and intrapartum chemoprophylaxis for women with preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of membranes, • a change in the recommended dose of penicillin-G for chemoprophylaxis, • updated prophylaxis regimens for women with penicillin allergy, and • a revised algorithm for management of newborns with respect to risk for early-onset GBS disease. Universal screening at 35-37 weeks' gestation for maternal GBS

  3. Internet-based guided self-help intervention for chronic pain based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Trompetter, Hester R; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Veehof, Martine M; Schreurs, Karlein M G

    2015-02-01

    Acceptance-based psychological interventions can potentially minimize the burden of chronic pain. This randomized controlled trial evaluated an internet-delivered, guided self-help intervention based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). A total of 238 chronic pain sufferers from the general population were randomly allocated to either ACT (n = 82), an internet-based control condition Expressive Writing (n = 79) or a waiting list condition (n = 77). Participants completed measures at baseline, posttreatment (3 months) and at a 3-month follow-up. At follow-up, ACT participants had improved in pain interference in daily life (primary outcome) compared to participants in Expressive Writing (Cohen's d = .47), but not compared to waiting list participants (p value = .11). Those who adhered to the ACT-intervention (48%) did improve significantly compared to waiting list participants (d = .49). ACT-participants also showed superior improvement on depression, pain intensity, psychological inflexibility and pain catastrophizing (d: .28-.60). Significant clinical improvement was present. Especially, 28% of ACT-participants showed general clinically relevant improvement in pain interference, as well as in pain intensity and depression (vs. Expressive Writing and waiting list 5%). Given these findings, internet-based ACT programs may be a promising treatment modality for chronic pain.

  4. Selling an Energy Efficiency Loan Portfolio in Oregon: Resale of the Craft3 loan portfolio to Self-Help Credit Union

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Peter; Borgeson, Merrian; Kramer, Chris; Zimring, Mark; Goldman, Charles

    2014-05-30

    Under the Clean Energy Works (CEW) program, Craft3 developed a loan product that widened access to financing for homeowners, offered long term funding, and collected repayments through the customer?s utility bill. The program?s success led Craft3 to pursue the sale of the loan portfolio to both mitigate its own risks and replenish funds for lending. This sale breaks new ground for energy efficiency finance and is notable as it was completed even with many novel program design elements. It replenished Craft3?s program capital and uncovered some valuable lessons that may facilitate future transactions. However, the lack of data history and the unproven nature of the loan portfolio meant that Craft3 had to limit the risk of losses to Self-Help, the purchaser of the portfolio. It remains to be seen whether this experience will pave the way for more sales of on-bill energy efficiency loan portfolios. This case study illustrates how certain program design decisions can sometimes both facilitate programmatic objectives and possibly present challenges for the sale of a portfolio of energy efficiency loans.

  5. Lung function decline rates according to GOLD group in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joohae; Yoon, Ho Il; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lim, Seong Yong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Lee, Sang Yeub; Lee, Jin Hwa; Lee, Sang-Do; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) groups A–D were introduced, the lung function changes according to group have been evaluated rarely. Objective We investigated the rate of decline in annual lung function in patients categorized according to the 2014 GOLD guidelines. Methods Patients with COPD included in the Korean Obstructive Lung Disease (KOLD) prospective study, who underwent yearly postbronchodilator spirometry at least three times, were included. The main outcome was the annual decline in postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), which was analyzed by random-slope and random-intercept mixed linear regression. Results A total 175 participants were included. No significant postbronchodilator FEV1 decline was observed between the groups (−34.4±7.9 [group A]; −26.2±9.4 [group B]; −22.7±16.0 [group C]; and −24.0±8.7 mL/year [group D]) (P=0.79). The group with less symptoms (−32.3±7.2 vs −25.0±6.5 mL/year) (P=0.44) and the low risk group (−31.0±6.1 vs −23.6±7.7 mL/year) (P=0.44) at baseline showed a more rapid decline in the postbronchodilator FEV1, but the trends were not statistically significant. However, GOLD stages classified by FEV1 were significantly related to the annual lung function decline. Conclusion There was no significant difference in lung function decline rates according to the GOLD groups. Prior classification using postbronchodilator FEV1 predicts decline in lung function better than does the new classification. PMID:26379432

  6. Frequency of ABO blood group in peptic ulcer disease in Iranian subjects.

    PubMed

    Rasmi, Y; Sadreddini, M; Peirovi, T; Jamali, M; Khosravifar, F; Dadkhah, A; Fatemi, F; Rahmati, M; Zargari, M; Sharifi, R

    2009-07-01

    The relationship between ABO blood group distribution and Peptic Ulcer Disease (PUD) has been widely evaluated in the past. But data concerning the same evaluation are very limited in Iran. This study sought to determine the distribution of ABO blood group in patients with PUD in Iranian subjects. Eighty-one patients with PUD (51 male and 30 female; mean age: 49 +/- 18 years) who attended our endoscopy section were enrolled. Blood samples were used for ABO/Rhesus (Rh) blood group antigen typing. The ABO blood group phenotype distribution in subjects was as follows: 37.1% (30/81) for group A, 23.4% (19/81) for group B, 35.6% (28/81) for group O and 4.9% (4/81) for group AB. Rh positivity was found in 63% (51/81) of patients. In local healthy population, ABO/Rh blood group distribution was 33.8, 20.7, 34.7, 8.4 and 89.6% for A, B, O, AB and Rh, respectively. AB blood group distribution in healthy population was higher than PUD (8.4 vs 4.9%). In contrast, Rh positivity of PUD in Iran is lower than healthy subjects (63 vs 89.6%). Variation in the results of studies is related to different study communities. According to these results, probably ABO/Rh blood group has an important role in patients with peptic ulceration. The functional significance of ABO blood group distribution might be associated with biological behavior of PUD. The impact of blood group on PUD may be a focus for further studies.

  7. Risk groups for yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD).

    PubMed

    Seligman, Stephen J

    2014-10-07

    Although previously considered as the safest of the live virus vaccines, reports published since 2001 indicate that live yellow fever virus vaccine can cause a severe, often fatal, multisystemic illness, yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD), that resembles the disease it was designed to prevent. This review was prompted by the availability of a listing of the cumulative cases of YEL-AVD, insights from a statistical method for analyzing risk factors and re-evaluation of previously published data. The purpose of this review is to identify and analyze risk groups based on gender, age, outcome and predisposing illnesses. Using a passive surveillance system in the US, the incidence was reported as 0.3 to 0.4 cases per 100,000. However, other estimates range from 0 to 12 per 100,000. Identified and potential risk groups for YEL-AVD include elderly males, women between the ages of 19 and 34, people with a variety of autoimmune diseases, individuals who have been thymectomized because of thymoma, and infants and children ≤11 years old. All but the last group are supported by statistical analysis. The confirmed risk groups account for 77% (49/64) of known cases and 76% (32/42) of the deaths. The overall case fatality rate is 66% (42/64) with a rate of 80% (12/15) in young women, in contrast to 50% (13/26) in men ≥56 years old. Recognition of YEL-AVD raises the possibility that similar reactions to live chimeric flavivirus vaccines that contain a yellow fever virus vaccine backbone could occur in susceptible individuals. Delineation of risk groups focuses the search for genetic mutations resulting in immune defects associated with a given risk group. Lastly, identification of risk groups encourages concentration on measures to decrease both the incidence and the severity of YEL-AVD.

  8. Chronic disease self-management and health literacy in four ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Susan J; Armin, Julie; Torres, Cristina Huebner; Orzech, Kathryn M; Vivian, James

    2012-01-01

    Research from several fields has explored health literacy as a multidimensional construct. The authors' multimethod study, "The Impact of Cultural Differences on Health Literacy and Chronic Disease Outcomes," assessed health literacy and chronic disease self-management among 296 patients from four ethnic groups (Vietnamese, African American, White, Latino) at a Massachusetts community health center between 2006 and 2010. Health literacy was assessed using the short form of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA), the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), and the Short Assessment of Health Literacy for Spanish-speaking Adults (SAHLSA) measures. Qualitative research methods, including in-depth interviews (n = 34), home visits (n = 12), chronic disease diaries (n = 15), and focus groups (n = 47), were completed with a subset of participants. Qualitative interviews indicated a wide range of interpretations of S-TOFHLA questions in which participants substituted their own illness or health care experiences for the abstract examples offered in the instrument, at times leading to incorrect responses. Situating these responses in a broader social and cultural context, this article describes examples of the wide range of chronic disease self-management abilities among participants with limited education and/or low health literacy. It also discusses the culturally variable health beliefs identified among participants interviewed that may play important roles in their chronic disease self-management practices.

  9. The economic costs of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) disease: prospective cohort study of infants with GBS disease in England.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Elizabeth-Ann; Petrou, Stavros; Balfour, Gail; Edamma, Oya; Heath, Paul T

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the economic costs over the first 2 years of life of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) disease occurring in infants less than 90 days of age. A cost analysis was conducted using a prospective cohort of children born between 2000 and 2003 in the Greater London, Oxford, Portsmouth and Bristol areas of England. Unit costs were applied to estimates of the health and social resource use made by 138 infants diagnosed with GBS disease and 305 non-GBS controls matched for birth weight and hospital stay and time of birth. The health and social care costs for infants exposed to GBS disease were analysed in a multiple linear regression model. The mean health and social care cost over the first 2 years of life was estimated at pound11,968.9 for infants with GBS, compared to pound6,260.7 for the non-GBS controls; a mean cost difference of pound5,708.1 (bootstrap 95% CI pound2,977.1, pound8,391.2, P=0.03). After adjusting for gestational age and other potential confounders in a multiple linear regression, mean societal costs was pound6,144.7 higher among GBS cases than among non-GBS controls (P<0.001). This study shows that the health and social care costs for infants with GBS disease is, on average, two-fold higher during the first 2 years of life than for infants without GBS disease. These data should be used to inform policy decisions regarding the cost-effectiveness of prevention and treatment strategies for GBS disease during early childhood.

  10. An alternative medicine treatment for Parkinson's disease: results of a multicenter clinical trial. HP-200 in Parkinson's Disease Study Group.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The natural occurrence of antiparkinsonian drugs in plants--anticholinergics in Datura stramonium, levodopa in Mucuna pruriens and Vicia faba, dopamine agonist activity in Claviceps purpura, and MAO inhibitor activity in Banisteria caapi-are known. Our study examined the efficacy and tolerability of HP-200, derived from Mucuna prurient, in patients with Parkinson's disease. Sixty patients with Parkinson's disease (46 male and 14 female) with a mean (+/- SD) age of 59 +/- 9 years were treated in an open study for 12 weeks. Of these, 26 patients were taking synthetic levodopa/carbidopa formulations before treatment with HP-200, and the remaining 34 were levodopa naive. HP-200, a powder (supplied as a 7.5 g sachet), was mixed with water and given orally. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) was used at baseline and periodically during the 12-week evaluation. Statistically significant reductions in Hoehn and Yahr stage and UPDRS scores were seen from baseline to the end of the 12-week treatment (p < 0.0001, t-test). The group mean (+/- SD) dose for optimal control of symptoms was 6 +/- 3 sachets. Adverse effects were mild and were mainly gastrointestinal in nature. No adverse effects were seen in clinical laboratory reports. HP-200, developed from an alternative medicine source, Ayurveda, was found to be an effective treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease.

  11. An Update on the Streptococcus bovis Group: Classification, Identification, and Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, John P.

    2016-01-01

    The Streptococcus bovis group has undergone significant taxonomic changes over the past 2 decades with the advent of new identification methods with higher discriminatory power. Although the current classification system is not yet embraced by all researchers in the field and debate remains over the performance of molecular techniques for identification to the species level within the group, important disease associations for several members of the group have been clarified. Here, we provide a brief overview of the history of the S. bovis group, an outline of the currently accepted classification scheme, a review of associated clinical syndromes, and a summary of the performance and diagnostic accuracy of currently available identification methods. PMID:26912760

  12. Detection of Alzheimer's disease using group lasso SVM-based region selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhuo; Fan, Yong; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; van de Giessen, Martijn

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most frequent forms of dementia and an increasing challenging public health problem. In the last two decades, structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown potential in distinguishing patients with Alzheimer's disease and elderly controls (CN). To obtain AD-specific biomarkers, previous research used either statistical testing to find statistically significant different regions between the two clinical groups, or l1 sparse learning to select isolated features in the image domain. In this paper, we propose a new framework that uses structural MRI to simultaneously distinguish the two clinical groups and find the bio-markers of AD, using a group lasso support vector machine (SVM). The group lasso term (mixed l1- l2 norm) introduces anatomical information from the image domain into the feature domain, such that the resulting set of selected voxels are more meaningful than the l1 sparse SVM. Because of large inter-structure size variation, we introduce a group specific normalization factor to deal with the structure size bias. Experiments have been performed on a well-designed AD vs. CN dataset1 to validate our method. Comparing to the l1 sparse SVM approach, our method achieved better classification performance and a more meaningful biomarker selection. When we vary the training set, the selected regions by our method were more stable than the l1 sparse SVM. Classification experiments showed that our group normalization lead to higher classification accuracy with fewer selected regions than the non-normalized method. Comparing to the state-of-art AD vs. CN classification methods, our approach not only obtains a high accuracy with the same dataset, but more importantly, we simultaneously find the brain anatomies that are closely related to the disease.

  13. [Characteristics of bacteria in the genus Proteus isolated from patients with sporadic and group intestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Apollonin, A V; Romanenko, E E; Iorzh, A L; Zueva, L P

    1985-02-01

    The biochemical and biological properties of 148 Proteus strains isolated from patients both in sporadic intestinal infections and in a case of group infection in children's hospital was studied. The study revealed that the etiological factor of the group infection was P. mirabilis belonging to rare serovar 48:2. Proteus organisms isolated in sporadic infections belonged to a great number of serovars. No relationship between the isolated serovar and the nosological form of the intestinal disease was established. Among the Proteus strains under study, 82 strains showed atypical biochemical properties in 1 test or more. No correlation between the clinical diagnosis and the occurrence of atypical strains was established.

  14. Neonatal group B streptococcus disease in developing countries: are we ready to deploy a vaccine?

    PubMed

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Delair, Shirley F; Obaro, Stephen K

    2015-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) disease is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis in developed countries and has high case fatality rates. In developing countries, however, the burden of GBS is less clear; this is due to a lack of studies using optimal diagnostic, clinical and laboratory techniques and is complicated by the wide availability of non-prescription antibiotics to the general population and in peripartum patients. There is an urgent need for prospective, population-based surveillance to provide an accurate assessment of neonatal GBS disease burden in developing countries, which remains largely unrecognized, and consequently obscures the potential relevance of GBS vaccination in these populations. Preliminary data on GBS vaccines are promising as a preventive tool for neonatal GBS infection, more so than any other currently available public health initiative. However, how do we assess the true impact of a GBS vaccine without accurate surveillance data on the real burden of disease?

  15. Revised Definitions of Invasive Fungal Disease from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) Consensus Group

    PubMed Central

    De Pauw, Ben; Walsh, Thomas J.; Donnelly, J. Peter; Stevens, David A.; Edwards, John E.; Calandra, Thierry; Pappas, Peter G.; Maertens, Johan; Lortholary, Olivier; Kauffman, Carol A.; Denning, David W.; Patterson, Thomas F.; Maschmeyer, Georg; Bille, Jacques; Dismukes, William E.; Herbrecht, Raoul; Hope, William W.; Kibbler, Christopher C.; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Marr, Kieren A.; Muñoz, Patricia; Odds, Frank C.; Perfect, John R.; Restrepo, Angela; Ruhnke, Markus; Segal, Brahm H.; Sobel, Jack D.; Sorrell, Tania C.; Viscoli, Claudio; Wingard, John R.; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Bennett, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Invasive fungal diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Clarity and uniformity in defining these infections are important factors in improving the quality of clinical studies. A standard set of definitions strengthens the consistency and reproducibility of such studies. Methods After the introduction of the original European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) Consensus Group definitions, advances in diagnostic technology and the recognition of areas in need of improvement led to a revision of this document. The revision process started with a meeting of participants in 2003, to decide on the process and to draft the proposal. This was followed by several rounds of consultation until a final draft was approved in 2005. This was made available for 6 months to allow public comment, and then the manuscript was prepared and approved. Results The revised definitions retain the original classifications of “proven,” “probable,” and “possible” invasive fungal disease, but the definition of “probable” has been expanded, whereas the scope of the category “possible” has been diminished. The category of proven invasive fungal disease can apply to any patient, regardless of whether the patient is immunocompromised, whereas the probable and possible categories are proposed for immunocompromised patients only. Conclusions These revised definitions of invasive fungal disease are intended to advance clinical and epidemiological research and may serve as a useful model for defining other infections in high-risk patients. PMID:18462102

  16. Efficacy of an internet-based self-help intervention to reduce co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression symptoms in adults: study protocol of a three-arm randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Michael P; Blankers, Matthijs; Lehr, Dirk; Boss, Leif; Riper, Heleen; Dekker, Jack; Goudriaan, Anna E; Maier, Larissa J; Haug, Severin; Amann, Manuel; Dey, Michelle; Wenger, Andreas; Ebert, David D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the general population, alcohol use disorder and depression more often occur together than any other combination of a mental illness with a substance use disorder. It is important to have a cost-effective intervention that is able to reach at-risk individuals in the early stages of developing alcohol use disorders and depression disorders. Methods and analysis This paper presents the protocol for a 3-arm multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the combined internet-based self-help intervention Take Care of You (TCOY) to reduce alcohol misuse and depression symptoms in comparison with a waiting list control group and a comparable intervention focusing on problematic alcohol use only. The active interventions consist of modules designed to reduce alcohol use, based on the principles of motivational interviewing and methods of cognitive behavioural therapy, together with additional modules in the combined study arm to reduce symptoms of depression. Data will be collected at baseline, as well as at 3 and 6 months postrandomisation. The primary outcome is the quantity of alcohol used in the past 7 days. A number of secondary outcome measures will be studied. These include the Centre of Epidemiologic Studies of Depression Scale (CES-D) and a combined measure with the criteria of values below the cut-off for severe alcohol use disorder and for CES-D. Data analysis will follow the intention-to-treat principle using (generalised) linear mixed models. In order to investigate the interventions’ cost-utility and cost-effectiveness, a full economic evaluation will be performed. Ethics and dissemination This RCT will be executed in compliance with the Helsinki Declaration and has been approved by 2 local Ethics Committees. Results will be reported at conferences and in peer-reviewed publications. Participant-friendly summaries of trial findings will be published on the TCOY websites. Trial registration

  17. URBAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND THE INDIAN SLUM, A CASE STUDY (IN SLUMS AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, EXPERIMENTS IN SELF-HELP, BY MARSHALL B. CLINARD. NEW YORK, THE FREE PRESS, 1966/139-278).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CLINARD, MARSHALL B.

    THE DELHI PILOT PROJECT IN URBAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, DESIGNED TO STIMULATE CITIZEN PARTICIPATION, INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP, AND SELF- HELP ACTIVITIES TO ALLEVIATE SLUM CONDITIONS, WAS INITIATED BY THE MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT (AIDED BY FORD FOUNDATION GRANTS) IN 1958. SLUM DWELLERS WERE ORGANIZED INTO--(1) VIKAS SUBHAS (ZONE COUNCILS) OF 15-100…

  18. Absence of Multiple Sclerosis and Demyelinating Diseases among Lacandonians, a Pure Amerindian Ethnic Group in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Jose; González, Silvia; Morales, Ximena; Yescas, Petra; Ochoa, Adriana; Corona, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a highly polymorphic disease characterized by different neurologic signs and symptoms. In MS, racial and genetic factors may play an important role in the geographic distribution of this disease. Studies have reported the presence of several protective alleles against the development of autoimmune disorders. In the case of MS, however, they help define MS as a complex disease, and confirm the importance of environmental agents as an independent variable not associated with ethnicity. We carried out an on-site epidemiological study to confirm the absence of MS or NMO among Lacandonians, a pure Amerindian ethnic group in Mexico. We administered a structured interview to 5,372 Lacandonians to assess by family background any clinical data consistent with the presence of a prior demyelinating event. Every participating subject underwent a comprehensive neurological examination by a group of three members of the research team with experience in the diagnosis and treatment of demyelinating disorders to detect clinical signs compatible with a demyelinating disease. We did not find any clinical signs compatible with multiple sclerosis among study participants. PMID:22973516

  19. Diabetic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis: a retrospective survival analysis across different socioeconomic groups

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Madhusudan; Radhakrishnan, Saranya; Mathew, Milly; Sampathkumar, Krishnaswamy; Mancha, Nevin Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetic kidney disease is the leading cause of stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) in India. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) is accessible to very few patients because of socioeconomic deprivation. We studied the effect of diabetes and socioeconomic status on the outcome of patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). Methods We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of 897 patients (629 males/268 females; mean age ± standard deviation 48.69 ± 14.27 years) initiated on MHD from 2003 to 2009 at five dialysis centers in south India. There were 335 type 2 diabetic patients and 562 non-diabetic patients. Group 1 comprised the self-paying patients (518 patients) and Group 2 included the TANKER Foundation charity dialysis patients (379 patients). We compared the 5-year survival rates of Group 1 versus Group 2 and also those of diabetic versus non-diabetic patients, using the Kaplan–Meier survival estimator. Results Of the 897 patients, 166 patients survived, 350 died, 234 were lost to follow-up, 137 had renal transplantation and 10 patients were transferred to peritoneal dialysis. The 5-year survival rates after censoring were 20.7 and 38.2% for diabetic and non-diabetic patients, respectively (P < 0.001). The survival rate of diabetic patients was significantly lower, compared with non-diabetic patients, in Group 2 (P < 0.001), but not significantly lower in Group 1 (P = 0.226). Conclusions Diabetic patients have poor survival rates on MHD, especially those from poor socioeconomic groups. Due to scarce RRT facilities and poor survival rates of diabetic patients, prevention, early detection and management of diabetic CKD patients should be the way to go forward. PMID:27994864

  20. Stroke in Children With Cardiac Disease: Report From the International Pediatric Stroke Study Group Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Adriane J.; Fox, Christine K.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Almond, Christopher S.; Bernard, Timothy J.; Beslow, Lauren A.; Chan, Anthony K.C.; Cheung, Michael; deVeber, Gabrielle; Dowling, Michael M.; Friedman, Neil; Giglia, Therese M.; Guilliams, Kristin P.; Humpl, Tilman; Licht, Daniel J.; Mackay, Mark T.; Jordan, Lori C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac disease is a leading cause of stroke in children, yet limited data support the current stroke prevention and treatment recommendations. A multidisciplinary panel of clinicians was convened in February 2014 by the International Pediatric Stroke Study group to identify knowledge gaps and prioritize clinical research efforts for children with cardiac disease and stroke. RESULTS Significant knowledge gaps exist, including a lack of data on stroke incidence, predictors, primary and secondary stroke prevention, hyperacute treatment, and outcome in children with cardiac disease. Commonly used diagnostic techniques including brain computed tomography and ultrasound have low rates of stroke detection, and diagnosis is frequently delayed. The challenges of research studies in this population include epidemiologic barriers to research such as small patient numbers, heterogeneity of cardiac disease, and coexistence of multiple risk factors. Based on stroke burden and study feasibility, studies involving mechanical circulatory support, single ventricle patients, early stroke detection strategies, and understanding secondary stroke risk factors and prevention are the highest research priorities over the next 5-10 years. The development of large-scale multicenter and multispecialty collaborative research is a critical next step. The designation of centers of expertise will assist in clinical care and research. CONCLUSIONS There is an urgent need for additional research to improve the quality of evidence in guideline recommendations for cardiogenic stroke in children. Although significant barriers to clinical research exist, multicenter and multispecialty collaboration is an important step toward advancing clinical care and research for children with cardiac disease and stroke. PMID:25532775

  1. Multistimulation group therapy in Alzheimer's disease promotes changes in brain functioning.

    PubMed

    Baglio, Francesca; Griffanti, Ludovica; Saibene, Francesca Lea; Ricci, Cristian; Alberoni, Margherita; Critelli, Raffaella; Villanelli, Fabiana; Fioravanti, Raffaella; Mantovani, Federica; D'amico, Alessandra; Cabinio, Monia; Preti, Maria Giulia; Nemni, Raffaello; Farina, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Background. The growing social emergency represented by Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the lack of medical treatments able to modify the disease course have kindled the interest in nonpharmacological therapies. Objective. We introduced a novel nonpharmacological approach for people with AD (PWA) named Multidimensional Stimulation group Therapy (MST) to improve PWA condition in different disease domains: cognition, behavior, and motor functioning. Methods. Enrolling 60 PWA in a mild to moderate stage of the disease, we evaluated the efficacy of MST with a randomized-controlled study. Neuropsychological and neurobehavioral measures and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were considered as outcome measures. Results. The following significant intervention-related changes were observed: reduction in Neuropsychiatric Inventory scale score, improvement in language and memory subscales of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale, and increased fMRI activations in temporal brain areas, right insular cortex, and thalamus. Conclusions. Cognitive-behavioral and fMRI results support the notion that MST has significant effects in improving PWA cognitive-behavioral status by restoring neural functioning.

  2. [Celiac disease in a group of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Brandt, Katia G; Silva, Giselia A P; Antunes, Margarida M C

    2004-12-01

    To know the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in a group of children and adolescents with type I diabetes mellitus. A cross sectional study was conducted at the Instituto Materno Infantil de Pernambuco (IMIP) in March 2000. The sample consisted of 19 children and adolescents with type I diabetes mellitus that had the human anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies assessed using kits from the Eurospital Laboratory. In case of positive results it was realized small intestine biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. For the calculation of the prevalence of CD it was considered the number of patients with serum positive histological alterations of the mucous membrane of the small intestine compatible with CD. Four patients presented serum positivity for human anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies with a serum prevalence of 21% (4/19). Out of these four subjects, three who accomplished small intestine biopsy presented histological alterations compatible with CD. The prevalence of CD in this group was 15.8% (3/19). The prevalence of CD in this study group was high, suggesting that those with type I diabetes mellitus should be led as a group of high risk to develop this disease.

  3. HLA, blood groups and secretor status in patients with established rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Jhinghan, B; Mehra, N K; Reddy, K S; Taneja, V; Vaidya, M C; Bhatia, M L

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of HLA-A, -B and -DR antigens as well as blood groups and secretor status was studied in sporadic, North Indian patients of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. While HLA-Aw33 occurred with an increased frequency in the patient group (X2 = 4.01), no statistically significant differences were observed in the frequency of B-locus antigens. In the DR locus, HLA-DR3 was found to be significantly increased (50% vs 26.1%, X2 = 13.8) and DR2 significantly reduced (21.8% vs 47.0%, X2 = 15.6). Also, there was a preponderance of non-'O' blood group individuals in the patient group as compared to controls. The DR3 association was significant only in those patients of RHD who did not have any previous history of rheumatic fever. These results indicate that susceptibility to rheumatic heart disease is HLA-class II mediated, with HLA-DR3 influencing susceptibility and DR2 conferring protection.

  4. Group comparison of spatiotemporal dynamics of intrinsic networks in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Madhyastha, Tara M; Askren, Mary K; Zhang, Jing; Leverenz, James B; Montine, Thomas J; Grabowski, Thomas J

    2015-09-01

    right insula, an area implicated in network shifting and associated with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease, was more highly correlated with both these networks in Parkinson's disease than in controls. In Parkinson's disease, increased correlation of the insula with the default mode network was related to lower attentional accuracy. We demonstrated that in an omnibus sense, correlations among network kernels describe biological impact of pathophysiological processes (through correlation with cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers) and clinical status (by classification of patient group). At a greater level of detail, we demonstrate aberrant involvement of the insula in the default mode network and the frontal frontoparietal task control network kernel. Network kernel analysis holds promise as a sensitive method for detecting biologically and clinical relevant changes to specific networks that support cognition and are impaired in Parkinson's disease.

  5. Extensive Genomic Variability of Knops Blood Group Polymorphisms Is Associated with Sickle Cell Disease in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Duru, Kimberley C; Noble, Jenelle A; Guindo, Aldiouma; Yi, Li; Imumorin, Ikhide G; Diallo, Dapa A; Thomas, Bolaji N

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a multisystem disorder characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, vaso-occlusive crises, and marked variability in disease severity. Patients require transfusions to manage disease complications, with complements, directed by complement regulatory genes (CR1) and its polymorphisms, implicated in the development of alloantibodies. We hypothesize that CR1 polymorphisms affect complement regulation and function, leading to adverse outcome in SCD. To this end, we determined the genomic diversity of complement regulatory genes by examining single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with Knops blood group antigens. Genomic DNA samples from 130 SCD cases and 356 control Africans, 331 SCD cases and 497 control African Americans, and 254 Caucasians were obtained and analyzed, utilizing a PCR—RFLP (polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism) assay. Analyzing for ethnic diversity, we found significant differences in the genotypic and allelic frequencies of Sl1/Sl2 (rs17047661) and McCa/b (rs17047660) polymorphisms between Africans, African Americans, and Caucasians (P < 0.05). The homozygote mutant variants had significantly higher frequencies in Africans and African Americans but were insignificant in Caucasians (80.2% and 59.6% vs 5.9% for Sl1/2; and 36% and 24% vs 1.8% for McCa/b). With SCD, we did not detect any difference among cases and controls either in Africa or in the United States. However, we found significant difference in genotypic (P < 0.0001) and allelic frequencies (P < 0.0001) of Sl1/Sl2 (rs17047661) and McCa/b (rs17047660) polymorphisms between SCD groups from Africa and the United States. There was no difference in haplotype frequencies of these polymorphisms among or between groups. The higher frequency of CR1 homozygote mutant variants in Africa but not United States indicates a potential pathogenic role, possibly associated with complicated disease pathophysiology in the former and potentially

  6. Insights into Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells in Human Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Karta, Maya R; Broide, David H; Doherty, Taylor A

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries have led to the identification of a novel group of immune cells, the innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). The members of this group are divided into three subpopulations: ILC1s, ILC2s, and ILC3s. ILC2s produce Th2 cytokines, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, upon activation by epithelial cell-derived cytokines, lipid mediators (cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2), and TNF family member TL1A and promote structural and immune cell responses in the airways after antigen exposure. In addition, ILC2 function is also influenced by inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS)/ICOS-ligand (ICOS-L) interactions via direct contact between immune cells. The most common airway antigens are allergens and viruses which are highly linked to the induction of airway diseases with underlying type 2 inflammation including asthma and allergic rhinitis. Based on recent findings linking ILC2s and airway Th2 responses, there is intensive investigation into the role of ILC2s in human disease with the hope of a better understanding of the pathophysiology and the discovery of novel potential therapeutic targets. This review summarizes the recent advances made in elucidating ILC2 involvement in human Th2 airway disease.

  7. Proallergic cytokines and group 2 innate lymphoid cells in allergic nasal diseases.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kazufumi; Kato, Yukinori; Akasaki, Shoko; Yoshimoto, Tomohiro

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of proallergic cytokines and group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) indicate their critical roles in type 2 immunity-mediated disorders. Proallergic cytokines, interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin, are released from epithelial cells in inflamed tissues and drive type 2 inflammation by acting on innate and acquired immune systems. ILC2s are an innate immune population that responds to proallergic cytokines by producing type 2 cytokines. In line with allergic disorders in the lung, skin, and intestine, emerging evidence suggests the involvement of proallergic cytokines and ILC2s in allergic nasal diseases such as chronic rhinosinusitis with polyps (CRSwNP), allergic fungal rhinosinusitis, and allergic rhinitis (AR). In CRSwNP patients, both proallergic cytokine levels and ILC2s frequency are increased in the nasal mucosa. Increased proallergic cytokine levels correlate with poorer disease outcomes in CRSwNP. Levels of nasal proallergic cytokines are also elevated in AR patients. In addition, animal studies demonstrate that cytokines are essential for the development of AR. It is becoming clear that the proallergic cytokine/ILC2s axis participates in allergic diseases by multiple mechanisms dependent upon the inflammatory context. Thus, a thorough understanding of these cytokines and ILC2s including their tissue- and disease-specific roles is essential for targeting the pathways to achieve therapeutic applications.

