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Sample records for disease self-help groups

  1. Developing and Offering Student Self-Help Support Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walz, Garry R., Ed.; Bleuer, Jeanne C., Ed.

    This document consists of one module extracted from a six-module larger work. Module 3 consists of seven articles on developing and offering student self-help support groups. Article titles and authors are as follows: (1) "Youth Engaged in Self-Help: A Guide for Starting Youth Self-Help Groups" (Mary K. Parkinson, Nancy Sax); (2)…

  2. A conceptual framework for understanding self-help groups.

    PubMed

    Rootes, L E; Aanes, D L

    1992-04-01

    Although self-help groups are recognized as an important part of the continuum of services in the mental health system, confusion about what constitutes a self-help group remains. The authors outline seven criteria for defining the self-help group and differentiating it from other types of groups, such as advocacy or support groups. Self-help groups are distinguished by their supportive and educational aims, focus on a single life-disrupting event, primary purpose of supporting personal change, anonymous and confidential nature, voluntary membership, member leadership, and absence of a profit orientation. Eight basic principles underlying successful self-help groups are discussed, including the shared experience of members, their acceptance of responsibility for themselves, and their commitment to personal change.

  3. Care for chronic illness in Australian general practice – focus groups of chronic disease self-help groups over 10 years: implications for chronic care systems reforms

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Carmel M; Peterson, Chris; Robinson, Rowena; Sturmberg, Joachim P

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic disease is a major global challenge. However, chronic illness and its care, when intruding into everyday life, has received less attention in Asia Pacific countries, including Australia, who are in the process of transitioning to chronic disease orientated health systems. Aim The study aims to examine experiences of chronic illness before and after the introduction of Australian Medicare incentives for longer consultations and structured health assessments in general practice. Methods Self-help groups around the conditions of diabetes, epilepsy, asthma and cancer identified key informants to participate in 4 disease specific focus groups. Audio taped transcripts of the focus groups were coded using grounded theory methodology. Key themes and lesser themes identified using a process of saturation until the study questions on needs and experiences of care were addressed. Thematic comparisons were made across the 2002/3 and 1992/3 focus groups. Findings At times of chronic illness, there was need to find and then ensure access to 'the right GP'. The 'right GP or specialist' committed to an in-depth relationship of trust, personal rapport and understanding together with clinical and therapeutic competence. The 'right GP', the main specialist, the community nurse and the pharmacist were key providers, whose success depended on interprofessional communication. The need to trust and rely on care providers was balanced by the need for self-efficacy 'to be in control of disease and treatment' and 'to be your own case manager'. Changes in Medicare appeared to have little penetration into everyday perceptions of chronic illness burden or time and quality of GP care. Inequity of health system support for different disease groupings emerged. Diabetes, asthma and certain cancers, like breast cancer, had greater support, despite common experiences of disease burden, and a need for research and support programs. Conclusion Core themes around chronic illness

  4. Role of Self-help Group in Substance Addiction Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prangya Paramita Priyadarshini

    2012-11-01

    Background: The Narcotics Anonymous (NA)/Alcoholic Anonymous(AA) is based on the philosophy of self-help, where the former addicts and recovering addicts share experiences, provide emotional support and do active monitoring through mentoring. In mentoring, a former addict with longer duration of drug-free life acts as a guide to the newly recovering addict. Objective: The objective was to study the effect of involvement in self help group upon addictís level of depression, functional social support, and anxiety. Method: The size of the sample was 60. 30 addicts were taken from rehabilitation centre and 30 were taken from self-help groups. ANOVA was used to analyze the result. Result: In all the criteria it was found that there exists a significant impact of Self-help group. Conclusion: Self-help group provide clients with a social network of individuals with similar problems and experiences, since most of these individuals may be isolated from society due to the social stigma attached to their addictions. The transition from being help recipients to being helpers enables recovering addicts to build their self-confidence and feelings of being wanted and desired in society, which facilitates their self-confidence and positive self-esteem.

  5. Self-Help Support Groups for Teachers Under Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walley, William V.; Stokes, Joseph P.

    The development of a program of self-help support groups for teachers experiencing stress in Chicago public schools is described. These support groups attempted to alleviate stress-related illness by reducing teacher isolation and by enabling teachers to help each other cope with problems and fears. The support groups were led by teachers who…

  6. Persuasion in a Self-Help Group: Processes and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurik, Nancy C.

    1987-01-01

    Examined techniques of persuasion used in self-help organization for persons with mental problems. Concludes that successful affiliation with the group is a conversion process and that, although acceptance of the organizational ideology may facilitate an individual member's recovery, it simultaneously reinforces an understanding of mental problems…

  7. An organizational typology for self-help groups.

    PubMed

    Schubert, M A; Borkman, T J

    1991-10-01

    Those investigating the nature and functioning of self-help groups have been handicapped by the lack of a conceptual framework to bridge the diversity among such groups as well as to clarify the boundaries between consumer-owned and professionally owned groups. This paper describes a typology that classifies local units of these groups in terms of differences and similarities in their organizational structures. Rooted in organizational theory, it has two dimensions: external dependence upon resources and internal extent of experiential authority. Using it, the authors identified five types of groups, referred to as Unaffiliated, Federated, Affiliated, Hybrid, and Managed. The typology was validated with actual groups.

  8. What helps in self-help? A qualitative exploration of interactions within a borderline personality disorder self-help group.

    PubMed

    Bond, Briony; Wright, John; Bacon, Alison

    2017-08-31

    Self-help groups can have a large impact on individuals well-being and could reduce costs for healthcare services. Previous research supports the effectiveness of self-help groups, but explanations for this are lacking. Identifying the active ingredients which encourage positive change could inform effectiveness of these groups producing the best outcomes for members. This research investigated how members and facilitators of a borderline personality disorder self-help group (BPD SHG) interacted and made sense of their experiences in group meetings, to determine what aspects of interaction were helpful. Naturalistic data was collected from 10 participants via audio recording and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three emergent themes are discussed: humour, praise and experiential knowledge. These are suggested to be active ingredients which are critical for the effectiveness of this BPD SHG, with particular focus on the facilitator's contribution.

  9. A qualitative study of breast cancer self-help groups.

    PubMed

    Gray, R; Fitch, M; Davis, C; Phillips, C

    1997-12-01

    This study reports on the experience of women in four community breast cancer self-help groups in Ontario, Canada. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 women, asking them about benefits and limitations of their group involvement, and about their perspectives on group processes and structures. Overall, participants reported their group involvement to be extremely helpful for navigating the short and long-term impact of breast cancer. Emotional support benefits included connecting with other breast cancer survivors, feeling understood and sharing experiences, providing hope, and sharing healing laughter. Informational and practical support benefits included sharing of important information and learning how to get what you want. Even where there were concerns about limitations or tensions of group experience, these occurred against a backdrop of appreciation and commitment. From the discussion of group processes and structures, a number of issues were identified as problematic. Most notable were how to deal with deaths of group members and how to balance the group's primary purpose of providing mutual support with secondary goals of dealing with group business and engaging in meaningful advocacy.

  10. Group Development in Self-Help Groups for College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuehrer, Ann E.; Keys, Christopher B.

    Research on mutual-aid groups has begun to examine reasons for joining and outcomes, but few investigations have focused on the processes of group development or interaction. The applicability of a therapy-group development model to student mutual-aid groups was examined to determine the extent to which specified formal group structure and…

  11. Responding to local needs. Self-help groups.

    PubMed

    Jayaseelan, J

    1993-01-01

    Pink Triangle, the only community-based group in Malaysia which works with men who have sex with men, took initial steps in August 1992 to establish a self-help project for people who are HIV-seropositive. Supporting people who are HIV-positive and fighting for their rights is new in Malaysia. The group has thus far been publicized through its public education events, hospitals, and other nongovernmental organizations. For the first time, information is being published specifically by and for people living with HIV/AIDS. The project also has a phone line to allow people to speak anonymously with someone who shares their experience. Many callers are men who have sex with men in the social context of intense prejudice and discrimination. Afraid to openly acknowledge their sexuality with strangers, the callers have yet to accede to meeting each other face-to-face in a group setting. The author notes in closing that Pink Triangle must be realistic about what can be achieved in Malaysia and allow the group to develop according to people's needs and not on the basis of a model imported from outside of the country.

  12. Self-Help Group Leaders as Community Helpers: An Impact Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meissen, Greg; Warren, Mary; Nansel, Tonja; Goodman, Samantha

    2002-01-01

    A study examined costs and benefits perceived by 26 self-help group leaders who helped rural Kansas communities in extending the use, awareness, and effectiveness of self-help groups. Findings that satisfaction in helping was the major benefit and time constraints the major cost were used to tailor leadership roles. Self-help group activity…

  13. Self-help friendliness: A German approach for strengthening the cooperation between self-help groups and health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Kofahl, Christopher; Trojan, Alf; Knesebeck, Olaf von dem; Nickel, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Public and patient involvement in social and health care has proceeded in many civil societies. Depending on the legislations on national and community levels, citizens and patients have a greater say in shaping social and health care. In Germany, the patient involvement by self-help organizations at the macro level (national level and level of federal states) has significantly developed over the last ten years. At the meso level, however, the patient involvement is neither such far nor such systematically developed. The concept of self-help friendliness (SHF) in health care is a patient centred model that allows the development and implementation of patient participation in different health care institutions: hospitals, ambulatory medical care, public health institutions, rehabilitation facilities etc. In a series of projects on SHF we have (1) analysed the needs and wishes of self-help groups for cooperation with health care professionals as well as their experience, (2) gathered facilitators and barriers concerning the cooperation between self-help groups and hospitals, (3) developed a framework concept for SHF in hospitals including eight quality criteria for measuring SHF, and (4) implemented the framework of SHF in about 40 health care institutions (www.selbsthilfefreundlichkeit.de). Further projects followed: development of an instrument for measuring SHF in hospitals, integration of SHF-criteria in quality management systems in inpatient care as well as in out-patient care, and transferring SHF to a) medical ambulatory care, b) public health departments, and c) rehabilitation facilities. Considering advantages and shortcomings of the approach, we can summarize that implementing SHF is feasible, transferable and a helpful measure for promoting patient centeredness in health care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Talk as Social Support: Communication in an Epilepsy Self-Help Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Droge, David

    Supplementing a national survey of self-help group members, a study examined the functioning of an epilepsy self-help group in order to identify communication patterns establishing mutual aid. An examination of eight tape-recorded sessions was combined with an observer's field notes to develop a profile of the group. Analysis revealed a loosely…

  15. Adolescent Substance-Use Frequency following Self-Help Group Attendance and Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangi, Jennifer; Darling, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the heterogeneity of posttreatment outcomes, the likelihood of relapse is often dependent on several factors, including participation in continuing care services such as self-help groups. However, few studies have examined the use of self-help groups among adolescent outpatients. Therefore, in this study, investigators examined self-help…

  16. Illness and Prevention: Self-Help Groups for Families Faced with Scoliosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichsen, Gregory A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine what kinds of people are motivated to join a medical self-help group and whether and in what areas of psychological and social functioning such self-help groups have positive benefits for adolescents and their families. Extensive survey questionnaires were sent throughout the United States to all former…

  17. Adolescent Substance-Use Frequency following Self-Help Group Attendance and Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangi, Jennifer; Darling, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the heterogeneity of posttreatment outcomes, the likelihood of relapse is often dependent on several factors, including participation in continuing care services such as self-help groups. However, few studies have examined the use of self-help groups among adolescent outpatients. Therefore, in this study, investigators examined self-help…

  18. Illness and Prevention: Self-Help Groups for Families Faced with Scoliosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichsen, Gregory A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine what kinds of people are motivated to join a medical self-help group and whether and in what areas of psychological and social functioning such self-help groups have positive benefits for adolescents and their families. Extensive survey questionnaires were sent throughout the United States to all former…

  19. An Information and Referral Model for Improving Self-Help Group Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wollert, Richard

    This paper describes the Self-Help Information Service (SIS), and summarizes data evaluating the program. Associated with a generally focused information and referral service (I&R), SIS was designed to facilitate research on self-help groups. Its specific goals were to develop and maintain a telephone referral service disseminating self-help…

  20. The Social Capital of Self-Help Mutual Aid Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Erik

    1997-01-01

    Argues that small-group mutual aid organizations are successful voluntary associations that attract members even in our individualistic and commodity-driven culture because they provide valuable collective benefits that can only be enjoyed in common. Small groups as a source of social capital have implications for the study of helping…

  1. The use of self-help groups as supportive reference communities.

    PubMed

    Powell, T J

    1975-10-01

    Self-help groups such as Recovery Inc., Parents without Partners, and Alcoholics Anonymous have a unique role in relation to the professional system of human services. From the professional's standpoint, such groups may be viewed as self-sufficient programs, concurrent treatment programs, and as sources of information and users of consultation. Patterns of influence operative in self-help groups are examined, and suggestions made for professional cooperation with such groups to the greater benefit of clients.

  2. [An analysis of the individual perception and coping strategies of people with dementia in the early stage of their disease in accordance to the function and effectiveness of self-help groups on the basis of self-expression].

    PubMed

    Panke-Kochinke, Birgit

    2013-12-01

    Society paints an inconsistent picture of people with dementia: on the one hand they are people who can basically think and act (even) self-determinate. But on the other hand they need support and help from outside in daily routine. Self-help groups are a possible form of support. There are actually no research results to decide if this form of intervention is appropriate to people with dementia or not. The question must be answered in which way people in the early stage of dementia perceive their illness and what kind of influence the intervention of a support group has on their self-concept. In the first survey period five focus groups and eight narrative biographically oriented interviews are performed. The following results are noted: People with dementia are exposed to processes of incapacitation. It is well intentioned (in order to help them), but in reality they are forced to do something they probably don't like. They must bear unwanted interventions. In contrast, the self-help groups promote recognition processes. Finding internal security and being able to accept the illness are some of the most important functions. Independent living with dementia is supported. Two conclusions can be drawn: Forms of incapacitation from outside must be reduced. Self-help groups in a support role should accordingly supply the existing care services for people with dementia. The support of self-help groups should be the provision/improvement of the existing care services for people with dementia.

  3. Active ingredients of substance use-focused self-help groups.

    PubMed

    Moos, Rudolf H

    2008-03-01

    This paper provides an overview of some of the probable active ingredients of self-help groups in light of four related theories that identify common social processes that appear to underlie effective psychosocial treatments for and continuing remission from these disorders. Social control theory specifies active ingredients such as bonding, goal direction and structure; social learning theory specifies the importance of norms and role models, behavioral economics and behavioral choice theory emphasizes involvement in rewarding activities other than substance use, and stress and coping theory highlights building self-efficacy and effective coping skills. A review of existing studies suggests that the emphasis on these active ingredients probably underlies some aspects of the effectiveness of self-help groups. Several issues that need to be addressed to enhance understanding of the active ingredients of action of self-help groups are discussed, including consideration of indices of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) affiliation as active ingredients, identification of personal characteristics that may moderate the influence of active ingredients on substance use outcomes, examination of whether active ingredients of self-help groups, can amplify or compensate for treatment, identification of potential detrimental effects of involvement in self-help groups and focusing on the link between active ingredients of self-help groups and other aspects of the overall recovery milieu, such as the family and social networks.

  4. Piloting self-help groups for alcohol use disorders in Saint Vincent/Grenadines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Antonia; Smart, Ynolde; Morris-Patterson, Amrie; Katz, Craig L

    2014-01-01

    Although alcohol consumption is recognized as a global problem, little research to date explores treatment options for alcohol use disorders in developing nations. Given the scarce mental health resources available in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, community self-help programming for alcohol use disorders could potentially provide an important complement to the existing mental health services. The aim of this study was to gather baseline data on knowledge and attitudes toward alcohol consumption among community members, and subsequently, to pilot self-help rehabilitation programs for alcohol use disorders, while determining factors that affect the feasibility and sustainability of such programs. Focus groups were conducted in 3 communities to discuss community perceptions of alcohol use and the feasibility of self-help programs. Focus group findings guided the development and implementation of the self-help groups. A postintervention focus group was held to determine the effectiveness and community-wide effect of the self-help programs. Focus group participants agreed that alcohol consumption was a problem in Saint Vincent, leading to underage drinking and violence. Suggestions to encourage self-help meeting attendance included organizing group activities and providing visuals to illustrate alcohol's effects on health. Self-help group members were surveyed about their group experience. Of the 35 members surveyed, 77% said the group was very helpful, and 91% indicated that they would attend again. Postintervention focus group participants stated that individuals had reduced alcohol consumption after attending at least 1 self-help meeting. Elements that contributed to the sustainability of self-help groups included strong local leadership from district health nurses as well as willingness of participants to seek support. However, efforts need to be made to increase community awareness of alcohol use disorders and its associated dangers. Our results suggested self-help

  5. Turkish Migrant Women with Recurrent Depression: Results from Community-based Self-help Groups.

    PubMed

    Siller, Heidi; Renner, Walter; Juen, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The study focuses on psychosocial functioning of female Turkish immigrants in Austria with recurrent depressive disorder participating in self-help groups. Self-help groups guided by group leaders of Turkish descent should increase autonomy in participants, providing the opportunity to follow their ethnic health beliefs. Turkish immigrant women (n = 43) with recurrent depressive disorder participated in self-help groups over four months. Qualitative data of participants and group leaders, containing interviews, group protocols and supervision protocols of group leaders were analyzed using the qualitative content analysis for effects on psychosocial function, such as interaction with others, illness beliefs and benefit from self-help group. Women reported feelings of being neglected and violated by their husbands. They stated that they had gained strength and had emancipated themselves from their husbands. Self-help groups functioned as social resources and support for changes in participants' lives. Further interventions should integrate the functional value of depressive symptoms and focus on social support systems and social networks.

  6. Dimensions and predictions of professional involvement in self-help groups: a view from within.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Adital Tirosh

    2002-05-01

    This article focuses on an analysis of how members of self-help groups perceived professional involvement and what they defined as the dimensions of such involvement. Models to predict these identified dimensions are also suggested. The instrument developed for the study consisted of two parts: (1) demographic question and (2) 12 statements concerning self-help group members' attitudes toward professional involvement. Based on responses from 183 members of self-help groups, three categories were identfied according to their main focus: groups dealing with health issues, groups dealing with alternative lifestyles, and groups based on the 12-step model. Analysis yielded two conceptually different constructs influencing group members' attitudes: collaboration and duality.

  7. Dimensions and Predictions of Professional Involvement in Self-Help Groups: A View from Within.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Ari, Adital Tirosh

    2002-01-01

    Discusses analysis of how members of self-help groups perceived professional involvement and dimensions of such involvement. Three categories were identified according to their main focus: groups dealing with health issues, groups dealing with alternative lifestyles, and groups based on the 12-step model. Analysis yielded two conceptually…

  8. [Self-help groups--a fashion trend or objective requirement?].

    PubMed

    Horvat, M; Gospocić, G; Gospocić, S

    1989-01-01

    The role and the significance of the self-help groups in the modern medicine are described. The authors propose that the medical profession should actively support the formation and the activity of such groups with the aim to improve the quality of life of many groups of patients.

  9. Expanding Self-Help Group Participation in Culturally Diverse Urban Areas: Media Approaches to Leveraging Referent Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Keith; Macus, Sue; Stewart, Eric; Oliva, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating research attests to the benefits of self-help groups for people who have various chronic health problems. Expansion of self-help group participation may enable a broader portion of society to experience these health benefits. The Media and Education for Self-Help (MESH) Project was an effort to increase interest in health-related…

  10. Measurement of Attitudes of Rural Women towards Self-Help Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meena, M. S.; Jain, Dilip; Meena, H. R.

    2008-01-01

    Self-help groups (SHGs) have emerged as an effective mechanism of empowerment and development of women as well as being on efficient mode of promoting group action and technology dissemination. Initiatives were undertaken at the Central Institute of Post-Harvest Engineering and Technology (CIPHET), Ludhiana to facilitate the formation of women's…

  11. Measurement of Attitudes of Rural Women towards Self-Help Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meena, M. S.; Jain, Dilip; Meena, H. R.

    2008-01-01

    Self-help groups (SHGs) have emerged as an effective mechanism of empowerment and development of women as well as being on efficient mode of promoting group action and technology dissemination. Initiatives were undertaken at the Central Institute of Post-Harvest Engineering and Technology (CIPHET), Ludhiana to facilitate the formation of women's…

  12. Padres Maltratadores: Grupos de Autoayuda (Abusive Parents: Self-Help Groups).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intebi, Irene V.; Groisman, Adriana E.

    1991-01-01

    Causes of child abuse by parents are discussed. A therapy program in Buenos Aires (Argentina) for abusive parents is described. The program utilizes self-help groups as part of the therapeutic plan and has found them to be promising. Referral, types of interactions with the groups, and short-, medium-, and long-term objectives are discussed. (BRM)

  13. Padres Maltratadores: Grupos de Autoayuda (Abusive Parents: Self-Help Groups).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intebi, Irene V.; Groisman, Adriana E.

    1991-01-01

    Causes of child abuse by parents are discussed. A therapy program in Buenos Aires (Argentina) for abusive parents is described. The program utilizes self-help groups as part of the therapeutic plan and has found them to be promising. Referral, types of interactions with the groups, and short-, medium-, and long-term objectives are discussed. (BRM)

  14. [Self-help groups conflicts of interest through sponsoring by the pharmaceutical industry].

    PubMed

    Klemperer, D

    2009-01-01

    Some patient and self-help groups accept financial support from the pharmaceutical industry and medical device manufacturers. For the industry, this constitutes an increasingly important product marketing component. The acceptance of material or other support triggers psychological mechanisms which endanger objective judgement without the persons involved realizing it. Thus, patient groups may evaluate drugs or devices in a positively distorted way.

  15. Beyond the therapeutic: A Habermasian view of self-help groups' place in the public sphere.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sarah; Avis, Mark; Munn-Giddings, Carol

    2013-02-01

    Self-help groups in the United Kingdom continue to grow in number and address virtually every conceivable health condition, but they remain the subject of very little theoretical analysis. The literature to date has predominantly focused on their therapeutic effects on individual members. And yet they are widely presumed to fulfil a broader civic role and to encourage democratic citizenship. The article uses Habermas' model of the public sphere as an analytical tool with which to reconsider the literature on self-help groups in order to increase our knowledge of their civic functions. In doing this it also aims to illustrate the continuing relevance of Habermas' work to our understanding of issues in health and social care. We consider, within the context of current health policies and practices, the extent to which self-help groups with a range of different forms and functions operate according to the principles of communicative rationality that Habermas deemed key to democratic legitimacy. We conclude that self-help groups' civic role is more complex than is usually presumed and that various factors including groups' leadership, organisational structure and links with public agencies can affect their efficacy within the public sphere.

  16. Beyond the therapeutic: A Habermasian view of self-help groups' place in the public sphere

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Sarah; Avis, Mark; Munn-Giddings, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Self-help groups in the United Kingdom continue to grow in number and address virtually every conceivable health condition, but they remain the subject of very little theoretical analysis. The literature to date has predominantly focused on their therapeutic effects on individual members. And yet they are widely presumed to fulfil a broader civic role and to encourage democratic citizenship. The article uses Habermas' model of the public sphere as an analytical tool with which to reconsider the literature on self-help groups in order to increase our knowledge of their civic functions. In doing this it also aims to illustrate the continuing relevance of Habermas' work to our understanding of issues in health and social care. We consider, within the context of current health policies and practices, the extent to which self-help groups with a range of different forms and functions operate according to the principles of communicative rationality that Habermas deemed key to democratic legitimacy. We conclude that self-help groups' civic role is more complex than is usually presumed and that various factors including groups' leadership, organisational structure and links with public agencies can affect their efficacy within the public sphere. PMID:23326207

  17. The Benefits of Parenting Self-Help Groups for Rural Latino Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wituk, Scott; Commer, Amy; Lindstrom, Julie; Meisen, Greg

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 118 rural, mostly female, Latino participants in Parents Helping Parents (PHP)--a Kansas network of parenting self-help groups--found high satisfaction with PHP. PHP provided support and information concerning child rearing and child development, improved family communication, and increased the use of alternative means of discipline.…

  18. The Benefits of Parenting Self-Help Groups for Rural Latino Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wituk, Scott; Commer, Amy; Lindstrom, Julie; Meisen, Greg

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 118 rural, mostly female, Latino participants in Parents Helping Parents (PHP)--a Kansas network of parenting self-help groups--found high satisfaction with PHP. PHP provided support and information concerning child rearing and child development, improved family communication, and increased the use of alternative means of discipline.…

  19. Expanding Our Understanding of Self-Help Support Groups for Substance Use Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadich, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Self-Help Support Groups (SHSGs) for substance use issues are recognized in current policies for their role in reducing substance use. However, these policies recognize only their therapeutic value. This article argues that SHSGs can offer more than therapeutic advantage. This contention follows a study involving young people who were involved in…

  20. Intrapersonal Resources and the Effectiveness of Self-Help Groups for Bereaved Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caserta, Michael S.; Lund, Dale A.

    1993-01-01

    Examined relative impact of 3 intrapersonal resources (self-esteem, competencies, and life satisfaction) and duration of self-help group intervention on levels of depression and grief over time among 295 recently widowed adults. Found that, in general, resources examined had greater direct influence on outcomes than did intervention. (Author/NB)

  1. An Ethnographic-Discursive Approach to Parental Self-Help Groups: The Case of ADHD.

    PubMed

    Frigerio, Alessandra; Montali, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    Mutual aid groups have become a common form of help in the mental health field. Although self-help groups are associated with a range of health and social benefits, they remain poorly understood in terms of the dynamics of their interactions. Adopting an ethnographic-discursive approach, we conducted a 6-month observation of the meetings of a self-help group of parents with children diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to analyze the discursive dynamics of the interactions that characterized the group. Using a set of discursive strategies and practices, the parents promoted a homogeneity of viewpoints and experiences within the group and constructed a shared and consensual narrative to endorse a specific understanding of ADHD. The production of both homogeneity within the group and a shared narrative served to absolve parents of guilt, helped parents to signify their experience within a blaming social context, and preserved their identities as "good parents."

  2. [Not alone with a rare disease. The importance of self-help given by the example of anorectal malformations].

    PubMed

    Jenetzky, E; Schwarzer, N

    2008-05-01

    Using the German self-help organization for people with anorectal malformations (SoMA e.V.) as an example, the aim is to illustrate the particular importance of selfhelp groups for rare diseases. First, the structure and work of the German support and advocacy organization are explained by means of a case study. The special benefit for people affected with a rare disease and their relatives, but also for medical practitioners and health insurance funds are highlighted. Synergetic effects by integrating networks are presented. Meanwhile and thanks to globalization and internet, 13 national self-help groups for anorectal malformations and related continence problems are currently in touch. Even today, the fields of activity and the mutual support in coping with the handicap are frequently underestimated. Professional self-help aims to be respected as an equal partner in interdisciplinary health care systems.

  3. Intervention to enhance empowerment in breast cancer self-help groups.

    PubMed

    Stang, Ingun; Mittelmark, Maurice B

    2010-03-01

    As arduous psychological reactions and loss of control almost inevitably represent a challenge for women diagnosed and treated for breast cancer, a participatory intervention study was initiated that aimed to enhance empowerment in breast cancer self-help groups. Women newly diagnosed with breast cancer were invited to participate. The intervention encompassed three professionally led self-help groups running sequentially, each group for approximately 4 months. Each group of five to seven participants met weekly. Several empowerment strategies were initiated by two professional facilitators, aiming to promote empowerment processes and to manage stress. The participants experienced group participation as both empowering and as a valuable source of support, and although the group processes developed very differently, a strong sense of fellowship developed in all three groups. The discussion highlights the findings in relation to several theoretical perspectives including social capital, social cohesion, risky agreements, helper-therapy and power/empowerment. We conclude that empowerment strategies that are implemented in professionally led breast cancer self-help groups can contribute to participant empowerment and function as an important source of re-discovery and confirmation of the participants' strengths and abilities.

  4. The structure of social exchange in self-help support groups: development of a measure.

    PubMed

    Brown, Louis D; Tang, Xiaohui; Hollman, Ruth L

    2014-03-01

    Self-help support groups are indigenous community resources designed to help people manage a variety of personal challenges, from alcohol abuse to xeroderma pigmentosum. The social exchanges that occur during group meetings are central to understanding how people benefit from participation. This paper examines the different types of social exchange behaviors that occur during meetings, using two studies to develop empirically distinct scales that reliably measure theoretically important types of exchange. Resource theory informed the initial measurement development efforts. Exploratory factor analyses from the first study led to revisions in the factor structure of the social exchange scales. The revised measure captured the exchange of emotional support, experiential information, humor, unwanted behaviors, and exchanges outside meetings. Confirmatory factor analyses from a follow-up study with a different sample of self-help support groups provided good model fit, suggesting the revised structure accurately represented the data. Further, the scales demonstrated good convergent and discriminant validity with related constructs. Future research can use the scales to identify aspects of social exchange that are most important in improving health outcomes among self-help support group participants. Groups can use the scales in practice to celebrate strengths and address weaknesses in their social exchange dynamics.

  5. The Structure of Social Exchange in Self-Help Support Groups: Development of a Measure

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Louis D.; Tang, Xiaohui; Hollman, Ruth L.

    2014-01-01

    Self-help support groups are indigenous community resources designed to help people manage a variety of personal challenges, from alcohol abuse to xeroderma pigmentosum. The social exchanges that occur during group meetings are central to understanding how people benefit from participation. This paper examines the different types of social exchange behaviors that occur during meetings, using two studies to develop empirically distinct scales that reliably measure theoretically important types of exchange. Resource theory informed the initial measurement development efforts. Exploratory factor analyses from the first study led to revisions in the factor structure of the social exchange scales. The revised measure captured the exchange of emotional support, experiential information, humor, unwanted behaviors, and exchanges outside meetings. Confirmatory factor analyses from a follow-up study with a different sample of self-help support groups provided good model fit, suggesting the revised structure accurately represented the data. Further, the scales demonstrated good convergent and discriminant validity with related constructs. Future research can use the scales to identify aspects of social exchange that are most important in improving health outcomes among self-help support group participants. Groups can use the scales in practice to celebrate strengths and address weaknesses in their social exchange dynamics. PMID:24398622

  6. The Efficacy of Self-Help Group Treatment and Therapist-Led Group Treatment for Binge Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Carol B.; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this investigation was to compare three types of treatment for binge eating disorder to determine the relative efficacy of self-help group treatment compared to therapist-led and therapist-assisted group cognitive-behavioral therapy. Method A total of 259 adults diagnosed with binge eating disorder were randomized to wait-list or 20 week group treatment that was therapist-led, therapist-assisted, or self-help. Binge eating as measured by the Eating Disorder Examination was assessed at baseline, post-treatment, 6- and 12 month follow-up and outcome was determined using logistic regression and analysis of covariance (intention-to-treat). Results At end of treatment, the therapist-led (51.7%) and the therapist-assisted (33.3%) conditions had higher binge eating abstinence rates than the self-help (17.9%) and wait-list (10.1%) conditions. No differences in abstinence rates were observed at either follow-up assessment. The therapist-led condition also showed more reductions in binge eating at post-treatment and follow-up compared to the self-help condition, and treatment completion rates were higher in the therapist-led (88.3%) and wait-list (81.2%) conditions than the therapist-assisted (68.3%) and the self-help (59.7%) conditions. Conclusions Therapist-led group cognitive-behavioral treatment for binge eating disorder led to higher binge eating abstinence rates, greater reductions in binge eating frequency, and lower attrition at the end of treatment compared to group self-help treatment. Although these findings indicate that therapist delivery of group treatment is associated with better short-term outcome and less attrition than self-help treatment, the lack of group differences at follow-up suggests that self-help group treatment may be a viable alternative to therapist-led interventions. (Clinical Trials Registration: Treatment of Binge Eating Disorder, #NCT00041743; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00041743?term=00041743&rank=1

  7. Self-help energy conservation programs for low-income groups: the SMILE experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bachman, A.L.

    1980-05-01

    The implementation of a pilot program of self-help energy conservation projects in low-income neighborhoods in Lafayette, Louisiana, is described. The program was designed to meet the needs of a specific group of people within the context of their particular energy use patterns, their housing stock, and the climate of the southcentral region. A wider application is indicated, however, and the report focuses on those elements of the program that could be applied in other regions. Special attention is devoted to weatherproofing, and an informational booklet on this topic is included.

  8. Self Help Groups and Household Asset Acquisition and Income among Women Group Members in Kisumu East Sub County, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atieno, Paul Okello

    2017-01-01

    Many studies covering Self-Help Groups (SHGs) have delved extensively on their impacts on food security, livelihoods, socio-economic empowerment, and enterprise enhancement. However, little attention has been paid to the impact of SHGs on household assets acquisition. Traditionally, SHGs are formed by people (mainly women) who are not in formal…

  9. The Relative Success of a Self-Help and a Group-Based Memory Training Program for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Erin C.; West, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates self-help and group-based memory training programs to test for their differential impact on memory beliefs and performance. Self-help participants used a manual that presented strategies for name, story, and list recall and practice exercises. Matched content from that same manual was presented by the trainer in 2-hr weekly group sessions for the group-based trainees. Relative to a wait-list control group, most memory measures showed significant gains for both self-help and group-based training, with no significant training condition differences, and these gains were maintained at follow-up. Belief measures showed that locus of control was significantly higher for the self-help and group-based training than the control group; memory self-efficacy significantly declined for controls, increased for group-trained participants, and remained constant in the self-help group. Self-efficacy change in a self-help group may require more opportunities for interacting with peers and/or an instructor emphasizing one's potential for memory change. PMID:19739914

  10. Utilisation of rheumatology care services in Germany: the case of physical therapy and self-help groups

    PubMed Central

    Thieme, Holm; Borgetto, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Physical Therapy (PT) and self-help groups (SHG) are important components of health care in rheumatic diseases. The utilisation of PT and SHG by patients with rheumatic diseases may be influenced by several factors. The aim of this study is to summarize the evidence on PT and SHG utilisation of patients with rheumatic diseases in Germany. We systematically searched the MEDLINE-database for studies that evaluated the utilisation and factors that possibly influence the utilisation of PT and SHG. Eight studies were found for PT-utilisation and one for SHG-utilisation. Between 25 and 59 percent of patients with rheumatic diseases received PT services. Several individual and contextual factors that may influence the utilisation could be identified. In conclusion, evidence exists for wide variations in the utilisation of PT services and an underuse of such services among patients with rheumatic diseases in Germany. By contrast, little evidence exists on the utilisation of SHG. PMID:23133502

  11. Expanding health coverage in India: role of microfinance-based self-help groups

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Somen

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To fulfil its commitment to universal health coverage, it will be necessary for the Indian government to expand access to appropriate and affordable health services. Through the mechanism of microfinance-based self-help groups (SHGs), poor women and their families are provided not only with access to finance to improve their livelihoods but also, in many cases, with a range of basic health services. Governments and non-governmental organisations in India have implemented large-scale programmes for the promotion of SHGs. With 93 million people organised nationally, the SHGs provide an established population base that can potentially be used to extend health coverage. However, the potential for working with SHGs to improve people’s access to health services has not been an active part of the national policy discourse.​ PMID:28562231

  12. Self-help groups reduce mortality risk: a 5-year follow-up study of alcoholics in the Tokyo metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Masudomi, Ichiro; Isse, Kunihiro; Uchiyama, Makoto; Watanabe, Hirohumi

    2004-10-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether alcoholics who attend self-help groups experience fewer deaths than those who do not. Subjects were patients from the Alcoholism Treatment Program (ATP) of Matsuzawa hospital. A cohort of alcoholic patients recruited into a prospective study was followed from April 1994 to March 1999. A total of 469 alcoholic patients met the International Classification of Diseases (10th edition) criteria for alcohol dependency. Of these, 94 patients refused to participate in the study, leaving a total of 375 participants. After discharge from the ATP and a complete explanation of the present study, subjects decided whether to attend a self-help group (SHG) or not. The SHG comprised 208 subjects, and the non-self-help group (NSHG) comprised 167 subjects. Outcomes were evaluated with regard to death during follow-up for a mean of 2.4 years. Death was ascertained through the records of the Setagaya Department of Health and Welfare center, Matsuzawa hospital and other hospitals, and through personal contact with informants, relatives, and significant others of subjects. Deaths were confirmed for 47 NSHG subjects and only five SHG subjects. NSHG displayed a significantly decreased cumulative survival compared with SHG (P < 0.0001). Cox proportion hazard analysis was used to examine variables that may help to predict mortality among alcoholics. Alcoholics who attended self-help groups differed from those who did not, with regard to mortality experience. Attending a self-help group represented the most important predictor of prognosis for alcoholics.

  13. Personality and alcohol/substance-use disorder patient relapse and attendance at self-help group meetings.

    PubMed

    Janowsky, D S; Boone, A; Morter, S; Howe, L

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of personality in the short-term outcome of alcohol/substance-use disorder patients. Detoxifying alcohol/substance-use disorder patients were administered the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ), the Michigan Alcohol Screening Test (MAST), the CAGE Questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). These patients were subsequently evaluated over a 1-month period for relapse and attendance at self-help group meetings. High TPQ Persistence scale scores predicted abstinence. When the Thinking and Feeling groups were considered separately, and when these two groups were combined into a single group, high scores for the individual groups and the combined group (i.e. Thinking and Feeling types together) predicted abstinence. High TPQ Persistence scale scores and low Shyness with Strangers and Fear of Uncertainty subscale scores predicted attendance at self-help group meetings. High MBTI Extroversion and high MBTI Thinking scores also predicted attendance at self-help group meetings. When the Extroverted and Introverted types and the Thinking and Feeling types respectively were combined, as with abstinence, high scores predicted attendance at self-help group meetings. Age, gender, CAGE, MAST, and BDI scores did not predict outcome. The above information suggests that specific personality variables may predict abstinence and attendance at self-help group meetings in recently detoxified alcoholics, and this may have prognostic and therapeutic significance.

  14. Social support, organizational characteristics, psychological well-being, and group appraisal in three self-help group populations.