  8. Dichotomous Life of DNA Binding High Mobility Group Box1 Protein in Human Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Lohani, Neelam; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2016-01-01

    The High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an extremely versatile, highly conserved nuclear protein, with its unique intracellular and extracellular functions mediated by its relatively simple domain structure. Within the nucleus, HMGB1 binds to DNA minor groove in a nonspecific manner and causes bends in the double helix thus helps in recruiting a number of DNA binding protein and transcription factors, to facilitate transcription of various genes. HMGB1 also helps in DNA repair, chromatin remodeling, V (D) J recombination, and assembly of nucleosome on the chromatin. On contrary, under pathological conditions HMGB1 displays inflammatory response by interaction with specific cell surface receptors like RAGE, TLR-4, TLR9, and TLR2 and activates NF-kB downstream signaling pathways. The upregulation of HMGB1 is directly associated with the pathogenesis of cancer, sepsis, ischemia, hemorrhagic shock, anorexia, rheumatic disease, periodontal disease etc. Therefore, HMGB1 has been considered as a promising target in the treatment of various human diseases. The interest in HMGB1 is evident and reflected in the exponential increase in the recent publications, and therefore there is a need for an update on the understanding of the role of HMGB1 in pathogenesis and its potential application of HMGB1 as a therapeutic target in a number of human diseases.

  9. Invasive Group B Streptococcal Disease in South Africa: Importance of Surveillance Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Cheryl; von Gottberg, Anne; Meiring, Susan; Cutland, Clare L.; Schrag, Stephanie J.; Madhi, Shabir A.

    2016-01-01

    Data on neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS) invasive disease burden are needed to refine prevention policies. Differences in surveillance methods and investigating for cases can lead to varying disease burden estimates. We compared the findings of laboratory-based passive surveillance for GBS disease across South Africa, and for one of the provinces compared this to a real-time, systematic, clinical surveillance in a population-defined region in Johannesburg, Soweto. Passive surveillance identified a total of 799 early-onset disease (EOD, <7 days age) and 818 LOD (late onset disease, 7–89 days age) cases nationwide. The passive surveillance provincial incidence varied for EOD (range 0.00 to 1.23/1000 live births), and was 0.03 to 1.04/1000 live births for LOD. The passive surveillance rates for Soweto, were not significantly different compared to those from the systematic surveillance (EOD 1.23 [95%CI 1.06–1.43] vs. 1.50 [95%CI 1.30–1.71], respectively, rate ratio 0.82 [95%CI 0.67–1.01]; LOD 1.04 [95% CI 0.90–1.23] vs. 1.22 [95%CI 1.05–1.42], rate ratio 0.85 [95% CI 0.68–1.07]). A review of the few cases missed in the passive system in Soweto, suggested that missing key identifiers, such as date of birth, resulted in their omission during the electronic data extraction process. Our analysis suggests that passive surveillance provides a modestly lower estimate of invasive GBS rates compared to real time sentinel-site systematic surveillance, however, this is unlikely to be the reason for the provincial variability in incidence of invasive GBS disease in South Africa. This, possibly reflects that invasive GBS disease goes undiagnosed due to issues related to access to healthcare, poor laboratory capacity and varying diagnostic procedures or empiric antibiotic treatment of neonates with suspected sepsis in the absence of attempting to making a microbiological diagnosis. An efficacious GBS vaccine for pregnant women, when available, could be used as a

  10. ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease Position Paper: assessing the risk of interventions in patients with valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenhek, Raphael; Iung, Bernard; Tornos, Pilar; Antunes, Manuel J.; Prendergast, Bernard D.; Otto, Catherine M.; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Stepinska, Janina; Kaden, Jens J.; Naber, Christoph K.; Acartürk, Esmeray; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa

    2012-01-01

    Aims Risk scores provide an important contribution to clinical decision-making, but their validity has been questioned in patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), since current scores have been mainly derived and validated in adults undergoing coronary bypass surgery. The Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease of the European Society of Cardiology reviewed the performance of currently available scores when applied to VHD, in order to guide clinical practice and future development of new scores. Methods and results The most widely used risk scores (EuroSCORE, STS, and Ambler score) were reviewed, analysing variables included and their predictive ability when applied to patients with VHD. These scores provide relatively good discrimination, i.e. a gross estimation of risk category, but cannot be used to estimate the exact operative mortality in an individual patient because of unsatisfactory calibration. Conclusion Current risk scores do not provide a reliable estimate of exact operative mortality in an individual patient with VHD. They should therefore be interpreted with caution and only used as part of an integrated approach, which incorporates other patient characteristics, the clinical context, and local outcome data. Future risk scores should include additional variables, such as cognitive and functional capacity and be prospectively validated in high-risk patients. Specific risk models should also be developed for newer interventions, such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation. PMID:21406443

  11. Group sequential methods and sample size savings in biomarker-disease association studies.

    PubMed Central

    Aplenc, R; Zhao, H; Rebbeck, T R; Propert, K J

    2003-01-01

    Molecular epidemiological association studies use valuable biosamples and incur costs. Statistical methods for early genotyping termination may conserve biosamples and costs. Group sequential methods (GSM) allow early termination of studies on the basis of interim comparisons. Simulation studies evaluated the application of GSM using data from a case-control study of GST genotypes and prostate cancer. Group sequential boundaries (GSB) were defined in the EAST-2000 software and were evaluated for study termination when early evidence suggested that the null hypothesis of no association between genotype and disease was unlikely to be rejected. Early termination of GSTM1 genotyping, which demonstrated no association with prostate cancer, occurred in >90% of the simulated studies. On average, 36.4% of biosamples were saved from unnecessary genotyping. In contrast, for GSTT1, which demonstrated a positive association, inappropriate termination occurred in only 6.6%. GSM may provide significant cost and sample savings in molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:12663557

  12. Social positioning by people with Alzheimer's disease in a support group.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Ragnhild; Hellström, Ingrid; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Hansebo, Görel; Norberg, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are often negatively positioned by others, resulting in difficulties upholding a positive sense of self. This might cause them to withdraw socially and apparently 'lose their minds'. Conversely, the sense of self can be strengthened with the support from others. This study aimed to describe, in accordance with positioning theory, how people with moderate AD positioned themselves and each other in a support group for people with AD. We describe five first-order positions; the project manager, the storyteller, the moral agent, the person burdened with AD, and the coping person. In the interactions that followed among the support group participants, those positions were mainly affirmed. This enabled participants to construct strong and agentic personae, and to have the severity of their illness acknowledged. Despite their language impairment participants managed to position and reposition themselves and others by assistance of the trained facilitator.

  13. International Myeloma Working Group Recommendations for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma–Related Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Terpos, Evangelos; Morgan, Gareth; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Drake, Matthew T.; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Raje, Noopur; Sezer, Orhan; García-Sanz, Ramón; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Turesson, Ingemar; Reiman, Tony; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Merlini, Giampaolo; Spencer, Andrew; Leleu, Xavier; Cavo, Michele; Munshi, Nikhil; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Durie, Brian G.M.; Roodman, G. David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the International Myeloma Working Group was to develop practice recommendations for the management of multiple myeloma (MM) –related bone disease. Methodology An interdisciplinary panel of clinical experts on MM and myeloma bone disease developed recommendations based on published data through August 2012. Expert consensus was used to propose additional recommendations in situations where there were insufficient published data. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were assigned and approved by panel members. Recommendations Bisphosphonates (BPs) should be considered in all patients with MM receiving first-line antimyeloma therapy, regardless of presence of osteolytic bone lesions on conventional radiography. However, it is unknown if BPs offer any advantage in patients with no bone disease assessed by magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Intravenous (IV) zoledronic acid (ZOL) or pamidronate (PAM) is recommended for preventing skeletal-related events in patients with MM. ZOL is preferred over oral clodronate in newly diagnosed patients with MM because of its potential antimyeloma effects and survival benefits. BPs should be administered every 3 to 4 weeks IV during initial therapy. ZOL or PAM should be continued in patients with active disease and should be resumed after disease relapse, if discontinued in patients achieving complete or very good partial response. BPs are well tolerated, but preventive strategies must be instituted to avoid renal toxicity or osteonecrosis of the jaw. Kyphoplasty should be considered for symptomatic vertebral compression fractures. Low-dose radiation therapy can be used for palliation of uncontrolled pain, impending pathologic fracture, or spinal cord compression. Orthopedic consultation should be sought for long-bone fractures, spinal cord compression, and vertebral column instability. PMID:23690408

  14. Does Group, Individual or Home Exercise Best Improve Mobility for People With Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed Central

    King, LA; Wilhelm, J; Chen, Y; Blehm, R; Nutt, J; Chen, Z; Serdar, A; Horak, FB

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Comparative studies of exercise interventions for people with Parkinson Disease (PD) rarely considered how one should deliver the intervention. The objective of this study was to compare the success of exercise when administered by 1) home exercise program, 2) individualized physical therapy, or 3) a group class. We examined if common comorbidities associated with PD impacted success of each intervention. Methods Fifty-eight people (age 63.9 ± 8) with PD participated. People were randomized into: 1) home exercise program 2) individual physical therapy or 3) group class intervention. All arms were standardized and based on the Agility Boot Camp exercise program for PD, 3 times per week for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the 7-item Physical Performance Test (PPT). Other measures of balance, gait, mobility, quality of life, balance confidence, depressions, apathy, self-efficacy and UPDRS motor and ADL scores were included. Results Only the individual group significantly improved in PPT. The individual exercise showed the most improvements in functional and balance measures, while the group class showed the most improvements in gait. The home exercise program improved the least across all outcomes. Several factors effected success, particularly for the home group. Discussion and Conclusions An unsupervised, home exercise program is the least effective way to deliver exercise to people with PD and individual and group exercises have differing benefits. Furthermore, people with PD who also have other comorbidities did better in a program directly supervised by a physical therapist. Video Abstract available for additional insights from the authors (See Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A112). PMID:26308937

  15. Analysis of Group ICA-Based Connectivity Measures from fMRI: Application to Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanshan; Eloyan, Ani; Joel, Suresh; Mostofsky, Stewart; Pekar, James; Bassett, Susan Spear; Caffo, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a powerful tool for the in vivo study of the pathophysiology of brain disorders and disease. In this manuscript, we propose an analysis stream for fMRI functional connectivity data and apply it to a novel study of Alzheimer's disease. In the first stage, spatial independent component analysis is applied to group fMRI data to obtain common brain networks (spatial maps) and subject-specific mixing matrices (time courses). In the second stage, functional principal component analysis is utilized to decompose the mixing matrices into population-level eigenvectors and subject-specific loadings. Inference is performed using permutation-based exact logistic regression for matched pairs data. The method is applied to a novel fMRI study of Alzheimer's disease risk under a verbal paired associates task. We found empirical evidence of alternative ICA-based metrics of connectivity when comparing subjects evidencing mild cognitive impairment relative to carefully matched controls. PMID:23226208

  16. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wang, Qing; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Ances, Beau M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Cash, Lisa A.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Klunk, William E.; Galasko, Douglas; Brickman, Adam M.; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M.; Thompson, Paul M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Fox, Nick C.; Förster, Stefan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Marcus, Daniel S.; Weiner, Michael W.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network (DIAN), an autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted. PMID:27010959

  17. Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease in Otherwise Healthy Infants: Failure of Specific Neonatal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Borghesi, Alessandro; Stronati, Mauro; Fellay, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Only a small proportion of newborn infants exposed to a pathogenic microorganism develop overt infection. Susceptibility to infection in preterm infants and infants with known comorbidities has a likely multifactorial origin and can be often attributed to the concurrence of iatrogenic factors, environmental determinants, underlying pathogenic processes, and probably genetic predisposition. Conversely, infection occurring in otherwise healthy full-term newborn infants is unexplained in most cases. Microbial virulence factors and the unique characteristics of the neonatal immune system only partially account for the interindividual variability in the neonatal immune responses to pathogens. We here suggest that neonatal infection occurring in otherwise healthy infants is caused by a failure of the specific protective immunity to the microorganism. To explain infection in term and preterm infants, we propose an extension of the previously proposed model of the genetic architecture of infectious diseases in humans. We then focus on group B streptococcus (GBS) disease, the best characterized neonatal infection, and outline the potential molecular mechanisms underlying the selective failure of the immune responses against GBS. In light of the recent discoveries of pathogen-specific primary immunodeficiencies and of the role of anticytokine autoantibodies in increasing susceptibility to specific infections, we hypothesize that GBS disease occurring in otherwise healthy infants could reflect an immunodeficiency caused either by rare genetic defects in the infant or by transmitted maternal neutralizing antibodies. These hypotheses are consistent with available epidemiological data, with clinical and epidemiological observations, and with the state of the art of neonatal physiology and disease. Studies should now be designed to comprehensively search for genetic or immunological factors involved in susceptibility to severe neonatal infections. PMID:28326082

  18. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 correlates with renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Barany, Peter; Yang, Lihong; Stenvinkel, Peter; Tracey, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with inflammation and malnutrition and carries a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB-1) is a 30-kDa nuclear and cytosolic protein known as a transcription and growth factor, recently identified as a proinflammatory mediator of tissue injury. Recent data implicates HMGB-1 in endotoxin lethality, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. The aim of this post-hoc, cross-sectional study was to determine whether HMGB-1 serum levels are elevated in CKD patients. The study groups were categorized as follows: 110 patients starting dialysis defined as CKD 5; 67 patients with moderately to severely reduced renal function or CKD 3-4; and 48 healthy controls. High-sensitivity C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), serum-albumin (S-albumin), hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), hemoglobin, subjective global nutritional assessment (SGA), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were analyzed. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare groups and Spearman's rank correlation test was used for continuous variables. HMGB-1, measured by Western blot, was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in CKD 5 (146.7 +/- 58.6 ng/mL) and CKD 3-4 (85.6 +/- 31.8) compared with controls (10.9 +/- 10.5). HMGB-1 levels were correlated positively with TNF (Rho = 0.52; P < 0.001), hs-CRP (Rho = 0.38; P < 0.001), IL-6 (Rho = 0.30; P < 0.001), HbA(1c) (Rho = 0.14; P = 0.02) and SGA (Rho = 0.21; P = 0.002) and negatively correlated with GFR (Rho = -0.69; P = 0.0001), Hb (Rho = -0.60; P < 0.001), S-albumin (Rho = -0.31; P < 0.001). The current study has revealed that HMGB-1 is elevated significantly in CKD patients and correlates with GFR as well as markers of inflammation and malnutrition. Future studies may delineate whether HMGB-1 is also a marker of disease activity and severity as well as a predictor of outcome in CKD.

  19. Tenth Technical Advisory Group (TAG) meeting on vaccine-preventable diseases.

    PubMed

    1992-04-01

    In march 1992, participants met in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil for the 10th Meeting of the PAHO Technical Advisory Group (TAG) on Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. Immunization coverage for all vaccines exceeded 75%. In 1991, only 9 confirmed cases of wild poliovirus occurred out of 4000 stool specimens examined. These cases were in Colombia and Peru. Many national immunization days and mop-up operations complement routine immunization services and have contributed greatly to interruption of the wild poliovirus in the Americas. Social mobilization efforts and mass media campaigns have increased coverage rates nationally and regionally. Surveillance efforts continue to improve. Almost 20,000 health units in Latin America report each week on the existence or nonexistence of acute flaccid paralysis cases. TAG continues to prefer the oral polio vaccine for the eradication program in the Americas. Participants discussed issues pertaining to certification of polio eradication. Measles incidence in the Americas is still falling and intervals between outbreaks are growing. Some countries in the English-speaking Caribbean using a month long, mass vaccination strategy have apparently interrupted measles transmission. Since measles causes more deaths than any other vaccine preventable disease, PAHO's TAG places it as the highest priority. The proportion of neonatal tetanus cases that are being investigated is growing (1991=8% and 1990=35%). Participants challenged Venezuela and Panama to vaccinate 100% of reproductive age women in high risk areas before the next meeting. Inadequate data on pertussis prevents PAHO from measuring any changes in pertussis epidemiology. Some countries have set up systems to monitor adverse events associated with vaccination. Participants agreed that member nations should begin hepatitis B vaccination programs for high risk groups.

  20. Evaluation of strategies for the control of canola and lupin seedling diseases caused by Rhizoctonia anastomosis groups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several methods with potential for the management of Rhizoctonia diseases of canola and lupin including several methods with potential for the management of Rhizoctonia plant resistance, fungicide seed treatment and biological control using binucleate Rhizoctonia anastomosis groups (AGs) were evalua...

  1. The Norwegian Voice Handicap Index (VHI-N) patient scores are dependent on voice-related disease group.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Tom; Heimdal, John-Helge; Grieg, Anne Rita Hella; Aarstad, Hans Jørgen

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine to what extent the Voice Handicap Index-Norwegian (VHI-N) is scored depending on specific laryngological disease. In a multi-center study, 126 healthy subjects and 355 patients with different voice-related diseases answered the VHI-N. The VHI-N scores showed high Cronbach's alpha. Analyses of variance were performed with VHI-N dependent and specific voice-related disease as independent variable, and showed highly significant dependence by group allocation (F(7,461) = 28.0; p < 0.001). When studying post hoc analyses secondary to this ANOVA analysis, we have shown that the control group scored lower than the entire patient groups (all p < 0.001) except the dysplasia group. Aphonic patients scored higher than all the other groups (all p < 0.001) except those with spasmodic dysphonia. The cancer patient group furthermore scored lower than patient groups with recurrent palsy, dysfunctional disease or spasmodic dysphonia (all p < 0.001). In addition, patients with recurrent palsy scored higher than patients with degenerative/inflammatory disease (p < 0.001). No influences of patient age, gender, or smoking were observed in the VHI-N scores. The VHI-N is a psychometrically well-functioning instrument, also at disease-specific levels and discriminates well between health and voice diseases, as well as between different voice-related diseases. The VHI-N may be recommended to be used when monitoring voice-related disease treatment.

  2. Classification of the cardiomyopathies: a position statement from the European Society Of Cardiology Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Perry; Andersson, Bert; Arbustini, Eloisa; Bilinska, Zofia; Cecchi, Franco; Charron, Philippe; Dubourg, Olivier; Kühl, Uwe; Maisch, Bernhard; McKenna, William J; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Pankuweit, Sabine; Rapezzi, Claudio; Seferovic, Petar; Tavazzi, Luigi; Keren, Andre

    2008-01-01

    In biology, classification systems are used to promote understanding and systematic discussion through the use of logical groups and hierarchies. In clinical medicine, similar principles are used to standardise the nomenclature of disease. For more than three decades, heart muscle diseases have been classified into primary or idiopathic myocardial diseases (cardiomyopathies) and secondary disorders that have similar morphological appearances, but which are caused by an identifiable pathology such as coronary artery disease or myocardial infiltration (specific heart muscle diseases). In this document, The European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases presents an update of the existing classification scheme. The aim is to help clinicians look beyond generic diagnostic labels in order to reach more specific diagnoses.

  3. An epidemiological study of coronary heart disease in different ethnic groups in Delhi urban population.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, N; Chadha, S L; Jain, P; Shekhawat, S; Tandon, R

    1995-01-01

    A community based epidemiologival survey of coronary heart disease (CHD) was carried out on a random urban sample of 13,560 adults of different ethnic groups in Delhi. CHD was diagnosed either on the basis of clinical history, supported by documentary evidence of treatment in hospital/home or on the ECG evidence in accordance with Minnesota Code. The prevalence rate of CHD on clinical basis per 1000 adults was the highest in Sikhs (47.3), lowest in Muslims (22.8) and identical in Hindus (31.8) and Christians (31.2). The prevalence rate/1000 of silent CHD on the basis of ECG was high in Muslims (89.5) and Sikhs (87.3), low in Christians (25.0) and intermediate in Hindus (60.0). The Sikhs showed the highest prevalence rate of myocardial infarct (MI) (15.5) and angina (AP) (31.8) compared to other communities. The prevalence rate of CHD on clinical basis was higher in males than females in all communities. The prevalence of silent CHD was higher in females in Hindus and Sikhs but in Muslims it was higher in men (94.8) than in women (85.2). The wide variations in prevalence rates of CHD in different ethnic groups cannot be explained satisfactorily on the basis of conventional risk factors and support the multifactorial etiological character of CHD.

  4. Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group: An Integrated Network for Congenital Heart Disease Research.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Sara K; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Farber, Gregory K; Bertoch, David; Blume, Elizabeth D; Burns, Kristin M; Campbell, Robert; Chang, Anthony C; Chung, Wendy K; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Curtis, Lesley H; Forrest, Christopher B; Gaynor, William J; Gaies, Michael G; Go, Alan S; Henchey, Paul; Martin, Gerard R; Pearson, Gail; Pemberton, Victoria L; Schwartz, Steven M; Vincent, Robert; Kaltman, Jonathan R

    2016-04-05

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a working group in January 2015 to explore issues related to an integrated data network for congenital heart disease research. The overall goal was to develop a common vision for how the rapidly increasing volumes of data captured across numerous sources can be managed, integrated, and analyzed to improve care and outcomes. This report summarizes the current landscape of congenital heart disease data, data integration methodologies used across other fields, key considerations for data integration models in congenital heart disease, and the short- and long-term vision and recommendations made by the working group.

  5. Internet-based preventive intervention for reducing eating disorder risk: A randomized controlled trial comparing guided with unguided self-help

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Andrea E.; Trockel, Mickey; Safer, Debra L.; Sinton, Meghan M.; Cunning, Darby; Rizk, Marianne T.; Genkin, Brooke H.; Weisman, Hannah L.; Bailey, Jakki O.; Jacobi, Corinna; Wilfley, Denise E.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2014-01-01

    Student Bodies, an internet-based intervention, has successfully reduced weight/shape concerns and prevented eating disorders in a subset of college-age women at highest risk for an eating disorder. Student Bodies includes an online, guided discussion group; however, the clinical utility of this component is unclear. This study investigated whether the guided discussion group improves program efficacy in reducing weight/shape concerns in women at high risk for an eating disorder. Exploratory analyses examined whether baseline variables predicted who benefitted most. Women with high weight/shape concerns (N=151) were randomized to Student Bodies with a guided discussion group (n=74) or no discussion group (n=77). Regression analyses showed weight/shape concerns were reduced significantly more among guided discussion group than no discussion group participants (p = 0.002; d = 0.52); guided discussion group participants had 67% lower odds of having high-risk weight/shape concerns post-intervention (p = 0.02). There were no differences in binge eating at post-intervention between the two groups, and no moderators emerged as significant. Results suggest the guided discussion group improves the efficacy of Student Bodies in reducing weight/shape concerns in college students at high risk for an eating disorder. PMID:25461783

  6. Genetic Stratification to Identify Risk Groups for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marioni, Riccardo E.; Campbell, Archie; Hagenaars, Saskia P.; Nagy, Reka; Amador, Carmen; Hayward, Caroline; Porteous, David J.; Visscher, Peter M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2017-01-01

    Stratification by genetic risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) may help identify groups with the greatest disease risk. Biological changes that cause late-onset AD are likely to occur years, if not decades prior to diagnosis. Here, we select a subset of the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study cohort in a likely preclinical age-range of 60–70 years (subset n = 3,495 with cognitive and genetic data). We test for cognitive differences by polygenic risk scores for AD. The polygenic scores are constructed using all available SNPs, excluding those within a 500 kb distance of the APOE locus. Additive and multiplicative effects of APOE status on these associations are investigated. Small memory decrements were observed in those with high polygenic risk scores for AD (standardized beta –0.04, p = 0.020). These associations were independent of APOE status. There was no difference in AD polygenic scores across APOE haplotypes (p = 0.72). Individuals with high compared to low polygenic risk scores for AD (top and bottom 5% of the distribution) show cognitive decrements, albeit much smaller than for APOE ɛ4ɛ4 compared to ɛ3ɛ3 individuals (2.3 versus 3.5 fewer points on the processing speed test, and 1.8 versus 2.8 fewer points on the memory test). Polygenic risk scores for AD may help identify older individuals at greatest risk of cognitive decline and preclinical AD. PMID:28222519

  7. Invasive aspergillosis. Disease spectrum, treatment practices, and outcomes. I3 Aspergillus Study Group.

    PubMed

    Patterson, T F; Kirkpatrick, W R; White, M; Hiemenz, J W; Wingard, J R; Dupont, B; Rinaldi, M G; Stevens, D A; Graybill, J R

    2000-07-01

    A review of representative cases of invasive aspergillosis was conducted to describe current treatment practices and outcomes. Eighty-nine physicians experienced with aspergillosis completed case forms on 595 patients with proven or probable invasive aspergillosis diagnosed using modifications of the Mycoses Study Group criteria. Pulmonary disease was present in 56%, with disseminated infection in 19%. The major risk factors for aspergillosis were bone marrow transplantation (32%) and hematologic malignancy (29%), but patients had a variety of underlying conditions including solid organ transplants (9%), AIDS (8%), and pulmonary diseases (9%). Overall, high antifungal failure rates occurred (36%), and complete antifungal responses were noted in only 27%. Treatment practices revealed that amphotericin B alone (187 patients) was used in most severely immunosuppressed patients while itraconazole alone (58 patients) or sequential amphotericin B followed by itraconazole (93 patients) was used in patients who were less immunosuppressed than patients receiving amphotericin B alone. Response rate for patients receiving amphotericin B alone was poor, with complete responses noted in only 25% and death due to or with aspergillosis in 65%. In contrast, patients receiving itraconazole alone or following amphotericin B had death due to or with Aspergillus in 26% and 36%, respectively. These results confirm that mortality from invasive aspergillosis in severely immunosuppressed patients remains high even with standard amphotericin B. Improved responses were seen in the less immunosuppressed patients receiving sequential amphotericin B followed by itraconazole and those receiving itraconazole alone. New approaches and new therapies are needed to improve the outcome of invasive aspergillosis in high-risk patients.

  8. Venous thromboembolism in Croatia – Croatian Cooperative Group for Hematologic Diseases (CROHEM) study

    PubMed Central

    Pulanić, Dražen; Gverić-Krečak, Velka; Nemet-Lojan, Zlatka; Holik, Hrvoje; Coha, Božena; Babok-Flegarić, Renata; Komljenović, Mili; Knežević, Dijana; Petrovečki, Mladen; Zupančić Šalek, Silva; Labar, Boris; Nemet, Damir

    2015-01-01

    Aim To analyze the incidence and characteristics of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in Croatia. Methods The Croatian Cooperative Group for Hematologic Diseases conducted an observational non-interventional study in 2011. Medical records of patients with newly diagnosed VTE hospitalized in general hospitals in 4 Croatian counties (Šibenik-Knin, Koprivnica-Križevci, Brod-Posavina, and Varaždin County) were reviewed. According to 2011 Census, the population of these counties comprises 13.1% of the Croatian population. Results There were 663 patients with VTE; 408 (61.54%) had deep vein thrombosis, 219 (33.03%) had pulmonary embolism, and 36 (5.43%) had both conditions. Median age was 71 years, 290 (43.7%) were men and 373 (56.3%) women. Secondary VTE was found in 57.3% of participants, idiopathic VTE in 42.7%, and recurrent VTE in 11.9%. There were no differences between patients with secondary VTE and patients with idiopathic VTE in disease recurrence and sex. The most frequent causes of secondary VTE were cancer (40.8%), and trauma, surgery, and immobilization (38.2%), while 42.9% patients with secondary VTE had ≥2 causes. There were 8.9% patients ≤45 years; 3.3% with idiopathic or recurrent VTE. Seventy patients (10.6%) died, more of whom had secondary (81.4%) than idiopathic (18.6%) VTE (P < 0.001), and in 50.0% VTE was the main cause of death. Estimated incidence of VTE in Croatia was 1.185 per 1000 people. Conclusion Characteristics of VTE in Croatia are similar to those reported in large international studies. Improved thromboprophylaxis during the presence of risk factors for secondary VTE might substantially lower the VTE burden. PMID:26718761

  9. Communication and Huntington's Disease: Qualitative Interviews and Focus Groups with Persons with Huntington's Disease, Family Members, and Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartelius, Lena; Jonsson, Maria; Rickeberg, Anneli; Laakso, Katja

    2010-01-01

    Background: As an effect of the cognitive, emotional and motor symptoms associated with Huntington's disease, communicative interaction is often dramatically changed. No study has previously included the subjective reports on this subject from individuals with Huntington's disease. Aims: To explore the qualitative aspects of how communication is…

  10. Low-molecular-weight heparin (Fragmin) during instability in coronary artery disease (FRISC). FRISC Study Group.

    PubMed

    Swahn, E; Wallentin, L

    1997-09-04

    This study evaluated whether the low-molecular-weight (LMW) heparin dalteparin sodium (Fragmin) had protective effects against cardiac events in aspirin-treated patients with unstable coronary artery syndromes. Patients (n = 1,506) with unstable angina or non-Q-wave myocardial infarction were randomized to double-blind, placebo-controlled treatment with LMW heparin. The treatment was given as subcutaneous injections: 120 U/kg body weight/12 hours during the first 5-7 days and 7,500 U once daily during the following 35-45 days. The primary endpoint, death or myocardial infarction after 6 days, showed a 3% (4.7%-1.7%) absolute and a 65% relative reduction in the LMW heparin group. There was a 6.8% (15.5%-8.7%) absolute and a 47% relative reduction of urgent revascularization or need for heparin or nitroglycerin infusions in combination with the primary endpoint. After 40 days there was an absolute reduction of death or myocardial infarction of 2.8% (10.7%-7.9%) and its combination with incapacitating angina was reduced by 5.9% (30.7%-24.8%). The survival analysis indicated a reactivation of the instability soon after lowering the dose at 5-7 days. With long-term follow-up, 3-4 months after termination of LMW heparin, the differences between groups were no longer statistically significant. However, the cumulative reduction in death, myocardial infarction, and revascularization because of incapacitating angina of 5.1% (25.3%-20.4%) was maintained. No cerebral and few major bleeds occurred. Compliance was adequate. Thus, subcutaneous LMW heparin protects against cardiac events in the acute phase of unstable coronary artery disease. The subcutaneous regimen also allows prolongation of treatment in the outpatient setting, which might maintain the initial benefits over a longer period.

  11. Screening for celiac disease in the general population and in high-risk groups

    PubMed Central

    Card, Timothy R; Kaukinen, Katri; Bai, Julio; Zingone, Fabiana; Sanders, David S; Murray, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) occurs in approximately 1% of the Western population. It is a lifelong disorder that is associated with impaired quality of life (QOL) and an excessive risk of comorbidity and death. Objectives To review the literature on screening for CD in relation to the current World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for mass screening. Methods We performed a PubMed search to identify indexed papers on CD screening with a publication date from 1900 until 1 June 2014. When we deemed an abstract relevant, we read the corresponding paper in detail. Results CD fulfills several WHO criteria for mass screening (high prevalence, available treatment and difficult clinical detection), but it has not yet been established that treatment of asymptomatic CD may reduce the excessive risk of severe complications, leading to higher QOL nor that it is cost-effective. Conclusions Current evidence is not sufficient to support mass screening for CD, but active case-finding may be appropriate, as we recognize that most patients with CD will still be missed by this strategy. Although proof of benefit is still lacking, screening for CD may be appropriate in high-risk groups. PMID:25922671

  12. Sing Your Lungs Out: a qualitative study of a community singing group for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Amanda; Aldington, Sarah; Williams, Gayle; Levack, William M M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the ways in which participation in a community singing group contributed to the health and well-being of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Design Qualitative description, based on transcripts from individual interviews and a focus group meeting with people with COPD participating in the singing group, regarding their experience. Setting Urban community, Wellington, New Zealand. Participants 23 people (13 women and 10 men), 51–91 years with COPD (21) or interstitial lung disease (2). Results The weekly singing group was a well-attended activity, with self-reported benefits to health and well-being. 4 key themes were identified: being in the ‘right space’, connection, purpose and growth, and participation in a meaningful physical activity. Conclusions This study helps us to better understand how participation in a community singing group can benefit the health and well-being of patients with COPD. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000736549; Results. PMID:27650768

  13. Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy Reduces Stress and Improves the Quality of Life in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hadinia, Anousha; Meyer, Antonia; Bruegger, Viviane; Hatz, Florian; Nowak, Karolina; Taub, Ethan; Nyberg, Elisabeth; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter; Fuhr, Peter; Gschwandtner, Ute

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to compare a cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBT) with a health enhancement program (HEP) for stress reduction and the impact on quality of life (QoL) in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Method: Thirty patients with PD participated in the study: 16 received CBT including stress-reducing elements and 14 took part in a HEP. The two groups did not differ significantly in their baseline demographic characteristics. The patients in both groups underwent weekly sessions of 2 h duration for 9 weeks. The Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire with 39 items (PDQ-39), the Burden Questionnaire for Parkinson’s Disease (translated from the original German: Belastungsfragebogen für Parkinsonpatienten (BELA) and the Disease-Related Questionnaire [Fragebogen zur krankheitsbezogenen Kommunikation (FKK)] were used for assessment. Ratings were completed at baseline and after 9 weeks (immediately after the last treatment session). Results: The patients in the CBT group achieved significantly better BELA, FKK and PDQ-39 scores (p < 0.05). Subscale analysis revealed that the scores on the BELA subscales “emotional well-being” and “somatic motor function” contributed significantly to stress reduction (p < 0.05). The FKK revealed significant improvement in social skills in the CBT group (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy appears to be an effective way for patients with PD to lessen stress and improve their quality of life. PMID:28101066

  14. Different Risk of Common Gastrointestinal Disease Between Groups Undergoing Hemodialysis or Peritoneal Dialysis or With Non-End Stage Renal Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Che; Hung, Shih-Yuan; Wang, Hsi-Hao; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Lin, Chi-Wei; Chang, Min-Yu; Ho, Li-Chun; Chen, Yi-Ting; Wu, Ching-Fang; Chen, Ho-Ching; Wang, Wei-Ming; Sung, Junne-Ming; Chiou, Yuan-Yow; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang

    2015-09-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is one type of renal replacement therapy, but potential peritoneal damage and gastrointestinal (GI) tract adverse effects during long-term exposure to bio-incompatible dialysate remain a concern. Although GI disease frequently occurs in dialysis patients, whether the risk of GI diseases differs among PD and hemodialysis (HD) or non-uremic groups is still uncertain.In this retrospective cohort study, data were obtained from the National Health Insurance Research Database, which includes almost all dialysis patients in Taiwan. Between 2000 and 2009, a total of 1791 PD and 8955 HD incident patients were enrolled and matched for age and sex or for propensity score. In addition, a comparison cohort of 8955 non-uremic patients was also selected. Individuals were monitored for the occurrence of common GI diseases until 2010, and data were analyzed using several different models.Generally speaking, the results showed that the risk of gastroesophageal reflux, intestinal obstruction or adhesions, and abdominal hernia was significantly higher in the PD group, whereas the risk of peptic ulcer disease and lower GI diverticula and bleeding was significantly greater in the HD group. Meanwhile, the risk of mesenteric ischemia, liver cirrhosis, and acute pancreatitis was higher in dialysis patients, but was not significantly different between the PD and HD groups; moreover, the risk of appendicitis in the PD group appeared to be lower than that in the HD group.In conclusion, dialysis patients have a higher risk of most common GI diseases, and PD and HD modalities are associated with different GI diseases.

  15. Costs of Neisseria meningitidis Group A Disease and Economic Impact of Vaccination in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Colombini, Anaïs; Trotter, Caroline; Madrid, Yvette; Karachaliou, Andromachi; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background. Five years since the successful introduction of MenAfriVac in a mass vaccination campaign targeting 1- to 29-year-olds in Burkina Faso, consideration must be given to the optimal strategies for sustaining population protection. This study aims to estimate the economic impact of a range of vaccination strategies in Burkina Faso. Methods. We performed a cost-of-illness study, comparing different vaccination scenarios in terms of costs to both households and health systems over a 26-year time horizon. These scenarios are (1) reactive vaccination campaign (baseline comparator); (2) preventive vaccination campaign; (3) routine immunization at 9 months; and (4) a combination of routine and an initial catchup campaign of children under 5. Costs were estimated from a literature review, which included unpublished programmatic documents and peer-reviewed publications. The future disease burden for each vaccination strategy was predicted using a dynamic transmission model of group A Neisseria meningitidis. Results. From 2010 to 2014, the total costs associated with the preventive campaign targeting 1- to 29-year-olds with MenAfriVac were similar to the estimated costs of the reactive vaccination strategy (approximately 10 million US dollars [USD]). Between 2015 and 2035, routine immunization with or without a catch-up campaign of 1- to 4-year-olds is cost saving compared with the reactive strategy, both with and without discounting costs and cases. Most of the savings are accrued from lower costs of case management and household costs resulting from a lower burden of disease. After the initial investment in the preventive strategy, 1 USD invested in the routine strategy saves an additional 1.3 USD compared to the reactive strategy. Conclusions. Prevention strategies using MenAfriVac will be significantly cost saving in Burkina Faso, both for the health system and for households, compared with the reactive strategy. This will protect households from

  16. Reinforcement learning and dopamine in schizophrenia: dimensions of symptoms or specific features of a disease group?

    PubMed

    Deserno, Lorenz; Boehme, Rebecca; Heinz, Andreas; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2013-12-23

    Abnormalities in reinforcement learning are a key finding in schizophrenia and have been proposed to be linked to elevated levels of dopamine neurotransmission. Behavioral deficits in reinforcement learning and their neural correlates may contribute to the formation of clinical characteristics of schizophrenia. The ability to form predictions about future outcomes is fundamental for environmental interactions and depends on neuronal teaching signals, like reward prediction errors. While aberrant prediction errors, that encode non-salient events as surprising, have been proposed to contribute to the formation of positive symptoms, a failure to build neural representations of decision values may result in negative symptoms. Here, we review behavioral and neuroimaging research in schizophrenia and focus on studies that implemented reinforcement learning models. In addition, we discuss studies that combined reinforcement learning with measures of dopamine. Thereby, we suggest how reinforcement learning abnormalities in schizophrenia may contribute to the formation of psychotic symptoms and may interact with cognitive deficits. These ideas point toward an interplay of more rigid versus flexible control over reinforcement learning. Pronounced deficits in the flexible or model-based domain may allow for a detailed characterization of well-established cognitive deficits in schizophrenia patients based on computational models of learning. Finally, we propose a framework based on the potentially crucial contribution of dopamine to dysfunctional reinforcement learning on the level of neural networks. Future research may strongly benefit from computational modeling but also requires further methodological improvement for clinical group studies. These research tools may help to improve our understanding of disease-specific mechanisms and may help to identify clinically relevant subgroups of the heterogeneous entity schizophrenia.

  17. A locus of group A Streptococcus involved in invasive disease and DNA transfer.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Grass, Carlos; Ravins, Miriam; Dan-Goor, Mary; Jaffe, Joseph; Moses, Allon E; Hanski, Emanuel

    2002-10-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes diseases ranging from benign to severe infections such as necrotizing fasciitis (NF). The reasons for the differences in severity of streptococcal infections are unexplained. We developed the polymorphic-tag-lengths-transposon-mutagenesis (PTTM) method to identify virulence genes in vivo. We applied PTTM on an emm14 strain isolated from a patient with NF and screened for mutants of decreased virulence, using a mouse model of human soft-tissue infection. A mutant that survived in the skin but was attenuated in its ability to reach the spleen and to cause a lethal infection was identified. The transposon was inserted into a small open reading frame (ORF) in a locus termed sil, streptococcal invasion locus. sil contains at least five genes (silA-E) and is highly homologous to the quorum-sensing competence regulons of Streptococcus pneumoniae. silA and silB encode a putative two-component system whereas silD and silE encode two putative ABC transporters. silC is a small ORF of unknown function preceded by a combox promoter. Insertion and deletion mutants of sil had a diminished lethality in the animal model. Virulence of a deletion mutant of silC was restored when injected together with the avirulent emm14-deletion mutant, but not when these mutants were injected into opposite flanks of a mouse. DNA transfer between these mutants occurred in vivo but could not account for the complementation of virulence. DNA exchange between the emm14-deletion mutant and mutants of sil occurred also in vitro, at a frequency of approximately 10-8 for a single antibiotic marker. Whereas silC and silD mutants exchanged markers with the emm14 mutant, silB mutant did not. Thus, we identified a novel locus, which controls GAS spreading into deeper tissues and could be involved in DNA transfer.

  18. Reinforcement Learning and Dopamine in Schizophrenia: Dimensions of Symptoms or Specific Features of a Disease Group?

    PubMed Central

    Deserno, Lorenz; Boehme, Rebecca; Heinz, Andreas; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Abnormalities in reinforcement learning are a key finding in schizophrenia and have been proposed to be linked to elevated levels of dopamine neurotransmission. Behavioral deficits in reinforcement learning and their neural correlates may contribute to the formation of clinical characteristics of schizophrenia. The ability to form predictions about future outcomes is fundamental for environmental interactions and depends on neuronal teaching signals, like reward prediction errors. While aberrant prediction errors, that encode non-salient events as surprising, have been proposed to contribute to the formation of positive symptoms, a failure to build neural representations of decision values may result in negative symptoms. Here, we review behavioral and neuroimaging research in schizophrenia and focus on studies that implemented reinforcement learning models. In addition, we discuss studies that combined reinforcement learning with measures of dopamine. Thereby, we suggest how reinforcement learning abnormalities in schizophrenia may contribute to the formation of psychotic symptoms and may interact with cognitive deficits. These ideas point toward an interplay of more rigid versus flexible control over reinforcement learning. Pronounced deficits in the flexible or model-based domain may allow for a detailed characterization of well-established cognitive deficits in schizophrenia patients based on computational models of learning. Finally, we propose a framework based on the potentially crucial contribution of dopamine to dysfunctional reinforcement learning on the level of neural networks. Future research may strongly benefit from computational modeling but also requires further methodological improvement for clinical group studies. These research tools may help to improve our understanding of disease-specific mechanisms and may help to identify clinically relevant subgroups of the heterogeneous entity schizophrenia. PMID:24391603

  19. Association between ABO Blood Group and Risk of Congenital Heart Disease: A 6-year large cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Bailing; You, Guoling; Fu, Qihua; Wang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    ABO blood group, except its direct clinical implications for transfusion and organ transplantation, is generally accepted as an effect factor for coronary heart disease, but the associations between ABO blood group and congenital heart disease (CHD) are not coherent by previous reports. In this study, we evaluated the the potential relationship between ABO blood group and CHD risk. In 39,042 consecutive inpatients (19,795 CHD VS 19,247 controls), we used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the roles of ABO blood group, gender, and RH for CHD. The associations between ABO blood group and CHD subgroups, were further evaluated using stratification analysis, adjusted by gender. A blood group demonstrated decreased risk for isolated CHD (OR 0.82; 95% CI, 0.78–0.87) in individuals with A blood group in the overall cohort analysis, and the finding was consistently replicated in independent subgroup analysis. ABO blood group may have a role for CHD, and this novel finding provides ABO blood group as a possible marker for CHD, but more studies need to be done. PMID:28211529

  20. ABO blood group system and the coronary artery disease: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Yang, Sheng-Hua; Xu, Hao; Li, Jian-Jun

    2016-03-18

    ABO blood group system, a well-known genetic risk factor, has clinically been demonstrated to be linked with thrombotic vascular diseases. However, the relationship between ABO blood group and coronary artery disease (CAD) is still controversial. We here performed an updated meta-analysis of the related studies and tried to elucidate the potential role of ABO blood group as a risk factor for CAD. All detectable case-control and cohort studies comparing the risk of CAD in different ABO blood groups were collected for this analysis through searching PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Ultimately, 17 studies covering 225,810 participants were included. The combined results showed that the risk of CAD was significantly higher in blood group A (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.26, p = 0.01) and lower in blood group O (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.94, p = 0.0008). Even when studies merely about myocardial infarction (MI) were removed, the risk of CAD was still significantly higher in blood group A (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.10, p = 0.03) and lower in blood group O (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85 to 0.93, p < 0.00001). This updated systematic review and meta-analysis indicated that both blood group A and non-O were the risk factors of CAD.

  1. Association between ABO Blood Group and Risk of Congenital Heart Disease: A 6-year large cohort study.

    PubMed

    Zu, Bailing; You, Guoling; Fu, Qihua; Wang, Jing

    2017-02-17

    ABO blood group, except its direct clinical implications for transfusion and organ transplantation, is generally accepted as an effect factor for coronary heart disease, but the associations between ABO blood group and congenital heart disease (CHD) are not coherent by previous reports. In this study, we evaluated the the potential relationship between ABO blood group and CHD risk. In 39,042 consecutive inpatients (19,795 CHD VS 19,247 controls), we used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the roles of ABO blood group, gender, and RH for CHD. The associations between ABO blood group and CHD subgroups, were further evaluated using stratification analysis, adjusted by gender. A blood group demonstrated decreased risk for isolated CHD (OR 0.82; 95% CI, 0.78-0.87) in individuals with A blood group in the overall cohort analysis, and the finding was consistently replicated in independent subgroup analysis. ABO blood group may have a role for CHD, and this novel finding provides ABO blood group as a possible marker for CHD, but more studies need to be done.

  2. Marital Discord and Coronary Artery Disease: A Comparison of Behaviorally Defined Discrete Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Timothy W.; Uchino, Bert N.; Berg, Cynthia A.; Florsheim, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Marital difficulties can confer risk of coronary heart disease, as in a study of outwardly healthy couples (T. W. Smith et al., 2011) where behavioral ratings of low affiliation and high control during marital disagreements were associated with asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). However, taxometric studies suggest that marital…

  3. Strategic plan for pediatric respiratory diseases research: an NHLBI working group report.

    PubMed

    Castro, Mario; Ramirez, Maria I; Gern, James E; Cutting, Garry; Redding, Greg; Hagood, James S; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Abman, Steve; Raj, J Usha; Barst, Robyn; Kato, Gregory J; Gozal, David; Haddad, Gabriel G; Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Gauda, Estelle; Martinez, Fernando D; Tepper, Robert; Wood, Robert E; Accurso, Frank; Teague, W Gerald; Venegas, Jose; Cole, F Sessions; Wright, Rosalind J

    2009-01-15

    The Division of Lung Diseases of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) recently held a workshop to identify gaps in our understanding and treatment of childhood lung diseases and to define strategies to enhance translational research in this field. Leading experts with diverse experience in both laboratory and patient-oriented research reviewed selected areas of pediatric lung diseases, including perinatal programming and epigenetic influences; mechanisms of lung injury, repair, and regeneration; pulmonary vascular disease; sleep and control of breathing; and the application of novel translational methods to enhance personalized medicine. This report summarizes the proceedings of this workshop and provides recommendations for emphasis on targeted areas for future investigation. The priority areas identified for research in pediatric pulmonary diseases included: (1) epigenetic and environmental influences on lung development that program pediatric lung diseases; (2) injury, regeneration, and repair in the developing lung; (3) pulmonary vascular disease in children; (4) development and adaptation of ventilatory responses to postnatal life; (5) nonatopic wheezing: aberrant large airway development or injury?; (6) strategies to improve assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric respiratory diseases; and (7) predictive and personalized medicine for children.

  4. Management goals for type 1 Gaucher disease: An expert consensus document from the European working group on Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Biegstraaten, M; Cox, T M; Belmatoug, N; Berger, M G; Collin-Histed, T; Vom Dahl, S; Di Rocco, M; Fraga, C; Giona, F; Giraldo, P; Hasanhodzic, M; Hughes, D A; Iversen, P O; Kiewiet, A I; Lukina, E; Machaczka, M; Marinakis, T; Mengel, E; Pastores, G M; Plöckinger, U; Rosenbaum, H; Serratrice, C; Symeonidis, A; Szer, J; Timmerman, J; Tylki-Szymańska, A; Weisz Hubshman, M; Zafeiriou, D I; Zimran, A; Hollak, C E M

    2016-10-24

    Gaucher Disease type 1 (GD1) is a lysosomal disorder that affects many systems. Therapy improves the principal manifestations of the condition and, as a consequence, many patients show a modified phenotype which reflects manifestations of their disease that are refractory to treatment. More generally, it is increasingly recognised that information as to how a patient feels and functions [obtained by patient- reported outcome measurements (PROMs)] is critical to any comprehensive evaluation of treatment. A new set of management goals for GD1 in which both trends are reflected is needed. To this end, a modified Delphi procedure among 25 experts was performed. Based on a literature review and with input from patients, 65 potential goals were formulated as statements. Consensus was considered to be reached when ≥75% of the participants agreed to include that specific statement in the management goals. There was agreement on 42 statements. In addition to the traditional goals concerning haematological, visceral and bone manifestations, improvement in quality of life, fatigue and social participation, as well as early detection of long-term complications or associated diseases were included. When applying this set of goals in medical practice, the clinical status of the individual patient should be taken into account.

  5. Consensus Statement on medication use in multiple sclerosis by the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group for demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    García-Merino, A; Fernández, O; Montalbán, X; de Andrés, C; Oreja-Guevara, C; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, A; Arbizu, T

    2013-01-01

    Treatments for multiple sclerosis therapy are rapidly evolving. It is believed that new drugs will be approved in the near future, thereby changing current indications for treatment. In this context, the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group on demyelinating diseases, which evaluates medication use in MS, has decided to draw up a consensus statement on the current indications and guidelines for multiple sclerosis treatment.

  6. Strategic plan for pediatric respiratory diseases research: an NHLBI working group report.

    PubMed

    Abman, Steve; Jobe, Alan; Chernick, Victor; Blaisdell, Carol; Castro, Mario; Ramirez, Maria I; Gern, James E; Cutting, Garry; Redding, Greg; Hagood, James S; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Abman, Steve; Raj, J Usha; Barst, Robyn; Kato, Gregory J; Gozal, David; Haddad, Gabriel G; Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Gauda, Estelle; Martinez, Fernando D; Tepper, Robert; Wood, Robert E; Accurso, Frank; Teague, W Gerald; Venegas, Jose; Cole, F Sessions; Wright, Rosalind J; Gail, Dorothy; Hamvas, Aaron; Kercsmar, Carolyn; Kiley, James; Weinmann, Gail

    2009-01-01

    The Division of Lung Diseases of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) recently held a workshop to identify gaps in our understanding and treatment of childhood lung diseases and to define strategies to enhance translational research in this field. Leading experts with diverse experience in both laboratory and patient-oriented research reviewed selected areas of pediatric lung diseases, including perinatal programming and epigenetic influences; mechanisms of lung injury, repair, and regeneration; pulmonary vascular disease (PVD); sleep and control of breathing; and the application of novel translational methods to enhance personalized medicine. This report summarizes the proceedings of this workshop and provides recommendations for emphasis on targeted areas for future investigation. The priority areas identified for research in pediatric pulmonary diseases included: (1) epigenetic and environmental influences on lung development that program pediatric lung diseases, (2) injury, regeneration, and repair in the developing lung, (3) PVD in children, (4) development and adaptation of ventilatory responses to postnatal life, (5) nonatopic wheezing: aberrant large airway development or injury? (6) strategies to improve assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric respiratory diseases, and (7) predictive and personalized medicine for children.

  7. Emerging Research Directions in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: A Report From an NHLBI/ACHA Working Group.

    PubMed

    Gurvitz, Michelle; Burns, Kristin M; Brindis, Ralph; Broberg, Craig S; Daniels, Curt J; Fuller, Stephanie M P N; Honein, Margaret A; Khairy, Paul; Kuehl, Karen S; Landzberg, Michael J; Mahle, William T; Mann, Douglas L; Marelli, Ariane; Newburger, Jane W; Pearson, Gail D; Starling, Randall C; Tringali, Glenn R; Valente, Anne Marie; Wu, Joseph C; Califf, Robert M

    2016-04-26

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect, affecting about 0.8% of live births. Advances in recent decades have allowed >85% of children with CHD to survive to adulthood, creating a growing population of adults with CHD. Little information exists regarding survival, demographics, late outcomes, and comorbidities in this emerging group, and multiple barriers impede research in adult CHD. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the Adult Congenital Heart Association convened a multidisciplinary working group to identify high-impact research questions in adult CHD. This report summarizes the meeting discussions in the broad areas of CHD-related heart failure, vascular disease, and multisystem complications. High-priority subtopics identified included heart failure in tetralogy of Fallot, mechanical circulatory support/transplantation, sudden cardiac death, vascular outcomes in coarctation of the aorta, late outcomes in single-ventricle disease, cognitive and psychiatric issues, and pregnancy.

  8. Heart disease education and prevention program targeting immigrant Latinos: using focus group responses to develop effective interventions.

    PubMed

    Moreno, C; Alvarado, M; Balcazar, H; Lane, C; Newman, E; Ortiz, G; Forrest, M

    1997-12-01

    Although research has provided considerable knowledge concerning the positive effects of behavioral change on morbidity and mortality from heart disease and related risk factors, some segments of the population have not benefited equitably from this information. In April 1995, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) conducted seven focus groups to determine knowledge and attitudes about heart disease and associated risk factors, identify media usage and preferences, and assess publications usage and preferences among Spanish-speaking Latino immigrants residing in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. This information was gathered to assist in the development of key messages and strategies for the NHLBI Latino Community Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Outreach Initiative, Salud para su Corazón--a heart disease prevention and education campaign. Findings from these focus groups indicate that Latinos may not benefit from heart disease prevention messages developed for the general population because of language and cultural differences. The researchers concluded that health education and disease prevention programs targeting the Latino community should develop educational materials and interventions that address language preferences and cultural values. Furthermore, to be effective, these programs should show people how to make positive behavioral changes based on their current circumstances, while remaining sensitive to the fact that Latino immigrants face major life adjustments and many are still greatly influenced by their country of origin.

  9. Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a telerehabilitation approach to group adapted tango instruction for people with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Katie J; Duncan, Ryan P; McNeely, Marie E; Hackney, Madeleine E; Earhart, Gammon M

    2016-09-13

    People with Parkinson disease (PD) demonstrate improvements in motor function following group tango classes, but report long commutes as a barrier to participation. To increase access, we investigated a telerehabilitation approach to group tango instruction. Twenty-six people with mild-to-moderate PD were assigned based on commute distance to either the telerehabilitation group (Telerehab) or an in-person instruction group (In-person). Both groups followed the same twice-weekly, 12-week curriculum with the same instructor. Feasibility metrics were participant retention, attendance and adverse events. Outcomes assessed were balance, PD motor sign severity and gait. Participant retention was 85% in both groups. Attendance was 87% in the Telerehab group and 84% in the In-person group. No adverse events occurred. Balance and motor sign severity improved significantly over time (p < 0.001) in both groups, with no significant group × time effects. Gait did not significantly change. Since a priori feasibility criteria were met or exceeded, and there were no notable outcome differences between the two instruction approaches, this pilot study suggests a telerehabilitation approach to group tango class for people with PD is feasible and may have similar outcomes to in-person instruction.

  10. Evaluating the Translation Process of an Internet-Based Self-Help Intervention for Prevention of Depression: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is common and treatable with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), for example. However, access to this therapy is limited. Internet-based interventions have been found to be effective in reducing symptoms of depression. The International Society for Research on Internet Interventions has highlighted the importance of translating effective Internet programs into multiple languages to enable worldwide dissemination. Objective The aim of the current study was to determine if it would be cost effective to translate an existing English-language Internet-based intervention for use in a non-English-speaking country. Methods This paper reports an evaluation of a trial in which a research group in Norway translated two English-language Internet-based interventions into Norwegian (MoodGYM and BluePages) that had previously been shown to reduce symptoms of depression. The translation process and estimates of the cost-effectiveness of such a translation process is described. Estimated health effect was found by using quality-adjusted life years (QALY). Results Conservative estimates indicate that for every 1000 persons treated, 16 QALYs are gained. The investment is returned 9 times and the cost-effectiveness ratio (CER) is 3432. The costs of the translation project totaled to approximately 27% of the estimated original English-language version development costs. Conclusions The economic analysis shows that the cost-effectiveness of the translation project was substantial. Hopefully, these results will encourage others to do similar analyses and report cost-effectiveness data in their research reports. PMID:23343481

  11. Motivational support provided via email improves the effectiveness of internet-delivered self-help treatment for insomnia: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lancee, Jaap; van den Bout, Jan; Sorbi, Marjolijn J; van Straten, Annemieke

    2013-12-01

    Internet-delivered treatment is effective for insomnia, but little is known about the beneficial effects of support. The aim of the current study was to investigate the additional effects of low-intensity support to an internet-delivered treatment for insomnia. Two hundred and sixty-two participants were randomized to an internet-delivered intervention for insomnia with (n = 129) or without support (n = 133). All participants received an internet-delivered cognitive behavioral treatment for insomnia. In addition, the participants in the support condition received weekly emails. Assessments were at baseline, post-treatment, and 6-month follow-up. Both groups effectively ameliorated insomnia complaints. Adding support led to significantly higher effects on most sleep measures (d = 0.3-0.5; p < 0.05), self-reported insomnia severity (d = 0.4; p < 0.001), anxiety, and depressive symptoms (d = 0.4; p < 0.01). At the 6-month follow-up, these effects remained significant for sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, insomnia symptoms, and depressive symptoms (d = 0.3-0.5; p < 0.05). Providing support significantly enhances the benefits of internet-delivered treatment for insomnia on several variables. It appears that motivational feedback increases the effect of the intervention and encourages more participants to complete the intervention, which in turn improves its effectiveness.

  12. Web-based self-help intervention reduces alcohol consumption in both heavy-drinking and dependent alcohol users: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Andrade, André Luiz Monezi; de Lacerda, Roseli Boerngen; Gomide, Henrique Pinto; Ronzani, Telmo Mota; Sartes, Laisa Marcorela Andreoli; Martins, Leonardo Fernandes; Bedendo, André; Souza-Formigoni, Maria Lucia Oliveira

    2016-12-01

    As part of a multicenter project supported by the World Health Organization, we developed a web-based intervention to reduce alcohol use and related problems. We evaluated the predictors of adherence to, and the outcomes of the intervention. Success was defined as a reduction in consumption to low risk levels or to <50% of the baseline levels of number of drinks. From the 32,401 people who accessed the site, 3389 registered and 929 completed the full Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), a necessary condition to be considered eligible to take part in the intervention. Based on their AUDIT scores, these participants were classified into: low risk users (LRU; n=319) harmful/hazardous users (HHU; n=298) or suggestive of dependence users (SDU; n=312). 29.1% of the registered users (LRU=42; HHU=90; SDU=82) completed the evaluation form at the end of the six-week period, and 63.5% reported low-risk drinking levels. We observed a significant reduction in alcohol consumption in the HHU (62.5%) and SDU (64.5%) groups in relation to baseline. One month after the intervention, in the follow-up, 94 users filled out the evaluation form, and their rate of success was similar to the one observed in the previous evaluation. Logistic regression analyses indicated that HHU participants presented higher adherence than LRU. Despite a relatively low adherence to the program, its good outcomes and low cost, as well as the high number of people that can be reached by a web-based intervention, suggest it has good cost-effectiveness.

  13. Patients’ experiences of a computerised self-help program for treating depression – a qualitative study of Internet mediated cognitive behavioural therapy in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Holst, Anna; Nejati, Shabnam; Björkelund, Cecilia; Eriksson, Maria C. M.; Hange, Dominique; Kivi, Marie; Wikberg, Carl; Petersson, Eva-Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore primary care patients’ experiences of Internet mediated cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) depression treatment. Design Qualitative study. Data were collected from focus group discussions and individual interviews. Setting Primary care. Method Data were analysed by systematic text condensation by Malterud. Subjects Thirteen patients having received iCBT for depression within the PRIM-NET study. Main outcome measures Analysis presented different aspects of patients’ experiences of iCBT. Results The informants described a need for face-to-face meetings with a therapist. A therapist who performed check-ups and supported the iCBT process seemed important. iCBT implies that a responsibility for the treatment is taken by the patient, and some patients felt left alone, while others felt well and secure. This was a way to work in privacy and freedom with a smoothly working technology although there was a lack of confidence and a feeling of risk regarding iCBT. Conclusion iCBT is an attractive alternative to some patients with depression in primary care, but not to all. An individual treatment design seems to be preferred, and elements of iCBT could be included as a complement when treating depression in primary care. Such a procedure could relieve the overall treatment burden of depression. Key points Internet mediated cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) can be effective in treating depression in primary care, but patients’ experiences of iCBT are rarely studied Most patients express a need for human contact, real-time interaction, dialogue and guidance when treated for depression.The patient’s opportunity to influence the practical circumstances about iCBT is a success factor, though this freedom brings a large responsibility upon the receiver.An individual treatment design seems to be crucial, and elements of iCBT could be included as a complement to face-to-face meetings. PMID:28277055

  14. Climate change and infectious diseases in the Arctic: establishment of a circumpolar working group

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Alan J.; Evengard, Birgitta; Semenza, Jan C.; Ogden, Nicholas; Børresen, Malene L.; Berner, Jim; Brubaker, Michael; Sjöstedt, Anders; Evander, Magnus; Hondula, David M.; Menne, Bettina; Pshenichnaya, Natalia; Gounder, Prabhu; Larose, Tricia; Revich, Boris; Hueffer, Karsten; Albihn, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The Arctic, even more so than other parts of the world, has warmed substantially over the past few decades. Temperature and humidity influence the rate of development, survival and reproduction of pathogens and thus the incidence and prevalence of many infectious diseases. Higher temperatures may also allow infected host species to survive winters in larger numbers, increase the population size and expand their habitat range. The impact of these changes on human disease in the Arctic has not been fully evaluated. There is concern that climate change may shift the geographic and temporal distribution of a range of infectious diseases. Many infectious diseases are climate sensitive, where their emergence in a region is dependent on climate-related ecological changes. Most are zoonotic diseases, and can be spread between humans and animals by arthropod vectors, water, soil, wild or domestic animals. Potentially climate-sensitive zoonotic pathogens of circumpolar concern include Brucella spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella spp., Clostridium botulinum, Francisella tularensis, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bacillus anthracis, Echinococcus spp., Leptospira spp., Giardia spp., Cryptosporida spp., Coxiella burnetti, rabies virus, West Nile virus, Hantaviruses, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. PMID:25317383

  15. Climate change and infectious diseases in the Arctic: establishment of a circumpolar working group.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Alan J; Evengard, Birgitta; Semenza, Jan C; Ogden, Nicholas; Børresen, Malene L; Berner, Jim; Brubaker, Michael; Sjöstedt, Anders; Evander, Magnus; Hondula, David M; Menne, Bettina; Pshenichnaya, Natalia; Gounder, Prabhu; Larose, Tricia; Revich, Boris; Hueffer, Karsten; Albihn, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The Arctic, even more so than other parts of the world, has warmed substantially over the past few decades. Temperature and humidity influence the rate of development, survival and reproduction of pathogens and thus the incidence and prevalence of many infectious diseases. Higher temperatures may also allow infected host species to survive winters in larger numbers, increase the population size and expand their habitat range. The impact of these changes on human disease in the Arctic has not been fully evaluated. There is concern that climate change may shift the geographic and temporal distribution of a range of infectious diseases. Many infectious diseases are climate sensitive, where their emergence in a region is dependent on climate-related ecological changes. Most are zoonotic diseases, and can be spread between humans and animals by arthropod vectors, water, soil, wild or domestic animals. Potentially climate-sensitive zoonotic pathogens of circumpolar concern include Brucella spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella spp., Clostridium botulinum, Francisella tularensis, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bacillus anthracis, Echinococcus spp., Leptospira spp., Giardia spp., Cryptosporida spp., Coxiella burnetti, rabies virus, West Nile virus, Hantaviruses, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses.

  16. At the bedside: the emergence of group 2 innate lymphoid cells in human disease.

    PubMed

    Peebles, R Stokes

    2015-03-01

    ILC2s have been primarily identified at environmental-mucosal interfaces and can be activated quickly by environmental antigens and pathogens to produce large quantities of IL-5 and IL-13. As a result of the production of these cytokines, ILC2s have been implicated in the host response to allergens, viruses, and parasites. However, the exact role of ILC2s in any human disease state is presently unknown, as specifically eliminating these cells is not possible, given that potentially targetable cell-surface markers are shared with other immune cells. Likewise, selectively and completely inhibiting ILC2 activation is also not currently possible, as several activating cytokines, IL-25, IL-33, and TSLP, act in redundancy or are not specific for ILC2 stimulation. Therefore, at this point, we can only identify the relative abundance of ILC2s in organs and tissue identified as being involved in specific diseases, and the contribution of ILC2s in human disease can only be inferred from mouse studies. Given these limitations, in this article, we will review the studies that have examined the presence of ILC2s in human disease states and speculate on their possible role in disease pathogenesis. The intent of the review is to identify priority areas for basic research based on clinical research insights.

  17. Costs and benefits of group living with disease: a case study of pneumonia in bighorn lambs (Ovis canadensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manlove, Kezia R.; Cassirer, E. Frances; Cross, Paul C.; Plowright, Raina K.; Hudson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Group living facilitates pathogen transmission among social hosts, yet temporally stable host social organizations can actually limit transmission of some pathogens. When there are few between-subpopulation contacts for the duration of a disease event, transmission becomes localized to subpopulations. The number of per capita infectious contacts approaches the subpopulation size as pathogen infectiousness increases. Here, we illustrate that this is the case during epidemics of highly infectious pneumonia in bighorn lambs (Ovis canadensis). We classified individually marked bighorn ewes into disjoint seasonal subpopulations, and decomposed the variance in lamb survival to weaning into components associated with individual ewes, subpopulations, populations and years. During epidemics, lamb survival varied substantially more between ewe-subpopulations than across populations or years, suggesting localized pathogen transmission. This pattern of lamb survival was not observed during years when disease was absent. Additionally, group sizes in ewe-subpopulations were independent of population size, but the number of ewe-subpopulations increased with population size. Consequently, although one might reasonably assume that force of infection for this highly communicable disease scales with population size, in fact, host social behaviour modulates transmission such that disease is frequency-dependent within populations, and some groups remain protected during epidemic events.