    PubMed

    Maton, K I

    1988-02-01

    This study examined the relationship of three social support and three organizational variables to two well-being and two group appraisal variables among 144 members of Compassionate Friends, Multiple Sclerosis, and Overeaters Anonymous self-help groups. An anonymous questionnaire was the major research instrument. Receiving social support was not significantly related to depression or anxiety but was positively related to perceived group benefits and group satisfaction. Providing social support and friendship were each positively related to one well-being and one group appraisal variable. Bidirectional supporters (i.e., individuals high on both receiving and providing support) reported more favorable well-being and group appraisal than Receivers, Providers, and Low Supporters. At the group level of analysis (n = 15 groups), groups with higher levels of role differentiation, greater order and organization, and in which leaders were perceived as more capable contained members who reported more positive well-being and group appraisal. The implications for future research and professional consultation to self-help groups are discussed.

  15. Healthcare seeking behaviour among self-help group households in Rural Bihar and Uttar Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Raza, Wameq A; Van de Poel, Ellen; Panda, Pradeep; Dror, David; Bedi, Arjun

    2016-01-04

    In recent years, supported by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), a number of community-based health insurance (CBHI) schemes have been operating in rural India. Such schemes design their benefit packages according to local priorities. This paper examines healthcare seeking behaviour among self-help group households with a view to understanding the implications for the benefit packages offered by such schemes. We use cross-sectional data collected from two of India's poorest states and estimate an alternative-specific conditional logit model to examine healthcare seeking behaviour. We find that the majority of respondents do access some form of care and that there is overwhelming use of private providers. Non-degree allopathic providers (NDAP) also called rural medical practitioners are the most popular providers. In the case of acute illnesses, proximity plays an important role in determining provider choice. For chronic illnesses, cost of care influences provider choice. Given the importance of proximity in determining provider choice, benefit packages offered by CBHI schemes should consider coverage of transportation costs and reimbursement of foregone earnings.

  16. Against many odds: the dilemmas of women's self-help groups in Mbeere, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mwaniki, N

    1986-01-01

    This article uses data collected through questionnaires and formal interviews to analyze women's self-help groups in Mbeere, Kenya. The discussion begins with a description of the geographic setting, which has low and unpredictable rainfall leading to periodic droughts and famine, and socioeconomic aspects of life in Mbeere, where women's status is defined by men who control important economic aspects of their lives, such as land tenure. In 1982, there were 140 women's groups in Mbeere with memberships ranging from below 10 to over 60 (most 30-50). The groups are formally organized, with a leader, a secretary, and a treasurer. Most of the women in the groups are from the poor peasant socioeconomic class, and residence in the same neighborhood is an important membership criteria. All of the women surveyed were married and had children. The work schedules of the groups depend on the type of project and amount of work to be done. Activities fall into the categories of raising money (general work, cotton farming, basket making); generating income (raising livestock; building stores, lodgings, or social halls; or buying equipment like a truck or grain mill); and general development (water extension, homestead improvements, buying cows or goats for members, or building schools). Of 25 groups sampled, 20 had a cash-crop garden cultivated on borrowed land. Groups gave members financial assistance (all members get equal treatment), labor assistance, and assistance in social matters through the dissemination of information and informal discussions. Groups face internal constraints in terms of the heavy burden women face to uphold their domestic and agricultural responsibilities, food shortages, water scarcity, and inadequate nutrition, poor organization, weak leadership, large allowances demanded by some group leaders, lack of support from husbands, criticisms from outside the groups, and an inability to identify the most viable projects. External constraints include lack of

  17. Sitting with others: mental health self-help groups in northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the past four decades, there has been increasing interest in Self-Help Groups, by mental health services users and caregivers, alike. Research in high-income countries suggests that participation in SHGs is associated with decreased use of inpatient facilities, improved social functioning among service users, and decreased caregiver burden. The formation of SHGs has become an important component of mental health programmes operated by non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in low-income countries. However, there has been relatively little research examining the benefits of SHGs in this context. Methods Qualitative research with 18 SHGs, five local non-governmental organisations, community mental health nurses, administrators in Ghana Health Services, and discussions with BasicNeeds staff. Results SHGs have the potential to serve as key components of community mental health programmes in low-resource settings. The strongest evidence concerns how SHGs provide a range of supports, e.g., social, financial, and practical, to service users and caregivers. The groups also appear to foster greater acceptance of service users by their families and by communities at large. Membership in SHGs appears to be associated with more consistent treatment and better outcomes for those who are ill. Discussion This study highlights the need for longitudinal qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the effect of SHGs on clinical, social and economic outcomes of service users and their carers. Conclusions The organisation of SHGs appears to be associated with positive outcomes for service users and caregivers. However, there is a need to better understand how SHGs operate and the challenges they face. PMID:22436354

  18. Mental Health Orientation for Self-Help Group Members: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Shrinivasa, Basavaraj; Janardhana, Navaneetham; Nirmala, Bergai Parthsarathy

    2017-01-01

    Background: Treatment gap for mental health care in low- and middle-income (LAMI) countries is very large, and building workforce using the locally available resources is very much essential in reducing this gap. The current study is a preliminary work toward this direction. Materials and Methods: A single group pre- and post-design was considered for assessing the feasibility of Mental Health Orientation (MHO) Program for Self-Help Group members. Assessment of participants’ MHO using Orientation Towards Mental Illness (OMI) scale was undertaken at three levels: Baseline assessment before the intervention, after completing 2 days orientation program, and 6 weeks later. Results: Analysis of data resulted in statistically significant mean scores in the domains of areas of causation (F[1.41, 40.7] = 21.7, P < 0.000, ηp2 = 0.428), perception of abnormality (F[1.27, 36.8] = 15.8, P < 0.000, ηp2 = 0.353), treatment (F[1.42, 41.3] = 34.8, P < 0.000, ηp2 = 0.546), and after effect (F[1.36,39.4] = 26.7, P < 0.000, ηp2 = 0.480). Although the overall mean scores of all the domains of OMI were found to be statistically significantly different, there was no significant difference in the mean scores between post and follow-up assessments on areas of causation (μd = 1.27, P = 0.440) and treatment (μd = 1.00, P = 0.156). Conclusion: Overall, the findings of our study demonstrate that brief MHO program can exert a beneficial effect on bringing about significant change in the orientation of the participants toward mental illness but need to be refreshed over time to make the impact of the program stay longer. PMID:28694619

  19. Professional Support of Self-Help Groups: A Support Group Project for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsen, Benedicte

    2003-01-01

    Study follows a collaborative support group project between a team of health professionals and a Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients' group. While advantageous for professionals to decide upon the aim of a joint intervention in dialogue with participants, simply asking participants what their aims are does not guarantee actual agreement. Case study…

  20. Professional Support of Self-Help Groups: A Support Group Project for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsen, Benedicte

    2003-01-01

    Study follows a collaborative support group project between a team of health professionals and a Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients' group. While advantageous for professionals to decide upon the aim of a joint intervention in dialogue with participants, simply asking participants what their aims are does not guarantee actual agreement. Case study…

  1. Can Addiction-Related Self-Help/Mutual Aid Groups Lower Demand for Professional Substance Abuse Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Keith

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the potential of self-help/mutual-aid groups as a way to reduce the demand for professional substance-abuse treatment and proposes a model that combines the two approaches for cost-effective and therapeutically effective networks of services. (SLD)

  2. Involving self-help groups in health-care institutions: the patients' contribution to and their view of 'self-help friendliness' as an approach to implement quality criteria of sustainable co-operation.

    PubMed

    Nickel, Stefan; Trojan, Alf; Kofahl, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    The importance of patient participation and involvement is now widely acknowledged; in the past, few systematic health-care institution policies existed to establish sustainable co-operation. In 2004, in Germany, the initiative 'Self-Help Friendliness (SHF) and Patient-Centeredness in Health Care' was launched to establish and implement quality criteria related to collaboration with patient groups. The objective of this study was to describe (i) how patients were involved in the development of SHF by summarizing a number of studies and (ii) a new survey on the importance and feasibility of SHF. In a series of participative studies, SHF was shaped, tested and implemented in 40 health-care institutions in Germany. Representatives from 157 self-help groups (SHGs), 50 self-help organizations and 17 self-help clearing houses were actively involved. The second objective was reached through a survey of 74 of the 115 member associations of the biggest self-help umbrella organization at federal level (response rate: 64 %). Patient involvement included the following: identification of the needs and wishes of SHGs regarding co-operation, their involvement in the definition of quality criteria of co-operation, having a crucial role during the implementation of SHF and accrediting health-care institutions as self-help friendly. The ten criteria in total were positively valued and perceived as moderately practicable. Through the intensive involvement of self-help representatives, it was feasible to develop SHF as a systematic approach to closer collaboration of professionals and SHGs. Some challenges have to be taken into account involving patients and the limitations of our empirical study. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Physician and consumer attitudes and behaviors regarding self-help health support groups as an adjunct to traditional medical care.

    PubMed

    Fridinger, F; Goodwin, G; Chng, C L

    1992-01-01

    This study assessed the creditability of self-help health support groups as an adjunct to traditional medical care among a sampling of physicians (N = 120) and group members (N = 73) located in the Dallas/Ft. Worth Metropolitan area. Findings suggest a general lack of awareness of local groups among physicians, referral to only a few select groups, as well as little communication between health care professionals and their patients. Physicians in group practice, surgical specialties, and having never referred patients to support groups responded less favorably. Several benefits were reported by the group members, although for a majority their patient-physician relationship remained relatively unchanged.

  4. [Visits to cancer patients in hospital by members of cancer self-help groups in the context of visit programmes - process and outome indicators].

    PubMed

    Slesina, W; Rennert, D; Weber, A

    2014-12-01

    In Germany since the 1970s, several self-help groups of cancer patients have begun to conduct patient visits to the hospital for cancer patients. Until today the conversations between cancer patients and visiting services were not subject to scientific investigation. Therefore, a cooperation study by the Deutsche ILCO, the women's self-help for cancer and the Section of Medical Sociology of a German university was conducted with the aim of evaluating the quality of the visitor conversations with patients with colon cancer and breast cancer. An observational cohort study with 2 time points (T1: during the hospital stay; T2 3 months after hospital discharge) combined a descriptive cross-sectional analysis for process quality of the conversations with a hypothesis-based longitudinal analysis of outcome quality of conversations. Data were collected by written, postal patient questionnaires. The T1 and T2 questionnaires were developed in consultation with a number of regional self-help groups. The questionnaires included socio-demographic and disease-related questions, validated scales for the burden of cancer patients (FBK-R10), for depression (CES-D) and health locus of control (GKÜ) and specially developed questions for cancer about process and outcome quality of the conversations with the visitors of self-help groups. The majority of patients rated the appearance and behaviour of the visitors in regard to several parameters as very positive. Thus, most patients found the conversation to be useful for their mental status and situation by reducing fears, building hope, courage, confidence, and the resulting suggestions for coping. However, disease-related stress, depression and health locus of control were found at 3 months after hospital discharge (T2) for the characteristics in patients with no evidence of a positive/salutogenetic effect of the visitor's conversation. The results of the study indicate that the opportunity to talk with members of self-help groups

  5. Promoting household water treatment through women's self help groups in Rural India: assessing impact on drinking water quality and equity.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Matthew C; Trinies, Victoria; Boisson, Sophie; Mak, Gregory; Clasen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Household water treatment, including boiling, chlorination and filtration, has been shown effective in improving drinking water quality and preventing diarrheal disease among vulnerable populations. We used a case-control study design to evaluate the extent to which the commercial promotion of household water filters through microfinance institutions to women's self-help group (SHG) members improved access to safe drinking water. This pilot program achieved a 9.8% adoption rate among women targeted for adoption. Data from surveys and assays of fecal contamination (thermotolerant coliforms, TTC) of drinking water samples (source and household) were analyzed from 281 filter adopters and 247 non-adopters exposed to the program; 251 non-SHG members were also surveyed. While adopters were more likely than non-adopters to have children under 5 years, they were also more educated, less poor, more likely to have access to improved water supplies, and more likely to have previously used a water filter. Adopters had lower levels of fecal contamination of household drinking water than non-adopters, even among those non-adopters who treated their water by boiling or using traditional ceramic filters. Nevertheless, one-third of water samples from adopter households exceeded 100 TTC/100ml (high risk), and more than a quarter of the filters had no stored treated water available when visited by an investigator, raising concerns about correct, consistent use. In addition, the poorest adopters were less likely to see improvements in their water quality. Comparisons of SHG and non-SHG members suggest similar demographic characteristics, indicating SHG members are an appropriate target group for this promotion campaign. However, in order to increase the potential for health gains, future programs will need to increase uptake, particularly among the poorest households who are most susceptible to disease morbidity and mortality, and focus on strategies to improve the correct, consistent

  6. Promoting Household Water Treatment through Women's Self Help Groups in Rural India: Assessing Impact on Drinking Water Quality and Equity

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Matthew C.; Trinies, Victoria; Boisson, Sophie; Mak, Gregory; Clasen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Household water treatment, including boiling, chlorination and filtration, has been shown effective in improving drinking water quality and preventing diarrheal disease among vulnerable populations. We used a case-control study design to evaluate the extent to which the commercial promotion of household water filters through microfinance institutions to women's self-help group (SHG) members improved access to safe drinking water. This pilot program achieved a 9.8% adoption rate among women targeted for adoption. Data from surveys and assays of fecal contamination (thermotolerant coliforms, TTC) of drinking water samples (source and household) were analyzed from 281 filter adopters and 247 non-adopters exposed to the program; 251 non-SHG members were also surveyed. While adopters were more likely than non-adopters to have children under 5 years, they were also more educated, less poor, more likely to have access to improved water supplies, and more likely to have previously used a water filter. Adopters had lower levels of fecal contamination of household drinking water than non-adopters, even among those non-adopters who treated their water by boiling or using traditional ceramic filters. Nevertheless, one-third of water samples from adopter households exceeded 100 TTC/100ml (high risk), and more than a quarter of the filters had no stored treated water available when visited by an investigator, raising concerns about correct, consistent use. In addition, the poorest adopters were less likely to see improvements in their water quality. Comparisons of SHG and non-SHG members suggest similar demographic characteristics, indicating SHG members are an appropriate target group for this promotion campaign. However, in order to increase the potential for health gains, future programs will need to increase uptake, particularly among the poorest households who are most susceptible to disease morbidity and mortality, and focus on strategies to improve the correct, consistent

  7. Testing two types of self-help CBT-I for insomnia in older adults with arthritis or coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Rybarczyk, Bruce; Mack, Laurin; Harris, Jennifer Huang; Stepanski, Edward

    2011-11-01

    The present study tested two methods of self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) for 106 older adults (mean age = 68) with osteoarthritis (n = 33) or coronary artery disease (n = 33) or no significant medical condition (n = 40). The latter was employed as a comparison group to test the differential efficacy between primary and comorbid insomnia. Self-help CBT-I has demonstrated efficacy in previous studies, so two treatments were compared rather than employing a no treatment control group. Participants were randomly assigned to a book version or an enhanced multimedia version of CBT-I. Both versions of CBT-I demonstrated efficacy in improving all measures of sleep at posttreatment, using intent-to-treat analyses. These sleep improvements were maintained among 86 treatment completers who participated in 1-year follow-up assessment. There were no significant differences in treatment response between primary (no medical condition) and comorbid insomnia participants and no significant differences between the two types of self-help according to sleep log measure. However, multimedia participants compared to book participants showed more improvement on three global sleep measures administered at posttreatment only. Although outcomes were attenuated relative to those obtained in therapist led intervention studies, the results suggest that self-help CBT-I has good potential to serve as a first-line, cost-effective treatment for both primary and comorbid insomnia in older adults.

  8. A neoliberalisation of civil society? Self-help groups and the labouring class poor in rural South India.

    PubMed

    Pattenden, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This paper notes the prominence of self-help groups (SHGs) within current anti-poverty policy in India, and analyses the impacts of government- and NGO-backed SHGs in rural North Karnataka. It argues that self-help groups represent a partial neoliberalisation of civil society in that they address poverty through low-cost methods that do not challenge the existing distribution of power and resources between the dominant class and the labouring class poor. It finds that intra-group savings and loans and external loans/subsidies can provide marginal economic and political gains for members of the dominant class and those members of the labouring classes whose insecure employment patterns currently provide above poverty line consumption levels, but provide neither material nor political gains for the labouring class poor. Target-oriented SHG catalysts are inattentive to how the social relations of production reproduce poverty and tend to overlook class relations and socio-economic and political differentiation within and outside of groups, which are subject to interference by dominant class local politicians and landowners.

  9. Strategies for Survival in Kenya: Women, Education, and Self-Help Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbugua-Murithi, Tata

    1997-01-01

    Drawing on data from 12 women's groups in Kenya, a recent study identified these women's general and demographic characteristics and discovered how rural Kenyan women acquire and exchange information, education, and learning skills; how education affects the groups' organizational management and leadership; how women work in groups and benefit…

  10. Burnout in the Helping Professions: Mutual Aid Groups as Self-Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicuzza, Frank J.; De Voe, Marianne W.

    1982-01-01

    Offers some insight and understanding of the stress-producing components of counseling practice. Discusses some of the physical symptoms of burnout and examines why the syndrome is prevalent in the human services. Proposes the development of mutual aid groups as one solution to prevent or minimize burnout. (Author/RC)

  11. Burnout in the Helping Professions: Mutual Aid Groups as Self-Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicuzza, Frank J.; De Voe, Marianne W.

    1982-01-01

    Offers some insight and understanding of the stress-producing components of counseling practice. Discusses some of the physical symptoms of burnout and examines why the syndrome is prevalent in the human services. Proposes the development of mutual aid groups as one solution to prevent or minimize burnout. (Author/RC)

  12. Group vs. Individual Training on a Self-Help Skill with the Profoundly Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elium, Michael D.; McCarver, Ronald B.

    The study compared the results of group and individual training methods on the acquisition of a roll-on-deodorant self care skill by 16 profoundly retarded adults residing at a residential institution for the mentally retarded. The deodorant skill was divided into 11 teaching steps and an initial performance baseline was obtained for each subject.…

  13. Importance of hemodialysis-related outcomes: comparison of ratings by a self-help group, clinicians, and health technology assessment authors with those by a large reference group of patients

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Inger M; Scheibler, Fueloep; Gerhardus, Ansgar

    2016-01-01

    Background The selection of important outcomes is a crucial decision for clinical research and health technology assessment (HTA), and there is ongoing debate about which stakeholders should be involved. Hemodialysis is a complex treatment for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and affects many outcomes. Apart from obvious outcomes, such as mortality, morbidity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), others such as, concerning daily living or health care provision, may also be important. The aim of our study was to analyze to what extent the preferences for patient-relevant outcomes differed between various stakeholders. We compared preferences of stakeholders normally or occasionally involved in outcome prioritization (patients from a self-help group, clinicians and HTA authors) with those of a large reference group of patients. Participants and methods The reference group consisted of 4,518 CKD patients investigated previously. We additionally recruited CKD patients via a regional self-help group, nephrologists via an online search and HTA authors via an expert database or personal contacts. All groups assessed the relative importance of the 23 outcomes by means of a discrete visual analog scale. We used descriptive statistics to rank outcomes and compare the results between groups. Results We received completed questionnaires from 49 self-help group patients, 19 nephrologists and 18 HTA authors. Only the following 3 outcomes were ranked within the top 7 outcomes by all 4 groups: safety, HRQoL and emotional state. The ratings by the self-help group were generally more concordant with the reference group ratings than those by nephrologists, while HTA authors showed the least concordance. Conclusion Preferences of CKD patients from a self-help group, nephrologists and HTA authors differ to a varying extent from those of a large reference group of patients with CKD. The preferences of all stakeholders should form the basis of a transparent approach so as to generate a

  14. Effect of a cognitive behavioral self-help intervention on depression, anxiety, and coping self-efficacy in people with rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Garnefski, N; Kraaij, V; Benoist, M; Bout, Z; Karels, E; Smit, A

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a new cognitive-behavioral self-help program with minimal coaching could improve psychological well-being (depression, anxiety, and coping self-efficacy) in people with rheumatic disease and depressive symptoms. In total, 82 persons with a rheumatic disease enrolled in a randomized controlled trial were allocated to either a group receiving the self-help program or a waiting list control condition group. For both groups, measurements were done at baseline, posttest, and followup. The outcome measures were the depression and anxiety scales of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and an adaptation of the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale. Repeated-measures analyses of covariance were performed to evaluate changes in outcome measures from pretest to posttest and from posttest to followup. The results showed that the self-help program was effective in reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety and in strengthening coping self-efficacy. The positive effects remained after a followup period of 2 months. This cost-effective program could very well be used as a first step in a stepped care approach or as one of the treatment possibilities in a matched care approach. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Users' involvement in the Italian NHS: the role of associations and self-help groups.

    PubMed

    Pavolini, Emmanuele; Spina, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to show the importance of considering patients' and citizens' associations for understanding users' involvement in health care systems. The paper is based on both qualitative and quantitative data on Italy drawn from various sources (national statistics, own survey data, qualitative interviews). Although the paper avoids an excessively positive view of the success and frequency of collective patients' participation, it nevertheless shows that the Italian National Health Care System (NHS) is undergoing important changes in this regard. Voice and co-production among patients, health care services and professionals have become more common and important also because of forms of collective action. Professionals themselves often belong to or promote such associations and groups. The Italian case also shows that voice and co-production tend frequently to merge into a single complex strategy where patients' requests go along with their direct involvement in health care provision. The study provides useful information for policy makers considering the implementation of policies that promote collective action in order to increase an active users' participation in health care. This is one of the limited number of Italian studies which investigates users' involvement in the NHS and collective action, thus adding knowledge to the limited research in this field.

  16. Effect of empowerment on the quality of life of the survivors of breast cancer: The moderating effect of self-help group participation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sunhwa; Park, Hyojung

    2017-01-20

    To analyze the moderating effect of self-help group participation on the relationship between empowerment and quality of life for survivors of breast cancer. This study was conducted in breast cancer centers in general hospitals and long-term care hospitals with 264 survivors of breast cancer. The Cancer Empowerment Questionnaire and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast were used for the data collection. Differences between the regularly attending participants in the self-help groups and those who did not regularly attend were studied and these groups were dichotomized. The empowerment of the survivors of breast cancer significantly influenced their quality of life. Depending on their participation in the self-help group, there was a significant difference in their quality of life. After controlling for empowerment, however, participation in the self-help group did not significantly influence the survivors' quality of life. Participation in the self-help group had a significant effect on the survivors' sense of empowerment, which in turn positively influenced their quality of life. It is essential to provide emotional support, including valuable information, to the survivors of breast cancer who do not participate in self-help groups. © 2017 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  17. Cognitive-behavioural group therapy versus guided self-help for compulsive buying disorder: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Müller, A; Arikian, A; de Zwaan, M; Mitchell, J E

    2013-01-01

    Compulsive buying (CB) is defined as extreme preoccupation with buying/shopping and frequent buying that causes substantial negative psychological, social, occupational and financial consequences. There exists preliminary evidence that group cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective in the treatment of CB. The present pilot study made a first attempt to compare group CBT for CB with telephone-guided self-help (GSH). Fifty-six patients were allocated randomly to one of the three conditions: (1) group CBT (n = 22); (2) GSH (n = 20); and (3) a waiting list condition (n = 14). The results indicate that face-to-face group CBT is superior not only to the waiting list condition but also to GSH. Patients who received GSH tended to have more success in overcoming CB compared with the waiting list controls. Given the sample size, the results must be considered as preliminary and further research is needed to address the topic whether GSH also could be a helpful intervention in reducing CB. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Effect of combining a health program with a microfinance-based self-help group on health behaviors and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Saha, S.; Kermode, M.; Annear, P.L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Women's participation in microfinance-based self-help groups (SHGs) and the resultant social capital may provide a basis to address the gap in health attainment for poor women and their children. We investigated the effect of combining a health program designed to improve health behaviours and outcomes with a microfinance-based SHG program. Design A mixed method study was conducted among 34 villages selected from three blocks or district subdivisions of India; one in Gujarat, two in Karnataka. Methods A set of 17 villages representing new health program areas were pair-matched with 17 comparison villages. Two rounds of surveys were conducted with a total of 472 respondents, followed by 17 key informant interviews and 17 focus group discussions. Results Compared to a matched comparison group, women in SHGs that received the health program had higher odds of delivering their babies in an institution (OR: 5.08, 95% CI 1.21–21.35), feeding colostrum to their newborn (OR: 2.83, 95% CI 1.02–5.57), and having a toilet at home (OR: 1.53, 95% CI 0.76–3.09). However, while the change was in the expected direction, there was no statistically significant reduction in diarrhoea among children in the intervention community (OR: 0.86, 95% CI 0.42–1.76), and the hypothesis that the health program would result in decreased out-pocket expenditures on treatment was not supported. Conclusion Our study found evidence that health programs implemented with microfinance-based SHGs is associated with improved health behaviours. With broad population coverage of SHGs and the social capital produced by their activities, microfinance-based SHGs may provide an avenue for addressing the health needs of poor women. PMID:26304181

  19. Weight-loss history as a predictor of obesity treatment outcome: prospective, long-term results from behavioral, group self-help treatment.

    PubMed

    Latner, Janet D; Ciao, Anna C

    2014-02-01

    Weight-loss history was examined as a predictor of outcome in group self-help obesity treatment. Participants (n = 128; 83% women; mean body mass index = 34.2 kg/m(2); mean age = 47.2 years) in self-help, group behavioral weight-loss treatment reported a mean of 5.1 prior weight-loss attempts and lost 13.8 percent of initial weight in current treatment. A greater number of past attempts independently predicted greater 6-month, 18-month, and intent-to-treat weight losses. Greater magnitude of largest past loss predicted greater 18-month weight loss. In contrast to studies on professional treatment, group self-help participants might benefit from repeated weight-loss efforts despite previous failures.

  20. Internet-Based Self-Help with Therapist Feedback and in Vivo Group Exposure for Social Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Holmstrom, Annelie; Sparthan, Elisabeth; Furmark, Tomas; Nilsson-Ihrfelt, Elisabeth; Buhrman, Monica; Ekselius, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Sixty-four individuals with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) were assigned to a multimodal cognitive-behavioral treatment package or to a waiting list control group. Treatment consisted of a 9-week, Internet-delivered, self-help program that was combined with 2 group exposure sessions in real life and minimal therapist contact via e-mail.…

  1. Internet-Based Self-Help with Therapist Feedback and in Vivo Group Exposure for Social Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Holmstrom, Annelie; Sparthan, Elisabeth; Furmark, Tomas; Nilsson-Ihrfelt, Elisabeth; Buhrman, Monica; Ekselius, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Sixty-four individuals with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) were assigned to a multimodal cognitive-behavioral treatment package or to a waiting list control group. Treatment consisted of a 9-week, Internet-delivered, self-help program that was combined with 2 group exposure sessions in real life and minimal therapist contact via e-mail.…

  2. Treating university students with social phobia and public speaking fears: Internet delivered self-help with or without live group exposure sessions.

    PubMed

    Tillfors, Maria; Carlbring, Per; Furmark, Tomas; Lewenhaupt, Susanne; Spak, Maria; Eriksson, Anna; Westling, Bengt E; Andersson, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of an Internet-based self-help program with minimal therapist contact via e-mail for Swedish university students with social phobia and public speaking fears. The main objective was to test if the Internet-based self-help program would be more effective if five live group exposure sessions were added. Thirty-eight students meeting the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition criteria for social phobia were randomized into two different treatment groups: Internet delivered cognitive behavior therapy combined with five group exposure sessions (ICBT+ exp) or the Internet program alone (ICBT). Results were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. Both treatment groups showed significant improvement from pre- to post-test, and from pre-test to 1-year follow-up, on all measured dimensions (social anxiety, general anxiety, depression levels, and quality of life). For both the groups, the average within-group effect sizes for the primary social anxiety scales, expressed as Cohen's d, were comparable to those seen in traditionally administered cognitive behavioral therapy both at post-test and at 1- year follow-up. The results suggest that the Internet-based self-help program on its own is efficient in the treatment of university students with social phobia. Adding group exposure sessions did not improve the outcome significantly. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Internet-based individually versus group guided self-help treatment for social anxiety disorder: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common mental disorders and causes subjective suffering and economic burden worldwide. Although effective treatments are available, a lot of cases go untreated. Internet-based self-help is a low-threshold and flexible treatment alternative for SAD. Various studies have already shown that internet-based self-help can be effective to reduce social phobic symptoms significantly. Most of the interventions tested include therapist support, whereas the role of peer support within internet-based self-help has not yet been fully understood. There is evidence suggesting that patients’ mutual exchange via integrated discussion forums can increase the efficacy of internet-based treatments. This study aims at investigating the added value of therapist-guided group support on the treatment outcome of internet-based self-help for SAD. Methods/design The study is conducted as a randomized controlled trial. A total of 150 adults with a diagnosis of SAD are randomly assigned to either a waiting-list control group or one of the active conditions. The participants in the two active conditions use the same internet-based self-help program, either with individual support by a psychologist or therapist-guided group support. In the group guided condition, participants can communicate with each other via an integrated, protected discussion forum. Subjects are recruited via topic related websites and links; diagnostic status will be assessed with a telephone interview. The primary outcome variables are symptoms of SAD and diagnostic status after the intervention. Secondary endpoints are general symptomology, depression, quality of life, as well as the primary outcome variables 6 months later. Furthermore, process variables such as group processes, the change in symptoms and working alliance will be studied. Discussion The results of this study should indicate whether group-guided support could enhance the efficacy of an

  4. Internet-based individually versus group guided self-help treatment for social anxiety disorder: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Ava; Stolz, Timo; Berger, Thomas

    2014-04-15

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common mental disorders and causes subjective suffering and economic burden worldwide. Although effective treatments are available, a lot of cases go untreated. Internet-based self-help is a low-threshold and flexible treatment alternative for SAD. Various studies have already shown that internet-based self-help can be effective to reduce social phobic symptoms significantly. Most of the interventions tested include therapist support, whereas the role of peer support within internet-based self-help has not yet been fully understood. There is evidence suggesting that patients' mutual exchange via integrated discussion forums can increase the efficacy of internet-based treatments. This study aims at investigating the added value of therapist-guided group support on the treatment outcome of internet-based self-help for SAD. The study is conducted as a randomized controlled trial. A total of 150 adults with a diagnosis of SAD are randomly assigned to either a waiting-list control group or one of the active conditions. The participants in the two active conditions use the same internet-based self-help program, either with individual support by a psychologist or therapist-guided group support. In the group guided condition, participants can communicate with each other via an integrated, protected discussion forum. Subjects are recruited via topic related websites and links; diagnostic status will be assessed with a telephone interview. The primary outcome variables are symptoms of SAD and diagnostic status after the intervention. Secondary endpoints are general symptomology, depression, quality of life, as well as the primary outcome variables 6 months later. Furthermore, process variables such as group processes, the change in symptoms and working alliance will be studied. The results of this study should indicate whether group-guided support could enhance the efficacy of an internet-based self-help treatment for SAD

  5. Self Help and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, Alan

    1976-01-01

    Suggests that the single most important common denominator of the various types of self-help groups examined may be that the role of the person who has already lived through the experience is critical for helping others. (Author/AM)

  6. Self Help and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, Alan

    1976-01-01

    Suggests that the single most important common denominator of the various types of self-help groups examined may be that the role of the person who has already lived through the experience is critical for helping others. (Author/AM)

  7. Self-Help Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert H.

    1973-01-01

    The author believes that there is a distinct need for professionals to become competent in providing materials for self-help lay efforts. Colleges and universities must provide for the facilitation of personal growth through self administered procedures by either a clinical approach (in counseling centers) or a didactic one (in classes as, for…

  8. Self-Help Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert H.

    1973-01-01

    The author believes that there is a distinct need for professionals to become competent in providing materials for self-help lay efforts. Colleges and universities must provide for the facilitation of personal growth through self administered procedures by either a clinical approach (in counseling centers) or a didactic one (in classes as, for…

  9. Validity and reliability of the Japanese version of the Therapeutic Factors Inventory-19: A study of family peer education self-help groups.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Masako; Nakamura, Yukako; Kobayashi, Sayaka; Yokoyama, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic factors are crucial mechanisms that promote change in self-help group members. Measuring therapeutic factors may improve practitioners' skills for assessment in whole-group contexts. The present authors, therefore, examined the validity and reliability of a Japanese version of the Therapeutic Factors Inventory-19. The Therapeutic Factors Inventory-19 was examined using a self-report questionnaire completed by members of 38 family peer education self-help groups. The instrument measured the following four factors: instillation of hope, secure emotional expression, awareness of relational impact, and social learning. Participants were 246 group members. Test-retest reliability was analyzed using data from 46 participants. Confirmatory factor analysis showed a goodness of fit of 0.85 and a root mean square error of approximation of 0.088. Multitrait scaling analyses showed that items for instillation of hope and secure emotional expression factors correlated higher with their own factors than other factors. Each factor and the total average of the 19 items were significantly correlated with the Group Benefit Scale and Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. When level of interaction with other members was higher, subjects perceived a stronger presence of therapeutic factors. The intraclass correlation coefficients of each factor at a week interval were 0.848-0.915. Cronbach's alpha of each factor and all items ranged 0.767-0.960. In the case of family peer education self-help groups, there is acceptable validity and reliability for the average score of all items, and for the instillation of hope and secure emotional expression factors. However, more work is needed to increase the generalizability. © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  10. Mutual Aid and Self-Help Groups in Minority Communities: A Preliminary Essay on Their Significance for High School United States History Classes Accompanied by Classroom Materials and Lesson Plans. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Steve

    The values of private association and self-help through individual effort have been a compelling aspect of the American philosophy. Reaffirming Americanism was not the only reason that immigrant or minority groups created mutual aid or self-help societies, however, since immediate economic and social goals were significant motivations for such…

  11. Cognitive behaviour therapy for menopausal hot flushes and night sweats: a qualitative analysis of women's experiences of group and self-help CBT.

    PubMed

    Balabanovic, Janet; Ayers, Beverley; Hunter, Myra S

    2013-07-01

    There is a growing need for non-medical treatments for women experiencing problematic menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes and night sweats (HF/NS). A recent randomized control trial (RCT) (MENOS2) provides evidence of the effectiveness of Group CBT and Self-Help CBT for HF/NS. This study examines MENOS 2 participants' experience of the CBT treatments. Twenty women who had experienced CBT for HF/NS (10 Group CBT and 10 Self-Help CBT) were interviewed at the end of the trial to explore how they experienced the treatment and its effects. The interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Women experienced both treatment formats as positive and helpful, increasing their ability to cope and their sense of control over HF/NS. Four super-ordinate themes were identified: making sense of symptom change, new ways of coping and regaining control, acknowledging and challenging the menopause taboo, and social interaction and support versus individual learning. These qualitative results are consistent with those of the main trial in that women found both CBT formats helpful in reducing the impact of HF/NS. However, the results also suggest possible mechanisms of change and provide useful information on women's responses to the different treatment components and formats.

  12. A Controlled Comparison of Cognitive Therapy and Self-Help Support Groups in the Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Annette; Blanchard, Edward B.

    1995-01-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (n=34) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment conditions for 8 weeks: individualized cognitive treatment, support group, or control. Results indicated significantly greater reductions in gastrointestinal symptoms and amelioration of depression and anxiety for the cognitive therapy group, and these results…

  13. [Social participation and activities of daily living of patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases : support by self-help, exercise therapy and new media].

    PubMed

    Mattukat, K; Thyrolf, A

    2014-02-01

    Rheumatic patients are at risk of social isolation and physical inactivity which can have a significant impact on physical and mental health. Only every seventh patient is organized in a self-help group (SHG), most of them in the German League Against Rheumatism (GLAR). Members of a SHG are socially and physically more active and take part in exercise therapy (ET) more often. Depending on the study, the utilization of ET ranges from 25 % to 71 %. The functional training as the most attended offer of the GLAR showed positive effects at the physical and psychological levels. To motivate difficult to reach patients to engage in self-help and regular exercise, further development of exercise programs with individually tailored intensive strength and endurance elements as well as the increased use of new media seems promising. The Internet provides various opportunities for networking and social participation especially for severely impaired and temporally less flexible patients.

  14. A community-based group-guided self-help intervention for low mood and stress: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McClay, Carrie-Anne; Morrison, Jill; McConnachie, Alex; Williams, Christopher

    2013-11-19

    Depression is a mental health condition which affects millions of people each year, with worldwide rates increasing. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is recommended in the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for the treatment of depression. However, waiting lists can cause delays for face-to-face therapy. Also a proportion of people decline to present for help through the health service - the so-called treatment gap. Self-referral to CBT using community-based group interventions delivered by a voluntary sector organization may serve to resolve this problem. The aim of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to determine the efficacy of such a guided CBT self-help course, the 'Living Life to the Full' (LLTTF) classes delivered by the charity Action on Depression (AOD). The primary outcome is level of depression at 6 months assessed using the patient health questionnaire-9 (PHQ9) depression scale. Secondary measures include levels of anxiety and social functioning. Participants with symptoms of low mood will be recruited from the community through newspaper adverts and also via the AOD website. Participants will receive either immediate or delayed access to guided CBT self-help classes - the eight session LLTTF course. The primary endpoint will be at 6 months at which point the delayed group will be offered the intervention. Levels of depression, anxiety and social functioning will be assessed and an economic analysis will be carried out. This RCT will test whether the LLTTF intervention is effective and/or cost-effective. If the LLTTF community-based classes are found to be cost effective, they may be helpful as both an intervention for those already seeking care in the health service, as well as those seeking help outside that setting, widening access to psychological therapy. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN86292664.

  15. Effectiveness of TB sensitization initiatives in improving the involvement of self help group members in rural TB control in south India.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Beena; Priscilla Rebecca, B; Dhanalakshmi, A; Rani, S; Deepa Lakshmi, A; Watson, Basilea; Vijayalakshmi, R; Muniyandi, M; Karikalan, N

    2016-12-01

    The 'End TB strategy' has highlighted the importance of inter-sectoral collaboration and community mobilization for achieving zero TB deaths by 2020. The aim of the study was to develop and test a model TB sensitization programme involving self help groups (SHGs). This experimental study was conducted in two blocks (intervention and control), in Tiruvallur district. The intervention content included short-lecture, musical story telling activity, role play, short film on TB. The impact was compared at baseline, third and sixth months in terms of SHGs' awareness, promotion of awareness, identification and referral of presumptive TB cases and provision of TB treatment. A total of 764 vs 796 SHGs were enrolled in control and intervention groups, respectively. The knowledge attitude, and practice score (lower score indicated a better attitude and practice), from baseline to 6 months was significantly reduced (29 to 24) in the intervention group. Similarly, a significant difference was observed in identification and referral of chest symptomatics in the intervention group at 3 and 6 months. During the 3 month follow-up a significantly higher proportion of SHG members were involved in TB awareness activities in the intervention (623/748 [83.3%]) vs control group (471/728 [64.7%]; p<0.001). Findings from this study highlight the feasibility of involving SHGs through a model TB sensitization program for strengthening TB prevention and control activities.

  16. Improving Self-Help E-Therapy for Depression and Anxiety Among Sexual Minorities: An Analysis of Focus Groups With Lesbians and Gay Men

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Anthony; Pitts, Marian; Mitchell, Anne; Christensen, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Background E-therapies for depression and anxiety rarely account for lesbian and gay users. This is despite lesbians and gay men being at heightened risk of mood disorders and likely to benefit from having access to tailored self-help resources. Objective We sought to determine how e-therapies for depression and anxiety could be improved to address the therapeutic needs of lesbians and gay men. Methods We conducted eight focus groups with lesbians and gay men aged 18 years and older. Focus groups were presented with key modules from the popular e-therapy “MoodGYM”. They were asked to evaluate the inclusiveness and relevance of these modules for lesbians and gay men and to think about ways that e-therapies in general could be modified. The focus groups were analyzed qualitatively using a thematic analysis approach to identify major themes. Results The focus groups indicated that some but not all aspects of MoodGYM were suitable, and suggested ways of improving e-therapies for lesbian and gay users. Suggestions included avoiding language or examples that assumed or implied users were heterosexual, improving inclusiveness by representing non-heterosexual relationships, providing referrals to specialized support services and addressing stigma-related stress, such as “coming out” and experiences of discrimination and harassment. Focus group participants suggested that dedicated e-therapies for lesbians and gay men should be developed or general e-therapies be made more inclusive by using adaptive logic to deliver content appropriate for a user’s sexual identity. Conclusions Findings from this study offer in-depth guidance for developing e-therapies that more effectively address mental health problems among lesbians and gay men. PMID:25761775

  17. Improving self-help e-therapy for depression and anxiety among sexual minorities: an analysis of focus groups with lesbians and gay men.

    PubMed

    Rozbroj, Tomas; Lyons, Anthony; Pitts, Marian; Mitchell, Anne; Christensen, Helen

    2015-03-11

    E-therapies for depression and anxiety rarely account for lesbian and gay users. This is despite lesbians and gay men being at heightened risk of mood disorders and likely to benefit from having access to tailored self-help resources. We sought to determine how e-therapies for depression and anxiety could be improved to address the therapeutic needs of lesbians and gay men. We conducted eight focus groups with lesbians and gay men aged 18 years and older. Focus groups were presented with key modules from the popular e-therapy "MoodGYM". They were asked to evaluate the inclusiveness and relevance of these modules for lesbians and gay men and to think about ways that e-therapies in general could be modified. The focus groups were analyzed qualitatively using a thematic analysis approach to identify major themes. The focus groups indicated that some but not all aspects of MoodGYM were suitable, and suggested ways of improving e-therapies for lesbian and gay users. Suggestions included avoiding language or examples that assumed or implied users were heterosexual, improving inclusiveness by representing non-heterosexual relationships, providing referrals to specialized support services and addressing stigma-related stress, such as "coming out" and experiences of discrimination and harassment. Focus group participants suggested that dedicated e-therapies for lesbians and gay men should be developed or general e-therapies be made more inclusive by using adaptive logic to deliver content appropriate for a user's sexual identity. Findings from this study offer in-depth guidance for developing e-therapies that more effectively address mental health problems among lesbians and gay men.

  18. Depression: an exploratory parallel-group randomised controlled trial of Antenatal guided self help for WomeN (DAWN): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Trevillion, Kylee; Domoney, Jill; Pickles, Andrew; Bick, Debra; Byford, Sarah; Heslin, Margaret; Milgrom, Jeannette; Mycroft, Rachel; Pariante, Carmine; Ryan, Elizabeth; Hunter, Myra; Howard, Louise Michele

    2016-10-18

    Depression is a common antenatal mental disorder and is associated with an increased risk of adverse effects on the fetus and significant morbidity for the mother; if untreated it can also continue into the post-natal period and affect mother-infant interactions. There has been little research evaluating the effectiveness or cost-effectiveness of antenatal psychological interventions for antenatal depression, particularly for mild to moderate disorders. International guidelines recommend a stepped care approach starting with Guided Self Help, and the aim of this exploratory trial is to investigate Guided Self Help modified for pregnancy. The DAWN trial is an exploratory randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of antenatal Guided Self Help, modified for pregnancy and delivered by National Health Service Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners. Antenatal Guided Self Help, in addition to usual care, is compared with usual care for pregnant women diagnosed with mild to moderate depression and mixed anxiety and depression, using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders. Modifications for pregnancy include perinatal mental health training, addressing pregnancy-specific worries and including sections on health issues in pregnancy and planning for parenthood. Women allocated to Guided Self Help will be seen for up to eight sessions by a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner (including an initial assessment session); there will also be an appointment at 12 weeks after delivery. Research measures including the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (primary outcome) and other measures of depression, anxiety, quality of life and service use will be collected from women before random allocation, 14 weeks after random allocation and at 12 weeks after delivery. Potential psychological mechanisms of the intervention will be explored using the Pregnancy-Related Thoughts Questionnaire and the Metacognitive Awareness Questionnaire. The

  19. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... by the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  20. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... by the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  1. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... by the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  2. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... by the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  3. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  4. [Movement and its significance: natural healing physiotherapy and modern pharmacological therapy of osteoporosis in the semantic differential. A quantitative study of a self-help group and two comparison groups].

    PubMed

    Konitzer, M; Fischer, G C; Doering, T J

    2003-06-01

    Physiotherapy is a frequently applied concomitant therapy for patients with osteoporosis. Compared to modern pharmacological therapy physiotherapy appears to receive sustained high regard, which should be further examined in view of the attribution pattern of the patients. Elements of physiotherapy and Kneipp therapy were quantitatively examined in terms of their semantic content in a three-dimensional space of meaning. This was done in comparison with elements of modern pharmacological therapy. The questions regarding possible patterns of the attributions and a possible hierarchy of the therapy forms were analyzed by a survey of a self-help group for osteoporosis patients and two control groups. According to the methods of semantic differentials, a self-help group for osteoporosis patients and two control groups (high-school female pupils, breast carcinoma patients) were queried about the individual elements of physiotherapy and modern pharmacological therapy in a polar profile of a questionnaire. The results were arranged onto a numerical matrix and by means of factor analysis, a location in a three-dimensional space of meaning was calculated for each element questioned. For purpose of illustration, the results were transferred to a succession of diagrams so that the assessments for the three axes of meaning became more distinct. The results are discussed on the background of a current neurolinguistic theory of meaning: Sensomotoric experience generates meaning in form of 'primary metaphors'; if reactivated e.g. by physiotherapy, these metaphors can give fundaments for an emergent and salutogenic system of meaning, which helps to reconstruct the patient's 'subjective anatomy' and helps to create new values of living one's life. If sensomotoric experience has a central function in generating meaning, the axis of 'motion' and therapies stressing on sensomotoric experience (e.g. exercise group) will show a corresponding profile of evaluation throughout the three

  5. [The public health office and its partners: perspectives on cooperation between public health offices and self-help organizations].

    PubMed

    Niermann, T

    1995-11-01

    Besides the three existing health sector entities in Germany: hospitals, established doctors and public health departments, a fourth area has developed, consisting of self-help organisations with their self-help groups. Today self-help organisations have a very extensive knowledge about special diseases and handicaps. Combined with the psychological and social assistance which they afford, their knowledge helps the affected persons considerably. Nevertheless, this practical experience cannot replace the professionals' know-how. Within the local "Gemeinschaftsaufgabe Gesundheitsförderung" (common task of health promotion) the co-operation between laymen and professionals may be particularly supported by the Public Health Offices.

  6. An Empowerment Approach for Elders Living With Diabetes: A Pilot Study of a Community-Based Self-Help Group--the Diabetes Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn A.; George, Lori

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a disabling, deadly disease, affecting one in five of adults over 65. Unfortunately, for the few elders that receive diabetes self-care training it is often taught using traditional didactic methods that are insensitive to their unique needs and immersed in the traditional medical paradigm. Integrating diabetes self-care into…

  7. An Empowerment Approach for Elders Living With Diabetes: A Pilot Study of a Community-Based Self-Help Group--the Diabetes Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn A.; George, Lori

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a disabling, deadly disease, affecting one in five of adults over 65. Unfortunately, for the few elders that receive diabetes self-care training it is often taught using traditional didactic methods that are insensitive to their unique needs and immersed in the traditional medical paradigm. Integrating diabetes self-care into…

  8. Consumer views on a new holistic screening tool for supportive and palliative-care needs: Sheffield Profile for Assessment and Referral for Care (SPARC): a survey of self-help support groups in health care.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Philippa; Ahmed, Nisar; Winslow, Michelle; Walters, Stephen J; Collins, Karen; Noble, Bill

    2015-08-01

    Sheffield Profile for Assessment and Referral for Care (SPARC) was developed in response to concerns that palliative care may not be reaching all people who could benefit from it. Acceptability of the tool is an important step in developing its future use. To elicit the views of a wide variety of members of consumer and self-help support groups concerned with health care on the relevance, acceptability and the overall perception of using SPARC as an early holistic needs assessment tool in supportive and palliative care. This study was conducted in South Yorkshire and North Derbyshire (UK). Ninety-nine consumer and self-help groups were identified from information in the public domain. Thirty-eight groups participated. Packs containing study information and self-complete postal questionnaires were distributed to groups, and they were asked to circulate these to their members. Completed questionnaires were returned in pre-paid envelopes to the research team. 135 questionnaires and feedback forms were returned. The majority of respondents found SPARC easy to understand (93% (120/129; 95% Confidence Interval 87% to 96%) and complete (94% (125/133; 95% CI: 88% to 97%). A minority, 12.2% (16/131), of respondents found questions on SPARC 'too sensitive'. Overall, respondents considered SPARC an acceptable and relevant tool for clinical assessment of supportive and palliative-care needs. Whilst a small minority of people found SPARC difficult to understand (i.e. patients with cognitive impairments), most categories of service user found it relevant. Clinical studies are necessary to establish the clinical utility of SPARC. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A written self-help intervention for depressed adults comparing behavioural activation combined with physical activity promotion with a self-help intervention based upon behavioural activation alone: study protocol for a parallel group pilot randomised controlled trial (BAcPAc).

    PubMed

    Farrand, Paul; Pentecost, Claire; Greaves, Colin; Taylor, Rod S; Warren, Fiona; Green, Colin; Hillsdon, Melvyn; Evans, Phil; Welsman, Jo; Taylor, Adrian H

    2014-05-29

    Challenges remain to find ways to support patients with depression who have low levels of physical activity (PA) to overcome perceived barriers and enhance the perceived value of PA for preventing future relapse. There is an evidence-base for behavioural activation (BA) for depression, which focuses on supporting patients to restore activities that have been avoided, but practitioners have no specific training in promoting PA. We aimed to design and evaluate an integrated BA and PA (BAcPAc) practitioner-led, written, self-help intervention to enhance both physical and mental health. This study is informed by the Medical Research Council Complex Intervention Framework and describes a protocol for a pilot phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the feasibility and acceptability of the trial methods to inform a definitive phase III RCT. Following development of the augmented written self-help intervention (BAcPAc) incorporating behavioural activation with physical activity promotion, depressed adults are randomised to receive up to 12 sessions over a maximum of 4 months of either BAcPAc or behavioural activation alone within a written self-help format, which represents treatment as usual. The study is located within two 'Improving Access to Psychological Therapies' services in South West England, with both written self-help interventions supported by mental health paraprofessionals. Measures assessed at 4, 9, and 12 month follow-up include the following: CIS-R, PHQ-9, accelerometer recorded (4 months only) and self-reported PA, body mass index, blood pressure, Insomnia Severity Index, quality of life, and health and social care service use. Process evaluation will include analysis of recorded support sessions and patient and practitioner interviews. At the time of writing the study has recruited 60 patients. The feasibility outcomes will inform a definitive RCT to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the augmented BAcPAc written self-help

  10. A written self-help intervention for depressed adults comparing behavioural activation combined with physical activity promotion with a self-help intervention based upon behavioural activation alone: study protocol for a parallel group pilot randomised controlled trial (BAcPAc)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Challenges remain to find ways to support patients with depression who have low levels of physical activity (PA) to overcome perceived barriers and enhance the perceived value of PA for preventing future relapse. There is an evidence-base for behavioural activation (BA) for depression, which focuses on supporting patients to restore activities that have been avoided, but practitioners have no specific training in promoting PA. We aimed to design and evaluate an integrated BA and PA (BAcPAc) practitioner-led, written, self-help intervention to enhance both physical and mental health. Methods/design This study is informed by the Medical Research Council Complex Intervention Framework and describes a protocol for a pilot phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the feasibility and acceptability of the trial methods to inform a definitive phase III RCT. Following development of the augmented written self-help intervention (BAcPAc) incorporating behavioural activation with physical activity promotion, depressed adults are randomised to receive up to 12 sessions over a maximum of 4 months of either BAcPAc or behavioural activation alone within a written self-help format, which represents treatment as usual. The study is located within two ‘Improving Access to Psychological Therapies’ services in South West England, with both written self-help interventions supported by mental health paraprofessionals. Measures assessed at 4, 9, and 12 month follow-up include the following: CIS-R, PHQ-9, accelerometer recorded (4 months only) and self-reported PA, body mass index, blood pressure, Insomnia Severity Index, quality of life, and health and social care service use. Process evaluation will include analysis of recorded support sessions and patient and practitioner interviews. At the time of writing the study has recruited 60 patients. Discussion The feasibility outcomes will inform a definitive RCT to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the

  11. Cults and zealous self-help movements: a psychiatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Galanter, M

    1990-05-01

    Modern cults and zealous self-help movements exercise an intense group influence and can have a major impact on their members' psychiatric status. On the basis of research findings, the author describes the charismatic group, a generic model for such cohesive, intensely ideological movements. He examines the psychological forces they tap and the way they can both relieve and exacerbate psychopathology. The model is then used to explain the operation of zealous self-help programs that address psychiatric syndromes; these are directed at problems of the medically ill, substance abusers, and relatives of psychiatric patients.

  12. Self-help interventions for psychosis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alexander J; Webb, Thomas L; Rowse, Georgina

    2015-07-01

    Self-help has been shown to be an effective intervention for a wide range of mental health problems. However, there is less evidence on the efficacy of self-help for psychosis and, to date, there has been no systematic review. A search of bibliographic databases identified 24 relevant studies with a total sample size of N=1816. Ten studies adopted a repeated measures design and 14 an independent group design (including RCTs and quasi-experimental studies). Self-help interventions had, on average, a small-to-medium-sized effect on overall symptoms (d+=0.33, 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.48). Sub-analyses revealed that self-help interventions had a small-to-medium-sized effect on positive symptoms (d+=0.42, 95% CI: 0.13 to 0.72), a small-to-medium-sized effect on negative symptoms (d+=0.37, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.66), and a small-sized effect on outcomes associated with the symptoms of psychosis such as quality of life (d+=0.13, 95% CI: 0.02 to 0.24). Moderation analysis identified a number of factors that influenced treatment effects including the complexity of the intervention and amount of contact time. Self-help interventions for psychosis have a lot of potential and recommendations for further research are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Self-help friendliness as an element of patient-centered rehabilitation--results of a model project].

    PubMed

    Bobzien, M; Trojan, A

    2015-04-01

    The concept of self-help friendliness describes a systematic approach in health care institutions to strengthen patient-centeredness through closer collaboration with self-help groups. Self-help groups enable patients to better coping with their diseases. Organised as a participatory process 5 quality criteria for best practice in the cooperation between professionals in rehabilitation facilities and patient organizations were developed and tested. The process of standards development of ISQUA--International Society for Quality in Health Care guided the model project. Implementing the criteria is feasible and in line with institution-specific requirements. The process documentation is accessible via the network "Selbsthilfefreundlichkeit und Patientenorientierung im Gesundheitswesen" (www.selbsthilfefreundlichkeit.de). The discussion deals with problems of realization and perspectives concerning the transfer of results. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Feasibility of a UK community-based, eTherapy mental health service in Greater Manchester: repeated-measures and between-groups study of 'Living Life to the Full Interactive', 'Sleepio' and 'Breaking Free Online' at 'Self Help Services'.

    PubMed

    Elison, Sarah; Ward, Jonathan; Williams, Chris; Espie, Colin; Davies, Glyn; Dugdale, Stephanie; Ragan, Kathryn; Chisnall, Leanne; Lidbetter, Nicky; Smith, Keith

    2017-07-20

    There is increasing evidence to support the effectiveness of eTherapies for mental health, although limited data have been reported from community-based services. Therefore, this service evaluation reports on feasibility and outcomes from an eTherapy mental health service. 'Self Help Services', an Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) eTherapy service in Greater Manchester. 1068 service users referred to the service for secondary care for their mental health difficulties. Participants were triaged into one of three eTherapy programmes: 'Living Life to the Full Interactive' for low mood, stress and anxiety; 'Sleepio' for insomnia; and 'Breaking Free Online' for substance misuse, depending on clinical need. Standardised psychometric assessments of depression, anxiety and social functioning, collected as part of the IAPT Minimum Data Set, were conducted at baseline and post-treatment. Data indicated baseline differences, with the Breaking Free Online group having higher scores for depression and anxiety than the Living Life to the Full Interactive (depression CI 1.27 to 3.21, p<0.0001; anxiety CI 077 to 1.72, p<0.0001) and Sleepio (depression CI 1.19 to 4.52, p<0.0001; anxiety CI 2.16 to 5.23, p<0.0001) groups. Promising improvements in mental health scores were found within all three groups (all p<0.0001), as were significant reductions in numbers of service users reaching clinical threshold scores for mental health difficulties (p<0.0001). Number of days of engagement was not related to change from baseline for the Living Life to the Full or Sleepio programmes but was associated with degree of change for Breaking Free Online. Data presented provide evidence for feasibility of this eTherapy delivery model in supporting service users with a range of mental health difficulties and suggest that eTherapies may be a useful addition to treatment offering in community-based services. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the

  15. [Development, situation and perspective of self-help support in Germany].

    PubMed

    Geene, R; Huber, E; Hundertmark-Mayser, J; Möller-Bock, B; Thiel, W

    2009-01-01

    Self-help groups and self-help associations are an important part of the social security system. In Germany, self-help contact points, senior citizen centers, volunteer agencies, citizen centers and multi-generation houses combine citizen participation with innovative professional services. Unfortunately, there is no guarantee of continuous financial support for these important, locally administered institutions. There are about 280 self-help contact points and more than 400 federal self-help associations that support and promote self-help in Germany. Healthy communities, healthy workplaces and healthy people need a decentralized system of self-help programs operated at local and regional levels, in districts and towns. Thereby, professional support systems that operate self-help programs and promote citizen participation in the self-help programs must be managed in a similar regional format. New forms of cooperation from the regional and local governments, private companies, and citizen engagement already exist. Additionally, regional projects of integrated maintenance systems with the regional health maintenance institutions have been established. Currently, the central challenges of the self-help programs are quality development, inclusion of people with social disadvantages and of people with migrational background. The essential prerequisites for this work are continuous financial support and a politically supported infrastructure, which is in fact an important health investment.

  16. Employee self-help smoking cessation programs: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Windsor, R A; Bartlett, E E

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a review of the literature on employee self-help smoking cessation programs. Included in this discussion are: (1) a rationale for self-help smoking cessation interventions; (2) a synopsis of their applicability to occupational settings; (3) a rational and description of the self-help smoking cessation interventions selected for a large group of employees; and (4) several methodological issues faced in conducting evaluations of smoking cessation programs.

  17. A Randomized controlled trial of motivational interviewing + self-help versus psychoeducation + self-help for binge eating.

    PubMed

    Vella-Zarb, Rachel A; Mills, Jennifer S; Westra, Henny A; Carter, Jacqueline C; Keating, Leah

    2015-04-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a collaborative therapy that focuses on strengthening a person's internal motivation to change. Research suggests that MI may be helpful for treating binge eating; however, findings are limited and little is known about how MI for binge eating compares to active therapy controls. The present study aimed to build on current research by comparing MI as a prelude to self-help treatment for binge eating with psychoeducation as a prelude to self-help treatment for binge eating. Participants with full or subthreshold DSM-IV Binge Eating Disorder or nonpurging Bulimia Nervosa were randomly assigned to receive either 60 minutes of MI followed by a self-help manual (n = 24) or 60 minutes of psychoeducation followed by a self-help manual (n = 21). Questionnaires were completed pre- and postsession, and at 1 and 4 months postsession. MI significantly increased readiness to change and confidence in ability to control binge eating, whereas psychoeducation did not. No group differences were found when changes in eating disorder attitudes and behaviors were examined. MI offers benefits for increasing motivation and self-efficacy. However, it may not be a uniquely effective treatment approach for reducing binge eating. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Decoding the Neoliberal Subjectivity in Self-Helping Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Moosung

    2017-01-01

    This article explores and explains the subjectivity of self-helping adult learners, as depicted in contemporary, best-selling self-help books. It interrogates how those self-help texts embody particular features of self-helping subjectivity by appropriating neoliberalist perspectives on self and the world. It illuminates four salient features of…

  19. Self-help organizations for alcohol and drug problems: toward evidence-based practice and policy.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Keith; Wing, Stephen; McCarty, Dennis; Chappel, John; Gallant, Lewi; Haberle, Beverly; Horvath, A Thomas; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Kirk, Thomas; Kivlahan, Daniel; Laudet, Alexandre; McCrady, Barbara S; McLellan, A Thomas; Morgenstern, Jon; Townsend, Mike; Weiss, Roger

    2004-04-01

    This expert consensus statement reviews evidence on the effectiveness of drug and alcohol self-help groups and presents potential implications for clinicians, treatment program managers and policymakers. Because longitudinal studies associate self-help group involvement with reduced substance use, improved psychosocial functioning, and lessened health care costs, there are humane and practical reasons to develop self-help group supportive policies. Policies described here that could be implemented by clinicians and program managers include making greater use of empirically-validated self-help group referral methods in both specialty and non-specialty treatment settings and developing a menu of locally available self-help group options that are responsive to client's needs, preferences, and cultural background. The workgroup also offered possible self-help supportive policy options (e.g., supporting self-help clearinghouses) for state and federal decision makers. Implementing such policies could strengthen alcohol and drug self-help organizations, and thereby enhance the national response to the serious public health problem of substance abuse.

  20. Cyber-Porn Dependence: Voices of Distress in an Italian Internet Self-Help Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaglion, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes narratives of cyber-porn users and defines major patterns of distress as self-reported by contributors to a self-help group in the Internet. It applies narrative analysis methodology to 2000 messages sent by 302 members of an Italian self-help Internet community for cyber-porn dependents ("noallapornodipendenza").…

  1. Cyber-Porn Dependence: Voices of Distress in an Italian Internet Self-Help Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaglion, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes narratives of cyber-porn users and defines major patterns of distress as self-reported by contributors to a self-help group in the Internet. It applies narrative analysis methodology to 2000 messages sent by 302 members of an Italian self-help Internet community for cyber-porn dependents ("noallapornodipendenza").…

  2. Self-Help and Health in Europe. New Approaches in Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Stephen, Ed.; Kickbusch, Ilona, Ed.

    This book brings together 24 contributions (from 13 European countries) about the role of self-help in the overall pattern of health care, dealing with both the practical and the theoretical: (1) "A Reorientation of Health Care?" (Ilona Kickbusch and Stephen Hatch); (2) "Self-help Groups in Primary Health Care" (David…

  3. Effectiveness of bibliotherapy self-help for depression with varying levels of telephone helpline support.

    PubMed

    Bilich, Linda L; Deane, Frank P; Phipps, Andrew B; Barisic, Marcella; Gould, Grahame

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural bibliotherapy self-help package, with varied levels of telephone support, delivered through a mental health telephone service was examined with 84 mildly to moderately depressed adults. The study compared the changes in depressive symptoms of three groups: control, self help with minimal contact and self-help with telephone assistance. Both the minimal contact and the assisted self-help groups had significant reductions in their levels of depression compared with the control group. Treatment gains were maintained at a 1-month follow-up. The potential of self-help resources such as this to be successfully disseminated and delivered through a national mental health telephone information service is discussed.

  4. Print-based self-help interventions for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Hartmann-Boyce, Jamie; Lancaster, Tim; Stead, Lindsay F

    2014-06-03

    Many smokers give up smoking on their own, but materials giving advice and information may help them and increase the number who quit successfully. The aims of this review were to determine: the effectiveness of different forms of print-based self-help materials, compared with no treatment and with other minimal contact strategies; the effectiveness of adjuncts to print-based self help, such as computer-generated feedback, telephone hotlines and pharmacotherapy; and the effectiveness of approaches tailored to the individual compared with non-tailored materials. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group trials register. Date of the most recent search April 2014. We included randomized trials of smoking cessation with follow-up of at least six months, where at least one arm tested a print-based self-help intervention. We defined self help as structured programming for smokers trying to quit without intensive contact with a therapist. We extracted data in duplicate on the participants, the nature of the self-help materials, the amount of face-to-face contact given to intervention and to control conditions, outcome measures, method of randomization, and completeness of follow-up.The main outcome measure was abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow-up in people smoking at baseline. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence in each trial, and biochemically validated rates when available. Where appropriate, we performed meta-analysis using a fixed-effect model. We identified 74 trials which met the inclusion criteria. Many study reports did not include sufficient detail to judge risk of bias for some domains. Twenty-eight studies (38%) were judged at high risk of bias for one or more domains but the overall risk of bias across all included studies was judged to be moderate, and unlikely to alter the conclusions.Thirty-four trials evaluated the effect of standard, non-tailored self-help materials. Pooling 11 of these trials in which there

  5. Microcomputer Applications in Self-Help Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas H.

    1984-01-01

    The trend towards self-help healthcare is a social current which appears to run counter to the increasing technological complexity and sophistication of modern medical care. Yet it is the development of consumer-oriented high-tech medical devices which is facilitating this trend and which will permit the development of an electronics-based self-care system within the next ten years. Data on the present status of computer-assisted self-care was obtained from several sources, including a survey of homecomputer owners. Several useful software applications programs are currently in the marketplace; however, a data-integrating advice and referral program remains to be written. This development is seen as the last major technological impediment to the introduction of a complete microcomputer-based self-care system.

  6. Self-help: What future role in health care for low and middle-income countries?

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, KR; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Razum, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    In the debate on 'Third options' for health care delivery in low- and middle-income countries it is proposed that self-help should play a larger role. Self-help is expected to contribute towards improving population health outcomes and reducing government health care expenditure. We review scope and limitations of self-help groups in Europe and South Asia and assess their potential role in health care within the context of health sector reform. Self-help groups are voluntary unions of peers, formed for mutual assistance in accomplishing a health-related purpose. In Europe, self-help groups developed out of dissatisfaction with a de-personalised health care system. They successfully complement existing social and health services but cannot be instrumentalized to improve health outcomes while reducing health expenditure. In South Asia, with its hierarchical society, instrumental approaches towards self-help prevail in Non-governmental Organizations and government. The utility of this approach is limited as self-help groups are unlikely to be sustainable and effective when steered from outside. Self-help groups are typical for individualistic societies with developed health care systems – they are less suitable for hierarchical societies with unmet demand for regulated health care. We conclude that self-help groups can help to achieve some degree of synergy between health care providers and users but cannot be prescribed to partially replace government health services in low-income countries, thereby reducing health care expenditure and ensuring equity in health care. PMID:15084250

  7. Salivary Cortisol Levels and Depressive Symptomatology in Consumers and Nonconsumers of Self-Help Books: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Catherine; Marin, Marie-France; Hand, Anne; Sindi, Shireen; Juster, Robert-Paul; Lupien, Sonia J

    2016-01-01

    The self-help industry generates billions of dollars yearly in North America. Despite the popularity of this movement, there has been surprisingly little research assessing the characteristics of self-help books consumers, and whether this consumption is associated with physiological and/or psychological markers of stress. The goal of this pilot study was to perform the first psychoneuroendocrine analysis of consumers of self-help books in comparison to nonconsumers. We tested diurnal and reactive salivary cortisol levels, personality, and depressive symptoms in 32 consumers and nonconsumers of self-help books. In an explorative secondary analysis, we also split consumers of self-help books as a function of their preference for problem-focused versus growth-oriented self-help books. The results showed that while consumers of growth-oriented self-help books presented increased cortisol reactivity to a psychosocial stressor compared to other groups, consumers of problem-focused self-help books presented higher depressive symptomatology. The results of this pilot study show that consumers with preference for either problem-focused or growth-oriented self-help books present different physiological and psychological markers of stress when compared to nonconsumers of self-help books. This preliminary study underlines the need for additional research on this issue in order to determine the impact the self-help book industry may have on consumers' stress.

  8. Salivary Cortisol Levels and Depressive Symptomatology in Consumers and Nonconsumers of Self-Help Books: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Catherine; Marin, Marie-France; Hand, Anne; Sindi, Shireen; Juster, Robert-Paul; Lupien, Sonia J.

    2016-01-01

    The self-help industry generates billions of dollars yearly in North America. Despite the popularity of this movement, there has been surprisingly little research assessing the characteristics of self-help books consumers, and whether this consumption is associated with physiological and/or psychological markers of stress. The goal of this pilot study was to perform the first psychoneuroendocrine analysis of consumers of self-help books in comparison to nonconsumers. We tested diurnal and reactive salivary cortisol levels, personality, and depressive symptoms in 32 consumers and nonconsumers of self-help books. In an explorative secondary analysis, we also split consumers of self-help books as a function of their preference for problem-focused versus growth-oriented self-help books. The results showed that while consumers of growth-oriented self-help books presented increased cortisol reactivity to a psychosocial stressor compared to other groups, consumers of problem-focused self-help books presented higher depressive symptomatology. The results of this pilot study show that consumers with preference for either problem-focused or growth-oriented self-help books present different physiological and psychological markers of stress when compared to nonconsumers of self-help books. This preliminary study underlines the need for additional research on this issue in order to determine the impact the self-help book industry may have on consumers' stress. PMID:26839713

  9. Awakening a self-help spirit.

    PubMed

    Lee, D K

    1980-01-01

    The National Construction Service (NCS) was established as an emergency program by the government of Korea in 1969 to provide work for the unemployed or underemployed rural population by providing food supplied under the United States PL 480 program. The NCS focused mostly on public works projects such as reforestation, irrigation, flood control and road construction. This multi-purpose program, designed to provide relief food to the hungry, unemployed rural population on land resources development, made a very significant contribution to improvement in agricultural land resources. The project also awakened in the population a self-help spirit and cooperative team work which eventually led to the spread of the New Community Movement and gradual permeation of democratic practices at the grassroots level. In order to build up cadres for the NCS operation, the government recruited university graduates as project leaders. The 2000 new recruits were trained as NCS participants to supervise and promote the coordination necessary for successful program implementation. Program planning and implementation problems included effectively organizing the administrative machinery and choice of techniques and the extent to which one should depend on labor-intensive programs.

  10. [Integration of self-help associations into the quality management of outpatient and inpatient health care].

    PubMed

    Trojan, A; Werner, S; Bobzien, M; Nickel, S

    2009-01-01

    The idea of introducing a special label for "self-help-friendly" institutions was first developed for hospitals. A demonstration project (BKK BV, the German Federal Association of Company Health Insurance Funds) was launched and organized by the local contact point for self-help groups in Hamburg. Shortly thereafter, a group of experienced self-help supporters started to implement self-help friendliness in quality management systems for ambulatory care. These endeavours, presented in this article, prove that not only professional but also user-based quality standards are becoming more and more common in quality development processes of health care services. The general legislative and political conditions for these developments have considerably improved over the past few years. This will be the foundation for a new quality of the doctor-patient relationship.

  11. Self-help treatment for insomnia symptoms associated with chronic conditions in older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kevin; Gregory, Pamela; Tomeny, Maureen; David, Beverley M; Gascoigne, Claire

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a self-help cognitive behavioral intervention in improving sleep quality in older adults reporting insomnia symptoms associated with chronic disease. A pragmatic two-arm randomized controlled trial comparing supported self-help with treatment as usual (TAU). Primary care. One hundred ninety-three self-referred individuals aged 55 to 87 with long-term conditions and chronic insomnia symptoms (as defined according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition). Self-help participants received six consecutive booklets, at weekly intervals, providing structured advice on important components of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I, including self-monitoring, sleep restriction, stimulus control procedures, and cognitive strategies), plus access to a telephone helpline. Control group participants received a single sheet of advice detailing standard sleep hygiene measures. The primary outcome was sleep quality, measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Secondary outcomes were the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), the subjective sleep efficiency index, and the Fatigue Severity Scale. In the self-help group, sleep outcomes showed significant improvements after treatment (PSQI, P < .001; ISI, P < .001; sleep efficiency, P < .001) and at 3-month (PSQI, P = .002; ISI, P = .006; sleep efficiency, P = .001) and 6-month (PSQI, P = .003; ISI, P = .003; sleep efficiency, P = .001) follow-up. Effect sizes were moderate (range of adjusted Cohen d = 0.51-0.75). Treatment had no effect on levels of daytime fatigue. Most treated participants (73%) said they would recommend the self-help program to others. Self-help CBT-I offers a practical first-line response to individual reporting insomnia symptoms associated with chronic disease in primary care settings. In these individuals, symptoms of daytime fatigue may be more closely associated with disease processes than with sleep quality

  12. Reading self-help literature in Russia: governmentality, psychology and subjectivity.

    PubMed

    Salmenniemi, Suvi; Vorona, Mariya

    2014-03-01

    Self-help has become a booming business over the past decades and an increasingly visible part of popular media culture worldwide. The paper analyzes the arrival and effects of this cultural technology in post-Soviet Russia after more than seventy years of socialism. It examines how Russians are engaging with popular psychology self-help as a technology of the self and how they are making it meaningful in their lives. Drawing on a set of one-to-one and focus group interviews conducted with self-help readers, it examines how these individuals negotiate the new ethics and the normative models of personhood put forward by the self-help genre. It argues that popular psychology has offered a new language for making sense of the self and the social world, and highlights how the readers critically engage with the normalizing power of popular psychology by drawing on a number of local historically sedimented discourses.

  13. Treatment of panic disorder: live therapy vs. self-help via the Internet.

    PubMed

    Carlbring, Per; Nilsson-Ihrfelt, Elisabeth; Waara, Johan; Kollenstam, Cecilia; Buhrman, Monica; Kaldo, Viktor; Söderberg, Marie; Ekselius, Lisa; Andersson, Gerhard

    2005-10-01

    A randomized trial was conducted comparing 10 individual weekly sessions of cognitive behaviour therapy for panic disorder (PD) with or without agoraphobia with a 10-module self-help program on the Internet. After confirming the PD diagnosis with an in-person structured clinical interview (SCID) 49 participants were randomized. Overall, the results suggest that Internet-administered self-help plus minimal therapist contact via e-mail can be equally effective as traditional individual cognitive behaviour therapy. Composite within-group effect sizes were high in both groups, while the between-group effect size was small (Cohen's d=16). One-year follow-up confirmed the results, with a within-group effect size of Cohen's d=0.80 for the Internet group and d=0.93 for the live group. The results from this study generally provide evidence to support the continued use and development of Internet-distributed self-help programs.

  14. Efficacy of a Self-Help Treatment for At-Risk and Pathological Gamblers.

    PubMed

    Boudreault, Catherine; Giroux, Isabelle; Jacques, Christian; Goulet, Annie; Simoneau, Hélène; Ladouceur, Robert

    2017-09-13

    Available evidence suggests that self-help treatments may reduce problem gambling severity but inconsistencies of results across clinical trials leave the extent of their benefits unclear. Moreover, no self-help treatment has yet been validated within a French Canadian setting. The current study therefore assesses the efficacy of a French language self-help treatment including three motivational telephone interviews spread over an 11-week period and a cognitive-behavioral self-help workbook. At-risk and pathological gamblers were randomly assigned to the treatment group (n = 31) or the waiting list (n = 31). Relative to the waiting list, the treatment group showed a statistically significant reduction in the number of DSM-5 gambling disorder criteria met, gambling habits, and gambling consequences at Week 11. Perceived self-efficacy and life satisfaction also significantly improved after 11 weeks for the treatment group, but not for the waiting list group. At Week 11, 13% of participants had dropped out of the study. All significant changes reported for the treatment group were maintained throughout 1, 6 and 12-month follow-ups. Results support the efficacy of the self-help treatment to reduce problem gambling severity, gambling behaviour and to improve overall functioning among a sample of French Canadian problem gamblers over short, medium and long term. Findings from this study lend support to the appropriateness of self-help treatments for problem gamblers and help clarify inconsistencies found in the literature. The low dropout rate is discussed with respect to the advantages of the self-help format. Clinical and methodological implications of the results are put forth.

  15. [Integration of self-help associations into the health services system--developments and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Trojan, A; Nickel, S

    2011-02-01

    The concept of a special label for "self-help-friendly" institutions was first developed for hospitals. A demonstration project (funded by the BKK BV, the German Federal Association of Company Health Insurance Funds) was launched in Hamburg. Between 2004 and 2007 quality criteria were developed and put into practice. Shortly thereafter, a group of experienced self-help supporters started to integrate self-help friendliness into quality management systems for ambulatory care. Recently similar developments have been initiated in the Public Health Services. After an introduction on the origins and political context of these new developments we present in this article the efforts and experiences in the 3 mentioned areas of the health-care system. It can be shown that user-based quality standards are becoming more and more common in quality development processes of the health-care services. In the last part we introduce the national "Network Self-Help-Friendliness in the Health Services--Together for Self-Help and Patient Orientation" as the new structure for further implementation, and give hints that the organised self-help is facing completely new challenges. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Self-Help and Community Education. Courier No. 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1983

    1983-01-01

    This journal consists of eight articles dealing with self-help and community education. Included in the volume are the following articles: "An Uphill Struggle--Self-Help in Bangladesh," by S. Harrison and Judy Saul; "How Not to Help a Local Community: A Case from South India," by Nora Sammut and Maria Theresa; "The High…

  17. Self-Help Career Assessment: Ethical and Professional Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Jeffrey P.; Most, Robert B.; Silver, Diane G.