  18. [The Saint-Petersburg summit of Group of Eight: the problems of infectious diseases and the ways of their solution].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, being the presiding country at the Group of Eight Summit for the first time, Russia proposed the issue of counteraction with infectious diseases as one of the priority issues. In addition to the realization of the priority National Health Project, which is to a large degree dedicated to the immunoprophylaxis of infectious diseases as well as the prevention and treatment of HIV-infection/AIDS and hepatites B and C, a meeting of the Presidium of Russian Federation State Council presided by President V. V. Putin, dedicated to the problem of HIV-infection epidemic spread, was held on April 21; the meeting resulted in the formation of Governmental Commission on the problems of HIV-infection/AIDS. On July 16, the leaders of Group of Eight during their meeting in Saint-Petersburg, discussed and validated the Declaration on counteraction with infectious diseases, reflecting the position of the leaders on the entire complex of problems connected with the spread of infectious diseases, and determining the main principles of the global strategy of counteraction with epidemics under the threats associated with the appearance of new infections, such as avian influenza, HIV-infection/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. While preparing for the Summit, Russia made a range of suggestion aimed mostly on the reinforcement of possibilities to control infectious diseases in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Practically all Russia's initiatives were supported by the partners, which was also reflected in the conclusive document of the Summit. Following Russian initiatives, Group of Eight intends to increase the effectiveness of international affords on the prevention and elimination of the consequences of natural disasters, including the use of fast response teams. To provide Russia's contribution to this initiative, modernized specialized antiepidemic teams will be used. Taking into consideration the present-day financial participation of Russian Federation in the realization of

  19. Urinary sodium to potassium ratio and urinary stone disease. The Gubbio Population Study Research Group.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, M; Laurenzi, M; Panarelli, W; Stamler, J

    1994-10-01

    The relation was investigated of urinary sodium to potassium ratio in first morning voided urine (spot urine) to urinary stone disease in 3,625 men and women aged 25 to 74 years participating in the baseline examination of the Gubbio Population Study. History of urinary stone disease (excretion of stone, and/or radiographic or ultrasonic evidence of urinary stone, and/or operation for urinary stone removal) was reported by 127 individuals (3.50%). Prevalence of urinary stone disease was lower in women than in men (2.59 and 4.58%, P < 0.001) and positively related to age (P < 0.001). Compared to nonstone formers, stone formers (N = 127) had higher urinary sodium to potassium ratio (P < 0.01), with similar plasma potassium and sodium concentration. In both sexes, urinary stone disease was positively related (P < 0.001) to sodium to potassium ratio: quartile analysis of this ratio showed that prevalence of stone formers in quartile 4 compared to quartile 1 was 3.33 times higher in women (P < 0.005, 95% confidence interval 1.36/8.60) and 2.71 times higher in men (P < 0.004, 95% confidence interval 1.35/5.93). In multiple logistic regression, urinary stone disease was significantly related to age, sex, and urinary sodium to potassium ratio (P < 0.01), controlled for other possible confounders, with or without exclusion of stone formers with plasma creatinine > 1.20 mg/dl. In an alternative model, with urinary sodium to potassium ratio not included, urinary stone disease was positively related to urinary sodium to creatinine ratio (P < 0.001) and weakly (P = 0.079) related inversely to urinary potassium to creatinine ratio.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. ABO blood group system and the coronary artery disease: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo; Yang, Sheng-Hua; Xu, Hao; Li, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    ABO blood group system, a well-known genetic risk factor, has clinically been demonstrated to be linked with thrombotic vascular diseases. However, the relationship between ABO blood group and coronary artery disease (CAD) is still controversial. We here performed an updated meta-analysis of the related studies and tried to elucidate the potential role of ABO blood group as a risk factor for CAD. All detectable case-control and cohort studies comparing the risk of CAD in different ABO blood groups were collected for this analysis through searching PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Ultimately, 17 studies covering 225,810 participants were included. The combined results showed that the risk of CAD was significantly higher in blood group A (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.26, p = 0.01) and lower in blood group O (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.94, p = 0.0008). Even when studies merely about myocardial infarction (MI) were removed, the risk of CAD was still significantly higher in blood group A (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.10, p = 0.03) and lower in blood group O (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85 to 0.93, p < 0.00001). This updated systematic review and meta-analysis indicated that both blood group A and non-O were the risk factors of CAD. PMID:26988722

  1. The Rare Bone Disease Working Group: report from the 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Drake, Matthew T; Collins, Michael T; Hsiao, Edward C

    2017-01-20

    A working group on rare bone diseases was held in Atlanta, Georgia as part of the 2016 annual meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. The meeting was organized by Matthew Drake. Given recent advances in our understanding of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), the initial portion of the program was devoted to basic, translational, and clinical aspects of FOP. The remainder of the program was divided into updates on an array of rare bone diseases as detailed below. In total, there were more than 120 scientists from academia and industry in attendance.

  2. Guided internet-administered self-help to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression among adolescents and young adults diagnosed with cancer during adolescence (U-CARE: YoungCan): a study protocol for a feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    Ander, Malin; Wikman, Anna; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Grönqvist, Helena; Ljungman, Gustaf; Woodford, Joanne; Lindahl Norberg, Annika; von Essen, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A subgroup of adolescents and young adults diagnosed with cancer during adolescence reports elevated levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms and unmet needs for psychological support. Evidence-based psychological treatments tailored for this population are lacking. This protocol describes a feasibility study of a guided-internet-administered self-help programme (YoungCan) primarily targeting symptoms of anxiety and depression among young persons diagnosed with cancer during adolescence and of the planned study procedures for a future controlled trial. Methods/analysis The study is an uncontrolled feasibility trial with a pre-post and 3-month follow-up design. Potential participants aged 15–25 years, diagnosed with cancer during adolescence, will be identified via the Swedish Childhood Cancer Registry. 30 participants will be included. Participants will receive YoungCan, a 12-week therapist-guided, internet-administered self-help programme consisting primarily of cognitive–behavioural therapy organised into individually assigned modules targeting depressive symptoms, worry and anxiety, body dissatisfaction and post-traumatic stress. Interactive peer support and psychoeducative functions are also available. Feasibility outcomes include: recruitment and eligibility criteria; data collection; attrition; resources needed to complete the study and programme; safety procedures; participants' and therapists' adherence to the programme; and participants' acceptability of the programme and study methodology. Additionally, mechanisms of impact will be explored and data regarding symptoms of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress, body dissatisfaction, reactions to social interactions, quality of life, axis I diagnoses according to the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview and healthcare service use will be collected. Exploratory analyses of changes in targeted outcomes will be conducted. Ethics/dissemination This feasibility protocol was

  3. [Educative program about sexuality and sexually transmitted diseases: experience report with a group of adolescents].

    PubMed

    Souza, Márcia M; Brunini, Sandra; Almeida, Nilza A M; Munari, Denize B

    2007-01-01

    The object of this study was to give an account of the experiment with a teenage group by using sexual education experiences of their own. Ten workshops were made with low-income teenagers of Município de Aparecida de Goiânia /GO, which happened because of the socialization and reflections about the contents of this study. The work was based on Paulo Freire's Participative Methodology and made better by the attention of the coordinators to every single group, considering their special needs and possibilities. We conclude that for the success of this work, the coordinator must listen to the group with a very sensitive prospect, especially when dealing with a teenage group. It is necessary to stimulate the participation, so that more can be learnt and the citizen work can be able to change its social reality.

  4. A Group Intervention Model for Speech and Communication Skills in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Initial Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manor, Yael; Posen, Jennie; Amir, Ofer; Dori, Nechama; Giladi, Nir

    2005-01-01

    Various speech and voice disorders affect 70% to 85% of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Speech treatment is generally conducted on an individual basis, with family member involvement. Clinical experience indicates that many patients do not practice treatments at home or apply the learned techniques in everyday situations. An…

  5. Project CARE: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Behavioral Intervention Group for Alzheimer's Disease Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonyea, Judith G.; O'Connor, Maureen K.; Boyle, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with Alzheimer's disease are a major contributor to caregiver distress and burden. Despite recent efforts to teach caregivers skills to manage neuropsychiatric symptoms and reduce burden, there continues to be limited evidence that these strategies have helped caregivers of individuals with…

  6. An investigation of long-term effects of group music therapy on agitation levels of people with Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ledger, Alison J; Baker, Felicity A

    2007-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the long-term effects of group music therapy on agitation manifested by nursing home residents with Alzheimer's disease. A non-randomised experimental design was employed with one group receiving weekly music therapy (n = 26) and another group receiving standard nursing home care (n = 19). Agitation levels were measured five times over one year using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (Cohen-Mansfield, J. (1989). Agitation in the elderly. In N. Billig & P. V. Rabins (Eds.), Issues in geriatric psychiatry (pp. 101-113). Basel, Switzerland: Karger). Although music therapy participants showed short-term reductions in agitation, there were no significant differences between the groups in the range, frequency, and severity of agitated behaviours manifested over time. Multiple measures of treatment efficacy are necessary to better understand the long-term effects music therapy programs have on this population.

  7. What does "a gene for heart disease" mean? A focus group study of public understandings of genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bates, Benjamin R; Templeton, Alan; Achter, Paul J; Harris, Tina M; Condit, Celeste M

    2003-06-01

    There is growing concern in the medical community about potential genetic determinism in the patient population. Limited information about the public understanding of genetic factors in disease formation is available. To access public perceptions of potentially deterministic phrasing of genetic risk factors, we sought to establish interpretations of the phrase, "a gene for heart disease." Focus groups in urban, suburban, and rural communities were conducted from July through October, 2001 in Georgia. A total of 108 participants were recruited. Participants were recruited to balance sex and racial representation. We used three outcome measures for participants understandings of the phrase: (1) participants' statements of the meaning of the phrase; (2) the level of determinism assigned to genetic factors by participants; and (3) participant reports of the health consequences of having "a gene for heart disease." Participants did not report a single interpretation of the phrase. There were dominant participant interpretations under each outcome measure: (1) "a gene for heart disease" was interpreted as meaning genetic and environmental factors both played roles in disease formation; (2) genetic predisposition was perceived as heightened, not absolute, risk; (3) the perceived health impact was a greater risk of becoming sick. Minority interpretations were found under each measure. Overall, naming "a gene for heart disease" does not appear to have a deterministic impact on a plurality of participants' perceptions of risks associated with genetic factors. Genetic fatalism in patient populations may be confined to a sizable minority. Important considerations for provider intervention and patient education are indicated.

  8. Evaluation of an Ecologically Valid Group Intervention to Address Sleep Health in Families of Children With Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Lisa J.; Booster, Genery D.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep issues in children with allergic diseases may be a result of illness related factors (e.g., itching, wheezing) and/or poor sleep habits due to disrupted routines and parental permissiveness. However, the ability of parents to attend a multi-session sleep intervention may be limited. Thus we examined the validity of a one-time sleep health group intervention for parents of children with allergic diseases. Ninety-three parents of children who were admitted to a two-week intensive day hospital treatment program completed measures of child sleep habits (Children’s Report of Sleep Patterns), parent sleep habits (Sleep Hygiene Inventory), parent sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and parental insomnia symptoms (Insomnia Severity Index) before the group intervention and one-month after program discharge; 54 parents attended the sleep health group. Sleep habits and sleep quality improved for both parents and children at the one-month follow-up. However, improvements were seen regardless of group attendance. Potential reasons for the lack of difference between those who did and did not participate in group are presented, and implications of this study for pediatric psychologist in practice are discussed. PMID:28083466

  9. Dermatological disease in the older age group: a cross-sectional study in aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Maneka S; Vandal, Alain C; Jarrett, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of dermatological disease in aged care facilities, and the relationship between cognitive or physical disability and significant disease. Setting 2 large aged care facilities in Auckland, New Zealand, each providing low and high level care. Participants All 161 residents of the facilities were invited to participate. The only exclusion criterion was inability to obtain consent from the individual or designated guardian. 88 participants were recruited—66 females (75%), 22 males (25%) with average age 87.1 years (SD 5.5 years). Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary—presence of significant skin disease (defined as that which in the opinion of the investigators needed treatment or was identified as a patient concern) diagnosed clinically on full dermatological examination by a dermatologist or dermatology trainee. Secondary—functional and cognitive status (Rehabilitation Complexity Scale and Abbreviated Mental Test Score). Results 81.8% were found to have at least one significant condition. The most common disorders were onychomycosis 42 (47.7%), basal cell carcinoma 13 (14.8%), asteototic eczema 11 (12.5%) and squamous cell carcinoma in situ 9 (10.2%). Other findings were invasive squamous cell carcinoma 7 (8%), bullous pemphigoid 2 (2.3%), melanoma 2 (2.3%), lichen sclerosus 2 (2.3%) and carcinoma of the breast 1 (1.1%). Inflammatory disease was more common in those with little physical disability compared with those with serious physical disability (OR 3.69; 95% CI 1.1 to 12.6, p=0.04). No significant association was found between skin disease and cognitive impairment. Conclusions A high rate of dermatological disease was found. Findings ranged from frequent but not life-threatening conditions (eg, onychomycosis), to those associated with a significant morbidity (eg, eczema, lichen sclerosus and bullous pemphigoid), to potentially life-threatening (eg, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma and breast cancer

  10. [Chagas disease in France: estimated number of infected persons and cardiac diseases in 2009, by risk groups].

    PubMed

    Dejour Salamanca, D; La Ruche, G; Tarantola, A; Degail, M A; Jeannel, D; Gastellu-Etchegorry, M

    2009-12-01

    An estimation of the number of Trypanosoma cruzi infected individuals and expected number of Chagasic cardiomyopathies in France (excluding French Guyana) was conducted in June, 2009 by InVS. Different risk groups were identified: Latino-Americans (LA) from endemic area (naturalized, legal and illegal migrants, adopted children), children born from LA's mother, French Guyanese living in Metropolitan France, expatriated and travellers from endemic countries. Prevalence rates by country of origin were applied to official data on risk populations obtained from the International Adoption Agency, Tourism Direction and French ministries (Finances, Foreign Affairs and Migrations). Around 157,000 individuals were potentially exposed. It is estimated than 1,464 [895-2,619] are infected by T. cruzi, of which 63 to 555 may evolve towards a chronic cardiomyopathy. This figure is within the range of earlier estimations of InVS and Guerri-Guttenberg. Taking into account illegal immigrants, the expected number of infected individuals in France should increase greatly this estimation.

  11. D-dimer levels in maintenance hemodialysis patients: High prevalence of positive values also in the group without predisposing diseases.

    PubMed

    Gubensek, Jakob; Lolic, Matea; Ponikvar, Rafael; Buturovic-Ponikvar, Jadranka

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to estimate the prevalence of elevated D-dimer levels in all chronic hemodialysis patients and those without additional disease, and to identify factors associated with increased D-dimer. In 167 chronic hemodialysis patients from our center, D-dimer was measured before dialysis. The effects of age, C-reactive protein (CRP), recent acute illness, vascular access, anticoagulation type, dialysis vintage, and chronic diseases, considered to predispose for increased D-dimer levels, were analyzed. The median D-dimer in the whole group was 966 (inter-quartile range [IQR] 524-1947) μg/L and was positive (>500 μg/L) in 75% of cases. D-dimer was positive in 91% of patients with acute illness, 76% of those with predisposing chronic diseases, but was still positive in 52% of patients without additional disease (i.e., acute illness or predisposing chronic diseases) - median D-dimer was 538.5 (IQR 359-966) μg/L. D-dimer was correlated to patients' age, but not dialysis vintage. In univariate analysis, the D-dimer levels were significantly higher in patients with atrial fibrillation, ischemic heart disease, recent acute illness, increased CRP, dialyzed over a catheter, and on citrate anticoagulation. Multivariate logistic regression showed that only age >65 years (odds ratio [OR] 2.93), catheter (OR 4.86), and positive CRP (OR 4.07) were independently associated with positive D-dimer at 500 μg/L cut-off, while the significance of age disappeared at 2000 μg/L cut-off. To conclude, the high prevalence of positive D-dimer values even in hemodialysis patients without additional disease limits the use of D-dimer for exclusion of thromboembolic diseases in hemodialysis patients.

  12. A Sharing Experience: Development of a Group for Families Affected by HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melvin, Diane; Appleby, Sue

    1995-01-01

    Describes the establishment and development of a support group for the parents of children infected and/or affected by HIV infection. The group is hospital-based, meeting monthly since April 1992, facilitated by professionals but with a self-help and peer support emphasis. Explains the planning, setting, and running of the group. Identifies…

  13. Group A Streptococcus: a re-emergent pathogen. Infectious Diseases and Immunization Committee, Canadian Paediatric Society.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Rheumatic fever is still rare in North America but must continue to be considered in the appropriate clinical setting. Invasive or severe GABHS disease remains unusual and is unlikely to be missed by the practitioner; however, it is essential that GABHS infection be considered as a possible cause of a severe sepsis-like syndrome. Currently the routine management of GABHS infection is unchanged; however, heightened awareness of the infection's rare, more serious complications is needed. PMID:8500028

  14. Singing in groups for Parkinson's disease (SING-PD): a pilot study of group singing therapy for PD-related voice/speech disorders.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ludy C; Piel, Jordan; Warren, Amanda; Kraics, Lauren; Silver, Althea; Vanderhorst, Veronique; Simon, David K; Tarsy, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Parkinson's disease related speech and voice impairment have significant impact on quality of life measures. LSVT(®)LOUD voice and speech therapy (Lee Silverman Voice Therapy) has demonstrated scientific efficacy and clinical effectiveness, but musically based voice and speech therapy has been underexplored as a potentially useful method of rehabilitation. We undertook a pilot, open-label study of a group-based singing intervention, consisting of twelve 90-min weekly sessions led by a voice and speech therapist/singing instructor. The primary outcome measure of vocal loudness as measured by sound pressure level (SPL) at 50 cm during connected speech was not significantly different one week after the intervention or at 13 weeks after the intervention. A number of secondary measures reflecting pitch range, phonation time and maximum loudness also were unchanged. Voice related quality of life (VRQOL) and voice handicap index (VHI) also were unchanged. This study suggests that a group singing therapy intervention at this intensity and frequency does not result in significant improvement in objective and subject-rated measures of voice and speech impairment.

  15. Early Gut Microbiota Perturbations Following Intrapartum Antibiotic Prophylaxis to Prevent Group B Streptococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, R. Paul; Biavati, Bruno; Corvaglia, Luigi T.; Faldella, Giacomo; Stanton, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The faecal microbiota composition of infants born to mothers receiving intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis with ampicillin against group B Streptococcus was compared with that of control infants, at day 7 and 30 of life. Recruited newborns were both exclusive breastfed and mixed fed, in order to also study the effect of dietary factors on the microbiota composition. Massive parallel sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene and qPCR analysis were performed. Antibiotic prophylaxis caused the most marked changes on the microbiota in breastfed infants, mainly resulting in a higher relative abundance of Enterobacteriaceae, compared with control infants (52% vs. 14%, p = 0.044) and mixed-fed infants (52% vs. 16%, p = 0.13 NS) at day 7 and in a lower bacterial diversity compared to mixed-fed infants and controls. Bifidobacteria were also particularly vulnerable and abundances were reduced in breastfed (p = 0.001) and mixed-fed antibiotic treated groups compared to non-treated groups. Reductions in bifidobacteria in antibiotic treated infants were also confirmed by qPCR. By day 30, the bifidobacterial population recovered and abundances significantly increased in both breastfed (p = 0.025) and mixed-fed (p = 0.013) antibiotic treated groups, whereas Enterobacteriaceae abundances remained highest in the breastfed antibiotic treated group (44%), compared with control infants (16%) and mixed-fed antibiotic treated group (28%). This study has therefore demonstrated the short term consequences of maternal intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis on the infant faecal microbial population, particularly in that of breastfed infants. PMID:27332552

  16. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Interacting Proteins: Fine-Tuning Receptor Functions in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowska, Magdalena; Francesconi, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors mediate slow excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and are critical to activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, a cellular substrate of learning and memory. Dysregulated receptor signaling is implicated in neuropsychiatric conditions ranging from neurodevelopmental to neurodegenerative disorders. Importantly, group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling functions can be modulated by interacting proteins that mediate receptor trafficking, expression and coupling efficiency to signaling effectors. These interactions afford cell- or pathway-specific modulation to fine-tune receptor function, thus representing a potential target for pharmacological interventions in pathological conditions. PMID:27296642

  17. NO-Synthase Activity in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease Associated with Hypertension of Different Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Hypertension is a major independent risk factor for the development of CHD. Abnormalities in NO generation or activity have been proposed as a major mechanism of CHD. The purpose of this article is to determine the activity of eNOS and iNOS in patients with isolated CHD and CHD associated with HT of different age groups. Methods Fifty patients with isolated CHD and 42 patients with CHD associated with HT were enrolled in this study. NOS activity was determined by nitrite anion formed in the reaction. Results A statistically significant increase in iNOS activity is observed in elderly donors. In patients with isolated coronary heart disease cNOS activity is statistically significantly reduced with respect to the control group. The reduction of enzymatic activity of cNOS is more expressed in elderly patients than in middle-aged patients with coronary heart disease. Alterations in eNOS activity are more expressed in patients with coronary heart disease associated with hypertension than in patients with isolated coronary heart disease. Against the background of cNOS inhibition in the patients, a sharp increase in iNOS activity is observed. Conclusions It has been shown that disturbance of endothelial function in patients with coronary heart disease associated with hypertension is characterized by reduced endothelial NO synthesis by cNOS and increased systemic NO synthesis due to increased iNOS activity. It has been found that the lack of endothelial NO and hyperproduction of »harmful« NO by iNOS are more expressed in elderly patients. PMID:28356863

  18. A novel protein modification generating an aldehyde group in sulfatases: its role in catalysis and disease.

    PubMed

    von Figura, K; Schmidt, B; Selmer, T; Dierks, T

    1998-06-01

    In multiple sulfatase deficiency, a rare human lysosomal storage disorder, all known sulfatases are synthesized as catalytically poorly active polypeptides. Analysis of the latter has shown that they lack a protein modification that was detected in all members of the sulfatase family. This novel protein modification generates a 2-amino-3-oxopropanoic acid (C alpha-formylglycine) residue by oxidation of the thiol group of a cysteine that is conserved among all eukaryotic sulfatases. The oxidation occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum at a stage when the nascent polypeptide is not yet folded. The aldehyde is part of the catalytic site and is likely to act as an aldehyde hydrate. One of the geminal hydroxyl groups accepts the sulfate during sulfate ester cleavage leading to the formation of a covalently sulfated enzyme intermediate. The other hydroxyl is required for the subsequent elimination of the sulfate and regeneration of the aldehyde group. In some prokaryotic members of the sulfatase gene family, the DNA sequence predicts a serine residue, and not a cysteine. Analysis of one of these prokaryotic sulfatases, however, revealed the presence of the C alpha-formylglycine indicating that the aldehyde group is essential for all members of the sulfatase family and that it can be generated from either cysteine or serine.

  19. Evaluation of a disease management program for COPD using propensity matched control group

    PubMed Central

    George, Pradeep Paul; Heng, Bee Hoon; Lim, Tow Keang; Abisheganaden, John; Ng, Alan Wei Keong; Lim, Fong Seng

    2016-01-01

    Background Disease management programs (DMPs) have proliferated recently as a means of improving the quality and efficiency of care for patients with chronic illness. These programs include education about disease, optimization of evidence-based medications, information and support from case managers, and institution of self-management principles. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Singapore and worldwide. DMP aims to reduce mortality, hospitalizations, and average length of stay in such patients. This study assesses the outcomes of the DMP, comparing the propensity score matched DMP patients with controls. Methods DMP patients were compared with the controls, who were COPD patients fulfilling the DMP’s inclusion criteria but not included in the program. Control patients were identified from Operations Data Store (ODS) database. The outcomes of interest were average length of stay, number of days admitted to hospital per 100 person days, readmission, and mortality rates per person year. The risk of death and readmission was estimated using Cox, and competing risk regression respectively. Propensity score was estimated to identify the predictors of DMP enrolment. DMP patients and controls were matched on their propensity score. Results There were 170 matched DMP patients and control patients having 287 and 207 hospitalizations respectively. Program patient had lower mortality than the controls (0.12 vs. 0.27 per person year); cumulative 1-year survival was 91% among program patient and 76% among the control patients. Readmission, and hospital days per 100 person-days was higher for the program patients (0.36 vs. 0.17 per person year), and (2.19 vs. 1.88 per person year) respectively. Conclusions Participation in “DMP” was associated with lower all-cause mortality when compared to the controls. This survival gain in the program patients was paradoxically associated with an increase in readmission rate and

  20. Women's knowledge about heart disease: Differences among ethnic and cultural groups in the Israeli Women's Health in Midlife Study.

    PubMed

    Blumstein, Tzvia; Benyamini, Yael; Boyko, Valentina; Lerner-Geva, Liat

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to assess levels of knowledge about risk factors for heart disease among midlife Israeli women, and to evaluate the relationship of knowledge to personal risk factors and vulnerability to heart disease. Face-to-face interviews with women aged 45-64 years were conducted during 2004-2006 within three population groups: long-term Jewish residents (LTR), immigrants from the former Soviet Union, and Arab women. The survey instrument included six knowledge statements relating to: the risk after menopause, family history, elevated cholesterol level, diabetes, obesity, and warning signs of a heart attack. The findings showed wide disparities in knowledge by educational level and between immigrants and LTR, after taking into account personal risk factors and education. Personal risk factors were not significantly related to the knowledge items, except for personal history of cardiovascular disease, which was associated with knowledge about "warning signs of a heart attack" and "family history." Women who perceived themselves as more vulnerable to heart disease were more likely to identify several risk factors correctly. These findings stress the need to increase knowledge about heart disease, especially among less educated and minority women, and to emphasize the risk of patients' personal status by health providers.

  1. Blood thicker than water: kinship, disease prevalence and group size drive divergent patterns of infection risk in a social mammal

    PubMed Central

    Delahay, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of social- and kin-structuring of populations for the transmission of wildlife disease is widely assumed but poorly described. Social structure can help dilute risks of transmission for group members, and is relatively easy to measure, but kin-association represents a further level of population sub-structure that is harder to measure, particularly when association behaviours happen underground. Here, using epidemiological and molecular genetic data from a wild, high-density population of the European badger (Meles meles), we quantify the risks of infection with Mycobacterium bovis (the causative agent of tuberculosis) in cubs. The risk declines with increasing size of its social group, but this net dilution effect conceals divergent patterns of infection risk. Cubs only enjoy reduced risk when social groups have a higher proportion of test-negative individuals. Cubs suffer higher infection risk in social groups containing resident infectious adults, and these risks are exaggerated when cubs and infectious adults are closely related. We further identify key differences in infection risk associated with resident infectious males and females. We link our results to parent–offspring interactions and other kin-biased association, but also consider the possibility that susceptibility to infection is heritable. These patterns of infection risk help to explain the observation of a herd immunity effect in badgers following low-intensity vaccination campaigns. They also reveal kinship and kin-association to be important, and often hidden, drivers of disease transmission in social mammals. PMID:27440666

  2. Tracking Parkinson’s Disease over One Year with Multimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Group of Older Patients with Moderate Disease

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Tracy R.; Myall, Daniel J.; MacAskill, Michael R.; Pitcher, Toni L.; Livingston, Leslie; Watts, Richard; Keenan, Ross J.; Dalrymple-Alford, John C.; Anderson, Tim J.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Objectives Cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggests that Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with changes in cerebral tissue volume, diffusion tensor imaging metrics, and perfusion values. Here, we performed a longitudinal multimodal MRI study—including structural, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and perfusion MRI—to investigate progressive brain changes over one year in a group of older PD patients at a moderate stage of disease. Methods Twenty-three non-demented PD (mean age (SD) = 69.5 (6.4) years, disease duration (SD) = 5.6 (4.3) years) and 23 matched control participants (mean age: 70.6 (6.8)) completed extensive neuropsychological and clinical assessment, and multimodal 3T MRI scanning at baseline and one year later. We used a voxel-based approach to assess change over time and group-by-time interactions for cerebral structural and perfusion metrics. Results Compared to controls, in PD participants there was localized grey matter atrophy over time in bilateral inferior and right middle temporal, and left orbito-frontal cortices. Using a voxel-based approach that focused on the centers of principal white matter tracts, the PD and control cohorts exhibited similar levels of change in DTI metrics. There was no significant change in perfusion, cognitive, or motor severity measures. Conclusions In a cohort of older, non-demented PD participants, macrostructural MRI detected atrophy in the PD group compared with the control group in temporal and orbito-frontal cortices. Changes in diffusion MRI along principal white matter tracts over one year were found, but this was not differentially affected by PD. PMID:26714266

  3. The prevention of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Money, Deborah; Allen, Victoria M

    2013-10-01

    Objectif : Analyser les données issues de la littérature et formuler des recommandations sur la prise en charge des parturientes en vue de prévenir l’infection néonatale à streptocoques du groupe B d’apparition précoce. Parmi les révisions clés que renferme la présente directive clinique mise à jour, on trouve des modifications quant aux recommandations en ce qui concerne les schémas posologiques d’antibioprophylaxie, les épreuves de sensibilité et la prise en charge des femmes présentant une rupture prématurée des membranes. Issues : Parmi les issues maternelles évaluées, on trouvait l’exposition aux antibiotiques au cours de la grossesse et du travail, ainsi que les complications associées à l’administration d’antibiotiques. Les issues néonatales associées aux taux d’infection néonatale à streptocoques du groupe B d’apparition précoce ont été évaluées. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed, CINAHL et The Cochrane Library entre janvier 1980 et juillet 2012, au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé et de mots clés appropriés (« Group B streptococcus », « antibiotic therapy », « infection », « prevention »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs et aux études observationnelles. Aucune restriction n’a été appliquée en matière de date ou de langue. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en mai 2013. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de sp

  4. Sing Your Lungs Out—a community singing group for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a 1-year pilot study

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Amanda; Weatherall, Mark; Williams, Mathew; McNaughton, Harry; Aldington, Sarah; Williams, Gayle; Beasley, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Objective Singing group participation may benefit patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies are limited by small numbers of participants and short duration of generally hospital-based singing group intervention. This study examines the feasibility of long-term participation in a community singing group for patients with COPD who had completed pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Methods This was a feasibility cohort study. Patients with COPD who had completed PR and were enrolled in a weekly community exercise group were recruited to a new community-based singing group which met weekly for over 1 year. Measurements at baseline, 4 months and 1 year comprised comprehensive pulmonary function tests including lung volumes, 6 min walk test (6MWT), Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and hospital admission days for acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) for 1 year before and after the first singing group session. Findings There were 28 participants with chronic lung disease recruited from 140 people approached. Five withdrew in the first month. 21 participants meeting Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease criteria for COPD completed 4-month and 18 completed 1-year assessments. The mean attendance was 85%. For the prespecified primary outcome measure, total HADS score, difference between baseline and 12 months was −0.9, 95% CI −3.0 to 1.2, p=0.37. Of the secondary measures, a significant reduction was observed for HADS anxiety score after 1 year of −0.9 (95% CI −1.8 to −0.1) points, p=0.038 and an increase in the 6MWT at 1 year, of 65 (95% CI 35 to 99) m compared with baseline p<0.001. Conclusions Our findings support the feasibility of long-term participation in a community singing group for adults with COPD who have completed PR and are enrolled in a weekly community exercise group and provide evidence of improved exercise capacity and a reduction in anxiety

  5. [Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of ischemic heart disease in a group of physically handicapped individuals (blind and mute)].

    PubMed

    Stanić, R

    1993-01-01

    Our long clinical experience, with observations of some authors as well, indicate that the epidemic data of the prevalence of ischaemic heart disease (I.H.D.) is significantly reduced in some physically handicapped people (the blind and the deaf-mute) if we compare them with the similar ones who have not such anomalies. With no regard to patho-physiologic mechanism of such condition, 233 examinees of both sex, chosen by the method of accidental choice, were examined by clinical, ECG, and laboratory (non- invasive) methods and divided into three groups: the blind 81 (34.76%), the deaf-mute 76 (32.61%), and industrial workers 76 (32.61%) who were taken a as control group. The obtained results show that the incidence of I.H.D. (4,56%), and the control group 11 (8,36%), which, from the point of statistics, offer a significant piece of information.

  6. Analysis of apoB gene polymorphism in control sample and group of patients with coronary heart disease from Moscow

    SciTech Connect

    Slominsky, P.A.; Shadrina, M.I.; Pogoda, T.V.