    2003-01-01

    Addresses the need for ethical and professional guidelines appropriate to the development and use of self-help career assessments. Discusses strengths and limitations of self-help career assessments. Identifies three criteria for evaluating these assessments (appropriateness, trustworthiness/soundness, emphasis on process) and presents an…

  18. SELF-HELP AND REHABILITATION, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KATZ, ALFRED H.; AND OTHERS

    NINETY-EIGHT ANNOTATED REFERENCES (FROM 1933 TO 1967) ON SELF HELP AND REHABILITATION FOR THE MENTALLY AND PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED ARE INCLUDED IN THE BIBLIOGRAPHY. ALL RELATE EITHER TO THE SELF HELP FORM OF ORGANIZATION IN THE STRUCTURING OF HEALTH AND WELFARE SERVICES OR TO THE SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF REHABILITATION. THE REFERENCES…

  19. Guided self-help for functional (psychogenic) symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J.; Williams, C.; Stone, J.; Cavanagh, J.; Murray, G.; Butcher, I.; Duncan, R.; Smith, S.; Carson, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Functional (psychogenic or somatoform) symptoms are common in neurology clinics. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) can be an effective treatment, but there are major obstacles to its provision in practice. We tested the hypothesis that adding CBT-based guided self-help (GSH) to the usual care (UC) received by patients improves outcomes. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 2 neurology services in the United Kingdom. Outpatients with functional symptoms (rated by the neurologist as “not at all” or only “somewhat” explained by organic disease) were randomly allocated to UC or UC plus GSH. GSH comprised a self-help manual and 4 half-hour guidance sessions. The primary outcome was self-rated health on a 5-point clinical global improvement scale (CGI) at 3 months. Secondary outcomes were measured at 3 and 6 months. Results: In this trial, 127 participants were enrolled, and primary outcome data were collected for 125. Participants allocated to GSH reported greater improvement on the primary outcome (adjusted common odds ratio on the CGI 2.36 [95% confidence interval 1.17–4.74; p = 0.016]). The absolute difference in proportion “better” or “much better” was 13% (number needed to treat was 8). At 6 months the treatment effect was no longer statistically significant on the CGI but was apparent in symptom improvement and in physical functioning. Conclusions: CBT-based GSH is feasible to implement and efficacious. Further evaluation is indicated. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that CBT-based GSH therapy improves self-reported general health, as measured by the CGI, in patients with functional neurologic symptoms. PMID:21795652

  20. PHASE: a randomised, controlled trial of supervised self-help cognitive behavioural therapy in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Ann; Barkham, Michael; Cahill, Jane; Richards, David; Williams, Chris; Heywood, Phil

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common mental health problems account for up to 40% of all general practitioner (GP) consultations. Patients have limited access to evidence-based psychological therapies. Cognitive behavioural therapy self-help strategies offer one potential solution. AIM: To determine differences in clinical outcome, patient satisfaction and costs, between a cognitive behavioural-based self-help package facilitated by practice nurses compared to ordinary care by GPs for mild to moderate anxiety and depression. DESIGN OF STUDY: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Seventeen primary healthcare teams. METHOD: Patients presenting to their GP with mild to moderate anxiety and/or depression were recruited to the study and randomised to receive either a self-help intervention facilitated by practice nurses or ordinary care. The self-help intervention consisted of up to three appointments: two 1 week apart and a third 3 months later. There were no restrictions on ordinary care. RESULTS: Intention-to-treat analysis showed that patients treated with practice nurse-supported cognitive behavioural therapy self-help attained similar clinical outcomes for similar costs and were more satisfied than patients treated by GPs with ordinary care. On-treatment analysis showed patients receiving the facilitated cognitive behavioural therapy self-help were more likely to be below clinical threshold at 1 month compared to the ordinary care group (odds ratio [OR] = 3.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.87 to 4.37). This difference was less well marked at 3 months (OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 0.52 to 3.56). CONCLUSION: Facilitated cognitive behavioural self-help may provide a short-term cost-effective clinical benefit for patients with mild to moderate anxiety and depression. This has the potential to help primary care provide a choice of effective psychological as well as pharmacological treatments for mental health problems. PMID:14601351

  1. Self-Help Housing: The Magic of Ownership for Migrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Richard F.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the activities of the Southwest Florida Self-Help Housing, Inc., serving three counties in the Florida migrant and seasonal farming area, first funded by the Office of Economic Opportunity out of its Migrant Division funds in 1967. (JM)

  2. Self-Help in Research and Development Relating to Assessment: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yorke, Mantz; Barnett, Greg; Evanson, Peter; Haines, Chris; Jenkins, Don; Knight, Peter; Scurry, Dave; Stowell, Marie; Woolf, Harvey

    2004-01-01

    This article briefly chronicles nearly a decade of research and development activity undertaken in the area of assessment by a group of committed volunteers, "The Student Assessment and Classification Working Group" (SACWG). However, greater attention is given to demonstrating what a self-help approach can achieve in respect of research…

  3. Self-help treatment of anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis and meta-regression of effects and potential moderators.

    PubMed

    Haug, Thomas; Nordgreen, Tine; Öst, Lars Göran; Havik, Odd E

    2012-07-01

    Self-help treatments have the potential to increase the availability and affordability of evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders. Although promising, previous research results are heterogeneous, indicating a need to identify factors that moderate treatment outcome. The present article reviews the literature on self-help treatment for anxiety disorders among adults, with a total sample of 56 articles with 82 comparisons. When self-help treatment was compared to wait-list or placebo, a meta-analysis indicated a moderate to large effect size (g=0.78). When self-help treatment was compared to face-to-face treatment, results indicated a small effect that favored the latter (g=-0.20). When self-help was compared to wait-list or placebo, subgroup analyses indicated that self-help treatment format, primary anxiety diagnosis and procedures for recruitment of subjects were related to treatment outcome in bivariate analyses, but only recruitment procedures remained significant in a multiple meta-regression analysis. When self-help was compared to face-to-face treatment, a multiple meta-regression indicated that the type of comparison group, treatment format and gender were significantly related to outcome. We conclude that self-help is effective in the treatment of anxiety disorders, and should be offered as part of stepped care treatment models in community services. Implications of the results and future directions are discussed.

  4. Integrating self-help materials into mental health practice.

    PubMed

    Church, Elizabeth; Cornish, Peter; Callanan, Terrence; Bethune, Cheri

    2008-10-01

    Patients' mental health issues have become an increasing focus of Canadian family physicians' practices. A self-help approach can help meet this demand, but there are few guidelines for professionals about how to use mental health self-help resources effectively. To aid health professionals in integrating self-help materials into their mental health practices. A resource library of print, audiotape, and videotape self-help materials about common mental health issues was developed for a rural community. The materials were prescreened in order to ensure high quality, and health professionals were given training on how to integrate self-help into their practices. The library was actively used by both health professionals and community members, and most resources were borrowed, particularly the nonprint materials. Health professionals viewed the resources as a way to supplement their mental health practice and reduce demands on their time, as patients generally worked through the resources independently. Some improvements are planned for future implementations of the program, such as providing health professionals with a "prescription pad" of resources and implementing Stages of Change and stepped-care models to maximize the program's effectiveness. Although more evidence is needed regarding the effectiveness of self-help within a family practice context, this program offers a promising way for family physicians to address mild to moderate mental health problems.

  5. Agreement among readers on what is relevant in self-help psychology books.

    PubMed

    Forest, James J; Del Ben, Kevin; Toews, Stuart B

    2003-12-01

    It was hypothesized that text marking in self-help psychology books would indicate that readers agree on which pages and lines contain relevant information. Previously owned copies of two self-help book titles (n=48, n=38), all with marked text, were collected from second-hand book stores and scored for line and page marking. Chi-squares for goodness-of-fit yielded significant differences between observed and chance agreement in marking behavior. Intraclass and KR-20 correlations were significantly different from zero, suggesting that readers agreed on what information was relevant and irrelevant. Actual users of self-help books may have similar standards because of cultural values, social group relations, or common problem experiences.

  6. Agoraphobia: nurse therapist-facilitated self-help manual.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Karina; Cox, Debbie; Garvey, Rachel; Raines, David; Richards, David; Conroy, Patrick; Repper, Dean

    2003-09-01

    Agoraphobia is a common and disabling mental health disorder. Substantial evidence supports the use of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), in particular the intervention termed exposure therapy, as the treatment of choice. However, although the evidence base for cognitive-behaviour therapy is extensive, the service delivery evidence base is poor, and alternative ways of delivering therapy are required if mental health services are to achieve standards set out by the National Service Framework in the United Kingdom. The study had two aims: (1) to develop a self-help manual, which could be facilitated by a nurse trained in CBT, for clients suffering from agoraphobia and (2) to pilot the self-help manual and evaluate its effectiveness. The self-help manual was piloted with experienced nurses trained in CBT on three clinical sites for 10 weekly sessions of 30 minutes duration. A range of clinical outcome measures was administered by an independent assessor before and after treatment and at 1-month follow-up. A total of 18 clients completed treatment and results showed improvement on all clinical measures; improvement was maintained at 1-month follow-up. Importantly, 89% of clients were clinically significantly improved at post-treatment assessment. Clients were satisfied with their treatment and the self-help manual, and therapists found facilitated self-help an acceptable way to deliver treatment. Nurses can deliver effective support to patients using a self-help manual for agoraphobia. Although the results are promising, further work is required with larger numbers, longer follow-up and economic evaluation under controlled conditions. The work could also be adapted to different psychological conditions. Variation in the amount of specialist educational training is necessary to determine how many nurses are needed to support patients using self-help.

  7. Health Status of Homeless and Marginally Housed Users of Mental Health Self-Help Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Steven P.; Gomory, Tomi; Silverman, Carol J.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the health status of 310 homeless and marginally housed people to determine the usefulness of mental health self-help agencies (SHAs) in addressing their physical health needs. Findings indicated that frequencies of health problems among respondents were similar to those of other homeless or marginally housed groups and that the study…

  8. Health Status of Homeless and Marginally Housed Users of Mental Health Self-Help Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Steven P.; Gomory, Tomi; Silverman, Carol J.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the health status of 310 homeless and marginally housed people to determine the usefulness of mental health self-help agencies (SHAs) in addressing their physical health needs. Findings indicated that frequencies of health problems among respondents were similar to those of other homeless or marginally housed groups and that the study…

  9. Acceptability of a guided self-help Internet intervention for family caregivers: mastery over dementia.

    PubMed

    Pot, Anne Margriet; Blom, Marco M; Willemse, Bernadette M

    2015-08-01

    The number of people with dementia is increasing rapidly. Providing care to a relative or friend with dementia may lead to serious mental health problems. Internet interventions may offer opportunities to improve the availability and accessibility of (cost)effective interventions to reduce family caregivers' psychological distress. This study describes the acceptability of a guided self-help Internet intervention "mastery over dementia" (MoD), aimed at reducing caregivers' psychological distress, in terms of reach, adherence and user evaluation. The sample for this study is the experimental group that participated in the (cost)effectiveness trial of MoD (N = 149). Data on characteristics of family caregivers and people with dementia, completion and user evaluation were used and analyzed with descriptive statistics, χ2and T-tests. MoD reaches a wide variety of caregivers, also those aged 75+, having a relative with a recent diagnosis of dementia or living in a care home. However, the percentage of caregivers who did not complete all eight lessons was rather high (55.7%). Among the completers (N = 66; 44.3%) were significantly more spouses, caregivers living in the same household, older caregivers, and those caring for somebody with another formal diagnosis than Alzheimer's disease. Caregivers' evaluation showed that females rated higher on the comprehensibility of the lessons and feedback and spent less time on the lessons. The guided self-help Internet intervention MoD is acceptable for a broad range of family caregivers of people with dementia. The next step is to substantiate its (cost)effectiveness.

  10. Online self-help forums on cannabis: A content assessment.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Christian; Chatton, Anne; Khazaal, Yasser

    2017-10-01

    To investigate online self-help forums related to cannabis users who were searching for help on the Internet. We analyzed the content of 717 postings by 328 users in three online forums in terms of fields of interest and self-help mechanisms. Only English-language forums that were free of charge and without registration were investigated. The main self-help mechanisms were disclosure and symptoms, with relatively few posts concerning legal issues and social perceptions. The forums differed significantly in all fields of interest and self-help mechanisms except for social network and financial and vocational issues. Highly involved users more commonly posted on topics related to diagnosis, etiology/research, and provision of information and less commonly on those related to gratitude. Correlation analysis showed a moderate negative correlation between emotional support and illness-related aspects and between emotional support and exchange of information. Cannabis forums share similarities with other mental health forums. Posts differ according to user involvement and the specific orientation of the forum. The Internet offers a viable source of self-help and social support for cannabis users, which has potential clinical implications in terms of referring clients to specific forums. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Validation of the braden self-help model in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tzu-Hui; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Gau, Meei-Ling

    2010-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that requires lifelong follow-up treatment. Most SLE patients experience feelings of helplessness and frustration in the period after which the condition has been brought under control but not yet cured. Thus, to improve the SLE patient's quality of life (QOL), it is very important to assist them to adjust to face both the severity of their disease and their own feelings of limitation and uncertainty, to understand their condition and required treatments, and to adopt self-help strategies to adjust to difficulties in daily life. This study was designed to test both the hypothesized relationships in the Braden Self-help Model and the mediating effects of self-help on QOL in a sample of women with SLE. A cross-sectional design with causal modeling approach was used to verify specified relationships in the theoretical model. SLE patients who were registered with the Rainbow SLE Association and the Lupus SLE Foundation in Taiwan were recruited as participants by convenience sampling. A total of 231 SLE patients participated in this project. Data were collected using a self-administered structured questionnaire consisting of a personal information section, the Disease Course Graphic Scale, the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale, the Limitation Scale, the Self-Control Scale, the Adult Role and Behavior Scale, and the Well-Being Scale. Path analysis found a high level of significance for the coefficient of each path. We also identified a positive correlation between the disease severity and limitations and the factor of uncertainty and a negative correlation between the limitations and uncertainty and the factors of enabling skills, self-help, and QOL. A positive correlation among enabling skills, self-help, and QOL was also evident. The Sobel analysis pointed to self-help as having the greatest impact on QOL (79.15%). The study examined the applicability of the causal Braden Self-help Model on women with SLE

  12. Ankylosing spondylitis self-help organisations - do members differ from non-members?

    PubMed

    Song, In-Ho; Brenneis, Cornelia; Hammel, Ludwig; Feldtkeller, Ernst; Listing, Joachim; Sieper, Joachim; Rudwaleit, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Joining a patient self-help organisation is recommended for patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The objective was to compare AS patients who are members of a self-help organisation with non-members regarding disease specific and patient personality aspects, and make inferences on potential benefits of membership. A comprehensive questionnaire regarding demographics, smoking habits, acquisition of information about the disease, disease activity, functioning, patient satisfaction, treatment, sick leave, work disability and educational level was distributed to members of the German AS self-help organisation and to non-member AS patients. In total, 1273 patients responded. Significant differences regarding age and disease duration led us to match members 2:1 to non-members. In the matched population (n=549), members had a higher level of education, felt more often well-informed about the disease, had less often physically demanding jobs, and smoked less than non-members. Members were more often treated with NSAIDs and less often with TNF-blockers suggesting more severe disease in non-members. While the level of disease activity was similar (BASDAI 4.1 vs. 4.2), members had a better functional status (BASFI 3.5 vs. 3.9) and significantly less days on sick leave during the last year (15.1 days vs. 31.2 days). Days on sick leave increased with increasing BASFI significantly more strikingly in non-members than in members. AS patients who are members of an AS self-help organisation have a higher educational level and are much better informed about the disease. Inferences on disease outcome measures, however, are hampered by potential confounders. Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. The effectiveness of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy self-help intervention for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Marnie; Foster, Mary; Shennan, Jeannette; Starkey, Nicola J; Johnson, Anders

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an Acceptance Commitment Therapy based self-help book for people with chronic pain. This was a randomized 2 group study design. Over a 6-week period, 6 participants read the self-help book and completed exercises from it with weekly telephone support whereas 8 others formed a wait-list control group. Subsequently, 5 of the wait-list participants completed the intervention. Participants completed preintervention and postintervention questionnaires for acceptance, values illness, quality of life, satisfaction with life, depression, anxiety, and pain. Initial outcome data were collected for 8 control participants and 6 intervention participants. Including the wait-list controls, a total of 11 participants completed preintervention and postintervention measures. Whilst completing the self-help intervention, each week participants' rated the content of the book according to reading level and usefulness, and their comprehension of the content was also assessed. Compared with controls, participants who completed the book showed improved quality of life and decreased anxiety. When data from all the treatment participants were pooled, those who completed the intervention showed statistically significant improvements (with large effect sizes) for acceptance, quality of life, satisfaction with life, and values illness. Medium effect sizes were found for improvements in pain ratings. These findings support the hypothesis that using the self-help book, with minimal therapist contact adds value to the lives of people who experience chronic pain.

  14. Self-Help for Depression via E-mail: A Randomised Controlled Trial of Effects on Depression and Self-Help Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Amy J.; Jorm, Anthony F.; Mackinnon, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-help or self-management strategies are commonly used to deal with depression, but not all are thought to be helpful. A previous study found that sub-threshold depression symptoms were improved by an e-mail intervention that encouraged the use of evidence-based self-help strategies. Aim To investigate whether these e-mails were effective for adults with a range of depression symptomatology including major depression. Method The study was a parallel-group randomised controlled trial. Adult participants with any level of depressive symptoms were recruited over the internet from the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand and the United States. Participants were randomised to receive a series of e-mails either promoting the use of evidence-based self-help strategies or containing depression information as a control. E-mails were sent automatically twice a week for six weeks. Depression symptoms were assessed with the self-rated Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale (PHQ-9). Results 1736 participants with a wide range of symptom severity were recruited and assigned to active (n = 862) and control (n = 874) groups. However, there was a significant attrition rate, with 66.9% lost to follow-up at post-intervention. Both groups showed large improvements in depression symptoms overall, with no significant difference in improvement at the end of the study (mean difference in improvement 0.35 points, 95% CI: −0.57 to 1.28, d = 0.11, 95% CI: −0.06 to 0.27), although there was a small effect at the study mid-point. Results were similar for the sub-group of participants with major depression. The active group showed small to moderate improvements in self-help behaviour (d = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.23 to 0.56). Conclusions These results suggest that the e-mails were able to increase participants’ use of evidence-based self-help, but that this did not improve depression more than an attention control. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  15. Evaluation of a DVD-based self-help program in highly socially anxious individuals--pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mall, Anna K; Mehl, Annette; Kiko, Sonja; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Salize, Hans-Joachim; Hermann, Christiane; Hoffmann, Torsten; Bohus, Martin; Steil, Regina

    2011-09-01

    High social anxiety is a risk factor for the incidence of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Early diagnosis and intervention may prevent more severe psychiatric courses. Self-help programs may be a convenient, accessible, and effective intervention. This study examined the efficacy of a newly developed self-help program for SAD in individuals with subthreshold social anxiety. A total of 24 highly socially anxious individuals were randomly assigned to a DVD-based self-help program or to a wait-list control group. The self-help program is based on the cognitive model according to Clark and Wells (1995; adapted to German by Stangier, Clark, & Ehlers, 2006) and comprises eight sessions. ANOVAs based on an intention-to-treat model were used for data analyses. The self-help program was well accepted; just one person withdrew during the intervention. There were significant Time× Group interactions on all primary outcome measures. For the intervention group moderate to high within-groups effect sizes up to Cohen's d = 1.05 were obtained. Between-groups effect sizes ranged from 0.24 to 0.65 in favor of the active intervention. The newly developed DVD-based self-help program seems to be a promising intervention for highly socially anxious individuals as it reduces social anxiety symptoms. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Self-Help Audiocassette Tapes: Adjunct to Psychological Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamauchi, Kent T.

    1987-01-01

    Argues that use of self-help audiocassette tapes in psychological counseling can accelerate the introduction of therapeutic ideas, promote continuity of counseling between sessions, and reinforce behavioral and attitudinal changes. Discussed rationale and description of a program in which this approach is used in brief counseling of college…

  17. Psychological Self-Help: A Five Step Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Lloyd R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    One strategy for helping clients develop their own self-development systems is educational intervention. The counselor assumes a teacher role to teach clients specific skills to better cope with problems of living. Presents a five-step counseling and self-help method to be learned by clients. (Author)

  18. Brief Online Self-help Exercises for Postnatal Women to Improve Mood: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Susan; Fitzgerald, Gemima; Thompson, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Giving birth and adjusting to a new baby can be difficult and stressful for new mothers. Negative mood may occur during this time and can affect women, their parenting and the infant's development. This pilot study evaluated a brief online self-help intervention designed to promote positive mood in mothers of babies and toddlers. Women in the UK who had given birth within the previous 18 months were randomly allocated to the online self-help intervention (n = 40) or active comparison group exercise (n = 40) which was matched for time and structure. Mood was measured before and after the intervention. Acceptability was examined at the end of the trial. The self-help intervention was acceptable to the majority of women and significantly increased positive mood compared to the comparison condition. This effect persisted after controlling for self-esteem, anxiety and depression. These results suggest that a simple self-help intervention focused on changing beliefs about oneself as a mother can have an immediate impact on women's mood. Further research is need to see whether these improvements continue long-term and what processes underlie these improvements.

  19. The Story of Self-Help Enterprises [SHE]. A History of Self-Help Housing in the San Joaquin Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unwin, Richard

    SHE is a rural California home building corporation founded on the principles of self-help. Lacking sufficient capital to purchase or finance a home by conventional means, a low-income family may elect to "self-construct with SHE". A participant family agrees to invest its labor, up to 1,500 hours, in the supervised construction of its…

  20. Effects of a Cognitive Behavioral Self-Help Program on Emotional Problems for People with Acquired Hearing Loss: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garnefski, Nadia; Kraaij, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine whether a cognitive-behavioral self-help program was effective in improving depressed mood and anxiety in people with acquired deafness. Participants were 45 persons with acquired deafness, randomly allocated to the Cognitive-Behavioral Self-help (CBS) group or the Waiting List Control (WLC) group. Depression…

  1. Effects of a Cognitive Behavioral Self-Help Program on Emotional Problems for People with Acquired Hearing Loss: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garnefski, Nadia; Kraaij, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine whether a cognitive-behavioral self-help program was effective in improving depressed mood and anxiety in people with acquired deafness. Participants were 45 persons with acquired deafness, randomly allocated to the Cognitive-Behavioral Self-help (CBS) group or the Waiting List Control (WLC) group. Depression…

  2. Internet-based guided self-help for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): Randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Catrin E; Farewell, Daniel; Groves, Vicky; Kitchiner, Neil J; Roberts, Neil P; Vick, Tracey; Bisson, Jonathan I

    2017-06-01

    There are numerous barriers that limit access to evidence-based treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Internet-based guided self-help is a treatment option that may help widen access to effective intervention, but the approach has not been sufficiently explored for the treatment of PTSD. Forty two adults with DSM-5 PTSD of mild to moderate severity were randomly allocated to internet-based self-help with up to 3 h of therapist assistance, or to a delayed treatment control group. The internet-based program included eight modules that focused on psychoeducation, grounding, relaxation, behavioural activation, real-life and imaginal exposure, cognitive therapy, and relapse prevention. The primary outcome measure was reduction in clinician-rated traumatic stress symptoms using the clinician administered PTSD scale for DSM-V (CAPS-5). Secondary outcomes were self-reported PTSD symptoms, depression, anxiety, alcohol use, perceived social support, and functional impairment. Posttreatment, the internet-based guided self-help group had significantly lower clinician assessed PTSD symptoms than the delayed treatment control group (between-group effect size Cohen's d = 1.86). The difference was maintained at 1-month follow-up and dissipated once both groups had received treatment. Similar patterns of difference between the two groups were found for depression, anxiety, and functional impairment. The average contact with treating clinicians was 2½ h. Internet-based trauma-focused guided self-help for PTSD is a promising treatment option that requires far less therapist time than current first line face-to-face psychological therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Revisioning the Self: A Phenomenological Investigation into Self-Help Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruneau, Laura; Bubenzer, Donald L.; McGlothlin, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The helpfulness of self-help reading was explored through interviews with 6 female self-help readers. Themes derived through phenomenological data analysis suggested that there is a distinct structure to the self-help reading experience, including self-help reading as a medium for revisioning of self. Implications for counseling practice and…

  4. Revisioning the Self: A Phenomenological Investigation into Self-Help Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruneau, Laura; Bubenzer, Donald L.; McGlothlin, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The helpfulness of self-help reading was explored through interviews with 6 female self-help readers. Themes derived through phenomenological data analysis suggested that there is a distinct structure to the self-help reading experience, including self-help reading as a medium for revisioning of self. Implications for counseling practice and…

  5. Is technology assisted guided self-help successful in treating female adolescents with bulimia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gudrun; Wagner, Gudrun; Penelo, Eva; Nobis, Gerald; Mayerhofer, Anna; Schau, Johanna; Spitzer, Marion; Imgart, Hartmut; Karwautz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the long-term outcome of new technology assisted guided self-help in adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN). One hundred and twenty-six patients with BN (29 adolescents and 97 adults) were randomly allocated to a cognitive behavioural therapy-based self-help program delivered by the Internet or bibliotherapy, both accompanied by e-mail guidance. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, month 4, 7 and 18 including remission rates and eating disorder associated psychopathology. In all, 44% of adolescents vs. 38.7% of adults were in remission at month 7, and 55% of adolescents vs. 62.5% of adults were in remission at follow-up. Objective binge eating and compensatory behaviour improved significantly over time in both groups, with the highest decrease during the first 4 months. A significant decrease over time and no group differences have been found in almost all EDI-2 subscales. E-mail guided self-help (delivered via the Internet or bibliotherapy) is equally effective for adolescents as for adults with BN, and can be recommended as an initial step of treatment for this younger age group.

  6. Self-help interventions for depressive disorders and depressive symptoms: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Amy J; Jorm, Anthony F

    2008-01-01

    Background Research suggests that depressive disorders exist on a continuum, with subthreshold symptoms causing considerable population burden and increasing individual risk of developing major depressive disorder. An alternative strategy to professional treatment of subthreshold depression is population promotion of effective self-help interventions that can be easily applied by an individual without professional guidance. The evidence for self-help interventions for depressive symptoms is reviewed in the present work, with the aim of identifying promising interventions that could inform future health promotion campaigns or stimulate further research. Methods A literature search for randomised controlled trials investigating self-help interventions for depressive disorders or depressive symptoms was performed using PubMed, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Reference lists and citations of included studies were also checked. Studies were grouped into those involving participants with depressive disorders or a high level of depressive symptoms, or non-clinically depressed participants not selected for depression. A number of exclusion criteria were applied, including trials with small sample sizes and where the intervention was adjunctive to antidepressants or psychotherapy. Results The majority of interventions searched had no relevant evidence to review. Of the 38 interventions reviewed, the ones with the best evidence of efficacy in depressive disorders were S-adenosylmethionine, St John's wort, bibliotherapy, computerised interventions, distraction, relaxation training, exercise, pleasant activities, sleep deprivation, and light therapy. A number of other interventions showed promise but had received less research attention. Research in non-clinical samples indicated immediate beneficial effects on depressed mood for distraction, exercise, humour, music, negative air ionisation, and singing; while potential for helpful longer-term effects

  7. Self-help books for depression: how can practitioners and patients make the right choice?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Liz; Lewis, Glyn; Araya, Ricardo; Elgie, Rodney; Harrison, Glynn; Proudfoot, Judy; Schmidt, Ulrike; Sharp, Deborah; Weightman, Alison; Williams, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Background Depression is a common and important public health problem most often treated by GPs. A self-help approach is popular with patients, yet little is known about its effectiveness. Aim Our primary aim was to review and update the evidence for the clinical effectiveness of bibliotherapy in the treatment of depression. Our secondary aim was to identify which of these self-help materials are generally available to buy and to examine the evidence specific to these publications. Method Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CCTR, PsiTri and the National Research Register were searched for randomised trials that evaluated self-help books for depression which included participants aged over 16 years with a diagnosis or symptoms of depression. Clinical symptoms, quality of life, costs or acceptability to users were the required outcome measures. Papers were obtained and data extracted independently by two researchers. A meta-analysis using a random effects model was carried out using the mean score and standard deviation of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression at the endpoint of the trial. Results Eleven randomised controlled trials were identified. None fulfilled CONSORT guidelines and all were small, with the largest trial having 40 patients per group. Nine of these evaluated two current publications, Managing Anxiety and Depression (UK) and Feeling Good (US). A meta-analysis of 6 trials evaluating Feeling Good found a large treatment effect compared to delayed treatment (standardised mean difference = −1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] = −1.76 to −0.96). Five self-help books were identified as being available and commonly bought by members of the public in addition to the two books that had been evaluated in trials. Conclusion There are a number of self-help books for the treatment of depression readily available. For the majority, there is little direct evidence for their effectiveness. There is weak evidence that suggests that bibliotherapy, based on a

  8. Feasibility of a UK community-based, eTherapy mental health service in Greater Manchester: repeated-measures and between-groups study of ‘Living Life to the Full Interactive’, ‘Sleepio’ and ‘Breaking Free Online’ at ‘Self Help Services’

    PubMed Central

    Elison, Sarah; Ward, Jonathan; Williams, Chris; Espie, Colin; Davies, Glyn; Dugdale, Stephanie; Ragan, Kathryn; Chisnall, Leanne; Lidbetter, Nicky; Smith, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Objectives There is increasing evidence to support the effectiveness of eTherapies for mental health, although limited data have been reported from community-based services. Therefore, this service evaluation reports on feasibility and outcomes from an eTherapy mental health service. Setting ‘Self Help Services’, an Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) eTherapy service in Greater Manchester. Participants 1068 service users referred to the service for secondary care for their mental health difficulties. Interventions Participants were triaged into one of three eTherapy programmes: ‘Living Life to the Full Interactive’ for low mood, stress and anxiety; ‘Sleepio’ for insomnia; and ‘Breaking Free Online’ for substance misuse, depending on clinical need. Primary outcomes measures Standardised psychometric assessments of depression, anxiety and social functioning, collected as part of the IAPT Minimum Data Set, were conducted at baseline and post-treatment. Results Data indicated baseline differences, with the Breaking Free Online group having higher scores for depression and anxiety than the Living Life to the Full Interactive (depression CI 1.27 to 3.21, p<0.0001; anxiety CI 077 to 1.72, p<0.0001) and Sleepio (depression CI 1.19 to 4.52, p<0.0001; anxiety CI 2.16 to 5.23, p<0.0001) groups. Promising improvements in mental health scores were found within all three groups (all p<0.0001), as were significant reductions in numbers of service users reaching clinical threshold scores for mental health difficulties (p<0.0001). Number of days of engagement was not related to change from baseline for the Living Life to the Full or Sleepio programmes but was associated with degree of change for Breaking Free Online. Conclusion Data presented provide evidence for feasibility of this eTherapy delivery model in supporting service users with a range of mental health difficulties and suggest that eTherapies may be a useful addition to treatment offering

  9. A self-help book is better than sleep hygiene advice for insomnia: a randomized controlled comparative study.

    PubMed

    Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Fiske, Eldbjørg; Pallesen, Ståle

    2011-12-01

    The objective was to compare the effects of two types of written material for insomnia in a randomized trial with follow-up after three months. Insomniacs were recruited through newspaper advertisements to a web-based survey with validated questionnaires about sleep, anxiety, depression, and use of sleep medications. A self-help book focusing on cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia was compared to standard sleep hygiene advice; 77 and 78 participants were randomized to self-help book or sleep hygiene advice, respectively. The response rate was 81.9%. The self-help book gave significantly better scores on the sleep questionnaires compared to sleep hygiene advice. The proportion using sleep medications was reduced in the self-help book group, whereas it was increased in the sleep hygiene group. Compared to pre-treatment, the self-help book improved scores on the sleep (effect sizes 0.61-0.62) and depression (effect size 0.18) scales, whereas the sleep hygiene advice improved scores on some sleep scales (effect sizes 0.24-0.28), but worsened another (effect size -0.36). In addition, sleep hygiene advice increased the number of days per week where they took sleep medications (effect size -0.50). To conclude, in this randomized controlled trial, the self-help book improved sleep and reduced the proportion using sleep medications compared to sleep hygiene advice. The self-help book is an efficient low-threshold intervention, which is cheap and easily available for patients suffering from insomnia. Sleep hygiene advice also improved sleep at follow-up, but increased sleep medication use. Thus, caution is warranted when sleep hygiene advice are given as a single treatment.

  10. A cost-effectiveness analysis of self-help smoking cessation methods for pregnant women.

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, R A; Warner, K E; Cutter, G R

    1988-01-01

    Estimates of the cost effectiveness and cost benefit of health promotion-health education methods for pregnant smokers designed to increase birth weight are not available. This paper presents the results of a cost-effectiveness analysis from a recently completed randomized trial to evaluate the effectiveness of self-help smoking cessation methods for pregnant women in public health maternity clinics. The study population--309 pregnant smokers from 3 prenatal clinics--were randomly assigned, during their first clinic visit, to 1 of 3 groups: (a) group 1 received the standard clinic information and advice to quit smoking, (b) group 2 received the standard clinic information and advice to quit plus the manual "Freedom From Smoking in 20 Days" by the American Lung Association, and (c) group 3 received the standard clinic information and advice to quit plus the pregnancy-specific manual "A Pregnant Woman's Self-Help Guide to Quit Smoking." The quit rates by the end of pregnancy were 2 percent for group 1, 6 percent for group 2, and 14 percent for group 3. Analyses also indicated that the method used for group 3 was the most cost effective: group 3 achieved smoking cessation at less than half the cost experienced by the other two groups. Although additional studies are needed concerning the behavioral impact, cost effectiveness, and cost benefit of self-help health education methods for smoking cessation, the methods tested in this trial are promising as solutions to part of the problem of low birth weight among infants of smoking mothers in the United States. PMID:3124203

  11. GET.ON Mood Enhancer: efficacy of Internet-based guided self-help compared to psychoeducation for depression: an investigator-blinded randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ebert, David Daniel; Lehr, Dirk; Baumeister, Harald; Boß, Leif; Riper, Heleen; Cuijpers, Pim; Reins, Jo Annika; Buntrock, Claudia; Berking, Matthias

    2014-01-30

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) imposes a considerable disease burden on individuals and societies. A large number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have shown the efficacy of Internet-based guided self-help interventions in reducing symptoms of depression. However, study quality varies considerably. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a new Internet-based guided self-help intervention (GET.ON Mood Enhancer) compared to online-based psychoeducation in an investigator-blinded RCT. A RCT will be conducted to compare the efficacy of GET.ON Mood Enhancer with an active control condition receiving online psychoeducation on depression (OPD). Both treatment groups will have full access to treatment as usual. Adults with MDD (n=128) will be recruited and randomised to one of the two conditions. Primary outcome will be observer-rated depressive symptoms (HRSD-24) by independent assessors blind to treatment conditions. Secondary outcomes include changes in self-reported depressive symptom severity, anxiety and quality of life. Additionally, potential negative effects of the treatments will systematically be evaluated on several dimensions (for example, symptom deteriorations, attitudes toward seeking psychological help, relationships and stigmatisation). Assessments will take place at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks after randomisation. This study evaluates a new Internet-based guided self-help intervention for depression using an active control condition (psychoeducation-control) and an independent, blinded outcome evaluation. This study will further enhance the evidence for Internet-based guided self-help interventions for MDD. German Clinical Trial Registration (DRKS): DRKS00005025.

  12. Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive Behavior Therapy Guided Self-Help Program for Mexican American Women with Binge Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Munyi; Cachelin, Fary; Uribe, Luz; Striegel, Ruth H.; Thompson, Douglas; Wilson, G. Terence

    2012-01-01

    Data on the compatibility of evidence-based treatment in ethnic minority groups are limited. This study utilized focus group interviews to elicit Mexican American women's (N = 12) feedback on a cognitive behavior therapy guided self-help program for binge eating disorders. Findings revealed 6 themes to be considered during the cultural adaptation…

  13. Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive Behavior Therapy Guided Self-Help Program for Mexican American Women with Binge Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Munyi; Cachelin, Fary; Uribe, Luz; Striegel, Ruth H.; Thompson, Douglas; Wilson, G. Terence

    2012-01-01

    Data on the compatibility of evidence-based treatment in ethnic minority groups are limited. This study utilized focus group interviews to elicit Mexican American women's (N = 12) feedback on a cognitive behavior therapy guided self-help program for binge eating disorders. Findings revealed 6 themes to be considered during the cultural adaptation…

  14. Privacy-preserving self-helped medical diagnosis scheme based on secure two-party computation in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Wen, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Yudong; Li, Wenmin

    2014-01-01

    With the continuing growth of wireless sensor networks in pervasive medical care, people pay more and more attention to privacy in medical monitoring, diagnosis, treatment, and patient care. On one hand, we expect the public health institutions to provide us with better service. On the other hand, we would not like to leak our personal health information to them. In order to balance this contradiction, in this paper we design a privacy-preserving self-helped medical diagnosis scheme based on secure two-party computation in wireless sensor networks so that patients can privately diagnose themselves by inputting a health card into a self-helped medical diagnosis ATM to obtain a diagnostic report just like drawing money from a bank ATM without revealing patients' health information and doctors' diagnostic skill. It makes secure self-helped disease diagnosis feasible and greatly benefits patients as well as relieving the heavy pressure of public health institutions.