    1994-09-01

    We have analyzed two polymorphic regions of the apo B gene (5{prime} (CA)n microsatellite and insertion/deletion polymorphisms) in a random control sample and coronary heart disease (CHD) patients from Moscow. For this purpose we have used PCR technique followed by high-resolution PAGE. In the control sample only 3 different allelic variants of the 5{prime} minisatellite existed with 14 (frequency 70,7%), 15 (26,8%) and 16 (2.5%) CA repeats. In the patient`s group, allelic variants were also found with 13 CA repeats, but the frequency was very low (2.5%). However, we did not reveal any significant differences in allele and genotype distributions of insertion/deletion polymorphisms in the control group and the group of CHD patients (insertion frequency 67.9% and 62.5%, respectively).

  7. Improved tolerance toward fungal diseases in transgenic Cavendish banana (Musa spp. AAA group) cv. Grand Nain.

    PubMed

    Vishnevetsky, Jane; White, Thomas L; Palmateer, Aaron J; Flaishman, Moshe; Cohen, Yuval; Elad, Yigal; Velcheva, Margarita; Hanania, Uri; Sahar, Nachman; Dgani, Oded; Perl, Avihai

    2011-02-01

    The most devastating disease currently threatening to destroy the banana industry worldwide is undoubtedly Sigatoka Leaf spot disease caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis. In this study, we developed a transformation system for banana and expressed the endochitinase gene ThEn-42 from Trichoderma harzianum together with the grape stilbene synthase (StSy) gene in transgenic banana plants under the control of the 35S promoter and the inducible PR-10 promoter, respectively. The superoxide dismutase gene Cu,Zn-SOD from tomato, under control of the ubiquitin promoter, was added to this cassette to improve scavenging of free radicals generated during fungal attack. A 4-year field trial demonstrated several transgenic banana lines with improved tolerance to Sigatoka. As the genes conferring Sigatoka tolerance may have a wide range of anti-fungal activities we also inoculated the regenerated banana plants with Botrytis cinerea. The best transgenic lines exhibiting Sigatoka tolerance were also found to have tolerance to B. cinerea in laboratory assays.

  8. Low-Temperature Isolation of Disease-Suppressive Bacteria and Characterization of a Distinctive Group of Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, P. Maria; Wright, Sandra A. I.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of environmental factors during isolation on the composition of potential biocontrol isolates is largely unknown. Bacterial isolates that efficiently suppressed wheat seedling blight caused by Fusarium culmorum were found by isolating psychrotrophic, root-associated bacteria and by screening them in a bioassay that mimicked field conditions. The impact of individual isolation factors on the disease-suppressive index (DSI) of almost 600 isolates was analyzed. The bacteria originated from 135 samples from 62 sites in Sweden and Switzerland. The isolation factors that increased the probability of finding isolates with high DSIs were sampling from arable land, Swiss origin of samples, and origination of isolates from plants belonging to the family Brassicaceae. The colony morphology of the isolates was characterized and compared to DSIs, which led to identification of a uniform morphological group containing 57 highly disease-suppressive isolates. Isolates in this group were identified as Pseudomonas sp.; they were fluorescent on King's medium B and had characteristic crystalline structures in their colonies. These isolates were morphologically similar to seven strains that had previously been selected for suppression of barley net blotch caused by Drechslera teres. Members of this morphological group grow at 1.5°C and produce an antifungal polyketide (2,3-deepoxy-2,3-didehydrorhizoxin [DDR]). They have similar two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein profiles, phenotypic characteristics, and in vitro inhibition spectra of pathogens. In summary, in this paper we describe some isolation factors that are important for obtaining disease-suppressive bacteria in our system, and we describe a novel group of biocontrol pseudomonads. PMID:14602601

  9. [SCREENING-EVALUATION OF THE CARDIAC ARTERY DISEASE IN CIVIL PILOTS OF THE SENIOR AGE GROUP].

    PubMed

    Kuzmina A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnostics of cardiac artery disease (CAD) is essential for annual medical flight certification. The investigation was aimed at screening-evaluation of senior civil pilots for CAD using the criteria of ECG findings during the submaximal bicycle ergometry test (BT). The investigation embraced 1189 civil pilots, on reaching the age of 55 years and older in 2009-2010. BT with ECG recording was completed by 976 pilots (82.1%). The test was considered CAD negative in 909 pilots (93.1 %) and CAD positive in 9 pilots (0.9%); of 53 doubtful tests (5.5%), CAD was stated by the ST-criterion in 40 pilots (4.1%) and because of arrhythmias in 13 pilots (1.4%). In 5 cases (0.5%) test results were uninterpretable. Further analysis of the screening results led to diagnosing of clinically significant atherosclerosis of coronary arteries in 17 pilots (1.75%).

  10. Antioxidant status in a group of institutionalised elderly people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Elena; Ortega, Rosa M; Andrés, Pedro; Aparicio, Aránzazu; González-Rodríguez, Liliana G; López-Sobaler, Ana M; Navia, Beatriz; Perea, José M; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Paula

    2016-05-28

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important and prevalent diseases suffered by the elderly. Evidence exists that its onset and severity might be conditioned by antioxidant status. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between antioxidant status and COPD in institutionalised elderly people. In all, 183 elderly people aged >65 years (twenty-one had COPD and 160 healthy controls) were studied. The subjects' diets were investigated via the use of precise individual weighing for 7 d. Body weight, height, and biceps and triceps skinfold thickness were measured, and body fat (kg) and BMI (kg/m2) were calculated. Serum retinol, α-tocopherol, β-carotene and vitamin C levels were determined. Subjects with COPD ate less fruits than healthy controls (117 (sd 52) v. 192 (sd 161) g/d), their coverage of the recommended intake of vitamin C was smaller (150 (sd 45) v. 191 (sd 88) %; note that both exceeded 100 %) and their diets had a lower antioxidant capacity (6558 (sd 2381) v. 9328 (sd 5367) mmol trolox equivalent/d). Those with COPD had lower serum vitamin C and α-tocopherol concentrations than healthy controls (32·4 (sd 15·3) v. 41·5 (sd 14·8) µmol/l and 12·1 (sd 3·2) v. 13·9 (sd 2·8) µmol/l, respectively). In addition, subjects with α-tocopherol <14·1µmol/l (50th percentile) were at 6·43 times greater risk of having COPD than those subjects with ≥14·1µmol/l (OR 6·43; 95 % CI 1·17, 35·24; P<0·05), taking sex, age, use of tobacco, body fat and vitamin E intake as covariables. Subjects with COPD had diets of poorer antioxidant quality, especially with respect to vitamins C and E, compared with healthy controls.

  11. [Social marketing applied to condom promotion: a proposal for intervention in groups at risk for sexually transmitted diseases].

    PubMed

    García España, F; March Cerdá, J C; Gómez Villegas, I

    1994-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are an important worldwide health problem. Their association with AIDS an other insidious viral processes have brought them to the foreground of sanitary authorities and general population concern. Often, health services have to struggle with reinfections, which concentrate in pockets of risk that consume large amount of care and constitute an important link in the transmission of these diseases. General publicity have little impact among high risk groups. Thus, it becomes necessary to be more precise and divide into segments the target population we want to reach. Prevention of reinfection in these communities requires the implementation of healthy behaviours through the promotion of a tangible product (condom). Regarding these considerations, social marketing emerges as the right instrument to be used. Through individual focused interviews with prostitutes, homosexual and young promiscuous heterosexual patients from a STDs Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment Centre, determining factors of the use condoms and related behaviour guidelines have been identified. Also, a social marketing strategy is suggested to prevent these diseases among groups at risk by means of condom promotion.

  12. Geographic distribution, evolution, and disease importance of species within the Neotropical Anopheles albitarsis Group (Diptera, Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Ruiz-Lopez, J. Freddy; Conn, Jan E.; Sallum, Maria Anice M.; Póvoa, Marinete M.; Bergo, Eduardo S.; Oliveira, Tatiane M. P.; Sucupira, Izis; Wilkerson, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    The Anopheles albitarsis group of mosquitoes comprises eight recognized species and one mitochondrial lineage. Our knowledge of malaria vectorial importance and the distribution and evolution of these taxa is incomplete. We constructed ecological niche models (ENMs) for these taxa and used hypothesized phylogenetic relationships and ENMs to investigate environmental and ecological divergence associated with speciation events. Two major clades were identified, one north (Clade 1) and one south (Clade 2) of the Amazon River that likely is or was a barrier to mosquito movement. Clade 1 species occur more often in higher average temperature locations than Clade 2 species, and taxon splits within Clade 1 corresponded with a greater divergence of variables related to precipitation than was the case within Clade 2. Comparison of the ecological profiles of sympatric species and sister species support the idea that phylogenetic proximity is related to ecological similarity. Anopheles albitarsis I, An. janconnae, and An. marajoara ENMs had the highest percentage of their predicted suitable habitat overlapping distribution models of Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax, and warrant additional studies of the transmission potential of these species. Phylogenetic proximity may be related to malaria vectorial importance within the Albitarsis Group. PMID:24820570

  13. Molecular Characterization of Disease-Associated Streptococci of the Mitis Group That Are Optochin Susceptible▿

    PubMed Central

    Balsalobre, Luz; Hernández-Madrid, Antonia; Llull, Daniel; Martín-Galiano, Antonio J.; García, Ernesto; Fenoll, Asunción; de la Campa, Adela G.

    2006-01-01

    Eight optochin-susceptible (Opts) alpha-hemolytic (viridans) streptococcus isolates were characterized at the molecular level. These isolates showed phenotypic characteristics typical of both viridans streptococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Comparison of the sequence of housekeeping genes from these isolates with those of S. pneumoniae, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae suggested that the Opts isolates corresponded to streptococci of the mitis group. Besides, the Opts streptococci were negative by a Gen-Probe AccuProbe pneumococcus test and hybridized with specific pneumococcal probes (lytA and ply) but also with ant, a gene not present in most S. pneumoniae strains. Moreover, the isolates were insoluble in 1% sodium deoxycholate but completely dissolved in 0.1% deoxycholate. Sequence analysis of the lytA gene revealed that the Opts streptococci carried lytA alleles characteristic of those present in nonpneumococcal streptococci of the mitis group. The determination of the partial nucleotide sequence embracing the atp operon encoding the FoF1 H+-ATPase indicated that the optochin susceptibility of the isolates was due to the acquisition of atpC, atpA, and part of atpB from S. pneumoniae by horizontal gene transfer. PMID:16971639

  14. Effects of new fish oil derivative on fatty acid phospholipid-membrane pattern in a group of Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Belluzzi, A; Brignola, C; Campieri, M; Camporesi, E P; Gionchetti, P; Rizzello, F; Belloli, C; De Simone, G; Boschi, S; Miglioli, M

    1994-12-01

    Fish oil has been recently proposed as a possible effective treatment in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, a lot of annoying side effects (ie, belching, halitosis, diarrhea, etc) affect patient compliance. We carried out a study of patient tolerance in a group of Crohn's disease (CD) patients with a new fish oil derivative consisting of 500-mg capsules of eicosapentaenoic-docosahexaenoic (EPA 40%-DHA 20%), a free fatty acid mixture (Purepa), and we also evaluated its incorporation into phospholipids, both in plasma and in red cell membranes. Five groups of 10 CD patients in remission received nine Purepa capsules daily in four different preparations (A: uncoated, B: coated, pH 5.5; C: coated, pH 5.5, 60 min time release; D: coated, pH 6.9) and 12 x 1-g capsules daily of a triglyceride preparation (Max-EPA, EPA 18%-DHA 10%), respectively. We coated three of the four Purepa preparations in order to delay the release of contents in an attempt to minimize the side effects. After six weeks of treatment, the group taking Purepa capsules, coated, pH 5.5, 60 min time release (group C) showed the best incorporation of EPA and DHA in red blood cell phospholipid membranes (EPA from 0.2 to 4.4%, DHA from 3.7 to 6.3%), and no side effects were registered, whereas in all other groups side effects were experienced in 50% or more of subjects. This new preparation will make it possible to treat patients for long periods.

  15. Local changes in rates of group A Streptococcus disease and antibiotic resistance are associated with geographically widespread strain turnover events.

    PubMed

    Metzgar, David; McDonough, Erin A; Hansen, Christian J; Blaesing, Carl R; Baynes, Darcie; Hawksworth, Anthony W; Blair, Patrick J; Faix, Dennis J; Russell, Kevin L

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the effects of dynamic strain turnover and antibiotic prophylaxis on rates of group A Streptococcus (GAS) antibiotic resistance and disease. The authors analyzed the strain distributions, disease rates, and patterns of antibiotic resistance of 802 GAS isolates collected from 2002 through 2007. These samples were collected from patients with GAS infection symptoms at 10 military facilities. Macrolide resistance peaked at 25% during 2004, due to the geographically widespread dominance of a single resistant strain (M75). The resistant strain was not retained regardless of local patterns of macrolide use, and resistance rates decreased upon replacement of M75 with macrolide-susceptible strains. Disease rates were similarly correlated with dominance of specific M types. Statistical analysis revealed temporal correlations between strain distributions at multiple locations. Only the most common strains yielded enough data at multiple sites for statistically significant comparison of temporal fluctuations in dominance, but these (including M44, M3, M18, M118, and M6) all yielded highly significant temporal correlations of 90% or greater on yearly scales. As expected given the complexity and variability of strain distributions on shorter time scales, analysis on a monthly scale yielded lower degrees of positive correlation (31-62%), but in this case all significant correlations were still positive. Shifts in antibiotic resistance profiles and disease rates at specific sites appear to be associated with strain replacements happening on larger scales, independent of antibiotic use at individual sites.

  16. Clonal Complex 17 Group B Streptococcus strains causing invasive disease in neonates and adults originate from the same genetic pool

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Ramoutar, Erin; McGeer, Allison; Li, Aimin; Melano, Roberto G.; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    A significant proportion of group B Streptococcus (GBS) neonatal disease, particularly late-onset disease, is associated with strains of serotype III, clonal complex (CC) 17. CC17 strains also cause invasive infections in adults. Little is known about the phylogenetic relationships of isolates recovered from neonatal and adult CC17 invasive infections. We performed whole-genome-based phylogenetic analysis of 93 temporally and geographically matched CC17 strains isolated from both neonatal and adult invasive infections in the metropolitan region of Toronto/Peel, Canada. We also mined the whole-genome data to reveal mobile genetic elements carrying antimicrobial resistance genes. We discovered that CC17 GBS strains causing neonatal and adult invasive disease are interspersed and cluster tightly in a phylogenetic tree, signifying that they are derived from the same genetic pool. We identified limited variation due to recombination in the core CC17 genome. We describe that loss of Pilus Island 1 and acquisition of different mobile genetic elements carrying determinants of antimicrobial resistance contribute to CC17 genetic diversity. Acquisition of some of these mobile genetic elements appears to correlate with clonal expansion of the strains that possess them. Our results provide a genome-wide portrait of the population structure and evolution of a major disease-causing clone of an opportunistic pathogen. PMID:26843175

  17. Telemedicine for cardiovascular disease continuum: A position paper from the Italian Society of Cardiology Working Group on Telecardiology and Informatics.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Natale Daniele; Scalvini, Simonetta; Acquistapace, Flavio; Parati, Gianfranco; Volterrani, Maurizio; Fedele, Francesco; Molinari, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Telemedicine is the provision of health care services, through the use of information and communication technology, in situations where the health care professional and the patient, or 2 health care professionals, are not in the same location. It involves the secure transmission of medical data and information, through text, sound, images, or other forms needed for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of a patient. First data on implementation of telemedicine for the diagnosis and treatment of acute myocardial infarction date from more than 10 years ago. Telemedicine has a potential broad application to the cardiovascular disease continuum and in many branches of cardiology, at least including heart failure, ischemic heart disease and arrhythmias. Telemedicine might have an important role as part of a strategy for the delivery of effective health care for patients with cardiovascular disease. In this document the Working Group on Telecardiology and Informatics of the Italian Society of Cardiology intends to remark some key-points regarding potential benefit achievable with the implementation of telemedicine support in the continuum of cardiovascular disease.

  18. Pulmonary hypertension in valvular disease: a comprehensive review on pathophysiology to therapy from the HAVEC Group.

    PubMed

    Magne, Julien; Pibarot, Philippe; Sengupta, Partho P; Donal, Erwan; Rosenhek, Raphael; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a classic pathophysiological consequence of left-sided valvular heart disease (VHD). However, as opposed to other forms of PH, there are relatively few published data on the prevalence, impact on outcome, and management of PH with VHD. The objective of this paper is to present a systematic review of PH in patients with VHD. PH is found in 15% to 60% of patients with VHD and is more frequent among symptomatic patients. PH is associated with higher risk of cardiac events under conservative management, during valve replacement or repair procedures, and even following successful corrective procedures. In addition to its usefulness in assessing the presence and severity of VHD, Doppler echocardiography is a key tool in diagnosis of PH and assessment of its repercussion on right ventricular function. Assessment of pulmonary arterial pressure during exercise stress echocardiography may provide additional prognostic information beyond resting evaluation. Cardiac magnetic resonance is also useful for assessing right ventricular geometry and function, which provide additional prognostic information in patients with VHD and PH.

  19. Visual acuity and quality of life in dry eye disease: Proceedings of the OCEAN group meeting.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Del-Castillo, José; Labetoulle, Marc; Baudouin, Christophe; Rolando, Maurizio; Akova, Yonca A; Aragona, Pasquale; Geerling, Gerd; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Messmer, Elisabeth M; Boboridis, Kostas

    2017-04-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) results in tear film instability and hyperosmolarity, inflammation of the ocular surface and, ultimately, visual disturbance that can significantly impact a patient's quality of life. The effects on visual acuity result in difficulties with driving, reading and computer use and negatively impact psychological health. These effects also extend to the workplace, with a loss of productivity and quality of work causing substantial economic losses. The effects of DED and the impact on vision experienced by patients may not be given sufficient importance by ophthalmologists. Functional visual acuity (FVA) is a measure of visual acuity after sustained eye opening without blinking for at least 10 s and mimics the sustained visual acuity of daily life. Measuring dynamic FVA allows the detection of impaired visual function in patients with DED who may display normal conventional visual acuity. There are currently several tests and methods that can be used to measure dynamic visual function: the SSC-350 FVA measurement system, assessment of best-corrected visual acuity decay using the interblink visual acuity decay test, serial measurements of ocular and corneal higher order aberrations, and measurement of dynamic vision quality using the Optical Quality Analysis System. Although the equipment for these methods may be too large or unaffordable for use in clinical practice, FVA testing is an important assessment for DED.

  20. Guidelines for the assessment and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Canadian Thoracic Society Workshop Group.

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fifth commonest cause of death in North America and is the only leading cause of death that is increasing in prevalence. Early detection and prevention through smoking cessation are essential to stem this epidemic. Once COPD is diagnosed there is a compelling rationale for vaccination against influenza and possibly pneumococcal pneumonia, although proof of efficacy is lacking. If airways obstruction is present, inhaled quaternary anticholinergic bronchodilators or inhaled beta 2 agonists or both may be of benefit, the former agents showing fewer side effects and often greater efficacy in elderly patients. Theophylline may enhance the effect or increase the duration of the bronchodilatation produced by an inhaled agent and may offer added nonbronchodilatory effects such as improved respiratory muscle endurance and ventilatory stimulation. If significant airflow obstruction persists, an objectively monitored trial of oral steroid therapy is required. Limitation of activity despite optimum medical therapy may be alleviated in selected patients by a supervised exercise rehabilitation program. If hypoxemia is present supplemental oxygen therapy will improve the patient's survival and quality of life. Additional therapies, from respiratory stimulants to lung transplantation, remain under investigation. PMID:1498754

  1. NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition is disrupted in a group of auto-inflammatory disease CAPS mutations.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Leanne; Moreau, France; MacDonald, Justin A; Chadee, Kris

    2016-10-01

    Inflammasomes are positioned to rapidly escalate the intensity of inflammation by activating interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18 and cell death by pyroptosis. However, negative regulation of inflammasomes remains poorly understood, as is the signaling cascade that dampens inflammasome activity. We found that rapid NLRP3 inflammasome activation was directly inhibited by protein kinase A (PKA), which was induced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling via the PGE2 receptor E-prostanoid 4 (EP4). PKA directly phosphorylated the cytoplasmic receptor NLRP3 and attenuated its ATPase function. We found that Ser295 in human NLRP3 was critical for rapid inhibition and PKA phosphorylation. Mutations in NLRP3-encoding residues adjacent to Ser295 have been linked to the inflammatory disease CAPS (cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes). NLRP3-S295A phenocopied the human CAPS mutants. These data suggest that negative regulation at Ser295 is critical for restraining the NLRP3 inflammasome and identify a molecular basis for CAPS-associated NLRP3 mutations.

  2. [Osteoarticular infections: therapeutic proposals of the Paediatric Infectious Diseases Group of the French Society of Paediatrics (GPIP)].

    PubMed

    Grimprel, E; Lorrot, M; Haas, H; Pinquier, D; Parez, N; Ferroni, A; Cohen, R

    2008-10-01

    The empiric choice of initial antibiotherapy in osteoarticular infections in infants and children must take into consideration the actual epidemiology of principal pathogens, their respective antibiotic sensitivity profile, their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and the results of efficacy clinical studies. After a review of recent data concerning these four major points, the Paediatric Infectious Diseases Group of the French Society of Paediatrics (GPIP) has proposed guidelines for initial recommended schemes of antimicrobial therapy in acute and non complicated osteoarticular infections in infants and children.

  3. Respiratory disease trends in the Pulmonary Complications of HIV Infection Study cohort. Pulmonary Complications of HIV Infection Study Group.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J M; Hansen, N I; Lavange, L; Glassroth, J; Browdy, B L; Rosen, M J; Kvale, P A; Mangura, B T; Reichman, L B; Hopewell, P C

    1997-01-01

    We examined trends in the incidence of specific respiratory disorders in a multicenter cohort with progressive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease during a 5-yr period. Individuals with a wide range of HIV disease severity belonging to three transmission categories were evaluated at regular intervals and for episodic respiratory symptoms using standard diagnostic algorithms. Yearly incidence rates of respiratory diagnoses were assessed in the cohort as a whole and according to CD4 count or HIV transmission category. The most frequent respiratory disorders were upper respiratory tract infections, but the incidence of lower respiratory tract infections increased as CD4 counts declined. Specific lower respiratory infections followed distinctive patterns according to study-entry CD4 count and transmission category. Acute bronchitis was the predominant lower respiratory infection of cohort members with entry CD4 counts > or = 200 cells/mm3. In cohort members with entry CD4 counts of 200 to 499 cells/mm3, the incidence of bacterial and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia each increased an average of 40% per year. In members with entry CD4 counts < 200 cells/mm3, acute bronchitis, bacterial pneumonia, and P. carinii pneumonia occurred at high rates without discernible time trends, despite chemoprophylaxis in more than 80% after Year 1, and the rate of other pulmonary opportunistic infections increased over time. Each year, injecting drug users had a higher incidence of bacterial pneumonia than did homosexual men. The yearly rate of tuberculosis was < 3 episodes/100 person-yr in each entry CD4 and HIV-transmission group. We conclude that the time trends of HIV-associated respiratory disorders are determined by HIV disease stage and influenced by transmission category. Whereas acute bronchitis is prevalent during all stages of HIV infection, incidence rates of bacterial pneumonia and P. carinii pneumonia rise continuously during progression to advanced disease. In

  4. Recommendations from the European Working Group for Value Assessment and Funding Processes in Rare Diseases (ORPH-VAL).

    PubMed

    Annemans, Lieven; Aymé, Ségolène; Le Cam, Yann; Facey, Karen; Gunther, Penilla; Nicod, Elena; Reni, Michele; Roux, Jean-Louis; Schlander, Michael; Taylor, David; Tomino, Carlo; Torrent-Farnell, Josep; Upadhyaya, Sheela; Hutchings, Adam; Le Dez, Lugdivine

    2017-03-10

    Rare diseases are an important public health issue with high unmet need. The introduction of the EU Regulation on orphan medicinal products (OMP) has been successful in stimulating investment in the research and development of OMPs. Despite this advancement, patients do not have universal access to these new medicines. There are many factors that affect OMP uptake, but one of the most important is the difficulty of making pricing and reimbursement (P&R) decisions in rare diseases. Until now, there has been little consensus on the most appropriate assessment criteria, perspective or appraisal process. This paper proposes nine principles to help improve the consistency of OMP P&R assessment in Europe and ensure that value assessment, pricing and funding processes reflect the specificities of rare diseases and contribute to both the sustainability of healthcare systems and the sustainability of innovation in this field. These recommendations are the output of the European Working Group for Value Assessment and Funding Processes in Rare Diseases (ORPH-VAL), a collaboration between rare disease experts, patient representatives, academics, health technology assessment (HTA) practitioners, politicians and industry representatives. ORPH-VAL reached its recommendations through careful consideration of existing OMP P&R literature and through a wide consultation with expert stakeholders, including payers, regulators and patients. The principles cover four areas: OMP decision criteria, OMP decision process, OMP sustainable funding systems and European co-ordination. This paper also presents a guide to the core elements of value relevant to OMPs that should be consistently considered in all OMP appraisals. The principles outlined in this paper may be helpful in drawing together an emerging consensus on this topic and identifying areas where consistency in payer approach could be achievable and beneficial. All stakeholders have an obligation to work together to ensure

  5. Characterization of a Large Group of Individuals with Huntington Disease and Their Relatives Enrolled in the COHORT Study

    PubMed Central

    Dorsey, E. Ray

    2012-01-01

    Background Careful characterization of the phenotype and genotype of Huntington disease (HD) can foster better understanding of the condition. Methods We conducted a cohort study in the United States, Canada, and Australia of members of families affected by HD. We collected demographic and clinical data, conducted the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale and Mini-Mental State Examination, and determined Huntingtin trinucleotide CAG repeat length. We report primarily on cross-sectional baseline data from this recently completed prospective, longitudinal, observational study. Results As of December 31, 2009, 2,318 individuals enrolled; of these, 1,985 (85.6%) were classified into six analysis groups. Three groups had expanded CAG alleles (36 repeats or more): individuals with clinically diagnosed HD [n = 930], and clinically unaffected first-degree relatives who had previously pursued [n = 248] or not pursued [n = 112] predictive DNA testing. Three groups lacked expanded alleles: first-degree relatives who had previously pursued [n = 41] or not pursued [n = 224] genetic testing, and spouses and caregivers [n = 430]. Baseline mean performance differed across groups in all motor, behavioral, cognitive, and functional measures (p<0.001). Clinically unaffected individuals with expanded alleles weighed less (76.0 vs. 79.6 kg; p = 0.01) and had lower cognitive scores (28.5 vs. 29.1 on the Mini Mental State Examination; p = 0.008) than individuals without expanded alleles. The frequency of “high normal” repeat lengths (27 to 35) was 2.5% and repeat lengths associated with reduced penetrance (36 to 39) was 2.7%. Conclusion Baseline analysis of COHORT study participants revealed differences that emerge prior to clinical diagnosis. Longitudinal investigation of this cohort will further characterize the natural history of HD and genetic and biological modifiers. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00313495 PMID:22359536

  6. Anti-high mobility group box 1 antibody exerts neuroprotection in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Liu, Keyue; Agari, Takashi; Yasuhara, Takao; Morimoto, Jun; Okazaki, Mihoko; Takeuchi, Hayato; Toyoshima, Atsuhiko; Sasada, Susumu; Shinko, Aiko; Kondo, Akihiko; Kameda, Masahiro; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato; Borlongan, Cesario V; Nishibori, Masahiro; Date, Isao

    2016-01-01

    The high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) exists as an architectural nuclear protein in the normal state, but displays an inflammatory cytokine-like activity in the extracellular space under pathological condition. Inflammation in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been documented. In this study, we investigated the involvement of HMGB1 in the pathology and the neuroprotective effects of neutralizing anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on an animal model of PD. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were initially injected with 6-hydroxydopmaine (6-OHDA, 20 μg/4 μl) into the right striatum, then anti-HMGB1 mAb (1 mg/kg), or control mAb was intravenously administered immediately, at 6 and 24 h after 6-OHDA injection. The treatment with anti-HMGB1 mAb significantly preserved dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta and dopaminergic terminals inherent in the striatum, and attenuated PD behavioral symptoms compared to the control mAb-treated group. HMGB1 was retained in the nucleus of neurons and astrocytes by inhibiting the proinflammation-induced oxidative stress in the anti-HMGB1 mAb-treated group, whereas HMGB1 translocation was observed in neurons at 1 day and astrocytes at 7 days after 6-OHDA injection in the control mAb-treated group. Anti-HMGB1 mAb inhibited the activation of microglia, disruption of blood-brain-barrier (BBB), and the expression of inflammation cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-6. These results suggested that HMGB1 released from neurons and astrocytes was at least partly involved in the mechanism and pathway of degeneration of dopaminergic neurons induced by 6-OHDA exposure. Intravenous administration of anti-HMGB1 mAb stands as a novel therapy for PD possibly acting through the suppression of neuroinflammation and the attenuation of disruption of BBB associated with the disease.

  7. Appropriateness of Intrapartum Antibiotic Prophylaxis to Prevent Neonatal Group B Streptococcus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Aida; Larosa, Elisabetta; Pileggi, Claudia; Pavia, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the adherence to CDC guidelines for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) and to identify possible factors influencing noncompliance with guidelines. We conducted a retrospective study in Italy. Our cohort included women in whom antenatal Group B Streptococcus (GBS) screening was not performed, was performed, but results were not available at the time of labor or delivery and women who were positive for GBS colonization. The indications for complete execution of IAP according to revised CDC guidelines was evaluated. It was considered adequate when performed with a recommended antibiotic at least four hours prior to delivery. The cohort included 902 women. Among those who had performed rectal and vaginal swabs (or recto-vaginal swabs), results were available in 86.9% of vaginal swabs and in 87.1% of rectal swabs and GBS was detected in 59.8% of vaginal swabs and in 71% of rectal swabs. 49.2% women had indication for GBS prophylaxis. Among these, 91.1% received an antibiotic during labor. Totally appropriate IAP was performed in 36.3% deliveries, an inappropriate antibiotic was administered in 10.4% women, the remaining 45.3% women received partially appropriate IAP; of these, 15.5% had received antibiotics through an inappropriate route of administration, 18.2% an inappropriate dosage regimen. Overall, 27.5% women received intrapartum ampicillin with inappropriate timing. Multivariate analysis showed that totally appropriate prophylaxis was significantly more likely in women who had no previous live birth, who had vaginal delivery, and a positive result at antenatal GBS screening. Despite satisfactory GBS screening implementation, there is still a substantial gap between optimal and actual IAP. We hypothesize that the complexity of the CDC guidelines may partially explain this shortcoming. Future efforts will include initiatives focused at enabling and reinforcing adherence to evidence-based prevention practices. PMID

  8. Appropriateness of Intrapartum Antibiotic Prophylaxis to Prevent Neonatal Group B Streptococcus Disease.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Aida; Larosa, Elisabetta; Pileggi, Claudia; Pavia, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the adherence to CDC guidelines for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) and to identify possible factors influencing noncompliance with guidelines. We conducted a retrospective study in Italy. Our cohort included women in whom antenatal Group B Streptococcus (GBS) screening was not performed, was performed, but results were not available at the time of labor or delivery and women who were positive for GBS colonization. The indications for complete execution of IAP according to revised CDC guidelines was evaluated. It was considered adequate when performed with a recommended antibiotic at least four hours prior to delivery. The cohort included 902 women. Among those who had performed rectal and vaginal swabs (or recto-vaginal swabs), results were available in 86.9% of vaginal swabs and in 87.1% of rectal swabs and GBS was detected in 59.8% of vaginal swabs and in 71% of rectal swabs. 49.2% women had indication for GBS prophylaxis. Among these, 91.1% received an antibiotic during labor. Totally appropriate IAP was performed in 36.3% deliveries, an inappropriate antibiotic was administered in 10.4% women, the remaining 45.3% women received partially appropriate IAP; of these, 15.5% had received antibiotics through an inappropriate route of administration, 18.2% an inappropriate dosage regimen. Overall, 27.5% women received intrapartum ampicillin with inappropriate timing. Multivariate analysis showed that totally appropriate prophylaxis was significantly more likely in women who had no previous live birth, who had vaginal delivery, and a positive result at antenatal GBS screening. Despite satisfactory GBS screening implementation, there is still a substantial gap between optimal and actual IAP. We hypothesize that the complexity of the CDC guidelines may partially explain this shortcoming. Future efforts will include initiatives focused at enabling and reinforcing adherence to evidence-based prevention practices.

  9. Impact of risk aversion and disease outbreak characteristics on the incentives of producers as a group to participate in animal disease insurance-A simulation.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Jarkko K; Heikkilä, Jaakko

    2011-06-01

    The participation of agricultural producers in financing losses caused by livestock epidemics has been debated in many countries. One of the issues raised is how reluctant producers are to participate voluntarily in the financing of disease losses before an outbreak occurs. This study contributes to the literature by examining whether disease losses should be financed through pre- or post-outbreak premiums or their combination. A Monte Carlo simulation was employed to illustrate the costs of financing two diseases of different profiles. The profiles differed in the probability in which the damage occurs and in the average damage per event. Three hypothetical financing schemes were compared based on their ability to reduce utility losses in the case of risk-neutral and risk-averse producer groups. The schemes were examined in a dynamic setting where premiums depended on the compensation history of the sector. If producers choose the preferred financing scheme based on utility losses, results suggest that the timing of the premiums, the transaction costs of the scheme, the degree of risk aversion of the producer, and the level and the volatility of premiums affect the choice of the financing scheme.

  10. A skin disease, a blood disease or something in between? An exploratory focus group study of patients' experiences with porphyria cutanea tarda*

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, J; Gjengedal, E; Sandberg, S; Råheim, M

    2015-01-01

    Background Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is characterized by fragile skin with blistering on sun-exposed areas. Symptoms typically develop in late adulthood and can be triggered by iron overload, alcohol intake, oestrogens and various liver diseases. Treatment consists of phlebotomy to reduce iron, or increasing urinary porphyrin excretion by administering chlorochin. To optimize patient care, health personnel need to understand the subjective experiences of PCT. Objectives To explore the experiences of persons with PCT with regard to symptoms, treatment, follow-up and prevention of the disease. Methods Interpretive description was used as a qualitative approach. Twenty-one participants attended three focus groups. All participants had experienced PCT symptoms during the last 5 years. Results Participants' experiences varied from trivializing symptoms and fragile skin to what was described as a desperate situation, with huge blisters, skin falling off and feeling as if one was in a ‘horror movie’. For some, itching was very troublesome, preventing sleep and delaying skin healing. In managing PCT a shift in focus from skin to blood was described. PCT was perceived as a chronic and systemic disease causing a range of health problems. Strategies for preventing symptoms ranged from doing nothing to frequent controls and check-ups. Conclusions Participants had a systemic perception of PCT, and a tendency to attribute a range of health problems to the condition. This study adds insight into the experiences patients have with PCT. PMID:24958197

  11. Ethical and social issues in presymptomatic testing for Huntington's disease: a European Community collaborative study. European Community Huntington's Disease Collaborative Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of social and ethical aspects of presymptomatic testing for Huntington's disease has been carried out, based on data on linked DNA markers, from four major testing centres in different European Community countries (Belgium, Italy, Netherlands, and United Kingdom). Information was available on 603 applicants, with 213 final results given, of which 32% gave an increased risk. A series of specific issues and problems were documented systematically for all applicants, results being given on frequency of occurrence and illustrated by individual case histories. The principal issues could be grouped as problems of inappropriate referral, problems involving relatives, and problems relating to disclosure of results. At least one important problem was encountered in 46% of applicants, emphasising the importance of expert counselling, preparation, and support of applicants, and of close liaison between clinical, counselling, and laboratory staff. The extensive and detailed information available for Huntington's disease from this and other studies will be of considerable value in relation to genetic testing for other late onset genetic disorders and will be even more relevant to Huntington's disease now that specific mutation analysis is possible for this disorder. PMID:8133502

  12. Psychological characteristics of people with Parkinson's disease who prematurely drop out of professionally led Internet chat support groups.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Morton A

    2007-12-01

    Researchers of Internet health interventions have begun to address the problems of high attrition rates. Attrition has been a problem for psychosocial interventions for nearly 50 years. It is ubiquitous no matter what the type of intervention or the modality of delivery. Consistent are the repeated findings that demographic characteristics are the most robust variables. We tested the hypothesis that the greater the fear and apprehension experienced in professionally led Internet support groups, the more likely the participants would not complete the 25-week intervention. The sample consisted of 66 people with Parkinson's disease; each participant was assigned to one of six chat groups. To assess psychological states, we used PCAD, a text analysis program analyzing each person's postings during each chat room session. There was a statistically significant difference between those who terminated the group early and those who completed the intervention on the Anxiety-Fear dimension, F=2.35, (6,63), p=0.03. People who dropped out demonstrated higher death and shame anxiety. A number of possible designs for online groups that may reduce premature attrition are discussed.

  13. Group motivational intervention in overweight/obese patients in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in the primary healthcare area

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The global mortality caused by cardiovascular disease increases with weight. The Framingham study showed that obesity is a cardiovascular risk factor independent of other risks such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and smoking. Moreover, the main problem in the management of weight-loss is its maintenance, if it is achieved. We have designed a study to determine whether a group motivational intervention, together with current clinical practice, is more efficient than the latter alone in the treatment of overweight and obesity, for initial weight loss and essentially to achieve maintenance of the weight achieved; and, secondly, to know if this intervention is more effective for reducing cardiovascular risk factors associated with overweight and obesity. Methods This 26-month follow up multi-centre trial, will include 1200 overweight/obese patients. Random assignment of the intervention by Basic Health Areas (BHA): two geographically separate groups have been created, one of which receives group motivational intervention (group intervention), delivered by a nurse trained by an expert phsychologist, in 32 group sessions, 1 to 12 fortnightly, and 13 to 32, monthly, on top of their standard program of diet, exercise, and the other (control group), receiving the usual follow up, with regular visits every 3 months. Discussion By addressing currently unanswered questions regarding the maintenance in weight loss in obesity/overweight, upon the expected completion of participant follow-up in 2012, the IMOAP trial should document, for the first time, the benefits of a motivational intervention as a treatment tool of weight loss in a primary care setting. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01006213 PMID:20298557

  14. Blood pressure categories and long-term risk of cardiovascular disease according to age group in Japanese men and women.

    PubMed

    Fujiyoshi, Akira; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Miura, Katsuyuki; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Nagasawa, Shin-Ya; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2012-09-01

    Blood pressure (BP) categories defined by systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) are commonly used. However, the BP category-specific risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has not been thoroughly investigated in different age groups. The aim of this study was to assess long-term CVD risk and its impact according to BP categories and age group. Pooling individual data from 10 cohorts, we studied 67 309 Japanese individuals (40-89 years old) who were free of CVD at baseline: we categorized them as belonging to three age groups: 'middle-aged' (40-64 years), 'elderly' (65-74 years) and 'very elderly' (75-89 years). BP was classified according to the 2009 Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines. Cox models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios for CVD deaths. We observed 1944 CVD deaths over a mean follow-up of 10.2 years. In all age groups, the overall relationship between BP category and CVD risk was positive, with a greater strength observed for younger age groups. We observed a trend of increased risk from SBP/DBP ≥ 130/85 mm Hg in the very elderly, and a significant increase from SBP/DBP ≥ 120/80 mm Hg in the other age groups. The population attributable fractions (PAFs) of CVD death in reference to the SBP/DBP<120/80 mm Hg category ranged from 23.4% in the very elderly to 60.3% in the middle-aged. We found an overall graded increase in CVD risk with higher BP category in the very elderly. The PAFs suggest that keeping BP levels low is an important strategy for primary CVD prevention, even in an elderly population.

  15. Six-Minute-Walk Distance and Accelerometry Predict Outcomes in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Independent of Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2011 Group

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Patrick J.; Babyak, Michael A.; Mabe, Stephanie K.; Martinu, Tereza; Welty-Wolf, Karen E.; Emery, Charles F.; Palmer, Scott M.; Blumenthal, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The 2011 combined Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) assessment incorporates symptoms, exacerbation history, and spirometry in discriminating risk of exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Six-minute-walk distance (6MWD) and accelerometry also have been used to assess disease severity in COPD. The association between these measures and the risks of hospitalization and mortality in the context of GOLD 2011 is unknown. Objectives: To describe changes in exercise tolerance and physical activity over time in patients with COPD and to test the hypothesis that lower baseline 6MWD or accelerometry step count is associated with increased risk of COPD-related hospitalization or all-cause mortality, independent of GOLD 2011 group. Methods: Physical function and medical outcomes were prospectively assessed in 326 patients with moderate to severe COPD in INSPIRE-II, a randomized controlled trial of a coping skills training intervention. Cox models were used to determine if GOLD 2011 group, 6MWD, or accelerometry steps were associated with risk of COPD-related hospitalization or all-cause mortality. Measurements and Main Results: Physical function declined over time in GOLD group D but remained stable in groups A, B, and C. GOLD classification was associated with time to death or first COPD-related hospitalization. Baseline 6MWD was more strongly associated with time to death or first COPD-related hospitalization (hazard ratio, 0.50 [95% confidence interval, 0.34, 0.73] per 150 m, P = 0.0003) than GOLD 2011 classification. A similar relationship was observed for accelerometry steps (hazard ratio, 0.80 [95% confidence interval, 0.70, 0.92] per 1,000 steps, P = 0.002). Conclusions: Exercise tolerance and daily physical activity are important predictors of hospitalization and mortality in COPD, independent of GOLD 2011 classification. Physical function may represent a modifiable risk factor that

  16. Rheumatic diseases: a general practitioner's view.

    PubMed

    Knox, J D

    1987-12-01

    Patients with rheumatic complaints are the subject of some 10% of the general practitioner's work. Approximately half of this work is related to the hitherto relatively neglected group of varied soft-tissue conditions, most of which are self-limiting and of a minor nature. Against a background of such diagnostic 'noise', the general practitioner has to remain alert for the fainter 'signal' of serious disease--rheumatic and non-rheumatic--at an early stage. Continuity of care calls on special qualities, behaviours and abilities in the doctor to boost and maintain morale, to coordinate management and to participate in team care. In addition to more traditional therapeutic measures, including analgesics, NSAIDs, disease-modifying drugs and physiotherapy, joint replacement is seen as a significant contribution. There is room for improvement in the structure process and outcomes of delivery of care as it may relate to rheumatic diseases. A simple illustration, based on a general practice audit of gout, is suggested as a possible model by which quality of care could be enhanced at the level of individual patients. While there is not a great deal of scope afforded to the general practitioner in the exercise of primary prevention of the rheumatic diseases, early diagnosis and timely support for carers of patients suffering from chronic rheumatic diseases are areas worth attention. Promotion of self-help is seen as a worthwhile activity in humanitarian and economic terms, though it calls for an appropriate balance to be struck.

  17. Beneficial effects of interleukin-6 in neonatal mouse models of group B streptococcal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, G; Tomasello, F; Migliardo, M; Delfino, D; Cochran, J; Cook, J A; Teti, G

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) plays a pathophysiologic role in sepsis induced in rat pups by group B streptococci (GBS). In this model, TNF-alpha is also partially responsible for the induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6). The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of IL-6 in neonatal BALB/c mice infected with type III GBS. The effect of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies and recombinant IL-6 on lethality and TNF-alpha production was investigated. In mouse pups infected with GBS strain COH1, plasma IL-6 reached levels of 3,067 +/- 955 and 1,923 +/- 891 U/ml when measured at 22 and 48 h, respectively (P < 0.05 compared with uninfected controls). Pretreatment with 25 micrograms of anti-IL-6 antibodies totally prevented the increase in circulating IL-6 bioactivity at both 22 and 48 h after infection (P < 0.05). Treatment with anti-IL-6 also induced a moderate decrease in survival time of mice infected with lethal doses of strains COH1 and COH31, as evidenced by increased lethality (P < 0.05) at 24 to 48 h but not at 96 h. Mouse recombinant IL-6 (12,500 U) given 6 h before challenge with strains COH1 and COH31 consistently increased survival time, as evidenced by decreased (P < 0.05) lethality at 48 to 72 h but not at 96 h. The effects of IL-6 pretreatment were dose dependent, since no protection was observed with doses lower than 12,500 U. In addition, no effects on lethality were noted when IL-6 was given at the time of challenge or at later times. TNF-alpha elevations (P < 0.05 compared with uninfected controls) were measured at 12, 22, and 48 h after challenge with strain COH1 (68 +/- 28, 233 +/- 98, and 98 +/- 34 U, respectively). Pretreatment with IL-6 significantly (P < 0.05) decreased plasma TNF-alpha levels at 12 and 22 h, with 55 and 69% inhibitions, respectively. Anti-IL-6 had an opposite effect, as evidenced by a 145% increase (P < 0.05) in TNF-alpha levels at 48 h after challenge. Collectively, our data are

  18. A best practice position statement on pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: the Italian Study Group on Kidney and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Castellino, Santina; Gernone, Giuseppe; Santoro, Domenico; Moroni, Gabriella; Giannattasio, Michele; Gregorini, Gina; Giacchino, Franca; Attini, Rossella; Loi, Valentina; Limardo, Monica; Gammaro, Linda; Todros, Tullia; Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Pregnancy is increasingly undertaken in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and, conversely, CKD is increasingly diagnosed in pregnancy: up to 3 % of pregnancies are estimated to be complicated by CKD. The heterogeneity of CKD (accounting for stage, hypertension and proteinuria) and the rarity of several kidney diseases make risk assessment difficult and therapeutic strategies are often based upon scattered experiences and small series. In this setting, the aim of this position statement of the Kidney and Pregnancy Study Group of the Italian Society of Nephrology is to review the literature, and discuss the experience in the clinical management of CKD in pregnancy. CKD is associated with an increased risk for adverse pregnancy-related outcomes since its early stage, also in the absence of hypertension and proteinuria, thus supporting the need for a multidisciplinary follow-up in all CKD patients. CKD stage, hypertension and proteinuria are interrelated, but they are also independent risk factors for adverse pregnancy-related outcomes. Among the different kidney diseases, patients with glomerulonephritis and immunologic diseases are at higher risk of developing or increasing proteinuria and hypertension, a picture often difficult to differentiate from preeclampsia. The risk is higher in active immunologic diseases, and in those cases that are detected or flare up during pregnancy. Referral to tertiary care centres for multidisciplinary follow-up and tailored approaches are warranted. The risk of maternal death is, almost exclusively, reported in systemic lupus erythematosus and vasculitis, which share with diabetic nephropathy an increased risk for perinatal death of the babies. Conversely, patients with kidney malformation, autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease, stone disease, and previous upper urinary tract infections are at higher risk for urinary tract infections, in turn associated with prematurity. No risk for malformations other than those

  19. Patterns of cardiovascular disease in a group of HIV-infected adults in Yaoundé, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Menanga, Alain Patrick; Ngomseu, Christelle Kougang; Jingi, Ahmadou M.; Mfangam, Brigitte Molu; Gweth, Marie Ntep; Blackett, Kathleen Ngu; Kingue, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is an increasingly important issue in human immunodeficiency viral (HIV)-infected individuals. There is dearth of information on the patterns of cardiovascular disease especially in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) patients. This study reports on the clinical, biological, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic characteristics of a group of HIV-infected patients presenting with symptoms of heart disease in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the Yaoundé Central Hospital and Jamot Hospital. Consenting HIV-infected adults aged ≥18 years with symptoms suggestive of heart disease were consecutively recruited between February and July 2014. All participants underwent a complete clinical examination; biological analyses including CD4 cell counts, fasting blood glucose, and serum lipids, resting electrocardiography and cardiac ultrasound, and a venous ultrasound where necessary. Results Forty four subjects (21 men) were included. Their mean age was 48 (SD 13) years. Thirty patients (68.2%) were in WHO clinical stages 3 and 4 of HIV infection, 27 (61.4%) had a CD4 cell count <200/mm3, and 31 (70.5%) were on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Hypertension (43.2%, n=19) was the most frequent cardiovascular risk factor; and dyslipidemia which was found in 17 subjects (38.6%) was significantly associated with ART (48.4% vs. 15.4%, P=0.04). Only men where smokers (23% vs. 0%, P=0.019). Exertional dyspnea (86.4%, n=38) and cough (59.1%, n=26) were the most frequent symptoms, and the clinical presentation was dominated by heart failure (75%, n=33). The most frequent echocardiographic abnormalities were pericardial effusion (45.5%, n=20) and dilated cardiomyopathy (22.7%, n=10). Dilated cardiomyopathy was significantly associated with CD4 cell counts <200/mm3 (100%, P=0.003). Primary pulmonary hypertension (PH) rate was 11.4% (n=5) and all cases occurred at CD4 cell counts ≥200/mm3 (P=0.005). The most frequent

  20. Diet and exercise adherence and practices among medically underserved patients with chronic disease: variation across four ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Orzech, Kathryn M; Vivian, James; Huebner Torres, Cristina; Armin, Julie; Shaw, Susan J

    2013-02-01

    Many factors interact to create barriers to dietary and exercise plan adherence among medically underserved patients with chronic disease, but aspects related to culture and ethnicity are underexamined in the literature. Using both qualitative (n = 71) and quantitative (n = 297) data collected in a 4-year, multimethod study among patients with hypertension and/or diabetes, the authors explored differences in self-reported adherence to diet and exercise plans and self-reported daily diet and exercise practices across four ethnic groups-Whites, Blacks, Vietnamese, and Latinos-at a primary health care center in Massachusetts. Adherence to diet and exercise plans differed across ethnic groups even after controlling for key sociodemographic variables, with Vietnamese participants reporting the highest adherence. Food and exercise options were shaped by economic constraints as well as ethnic and cultural familiarity with certain foods and types of activity. These findings indicate that health care providers should consider ethnicity and economic status together to increase effectiveness in encouraging diverse populations with chronic disease to make healthy lifestyle changes.

  1. The effects and mechanism of estrogen on rats with Parkinson’s disease in different age groups

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Zhong; Sui, Chen-Yan; Chen, Qiang; Zhuang, Yuan-Su; Zhang, Hong; Zhou, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In order to investigate the effect and mechanism of estrogen in rotenone-induced Parkinson’s disease (PD) rats in different age groups. Methods: we established rat models of PD by rotenone at different interventions. Then, behavioral tests, immunohistochemistry, western blot, high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detector (HPLC-ECD) and electron microscopy were performed. Results: Results revealed the following: (1) Rotenone significantly reduced rotarod latencies in senile rats, prolonged their climbing pole time, and decreased TH positive cells, DA and its metabolite, DOPAC. Estrogen ameliorated this effect, in which weaker effects were observed in younger rats compared with older rats. (2) Rotenone increased the expression of LC3-II in older rats, but estrogen and tamoxifen did not show the same effect. (3) Rotenone increased the number of autophagosomes, but estrogen increased the proportion of autolysosomes/autophagosomes in the rotenone-treated group. (4) U0126 could reduce the number of autophagosomes in the rotenone-treated group, but this did not change the proportion of autolysosome/autophagosome in combining rotenone with the estrogen group. Rapamycin did not increase the number of autophagosomes in the rotenone-treated group, but combining rapamycin with estrogen and rotenone was able to further increase the proportion of autolysome/autophagosomes. Therefore, we speculate that the senile rat model of PD was more reliable than that in young rats. Conclusions: In addition, estrogen could promote autophagy maturation through the ERK pathway, and had an obvious therapeutic effect on the rat model of PD. PMID:27829998

  2. Scoring system for renal pathology in Fabry disease: report of the International Study Group of Fabry Nephropathy (ISGFN)

    PubMed Central

    Fogo, Agnes B.; Bostad, Leif; Svarstad, Einar; Cook, William J.; Moll, Solange; Barbey, Federic; Geldenhuys, Laurette; West, Michael; Ferluga, Dusan; Vujkovac, Bojan; Howie, Alexander J.; Burns, Áine; Reeve, Roy; Waldek, Stephen; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Valbuena, Carmen; Oliveira, João Paulo; Müller, Justus; Breunig, Frank; Zhang, Xiao; Warnock, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Background. In Fabry nephropathy, alpha-galactosidase deficiency leads to accumulation of glycosphingolipids in all kidney cell types, proteinuria and progressive loss of kidney function. Methods. An international working group of nephrologists from 11 Fabry centres identified adult Fabry patients, and pathologists scored histologic changes on renal biopsies. A standardized scoring system was developed with a modified Delphi technique assessing 59 Fabry nephropathy cases. Each case was scored independently of clinical information by at least three pathologists with an average final score reported. Results. We assessed 35 males (mean age 36.4 years) and 24 females (43.9 years) who mostly had clinically mild Fabry nephropathy. The average serum creatinine was 1.3 mg/dl (114.9 μmol/l); estimated glomerular filtration rate was 81.7 ml/min/1.73 m2 and urine protein to creatinine ratio was 1.08 g/g (122.0 mg/mmol). Males had greater podocyte vacuolization on light microscopy (mean score) and glycosphingolipid inclusions on semi-thin sections than females. Males also had significantly more proximal tubule, peritubular capillary and vascular intimal inclusions. Arteriolar hyalinosis was similar, but females had significantly more arterial hyalinosis. Chronic kidney disease stage correlated with arterial and glomerular sclerosis scores. Significant changes, including segmental and global sclerosis, and interstitial fibrosis were seen even in patients with stage 1–2 chronic kidney disease with minimal proteinuria. Conclusions. The development of a standardized scoring system of both disease-specific lesions, i.e. lipid deposition related, and general lesions of progression, i.e. fibrosis and sclerosis, showed a spectrum of histologic appearances even in early clinical stage of Fabry nephropathy. These findings support the role of kidney biopsy in the baseline evaluation of Fabry nephropathy, even with mild clinical disease. The scoring system will be useful for

  3. Associations between food and beverage groups and major diet-related chronic diseases: an exhaustive review of pooled/meta-analyses and systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Fardet, Anthony; Boirie, Yves

    2014-12-01

    Associations between food and beverage groups and the risk of diet-related chronic disease (DRCD) have been the subject of intensive research in preventive nutrition. Pooled/meta-analyses and systematic reviews (PMASRs) aim to better characterize these associations. To date, however, there has been no attempt to synthesize all PMASRs that have assessed the relationship between food and beverage groups and DRCDs. The objectives of this review were to aggregate PMASRs to obtain an overview of the associations between food and beverage groups (n = 17) and DRCDs (n = 10) and to establish new directions for future research needs. The present review of 304 PMASRs published between 1950 and 2013 confirmed that plant food groups are more protective than animal food groups against DRCDs. Within plant food groups, grain products are more protective than fruits and vegetables. Among animal food groups, dairy/milk products have a neutral effect on the risk of DRCDs, while red/processed meats tend to increase the risk. Among beverages, tea was the most protective and soft drinks the least protective against DRCDs. For two of the DRCDs examined, sarcopenia and kidney disease, no PMASR was found. Overweight/obesity, type 2 diabetes, and various types of cardiovascular disease and cancer accounted for 289 of the PMASRs. There is a crucial need to further study the associations between food and beverage groups and mental health, skeletal health, digestive diseases, liver diseases, kidney diseases, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

  4. A cohort study on diet and the risk of Parkinson's disease: the role of food groups and diet quality.

    PubMed

    Sääksjärvi, K; Knekt, P; Lundqvist, A; Männistö, S; Heliövaara, M; Rissanen, H; Järvinen, R

    2013-01-28

    Previous studies on individual foods and nutrients and Parkinson's disease (PD) risk have been inconsistent. Furthermore, only one study has examined the association between the quality of diet and PD. We investigated the prediction of food groups and diet quality on PD in the Finnish Mobile Clinic Survey (1966-72). The population comprised 4524 individuals, aged 40-79 years and free from PD at baseline. Data collection included health examinations, a questionnaire and a 1-year dietary history interview. A modified Alternate Healthy Eating Index was formed to assess diet quality. Statistical analyses were based on Cox's model. During a 41-year follow-up, eighty-five incident cases of PD occurred. No statistically significant associations were found between PD incidence and most of the food groups examined. A few exceptions were fruits and berries in men and milk in women, which showed positive associations. An inverse association between the intake of meat products and PD was found in women. The diet quality index did not predict PD, the adjusted relative risk between the highest and lowest quartiles being 1.83 (95 % CI 0.65, 5.18) in men and 0.97 (95 % CI 0.38, 2.48) in women. The present study suggests that since most of the single food groups or the quality of diet did not predict PD occurrence, the role of diet is apparently rather modest.

  5. Symptomatic and neuroprotective effects following activation of nigral group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in rodent models of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Austin, PJ; Betts, MJ; Broadstock, M; O'Neill, MJ; Mitchell, SN; Duty, S

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Increased glutamatergic innervation of the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) and pars compacta (SNpc) may contribute to the motor deficits and neurodegeneration, respectively, in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study aimed to establish whether activation of pre-synaptic group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors reduced glutamate release in the SN, and provided symptomatic or neuroprotective relief in animal models of PD. Experimental approach: Broad-spectrum group III mGlu receptor agonists, O-phospho-l-serine (l-SOP) and l-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (l-AP4), were assessed for their ability to inhibit KCl-evoked [3H]-d-aspartate release in rat nigral prisms or inhibit KCl-evoked endogenous glutamate release in the SNpr in vivo using microdialysis. Reversal of akinesia in reserpine-treated rats was assessed following intranigral injection of l-SOP and l-AP4. Finally, the neuroprotective effect of 7 days' supra-nigral treatment with l-AP4 was examined in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. Key results: l-SOP and l-AP4 inhibited [3H]-d-aspartate release by 33 and 44% respectively. These effects were blocked by the selective group III mGlu antagonist (RS)-α-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (CPPG). l-SOP also reduced glutamate release in the SNpr in vivo by 48%. Injection of l-SOP and l-AP4 into the SNpr reversed reserpine-induced akinesia. Following administration above the SNpc, l-AP4 provided neurochemical, histological and functional protection against 6-OHDA lesion of the nigrostriatal tract. Pretreatment with CPPG inhibited these effects. Conclusions and implications: These findings highlight group III mGlu receptors in the SN as potential targets for providing both symptomatic and neuroprotective relief in PD, and indicate that inhibition of glutamate release in the SN may underlie these effects. PMID:20649576

  6. Invasive group B streptococcal disease in infants: a 19-year nationwide study. Serotype distribution, incidence and recurrent infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ekelund, K.; Konradsen, H. B.

    2004-01-01

    During the period 1984-2002, 472 cases of invasive group B streptococcal (GBS) disease in infants aged 0-90 days in Denmark were registered. The overall incidence was 0.4/1000 live births. Most infants (73%) had early-onset GBS infection with 53% registered within the first day. Serotype III predominated (59%) with other serotypes as follows: Ia (16%), Ib (8%), NT (7%), II (6%), other serotypes (5%). Recurrence of GBS infection was registered in six infants, and the interval with no antibiotic therapy varied from 2 to 39 days. The serotypes of the isolates obtained from first and second episodes were identical (serotype III in five, and serotype Ia in one infant). Paired isolates were indistinguishable by PFGE and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Invasive GBS infections in infants are still a problem in Denmark, and recurrent infections are registered in 1% of these infants. PMID:15635965

  7. Expressed Sense of Self by People With Alzheimer's Disease in a Support Group Interpreted in Terms of Agency and Communion.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Ragnhild; Hansebo, Görel; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Hellström, Ingrid; Norberg, Astrid

    2016-04-01

    The self is constructed in cooperation with other people and social context influences how people perceive and express it. People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) often receive insufficient support in constructing their preferred selves, but little is known about how they express themselves together with other people with AD. In accordance with Harré's social constructionist theory of self, this study aimed to describe how five people with mild and moderate AD express their Self 2 (i.e., their personal attributes and life histories) in a support group with a facilitator experienced in communicating with people with AD. The participants' expressions of their Self 2 were analyzed with qualitative abductive content analysis and interpreted in terms of agency and communion and a lack of agency and communion. The findings highlight the importance of supporting a sense of agency and communion when assisting people with AD in constructing their self.

  8. Predictors of placebo group decline in the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) in 24 week clinical trials of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Irizarry, Michael C; Webb, David J; Bains, Chanchal; Barrett, Steven J; Lai, Robert Y; Laroche, Janette P; Hosford, David; Maher-Edwards, Gareth; Weil, John G

    2008-07-01

    One limitation of several recent 24 week Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials was the lack of cognitive decline detected by the AD Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) in the placebo groups, possibly obscuring true medication effects. Data from 733 individuals in the placebo arms of six AD clinical trials performed 1996-1997 were pooled to examine the relationship of clinical, demographic, and genetic characteristics with the 24 week change in ADAS-cog. Baseline cognitive and functional status and the screening-to-baseline change in ADAS-cog were the strongest independent predictors of the 24 week change in ADAS-cog. The ADAS-cog did not detect progression in patients with mild dementia (screening Mini-Mental State Exam, MMSE, >or=20). The change in ADAS-cog from screening to baseline was inversely correlated with the 24 week change score; it was more difficult to detect cognitive decline at 24 weeks if individuals markedly worsened from screening to baseline. The effects of baseline MMSE and screening-to-baseline change in ADAS-cog generalized to the placebo group (N=106) of another AD study performed in 2004-2005. Overcoming lack of placebo decline in AD clinical trials will require scales more sensitive to cognitive decline in mild AD and strategies to reduce within-person variability in outcome measures.

  9. An ongoing six-year innovative osteoporosis disease management program: challenges and success in an IPA physician group environment.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ann; Hittell, Jodi; Beardsley, Carrie; Noh, Charles; Stoukides, Cheryl A; Kaul, Alan F

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this ongoing comprehensive osteoporosis disease management initiative is to provide the adult primary care physicians' (PCPs) offices with a program enabling them to systematically identify and manage their population for osteoporosis. For over six years, Hill Physicians Medical Group (Hill Physicians) has implemented multiple strategies to develop a best practice for identifying and treating members who were candidates for osteoporosis therapy. Numerous tools were used to support this disease management effort, including: evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, patient education sessions, the Simple Calculated Osteoporosis Risk Estimation (SCORE) questionnaire tool, member specific reports for PCPs, targeted member mailings, office-based Peripheral Instantaneous X-ray Imaging (PIXI) test and counseling, dual x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan guidelines, and web-based Electronic Simple Calculated Osteoporosis Risk Estimation (eSCORE) questionnaire tools. Hill Physicians tabulated results for patients who completed 2649 SCORE tests, screened 978 patients with PIXI tests, and identified 338 osteopenic and 124 osteoporotic patients. The preliminary results of this unique six-year ongoing educational initiative are slow but promising. New physician offices express interest in participating and those offices that have participated in the program continue to screen for osteoporosis. Hill Physicians' message is consistent and is communicated to the physicians repeatedly in different ways in accordance with the principles of educational outreach. Physicians who have conducted the program have positive feedback from their patients and office staff and have begun to communicate their experience to their peers.

  10. Working Group Guidelines on the nursing roles in caring for patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Kurek, Marzena; Poteralska, Aneta; Bieniek, Ewa; Marynka, Anna; Pabich, Grażyna; Liebert, Ariel; Kłopocka, Maria; Rydzewska, Grażyna

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, present a major challenge for present-day gastroenterology due to their increasing incidence, chronic nature, risk of permanent worsening of quality of life of patients, and the costs of conservative and invasive treatment. Basic and advanced nursing care are important parts of the multidisciplinary care for patients. The developed guidelines on the nursing care, which are compliant with the European guidelines published by Nurses-European Crohn's & Colitis Organisation (N-ECCO), were adjusted to the current situation in Poland. Significant issues that are important for nursing teams have been identified, with particular emphasis on the specificity of working in centres specialising in the care of IBD patients. The Working Group paid attention to the conditions that should be satisfied in order to optimise the nursing care for IBD patients, and the necessity to develop professional and scientific cooperation with European centres within European Crohn's & Colitis Organisation (ECCO) and N-ECCO. PMID:25276248

  11. Community perceptions on diarrheal diseases: a case study in swampy lowland area of south Sumatra, Indonesia. The Diarrheal Diseases Research and Training Study Group.

    PubMed

    Ismail, R; Aulia, H; Susanto, T A; Roisuddin; Hamzah, M

    1991-01-01

    Four investigators conducted participative observation at 4 hamlets, representing 4 typical topography in the area, wet or dry near the river and wet or dry far from the river, in District Rambutan, South Sumatera Province, Indonesia from July 1988 up until February 1989 to study the community perception and practices on diarrheal diseases (DD). The observation was supported by focus group discussions and informal interviews. It was found that the causes of DD can be grouped into: dirty water; wrong (cold, hot, sting) food; part of the growth process; physical condition (extreme heat, cold wind and inner abnormality, inner heat, muscle strain), and supernatural. The type of DD can be grouped into: mild without vomiting named ngadi, negenteng-ngentengi, nambah kepacakan, etc which was linked to the growth process; more severe diarrhea, might be with fever (mising-mising, murus, mencret, etc); more severe diarrhea with severe vomiting (muntager, kolera); bloody/mucoid stool (disentri, mising tai angin, mising umbal). The community had also the concept of prolonged diarrhea named as menerus (literally meaning prolonged) Muntaber was more associated with bad water while the prolonged one was more associated with inner abnormality. The danger of diarrhea perceived was susut = shrinkage, lisut = emaciation. Pale and red hair with lisut were recognized as the dangers of prolonged diarrhea. The community did not associate these conditions with fluid loss. The management started by self medication using tapel (pasta of herb applied) to the stomach), decoct (daun jambu, akar teratai etc), solid oral preparation (cassava with raw sugar, rast rice, etc).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Quality of life assessment in Hodgkin's disease: a new comprehensive approach. First experiences from the EORTC/GELA and GHSG trials. EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group. Groupe D'Etude des Lymphomes de L'Adulte and German Hodgkin Study Group.