  15. Privacy-Preserving Self-Helped Medical Diagnosis Scheme Based on Secure Two-Party Computation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Yudong; Li, Wenmin

    2014-01-01

    With the continuing growth of wireless sensor networks in pervasive medical care, people pay more and more attention to privacy in medical monitoring, diagnosis, treatment, and patient care. On one hand, we expect the public health institutions to provide us with better service. On the other hand, we would not like to leak our personal health information to them. In order to balance this contradiction, in this paper we design a privacy-preserving self-helped medical diagnosis scheme based on secure two-party computation in wireless sensor networks so that patients can privately diagnose themselves by inputting a health card into a self-helped medical diagnosis ATM to obtain a diagnostic report just like drawing money from a bank ATM without revealing patients' health information and doctors' diagnostic skill. It makes secure self-helped disease diagnosis feasible and greatly benefits patients as well as relieving the heavy pressure of public health institutions. PMID:25126107

  16. The effect for Japanese workers of a self-help computerized cognitive behaviour therapy program with a supplement soft drink.

    PubMed

    Shirotsuki, Kentaro; Nonaka, Yuji; Abe, Keiichi; Adachi, So-Ichiro; Adachi, Shohei; Kuboki, Tomifusa; Nakao, Mutsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Computerized cognitive behaviour therapy (CCBT) programs can provide a useful self-help approach to the treatment of psychological problems. Previous studies have shown that CCBT has moderate effects on depression, insomnia, and anxiety. The present study investigated whether a supplement drink that includes L-carnosine enhances the effect of CCBT on psychological well-being. Eighty-seven participants were randomly allocated to a control group, CCBT, or CCBT with supplement drink. The CCBT and CCBT with supplement drink groups received six weekly self-help CCBT program instalments, which consisted of psycho-education about stress management and coping, behaviour activation, and cognitive restructuring. The CCBT group consumed a bottle of the supplement soft drink every morning through the 6 weeks. This program was delivered by an e-learning system on demand and also included a self-help guidebook. Seventy-two participants completed the program or were assess at the end of the study. ANOVA revealed that there were significant interactions (times × groups) for POMS tension-anxiety and fatigue. The CCBT group showed significantly improved tension-anxiety scores, whereas the CCBT with drink group showed significant improvements on fatigue. The self-help CCBT program reduced the subjective experience of tension-anxiety in this group of workers. The addition of a supplement drink enhanced the effect of CCBT on fatigue, providing one possible approach to enhancement of such programs. This study was registered on September 2, 2016 at UMIN. The registration number is UMIN000023903.

  17. 77 FR 71609 - Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) Grant Monitoring

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) Grant Monitoring AGENCY: Office of... following information: Title of Proposed: Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP)...

  18. [Self-help on the internet. Chances and risks of communication in electronic networks].

    PubMed

    Podoll, K; Mörth, D; Sass, H; Rudolf, H

    2002-01-01

    The worldwide web is used for self-help purposes by an increasing number of patients with a variety of mental disorders. The benefits and dangers of applying the internet in psychiatry are discussed based on a case report concerning a female with post traumatic stress and multiple personality disorders who visited a chat-room in the internet with two of her 48 supernumerary identities. During one stage of her history, she displayed an excessive use of the internet which must be considered a symptom of mental disorder rather than a distinct disease entity, viz. "internet addiction".

  19. Weekly brief phone support in self-help cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia disorder: Relevance to adherence and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ho, Fiona Yan-Yee; Chung, Ka-Fai; Yeung, Wing-Fai; Ng, Tommy Ho-Yee; Cheng, Sammy Kin-Wing

    2014-12-01

    Self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is an acceptable, low-intensity treatment in a stepped care model for insomnia. We tested the application of self-help CBT-I in a Chinese population. 312 participants with self-report of insomnia associated with distress or daytime impairment 3 or more nights per week for at least 3 months were randomized to self-help CBT-I with telephone support (SHS), self-help CBT-I (SH) and waiting-list (WL). The program was Internet-based with treatment materials delivered once per week, and lasted for 6 consecutive weeks, while the telephone support was limited to 15 min weekly. Mixed-effects analyses found significant group by time interaction in sleep and sleep-related cognitions at immediate and 4-week posttreatment. Post-hoc pairwise comparison with WL revealed that both SHS and SH had significantly higher sleep efficiency at immediate (p = .004 and p = .03, respectively) and 4-week posttreatment (p = .002 and p = .02, respectively) and lower insomnia and dysfunctional beliefs scores. The SHS group had additional improvements in sleep onset latency and sleep quality. Benefits with self-help CBT-I were maintained at 12-week posttreatment, but attrition rate was about 35%. Internet-based self-help CBT-I was effective and acceptable for treating insomnia in the Chinese population. A brief telephone support further enhanced the efficacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Public Pedagogy, Private Lives: Self-Help Books and Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Self-help literature has become an important domain of adult learning in North America. Self-help books offer readers advice on how to take charge of their lives and achieve goals such as prosperity, love, happiness, wellness, and self-actualization. Despite the popularity of self-help books, there has been little research about them from scholars…

  1. Up from Dependency: A New National Public Assistance Strategy. Supplement 3: A Self-Help Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotler, Martin; And Others

    Self-help among low-income people is vitally important. In no area is self-help more important than in overcoming poverty's burdens and energizing the escape from poverty. This document comprises an inventory of self-help and mutual-help programs that feature active involvement of members of the low-income population. The programs in this…

  2. Public Pedagogy, Private Lives: Self-Help Books and Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Self-help literature has become an important domain of adult learning in North America. Self-help books offer readers advice on how to take charge of their lives and achieve goals such as prosperity, love, happiness, wellness, and self-actualization. Despite the popularity of self-help books, there has been little research about them from scholars…

  3. Constructing and testing a self-help intervention program for high blood pressure control in Korean American seniors--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miyong T; Han, Hae-Ra; Park, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Hwayun; Kim, Kim B

    2006-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in the reduction of overall cardiovascular risk factors in the United States during the last decade, controlling high blood pressure (HBP) remains a difficult task for many individuals. In particular, socially disadvantaged groups, such as new immigrants, and ethnic minority groups, such as Korean Americans, continue to struggle with this chronic disease and suffer unnecessary complications. We conducted a quasi-experimental study to test the efficacy of a self-help intervention program for HBP control in first-generation Korean American seniors with HBP. The intervention consisted of 3 concurrently administered components: (1) structured behavioral education on HBP management, (2) home blood pressure (BP) monitoring, and (3) monthly support groups facilitated by a bilingual nurse. Of the 49 Korean American seniors (> or =60 years old) who agreed to participate, 31 received the intervention and completed the follow-up interviews at 6 months. Final analysis of BP outcomes using repeated measures and postintervention data suggested that the self-help intervention was effective in significantly improving the proportion of individuals who achieved BP control (<140/90 mm Hg) and in lowering both systolic and diastolic BP in the sample. Specifically, the BP control rate, which was 29% at baseline, increased at 6 months to 69%. Likewise, the mean systolic and diastolic BP values of 142.7 and 87.1 mm Hg at baseline decreased to 129.3 and 75.3 mm Hg, respectively, after 6 months of follow-up. This improvement of the HBP control rate in the sample highlights the clinical efficacy of the self-help intervention for this traditionally underserved immigrant group.

  4. Effectiveness of Supported Self-Help in Recurrent Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Biesheuvel-Leliefeld, Karolien E M; Dijkstra-Kersten, Sandra M A; van Schaik, Digna J F; van Marwijk, Harm W J; Smit, Filip; van der Horst, Henriette E; Bockting, Claudi L H

    2017-01-01

    The burden and economic consequences of depression are high, mostly due to its recurrent nature. Due to current budget and time restraints, a preventive, low- cost, accessible minimal intervention is much needed. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of a supported self-help preventive cognitive therapy (S-PCT) added to treatment as usual (TAU) in primary care, compared to TAU alone. We conducted a randomized controlled trial among 248 patients with a history of depression, currently in full or partial remission or recovery. Participants were randomized to TAU augmented with S-PCT (n = 124) or TAU alone (n = 124). S-PCT consisted of an 8-week self-help intervention, supported by weekly telephone guidance by a counselor. The intervention included a self-help book that could be read at home. The primary outcome was the incidence of relapse or recurrence and was assessed over the telephone by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV axis 1 disorders. Participants were observed for 12 months. Secondary outcomes were depressive symptoms, quality of life (EQ-5D and SF-12), comorbid psychopathology, and self-efficacy. These secondary outcomes were assessed by digital questionnaires. In the S-PCT group, 44 participants (35.5%) experienced a relapse or recurrence, compared to 62 participants (50.0%) in the TAU group (incidence rate ratio = 0.71, 95% CI 0.52-0.97; risk difference = 14, 95% CI 2-24, number needed to treat = 7). Compared to the TAU group, the S-PCT group showed a significant reduction in depressive symptoms over 12 months (mean difference -2.18; 95% CI -3.09 to -1.27) and a significant increase in quality of life (EQ-5D) (mean difference 0.04; 95% CI 0.004-0.08). S-PCT had no effect on comorbid psychopathology, self-efficacy, and quality of life based on the SF-12. A supported self-help preventive cognitive therapy, guided by a counselor in primary care, proved to be effective in reducing the burden of recurrent depression. © 2017 The Author

  5. Self-help participation and quality of life: a study of the staff of Recovery, Inc.

    PubMed

    Raiff, N R

    1982-01-01

    This report explores mental health outcomes reported by the self-help group leaders and administrators of Recovery, Inc.: The Association of Nervous and Former Mental Patients. Following Campbell (1976), both global and domain-specific quality of life indicators are used as measures of mental health. The contributions of the leader's income, health history, and Recovery career variables are also examined and the general findings are compared to a normative population. The data indicates that Recovery participation is associated with positive mental status reports, particularly in global self-ratings. Residual areas requirng supplementary human service intervention are specified.

  6. Implementing 'self-help friendliness' in German hospitals: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Trojan, Alf; Nickel, Stefan; Kofahl, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    In Germany, the term 'self-help friendliness' (SHF) describes a strategy to institutionalize co-operation of healthcare institutions with mutual aid or self-help groups of chronically ill patients. After a short explanation of the SHF concept and its development, we will present findings from a longitudinal study on the implementation of SHF in three German hospitals. Specifically, we wanted to know (i) to what degree SHF had been put into practice after the initial development phase in the pilot hospitals, (ii) whether it was possible to maintain the level of implementation of SHF in the course of at least 1 year and (iii) which opinions exist about the inclusion of SHF criteria in quality management systems. With only minor restrictions, the findings provide support for the usefulness, practicability, sustainability and transferability of SHF. Limitations of our empirical study are the small number of hospitals, the above average motivation of their staff, the small response rate in the staff-survey and the inability to get enough data from members of self-help groups. The research instrument for measuring SHF was adequate and fulfils the most important scientific quality criteria in a German context. We conclude that the implementation of SHF leads to more patient-centredness in healthcare institutions and thus improves satisfaction, self-management, coping and health literacy of patients. SHF is considered as an adequate approach for reorienting healthcare institutions in the sense of the Ottawa Charta, and particularly suitable for health promoting hospitals. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A randomised controlled trial of face to face versus pure online self-help cognitive behavioural treatment for perfectionism.

    PubMed

    Egan, Sarah J; van Noort, Emily; Chee, Abby; Kane, Robert T; Hoiles, Kimberley J; Shafran, Roz; Wade, Tracey D

    2014-12-01

    Previous research has shown cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) to be effective in reducing perfectionism. The present study investigated the efficacy of two formats of CBT for perfectionism (CBT-P), face-to-face and pure online self-help, in reducing perfectionism and associated psychological symptoms. Participants were randomly allocated to face-to-face CBT-P (n = 18), pure online self-help CBT-P (n = 16), or a waitlist control period (n = 18). There was no significant change for the waitlist group on any of the outcome measures at the end of treatment. Both the face-to-face and pure online self-help groups reported significant reductions at the end of treatment for the perfectionism variables which were maintained at the 6-month follow-up. The face-to-face group also reported significant reductions over this time in depression, anxiety, and stress, and a significant pre-post increase in self-esteem, all of which were maintained at the 6-month follow-up. In contrast, the pure online self-help group showed no significant changes on these outcomes. The face-to-face group was statistically superior to the pure online self-help group at follow-up on the perfectionism measures, concern over mistakes and personal standards. The results show promising evidence for CBT for perfectionism, especially when offered face to face, where sustained benefit across a broad range of outcomes can be expected.

  8. [Efficacy and safety of tertiary hospital guided and community-driven family self-help cardiac rehabilitation model].

    PubMed

    Ding, R J; Gao, L M; Chu, L; Xie, W L; Wang, X R; Tang, Q; Wang, H L; Hu, D Y

    2017-03-24

    Objective: To explore the efficacy and safety of tertiary hospital guided and community-driven family self-help cardiac rehabilitation model. Methods: This study was a prospective randomized controlled study, 80 patients from Beijing Electrical Power Hospital and Beijing Jingmei Group General Hospital with acute coronary syndrome were included from June to December 2015 and divided into 2 groups. Patients in rehabilitation group (n=52) received tertiary hospital(Peiking University Peoples' Hospital) guided and community-driven family self-help cardiac rehabilitation for 3 months, and patients in control group (n=28) received routine secondary treatment for 3 months. Following parameters including 6 minutes walk distance, score of life quality (evaluated by Short Form-12), score of anxiety (evaluated by Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), score of depression (evaluated by Perceived Health Questionnaire-9), self-management competency (evaluated by questionnaire) were collected at baseline and after treatment for 3 months. Results: Compared with control group, 6 minutes walk distance was longer in rehabilitation group((60.2±6.8) meters vs. (24.9±10.5)meters, P<0.01). The difference values between after and before intervention of life quality scores((0.14±3.90)scores vs.(-7.44±5.85)scores, P>0.05), anxiety scores((-0.16±2.12 ) scores vs.(0.70±1.13)scores, P>0.05) and depression scores((-1.17±2.79) scores vs.(0.60±0.36)scores, P>0.05) were similar between the 2 groups. The amplification of patients with regular exercise (50.26% vs. 0, P<0.05), limit sugary foods usually and always (53.22% vs. 3.98%, P<0.05), eat 200-400 g fruits usually and always (78.61 % vs. 0, P<0.05), eat 300-500 g vegetables usually and always (9.74% vs. 0, P<0.05), and answering very confident to questions such as let the physicians know about your diseases (40.17% vs. 5.00%, P<0.05), know how to take medicines (44.52% vs. 5.00%, P<0.05), know how much exercise was right for yourself (26

  9. Nicotine Gum and Self-Help Behavioral Treatment for Smoking Relapse Prevention: Results from a Trial Using Population-Based Recruitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortmann, Stephen P.; Killen, Joel D.

    1995-01-01

    Smokers were randomized using a factorial design to compare nicotine gum use to no gum use, and self-help materials to no materials. Compared with the no-gum group, relapse occurred at a significantly lower rate in the gum group for the entire 12 months of follow-up. There was no significant main effect for the self-help materials and no…

  10. A qualitative exploration of a family self-help mental health program in El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Samuel V; Flamenco Arvaiza, Nelson A; Rojas Valle, Myrna S

    2016-01-01

    There is a significant gap in our knowledge regarding community-based self-help groups and their benefits for persons living with mental conditions and their family caregivers in low and middle income countries. This study describes a such a program in El Salvador and explores participants' perceptions of program effectiveness and benefits. The Family Education, Support and Empowerment Program is a multi-component program in the capital that is facilitated by nonprofit professionals but carried out primarily by volunteers. A focus group methodology to build evaluation and research capacity in the organization was used. The study consisted of a questionnaire completed by participants individually, followed by two focus group sessions with the same ten people. The study found perceptions of multiple benefits across social, functional, and economic dimensions and a variety of achievements at organizational and national levels. This study identified a family self-help program in El Salvador as a potentially highly beneficial program for its participants. This appears to be the first study to explore benefits across micro, mezzo and macro social levels and to include discussion of more diverse potential benefits such as individual and organizational social capital, leadership, and advocacy. These factors should be explored in future quantitative studies to help determine the relative importance and usefulness of such programs in meeting World Health Organization goals for access to mental health treatment and quality community-based services.

  11. Increases in Tolerance within Naturalistic, Self-Help Recovery Homes

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Brad D.; Jason, Leonard A.; Davidson, Michelle; Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in tolerance toward others (i.e., universality/diversity measure) among 150 participants (93 women, 57 men) discharged from inpatient treatment centers randomly assigned to either a self-help, communal living setting or usual after-care and interviewed every 6 months for a 24 month period was explored. Hierarchical Linear Modeling examined the effect of condition (Therapeutic Communal Living versus Usual Care) and other moderator variables on wave trajectories of tolerance attitudes (i.e., universality/diversity scores). Over time, residents of the communal living recovery model showed significantly greater tolerance trajectories than usual care participants. Results supported the claim that residents of communal living settings unit around super-ordinate goals of overcoming substance abuse problems. Also older compared to younger residents living in a house for 6 or more months experienced the greatest increases in tolerance. Theories regarding these differential increases in tolerance, such as social contact theory and transtheoretical processes of change, are discussed. PMID:19838787

  12. Neurodharma Self-Help: Personalized Science Communication as Brain Management.

    PubMed

    Eklöf, Jenny

    2017-09-01

    Over the past ten to fifteen years, medical interventions, therapeutic approaches and scientific studies involving mindfulness meditation have gained traction in areas such as clinical psychology, psychotherapy, and neuroscience. Simultaneously, mindfulness has had a very strong public appeal. This article examines some of the ways in which the medical and scientific meaning of mindfulness is communicated in public and to the public. In particular, it shows how experts in the field of mindfulness neuroscience seek to communicate to the public at large the imperative of brain fitness for the promotion of health, wellbeing and happiness. The study identifies claims being made in popular outlets that, by and large, bypass traditional mass media, such as self-help books, websites and online videos. By treating this material as a form of personalized science communication, this article contributes to the body of literature that understands science communication as a continuum and the boundary between science and popularized science as the outcome of human negotiations. The study finds that processes of personalization help to build bridges between scientific findings and their supposed application, that they infuse science with subjective meaning, and turn expert communication with the public into a moral vocation.

  13. A small-scale randomized controlled trial of the self-help version of the New Forest Parent Training Programme for children with ADHD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Daley, David; O'Brien, Michelle

    2013-09-01

    The efficacy of a self-help parent training programme for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was evaluated. The New Forest Parenting Programme Self-help (NFPP-SH) is a 6-week written self-help psychological intervention designed to treat childhood ADHD. Forty-three children were randomised to either NFPP-SH intervention or a waiting list control group. Outcomes were child ADHD symptoms measured using questionnaires and direct observation, self-reported parental mental health, parenting competence, and the quality of parent-child interaction. Measures of child symptoms and parental outcomes were assessed before and after the intervention. ADHD symptoms were reduced, and parental competence was increased by self-help intervention. Forty-five percent of intervention children showed clinically significant reductions in ADHD symptoms. Self-help intervention did not lead to improvements in parental mental health or parent-child interaction. Findings provide support for the efficacy of self-help intervention for a clinical sample of children with ADHD symptoms. Self-help may provide a potentially cost-effective method of increasing access to evidence-based interventions for clinical populations.

  14. Psychodynamic Guided Self-Help for Adult Depression through the Internet: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Robert; Ekbladh, Sigrid; Hebert, Amanda; Lindström, Malin; Möller, Sara; Petitt, Eleanor; Poysti, Stephanie; Larsson, Mattias Holmqvist; Rousseau, Andréas; Carlbring, Per; Cuijpers, Pim; Andersson, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT) is an effective treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD), but not all clients with MDD can receive psychotherapy. Using the Internet to provide psychodynamic treatments is one way of improving access to psychological treatments for MDD. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to investigate the efficacy of an Internet-based psychodynamic guided self-help treatment for MDD. Methods Ninety-two participants who were diagnosed with MDD according to the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview were randomised to treatment or an active control. The treatment consisted of nine treatment modules based on psychodynamic principles with online therapist contact. The active control condition was a structured support intervention and contained psychoeducation and scheduled weekly contacts online. Both interventions lasted for 10 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Results Mixed-effects model analyses of all randomised participants showed that participants receiving Internet-based PDT made large and superior improvements compared with the active control group on the BDI-II (between-group Cohen's d = 1.11). Treatment effects were maintained at a 10-month follow-up. Conclusions Internet-based psychodynamic guided self-help is an efficacious treatment for MDD that has the potential to increase accessibility and availability of PDT for MDD. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01324050 PMID:22741027

  15. Psychodynamic guided self-help for adult depression through the internet: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Robert; Ekbladh, Sigrid; Hebert, Amanda; Lindström, Malin; Möller, Sara; Petitt, Eleanor; Poysti, Stephanie; Larsson, Mattias Holmqvist; Rousseau, Andréas; Carlbring, Per; Cuijpers, Pim; Andersson, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT) is an effective treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD), but not all clients with MDD can receive psychotherapy. Using the Internet to provide psychodynamic treatments is one way of improving access to psychological treatments for MDD. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to investigate the efficacy of an Internet-based psychodynamic guided self-help treatment for MDD. Ninety-two participants who were diagnosed with MDD according to the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview were randomised to treatment or an active control. The treatment consisted of nine treatment modules based on psychodynamic principles with online therapist contact. The active control condition was a structured support intervention and contained psychoeducation and scheduled weekly contacts online. Both interventions lasted for 10 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Mixed-effects model analyses of all randomised participants showed that participants receiving Internet-based PDT made large and superior improvements compared with the active control group on the BDI-II (between-group Cohen's d = 1.11). Treatment effects were maintained at a 10-month follow-up. Internet-based psychodynamic guided self-help is an efficacious treatment for MDD that has the potential to increase accessibility and availability of PDT for MDD. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01324050.

  16. Analyzing Self-Help Forums with Ontology-Based Text Mining: An Exploration in Kidney Space.

    PubMed

    Burckhardt, Philipp; Padman, Rema

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has emerged as a popular source for health-related information. More than eighty percent of American Internet users have searched for health topics online. Millions of patients use self-help online forums to exchange information and support. In parallel, the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases has become a financial burden for the healthcare system demanding new, cost-effective interventions. To provide such interventions, it is necessary to understand patients' preferences of treatment options and to gain insights into their experiences as patients. We introduce a text-processing algorithm based on semantic ontologies to allow for finer-grained analyses of online forums compared to standard methods. We have applied our method in an analysis of two major Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) forums. Our results suggest that the analysis of forums may provide valuable insights on daily issues patients face, their choice of different treatment options and interactions between patients, their relatives and clinicians.

  17. Acceptance and commitment therapy as guided self-help for psychological distress and positive mental health: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fledderus, M; Bohlmeijer, E T; Pieterse, M E; Schreurs, K M G

    2012-03-01

    In order to reduce the high prevalence of depression, early interventions for people at risk of depression are warranted. This study evaluated the effectiveness of an early guided self-help programme based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for reducing depressive symptomatology. Participants with mild to moderate depressive symptomatology were recruited from the general population and randomized to the self-help programme with extensive email support (n=125), the self-help programme with minimal email support (n=125) or to a waiting list control group (n=126). Participants completed measures before and after the intervention to assess depression, anxiety, fatigue, experiential avoidance, positive mental health and mindfulness. Participants in the experimental conditions also completed these measures at a 3-month follow-up. In the experimental conditions significant reductions in depression, anxiety, fatigue, experiential avoidance and improvements in positive mental health and mindfulness were found, compared with the waiting list condition (effect sizes Cohen's d=0.51-1.00). These effects were sustained at the 3-month follow-up. There were no significant differences between the experimental conditions on the outcome measures. The ACT-based self-help programme with minimal email support is effective for people with mild to moderate depressive symptomatology.

  18. Evaluating the (cost-)effectiveness of guided and unguided Internet-based self-help for problematic alcohol use in employees--a three arm randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Boß, Leif; Lehr, Dirk; Berking, Matthias; Riper, Heleen; Schaub, Michael Patrick; Ebert, David Daniel

    2015-10-12

    Problematic alcohol consumption is associated with a high disease burden for affected individuals and has a detrimental impact on companies and society due to direct and indirect health costs. This protocol describes a study design to evaluate the (cost)-effectiveness of a guided and unguided Internet-based self-help intervention for employees called "GET.ON Clever weniger trinken" (be smart - drink less) compared to a waiting list control group. In a three-arm randomized controlled trial, 528 German adults who are currently members of the workforce will be recruited by occupational health departments of major health insurance companies. Employees aged 18 and older displaying problematic drinking patterns (>21/14 drinks per week and an AUDIT score > 8/6 for men/women) will be randomly assigned to one of three following study conditions: 1. unguided web-based self-help for problematic drinking, 2. adherence-focused guided self-help, and 3. waiting list control. Self-report data will be collected at baseline (T1), 6 weeks (T2), and 6 months (T3) after randomization. The primary outcome will be the reduction of alcohol standard units during the 7 days prior to T2, using the Timeline Followback method. Cost-effectiveness analyses to determine direct and indirect costs will be conducted from the perspectives of employers and the society. Data will be analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis and per protocol. There is a need to identify effective low-threshold solutions to improve ill-health and reduce the negative economic consequences due to problematic alcohol drinking in workforces. If the proposed web-based intervention proves both to be efficacious and cost-effective, it may be a useful tool to increase utilization rates of interventions for problematic drinking in occupational settings. German Register of Clinical Studies (DRKS): DRKS00006105 , date of registration: 2014-07-07.

  19. Motivational concordance: an important mechanism in self-help therapeutic rituals involving inert (placebo) substances.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Michael E; Whalley, Ben

    2008-11-01

    We tested the contribution of two mechanisms, response expectancy and motivational concordance, to reported psychological benefit from a popular, biologically inactive, self-help, complementary therapy (a placebo). Flower essences were taken by 251 people for self-selected symptoms and were randomized to receive three different kinds of information. When the flower essence was presented as a spiritual therapy, then baseline spirituality (beta=.35, P=.01) and expectancy (beta=.25, P=.03) independently predicted outcome. When flower essences were presented as an affirmation (i.e., nonspiritual) therapy, then spirituality negatively (beta=-.27, P=.03) and expectancy (beta=.33, P=.01) predicted outcome. For both groups, expectancy predicted outcome after controlling for spirituality and compliance, but did not after controlling for ease of task completion. Expectancy failed to predict outcome in the nonenhanced ritual group. The results suggest that motivational concordance is an important therapeutic mechanism for real-life placebos.

  20. A space for suffering? Communicating breast cancer in an online self-help context.

    PubMed

    Sandaunet, Anne-Grete

    2008-12-01

    In this article, I explore the communication in an online self-help group for Norwegian women with breast cancer, aiming to add further knowledge to the question of whether the online context functions as a "liberating realm" for alternative discourses about illness. My analysis is conducted within an action-oriented framework and is based on participant observation of the online communication and qualitative interviews of women who participated in the group. Based on the analysis, I argue that proposals of a replication of dominating offline discourses in online communication are affirmed. More precisely, I argue that a "socially desirable" story about the cancer "hero" was further circulated in this online context, and that experiences of resignation and meaninglessness were not woven into the communication. Offering some reflections on this process, I suggest that it has active and voluntary aspects that need attention in further research.

  1. Self-help treatment for insomnia: bibliotherapy with and without professional guidance.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, V; Morin, C M

    1999-08-01

    Fifty-four adults with primary insomnia were randomly assigned to a self-help treatment (cognitive-behavioral bibliotherapy [BT]), BT with weekly phone consultations, or a waiting-list control (WL) group. Treated participants were mailed 6 treatment booklets at the rate of 1 booklet per week; 1/2 of them also received minimal professional guidance through a 15-min weekly phone consultation. The WL group members continued to monitor their sleep during this period. Participants in both treatment conditions improved significantly on the main outcome variables (total wake time and sleep efficiency) at posttreatment, whereas WL participants remained unchanged. The addition of weekly phone calls slightly enhanced improvements at posttreatment. However, both treatment conditions were comparable at follow-up. These results suggest that BT, with or without minimal professional guidance, is an effective approach for treating primary insomnia.

  2. Efficacy of a self-help manual in increasing resilience in carers of adults with depression in Thailand.

    PubMed

    McCann, Terence V; Songprakun, Wallapa; Stephenson, John

    2016-02-01

    Caring for a person with a mental illness can have adverse effects on caregivers; however, little is known about how best to help such caregivers. The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of a cognitive behaviour therapy-guided self-help manual in increasing resilience in caregivers of individuals with depression, in comparison to caregivers who receive routine support only. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted, following CONSORT guidelines, with 54 caregivers allocated to parallel intervention (self-help manual) (n = 27) or control (standard support) (n = 27) groups. Resilience was assessed at baseline, post-test (week 8), and follow up (week 12). Intention-to-treat analyses were undertaken. Repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a significant difference in resilience scores between the three time points, showing a large effect. Pairwise comparisons between intervention and control groups indicated resilience to be significantly different between baseline and post-test, and between baseline and follow up, but not between post-test and follow up. Overall, the intervention group showed a slightly greater increase in resilience over time than the control group; however, the time-group interaction was not significant. Guided self-help is helpful in improving caregivers' resilience and could be used as an adjunct to the limited support provided to carers by mental health nurses and other clinicians.

  3. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement A Exhibit A to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. A Exhibit A to Subpart I of Part 1944—Self-Help Technical...

  4. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement A Exhibit A to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. A Exhibit A to Subpart I of Part 1944—Self-Help Technical...

  5. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement A Exhibit A to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. A Exhibit A to Subpart I of Part 1944—Self-Help Technical...

  6. 76 FR 80377 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Self-Help Homeownership...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP... from Ms. Pollard. Title of Proposal: Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP). OMB Approval...-2995, HUD-9601, HUD-96011. Description of the Information Collection and Its Proposed Use: The...

  7. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment... Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part 1944—Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement This grant predevelopment agreement dated, _________ 19...

  8. With or without a Therapist: Self-Help Reading for Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To address a critical gap in health education scholarship by exploring the contexts in which self-help reading takes place, the motivations of self-help readers and the processes through which such readers engage with books on mental health. Design: Structured, in-depth interviews conducted with participants recruited through online…

  9. Solution-Focused Self-Help for Improving University Students' Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakrosnis, Rytis; Cepukiene, Viktorija

    2015-01-01

    Along with positive developments in psychology, the self-help movement is becoming widespread, based on the belief that people are capable of growing and achieving positive change with only minimal help. This article addresses the potential of a solution-focused self-help tool to improve university students' well-being by comparing its outcome to…

  10. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part...

  11. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part...

  12. With or without a Therapist: Self-Help Reading for Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To address a critical gap in health education scholarship by exploring the contexts in which self-help reading takes place, the motivations of self-help readers and the processes through which such readers engage with books on mental health. Design: Structured, in-depth interviews conducted with participants recruited through online…

  13. Self-Help Conferences for People Who Stutter: A Qualitative Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trichon, Mitchell; Tetnowski, John

    2011-01-01

    Self-help activities for people who stutter (PWS) have been gaining in popularity; however, there is a scarcity of evidence to support their utility in stuttering management. The purpose of this investigation was to understand the lived experience of individuals who attended a self-help conference(s) for PWS from the perspective of a PWS to learn…

  14. Solution-Focused Self-Help for Improving University Students' Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakrosnis, Rytis; Cepukiene, Viktorija

    2015-01-01

    Along with positive developments in psychology, the self-help movement is becoming widespread, based on the belief that people are capable of growing and achieving positive change with only minimal help. This article addresses the potential of a solution-focused self-help tool to improve university students' well-being by comparing its outcome to…

  15. Self-Help Conferences for People Who Stutter: A Qualitative Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trichon, Mitchell; Tetnowski, John

    2011-01-01

    Self-help activities for people who stutter (PWS) have been gaining in popularity; however, there is a scarcity of evidence to support their utility in stuttering management. The purpose of this investigation was to understand the lived experience of individuals who attended a self-help conference(s) for PWS from the perspective of a PWS to learn…

  16. Effects of a Smokers' Hotline: Results of a 10-County Self-Help Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ossip-Klein, Deborah J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Evaluated effect of smokers' hotline as adjunct to self-help manuals. Subjects (n=1,813), assigned to manual only or manual plus hotline condition, were followed over 18 months. Results showed consistent, significant hotline effect across outcome measures and follow-up periods. Findings suggest effectiveness of hotline in enhancing self-help quit…

  17. Preliminary evaluation of a “formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help (fCBT-GSH)” for crisis and transitional case management clients

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Farooq; Johal, Rupinder K; Mckenna, Claire; Calancie, Olivia; Munshi, Tariq; Hassan, Tariq; Nasar, Amina; Ayub, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Background Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is found to be effective for common mental disorders and has been delivered in self-help and guided self-help formats. Crisis and transitional case management (TCM) services play a vital role in managing clients in acute mental health crises. It is, therefore, an appropriate setting to try CBT in guided self-help format. Methods This was a preliminary evaluation of a formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help. Thirty-six (36) consenting participants with a diagnosis of nonpsychotic illness, attending crisis and the TCM services in Kingston, Canada, were recruited in this study. They were randomly assigned to the guided self-help plus treatment as usual (TAU) (treatment group) or to TAU alone (control group). The intervention was delivered over 8–12 weeks. Assessments were completed at baseline and 3 months after baseline. The primary outcome was a reduction in general psychopathology, and this was done using Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure. The secondary outcomes included a reduction in depression, measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and reduction in disability, measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. Findings Participants in the treatment group showed statistically significant improvement in overall psychopathology (P<0.005), anxiety and depression (P<0.005), and disability (P<0.005) at the end of the trial compared with TAU group. Conclusion A formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help was feasible for the crisis and TCM clients and can be effective in improving mental health, when compared with TAU. This is the first report of a trial of guided self-help for clients attending crisis and TCM services. PMID:28331328

  18. Preliminary evaluation of a "formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help (fCBT-GSH)" for crisis and transitional case management clients.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Farooq; Johal, Rupinder K; Mckenna, Claire; Calancie, Olivia; Munshi, Tariq; Hassan, Tariq; Nasar, Amina; Ayub, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is found to be effective for common mental disorders and has been delivered in self-help and guided self-help formats. Crisis and transitional case management (TCM) services play a vital role in managing clients in acute mental health crises. It is, therefore, an appropriate setting to try CBT in guided self-help format. This was a preliminary evaluation of a formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help. Thirty-six (36) consenting participants with a diagnosis of nonpsychotic illness, attending crisis and the TCM services in Kingston, Canada, were recruited in this study. They were randomly assigned to the guided self-help plus treatment as usual (TAU) (treatment group) or to TAU alone (control group). The intervention was delivered over 8-12 weeks. Assessments were completed at baseline and 3 months after baseline. The primary outcome was a reduction in general psychopathology, and this was done using Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure. The secondary outcomes included a reduction in depression, measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and reduction in disability, measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. Participants in the treatment group showed statistically significant improvement in overall psychopathology (P<0.005), anxiety and depression (P<0.005), and disability (P<0.005) at the end of the trial compared with TAU group. A formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help was feasible for the crisis and TCM clients and can be effective in improving mental health, when compared with TAU. This is the first report of a trial of guided self-help for clients attending crisis and TCM services.

  19. A randomized clinical trial of self-help intervention for smoking cessation: research design, interventions, and baseline data.

    PubMed

    Unrod, Marina; Simmons, Vani N; Sutton, Steven K; Meltzer, Lauren R; Harrell, Paul T; Meade, Cathy D; Craig, Benjamin M; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Brandon, Thomas H

    2014-07-01

    Tobacco smoking is the leading preventable cause of mortality and morbidity. Although behavioral counseling combined with pharmacotherapy is the most effective approach to aiding smoking cessation, intensive treatments are rarely chosen by smokers, citing inconvenience. In contrast, minimal self-help interventions have the potential for greater reach, with demonstrated efficacy for relapse prevention, but not for smoking cessation. This paper summarizes the design and methods used for a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a minimal self-help smoking cessation intervention that consists of a set of booklets delivered across time. Baseline participant recruitment data are also presented. Daily smokers were recruited nationally via multimedia advertisements and randomized to one of three conditions. The Usual Care (UC) group received a standard smoking-cessation booklet. The Standard Repeated Mailings (SRM) group received 8 booklets mailed over a 12-month period. The Intensive Repeated Mailings (IRM) group received 10 booklets and additional supplemental materials mailed monthly over 18months. A total of 2641 smokers were screened, 2349 were randomized, and 1874 provided data for analyses. Primary outcomes will be self-reported abstinence at 6-month intervals up to 30months. If the self-help booklets are efficacious, this minimal, low cost intervention can be widely disseminated and, hence, has the potential for significant public health impact with respect to reduction in smoking-related illness and mortality.