    PubMed

    Flechtner, H; Rüffer, J U; Henry-Amar, M; Mellink, W A; Sieber, M; Fermé, C; Eghbali, H; Josting, A; Diehl, V

    1998-01-01

    Previous reports from available trials have dealt with negative long-term sequelae in Hodgkin's disease (HD) survivors. There is, however, a lack of longitudinal data showing the correlation between outcome and various treatment-related variables and the process of re-adaptation into normal life after the end of treatment. In order to investigate the quality of life (QoL) of patients with HD in different dimensions during active treatment and follow-up and to identify longitudinal patterns of QoL dimensions during re-adaptation to normal life within the EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group and Groupe D'Etude des Lymphomes de L'Adulte (EORTC/GELA) and the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG), QoL assessment strategies were put into use over the last three to five years. Furthermore, the efforts aimed at obtaining cross-cultural comparisons between the participating countries and study groups (EORTC/GELA and GHSG). Within the randomised EORTC/GELA Trial 'H8' for clinical stage I-II HD which started in September 1993, patients receive a QoL questionnaire for completion at each follow-up visit during the first 10 years after the end of active therapy. The corresponding 'HD8' study of the GHSG employs the assessment of QoL during and after active treatment periods. Within both studies, the EORTC QLQ C30 is used for QoL assessment incorporated in the QLQ-S (quality of life questionnaire for survivors), which additionally addresses the aspects of fatigue/malaise, sexuality, specific side effects, and retrospective evaluation of treatment. In total the QLQ-S includes 45 questions on 14 functional, symptom, and fatigue scales, 15 additional single items, and 3 open questions. In addition to the longitudinal QoL assessment, the GHSG carried out cross-sectional QoL trials with all cured surviving patients from the past HD1-6 studies and a matched normal control sample employing the QLQ-S and the life situation questionnaire (LSQ), an instrument covering objective data from 45

  13. Co-circulation of genetically distinct groups of avian paramyxovirus type 1 in pigeon Newcastle disease in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rezaei Far, A; Peighambari, S M; Pourbakhsh, S A; Ashtari, A; Soltani, M

    2017-02-01

    Pigeons are considered as one of the major natural reservoirs in the epidemiology of Newcastle disease (ND). In this study, the partial sequence of fusion protein gene of 17 pigeon-origin ND viruses (NDVs) isolated during 2012-2013 in Iran was analysed. Since the studied isolates showed F0 protein cleavage sites compatible with velogenic NDVs, all were considered as virulent NDVs. Two isolates carried 112RRQKRF117 as the cleavage site motif, whereas the rest demonstrated 112KRQKRF117 motif which just recently has been reported among Iranian virulent NDVs. Phylogenetic analysis divided all these diverse isolates in two distinct clusters within class II genotype VI. Based on the partial fusion protein gene sequence, 15 out of 17 isolates showed the highest genetic identity to subgenotype VIb/2 and the other two isolates were placed in a distinct genetic group of genotype VI. Based on recent findings, at least two different sublineages of genotype VI are causing the ND outbreaks in the pigeon population and are circulating simultaneously along with virulent NDVs of genotype VII in various species in Iran. The continuing circulation of a diverse group of virulent NDVs as an enzootic in widespread species such as pigeon can cause outbreaks in commercial poultry flocks and also failure in controlling programmes. Therefore, the constant monitoring and awareness of the virus characteristics should be considered in controlling programmes against ND in Iran.

  14. Lung Capillary Stress Failure and Arteriolar Remodelling in Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Left Heart Disease (Group 2 PH).

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Nour R; Ledoux, Jonathan; Dupuis, Jocelyn

    2016-01-01

    Left heart diseases (LHD) represent the most prevalent cause of pulmonary hypertension (PH), yet there are still no approved therapies that selectively target the pulmonary circulation in LHD. The increase in pulmonary capillary pressure due to LHD is a triggering event leading to physical and biological alterations of the pulmonary circulation. Acutely, mechanosensitive endothelial dysfunction and increased capillary permeability combined with reduced fluid resorption lead to the development of interstitial and alveolar oedema. From repeated cycles of such capillary stress failure originate more profound changes with pulmonary endothelial dysfunction causing increased basal and reactive pulmonary vascular tone. This contributes to pulmonary vascular remodelling with increased arterial wall thickness, but most prominently, to alveolar wall remodelling characterized by myofibroblasts proliferation with collagen and interstitial matrix deposition. Although protective against acute pulmonary oedema, alveolar wall thickening becomes maladaptive and is responsible for the development of a restrictive lung syndrome and impaired gas exchanges contributing to shortness of breath and PH. Increasing awareness of these processes is unraveling novel pathophysiologic processes that could represent selective therapeutic targets. Thus, the roles of caveolins, of the intermediate myofilament nestin and of endothelial calcium dyshomeostasis were recently evaluated in pre-clinical models. The pathophysiology of PH due to LHD (group II PH) is distinctive from other groups of PH. Therefore, therapies targeting PH due to LHD must be evaluated in that context.

  15. Acute clinical events in 299 homozygous sickle cell patients living in France. French Study Group on Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Neonato, M G; Guilloud-Bataille, M; Beauvais, P; Bégué, P; Belloy, M; Benkerrou, M; Ducrocq, R; Maier-Redelsperger, M; de Montalembert, M; Quinet, B; Elion, J; Feingold, J; Girot, R

    2000-09-01

    A subset of 299 patients with homozygous sickle cell anaemia, enrolled in the cohort of the French Study Group on sickle cell disease (SCD), was investigated in this study. The majority of patients were children (mean age 10.1 +/- 5.8 yr) of first generation immigrants from Western and Central Africa, the others originated from the French West Indies (20.2%). We report the frequency of the main clinical events (mean follow-up 4.2 +/- 2.2 yr). The prevalence of meningitis-septicaemia and osteomyelitis was, respectively, 11.4% and 12% acute chest syndrome was observed in 134 patients (44.8%). Twenty patients (6.7%) developed stroke with peak prevalence at 10-15 yr of age. One hundred and seventy-two patients (58%) suffered from one or more painful sickle cell crises, while the others (42.5%) never suffered from pain. The overall frequency of acute anaemic episodes was 50.5%, (acute aplastic anaemia 46%; acute splenic sequestration 26%). A group of 27 patients were asymptomatic (follow-up > 3 yr). Epistatic mechanisms influencing SCD were studied. Coinherited alpha-thalassemia strongly reduced the risk of stroke (p <0.001) and increased that of painful crises (p < 0.02). There was a low prevalence of Senegal and Bantu (CAR) betas-chromosomes in patients with meningitis (p <0.04) and osteomyelitis (p < 0.03). Prevalence of Senegal betas-chromosomes was lower in the asymptomatic group of 27 patients (p < 0.02). The patients come from a population of unmixed immigrants in whom the beta-globin gene haplotype strongly reflects the geographic origin and identifies subgroups with a homogenous genetic background. Thus the observed effects might result more from differences in as yet unidentified determinants in the genetic background than from the direct linkage with differences in the beta-globin gene locus.

  16. The Devil Has Slippery Shoes. A Biased Biography of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Polly

    This book provides an insider's account of the attempts of the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM) to introduce self-help educational innovations into the Black community of Mississippi. It documents the efforts of one of the first OEO-financed Head Start projects designed to help the Black people of Mississippi overcome economic,…

  17. Sequence type 1 group B Streptococcus, an emerging cause of invasive disease in adults, evolves by small genetic changes.

    PubMed

    Flores, Anthony R; Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Saldaña, Miguel; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Ajami, Nadim J; Holder, Michael E; Petrosino, Joseph F; Thompson, Erika; Margarit Y Ros, Immaculada; Rosini, Roberto; Grandi, Guido; Horstmann, Nicola; Teatero, Sarah; McGeer, Allison; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Rappuoli, Rino; Baker, Carol J; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2015-05-19

    The molecular mechanisms underlying pathogen emergence in humans is a critical but poorly understood area of microbiologic investigation. Serotype V group B Streptococcus (GBS) was first isolated from humans in 1975, and rates of invasive serotype V GBS disease significantly increased starting in the early 1990s. We found that 210 of 229 serotype V GBS strains (92%) isolated from the bloodstream of nonpregnant adults in the United States and Canada between 1992 and 2013 were multilocus sequence type (ST) 1. Elucidation of the complete genome of a 1992 ST-1 strain revealed that this strain had the highest homology with a GBS strain causing cow mastitis and that the 1992 ST-1 strain differed from serotype V strains isolated in the late 1970s by acquisition of cell surface proteins and antimicrobial resistance determinants. Whole-genome comparison of 202 invasive ST-1 strains detected significant recombination in only eight strains. The remaining 194 strains differed by an average of 97 SNPs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a temporally dependent mode of genetic diversification consistent with the emergence in the 1990s of ST-1 GBS as major agents of human disease. Thirty-one loci were identified as being under positive selective pressure, and mutations at loci encoding polysaccharide capsule production proteins, regulators of pilus expression, and two-component gene regulatory systems were shown to affect the bacterial phenotype. These data reveal that phenotypic diversity among ST-1 GBS is mainly driven by small genetic changes rather than extensive recombination, thereby extending knowledge into how pathogens adapt to humans.

  18. Causes of death after therapy for early stage Hodgkin's disease entered on EORTC protocols. EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group.

    PubMed

    Henry-Amar, M; Hayat, M; Meerwaldt, J H; Burgers, M; Carde, P; Somers, R; Noordijk, E M; Monconduit, M; Thomas, J; Cosset, J M

    1990-11-01

    The risk of dying from different causes after Hodgkin's disease (HD) therapy has been quantified from a series of 1,449 patients with early stages included in four successive clinical trials conducted by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Lymphoma Cooperative Group since 1963. Overall, 240 patients died and the 15-year survival rate was 69% whereas the expected rate was 95%. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) technique was used to quantify excess deaths as a function of time since first therapy. At each interval, SMR was significantly increased, giving: 0-3 year, 8.86 (p less than 0.001); 4-6 year, 9.25 (p less than 0.001); 7-9 year, 7.08 (p less than 0.001); 10-12 year, 9.53 (p less than 0.001); 13-15 year, 4.37 (p less than 0.01); and 16+ years, 3.80 (p less than 0.05). While the proportion of deaths as a consequence of HD progression, treatment side-effect, and intercurrent disease decreased with time, that of second cancer and cardiac failure peaked during the 10-12 year post-treatment interval. After 15 years of follow-up, the risk of dying from causes other than HD continued to increase. These findings indicate that although probably cured from HD, patients are at higher risk for death than expected, a risk that might be a consequence of therapy.

  19. Evaluating the impact of a disease management program for chronic complex conditions at two large northeast health plans using a control group methodology.

    PubMed

    Schwerner, Henry; Mellody, Timothy; Goldstein, Allan B; Wansink, Daryl; Sullivan, Virginia; Yelenik, Stephan N; Charlton, Warwick; Lloyd, Kelley; Courtemanche, Ted

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study was to observe trends in payer expenditures for plan members with one of 14 chronic, complex conditions comparing one group with a disease management program specific to their condition (the intervention group) and the other with no specific disease management program (the control group) for these conditions. The authors used payer claims and membership data to identify members eligible for the program in a 12-month baseline year (October 2001 to September 2002) and a subsequent 12-month program year (October 2002 to September 2003). Two payers were analyzed: one health plan with members primarily in New Jersey (AmeriHealth New Jersey [AHNJ]), where the disease management program was offered, and one affiliated large plan with members primarily in the metro Philadelphia area, where the program was not offered. The claims payment policy for both plans is identical. Intervention and control groups were analyzed for equivalence. The analysis was conducted in both groups over identical time periods. The intervention group showed statistically significant (p < 0.01) differences in total paid claims trend and expenditures when compared to the control group. Intervention group members showed a reduction in expenditures of -8%, while control group members showed an increase of +10% over identical time periods. Subsequent analyses controlling for outliers and product lines served to confirm the overall results. The disease management program is likely responsible for the observed difference between the intervention and control group results. A well-designed, targeted disease management program offered by a motivated, supportive health plan can play an important role in cost improvement strategies for members with complex, chronic conditions.

  20. Haematopoietic SCT in severe autoimmune diseases: updated guidelines of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Snowden, J A; Saccardi, R; Allez, M; Ardizzone, S; Arnold, R; Cervera, R; Denton, C; Hawkey, C; Labopin, M; Mancardi, G; Martin, R; Moore, J J; Passweg, J; Peters, C; Rabusin, M; Rovira, M; van Laar, J M; Farge, D

    2012-01-01

    In 1997, the first consensus guidelines for haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) in autoimmune diseases (ADs) were published, while an international coordinated clinical programme was launched. These guidelines provided broad principles for the field over the following decade and were accompanied by comprehensive data collection in the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) AD Registry. Subsequently, retrospective analyses and prospective phase I/II studies generated evidence to support the feasibility, safety and efficacy of HSCT in several types of severe, treatment-resistant ADs, which became the basis for larger-scale phase II and III studies. In parallel, there has also been an era of immense progress in biological therapy in ADs. The aim of this document is to provide revised and updated guidelines for both the current application and future development of HSCT in ADs in relation to the benefits, risks and health economic considerations of other modern treatments. Patient safety considerations are central to guidance on patient selection and HSCT procedural aspects within appropriately experienced and Joint Accreditation Committee of International Society for Cellular Therapy and EBMT accredited centres. A need for prospective interventional and non-interventional studies, where feasible, along with systematic data reporting, in accordance with EBMT policies and procedures, is emphasized. PMID:22002489

  1. Options for basing Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) on chronic disease endpoints: report from a joint US-/Canadian-sponsored working group.

    PubMed

    Yetley, Elizabeth A; MacFarlane, Amanda J; Greene-Finestone, Linda S; Garza, Cutberto; Ard, Jamy D; Atkinson, Stephanie A; Bier, Dennis M; Carriquiry, Alicia L; Harlan, William R; Hattis, Dale; King, Janet C; Krewski, Daniel; O'Connor, Deborah L; Prentice, Ross L; Rodricks, Joseph V; Wells, George A

    2017-01-01

    Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) are used in Canada and the United States in planning and assessing diets of apparently healthy individuals and population groups. The approaches used to establish DRIs on the basis of classical nutrient deficiencies and/or toxicities have worked well. However, it has proved to be more challenging to base DRI values on chronic disease endpoints; deviations from the traditional framework were often required, and in some cases, DRI values were not established for intakes that affected chronic disease outcomes despite evidence that supported a relation. The increasing proportions of elderly citizens, the growing prevalence of chronic diseases, and the persistently high prevalence of overweight and obesity, which predispose to chronic disease, highlight the importance of understanding the impact of nutrition on chronic disease prevention and control. A multidisciplinary working group sponsored by the Canadian and US government DRI steering committees met from November 2014 to April 2016 to identify options for addressing key scientific challenges encountered in the use of chronic disease endpoints to establish reference values. The working group focused on 3 key questions: 1) What are the important evidentiary challenges for selecting and using chronic disease endpoints in future DRI reviews, 2) what intake-response models can future DRI committees consider when using chronic disease endpoints, and 3) what are the arguments for and against continuing to include chronic disease endpoints in future DRI reviews? This report outlines the range of options identified by the working group for answering these key questions, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of each option.

  2. Type-specific capsular antigen is associated with virulence in late-onset group B Streptococcal type III disease.

    PubMed Central

    Klegerman, M E; Boyer, K M; Papierniak, C K; Levine, L; Gotoff, S P

    1984-01-01

    Strain differences have been postulated to explain the observation that group B Streptococcus type III (GBS III) late-onset disease occurs in only a fraction of colonized infants. To determine the distribution of type-specific polysaccharide antigen (Ag) in GBS III, Ag was measured by rocket immunoelectrophoresis in both supernatant fluids and EDTA extracts and by radial immunodiffusion in multiple HCl extracts of the pellet from cultures of 10 strains of GBS III. Capsular Ag was defined as the sum of Ag in EDTA extracts + Ag in multiple HCl extracts. Both Ag in EDTA extracts and Ag in supernatant fluids correlated with capsular Ag (r = 0.94). GBS III strains were obtained from the blood of 19 infants with late-onset sepsis, from the cerebrospinal fluid or blood of 22 infants with late-onset meningitis, and from mucosal surfaces of both 18 infants and 12 mothers of infants with low levels of type-specific antibody and asymptomatic colonization. Mean values of Ag in supernatant fluids in strains from infants with late-onset sepsis (1.50 +/- 0.08 micrograms/ml) and late-onset meningitis (1.67 +/- 0.09 micrograms/ml) were significantly greater than those in asymptomatic colonization strains (1.14 +/- 0.05 micrograms/ml; P less than 0.001). The number of organisms required for a 50% lethal dose in the chick embryo, determined in 29 strains, was inversely related to Ag in supernatant fluids (r = -0.60). The demonstration that the quantity of capsular Ag produced by GBS III strains is related to their virulence in chick embryos and to their invasiveness in susceptible infants supports the hypothesis that Ag is a virulence factor in humans. Images PMID:6423540

  3. [se-atlas - the health service information platform for people with rare diseases : Supporting research on medical care institutions and support groups].

    PubMed

    Haase, Johanna; Wagner, Thomas O F; Storf, Holger

    2017-03-08

    se-atlas - the health service information platform for rare diseases - is part of the German National Action Plan for People with Rare Diseases and is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Health. The objective of se-atlas as a web-based platform is to illustrate those medical care institutions that are linked to rare diseases, in a transparent and user-friendly way. The website provides an overview of medical care institutions and support groups focusing on rare diseases in Germany. The primary target groups of se-atlas are affected patients, their relatives and physicians but can also include non-medical professionals and the general public. In order to make it easier to look up medical care institutions or support groups and optimize the search results displayed, various strategies are being developed and evaluated. Hence, the allocation of diseases to appropriate medical care institutions and support groups is currently a main focus. Since its launch in 2015, se-atlas has grown continuously and now incorporates five times more entries than were included 20 months prior. Among this data are the current rare diseases centres in Germany, which play a major role in providing patient-centred healthcare by acting as primary contact points for people with rare diseases. Further expansion and maintenance of the data base raises several organisational and software-related challenges. For one, the data should be completed by adding more high-quality information, while not neglecting the existing entries and maintaining their high level of quality in the long term.

  4. Treatment of children and adolescents with Hodgkin's disease: the experience of the German-Austrian Paediatric Study Group.

    PubMed

    Schellong, G

    1996-09-01

    In treatment strategies adapted to the specific problems in children with Hodgkin's disease (HD) high priority has been given to the reduction of late effects caused by radio- and chemotherapy, without sacrificing high survival rates. Combined modality treatment, as a standard option, has enabled reduced doses and fields of radiotherapy and lower cumulative total doses of critical cytotoxic agents. In Germany and Austria 1242 children and adolescents with HD have been treated in five consecutive multicentre studies since 1978. The main general objectives were to determine the extent to which radio- and chemotherapy can be reduced within a combined modality treatment concept and to find an effective chemotherapy of low long-term toxicity. Mechlorethamine in MOPP was replaced by adriamycin (OPPA) in the first 2 cycles of CT and by cyclophosphamide (COPP) in the additional cycles. The total number of cycles was reduced for early and intermediate stages. From the second study (HD-82) onward, patients were allocated to three treatment groups (2, 4 or 6 cycles, respectively) according to disease stage, and involved-field instead of extended-field irradiation was given. With radiation doses of 35, 30 and 25 Gy, high rates for event-free survival (97, 92 and 85%, respectively) at 14 years were achieved, demonstrating that microfoci in adjacent fields are safely eradicated by the chemotherapy used. Late effects of OPPA and OPPA/COPP: the cumulative risk of secondary leukaemias in 686 patients after 15 years was 0.9% for all patients and 0.8% for those who remained in first remission. Cardiomyopathies have not been observed (cumulative total dose of adriamycin 160 mg/m2). Increased FSH-levels indicating impaired spermatogenesis were found in 40% of the male patients without relapse. The prevalence was related to the number of procarbazine containing cycles (29% after 2 cycles, 46% after 4, and 63% after 6). In study HD-90, procarbazine in OPPA was replaced by etoposide (OEPA

  5. Host group formation decreases exposure to vector-borne disease: a field experiment in a ‘hotspot’ of West Nile virus transmission

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Bethany L.; Anderson, Tavis K.; Goldberg, Tony L.; Hamer, Gabriel L.; Kitron, Uriel D.; Newman, Christina M.; Ruiz, Marilyn O.; Walker, Edward D.; Brawn, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Animals can decrease their individual risk of predation by forming groups. The encounter-dilution hypothesis extends the potential benefits of gregariousness to biting insects and vector-borne disease by predicting that the per capita number of insect bites should decrease within larger host groups. Although vector-borne diseases are common and can exert strong selective pressures on hosts, there have been few tests of the encounter-dilution effect in natural systems. We conducted an experimental test of the encounter-dilution hypothesis using the American robin (Turdus migratorius), a common host species for the West Nile virus (WNV), a mosquito-borne pathogen. By using sentinel hosts (house sparrows, Passer domesticus) caged in naturally occurring communal roosts in the suburbs of Chicago, we assessed sentinel host risk of WNV exposure inside and outside of roosts. We also estimated per capita host exposure to infected vectors inside roosts and outside of roosts. Sentinel birds caged inside roosts seroconverted to WNV more slowly than those outside of roosts, suggesting that social groups decrease per capita exposure to infected mosquitoes. These results therefore support the encounter-dilution hypothesis in a vector-borne disease system. Our results suggest that disease-related selective pressures on sociality may depend on the mode of disease transmission. PMID:25339722

  6. Alaska Native and Rural Youths' Views of Sexual Health: A Focus Group Project on Sexually Transmitted Diseases, HIV/AIDS, and Unplanned Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leston, Jessica D.; Jessen, Cornelia M.; Simons, Brenna C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The disparity in rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), HIV/AIDS, and unplanned pregnancy between Alaska Native (AN) and non-AN populations, particularly among young adults and females, is significant and concerning. Focus groups were conducted to better understand the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of rural Alaska youth…

  7. [Reccomendations of the Spanish Working Group on Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis (GETECCU) on the use of methotrexate in inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Gomollón, Fernando; Rubio, Saioa; Charro, Mara; García-López, Santiago; Muñoz, Fernando; Gisbert, Javier P; Domènech, Eugeni

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate is an immunosuppressant that may be useful in several clinical scenarios in inflammatory bowel disease. In this article, we review the available evidence in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis and establish general recommendations for its use in clinical practice. Although the available data are limited, it is very likely that methotrexate is underused because its effectiveness is underestimated and its toxicity is overestimated. Both in induction therapy and in maintenance of remission, methotrexate is useful in Crohn's disease. When prescribed in combination with biologic agents, immunogenicity is less frequent and consequently long-term response could potentially be improved. There are few published studies, but several data suggest that methotrexate could also be useful in ulcerative colitis. Although myelotoxicity and liver toxicity are well known risks, methotrexate is a drug that is well tolerated in many patients, even in the long term.

  8. The miR-15/107 group of microRNA genes: evolutionary biology, cellular functions, and roles in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, John R.; Wang, Wang-Xia; Hébert, Sébastien S.; Wilfred, Bernard R.; Mao, Guogen; Nelson, Peter T.

    2010-01-01

    The miR-15/107 group of microRNA (miRNA) genes is increasingly appreciated to serve key functions in humans. These miRNAs regulate gene expression involved in cell division, metabolism, stress response, and angiogenesis in vertebrate species. The miR-15/107 group has also been implicated in human cancers, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we provide an overview of (1) the evolution of miR-15/107 group member genes, (2) the expression levels of the miRNAs in mammalian tissues, (3) evidence for overlapping gene regulatory functions by the different miRNAs, (4) the normal biochemical pathways regulated by miR-15/107 group miRNAs, and (5) the roles played by these miRNAs in human diseases. Membership in this group is defined on the basis of sequence similarity near the mature miRNAs’ 5′ end: all include the sequence AGCAGC. Phylogeny of this group of miRNAs is incomplete so a definitive taxonomic classification (for example, designation as a “superfamily”) is currently not possible. While all vertebrates studied to date express miR-15a, -15b, -16, -103, and -107, mammals alone are known to express miR-195, -424, -497, -503, and -646. Multiple different miRNAs in the miR-15/107 group are expressed at moderate-to-high levels in human tissues. We present data on the expression of all known miR-15/107 group members in human cerebral cortical gray and white matter using new miRNA profiling microarrays. There is extensive overlap in the mRNAs targeted by miR-15/107 group members. We show new data from cultured H4 cancer cells that demonstrate similarities in mRNAs targeted by miR-16 and miR-103, and also support the importance of the mature miRNAs’ 5′ seed region in mRNA target recognition. In conclusion, the miR-15/107 group of miRNA genes is a fascinating topic of study for evolutionary biologists, miRNA biochemists, and clinically-oriented translational researchers alike. PMID:20678503

  9. New autoimmune diseases after cord blood transplantation: a retrospective study of EUROCORD and the Autoimmune Disease Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Daikeler, Thomas; Labopin, Myriam; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Crotta, Alessandro; Abinun, Mario; Hussein, Ayad Ahmed; Carlson, Kristina; Cornillon, Jérôme; Diez-Martin, Jose L; Gandemer, Virginie; Faraci, Maura; Lindemans, Caroline; O'Meara, Anne; Mialou, Valerie; Renard, Marleen; Sedlacek, Petr; Sirvent, Anne; Socié, Gérard; Sora, Federica; Varotto, Stefania; Sanz, Jaime; Voswinkel, Jan; Vora, Ajay; Yesilipek, M Akif; Herr, Andree-Laure; Gluckman, Eliane; Farge, Dominique; Rocha, Vanderson

    2013-02-07

    To describe the incidence, risk factors, and treatment of autoimmune diseases (ADs) occurring after cord blood transplantation (CBT), we analyzed both CBT recipients reported to EUROCORD who had developed at least 1 new AD and those who had not. Fifty-two of 726 reported patients developed at least 1 AD within 212 days (range, 27-4267) after CBT. Cumulative incidence of ADs after CBT was 5.0% +/- 1% at 1 year and 6.6% +/- 1% at 5 years. Patients developing ADs were younger and had more nonmalignant diseases (P < .001). ADs target hematopoietic (autoimmune hemolytic anemia, n = 20; Evans syndrome, n = 9; autoimmune thrombocytopenia, n = 11; and immune neutropenia, n = 1) and other tissues (thyroiditis, n = 3; psoriasis, n = 2; Graves disease, n 1; membranous glomerulonephritis, n = 2; rheumatoid arthritis, n = 1; ulcerative colitis, n = 1; and systemic lupus erythematosus, n = 1). Four patients developed 2 ADs (3 cases of immune thrombocytopenia followed by autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 1 Evans syndrome with rheumatoid arthritis). By multivariate analysis, the main risk factor for developing an AD was nonmalignant disease as an indication for CBT (P = .0001). Hematologic ADs were most often treated with steroids, rituximab, and cyclosporine. With a median follow-up of 26 months (range, 2-91), 6 of 52 patients died as a consequence of ADs. We conclude that CBT may be followed by potentially life-threatening, mainly hematologic ADs.

  10. Diet and Exercise Adherence and Practices among Medically Underserved Patients with Chronic Disease: Variation across Four Ethnic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orzech, Kathryn M.; Vivian, James; Huebner Torres, Cristina; Armin, Julie; Shaw, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors interact to create barriers to dietary and exercise plan adherence among medically underserved patients with chronic disease, but aspects related to culture and ethnicity are underexamined in the literature. Using both qualitative ("n" = 71) and quantitative ("n" = 297) data collected in a 4-year, multimethod study…

  11. Caring for Others: Internet Video-Conferencing Group Intervention for Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Neurodegenerative Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marziali, Elsa; Donahue, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pilot feasibility study was to evaluate the effects of an innovative, Internet-based psychosocial intervention for family caregivers of older adults with neurodegenerative disease. Design and Methods: After receiving signed informed consent from each participant, we randomly assigned 66 caregivers to an Internet-based…

  12. Genomic Characterisation of Three Mapputta Group Viruses, a Serogroup of Australian and Papua New Guinean Bunyaviruses Associated with Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, Penelope J.; McAllister, Jane; Mitchell, Ian R.; Boyle, David B.; Bulach, Dieter M.; Weir, Richard P.; Melville, Lorna F.; Gubala, Aneta J.

    2015-01-01

    The Mapputta serogroup tentatively contains the mosquito-associated viruses Mapputta, Maprik, Trubanaman and Gan Gan. Interestingly, this serogroup has previously been associated with an acute epidemic polyarthritis-like illness in humans; however, there has been no ensuing genetic characterisation. Here we report the complete genome sequences of Mapputta and Maprik viruses, and a new Mapputta group candidate, Buffalo Creek virus, previously isolated from mosquitoes and detected by serology in a hospitalised patient. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the group is one of the earliest diverged groups within the genus Orthobunyavirus of the family Bunyaviridae. Analyses show that these three viruses are related to the recently sequenced Australian bunyaviruses from mosquitoes, Salt Ash and Murrumbidgee. A notable feature of the Mapputta group viruses is the absence of the NSs (non-structural) ORF commonly found on the S segment of other orthobunyaviruses. Viruses of the Mapputta group have been isolated from geographically diverse regions ranging from tropical Papua New Guinea to the semi-arid climate of south-eastern Australia. The relevance of this group to human health in the region merits further investigation. PMID:25588016

  13. Cidofovir for cytomegalovirus infection and disease in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients. The Infectious Diseases Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ljungman, P; Deliliers, G L; Platzbecker, U; Matthes-Martin, S; Bacigalupo, A; Einsele, H; Ullmann, J; Musso, M; Trenschel, R; Ribaud, P; Bornhäuser, M; Cesaro, S; Crooks, B; Dekker, A; Gratecos, N; Klingebiel, T; Tagliaferri, E; Ullmann, A J; Wacker, P; Cordonnier, C

    2001-01-15

    A retrospective study was performed to collect information regarding efficacy and toxicity of cidofovir (CDV) in allogeneic stem cell transplant patients. Data were available on 82 patients. The indications for therapy were cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease in 20 patients, primary preemptive therapy in 24 patients, and secondary preemptive therapy in 38 patients. Of the patients, 47 had received previous antiviral therapy with ganciclovir, foscarnet, or both drugs. The dosage of CDV was 1 to 5 mg/kg per week followed by maintenance every other week in some patients. The duration of therapy ranged from 1 to 134 days (median, 22 days). All patients received probenecid and prehydration. Ten of 20 (50%) patients who were treated for CMV disease (9 of 16 with pneumonia) responded to CDV therapy, as did 25 of 38 (66%) patients who had failed or relapsed after previous preemptive therapy and 15 of 24 (62%) patients in whom CDV was used as the primary preemptive therapy. Of the patients, 21 (25.6%) developed renal toxicity that remained after cessation of therapy in 12 patients. Fifteen patients developed other toxicities that were potentially due to CDV or the concomitantly given probenecid. No toxicity was seen in 45 (61.6%) patients. Cidofovir can be considered as second-line therapy in patients with CMV disease failing previous antiviral therapy. However, additional studies are needed before CDV can be recommended for preemptive therapy.

  14. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and PAD risk factors among different ethnic groups in the US population.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Judith

    2012-06-01

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2004 data set was utilized to examine and compare trends and differences in PAD-related risk factor variables among 5 different ethnic/racial groups. The sample included individuals 40 years and older with PAD and of the ethnic/racial groups: Mexican American, Other Hispanic, Non-Hispanic White, Non-Hispanic Black, and Other/Multiracial. Two demographic variables (age and gender) and 4 PAD-risk factors (hypertension [HTN], systolic blood pressure [SBP], and diastolic blood pressure [DBP]), dyslipidemia, high-density lipoprotein [HDL] and low-density lipoprotein [LDL], diabetes, and cigarette smoking) were examined for each group. The study design conducted was descriptive using the NHANES 2003-2004 secondary data set. Raw data were weighted. Descriptive statistics were measured, Chi-squares were compared, and Phi-coefficients were measured for association using SAS version 9.1 and SUDAAN 10.0. The group with the highest prevalence of PAD are females 40-50 years of age, and the ethnic group with PAD who have the highest risk for PAD-related risk factors are Non-Hispanic Black. Through Chi-square significant differences (P=0.00001-0.03874) between specific ethnic groups for all four PAD-related risk factors (i.e., HTN, dyslipidemia, diabetes and cigarette smoking). All of the associations between the prevalence of HTN, dyslipidemia, diabetes, or cigarette smoking and ethnicity were statistically significant (P=<0.0001). Overall differences exist among the different ethnic groups.