  20. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Self-Help Intervention for Smoking Cessation: Research Design, Interventions, and Baseline Data

    PubMed Central

    Unrod, Marina; Simmons, Vani N.; Sutton, Steven K.; Meltzer, Lauren R.; Harrell, Paul T.; Meade, Cathy D.; Craig, Benjamin M.; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Brandon, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is the leading preventable cause of mortality and morbidity. Although behavioral counseling combined with pharmacotherapy is the most effective approach to aiding smoking cessation, intensive treatments are rarely chosen by smokers, citing inconvenience. In contrast, minimal self-help interventions have the potential for greater reach, with demonstrated efficacy for relapse prevention, but not for smoking cessation. This paper summarizes the design and methods used for a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a minimal self-help smoking cessation intervention that consists of a set of booklets delivered across time. Baseline participant recruitment data are also presented. Daily smokers were recruited nationally via multimedia advertisements and randomized to one of three conditions. The Usual Care (UC) group received a standard smoking-cessation booklet. The Standard Repeated Mailings (SRM) group received 8 booklets mailed over a 12-month period. The Intensive Repeated Mailings (IRM) group received 10 booklets and additional supplemental materials mailed monthly over 18 months. A total of 2641 smokers were screened, 2349 were randomized, and 1874 provided data for analyses. Primary outcomes will be self-reported abstinence at 6-month intervals up to 30 months. If the self-help booklets are efficacious, this minimal, low cost intervention can be widely disseminated and, hence, has the potential for significant public health impact with respect to reduction in smoking-related illness and mortality. PMID:24865525

  1. Self-help guidebook improved quality of life for patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Stefanie; Bobardt, Johanna; Bungartz-Catak, Jessica; Atmann, Oxana; Haller, Bernhard; Kennedy, Anne; Enck, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Background The primary aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of a comprehensive self-help guidebook on the disease related quality of life for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The secondary aim was to evaluate whether the guidebook is less effective in IBS patients with depression, somatization disorder or panic disorder as a psychiatric comorbidity. Methods Prospective observational study. At baseline (t1), patients filled in the ´Functional Digestive Disorders Quality of Life´ (FDDQL) questionnaire and received the IBS guidebook together with an explanation of its content and use. Depression, anxiety and somatization were evaluated with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Three (t2) and six months (t3) later, the questionnaire was sent by mail to the patients for follow-up evaluation. Data were analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA. Results 71 patients participated (74.6% female). 53 (74.6%) completed the final assessment at t3 after 6 months. The global FDDQL score increased from 49.3 (SD 12.7) at t1 to 64.3 (SD 16.0) at t3 (p < 0.001). There was a significant between-subjects effect on the global FDDQL score related to depression (p = 0.001), anxiety (p = 0.001) and somatization (p = 0.011). Thus, the quality of life of patients with psychosomatic comorbidity was lower at baseline, but showed a similar increase within the following six months. Conclusion The self-help guidebook significantly improved measured quality of life for IBS patients. The use of screening questionnaires like PHQ might be valuable to identify patients with more complex problems. This might be helpful for them to intensify and adapt therapy. Further research has to evaluate if patients with psychological comorbidity are treated more effectively when they receive psychotherapy or specific medication in addition to the self-management guidebook. PMID:28742808

  2. Acceptability and Cultural Appropriateness of Self-Help Booklets for Smoking Cessation in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Menzie, Nicole S.; Simmons, Vani N.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Diaz, Diana B.; Piñeiro, Barbara; Jimenez, Julio; Castro, Eida; Brandon, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with a range of cancers and is related to five of seven leading causes of death in Puerto Rico. Minimal self-help interventions have shown promising results in reaching participants and preventing relapse from smoking. Specifically, a collection of 8 self-help booklets has demonstrated efficacy (Brandon et al., 2000; 2004). Those booklets have been transcreated into Spanish, with efforts to make them culturally appropriate across a range of Hispanic cultures. We conducted a pilot study in Ponce, Puerto Rico, to evaluate the Spanish version of our smoking relapse-prevention booklets. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 current and former smokers. Interviews were conducted to elicit feedback regarding the booklet’s content, cultural appropriateness, dissemination, and perceived availability of smoking cessation resources in Puerto Rico. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded using content analysis, with a priori codes based on the interview guide. Emergent themes were examined. Overall, participants liked the booklets’ content, perceived them to be culturally appropriate, easy to read and understand. Regarding dissemination, it was recommended that the booklets be disseminated by physicians and advertised through television. Most importantly, participants reported the best way to distribute and complement the booklets would be through support groups. Participants also reported having limited knowledge about resources provided in the community to aid smoking cessation. Overall, this pilot study was able to show the cultural acceptability of the booklets and highlights the need for the dissemination of these materials among current and former smokers in Puerto Rico. PMID:25219544

  3. Acceptability and Cultural Appropriateness of Self-Help Booklets for Relapse Prevention in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Menzie, Nicole S; Simmons, Vani N; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Diaz, Diana B; Piñeiro, Barbara; Jimenez, Julio; Castro, Eida; Brandon, Thomas H

    2015-09-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with a range of cancers and is related to five of seven leading causes of death in Puerto Rico. Minimal self-help interventions have shown promising results in reaching participants and preventing relapse from smoking. Specifically, a collection of eight self-help booklets has demonstrated efficacy (Brandon et al., 2000; 2004). Those booklets have been transcreated into Spanish, with efforts to make them culturally appropriate across a range of Hispanic cultures. We conducted a pilot study in Ponce, Puerto Rico, to evaluate the Spanish version of our smoking relapse-prevention booklets. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 current and former smokers. Interviews were conducted to elicit feedback regarding the booklet's content, cultural appropriateness, dissemination, and perceived availability of smoking cessation resources in Puerto Rico. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded using content analysis, with a priori codes based on the interview guide. Emergent themes were examined. Overall, participants liked the booklets' content, perceived them to be culturally appropriate, easy to read and understand. Regarding dissemination, it was recommended that the booklets be disseminated by physicians and advertised through television. Most importantly, participants reported the best way to distribute and complement the booklets would be through support groups. Participants also reported having limited knowledge about resources provided in the community to aid smoking cessation. Overall, this pilot study was able to show the cultural acceptability of the booklets and highlights the need for the dissemination of these materials among current and former smokers in Puerto Rico.

  4. Primary care in the village. An approach to village self-help health programmes.

    PubMed

    Suyadi, A; Sadjimin, T; Rohde, J E

    1977-07-01

    The health clinic run in Kalirandu, Indonesia, by Foster Parents Plan, a private philanthropic welfare organization is described. In 1974 the Plan was serving 3000 families through 4 clinics, providing general curative services, pre- and postnatal services, family planning, dental care, and referral to the local urban hospital where needed. Each clinic treated about 100 patients per day at a cost of $1 per client family per month. However, few inocculations were given and few preventive health checks were requested. When the number of Plan families grew to 9500 while the population of the served communities grew to 400,000 with no increase in clinic budget, a different approach was tried. Instead of serving only the families helped direactly by the Plan, a total community service was developed. Plan personnel began to encourage use of the government health clinics. A rural health insurance system was developed which entitles the families to preventive health services. Plan medical staff and the local health center trained volunteers from Kalirandu in the use of a few simple medicines. The volunteers were selected by the village headmen and generally have elementary school education and a position of responsibility. This health "kader" works without payment and has 10-15 families living near him for whom he is responsible. At the time of writing there were over 500 kaders trained. Inservice courses are conducted to keep them up-to-date. An acceptors club was formed to motivate use of family planning. Seeking a more active role in village life, the acceptors club then took on child nutrition as a project, weighing children and reminding mothers of inoculations. The self-help momentum is spreading to housing and better farming practices, which is providing more vegetable gardens and better sources of Vitamin A. It is emphasized that this type of group responsibility cannot be imposed from outside. It is community leaders within that provide the motivation for self-help

  5. One-year follow-up of guided self-help for parents of preschool children with externalizing behavior.

    PubMed

    Ise, Elena; Kierfeld, Frauke; Döpfner, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    Self-help programs are an effective intervention for parents of children with externalizing behavior. A number of studies have shown that self-administered parent training has positive short-term effects on a child's behavior, but there is little research done on long-term outcomes. This paper reports results from a 1-year follow-up of a randomized controlled prevention trial of self-administered parent training with minimal therapist contact. In the initial prevention trial, we randomly assigned 48 preschool children with elevated levels of externalizing behavior to either a treatment group (TG) or a waitlist control group (WLC). The intervention consisted of written material and brief weekly telephone consultations. Thirty-six families (25 TG families, 11 WLC families) completed the self-help program. Twenty-five of these participated in a follow-up assessment 1 year after the intervention. There were no significant changes from post-test to follow-up on measures of child behavior (e.g., Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder symptom rating scales) and parental mental health, indicating that gains achieved post-intervention were maintained for at least 1 year. Moreover, the percentage of children with substantial behavior problems was reduced from pre-intervention to follow-up. These findings provide evidence that telephone-assisted self-help programs can be effective in the prevention of disruptive behavior problems.

  6. Awareness, Access and Use of Internet Self-Help Websites for Depression by University Students

    PubMed Central

    Kowalenko, Nick; Tennant, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background University students have a higher prevalence rate of depression than the average 18 to 24 year old. Internet self-help has been demonstrated to be effective in decreasing self-rated measures of depression in this population, so it is important to explore the awareness, access and use of such self-help resources in this population. Objective The objective of this study is to explore university students’ awareness, access and use of Internet self-help websites for depression and related problems. Methods A total of 2691 university students were surveyed at 3 time points. Results When asked about browsing behavior, 69.6% (1494/2146) of students reported using the Internet for entertainment. Most students were not familiar with self-help websites for emotional health, although this awareness increased as they completed further assessments. Most students considered user-friendliness, content and interactivity as very important in the design of a self-help website. After being exposed to a self-help website, more students reported visiting websites for emotional health than those who had not been exposed. Conclusions More students reported visiting self-help websites after becoming aware of such resources. Increased awareness of depression and related treatment resources may increase use of such resources. It is important to increase public awareness with the aim of increasing access to targeted strategies for young people. PMID:27789425

  7. Computer-based self-help therapy: A qualitative analysis of attrition.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Eric DA; Merrel, Jeremy; Clayton, Ashley; Morris, Christa; Rowe, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The impact of computer-based cognitive-behavioral self-help therapy programs is limited by high attrition. This study explored reactions to computer-based cognitive-behavioral self-help therapy use among individuals not completing a full treatment course. Individuals receiving outpatient substance use disorder treatment at a Veterans Health Administration clinic who enrolled in a study implementing a computer-based cognitive-behavioral self-help therapy for insomnia, but subsequently dropped out prior to completion, were interviewed. Reactions to use and reasons for attrition were explored through thematic analysis of interviews. Among barriers to use, themes of competing demands, personal attributes, the computer-based format of computer-based cognitive-behavioral self-help therapies, and negative experiences with the specific program used were identified. Among facilitators of use, themes of personal support, the computer-based cognitive-behavioral self-help therapy format, and personal attributes were identified. Recommendations for future implementation efforts to include additional person-to-person contact during computer-based cognitive-behavioral self-help therapy participation were made. These themes may be employed to develop strategies for computer-based cognitive-behavioral self-help therapy implementation in order to maximize program engagement and completion.

  8. Awareness, Access and Use of Internet Self-Help Websites for Depression by University Students.

    PubMed

    Culjak, Gordana; Kowalenko, Nick; Tennant, Christopher

    2016-10-27

    University students have a higher prevalence rate of depression than the average 18 to 24 year old. Internet self-help has been demonstrated to be effective in decreasing self-rated measures of depression in this population, so it is important to explore the awareness, access and use of such self-help resources in this population. The objective of this study is to explore university students' awareness, access and use of Internet self-help websites for depression and related problems. A total of 2691 university students were surveyed at 3 time points. When asked about browsing behavior, 69.6% (1494/2146) of students reported using the Internet for entertainment. Most students were not familiar with self-help websites for emotional health, although this awareness increased as they completed further assessments. Most students considered user-friendliness, content and interactivity as very important in the design of a self-help website. After being exposed to a self-help website, more students reported visiting websites for emotional health than those who had not been exposed. More students reported visiting self-help websites after becoming aware of such resources. Increased awareness of depression and related treatment resources may increase use of such resources. It is important to increase public awareness with the aim of increasing access to targeted strategies for young people.

  9. Taking care of business: self-help and sleep medicine in american corporate culture.

    PubMed

    Brown, Megan

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that corporate management in the United States has expanded its scope beyond office walls and encompasses many aspects of workers' daily lives. One new element of corporate training is the micromanagement of sleep; self-help books, newspaper reports, magazine articles, and consulting firms currently advise workers and supervisors on optimizing productivity by cultivating certain sleep habits. Although consultants and self-help books make specific recommendations about sleep, most medical research is inconclusive about sleep's benefits for human performance. Using the ideas of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze as a philosophical backdrop, this article examines the complex and often contradictory links between self-help, medicine, and corporate governance.

  10. Behavioral Consultation to Community Self-Help Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jason, Leonard A.

    A high priority area for behavioral community psychologists involves working to strengthen informal support systems within communities. A collaborative effort between a community group and academic based psychologists focusses on a community problem--dog litter in an urban area. An original demonstration project was used to influence the political…

  11. Validation of the Full and Short-Form Self-Help Involvement Scale Against the Rasch Measurement Model

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Karen M.; Conrad, Kendon J.; Passetti, Lora L.; Funk, Rodney R.; Dennis, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Substance use disorders (SUDs) are one of the nation’s most costly problems in terms of dollars, disability, and death. Self-help programs are among the varied recovery support options available to address SUD, and evaluation of these programs depends on good measurement. There exists an unmet need for a psychometrically sound, brief, efficient measure of self-help involvement for individuals with SUD that is valid across different substances and age-groups. Methods Using data from 2,101 persons presenting for SUD treatment, the full 21-item Global Appraisal of Individual Needs Self-Help Involvement Scale (SHIS) and a newly developed 11-item short-form version were validated against the Rasch measurement model and each other. Differential item functioning (DIF) was assessed by primary substance and age. Results Both versions met Rasch psychometric criteria. The full scale had minor misfit with no DIF for alcohol, marijuana, or opioids but a few instances of DIF for amphetamine and cocaine users as well as for age, in that youth tended to endorse several easier items more frequently than did adults. The 11-item short form had neither misfit nor DIF by substance and only minor DIF by age was highly correlated with the full version and was relatively more efficient. Criterion-related validity was supported for both. Conclusions Both the long and short versions of SHIS are psychometrically sound measures of a more comprehensive conceptualization of self-help involvement for SUDs that can be used as part of an in-depth assessment or as a short measure that lessens respondent burden. PMID:26275980

  12. Upper secondary school students' compliance with two Internet-based self-help programmes: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Antonson, Carl; Thorsén, Frida; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2017-08-03

    Psychiatric symptoms and stress are on the increase among Swedish adolescents. We aimed to study the potential effect and feasibility of two Internet-based self-help programmes, one mindfulness based (iMBI) and the other music based in a randomised controlled trial that targeted adolescents. A total of 283 upper secondary school students in two Swedish schools were randomised to either a waiting list or one of the two programmes, on their own incentive, on schooltime. General psychiatric health (Symptoms Checklist 90), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale) were assessed before and after the interventions. In total, 202 participants answered the questionnaires. Less than 20 logged into each intervention and only 1 performed a full intervention (iMBI). No significant differences in any of the scales were found between those who logged in and those who did not. The potential effect of Internet-based self-help programmes was not possible to examine due to low compliance rates. Adolescents seem to have a very low compliance with Internet-based self-help programmes if left to their own incentive. There were no associations between the psychiatric and stress-related symptoms at baseline and compliance in any of the intervention groups, and no evidence for differences in compliance in relation to the type of programme. Additional studies are needed to examine how compliance rates can be increased in Internet-based self-help mindfulness programmes in adolescents, as the potentially positive effects of mindfulness are partly related to compliance rates.

  13. Validation of the Full and Short-Form Self-Help Involvement Scale Against the Rasch Measurement Model.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Karen M; Conrad, Kendon J; Passetti, Lora L; Funk, Rodney R; Dennis, Michael L

    2015-08-01

    Substance use disorders (SUDs) are one of the nation's most costly problems in terms of dollars, disability, and death. Self-help programs are among the varied recovery support options available to address SUD, and evaluation of these programs depends on good measurement. There exists an unmet need for a psychometrically sound, brief, efficient measure of self-help involvement for individuals with SUD that is valid across different substances and age-groups. Using data from 2,101 persons presenting for SUD treatment, the full 21-item Global Appraisal of Individual Needs Self-Help Involvement Scale (SHIS) and a newly developed 11-item short-form version were validated against the Rasch measurement model and each other. Differential item functioning (DIF) was assessed by primary substance and age. Both versions met Rasch psychometric criteria. The full scale had minor misfit with no DIF for alcohol, marijuana, or opioids but a few instances of DIF for amphetamine and cocaine users as well as for age, in that youth tended to endorse several easier items more frequently than did adults. The 11-item short form had neither misfit nor DIF by substance and only minor DIF by age was highly correlated with the full version and was relatively more efficient. Criterion-related validity was supported for both. Both the long and short versions of SHIS are psychometrically sound measures of a more comprehensive conceptualization of self-help involvement for SUDs that can be used as part of an in-depth assessment or as a short measure that lessens respondent burden. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. A randomized trial of a tailored, self-help dietary intervention: the Puget Sound Eating Patterns study.

    PubMed

    Kristal, A R; Curry, S J; Shattuck, A L; Feng, Z; Li, S

    2000-10-01

    This study evaluated a tailored, multiple-component self-help intervention designed to promote lower fat and higher fruit and vegetable consumption. Participants were 1,459 adults selected at random, stratified by sex and age (18-34, 35-54, 55-69), from enrollees of a large health maintenance organization. After completing a baseline telephone survey, participants were randomized to receive the intervention (consisting of a computer-generated personalized letter, a motivational phone call, a self-help manual, a package of supplementary materials, computer-generated behavioral feedback based on a self-administered food frequency questionnaire, and newsletters) or to receive no materials. Evaluation was based on 1,205 (86.5%) participants who completed both a 3- and a 12-month follow up survey. The intervention effect +/- SE for fat, based on a diet habits questionnaire, was -0.10 +/- 0.02 (P < 0.001), corresponding to a reduction of approximately 0.8 percentage points of percentage energy from fat. For fruits and vegetables, the intervention effect was 0.47 +/- 0.10 servings/day (P < 0.001). Intervention effects were similar across age and sex groups. Tailored, self-help interventions can effectively promote dietary change among both men and women and among younger as well as older adults. Copyright 2000 American Health Foundation and Academic Press.

  15. Self-Help for Weight Loss in Overweight and Obese Adults: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jebb, Susan A.; Fletcher, Ben R.; Aveyard, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis investigating the components and effectiveness of self-help weight-loss interventions and their applicability to less-advantaged populations. We searched (November 2013) for randomized controlled trials comparing self-help interventions with each other or with minimal controls in overweight and obese adults, with 6 months or longer follow-up. We calculated mean difference between intervention and control for 6- and 12-month weight change. Twenty-three studies met the inclusion criteria (9632 participants; 39 intervention arms). Intervention participants lost significantly more weight than controls at 6 months (mean difference −1.85 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI] = −2.86, −0.83; 7 studies). No significant effect was detected at 12 months but results were sensitive to the inclusion of 1 study at high risk of bias. Interactive programs appeared more effective than standard ones at 6 months (mean difference −0.94 kg; 95% CI = −1.50, −0.38). Evidence is insufficient to reach conclusions on effectiveness in socioeconomically disadvantaged people, but suggests self-help interventions may be less effective in this group. PMID:25602873

  16. Complaint-Directed Mini-Interventions for Depressive Complaints: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Unguided Web-Based Self-Help Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sommers-Spijkerman, Marion; van der Poel, Agnes; Smit, Filip; Boon, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Background Prevention of depression is important due to the substantial burden of disease associated with it. To this end, we developed a novel, brief, and low-threshold Web-based self-help approach for depressive complaints called complaint-directed mini-interventions (CDMIs). These CDMIs focus on highly prevalent complaints that are demonstrably associated with depression and have a substantial economic impact: stress, sleep problems, and worry. Objective The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Web-based self-help CDMIs in a sample of adults with mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms compared to a wait-list control group. Methods A two-armed randomized controlled trial was conducted. An open recruitment strategy was used. Participants were randomized to either the Web-based CDMIs or the no-intervention wait-list control group. The CDMIs are online, unguided, self-help interventions, largely based on cognitive behavioral techniques, which consist of 3 to 4 modules with up to 6 exercises per module. Participants are free to choose between the modules and exercises. Assessments, using self-report questionnaires, took place at baseline and at 3 and 6 months after baseline. The control group was given access to the intervention following the 3-month assessment. The primary goal of the CDMIs is to reduce depressive complaints. The primary outcome of the study was a reduction in depressive complaints as measured by the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (IDS-SR). Secondary outcomes included reductions in stress, worry, sleep problems, and anxiety complaints, and improvements in well-being. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models. Results In total, 329 participants enrolled in the trial, of which 165 were randomized to the intervention group and 164 to the control group. Approximately three-quarters of the intervention group actually created an account. Of these participants, 91.3% (116/127) logged into their chosen CDMI at least once during

  17. Complaint-Directed Mini-Interventions for Depressive Complaints: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Unguided Web-Based Self-Help Interventions.

    PubMed

    Lokman, Suzanne; Leone, Stephanie S; Sommers-Spijkerman, Marion; van der Poel, Agnes; Smit, Filip; Boon, Brigitte

    2017-01-04

    Prevention of depression is important due to the substantial burden of disease associated with it. To this end, we developed a novel, brief, and low-threshold Web-based self-help approach for depressive complaints called complaint-directed mini-interventions (CDMIs). These CDMIs focus on highly prevalent complaints that are demonstrably associated with depression and have a substantial economic impact: stress, sleep problems, and worry. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Web-based self-help CDMIs in a sample of adults with mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms compared to a wait-list control group. A two-armed randomized controlled trial was conducted. An open recruitment strategy was used. Participants were randomized to either the Web-based CDMIs or the no-intervention wait-list control group. The CDMIs are online, unguided, self-help interventions, largely based on cognitive behavioral techniques, which consist of 3 to 4 modules with up to 6 exercises per module. Participants are free to choose between the modules and exercises. Assessments, using self-report questionnaires, took place at baseline and at 3 and 6 months after baseline. The control group was given access to the intervention following the 3-month assessment. The primary goal of the CDMIs is to reduce depressive complaints. The primary outcome of the study was a reduction in depressive complaints as measured by the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (IDS-SR). Secondary outcomes included reductions in stress, worry, sleep problems, and anxiety complaints, and improvements in well-being. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models. In total, 329 participants enrolled in the trial, of which 165 were randomized to the intervention group and 164 to the control group. Approximately three-quarters of the intervention group actually created an account. Of these participants, 91.3% (116/127) logged into their chosen CDMI at least once during the 3-month intervention period

  18. Online Cognitive-Restructuring Self-Help: www.SelfHelpSocialAnxiety.com a New Application for Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to develop an online self-help treatment program for Social Anxiety Disorder, focused on cognitive restructuring. It can be difficult getting socially anxious individuals to commit to treatment since therapy is typically a face to face social interaction (the feared stimulus). Recent research suggests…

  19. Online Cognitive-Restructuring Self-Help: www.SelfHelpSocialAnxiety.com a New Application for Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to develop an online self-help treatment program for Social Anxiety Disorder, focused on cognitive restructuring. It can be difficult getting socially anxious individuals to commit to treatment since therapy is typically a face to face social interaction (the feared stimulus). Recent research suggests…

  20. Modeling community-based, self-help mental health rehabilitation reform.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Robbie

    2007-01-01

    The research used supported collaborative inquiry in participative action research to record the effectiveness of peer support and narrative therapy, in an indigenous-informed community of belonging, or open urban tribe. There were three objectives: (i) to identify the active attributes of consciousness among those living with intellectual disability and/or mental illness, which can be acknowledged, nurtured and developed to strengthen their balanced self-awareness, and assist them in taking more responsibility for their lives; (ii) to identify how these aspects of self awareness can be used to inform improved individual and group empowerment and improved rehabilitation practice, in communities of inter-subjective relationship and belonging, and; (iii) by exploring collaborative engagement with 'the system' which serves these two groups, to identify how they can more effectively be empowered to manage the planning, policies, programs and service delivery which largely determine their quality of life. The research also seeks to clarify how this person-valuing approach can be applied, in a self-help, peer-supported, community-based rehabilitation system. People living with mental illness and/or intellectual disability experience improved quality of life and self-determining sense of self when they are included in mixed open urban tribes, or communities of belonging. The predominant way this comes about is through the diverse shared metaphors of being which the participants provide for each other, through their energy of life and testimonies of experience which give each other encouragement and stimulation, generating motivation and strengthened intention for life. It is not the cognitive or social ability to perform particular skills in individual or group exchange that determines the impact of this open urban tribal model; it is more the spirit and essence of the people, and their way of exchanging loving interaction and generous caring, listening and feedback that

  1. Internet administered guided self-help versus individualized e-mail therapy: A randomized trial of two versions of CBT for major depression.

    PubMed

    Vernmark, Kristofer; Lenndin, Jan; Bjärehed, Jonas; Carlsson, Mattias; Karlsson, Johan; Oberg, Jörgen; Carlbring, Per; Eriksson, Thomas; Andersson, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    Internet-delivered psychological treatment of major depression has been investigated in several trials, but the role of personalized treatment is less investigated. Studies suggest that guidance is important and that automated computerized programmes without therapist support are less effective. Individualized e-mail therapy for depression has not been studied in a controlled trial. Eighty-eight individuals with major depression were randomized to two different forms of Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), or to a waiting-list control group. One form of Internet treatment consisted of guided self-help, with weekly modules and homework assignments. Standard CBT components were presented and brief support was provided during the treatment. The other group received e-mail therapy, which was tailored and did not use the self-help texts i.e., all e-mails were written for the unique patient. Both treatments lasted for 8 weeks. In the guided self-help 93% completed (27/29) and in the e-mail therapy 96% (29/30) completed the posttreatment assessment. Results showed significant symptom reductions in both treatment groups with moderate to large effect sizes. At posttreatment 34.5% of the guided self-help group and 30% of the e-mail therapy group reached the criteria of high-end-state functioning (Beck Depression Inventory score below 9). At six-month follow-up the corresponding figures were 47.4% and 43.3%. Overall, the difference between guided self-help and e-mail therapy was small, but in favour of the latter. These findings indicate that both guided self-help and individualized e-mail therapy can be effective.

  2. Internet forums: a self-help approach for individuals with schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Haker, H; Lauber, C; Rössler, W

    2005-12-01

    To study if and how online self-help forums for individuals with schizophrenia are used. We analysed 1200 postings of 576 users in 12 international schizophrenia forums regarding communicative skills [fields of interest and self-help mechanisms (SHM)]. The forums were predominantly used by affected individuals, few relatives or friends. The fields of interest of the users concern daily problems of the illness like symptoms and emotional involvement with the illness. Self-help mechanisms mostly used are disclosure and providing information. Emotional interaction e.g. empathy or gratitude were comparatively rare. Individuals suffering from schizophrenia participate in online self-help forums using the same SHM, discussing similar topics as do individuals with other psychiatric disorders as well as not affected relatives and caregivers. Therefore, this tool seems to be a useful approach to cope with alienation and isolation, albeit only a small number of schizophrenia forums are found in the Internet.

  3. Action Planning for Prevention and Recovery: A Self-Help Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... TV show, knit- ting, or reading a good book  exercising  doing a relaxation exercise  writing in your ... suggestions, and by looking into self-help resource books. Write down everything, from really easily accessible things, ...

  4. Family Housing Self-Help Program: Evaluation and Recommendations for Improvements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    analysis of self-help vs . preventive maintenance. The data obtained showed that both occupants and installation personnel favored the - program and that...toward the program, and gives a cost/benefit analysis of self-help vs . preventive maintenance. The data obtained showed that both occupants and...comparisons of the SH Program vs . preventive maintenance (PM). Based on the user responses and the economic analyses, recommendations were made for improving

  5. Successful weight loss with self-help: A stepped-care approach

    PubMed Central

    Wott, Carissa B.; Young, Kathleen M.; Gumble, Amanda; Darby, Lynn A.; Oehlhof, Marissa Wagner; Harper, Jessica; Koball, Afton

    2012-01-01

    In a stepped-care approach to treatment, patients are transitioned to more intensive treatments when less intensive treatments fail to meet treatment goals. Self-help programs are recommended as an initial, low intensity treatment phase in stepped-care models. This investigation examined the effectiveness of a self-help, stepped-care weight loss program. Fifty-eight overweight/obese adults (BMI ≥ 27 kg/m2) participated in a weight loss program. Participants were predominately Caucasian (93.1%) and female (89.7%) with a mean BMI of 36.6 (SD = 7.1). Of those completing the program, 57% of participants (N = 21) who remained in self-help maintained an 8% weight loss at follow-up. Participants who were stepped-up self-monitored fewer days and reported higher daily caloric intake than self-help participants. Once stepped-up, weight loss outcomes were equivalent between individuals who remained in self-help compared to those who were stepped-up. Individuals who were stepped-up benefited from early intensive intervention when unsuccessful at losing weight with self-help. PMID:19521759

  6. A systematic review of self-help for disfigurement: effectiveness, usability, and acceptability.

    PubMed

    Muftin, Zina; Thompson, Andrew R

    2013-09-01

    Self-help has been found to be efficacious in treating mood disorders, however, little is known about its use, effectiveness, or user satisfaction, in reducing distress associated with disfigurement. This review describes the content and focus of self-help interventions available in this area. A systematic search and appraisal protocol facilitated identification of studies, extraction of data, and appraisal of quality. Clinical trials were included if the primary method of intervention delivery was via self-help. Other types of study were included if they investigated user perspectives of a self-help intervention. Eleven studies covering a range of populations met the inclusion criteria. There is tentative support for the use of self-help to manage anxiety associated with disfigurement but little is known about the management of other psychosocial difficulties. Further research and intervention development is required to examine the effectiveness, acceptability, and utility of self-help in managing the appearance related distress associated with disfigurement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Food and survival in Lusaka's self-help townships.

    PubMed

    Ledogar, R J

    1978-01-01

    Zambia, formerly 1 of the more prosperous of developing nations, has fallen on hard times due to political problems of its neighbors and the depressed market price of copper, its main export product and largely the basis for its prosperity. The country is currently (1978) trying to shift its economic base to agriculture -- meaning that surplus crops go to export rather than to the crowded urban areas of Zambia itself (35 to 40% of the population). Zambian squatter settlements, traditionally self-reliant, are the target of a pilot project planned by UNICEF and The American Friends Service Committee, which hopes to encourage this self reliant tradition by expanding the practice of urban agriculture. The project hopes to develop ways to raise the productivity of urban agricultural areas by finding the most suitable crops and creating irrigation so that agriculture can be practised year round. This is the start of a planned "Urban Agriculture and Nutrition Service" to be funded by the above groups, with the Zambian government and, hopefully, other agencies, aimed at providing: 1) Kitchen gardens on residential plots. 2) Cultivation of road reserves, green belts, and other reserved areas throughout the city and on its outskirts. 3) Rainy season cultivation of all idle land in the urban area. 4) Raising of poultry, rabbits and other small livestock on residential and communal plots. 5) Cultivation of small holdings in the urban periphery by low income residents on a cooperative basis. 6) Eventual resettlement of some urban residents on farms in the urban periphery. There will be, in addition, a small-loan fund, 1st for individuals and later for cooperative ventures, and a program to improve technical skills. It is hoped that by 1980, when the pilot project is completed, the service will be self-supporting.

  8. Comparison of face-to-face versus email guided self-help for binge eating: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Paul E; Luck, Amy; Burrows, Alison; Boughton, Nicky

    2014-05-22

    Guided self-help is a recommended first-step treatment for bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and atypical variants of these disorders. Further research is needed to compare guided self-help that is delivered face-to-face versus via email. This clinical trial uses a randomised, controlled design to investigate the effectiveness of providing guided self-help either face-to-face or via e-mail, also using a delayed treatment control condition. At least 17 individuals are required per group, giving a minimum N of 51. Symptom outcomes will be assessed and estimates of cost-effectiveness made. Results are proposed to be disseminated locally and internationally (through submission to conferences and peer-reviewed journals), and will hopefully inform local service provision. The trial has been approved by an ethics review board and was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01832792 on 9 April 2013.

  9. Social Development: Self Help Skills. A Performance-Based Early Childhood-Special Education Teacher Preparation Program. Monograph 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Lynne

    This monograph presents the self-help skills module of the social development curriculum portion of the Early Childhood-Special Education Teacher Preparation Program. Included are: (1) an ontogeny of self-help skills (feeding, dressing, toileting, and grooming) in young children; (2) a brief discussion of the relevance of self-help skills to the…

  10. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  11. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  12. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  13. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  14. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart I of... - Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944—Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants Evaluation for Quarter...

  15. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart I of... - Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944—Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants Evaluation for Quarter...

  16. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart I of... - Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944—Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants Evaluation for Quarter...

  17. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart I of... - Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944—Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants Evaluation for Quarter...

  18. Government interventions to aid choice: Help to self-help or paternalism?

    PubMed

    Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Kjær, Trine

    2015-07-01

    A random sample of Danish respondents was asked in which aspects of every-day life they find it more difficult to adhere to behavioural patterns that they believe are best for them and their family. Individuals report high degrees of lack of self-control in specific areas of everyday life, suggesting that individuals are not consistently exhibiting utility optimising behaviour, a finding that accords with behavioural economics and the expected prevalence of irrational behaviour. We observe greater self-perceived self-control problems amongst individuals from the lower economic strata. Thus, to the extent that self-control relates to environmental factors, there is justification for introducing government interventions targeting such factors to improve equity in health and to increase utility levels amongst those with lower incomes and lower levels of education. Further, the public's preferences for a range of government interventions targeting different facets of life-style were elicited. Individuals who were the target of interventions were less supportive of these interventions. Individuals in the target group whose self-perceived self-control was low tended to be more supportive, but still less so than those who were not targeted. Since support was shown to come mainly from those not targeted by the intervention, and especially from those who feel in control of their lives, our results indicate that the interventions cannot be justified on the grounds of libertarianism (help to self-help).

  19. Self-help interventions for adjustment disorder problems: a randomized waiting-list controlled study in a sample of burglary victims.

    PubMed

    Bachem, Rahel; Maercker, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Adjustment disorders (AjD) are among the most frequent mental disorders yet often remain untreated. The high prevalence, comparatively mild symptom impairment, and transient nature make AjD a promising target for low-threshold self-help interventions. Bibliotherapy represents a potential treatment for AjD problems. This study investigates the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral self-help manual specifically directed at alleviating AjD symptoms in a homogenous sample of burglary victims. Participants with clinical or subclinical AjD symptoms following experience of burglary were randomized to an intervention group (n = 30) or waiting-list control group (n = 24). The new explicit stress response syndrome model for diagnosing AjD was applied. Participants received no therapist support and assessments took place at baseline, after the one-month intervention, and at three-month follow-up. Based on completer analyses, group by time interactions indicated that the intervention group showed more improvement in AjD symptoms of preoccupation and in post-traumatic stress symptoms. Post-intervention between-group effect sizes ranged from Cohen's d = .17 to .67 and the proportion of participants showing reliable change was consistently higher in the intervention group than in the control group. Engagement with the self-help manual was high: 87% of participants had worked through at least half the manual. This is the first published RCT of a bibliotherapeutic self-help intervention for AjD problems. The findings provide evidence that a low-threshold self-help intervention without therapist contact is a feasible and effective treatment for symptoms of AjD.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of Guided Self-help Treatment for Recurrent Binge Eating

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Frances L.; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Dickerson, John F.; Perrin, Nancy; DeBar, Lynn; Wilson, G. Terence; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Adoption of effective treatments for recurrent binge-eating disorders depends on the balance of costs and benefits. Using data from a recent randomized controlled trial, we conducted an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of a cognitive behavioral therapy guided self-help intervention (CBT-GSH) to treat recurrent binge eating compared to treatment as usual (TAU). Method Participants were 123 adult members of an HMO (mean age = 37.2, 91.9% female, 96.7% non-Hispanic White) who met criteria for eating disorders involving binge eating as measured by the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE, Fairburn & Cooper, 1993). Participants were randomized either to treatment as usual (TAU) or TAU plus CBT-GSH. The clinical outcomes were binge-free days and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs); total societal cost was estimated using costs to patients and the health plan, and related costs. Results Compared to the group receiving TAU only, those who received TAU + CBT-GSH experienced 25.2 more binge-free days and had lower total societal costs of $427 over 12 months following the intervention (incremental CEA ratio -$20.23 per binge-free day or −$26,847 per QALY). Lower costs in the TAU + CBT-GSH group were due to reduced use of TAU services in that group, resulting in lower net costs for the TAU + CBT group despite the additional cost of CBT-GSH. Conclusions Findings support CBT-GSH dissemination for recurrent binge-eating treatment. PMID:20515208

  1. Peoples' understandings of a primary care-based mental health self-help clinic.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Anne; Oliver, Dianne; Bower, Peter; Lovell, Karina; Richards, Dave

    2004-04-01

    Self-help programmes are increasingly advocated as a means of managing mental health problems. This qualitative study explored patients' understandings of the use of a UK primary care-based self-help clinic (facilitated by a nurse). As part of a wider evaluation of the clinic, in-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sub-sample of clinic users. Data indicate that people understand their problem as one of having lost an ability to cope, and that the ethos underlying the clinic is well matched to restore a sense of coping, by motivating patients to re-establish and retain control over their everyday lives. However, some patients experienced a sense of dissonance between prior expectations and actual use of the self-help clinic. Without prior familiarity with self-help, engaging the patient as the mechanism of change may be difficult. Some patients expected formal counselling and were influenced in this by their previous experience of services and discussions with the GP at the point of referral. It takes time and active engagement with self-help materials before patients become aware that they are a crucial mechanism of change. Patients may benefit from information and a referral process, which emphasises the centrality of self-efficacy and the patient as 'change agent' prior to referral.

  2. Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy v. conventional guided self-help for bulimia nervosa: long-term evaluation of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gudrun; Penelo, Eva; Wanner, Christian; Gwinner, Paulina; Trofaier, Marie-Louise; Imgart, Hartmut; Waldherr, Karin; Wöber-Bingöl, Ciçek; Karwautz, Andreas F K

    2013-02-01

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT)-based guided self-help is recommended as a first step in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. To evaluate in a randomised controlled trial (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT00461071) the long-term effectiveness of internet-based guided self-help (INT-GSH) compared with conventional guided bibliotherapy (BIB-GSH) in females with bulimia nervosa. A total of 155 participants were randomly assigned to INT-GSH or BIB-GSH for 7 months. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, month 4, month 7 and month 18. The greatest improvement was reported after 4 months with a continued reduction in eating disorder symptomatology reported at month 7 and 18. After 18 months, 14.6% (n = 7/48) of the participants in the INT-GSH group and 25% (n = 7/28) in the BIB-GSH group were abstinent from binge eating and compensatory measures, 43.8% (n = 21/48) and 39.2% (n = 11/28) respectively were in remission. No differences regarding outcome between the two groups were found. Internet-based guided self-help for bulimia nervosa was not superior compared with bibliotherapy, the gold standard of self-help. Improvements remain stable in the long term.