  15. Defining responses to therapy and study outcomes in clinical trials of invasive fungal diseases: Mycoses Study Group and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus criteria.

    PubMed

    Segal, Brahm H; Herbrecht, Raoul; Stevens, David A; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Sobel, Jack; Viscoli, Claudio; Walsh, Thomas J; Maertens, Johan; Patterson, Thomas F; Perfect, John R; Dupont, Bertrand; Wingard, John R; Calandra, Thierry; Kauffman, Carol A; Graybill, John R; Baden, Lindsey R; Pappas, Peter G; Bennett, John E; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Cordonnier, Catherine; Viviani, Maria Anna; Bille, Jacques; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G; Wheat, L Joseph; Graninger, Wolfgang; Bow, Eric J; Holland, Steven M; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Dismukes, William E; De Pauw, Ben E

    2008-09-01

    Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) have become major causes of morbidity and mortality among highly immunocompromised patients. Authoritative consensus criteria to diagnose IFD have been useful in establishing eligibility criteria for antifungal trials. There is an important need for generation of consensus definitions of outcomes of IFD that will form a standard for evaluating treatment success and failure in clinical trials. Therefore, an expert international panel consisting of the Mycoses Study Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer was convened to propose guidelines for assessing treatment responses in clinical trials of IFDs and for defining study outcomes. Major fungal diseases that are discussed include invasive disease due to Candida species, Aspergillus species and other molds, Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Coccidioides immitis. We also discuss potential pitfalls in assessing outcome, such as conflicting clinical, radiological, and/or mycological data and gaps in knowledge.

  16. Schistosomiasis: The Social Challenge of Controlling a Man-Made Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemma, Aklilu

    1973-01-01

    There is an indication of a method for curbing or controlling schistosomiasis or bilharziasis. Modern technological advances in applied pharmacology have not provided a satisfactory remedy but a simple natural product, an endod berry, has been used to control the disease on a self-help basis. (EB)

  17. Association of the consumption of common food groups and beverages with mortality from cancer, ischaemic heart disease and diabetes mellitus in Serbia, 1991–2010: an ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Ilic, Milena; Ilic, Irena; Stojanovic, Goran; Zivanovic-Macuzic, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper reports association between mortality rates from cancer, ischaemic heart disease and diabetes mellitus and the consumption of common food groups and beverages in Serbia. Design In this ecological study, data on both mortality and the average annual consumption of common food groups and beverages per household's member were obtained from official data-collection sources. The multivariate linear regression analysis was used to determine the strength of the associations between consumption of common food groups and beverages and mortality rates. Results Markedly increasing trends of cancer, ischaemic heart disease and diabetes mellitus mortality rates were observed in Serbia in the period 1991–2010. Mortality rates from cancer were negatively associated with consumption of vegetable oil (p=0.005) and grains (p=0.001), and same was found for ischaemic heart disease (p=0.002 and 0.021, respectively), while consumption of other dairy products showed a significant positive association (p<0.001 and p=0.032, respectively). In men and women, mortality rates from diabetes mellitus showed a significant positive association with consumption of poultry (p=0.014 and 0.004, respectively). Consumption of beef and grains showed a significant negative association with cancer mortality rates in both genders (p=0.002 and p<0.001 in men, and p<0.001 and p=0.014 in women, respectively), while consumption of cheese was negatively associated only in men (p<0.001). Mortality from diabetes mellitus showed a significant positive association with consumption of animal fat and other dairy products only in women (p=0.003 and 0.046, respectively). Conclusions Association between unfavourable mortality trends from cancer, ischaemic heart disease and diabetes mellitus, and common food groups and beverages consumption was observed and should be assessed in future analytical epidemiological studies. Promotion of healthy diet is sorely needed in Serbia. PMID:26733565

  18. Evaluating the predictive power of multivariate tensor-based morphometry in Alzheimer's disease progression via convex fused sparse group Lasso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Sinchai; Gajawelli, Niharika; Zhou, Jiayu; Shi, Jie; Ye, Jieping; Wang, Yalin; Lepore, Natasha

    2014-03-01

    Prediction of Alzheimers disease (AD) progression based on baseline measures allows us to understand disease progression and has implications in decisions concerning treatment strategy. To this end we combine a predictive multi-task machine learning method1 with novel MR-based multivariate morphometric surface map of the hippocampus2 to predict future cognitive scores of patients. Previous work by Zhou et al.1 has shown that a multi-task learning framework that performs prediction of all future time points (or tasks) simultaneously can be used to encode both sparsity as well as temporal smoothness. They showed that this can be used in predicting cognitive outcomes of Alzheimers Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) subjects based on FreeSurfer-based baseline MRI features, MMSE score demographic information and ApoE status. Whilst volumetric information may hold generalized information on brain status, we hypothesized that hippocampus specific information may be more useful in predictive modeling of AD. To this end, we applied Shi et al.2s recently developed multivariate tensor-based (mTBM) parametric surface analysis method to extract features from the hippocampal surface. We show that by combining the power of the multi-task framework with the sensitivity of mTBM features of the hippocampus surface, we are able to improve significantly improve predictive performance of ADAS cognitive scores 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months from baseline.

  19. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Shwachman-Diamond disease: a study from the European Group for blood and marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Oneto, Rosi; Messina, Chiara; Gibson, Brenda E; Buzyn, Agnes; Steward, Colin; Gluckman, Eliane; Bredius, Robbert; Breddius, Robbert; Boogaerts, Marc; Vermylen, Christiane; Veys, Paul; Marsh, Judith; Badell, Isabel; Michel, Gerard; Güngör, Tayfun; Niethammer, Dietrich; Bordigoni, Pierre; Oswald, Cecilia; Favre, Claudio; Passweg, Jakob; Dini, Giorgio

    2005-10-01

    This report assessed the results of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) in 26 patients with Shwachman-Diamond disease (SDS) and severe bone marrow abnormalities. The conditioning regimen was based on busulphan (54%), total body irradiation (23%), fludarabine (15%) or other chemotherapy combinations (8%). Standard prevention of graft versus host disease (GVHD) with cyclosporin +/- methotrexate was adopted in 54% of the patients whilst in vivo or in vitro T-cell depletion was used in 17 and four patients respectively. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment were achieved in 21 (81%) and 17 (65%) of 26 patients after a median time of 18 days and 29 days respectively. The incidence of grade III and IV acute GVHD was 24% and of chronic GVHD 29%. Nine patients died after a median time of 70 d, post-SCT. After a median follow-up of 1.1 years, the transplant-related mortality was 35.5% (95% CI 17-54) whilst the overall survival was 64.5% (95% CI 45.7-83.2). Allo-SCT was found to be successful in more than half of SDS patients with severe bone marrow dysfunction. Further improvements would be anticipated by a better definition of the optimum time in the course of disease to transplant and by the adoption of less toxic conditioning regimens.

  20. [The CYP1B1 and CYP2F1 genes polymorphisms frequency in three ethnic groups of Bashkortostan and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients].

    PubMed

    Korytina, G F; Akhmadishina, L Z; Viktorova, T V

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a multifactorial respiratory disorder. Members of the cytochrome P450 family catalyze the oxidative metabolism of exogenous chemicals and activate their substrates into reactive intermediates that may initiate lung injury. The aim of this study was to learn interethnic variation in frequency distribution patterns of CYP1B1 and CYP2F1 genes polymorphic markers and to analyse its association withchronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The polymorphic markers Leu432Val(CYP1B1) and c.14_15insC(CYP2F1) were studied at chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients (Russian (N=169), Tatar (N=137)) and cases of healthy individuals (Russian (N=191), Tatar (N=198) and Bashkir (N=78)), residents of Bashkortostan by PCR-RFLP method. It was shown that the CYP2F1 gene genotype frequency distribution patterns differed between three ethnic groups (chi2 = 21.29, df=4, P = 0.0001), because of high frequency of c.14_15insC/c.14_15insC genotype in Tatars (6.38%). On the other hand, high frequency (39.74%) of normal/ c.14_15insC genotype was appeared in Bashkirs. Association analysis of CYP2F1 geneinsertion variant with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have shown high frequency (87.5%) of normal allele in Tatars patients with very severe stage and manifestation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease after 55 years (chi2 = 3.964, df=1, P = 0.046; OR = = 2.268). It was shown that allele and genotype frequency distribution of Leu432ValCYP1B1 gene not differed between Russian, Tatar and Bashkir ethnic groups. We did not find any association of Leu432Val CYP1B1 gene with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  1. Diseases and their management strategies take top research priority in watermelon research and development group member’s survey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watermelon is an important crop grown for its delicious fruit in the U.S. and in many countries across the world. A survey of members of Watermelon Research and Development Group (WRDG) was conducted via email and during WRDG meetings in 2014 and 2015 in an effort to identify and rank important rese...

  2. Ibex-associated malignant catarrhal fever-like disease in a group of bongo antelope (Tragelaphus euryceros)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A private zoological facility experienced an outbreak of fatal malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in a group of bongo antelope (Tragelaphus euryceros). Three periparturient female bongos exhibited an acute onset of anorexia beginning ~6 weeks after being housed with a Nubian ibex (Capra nubiana). Disea...

  3. Identification and Prioritization of Important Attributes of Disease-Modifying Drugs in Decision Making among Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Nominal Group Technique and Best-Worst Scaling

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Ingrid E. H.; van der Weijden, Trudy; van de Kolk, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Understanding the preferences of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for disease-modifying drugs and involving these patients in clinical decision making can improve the concordance between medical decisions and patient values and may, subsequently, improve adherence to disease-modifying drugs. This study aims first to identify which characteristics–or attributes–of disease-modifying drugs influence patients´ decisions about these treatments and second to quantify the attributes’ relative importance among patients. Methods First, three focus groups of relapsing-remitting MS patients were formed to compile a preliminary list of attributes using a nominal group technique. Based on this qualitative research, a survey with several choice tasks (best-worst scaling) was developed to prioritize attributes, asking a larger patient group to choose the most and least important attributes. The attributes’ mean relative importance scores (RIS) were calculated. Results Nineteen patients reported 34 attributes during the focus groups and 185 patients evaluated the importance of the attributes in the survey. The effect on disease progression received the highest RIS (RIS = 9.64, 95% confidence interval: [9.48–9.81]), followed by quality of life (RIS = 9.21 [9.00–9.42]), relapse rate (RIS = 7.76 [7.39–8.13]), severity of side effects (RIS = 7.63 [7.33–7.94]) and relapse severity (RIS = 7.39 [7.06–7.73]). Subgroup analyses showed heterogeneity in preference of patients. For example, side effect-related attributes were statistically more important for patients who had no experience in using disease-modifying drugs compared to experienced patients (p < .001). Conclusions This study shows that, on average, patients valued effectiveness and unwanted effects as most important. Clinicians should be aware of the average preferences but also that attributes of disease-modifying drugs are valued differently by different patients. Person-centred clinical

  4. [Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of renal diseases in HIV infected patients. Recommendations of the Spanish AIDS Study Group/National AIDS Plan].

    PubMed

    2010-10-01

    The incidence of opportunistic infections and tumours in HIV-infected patients has sharply declined in the HAART era. At the same time there has been a growing increase of other diseases not directly linked to immunodeficiency. Renal diseases are an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients. In the general population, chronic renal failure has considerable multiorgan repercussions that have particular implications in patients with HIV infection. The detection of occult or subclinical chronic kidney disease is crucial since effective measures for delaying progression exist. Furthermore, the deterioration in glomerular filtration should prompt clinicians to adjust doses of some antiretroviral agents and other drugs used for treating associated comorbidities. Suppression of viral replication, strict control of blood pressure, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus, and avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs in certain patients are fundamental components of programs aimed to prevent renal damage and delaying progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with HIV. Renal transplantation and dialysis have also special implications in HIV-infected patients. In this article, we summarise the updated clinical practice guidelines for the evaluation, management and prevention of renal diseases in HIV-infected patients from a panel of experts in HIV and nephrologists on behalf of the Spanish AIDS Study Group (GESIDA) and the National AIDS Plan.

  5. Virtual communities for diabetes chronic disease healthcare.

    PubMed

    Chorbev, Ivan; Sotirovska, Marija; Mihajlov, Dragan

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is classified as the world's fastest-growing chronic illness that affects millions of people. It is a very serious disease, but the bright side is that it is treatable and can be managed. Proper education in this view is necessary to achieve essential control and prevent the aggregation of this chronic sickness. We have developed a healthcare social network that provides methods for distance learning; opportunities for creation of virtual self-help groups where patients can get information and establish interactions among each other in order to exchange important healthcare-related information; discussion forums; patient-to-healthcare specialist communication. The mission of our virtual community is to increase the independence of people with diabetes, self-management, empower them to take care of themselves, make their everyday activities easier, enrich their medical knowledge, and improve their health condition, make them more productive, and improve their communication with other patients with similar diagnoses. The ultimate goal is to enhance the quality of their life.

  6. [Toxocariasis in children and adolescents with allergic and bronchopulmonary diseases, HIV infection, hepatitis B and C risk groups: results of serological screening].

    PubMed

    Pautova, E A; Dovgalev, A S; Astanina, S Iu

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassay was used to determine the presence of immunoglobulins class G to Toxocara canis antigens in the sera of children and adolescents (hereinafter referred to as children) with allergic and bronchopulmonary diseases from HIV infection and hepatitis B and C risk groups. A total of 422 dwellers of the Republic of Altai, including 144 subjects aged 1 to 17 years, were examined. Toxocara antibodies were found in 18.8 +/- 3.3% of the children and in 21.9 +/- 2.5% of the adults. The infection rate in children with bronchopulmonary and allergic diseases was 27.1 +/- 5.8 and 14.3 +/- 5.0%, respectively; that in the hepatitis B and C risk groups was 13.1 +/- 6.2%. The children (n = 6) from the HIV infection risk group were seronegative. The infection rate in the adults from the HIV infection and hepatitis risk group was 19.2 +/- 3.5 and 24.3 +/- 3.5%, respectively. Diagnostic antibody titers in the children and adults were determined in 9.0 +/- 2.3 and 8.3 +/- 1.6%, respectively. Immunological assays should be used to rule out toxocariasis in the examinees. If there are seropositive results, specific antiparasitic threatment should be performed.

  7. The KMDS-NATION Study: Korean Movement Disorders Society Multicenter Assessment of Non-Motor Symptoms and Quality of Life in Parkinson's Disease NATION Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Do-Young; Koh, Seong-Beom; Lee, Jae Hyeok; Park, Hee Kyung; Kim, Han-Joon; Shin, Hae-Won; Youn, Jinyoung; Park, Kun Woo; Choi, Sun-Ah; Kim, Sang Jin; Choi, Seong-Min; Park, Ji-Yun; Jeon, Beom S.; Kim, Ji Young; Chung, Sun Ju; Lee, Chong Sik; Park, Jeong-Ho; Ahn, Tae-Beom; Kim, Won Chan; Kim, Hyun Sook; Cheon, Sang Myung; Kim, Hee-Tae; Lee, Jee-Young; Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, Eun-Joo; Kim, Jong-Min; Lee, Kwang Soo; Kim, Joong-Seok; Kim, Min-Jeong; Baik, Jong Sam; Park, Ki-Jong; Kim, Hee Jin; Park, Mee Young; Kang, Ji Hoon; Song, Sook Kun; Kim, Yong Duk; Yun, Ji Young; Lee, Ho-Won; Oh, Hyung Geun; Cho, Jinwhan; Song, In-Uk; Sohn, Young H.; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Nonmotor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) have multisystem origins with heterogeneous manifestations that develop throughout the course of PD. NMS are increasingly recognized as having a significant impact on the health-related quality of life (HrQoL). We aimed to determine the NMS presentation according to PD status, and the associations of NMS with other clinical variables and the HrQoL of Korean PD patients. Methods We surveyed patients in 37 movement-disorders clinics throughout Korea. In total, 323 PD patients were recruited for assessment of disease severity and duration, NMS, HrQoL, and other clinical variables including demographics, cognition, sleep scale, fatigability, and symptoms. Results In total, 98.1% of enrolled PD subjects suffered from various kinds of NMS. The prevalence of NMS and scores in each NMS domain were significantly higher in the PD group, and the NMS worsened as the disease progressed. Among clinical variables, disease duration and depressive mood showed significant correlations with all NMS domains (p<0.001). NMS status impacted HrQoL in PD (rS=0.329, p<0.01), and the association patterns differed with the disease stage. Conclusions The results of our survey suggest that NMS in PD are not simply isolated symptoms of degenerative disease, but rather exert significant influences throughout the disease course. A novel clinical approach focused on NMS to develop tailored management strategies is warranted to improve the HrQoL in PD patients. PMID:27819413

  8. Recommended curriculum for subspecialty training in transplant infectious disease on behalf of the American Society of Transplantation Infectious Diseases Community of Practice Educational Initiatives Working Group.

    PubMed

    Avery, R; Clauss, H; Danziger-Isakov, L; Davis, J; Doucette, K; van Duin, D; Fishman, J; Gunseren, F; Humar, A; Husain, S; Isada, C; Julian, K; Kaul, D; Kumar, D; Martin, S; Michaels, M; Morris, M; Silveira, F; Subramanian, A

    2010-06-01

    The American Society of Transplantation Infectious Diseases (ID) Community of Practice has established an education workgroup to identify core components of a curriculum for training specialists in transplant ID. Clinical, laboratory, and research training form the triad of components on which an additional year of ID training, dedicated to the care of solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, should be based. The recommended training environment would have access to adequate numbers of transplant patients, along with qualified faculty committed to teaching specialized fellows in this area. The learning objectives for both inpatient and outpatient clinical training are presented. The laboratory component requires trainees to attain expertize in utilizing and interpreting cutting-edge diagnostics used in transplant medicine. The research component may involve basic science, and translational or clinical research individualized to the trainee. Finally, suggestions for evaluation of both the fellows and the training program are provided.

  9. Report from the 2nd Cardiovascular Outcome Trial (CVOT) Summit of the Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease (D&CVD) EASD Study Group.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Oliver; Standl, Eberhard; Catrinoiu, Doina; Genovese, Stefano; Lalic, Nebojsa; Skra, Jan; Valensi, Paul; Rahelic, Dario; Ceriello, Antonio

    2017-03-11

    The 2nd Cardiovascular Outcome Trial (CVOT) Summit of the Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease (D&CVD) EASD Study Group was held on the 20th-21st October 2016 in Munich. This second Summit was organized in light of recently published CVOTs on diabetes, with the aim of serving as a reference meeting for discussion on this topic. Along with presentations on the results of the most recently published CVOTs, panel discussions on trial implications for reimbursement and the perspective of cardiologists and/or nephrologists, as well as on CVOTs weaknesses and potentials constituted the heart of the program. Future activities of the D&CVD EASD Study Group in 2017 include an annual meeting in Milano and the 3rd CVOT Summit on Diabetes of the D&CVD EASD Study Group, in Munich ( http://www.dcvd.org ).

  10. Human intronless genes: Functional groups, associated diseases, evolution, and mRNA processing in absence of splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Grzybowska, Ewa A.

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functional characteristics of intronless genes (IGs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diseases associated with IGs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Origin and evolution of IGs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mRNA processing without splicing. -- Abstract: Intronless genes (IGs) constitute approximately 3% of the human genome. Human IGs are essentially different in evolution and functionality from the IGs of unicellular eukaryotes, which represent the majority in their genomes. Functional analysis of IGs has revealed a massive over-representation of signal transduction genes and genes encoding regulatory proteins important for growth, proliferation, and development. IGs also often display tissue-specific expression, usually in the nervous system and testis. These characteristics translate into IG-associated diseases, mainly neuropathies, developmental disorders, and cancer. IGs represent recent additions to the genome, created mostly by retroposition of processed mRNAs with retained functionality. Processing, nuclear export, and translation of these mRNAs should be hampered dramatically by the lack of splice factors, which normally tightly cover mature transcripts and govern their fate. However, natural IGs manage to maintain satisfactory expression levels. Different mechanisms by which IGs solve the problem of mRNA processing and nuclear export are discussed here, along with their possible impact on reporter studies.

  11. Alcoholic patients' response to their disease: perspective of patients and family

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Rodríguez, Joaquín Salvador; Guerra-Martín, María Dolores; Domínguez-Sánchez, Isabel; Lima-Serrano, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to know the perspective of alcoholic patients and their families about the behavioral characteristics of the disease, identifying the issues to modify the addictive behavior and seek rehabilitation. Method: ethnographic research using interpretative anthropology, via participant observation and a detailed interview with alcoholic patients and their families, members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Alanon in Spain. Results: development of disease behavior in alcoholism is complex due to the issues of interpreting the consumption model as a disease sign. Patients often remain long periods in the pre-contemplation stage, delaying the search for assistance, which often arrives without them accepting the role of patient. This constrains the recovery and is related to the social thought on alcoholism and self-stigma on alcoholics and their families, leading them to deny the disease, condition of the patient, and help. The efforts of self-help groups and the involvement of health professionals is essential for recovery. Conclusion: understanding how disease behavior develops, and the change process of addictive behavior, it may be useful for patients, families and health professionals, enabling them to act in a specific way at each stage. PMID:26626009

  12. Ibex-associated malignant catarrhal fever-like disease in a group of bongo antelope (Tragelaphus eurycerus).

    PubMed

    Gasper, D; Barr, B; Li, H; Taus, N; Peterson, R; Benjamin, G; Hunt, T; Pesavento, P A

    2012-05-01

    A private zoological facility experienced an outbreak of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in 3 bongo antelope (Tragelaphus eurycerus). All cases were periparturient bongos that presented acutely anorectic beginning ~6 weeks after being housed with a Nubian ibex. Disease quickly progressed to respiratory distress and death within 24-72 hours of onset of clinical signs. Consistent gross findings in affected bongos were pulmonary edema and small pale tan foci in the livers. Histological lesions included a nonsuppurative vasculitis in multiple tissues, which is well recognized in MCF, but additionally included necrotizing cholangiohepatitis and neutrophilic, necrotizing myocarditis. Ibex-associated viral DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction and was identical in sequence whether derived from bongos or ibex. The sequence closely matched an MCF viral DNA fragment that had been amplified from an ibex and bongo in a previous case report.

  13. Prevalence of Haemophilus influenzae carriers in the Catalan preschool population. Working Group on Invasive Disease Caused by Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Fontanals, D; Bou, R; Pons, I; Sanfeliu, I; Domínguez, A; Pineda, V; Renau, J; Muñoz, C; Latorre, C; Sanchez, F

    2000-04-01

    This study was designed to determine the prevalence of healthy Haemophilus influenzae carriers in a random sample of the preschool population in Catalonia. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected and cultured on chocolate agar supplemented with 260 microg/ml of bacitracin. Four hundred two of the 734 (54.8%) children studied were detected as Haemophilus influenzae carriers: 7 (0.9%) carried serotype b, 14 (1.9%) serotype e, 6 (0.8%) serotype f, and 375 (51%) carried nontypable strains. The results show that, although the prevalence of Haemophilus influenzae carriers is similar to figures reported from other countries, the prevalence of Haemophillus influenzae serotype b carriers is lower and corresponds with the low incidence of invasive disease observed in the Catalan community.

  14. Agranulocytosis in Bangkok, Thailand: a predominantly drug-induced disease with an unusually low incidence. Aplastic Anemia Study Group.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, S; Issaragrisil, S; Kaufman, D W; Anderson, T; Chansung, K; Thamprasit, T; Sirijirachai, J; Piankijagum, A; Porapakkham, Y; Vannasaeng, S; Leaverton, P E; Young, N S

    1999-04-01

    Agranulocytosis, a syndrome characterized by a marked reduction in circulating granulocytes, is strongly associated with medical drug use in Europe and the United States. Unregulated use of common pharmaceutical agents in developing countries has been suspected of causing large numbers of cases of agranulocytosis and deaths, especially among children. To elucidate the incidence and etiology of agranulocytosis in Thailand, a population-based case-control study of symptomatic agranulocytosis that resulted in hospital admission was conducted in Bangkok from 1990 to 1994. An attempt was also made to study the disease in Khonkaen (in northeastern Thailand) and Songkla (in southern Thailand), but there were insufficient cases in the latter regions, and the analysis was confined to subjects from Bangkok. In that region, the overall incidence of agranulocytosis was 0.8 per million per year; there were no deaths. As expected, the incidence was higher in females (0.9 per million), and it increased with age (4.3 per million beyond age 60). Among 25 cases and 529 controls the relative risk estimate for a combined category of all suspect drugs was 9.2 (95% confidence interval = 3.9-21), and the proportion of cases that could be attributed to drug use was 68%. For individual drugs and drug classes the data were sparse; within these limitations, the strongest association appeared to be with antithyroid drugs. One case and three controls were exposed to dipyrone, a drug known to cause agranulocytosis; with such scanty data the risk could not be evaluated. Exposure to pesticides or solvents was not associated with an increased risk. This is the first formal epidemiologic study of agranulocytosis in a developing country. As in the West, most cases are attributable to medical drug use. However, the incidence of agranulocytosis in Bangkok, and apparently, in Thailand as a whole, is unusually low, and the disease does not pose a public health risk.

  15. Autologous transplantation in poor risk Hodgkin's disease using high dose melphalan/etoposide conditioning with non-cryopreserved marrow rescue. The Newcastle and Northern Region Lymphoma Group.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, P. R.; Jackson, G. H.; Lennard, A. L.; Lucraft, H.; Proctor, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of using high dose melphalan and etoposide followed by autologous, non-cryopreserved marrow rescue in advanced Hodgkin's disease (HD). Seventeen patients with poor risk Hodgkin's disease from a single centre underwent autologous bone marrow transplant (ABMT) using high dose melphalan and etopside conditioning. Two patients had primary progressive resistant disease (PD), two were in fourth relapse, six in second or third complete remission (CR), one patient had good partial response (GPR) (> 75% reduction in initial bulk) to primary therapy and six were in first complete remission. The patients transplanted in first CR all has a Scotland and Newcastle Lymphoma Group (SNLG) Prognostic Index (Proctor et al., 1991) which indicated they were in a poor risk prognostic group. Melphalan and etoposide both have a short half life enabling ABMT to be accomplished using unmanipulated marrow stored at 4 degrees C. The marrow was returned to the patient within 56 h of harvest. Complete haematological reconstitution occurred in 16/17 patients, the rate of engraftment reflecting the amount of previous chemotherapy. One patient died of progressive Hodgkin's disease before full engraftment could occur. In patients autografted in first remission, the median number of days with neutropenia (< 0.5 x 10(9) l-1 neutrophils) was 19 (range 9-33) and, in those in subsequent remission, 27 days (range 18-36). The median number of days to 50 x 10(9) l-1 platelets in the same groups were 29 (21-80) and 50 (41-74) respectively. The number of days in hospital post transplant in both groups was similar; median 22 (15-27) and 23 (17-37) respectively. There were no procedural deaths and none of the patients transplanted in first, second or third CR have relapsed (median follow up 21 months). The two patients transplanted with progressive disease showed only temporary responses. The two patients transplanted in fourth relapse went into CR; one is

  16. Mediating the Cognitive Walkthrough with Patient Groups to achieve Personalized Health in Chronic Disease Self-Management System Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Georgsson, Mattias; Kushniruk, Andre

    2016-01-01

    The cognitive walkthrough (CW) is a task-based, expert inspection usability evaluation method involving benefits such as cost effectiveness and efficiency. A drawback of the method is that it doesn't involve the user perspective from real users but instead is based on experts' predictions about the usability of the system and how users interact. In this paper, we propose a way of involving the user in an expert evaluation method by modifying the CW with patient groups as mediators. This along with other modifications include a dual domain session facilitator, specific patient groups and three different phases: 1) a preparation phase where suitable tasks are developed by a panel of experts and patients, validated through the content validity index 2) a patient user evaluation phase including an individual and collaborative process part 3) an analysis and coding phase where all data is digitalized and synthesized making use of Qualitative Data Analysis Software (QDAS) to determine usability deficiencies. We predict that this way of evaluating will utilize the benefits of the expert methods, also providing a way of including the patient user of these self-management systems. Results from this prospective study should provide evidence of the usefulness of this method modification.

  17. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013–2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread

  18. Identification of a High-Risk Group Among Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and pT1-2N0 Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Chen, I-How; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 classification system, pT1-2N0 oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is considered an early-stage cancer treatable with surgery alone (National Comprehensive Cancer Network 2010 guidelines). Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of surgery alone for pT1-2N0 OSCC patients. Methods and Materials: Among 1279 previously untreated OSCC patients referred to our hospital between January 1996 and May 2008, we identified 457 consecutive patients with pT1-2N0 disease. All had radical tumor excision with neck dissection. A total of 387 patients showing pathologic margins greater than 4 mm and treated by surgery alone were included in the final analysis. All were followed up for at least 24 months after surgery or until death. The 5-year rates of control, distant metastasis, and survival were the main outcome measures. Results: The 5-year rates in the entire group of pT1-2N0 patients were as follows: local control, 91%; neck control, 92%; distant metastases, 1%; disease-free survival, 85%; disease-specific survival, 93%; and overall survival, 84%. Multivariate analysis identified poor differentiation and pathologic tumor depth of 4 mm or greater as independent risk factors for neck control, disease-free survival, and disease-specific survival. A scoring system using poor differentiation and tumor depth was formulated to define distinct prognostic groups. The presence of both poorly differentiated tumors and a tumor depth of 4 mm or greater resulted in significantly poorer 5-year neck control (p < 0.0001), disease-free (p < 0.0001), disease-specific (p < 0.0001), and overall survival (p = 0.0046) rates. Conclusion: The combination of poor differentiation and pathologic tumor depth of 4 mm or greater identified a subset of pT1-2N0 OSCC patients with poor outcome, who may have clinical benefit from postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy.

  19. Coreplication of the Major Genotype Group Members of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 as a Prerequisite to Coevolution May Explain the Variable Disease Manifestations ▿

    PubMed Central

    Khaiseb, Siegfried; Sydler, Titus; Zimmermann, Dieter; Pospischil, Andreas; Sidler, Xaver; Brugnera, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    A member of the family Circoviridae, porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), is associated with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), a recent emerging disease worldwide. PCV2 is also found in clinically asymptomatic animals. This paradoxical finding makes the syndrome etiology challenging. We developed new assays to study PCV2 with links to syndrome etiology. For analysis, we used PCV2-infected tissues from subclinically infected and diseased piglets. We compared antigen- and PCV2 DNA-derived signals for tissue localization and intensity. Oligonucleotides were designed to the signature motif of the PCV2 capsid open reading frame to discriminate experimentally between PCV2 genotype groups by PCR, in situ hybridization (ISH), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Unexpectedly, all PCV2-infected animals carried both PCV2a and PCV2b genotype group members. Using confocal microscopy, genotype single-cell infections and cell superinfections were visible. Additionally, we discriminated replicative DNA from total PCV2 DNA isoforms with FISH. This aided in our inquiry into cellular genotype-specific replication. Importantly, single-genotype-group replication was not observed. In infected cells with replicating virus, both genotype groups were equally present. These findings suggest PCV2 genotype group members relaxed replication regulation requirements and may even point to PCV2 replication cooperativity in vivo. These observations explain the readily seen PCV2 DNA recombinations and the high overall PCV2 genome plasticity. Hence, we suggest a novel mechanism of syndrome etiology that consists of a continuously changing PCV2 genome pool in hosts and pig herds, posing a constant challenge to the individual maturing immune system. PMID:21865380

  20. Histo-blood group gene polymorphisms as potential genetic modifiers of the development of coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, K; Ihara, K; Ikeda, K; Nagata, H; Mizuno, Y; Hara, T

    2012-04-01

    Abnormal immunological responses to certain microbial agents may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Kawasaki disease (KD). The association studies between histo-blood group genes (Lewis and ABO blood types) and various types of infectious diseases or vasculopathy have been carried out based on the fact that glycosylated antigens could directly mediate microbial infections. We attempted to clarify the role of blood type antigens in the development of KD and coronary artery lesions in KD patients. The subjects included 164 KD patients enrolled from 1998 to 2003 (1st group), 232 patients from 2004 to 2009 (2nd group), and 223 healthy children and 118 patients with growth hormone deficiency as controls. The genotyping of the FUT2 and FUT3 genes, and ABO genotypes, was determined with the TaqMan SNP assay and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. No significant differences were observed in the genotypes and allele frequencies of the FUT2 and FUT3 genes between the groups. The frequency of the BB blood genotype was significantly higher in KD patients with coronary artery lesions in the 1st and 2nd groups than in the controls (17% and 14% vs. 5%, P = 0.0020). This is the first report to investigate the roles of ABO and Lewis blood types in the development of KD, and in the formation of coronary artery lesions in KD patients. These data suggest that the ABO blood type may play a role in the development of coronary artery lesions in KD patients.