  3. Attitudes and Preferences towards Self-help Treatments for Depression in Comparison to Psychotherapy and Antidepressant Medication.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Katie; Webb, Thomas L; Sheeran, Paschal; Turpin, Graham

    2016-03-01

    Self-help is an effective treatment for depression. Less is known, however, about how acceptable people find different self-help treatments for depression. To investigate preferences and attitudes toward different self-help treatments for depression in comparison to psychotherapy and antidepressants. N = 536 people who were not actively seeking treatment for depression were randomly assigned to read about one of five treatment options (bibliotherapy, Internet-based self-help, guided self-help, antidepressants, or psychotherapy) before rating how acceptable they found the treatment. Participants also ranked the treatments in order of preference. Psychotherapy and guided self-help were found to be the most acceptable and preferred treatment options. Antidepressants and bibliotherapy were found to be the least acceptable treatments, with antidepressants rated as the most likely to have side effects. Preference data reflected the above findings - psychotherapy and guided self-help were the most preferred treatment options. The findings highlight differences in attitudes and preferences between guided and unguided self-help interventions; and between self-help interventions and psychotherapy. Future research should focus on understanding why unguided self-help interventions are deemed to be less acceptable than guided self-help interventions for treating depression.

  4. Web-based cognitive behavioral self-help intervention to reduce cocaine consumption in problematic cocaine users: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Michael; Sullivan, Robin; Haug, Severin; Stark, Lars

    2012-11-28

    Web-based self-help programs that reduce problematic substance use are able to reach hidden consumer groups in the general population. These programs are characterized by their low treatment threshold and nonrestrictive intervention settings. They are also cost effective, making them of interest to both low-income and high-income industrialized countries with ever-increasing health costs. To test the feasibility and effectiveness of an anonymous, fully automated, Web-based self-help intervention as an alternative to outpatient treatment services for cocaine users. A total of 196 cocaine-using participants were recruited through various online and offline media for a randomized controlled trial. Participants in the intervention group received interactive cognitive behavioral modules and a consumption diary to reduce cocaine use, whereas participants in the control group received online psychoeducative information modules. Web-based follow-up assessments were conducted after 4 weeks, 6 weeks, and 6 months. Treatment retention was examined and compared between the intervention and control groups. Severity of cocaine dependence was the main outcome measure. Secondary outcomes were cocaine craving, depression symptoms, and alcohol and other substance use. This Web-based intervention attracted older and more educated participants than existing outpatient treatment programs for which cocaine is the primary substance of abuse. Participants in the intervention group showed greater treatment retention compared with the control group (P = .04). Low response rates at the follow-up assessments restricted the explanatory power of the analyses. At the follow-up assessments, the severity of cocaine dependence did not differ between the intervention and control groups (P = .75). Furthermore, there were no differences in cocaine craving, depression, or alcohol and other substance use. Using the consumption diaries, the average number of cocaine-free days per week did not change

  5. [Evaluation of a Self-Help Supported Counseling Concept for Children and Adolescents with Disproportional Short Stature].

    PubMed

    Rohenkohl, A C; Sommer, R; Kahrs, S; Bullinger, M; Klingebiel, K-H; Quitmann, J H

    2016-01-01

    Disproportionate short stature may impair the quality of life (QoL) of patients and their families. This study aimed to evaluate a self-help supported counseling concept to increase the QoL of the participants. QoL data from 58 children/adolescents (8-17 years) with a diagnosis of achondroplasia was collected at 2 measurement points during one year using the the QoLISSY questionnaire (self-/parental report). Differences before and after participation vs. non-participation in the intervention were evaluated using a linear mixed model. The longitudinal results show a greater increase of QoL in the active intervention group compared to a passive control group (p=0,005). The increase in the self-reported QoL of affected patients was significantly higher than for the parent-report (p=0,048). The study shows that patients with achondroplasia benefit from a self-help supported counseling concept. However, this should be tested in a randomized trial. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Guided self-help on the internet for turkish migrants with depression: the design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Turkish population living in the Netherlands has a high prevalence of psychological complaints and has a high threshold for seeking professional help for these problems. Seeking help through the Internet can overcome these barriers. This project aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a guided self-help problem-solving intervention for depressed Turkish migrants that is culturally adapted and web-based. Methods This study is a randomized controlled trial with two arms: an experimental condition group and a wait list control group. The experimental condition obtains direct access to the guided web-based self-help intervention, which is based on Problem Solving Treatment (PST) and takes 6 weeks to complete. Turkish adults with mild to moderate depressive symptoms will be recruited from the general population and the participants can choose between a Turkish and a Dutch version. The primary outcome measure is the reduction of depressive symptoms, the secondary outcome measures are somatic symptoms, anxiety, acculturation, quality of life and satisfaction. Participants are assessed at baseline, post-test (6 weeks), and 4 months after baseline. Analysis will be conducted on the intention-to-treat sample. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a guided problem-solving intervention for Turkish adults living in the Netherlands that is culturally adapted and web-based. Trial Registration Nederlands Trial Register: NTR2303 PMID:21047442

  7. Evaluation of a Motivation and Psycho-Educational Guided Self-Help Intervention for People with Eating Disorders (MOPED).

    PubMed

    Brewin, Nicola; Wales, Jackie; Cashmore, Rebecca; Plateau, Carolyn R; Dean, Brett; Cousins, Tara; Arcelus, Jon

    2016-05-01

    High dropout rates and poor levels of engagement are well documented for patients with eating disorders. Utilising motivational techniques and providing psycho-education have been suggested as ways to reduce treatment disengagement. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a newly developed motivational and psycho-educational (MOPED) guided self-help intervention for people with eating disorders on engagement and retention in therapy. Patients who received MOPED pre-treatment (n = 79) were compared with a diagnosis-matched group of patients receiving treatment as usual (TAU; n = 79). The study found that patients receiving MOPED had a higher engagement rate than those within the TAU group. Specifically, patients in the anorexic spectrum were found to present with both higher rates of engagement and completion of therapy when issued with MOPED in comparison with TAU. Self-help packages using motivational style could be a valuable and cost-effective intervention for patients with eating disorders. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  8. The efficacy of life-review as online-guided self-help for adults: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lamers, Sanne M A; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Korte, Jojanneke; Westerhof, Gerben J

    2015-01-01

    The study used a randomized controlled trial to investigate the short-term and long-term effects of life-review as online-guided self-help in adults (40+) with moderate depressive symptomatology. We evaluated ego-integrity and rumination as mediators and assessed whether the effects of the intervention did not differ across middle-aged and older adults. Effects of life-review (n = 58) were compared with a waiting list group (n = 58) and an expressive writing intervention (n = 58) on depressive symptoms (primary outcome), anxiety, and well-being (secondary outcomes). Mediator and moderator analyses were also applied. Compared with the waiting list, life-review reduced depressive symptoms (d = 0.35) and enhanced emotional (d = 0.16) and psychological well-being (d = 0.27). Life-review was not more effective than expressive writing. The effects on depressive symptoms were partly related with increases in ego-integrity and decreases in rumination. The intervention is applicable for middle-aged and older adults. Life-review is effective as self-help for middle-aged and older adults with moderate depressive symptomatology compared with a waiting list group. Future research should investigate whether stimulating ego-integrity and reducing rumination enhance the effects of the intervention. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Efficacy of a Multicomponent Positive Psychology Self-Help Intervention: Study Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Drossaert, Constance HC; Pieterse, Marcel E; Walburg, Jan A; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T

    2015-01-01

    Background Positive psychology interventions have been found to enhance well-being and decrease clinical symptomatology. However, it is still unknown how flourishing can also be increased. Although multicomponent interventions seem to be necessary for this purpose, different formats can be used. A cost-effective approach could be a positive psychology-based self-help book with tailored email support to reach large target groups and to prevent dropout. Objective This study will evaluate the efficacy of a comprehensive multicomponent self-help intervention with or without email support on well-being and flourishing, and will seek to determine the working mechanisms underlying the intervention. Methods In this 3-armed, parallel, randomized controlled trial, 396 participants with low or moderate levels of well-being and without clinical symptomatology will be randomly assigned to (1) a self-help book condition with weekly email support, (2) a self-help book condition without email support but with a weekly information email, or (3) a waiting list control condition. Online measurements will be assessed at baseline, at post-test (3 months after baseline), and at 6 and 12 months after baseline. Results The primary outcomes are well-being and flourishing (ie, high levels of well-being). Secondary outcomes are the well-being components included in the intervention: positive emotion, use of strengths, optimism, self-compassion, resilience, and positive relations. Other measures include depressive and anxiety symptoms, personality traits, direct medical and non-medical costs, life-events, and client satisfaction. Conclusions This study will add knowledge to the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a multicomponent positive psychology intervention. We will also explore who can benefit most from this intervention. If the intervention is found to be effective, our results will be especially relevant for public mental health services, governments, and primary care. Trial

  10. Efficacy of a Multicomponent Positive Psychology Self-Help Intervention: Study Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Schotanus-Dijkstra, Marijke; Drossaert, Constance Hc; Pieterse, Marcel E; Walburg, Jan A; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T

    2015-08-20

    Positive psychology interventions have been found to enhance well-being and decrease clinical symptomatology. However, it is still unknown how flourishing can also be increased. Although multicomponent interventions seem to be necessary for this purpose, different formats can be used. A cost-effective approach could be a positive psychology-based self-help book with tailored email support to reach large target groups and to prevent dropout. This study will evaluate the efficacy of a comprehensive multicomponent self-help intervention with or without email support on well-being and flourishing, and will seek to determine the working mechanisms underlying the intervention. In this 3-armed, parallel, randomized controlled trial, 396 participants with low or moderate levels of well-being and without clinical symptomatology will be randomly assigned to (1) a self-help book condition with weekly email support, (2) a self-help book condition without email support but with a weekly information email, or (3) a waiting list control condition. Online measurements will be assessed at baseline, at post-test (3 months after baseline), and at 6 and 12 months after baseline. The primary outcomes are well-being and flourishing (ie, high levels of well-being). Secondary outcomes are the well-being components included in the intervention: positive emotion, use of strengths, optimism, self-compassion, resilience, and positive relations. Other measures include depressive and anxiety symptoms, personality traits, direct medical and non-medical costs, life-events, and client satisfaction. This study will add knowledge to the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a multicomponent positive psychology intervention. We will also explore who can benefit most from this intervention. If the intervention is found to be effective, our results will be especially relevant for public mental health services, governments, and primary care. The Netherlands Trial Register NTR4297; http

  11. Online Counseling: Prioritizing Psychoeducation, Self-Help, and Mutual Help for Counseling Psychology Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Tai

    2005-01-01

    This reaction article extends the research and practice recommendations for online counseling from the Major Contribution to the November 2005 issue of "The Counseling Psychologist" by prioritizing research and practice in online psychoeducation, self-help, and mutual help. Research suggests that tens of millions of Americans use the Internet for…

  12. Laws and Regulations to Meet the Vocational Needs of Handicapped Students. Self-Help Booklet 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warden, John W.; Lehrman, Raymond H.

    This publication on laws and regulations is the first in the Self-Help series of five booklets designed for Alaska administrators and teachers to improve vocational services provided to handicapped pupils. It begins with a checklist of implications for administrators and teachers. Major laws and regulations which influence vocational education for…

  13. A feminist analysis of self-help bestsellers for improving relationships: a decade review.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, T S; Holm, K E; Starrels, M E

    2001-04-01

    Self-help literature is pervasive and influential in the United States. A critical analysis of self-help books would help therapists to determine their utility for the therapeutic process and assist them in making reading recommendations to clients. In this study, a content analysis was conducted of the top 11 relationship self-help books on the New York Times Bestseller List over a period of 10 years (1988-1998) to determine the degree to which these books support a feminist approach to therapy. This study yielded three major findings. First, the number of feminist books, the number of nonfeminist books, and those falling in the middle across four components of feminist family therapy are about equal. However, the second major finding was that the top-selling books are more likely to be nonfeminist than feminist. The third finding is that most best-selling self-help books appear to have become less compatible with a feminist approach to relationships over time. This analysis encourages therapists to think critically about these best-selling books; it will also allow therapists to consider this methodology as a model for critically analyzing other books that they recommend to clients or use in their own professional development.

  14. A Feminist Analysis of Self-Help Bestsellers for Improving Relationships: A Decade Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Holm, Kristen E.; Starrels, Marjorie E.

    2001-01-01

    Content analysis was conducted of the top eleven relationship self help books on the New York Times Bestseller List over ten years to determine the degree to which they support a feminist approach to therapy. Results indicated the number of feminist and nonfeminist approach books is about equal and that bestsellers have become less feminist…

  15. Investigation of self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Enderlin, W I; Downing, J P; Enderlin, C W; Sanquist, T F; Pope, W S

    1992-06-01

    The US Coast Guard commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct this study of 45 self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment for oceangoing tankers and inland tank barges to assess the potential effectiveness of the proposed countermeasure categories. This study considers the hypothetical outflow of oil in the case of side damage and bottom damage to single-hull designs. The results will be considered by the Coast Guard in drafting regulations pertaining to the requirement for tanker vessels to carry oil pollution response equipment (i.e., in response to the oil Pollution Act of 1990). PNL's approach to this investigation included: assessing time-dependent oil outflow in the cases of collision and grounding of both tankers and barges; identifying environmental constraints on self-help countermeasure operation; identifying human factor issues, such as crew performance, safety, and training requirements for the self-help countermeasures considered; and assessing each self-help countermeasure with respect to its potential for minimizing oil loss to the environment. Results from the time-dependent oil outflow, environmental limitations, and human factors requirements were input into a simulation model.

  16. The SAINT: A Guided Self-Help Approach for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Eddie; Craig, Tom; McCarthy, Jane; Bouras, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This article introduces the SAINT (Self-Assessment and INTervention), a guided self-help intervention for the treatment of mild depression in people with intellectual disabilities. Method: The study used a single-case experimental design and adopted quality frameworks specific to the approach to describe the participants and to…

  17. Project Self Help: A First-Year Evaluation of a Family Literacy Program. Report No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Lawrence J.

    This report describes the first year evaluation of the implementation and effects of the Project SELF HELP, a family literacy program located in two urban elementary schools and run by a community organization. The program was available to 15 adults from each site who had lower than a fifth grade reading level and whose children were experiencing…

  18. Comparison of Six- and Eight-Session Cognitive Guided Self-Help for Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furber, Gareth; Steele, Anna; Wade, Tracey D.

    2004-01-01

    A previous case-series evaluation of a six-session guided self-help (GSH) approach with 15 people with bulimia nervosa (BN) showed significant reductions across all measures, including binge eating, self-induced vomiting, weight concern, shape concern and dietary restraint. However, the reduction of binge eating and self-induced vomiting was…

  19. The Key Is the Individual: Practices of the Self, Self-Help and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marín-Díaz, Dora Lilia

    2017-01-01

    The article analyses the boom of self-help discourses and their relationship with pedagogic discourses, with the purpose of marking the centrality of the individual in the practices of contemporaneous government. Two exercises are important in this analysis of an archaeological genealogical perspective: on the one hand, it comprehends the impact…

  20. From Hospital to Community: A Self-Help Program to Promote the Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutner, Bernard; And Others

    Vocational placement, social needs, and the lack of proper transportation for disabled persons are major problems to be solved if physically handicapped people are to function in community life. Mobilization for Maturity was a 3-year research and demonstration project which utilized a self-help approach to help disabled people to re-enter…

  1. Behavioral Bibliotherapy: A Review of Self-Help Behavior Therapy Manuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasgow, Russell E.; Rosen, Gerald M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the organizing concepts and strategies for the development and evaluation of self-help behavioral treatment manuals. Reviews programs that have been published or empirically tested for the treatment of phobias, smoking, obesity, sexual dysfunction, assertiveness, child behavior problems, study skills, and physical fitness, as well as…

  2. Music for Elementary Teachers; Self-Help Guide (MUS 370). Adams State College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Cloyce

    This self-help guide for the music teacher is one of a series of eight Teacher Education Modules developed by Adams State College Teacher Corps Program. The guide itself consists of 11 modules, the first five of which focus on the mathematical and scientific aspects of music--pitch, tempo, furation, time, and key. These five modules are…

  3. Hypnotic Taper with or without Self-Help Treatment of Insomnia: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belleville, Genevieve; Guay, Catherine; Guay, Bernard; Morin, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a minimal intervention focusing on hypnotic discontinuation and cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for insomnia. Fifty-three adult chronic users of hypnotics were randomly assigned to an 8-week hypnotic taper program, used alone or combined with a self-help CBT. Weekly hypnotic use decreased in both…

  4. Predictors of dropout from internet-based self-help cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Wing-Fai; Chung, Ka-Fai; Ho, Fiona Yan-Yee; Ho, Lai-Ming

    2015-10-01

    Dropout from self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) potentially diminishes therapeutic effect and poses clinical concern. We analyzed the characteristics of subjects who did not complete a 6-week internet-based CBT-I program. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to identify potential variables and cutoff for predicting dropout among 207 participants with self-report insomnia 3 or more nights per week for at least 3 months randomly assigned to self-help CBT-I with telephone support (n = 103) and self-help CBT-I (n = 104). Seventy-two participants (34.4%) did not complete all 6 sessions, while 42 of the 72 (56.9%) dropped out prior to the fourth session. Significant predictors of non-completion are total sleep time (TST) ≥ 6.82 h, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score ≥ 9 and Insomnia Severity Index score < 13 at baseline in this ranking order. Only TST ≥ 5.92 h predicts early dropout. Longer TST and less severe insomnia predict dropout in this study of self-help CBT-I, in contrast to shorter TST as a predictor in 2 studies of face-to-face CBT-I, while greater severity of depression predicts dropout in both this study and a study of face-to-face CBT-I. Strategies for minimizing dropout from internet-based CBT-I are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of Six- and Eight-Session Cognitive Guided Self-Help for Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furber, Gareth; Steele, Anna; Wade, Tracey D.

    2004-01-01

    A previous case-series evaluation of a six-session guided self-help (GSH) approach with 15 people with bulimia nervosa (BN) showed significant reductions across all measures, including binge eating, self-induced vomiting, weight concern, shape concern and dietary restraint. However, the reduction of binge eating and self-induced vomiting was…

  6. Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for the Treatment of Recurrent Binge Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Wilson, G. Terence; DeBar, Lynn; Perrin, Nancy; Lynch, Frances; Rosselli, Francine; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Despite proven efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating eating disorders with binge eating as the core symptom, few patients receive CBT in clinical practice. Our blended efficacy-effectiveness study sought to evaluate whether a manual-based guided self-help form of CBT (CBT-GSH), delivered in 8 sessions in a health…

  7. Public Pedagogy from the Learner's Perspective: Women Reading Self-Help Relationship Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapell, Brandi M.; McLean, Scott

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of public pedagogy has increasingly influenced the study of continuing education, drawing attention to ways in which adults access resources from popular culture and learn without the involvement of educational institutions. Reading relationship self-help books has become a prominent component of popular culture. There…

  8. From Hospital to Community: A Self-Help Program to Promote the Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutner, Bernard; And Others

    Vocational placement, social needs, and the lack of proper transportation for disabled persons are major problems to be solved if physically handicapped people are to function in community life. Mobilization for Maturity was a 3-year research and demonstration project which utilized a self-help approach to help disabled people to re-enter…

  9. Parents' Training: Effects of the Self-Help Skills Programme with Down's Syndrome Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz, Maria Teresa; Menendez, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews studies evaluating the effectiveness of two types of early intervention programmes for babies with Down's syndrome (DS). Evaluation of self-help early intervention programmes was done with two types of training with the parents: in the first the parents learned the training programme from observing the clinician, and in the…

  10. Specific Psychosocial and Behavioral Outcomes from the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Self-Help Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, Carrie Jo; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Data from 104 participants in the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Self-Help Course showed that patients had significant increases in enabling skills and use of relaxation/exercise and decreases in depression. Amount of time spent in class was correlated with significant changes over time. (SK)

  11. Telepsychology and Self-Help: The Treatment of Fear of Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botella, Cristina; Guillen, Veronica; Banos, Rosa M.; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Gallego, Maria J.; Alcaniz, Mariano

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a self-help, Internet-based telepsychology program for the treatment of public speaking fears. The system is comprised of 3 parts: The "assessment protocol" gives the patient information about his or her problem (i.e., amount of interference it creates in his or her life, severity, degree of fear and avoidance). The…

  12. "Transform Your Child's Behaviour Now": Parent Education as Self-Help Culture and Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widding, Ulrika

    2011-01-01

    Parents in the Western world today are often said to feel unsure and inadequate and as a consequence there are a plethora of self-help products on the market as well as parent education programmes. This article explores the kinds of research questions that are raised by this state of affairs. The discussion is mainly based on existing studies of…

  13. An Evaluation of the Stepfamily Self-Help Literature for Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    Reviews and critiques 11 stepfamily self-help books for children and adolescents. Codes books on dimensions of appropriate audience, author background, issues, advice, and strengths. Rates general interest and quality of writing of books and assigns categories of recommendation. Discusses use of the books as an adjunct to therapy. (Author/NB)

  14. The Uses of Juvenile Fiction and Self-Help Books with Stepfamilies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence H.

    1990-01-01

    Advocates use of bibliotherapy as an adjunct to counseling with stepchildren and remarried adults. Information to guide the selection and use of fiction and self-help books for children and adolescents is provided. Also mentioned are other audiences and uses for the adolescent fiction. (Author)

  15. Institution Building Through Self-Help in Rural Developing Areas: An Integrated Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi, Yair

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of regional community development through self-help programs in rural developing areas presents the need for a diversified system of institutions to ensure a developmental process based on qualitative rather than quantitative criteria. Available from: Editorial and Business Offices, Piazza Cavalieri di Malta, 2, 00153 Rome, Italy. (EA)

  16. The Acceptability of an Internet-Based Self-Help Treatment for Fear of Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botella, C.; Gallego, M. J.; Garcia-Palacios, A.; Banos, R. M.; Quero, S.; Alcaniz, M.

    2009-01-01

    Several randomised controlled studies have shown the efficacy of Internet-based self-help treatments. These studies have centred their attention on axis I (efficacy) of the Guidelines for Empirically Validated Treatments, although there are a few studies that also take into account axis II (effectiveness). The aim of the present work was to test…

  17. Telepsychology and Self-Help: The Treatment of Fear of Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botella, Cristina; Guillen, Veronica; Banos, Rosa M.; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Gallego, Maria J.; Alcaniz, Mariano

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a self-help, Internet-based telepsychology program for the treatment of public speaking fears. The system is comprised of 3 parts: The "assessment protocol" gives the patient information about his or her problem (i.e., amount of interference it creates in his or her life, severity, degree of fear and avoidance). The…

  18. Examination of Predictors and Moderators for Self-Help Treatments of Binge-Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masheb, Robin M.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2008-01-01

    Predictors and moderators of outcomes were examined in 75 overweight patients with binge-eating disorder (BED) who participated in a randomized clinical trial of guided self-help treatments. Age variables, psychiatric and personality disorder comorbidity, and clinical characteristics were tested as predictors and moderators of treatment outcomes.…

  19. An Evaluation of the Remarriage and Stepfamily Self-Help Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marilyn; Nickleberry, Lynette

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to critique in-print, post-1990 copyrighted stepfamily self-help books in order to provide guidance to helping professionals who work with these complex families. Of the 63 books reviewed, trained coders were able to strongly recommend 13 books for being well organized, for relying on clinical or empirical sources of…

  20. Hypnotic Taper with or without Self-Help Treatment of Insomnia: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belleville, Genevieve; Guay, Catherine; Guay, Bernard; Morin, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a minimal intervention focusing on hypnotic discontinuation and cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for insomnia. Fifty-three adult chronic users of hypnotics were randomly assigned to an 8-week hypnotic taper program, used alone or combined with a self-help CBT. Weekly hypnotic use decreased in both…

  1. Disability and Self-Help: A Case Study of the Spinal Injuries Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Mike; Hasler, Frances

    1987-01-01

    The important role of the self-help approach in helping persons deal with medical, emotional, and practical effects of a sudden disability is considered in a discussion of the work of the Spinal Injuries Association in Britain. Services that can be provided and controlled by disabled persons are described. (Author/CB)

  2. Parents' Training: Effects of the Self-Help Skills Programme with Down's Syndrome Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz, Maria Teresa; Menendez, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews studies evaluating the effectiveness of two types of early intervention programmes for babies with Down's syndrome (DS). Evaluation of self-help early intervention programmes was done with two types of training with the parents: in the first the parents learned the training programme from observing the clinician, and in the…

  3. Specific Psychosocial and Behavioral Outcomes from the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Self-Help Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, Carrie Jo; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Data from 104 participants in the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Self-Help Course showed that patients had significant increases in enabling skills and use of relaxation/exercise and decreases in depression. Amount of time spent in class was correlated with significant changes over time. (SK)

  4. The Effectiveness of a Computerized Self-Help Stress Coping Program with Adult Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James J.

    1987-01-01

    Examined whether computerized self-help stress coping program was effective in reducing stress among 30 adult male juvenile counselors. Compared to controls, subjects who participated in program showed decreases in personal strain and state anxiety and increases in personal resources. Concluded that program could provide relief for situational…

  5. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Agreement D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part 1944—Self-Help... § 1944.410(d) of 7 CFR part 1944, subpart I, as necessary, to develop a complete program for a...

  6. The Effectiveness of a Computerized Self-Help Stress Coping Program with Adult Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James J.

    1987-01-01

    Examined whether computerized self-help stress coping program was effective in reducing stress among 30 adult male juvenile counselors. Compared to controls, subjects who participated in program showed decreases in personal strain and state anxiety and increases in personal resources. Concluded that program could provide relief for situational…

  7. "Transform Your Child's Behaviour Now": Parent Education as Self-Help Culture and Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widding, Ulrika

    2011-01-01

    Parents in the Western world today are often said to feel unsure and inadequate and as a consequence there are a plethora of self-help products on the market as well as parent education programmes. This article explores the kinds of research questions that are raised by this state of affairs. The discussion is mainly based on existing studies of…

  8. Public Pedagogy from the Learner's Perspective: Women Reading Self-Help Relationship Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapell, Brandi M.; McLean, Scott

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of public pedagogy has increasingly influenced the study of continuing education, drawing attention to ways in which adults access resources from popular culture and learn without the involvement of educational institutions. Reading relationship self-help books has become a prominent component of popular culture. There…

  9. Examination of Predictors and Moderators for Self-Help Treatments of Binge-Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masheb, Robin M.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2008-01-01

    Predictors and moderators of outcomes were examined in 75 overweight patients with binge-eating disorder (BED) who participated in a randomized clinical trial of guided self-help treatments. Age variables, psychiatric and personality disorder comorbidity, and clinical characteristics were tested as predictors and moderators of treatment outcomes.…

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Guided Self-Help Treatment for Recurrent Binge Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Frances L.; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Dickerson, John F.; Perrin, Nancy; DeBar, Lynn; Wilson, G. Terence; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Adoption of effective treatments for recurrent binge-eating disorders depends on the balance of costs and benefits. Using data from a recent randomized controlled trial, we conducted an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of a cognitive-behavioral therapy guided self-help intervention (CBT-GSH) to treat recurrent binge eating…

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of Guided Self-Help Treatment for Recurrent Binge Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Frances L.; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Dickerson, John F.; Perrin, Nancy; DeBar, Lynn; Wilson, G. Terence; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Adoption of effective treatments for recurrent binge-eating disorders depends on the balance of costs and benefits. Using data from a recent randomized controlled trial, we conducted an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of a cognitive-behavioral therapy guided self-help intervention (CBT-GSH) to treat recurrent binge eating…

  12. Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for the Treatment of Recurrent Binge Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Wilson, G. Terence; DeBar, Lynn; Perrin, Nancy; Lynch, Frances; Rosselli, Francine; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Despite proven efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating eating disorders with binge eating as the core symptom, few patients receive CBT in clinical practice. Our blended efficacy-effectiveness study sought to evaluate whether a manual-based guided self-help form of CBT (CBT-GSH), delivered in 8 sessions in a health…

  13. The Acceptability of an Internet-Based Self-Help Treatment for Fear of Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botella, C.; Gallego, M. J.; Garcia-Palacios, A.; Banos, R. M.; Quero, S.; Alcaniz, M.

    2009-01-01

    Several randomised controlled studies have shown the efficacy of Internet-based self-help treatments. These studies have centred their attention on axis I (efficacy) of the Guidelines for Empirically Validated Treatments, although there are a few studies that also take into account axis II (effectiveness). The aim of the present work was to test…

  14. An Evaluation of the Stepfamily Self-Help Literature for Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    Reviews and critiques 11 stepfamily self-help books for children and adolescents. Codes books on dimensions of appropriate audience, author background, issues, advice, and strengths. Rates general interest and quality of writing of books and assigns categories of recommendation. Discusses use of the books as an adjunct to therapy. (Author/NB)

  15. The Uses of Juvenile Fiction and Self-Help Books with Stepfamilies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence H.

    1990-01-01

    Advocates use of bibliotherapy as an adjunct to counseling with stepchildren and remarried adults. Information to guide the selection and use of fiction and self-help books for children and adolescents is provided. Also mentioned are other audiences and uses for the adolescent fiction. (Author)

  16. Getting out of Depression: Teens' Self-Help Interventions to Relieve Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisdom, Jennifer P.; Barker, Ellen C.

    2006-01-01

    Most depressed adolescents do not access medical care for symptoms, yet many improve without professional intervention. While several self-help interventions have empirical support, teens' non-directed efforts to reduce symptoms are not documented. We reviewed 14 depressed adolescents' reports of attempts to reduce depressive symptoms. Results…

  17. The current status and future direction of self-help treatments for problem gamblers.

    PubMed

    Raylu, Namrata; Oei, Tian P S; Loo, Jasmine

    2008-12-01

    The self-help treatment (SHT) studies for other psychological problems significantly outweigh those for problem gambling. Currently, very little is published about the application and efficacy of various forms of SHTs for problem gambling. Thus, this paper reviews the self-help literature (using the PsycINFO database--all years up to April 2008) to stimulate further research in this area for problem gambling. The findings show that SHTs in problem gambling are still in their infancy. Although the problem gambling literature has mainly reported on two forms of SHTs with problem gamblers (i.e. use of self-help manuals and audiotapes), the review discuss utilizing a wide range of SHTs with problem gamblers. These include written materials (e.g. self-help books and treatment manuals), audiotapes, videotapes, computer-based SHTs implemented on palmtop computers, desktop computers, via telephone (Interactive Voice Response systems--IVR) or via the Internet and virtual reality applications. These SHTs would suit those problem gamblers who are not accessing professional treatment due to shame, guilt, fear of stigma, privacy concerns or financial difficulties, as well as those living in rural areas or with less severe gambling problems. The review also suggest future protocols for conducting further research in this area with problem gamblers, highlighting a need for a cohesive theory to guide research.

  18. Cognitive-Behavioral Guided Self-Help for the Treatment of Recurrent Binge Eating

    PubMed Central

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Wilson, G. Terence; DeBar, Lynn; Perrin, Nancy; Lynch, Frances; Rosselli, Francine; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Despite proven efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating eating disorders with binge eating as the core symptom, few patients receive CBT in clinical practice. Our blended efficacy-effectiveness study sought to evaluate whether a manual-based guided self-help form of CBT (CBT-GSH), delivered in 8 sessions in a Health Maintenance Organization setting over a 12-week period by masters level interventionists, is more effective than treatment as usual (TAU). Method In all, 123 individuals (mean age = 37.2, 91.9% female, 96.7% non-Hispanic White) were randomized, including 10.6% with bulimia nervosa (BN), 48% with Binge Eating Disorder (BED), and 41.4% with recurrent binge eating in the absence of BN or BED. Baseline, post-treatment, and 6- and 12 month follow-up data were used in intent-to-treat analyses. At 12-month follow-up, CBT-GSH resulted in greater abstinence from binge eating (64.2%) than TAU (44.6%, Number Needed to Treat = 5), as measured by the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE, Fairburn & Cooper, 1993). Secondary outcomes reflected greater improvements in the CBT-GSH group in dietary restraint (d = .30), eating-, shape-, and weight concern (d’s = .54, 1.01, .49) (measured by the EDE-Questionnaire, respectively, Fairburn & Beglin, 2008), depression (d = .56) (Beck Depression Inventory, Beck, Steer, & Garbin, 1988), and social adjustment (d = .58) (Work and Social Adjustment Scale, Mundt, Marks, Shear, & Greist, 2002), but not weight change. Conclusions CBT-GSH is a viable first-line treatment option for the majority of patients with recurrent binge eating who do not meet diagnostic criteria for BN or anorexia nervosa. PMID:20515207

  19. Can mindfulness and acceptance be learnt by self-help?: a systematic review and meta-analysis of mindfulness and acceptance-based self-help interventions.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Kate; Strauss, Clara; Forder, Lewis; Jones, Fergal

    2014-03-01

    There is growing evidence that mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions have positive consequences for psychological and physical health. The most well-established of these interventions typically involve relatively large resource commitments, in terms of both the provider and participant. A number of recent studies have begun to explore whether the benefits of such interventions can be generalised to less intensive methods. Methods include pure and guided self-help utilising resources such as books and workbooks, computer programmes and applications and audio-visual materials. This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that have evaluated the effectiveness and acceptability of low-intensity interventions including mindfulness and acceptance-based components. Fifteen RCTs (7 ACT-based, 4 mindfulness-based and 4 multi-component interventions including elements of mindfulness and/or acceptance) were identified and reviewed. Interventions that included mindfulness and/or acceptance-based components produced significant benefits in comparison to control conditions on measures of mindfulness/acceptance, depression and anxiety with small to medium effect sizes. Engagement with the self-help interventions varied but on average two-thirds of participants completed post-intervention measures. Emerging research into low-intensity mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions is hopeful. Recommendations for research and practice are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Women's Empowerment and Education: Panchayats and Women's Self-Help Groups in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Ratna; Chakravarti, Paromita; Mansi, Kumari

    2015-01-01

    While women have made many advances, their inferior status to men continues to be a global phenomenon. At a time of unprecedented economic growth, India is experiencing a dramatic intensification of violence against women and the majority of girls are still not getting equal educational opportunity. In one of the most important steps for the…

  1. Women's Empowerment and Education: Panchayats and Women's Self-Help Groups in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Ratna; Chakravarti, Paromita; Mansi, Kumari

    2015-01-01

    While women have made many advances, their inferior status to men continues to be a global phenomenon. At a time of unprecedented economic growth, India is experiencing a dramatic intensification of violence against women and the majority of girls are still not getting equal educational opportunity. In one of the most important steps for the…

  2. Self-Care and Self-Help Groups for the Elderly: A Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This document notes that, as health care costs continue to rise, the elderly are monitoring themselves as a means of cost containment, and as a way of enhancing their sense of well-being and their ability to lead active lives. It points out that more and more organizations are sponsoring health programs that promote the concept of self-care and…

  3. An Internet-based self-help intervention for people with HIV and depressive symptoms: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van Luenen, Sanne; Kraaij, Vivian; Spinhoven, Philip; Garnefski, Nadia

    2016-03-31

    Many people living with HIV suffer from depressive symptoms. In a previous pilot study, self-help cognitive behavioral therapy (in booklet format) was found to be effective in treating depressive symptoms in people with HIV. We developed an online self-help program in Dutch and English (based on the booklet) for people with HIV and depressive symptoms. Besides the main question regarding the effectiveness of the program aimed at lowering depressive symptoms, sub-questions will focus on the moderators of treatment success (for which patients is the program especially beneficial?) and the mechanisms of change underlying the treatment outcome (which mediators affect the outcome of treatment?). In this paper, the protocol of the study will be described. The effectiveness of the program will be investigated by comparing the intervention group with a waiting list-control group in a randomized controlled design, by including a pretest and three post-tests. The self-help program contains four main components: activation, relaxation, changing maladaptive cognitions, and goal attainment. Participants with mild to moderate depressive symptoms will work on the program for 6 to 10 weeks, during which a coach will provide motivational support by telephone once a week. Participants in the control condition will receive weekly minimal support from a coach for 8 weeks, and after the second post-test, they can gain access to the self-help program. Depressive symptoms and possible mediators (e.g., activation, cognitive coping, self-efficacy, and goal adjustment) will be assessed by self-report three times during the intervention/waiting period and at the pretest and first post-test. The proposed study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an online self-help intervention for people with HIV and depressive symptoms. If the intervention is shown to be effective, the program will be implemented. Consequently, many patients with HIV could be reached, and their psychological care may be

  4. Behavioral and Nondirective Guided Self-Help for Parents of Children with Externalizing Behavior: Mediating Mechanisms in a Head-To-Head Comparison.

    PubMed

    Katzmann, Josepha; Hautmann, Christopher; Greimel, Lisa; Imort, Stephanie; Pinior, Julia; Scholz, Kristin; Döpfner, Manfred

    2017-05-01

    Parent training (PT) delivered as a guided self-help intervention may be a cost- and time-effective intervention in the treatment of children with externalizing disorders. In face-to-face PT, parenting strategies have repeatedly been identified as mediating mechanisms for the decrease of children's problem behavior. Few studies have examined possible mediating effects in guided self-help interventions for parents. The present study aimed to investigate possible mediating variables of a behaviorally oriented guided self-help program for parents of children with externalizing problems compared to a nondirective intervention in a clinical sample. A sample of 110 parents of children with externalizing disorders (80 % boys) were randomized to either a behaviorally oriented or a nondirective guided self-help program. Four putative mediating variables were examined simultaneously in a multiple mediation model using structural equation modelling. The outcomes were child symptoms of ADHD and ODD as well as child externalizing problems, assessed at posttreatment. Analyses showed a significant indirect effect for dysfunctional parental attributions in favor of the group receiving the behavioral program, and significant effects of the behavioral program on positive and negative parenting and parental self-efficacy, compared to the nondirective intervention. Our results indicate that a decrease of dysfunctional parental attributions leads to a decrease of child externalizing problems when parents take part in a behaviorally oriented guided self-help program. However, none of the putative mediating variables could explain the decrease in child externalizing behavior problems in the nondirective group. A change in dysfunctional parental attributions should be considered as a possible mediator in the context of PT.

  5. Making self-help more helpful: a randomized controlled trial of the impact of augmenting self-help materials with implementation intentions on promoting the effective self-management of anxiety symptoms.

    PubMed

    Varley, Rachel; Webb, Thomas L; Sheeran, Paschal

    2011-02-01

    The effectiveness of self-help materials may be constrained by failures to undertake recommended exercises or to deploy the techniques that one has learned at the critical moment. The present randomized controlled trial investigated whether augmenting self-help materials with if-then plans (or implementation intentions) could overcome these problems and enhance the self-management of anxiety symptoms. At baseline, participants who reported anxiety symptoms completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the state version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Participants were then randomized via a computer program to standard self-help (n = 86), augmented self-help (n = 90), or no-intervention (n = 86) conditions. Eight weeks later, 95% (n = 249) of the participants completed the HADS and STAI again. Findings showed a significant reduction in anxiety in the augmented self-help condition compared with both the standard self-help and no-intervention conditions (caseness rates on the HADS at follow-up were 21%, 49%, and 44%, respectively). Mediation analyses indicated that the benefits of augmented self-help materials were explained by improved detection of anxiety-related triggers and greater experienced benefits of the self-help techniques. These findings suggest that implementation intentions offer a valuable supplement to self-help materials that can enhance their impact on outcomes.

  6. "Nothing about me, without me": participatory action research with self-help/mutual aid organizations for psychiatric consumer/survivors.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G; Ochocka, J; Griffin, K; Lord, J

    1998-12-01

    Participatory action research with self-help/mutual aid organizations for psychiatric consumer/survivors is reviewed. We begin by tracing the origins of and defining both participatory action research and self-help/mutual aid. In so doing, the degree of correspondence between the assumptions/values of participatory action research and those of self-help/mutual aid for psychiatric consumer/survivors is examined. We argue that participatory action research and self-help/mutual aid share four values in common: (a) empowerment, (b) supportive relationships, (c) social change, and (d) learning as an ongoing process. Next, selected examples of participatory action research with psychiatric consumer/survivor-controlled self-help/mutual aid organizations which illustrate these shared values are provided. We conclude with recommendations of how the key values can be promoted in both the methodological and substantive aspects of future participatory action research with self-help/mutual aid organizations for psychiatric consumer/survivors.

  7. Effectiveness and economic evaluation of self-help educational materials for the prevention of smoking relapse: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Blyth, Annie; Maskrey, Vivienne; Notley, Caitlin; Barton, Garry R; Brown, Tracey J; Aveyard, Paul; Holland, Richard; Bachmann, Max O; Sutton, Stephen; Leonardi-Bee, Jo; Brandon, Thomas H; Song, Fujian

    2015-07-01

    Most people who quit smoking successfully for a short period will return to smoking again in 12 months. A previous exploratory meta-analysis indicated that self-help booklets may be effective for smoking relapse prevention in unaided quitters. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a set of self-help educational booklets to prevent smoking relapse in people who had stopped smoking with the aid of behavioural support. This is an open, randomised controlled trial and qualitative process evaluation. Trial participants were randomly allocated to one of two groups, using a simple randomisation process without attempts to stratify by participant characteristics. The participant allocation was 'concealed' because the recruitment of quitters occurred before the random allocation. Short-term quitters were recruited from NHS Stop Smoking Clinics, and self-help educational materials were posted to study participants at home. A total of 1407 carbon monoxide (CO)-validated quitters at 4 weeks after quit date in NHS Stop Smoking Clinics. The trial excluded pregnant women and quitters who were not able to read the educational materials in English. Participants in the experimental group (n = 703) received a set of eight revised Forever Free booklets, and participants in the control group (n = 704) received a single leaflet that is currently given to NHS patients. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted 3 and 12 months after quit date. The primary outcome was prolonged, CO-verified abstinence from months 4 to 12 during which time no more than five cigarettes were smoked. The secondary outcomes included self-reported abstinence during the previous 7 days at 3 and 12 months, CO-verified abstinence at 12 months, costs (NHS and NHS and participant medication costs perspectives) and quality-adjusted life-years. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate effect-modifying variables. A simultaneous qualitative process evaluation was conducted to help

  8. Clinical study results from a randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioural guided self-help in patients with partially remitted depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Schlögelhofer, Monika; Willinger, Ulrike; Wiesegger, Georg; Eder, Harald; Priesch, Margrit; Itzlinger, Ulrike; Bailer, Ursula; Schosser, Alexandra; Leisch, Friedrich; Aschauer, Harald

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive behavioural guided self-help has been shown to be effective in mild and moderate depressive disorder. It is not known, however, if it is effective in individuals with partially remitted depressive disorder, which is a serious clinical problem in up to 50-60% of treated patients. This study is the first one to examine the clinical benefit of this intervention in this patient population. For the purpose of this study, a single-blind, randomized controlled design was used. We randomized 90 individuals with partially remitted depressive disorder either to cognitive behavioural guided self-help plus psychopharmacotherapy (n = 49) or psychopharmacotherapy alone (n = 41). They were clinically assessed at regular intervals with ratings of depressive symptoms and stress-coping strategies over a 3-week run-in period and a 6-week treatment period. After 6 weeks, intention-to-treat analysis (n = 90) showed that patients treated with cognitive behavioural guided self-help plus psychopharmacotherapy did not have significantly lower scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale of Depression (17-item version; HRSD-17) and on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) compared to patients treated with psychopharmacotherapy alone. When negative stress-coping strategies were considered, there was a significant difference between the two groups at the end of treatment with respect to the BDI but not to the HRSD-17. Guided self-help did not lead to a significant reduction in symptom severity in patients with partially remitted depressive disorder after a 6-week intervention. However, the intervention leads to a reduction of negative stress-coping strategies. Cognitive behavioural guided self-help did not significantly improve depressive symptoms measured with the Hamilton Rating Scale of Depression (17-item version; HRSD-17) in patients with partially remitted depressive disorder. Improvements were found in reducing negative stress-coping strategies for those allocated to the cognitive

  9. Self-help for Binge Eating Disorder in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Ethnically and Racially Diverse Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grilo, Carlos M.; White, Marney A.; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Barnes, Rachel D.; Masheb, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective was to examine the effectiveness of a self-help treatment as a first line primary care intervention for binge eating disorder (BED) in obese patients. This study compared the effectiveness of a usual care plus self-help version of cognitive behavioral therapy (shCBT) to usual care (UC) only in ethnically/racially diverse obese patients with BED in primary care settings in an urban center. Method 48 obese patients with BED were randomly assigned to either shCBT (N=24) or UC (N=24) for four months. Independent assessments were performed monthly throughout treatment and at post-treatment. Results Binge-eating remission rates did not differ significantly between shCBT (25%) and UC (8.3%) at post-treatment. Mixed models of binge eating frequency determined using the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) revealed significant decreases for both conditions but that shCBT and UC did not differ. Mixed models of binge eating frequency from repeated monthly EDE-questionnaire assessments revealed a significant treatment-by-time interaction indicating that shCBT had significant reductions whereas UC did not during the four-month treatments. Mixed models revealed no differences between groups on associated eating disorder psychopathology or depression. No weight loss was observed in either condition. Conclusions Our findings suggest that pure self-help CBT did not show effectiveness relative to usual care for treating BED in obese patients in primary care. Thus, self-help CBT may not have utility as a front-line intervention for BED for obese patients in primary care and future studies should test guided-self-help methods for delivering CBT in primary care generalist settings. PMID:24189569

  10. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a Guided Self-Help Intervention to Manage Chronic Orofacial Pain.

    PubMed

    Goldthorpe, Joanna; Lovell, Karina; Peters, Sarah; McGowan, Linda; Nemeth, Imola; Roberts, Christopher; Aggarwal, Vishal R

    2017-01-01

    To conduct a pilot trial to test the feasibility of a guided self-help intervention for chronic orofacial pain. A pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted to compare the intervention with usual treatment. A total of 37 patients with chronic orofacial pain were randomized into either the intervention group (n = 19) or the usual treatment (control) group (n = 18). Validated outcome measures were used to measure the potential effectiveness of the intervention over a number of domains: physical and mental functioning (Short Form 36 [SF-36]); anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]); pain intensity and interference with life (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]); disability (Manchester Orofacial Pain Disability Scale [MOPDS]); and illness behavior (Revised Illness Perceptions Questionnaire [IPQr]). Bootstrap confidence intervals were computed for the treatment effect (ES) posttreatment and at 3 months follow-up and adjusted for baseline values of the outcome measure by using analysis of covariance. At posttreatment and the 3-month follow-up, 11 participants in the intervention group and 7 in the control group failed to complete outcome measures. The intervention was acceptable and could be feasibly delivered face to face or over the telephone. Although the pilot trial was not powered to draw conclusions about the effectiveness, it showed significant (P < .05) effects of the intervention on physical and mental functioning and treatment control. The self-help intervention was acceptable to patients and allowed them to better understand and self-manage chronic orofacial pain. It showed potential effectiveness on outcome domains related to functioning and illness perception. Further research is needed to understand the cost effectiveness of the intervention for chronic orofacial pain.

  11. Making Self-Help More Helpful: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Impact of Augmenting Self-Help Materials with Implementation Intentions on Promoting the Effective Self-Management of Anxiety Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varley, Rachel; Webb, Thomas L.; Sheeran, Paschal

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The effectiveness of self-help materials may be constrained by failures to undertake recommended exercises or to deploy the techniques that one has learned at the critical moment. The present randomized controlled trial investigated whether augmenting self-help materials with if-then plans (or implementation intentions) could overcome…

  12. Making Self-Help More Helpful: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Impact of Augmenting Self-Help Materials with Implementation Intentions on Promoting the Effective Self-Management of Anxiety Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varley, Rachel; Webb, Thomas L.; Sheeran, Paschal

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The effectiveness of self-help materials may be constrained by failures to undertake recommended exercises or to deploy the techniques that one has learned at the critical moment. The present randomized controlled trial investigated whether augmenting self-help materials with if-then plans (or implementation intentions) could overcome…

  13. A comparison of online versus workbook delivery of a self-help positive parenting program.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Matthew R; Dittman, Cassandra K; Farruggia, Susan P; Keown, Louise J

    2014-06-01

    A noninferiority randomized trial design compared the efficacy of two self-help variants of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program: an online version and a self-help workbook. We randomly assigned families of 193 children displaying early onset disruptive behavior difficulties to the online (N = 97) or workbook (N = 96) interventions. Parents completed questionnaire measures of child behavior, parenting, child maltreatment risk, personal adjustment and relationship quality at pre- and post-intervention and again at 6-month follow up. The short-term intervention effects of the Triple P Online program were not inferior to the workbook on the primary outcomes of disruptive child behavior and dysfunctional parenting as reported by both mothers and fathers. Both interventions were associated with significant and clinically meaningful declines from pre- to post-intervention in levels of disruptive child behavior, dysfunctional parenting styles, risk of child maltreatment, and inter-parental conflict on both mother and father report measures. Intervention effects were largely maintained at 6-month follow up, thus supporting the use of self-help parenting programs within a comprehensive population-based system of parenting support to reduce child maltreatment and behavioral problems in children.

  14. Feasibility randomised controlled trial of a self-help acceptance and commitment therapy intervention for grief and psychological distress in carers of palliative care patients.

    PubMed

    Davis, Esther L; Deane, Frank P; Lyons, Geoffrey Cb; Barclay, Gregory D; Bourne, Joan; Connolly, Vivienne

    2017-06-01

    We tested the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy self-help intervention for grief and psychological distress in carers of patients in palliative care. Carers were randomised to the control group, which received treatment as usual, or the intervention group, which received treatment as usual plus an acceptance and commitment therapy-based self-help booklet and telephone support call. Questionnaires were completed at baseline, 1-month post-allocation and 6 months post-loss. Results indicated that the intervention was generally feasible and viewed as acceptable to carers. Preliminary effectiveness analyses showed at least a small effect in acceptance, valued-living, grief and psychological distress.

  15. Development, implementation and evaluation of a new self-help programme for mothers of haemophilic children in Korea: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kang, H S; Kim, W O; Cho, K J; Jeong, Y

    2010-01-01

    Developing an effective support group programme is necessary to help the mothers of haemophilic children to encourage their children to live healthily and independently through early management, as well as to reduce the mothers' depression and stress. Although the need is high, there is no self-help group programme for mothers in Korea yet.The purpose of this study was to develop, implement and evaluate a new self-help group programme for mothers of children with haemophilia. Pre-experimental design was used to evaluate the effect of a pilot group. Participants were 12 mothers of haemophilic children below 15 years old. Knowledge on haemophilia, self-efficacy, depression, rearing stress and quality of life were evaluated using questionnaires. A Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare pre- and post-test.Knowledge, self-efficacy and quality of life were significantly increased, while depression was statistically reduced after the programme. The rearing stress was also reduced, but the result was not statistically significant.The self-help programme for mothers of haemophilic children increased the mothers' knowledge of haemophilia, self-efficacy and quality of life, while decreasing their depression symptoms. It seems that the programme was effective, but additional experimental study is necessary to verify the effects of the programme.

  16. Development policy and the evaluation of community self-help: the Harambee school movement in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Keller, E J

    1983-01-01

    This attempt to objectively assess the costs and benefits of involvement in the harambee education movement for individuals and families is directed at policymakers and is an exercise in policy analysis. Evaluative studies of this nature are essential to the improvement of the of the overall quality of policymaking. Despite general agreement that harambee education projects involving secondary schools differ in many ways from types of self-help projects, few attempts have been made to assess the long-term social impact of the harambee education movement. For nearly 2 decades Kenya's harambee movement has flourished and has been largely viewed as a positive contribution to national development. Between 1969-79, the total value of contributions to self-help projects rose from around $6 million to almost $27 million, demostrating the substantial inputs of local communities to the economic growth of the country as a whole. Policymakers, after initial reservations about independent self-help, in recent years have come to rely on such activities as complementary to the government's efforts. Self-help activities aimed at expanding educational opportunity are the most significant in terms of both monetary resources expended and the scope of human involvement. Benefits are difficult to extimate. The growing number of students in harambee schools does not necessarly indicate that the majority of these students are acquiring marketable skills or that their consequent levels of academic training will prepare them to complete successfully in the job market with the average student educated in government-sponsored schools. The evidence, in fact, clearly points in the opposite direction. Yet, politicians, policymakers, and citizens continue to regard harambee activities for expanding educational opportunities atall levels as necessary contributions to Kenya's development program and to individual achievement. The direct cost to government for harambee education can be compared

  17. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean? Property...

  18. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart I of... - Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant... Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. C Exhibit C to Subpart I of Part 1944—Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement This Agreement dated, 19__ between a nonprofit corporation...

  19. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart I of... - Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help...-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement This Agreement dated, 19__ between a nonprofit...

  20. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart I of... - Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help...-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement This Agreement dated, 19__ between a nonprofit...

  1. Evaluation of a DVD-Based Self-Help Program in Highly Socially Anxious Individuals--Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mall, Anna K.; Mehl, Annette; Kiko, Sonja; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Salize, Hans-Joachim; Hermann, Christiane; Hoffmann, Torsten; Bohus, Martin; Steil, Regina

    2011-01-01

    High social anxiety is a risk factor for the incidence of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Early diagnosis and intervention may prevent more severe psychiatric courses. Self-help programs may be a convenient, accessible, and effective intervention. This study examined the efficacy of a newly developed self-help program for SAD in individuals with…

  2. African Americans and Self-Help Education: The Missing Link in Adult Education. ERIC Digest No. 222.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Michael L.

    Self-help education and self-help literature is important in the lives of African American adults, but the basic models of learning, development, and program planning in adult education have often been developed with little concern for the unique needs of African Americans. In addition, current theories of adult learning often lack understanding…

  3. Evaluation of a DVD-Based Self-Help Program in Highly Socially Anxious Individuals--Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mall, Anna K.; Mehl, Annette; Kiko, Sonja; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Salize, Hans-Joachim; Hermann, Christiane; Hoffmann, Torsten; Bohus, Martin; Steil, Regina

    2011-01-01

    High social anxiety is a risk factor for the incidence of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Early diagnosis and intervention may prevent more severe psychiatric courses. Self-help programs may be a convenient, accessible, and effective intervention. This study examined the efficacy of a newly developed self-help program for SAD in individuals with…

  4. Usability and Utility of a Computerized Cognitive-Behavioral Self-Help Program for Public Speaking Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Page; Zimand, Elana; Schmertz, Stefan K.; Ferrer, Mirtha

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the use of a cognitive-behavioral computer-administered self-help program with minimal therapist contact for public speaking anxiety. Participants (N = 10) with social phobia, as measured by a structured clinical interview, completed the self-help program in an open clinical trial. The program was delivered via a CD-ROM during…

  5. Usability and Utility of a Computerized Cognitive-Behavioral Self-Help Program for Public Speaking Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Page; Zimand, Elana; Schmertz, Stefan K.; Ferrer, Mirtha

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the use of a cognitive-behavioral computer-administered self-help program with minimal therapist contact for public speaking anxiety. Participants (N = 10) with social phobia, as measured by a structured clinical interview, completed the self-help program in an open clinical trial. The program was delivered via a CD-ROM during…

  6. Overcoming Depression on the Internet (ODIN) (2): A Randomized Trial of a Self-Help Depression Skills Program With Reminders

    PubMed Central

    Eubanks, Donna; Reid, Ed; Kelleher, Chris; O'Connor, Elizabeth; DeBar, Lynn L; Lynch, Frances; Nunley, Sonia; Gullion, Christina

    2005-01-01

    Background Guided self-help programs for depression (with associated therapist contact) have been successfully delivered over the Internet. However, previous trials of pure self-help Internet programs for depression (without therapist contact), including an earlier trial conducted by us, have failed to yield positive results. We hypothesized that methods to increase participant usage of the intervention, such as postcard or telephone reminders, might result in significant effects on depression. Objectives This paper presents a second randomized trial of a pure self-help Internet site, ODIN (Overcoming Depression on the InterNet), for adults with self-reported depression. We hypothesized that frequently reminded participants receiving the Internet program would report greater reduction in depression symptoms and greater improvements in mental and physical health functioning than a comparison group with usual treatment and no access to ODIN. Methods This was a three-arm randomized control trial with a usual treatment control group and two ODIN intervention groups receiving reminders through postcards or brief telephone calls. The setting was a nonprofit health maintenance organization (HMO). We mailed recruitment brochures by US post to two groups: adults (n = 6030) who received depression medication or psychotherapy in the previous 30 days, and an age- and gender-matched group of adults (n = 6021) who did not receive such services. At enrollment and at 5-, 10- and 16-weeks follow-up, participants were reminded by email (and telephone, if nonresponsive) to complete online versions of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and the Short Form 12 (SF-12). We also recorded participant HMO health care services utilization in the 12 months following study enrollment. Results Out of a recruitment pool of 12051 approached subjects, 255 persons accessed the Internet enrollment site, completed the online consent form, and were randomized to one of the

  7. Overcoming Depression on the Internet (ODIN) (2): a randomized trial of a self-help depression skills program with reminders.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Greg; Eubanks, Donna; Reid, Ed; Kelleher, Chris; O'Connor, Elizabeth; DeBar, Lynn L; Lynch, Frances; Nunley, Sonia; Gullion, Christina

    2005-06-21

    Guided self-help programs for depression (with associated therapist contact) have been successfully delivered over the Internet. However, previous trials of pure self-help Internet programs for depression (without therapist contact), including an earlier trial conducted by us, have failed to yield positive results. We hypothesized that methods to increase participant usage of the intervention, such as postcard or telephone reminders, might result in significant effects on depression. This paper presents a second randomized trial of a pure self-help Internet site, ODIN (Overcoming Depression on the InterNet), for adults with self-reported depression. We hypothesized that frequently reminded participants receiving the Internet program would report greater reduction in depression symptoms and greater improvements in mental and physical health functioning than a comparison group with usual treatment and no access to ODIN. This was a three-arm randomized control trial with a usual treatment control group and two ODIN intervention groups receiving reminders through postcards or brief telephone calls. The setting was a nonprofit health maintenance organization (HMO). We mailed recruitment brochures by US post to two groups: adults (n = 6030) who received depression medication or psychotherapy in the previous 30 days, and an age- and gender-matched group of adults (n = 6021) who did not receive such services. At enrollment and at 5-, 10- and 16-weeks follow-up, participants were reminded by email (and telephone, if nonresponsive) to complete online versions of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and the Short Form 12 (SF-12). We also recorded participant HMO health care services utilization in the 12 months following study enrollment. Out of a recruitment pool of 12051 approached subjects, 255 persons accessed the Internet enrollment site, completed the online consent form, and were randomized to one of the three groups: (1) treatment as usual

  8. One-session computer-based exposure treatment for spider-fearful individuals--efficacy of a minimal self-help intervention in a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Müller, Birgit H; Kull, Sandra; Wilhelm, Frank H; Michael, Tanja

    2011-06-01

    Computer-based self-help treatments have been proposed to provide greater access to treatment while requiring minimum input from a therapist. The authors employed a randomised controlled trial to investigate the efficacy of one-session computer-based exposure (CBE) as a self-help treatment for spider-fearful individuals. Spider-fearful participants in a CBE group underwent one 27-min session of standardised exposure to nine fear-eliciting spider pictures. Treatment outcome was compared to spider-fearful control participants exposed to nine neutral pictures. Fear reduction was quantified on a subjective level by the Fear of Spiders Questionnaire (FSQ) and complemented with a behavioural approach test (BAT). Results demonstrate that compared to control participants, CBE participants showed greater fear reduction from pre- to posttreatment on both the subjective level (FSQ) and the behavioural level (BAT). Moreover, in contrast to the control group, the obtained subjective fear reduction effect remained stable in the CBE group at 1-month follow-up. These findings highlight the role of computer-based self-help as a minimal but effective intervention to reduce fear of spiders.

  9. A randomized controlled trial of a smoking cessation self-help intervention for dual users of tobacco cigarettes and E-cigarettes: Intervention development and research design.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Lauren R; Simmons, Vani N; Sutton, Steven K; Drobes, David J; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Meade, Cathy D; Unrod, Marina; Brandon, Karen O; Harrell, Paul T; Eissenberg, Thomas; Bullen, Christopher R; Brandon, Thomas H

    2017-09-01

    Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems, also called electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes, have been available for over a decade and use has been increasing dramatically. The primary reported reasons for use are to aid smoking cessation or reduction, yet a significant proportion appear to be long-term users of both products ("dual users"). Dual users may be motivated to quit smoking and might benefit from a behavioral intervention for smoking cessation. This paper describes the intervention development, as well as the design, methods, and data analysis plans for an ongoing randomized controlled trial (RCT). Formative research and learner verification were conducted to create a usable, understandable, and acceptable self-help intervention targeting dual users. The efficacy is being tested in an RCT with current dual users (N=2900) recruited nationally and randomized to one of three conditions. The Assessment Only (ASSESS) group only completes assessments. The Generic Self-Help (GENERIC) group receives non-targeted smoking cessation booklets and supplemental materials sent monthly over 18months. The e-cigarette Targeted Self-Help (eTARGET) group receives the newly developed intervention (targeted booklets and supplemental materials) sent over the same period. All participants complete self-report surveys every 3months over 2years. The primary study outcome is self-reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence. Cost-effectiveness metrics for the GENERIC and eTARGET interventions will also be calculated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Web-Based Self-Help Intervention With and Without Chat Counseling to Reduce Cannabis Use in Problematic Cannabis Users: Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Michael P; Wenger, Andreas; Berg, Oliver; Beck, Thilo; Stark, Lars; Buehler, Eveline; Haug, Severin

    2015-10-13

    After alcohol and tobacco, cannabis is the most widely used psychoactive substance in many countries worldwide. Although approximately one in ten users develops serious problems of dependency, only a minority attend outpatient addiction counseling centers. A Web-based intervention could potentially reach those users who hesitate to approach such treatment centers. To test the efficacy of a Web-based self-help intervention with and without chat counseling-Can Reduce-in reducing the cannabis use of problematic cannabis users as an alternative to outpatient treatment services. Altogether, 436 participants were recruited by various online and offline media for the Web-based trial. A total of 308 of these were eligible for study participation and were randomly allocated in an unblinded manner to either self-help with chat (n=114), self-help without chat (n=101), or a waiting list control group (n=93). The fully automated self-help intervention consisted of eight modules designed to reduce cannabis use, and was based on the principles of motivational interviewing, self-control practices, and methods of cognitive behavioral therapy. Additional individual chat counseling sessions were based on the same therapeutic principles. The sessions were conducted by trained counselors and addressed participants' personal problems. The main outcomes were the frequency (number of days) and quantity of cannabis use (number of standardized joints) per week, as entered into the consumption diary at baseline and at the 3-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included self-reported symptoms of cannabis use disorder, severity of cannabis dependence, risky alcohol use, and mental health symptoms. Intervention participation and retention were extracted from the user progress data and the consumption diary, respectively. Can Reduce participants were older (U=2.296, P=.02) and reported a greater number of cannabis use days at baseline than patients who entered outpatient treatment with cannabis

  11. A Web-Based Self-Help Intervention With and Without Chat Counseling to Reduce Cannabis Use in Problematic Cannabis Users: Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Andreas; Berg, Oliver; Beck, Thilo; Stark, Lars; Buehler, Eveline; Haug, Severin

    2015-01-01

    Background After alcohol and tobacco, cannabis is the most widely used psychoactive substance in many countries worldwide. Although approximately one in ten users develops serious problems of dependency, only a minority attend outpatient addiction counseling centers. A Web-based intervention could potentially reach those users who hesitate to approach such treatment centers. Objective To test the efficacy of a Web-based self-help intervention with and without chat counseling—Can Reduce—in reducing the cannabis use of problematic cannabis users as an alternative to outpatient treatment services. Methods Altogether, 436 participants were recruited by various online and offline media for the Web-based trial. A total of 308 of these were eligible for study participation and were randomly allocated in an unblinded manner to either self-help with chat (n=114), self-help without chat (n=101), or a waiting list control group (n=93). The fully automated self-help intervention consisted of eight modules designed to reduce cannabis use, and was based on the principles of motivational interviewing, self-control practices, and methods of cognitive behavioral therapy. Additional individual chat counseling sessions were based on the same therapeutic principles. The sessions were conducted by trained counselors and addressed participants' personal problems. The main outcomes were the frequency (number of days) and quantity of cannabis use (number of standardized joints) per week, as entered into the consumption diary at baseline and at the 3-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included self-reported symptoms of cannabis use disorder, severity of cannabis dependence, risky alcohol use, and mental health symptoms. Intervention participation and retention were extracted from the user progress data and the consumption diary, respectively. Results Can Reduce participants were older (U=2.296, P=.02) and reported a greater number of cannabis use days at baseline than patients who

  12. Usage and Longitudinal Effectiveness of a Web-Based Self-Help Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Program for Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Denisoff, Eilenna; Selby, Peter; Bagby, R Michael; Rudy, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are common problems that result in enormous suffering and economic costs. The efficacy of Web-based self-help approaches for anxiety disorders has been demonstrated in a number of controlled trials. However, there is little data regarding the patterns of use and effectiveness of freely available Web-based interventions outside the context of controlled trials. Objective To examine the use and longitudinal effectiveness of a freely available, 12-session, Web-based, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) program for panic disorder and agoraphobia. Methods Cumulative anonymous data were analyzed from 99695 users of the Panic Center. Usage statistics for the website were examined and a longitudinal survey of self-reported symptoms for people who registered for the CBT program was conducted. The primary outcome measures were self-reported panic-attack frequency and severity at the beginning of each session (sessions 2-12). Results Between September 1, 2002 and February 1, 2004, there were 484695 visits and 1148097 page views from 99695 users to the Panic Center. In that same time period, 1161 users registered for the CBT program. There was an extremely high attrition rate with only 12 (1.03%) out of 1161 of registered users completing the 12-week program. However, even for those who remained in the program less than 12 weeks we found statistically significant reductions (P<.002) in self-reported panic attack frequency and severity, comparing 2 weeks of data against data after 3, 6, or 8 weeks. For example, the 152 users completing only 3 sessions of the program reduced their average number of attacks per day from 1.03 (week 2) to 0.63 (week 3) (P<.001). Conclusions Freely available Web-based self-help will likely be associated with high attrition. However, for the highly self-selected group who stayed in the program, significant improvements were observed. PMID:15829479

  13. Disseminating self-help: positive psychology exercises in an online trial.

    PubMed

    Schueller, Stephen M; Parks, Acacia C

    2012-06-25

    The recent growth of positive psychology has led to a proliferation in exercises to increase positive thoughts, behaviors, and emotions. Preliminary evidence suggests that these exercises hold promise as an approach for reducing depressive symptoms. These exercises are typically researched in isolation as single exercises. The current study examined the acceptability of several multi-exercise packages using online dissemination. The purpose of this study was to investigate methods of dissemination that could increase the acceptability and effectiveness of positive psychology exercises. To achieve this goal, we compared the use of positive psychology exercises when delivered in packages of 2, 4, or 6 exercises. Self-help-seeking participants enrolled in this study by visiting an online research portal. Consenting participants were randomly assigned to receive 2, 4, or 6 positive psychology exercises (or assessments only) over a 6-week period. These exercises drew from the content of group positive psychotherapy. Participants visited an automated website that distributed exercise instructions, provided email reminders, and contained the baseline and follow-up assessments. Following each exercise, participants rated their enjoyment of the exercise, answered how often they had used each technique, and completed outcome measures. In total, 1364 individuals consented to participate. Attrition rates across the 2-, 4-, and 6-exercise conditions were similar at 55.5% (181/326), 55.8% (203/364), and 52.7% (168/319) respectively but were significantly greater than the attrition rate of 42.5% (151/355) for the control condition (χ(2)(3) = 16.40, P < .001). Participants in the 6-exercise condition were significant more likely than participants in the 4-exercise condition to use both the third (F(1,312) = 5.61, P = .02) and fourth (F(1,313 )= 6.03, P = .02) exercises. For 5 of the 6 exercises, enjoyment was related to continued use of the exercise at 6-week follow-up (r's = .12

  14. Investigation of Self-Help Oil-Spill Response Techniques and Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    results of the research performed on bioremediation do not conclusively indicate what the proper application ratio for the bioprod- ucts should be...AD-A260 881 Report No. CG-D-21-92 1, jjr II . I’ !,lI, INVESTIGATION OF SELF-HELP OIL-SPILL RESPONSE TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT Walter I. Enderlin John...Springfield, Virginia 22161 JAN 2 2 1993 -" E Prepared for: . U.S. Coast Guard Research and Development Center 1082 Shennecossett Road Groton

  15. Self-Help Service Center Management System User’s Manual: Version 2.5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    USACERL. Interested parties can find out how to obtain the Self-Help Service Center Management System software by contacting RCE, 1408 W. University...Customer Transaction. 4-8 Ctose Transaction List Overdues List Outstanding List FaciLity Account I : 08423077 Customrs : 084423077 DooGSM, CHARLES Unit...LOC: BUVAA I 102A 5620-01-TOO-0844 GLASS , DOUBLE STRENGTH, SH 20 C 9 16 K X 50" 1 102A 5680-00-477-6071 COVE BASE, BLACK, 4- X 48" EA 48 C 90 RUBSER

  16. Amount of information on case illustrations in self-help psychology books.

    PubMed

    Forest, J J

    1998-12-01

    40 books on self-help psychology were examined in a 2 x 2 multivariate analysis of covariance design for the number of case illustrations, number of lines of text about case illustrations, and average number of lines per case illustration. The covariate was pages per book and the independent variables were status of the book (bestseller or nonbestseller) and decade of publication (1970-1979 or 1980-1989). It was hypothesized that bestsellers would contain more case illustrations and lines of text describing case illustrations than nonbestsellers. Case illustrations per book in nonbestsellers increased significantly in number over the two decades when compared to bestsellers.

  17. Do grief self-help books convey contemporary perspectives on grieving?

    PubMed

    Dennis, Michael Robert

    2012-01-01

    Grief therapy and psychology literatures of the modern Western world conceptualized bereavement and grief as processes to be "worked through" so that other relationships could be pursued. In the last decade or so, however, grief theorists have endorsed the value of attaining new meaning(s) and continuing bonds with our lost loved ones instead of "moving on from," "letting go of" or "achieving closure from" them. This article tracks the evolution of thought pertaining to this shift and examines its relevance to grief self-help books that may offer Americans guidance in the ways of grieving.

  18. Unlocking community capability through promotion of self-help for health: experience from Chakaria, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Bhuiya, Abbas; Hanifi, Syed Manzoor Ahmed; Hoque, Shahidul

    2016-11-15

    People's participation in health, enshrined in the 1978 Alma Ata declaration, seeks to tap into community capability for better health and empowerment. One mechanism to promote participation in health is through participatory action research (PAR) methods. Beginning in 1994, the Bangladeshi research organization ICDDR,B implemented a project "self-help for health," to work with existing rural self-help organizations (SHOs). SHOs are organizations formed by villagers for their well-being through their own initiatives without external material help. This paper describes the project's implementation, impact, and reflective learnings. Following a self-help conceptual framework and PAR, the project focused on building the capacity of SHOs and their members through training on organizational issues, imparting health literacy, and supporting participatory planning and monitoring. Quarterly activity reports and process documentation were the main sources of qualitative data used for this paper, enabling documentation of changes in organizational issues, as well as the number and nature of initiatives taken by the SHOs in the intervention area. Health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS) data from intervention and comparison areas since 1999 allowed assessment of changes in health indicators over time. Villagers and members of the SHOs actively participated in the self-help activities. SHO functionality increased in the intervention area, in terms of improved organizational processes and planned health activities. These included most notably in convening more regular meetings, identifying community needs, developing and implementing action plans, and monitoring progress and impact. Between 1999 and 2015, while decreases in infant mortality and increases in utilization of at least one antenatal care visit occurred similarly in intervention and comparison areas, increases in immunization, skilled birth attendance, facility deliveries and sanitary latrines were

  19. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial investigating self-help email messages for sub-threshold depression: the Mood Memos study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sub-threshold depression is common, impairs functioning, and increases the risk of developing major depression. Although psychological treatments have been investigated for sub-threshold depression, they are costly. A less costly alternative could be an educational health promotion campaign about effective self-help for depression symptoms. The aim of the study is to test the efficacy of a low-cost email-based mental health promotion campaign in changing self-help behaviour and preventing more severe depression in adults with sub-threshold depression. Methods/Design The project is a randomised controlled trial of an automated preventive email-intervention aimed at people with sub-threshold depression. Adults aged 18+ with sub-threshold depression (as measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9), who are not already receiving professional treatment for depression, are eligible for admission to the study. Internet users will sign up via the study website http://www.moodmemos.com and be randomly allocated to receive emails twice weekly for six weeks containing either self-help coping advice or general information about depression as a control. Outcomes will be assessed at the start, midpoint, and end of the intervention, as well as six months later. Outcomes assessed include symptoms, incidence of major depression, psychological distress, social and occupational functioning, coping strategies, and coping self-efficacy. The primary hypothesis is that the Mood Memo emails containing coping strategies will reduce depression symptoms and be better at preventing major depression than the control emails that contain general information about depression. Discussion Promotion of actions an individual can take to prevent physical disease is a technique often used in public health. This study applies this approach to mental health, and explores whether a low-cost, easily disseminated email-based campaign can improve self-help coping behaviour and prevent

  20. Self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Ho, Fiona Yan-Yee; Chung, Ka-Fai; Yeung, Wing-Fai; Ng, Tommy H; Kwan, Ka-Shing; Yung, Kam-Ping; Cheng, Sammy K

    2015-02-01

    Self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an increasingly popular treatment option for insomnia. The objective of this meta-analysis was to compile an up-to-date evaluation on the efficacy, adherence, acceptability and dropout rate of self-help CBT for insomnia. We systematically searched six key electronic databases up until May 2013. Two researchers independently selected relevant publications, extracted data, and evaluated methodological quality according to the Cochrane criteria. Twenty randomized controlled trials were included; 10 of which were published after the last review up until January 2007. Meta-analysis of self-help CBT vs. waiting-list, routine care or no treatment was performed. Results showed that self-help CBT improved sleep, sleep-related cognitions and anxiety and depressive symptoms. Effect sizes for sleep-diary-derived sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, and wake after sleep onset at immediate posttreatment were 0.80, 0.66, and 0.55, respectively. The average dropout rate of self-help CBT at immediate posttreatment was 14.5%, which was not significantly different from the 16.7% in therapist-administered CBT. Subgroup analyses supported the added benefit of telephone consultation. In conclusion, self-help CBT is efficacious and acceptable as an entry level of a stepped care model for insomnia. In places where face-to-face treatments are unavailable or too costly, self-help CBT can be considered as a compromise.

  1. Qualitative process evaluation of a problem-solving guided self-help manual for family carers of young people with first-episode psychosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Caring for a young person experiencing first-episode psychosis is challenging and can affect carers’ well-being adversely. While some face-to-face approaches have achieved promising outcomes, they are costly and resource-intensive to provide, restricting their reach and penetration. Guided self-help in book-form (or bibliotherapy) is an alternative but untested approach in these circumstances. In this study, we aimed to evaluate carers’ beliefs about the usefulness of problem-solving guided self-help manual for primary carers of young people with first-episode psychosis. Methods A qualitative process evaluation nested in a randomised controlled trial, conducted across two early intervention psychosis services in Melbourne, Australia. 124 carers were randomised to problem-solving guided self-help intervention or treatment as usual. We also undertook a qualitative process evaluation, using individual interviews, with a random sample of 24 of the intervention group. A thematic analysis of the qualitative data was undertaken, which is the subject of this paper. Interviews were conducted between January 2009 and September 2010. Results Three themes were abstracted from the data, reflecting carers’ beliefs about the usefulness of the manual: promoting carers’ well-being, increasing carers’ understanding of and support for the young person with first-episode psychosis, and accessibility and delivery modes of the programme. Conclusion This process evaluation highlights that guided self-help is useful in informing and supporting carers of affected young people. While there is scope for broadening the delivery modes, the approach is easy to use and accessible, and can be used as a cost-effective adjunct to standard support provided to carers, by community mental health nurses and other clinicians. Trial registration ACTRN12609000064202 PMID:24906392

  2. Evaluation of an internet-based self-help program for better quality of sleep among Japanese workers: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Etsuji; Tsuchiya, Masao; Hirokawa, Kumi; Taniguchi, Toshiyo; Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu; Kawakami, Norito

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of Internet-based self-help programs for insomnia is still unclear. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of an Internet-based self-help program for better quality of sleep among adult workers. Forty-three volunteers were recruited and randomly assigned to either an intervention group (n=21) or a waiting-list group (n=22). The intervention group participated in a two-week Internet-based program, including selecting and daily practicing sleep-related target behaviors and monitoring those behaviors along with sleep quality. At the same time, each participant received automatically generated, personalized messages and reports both daily and weekly. A total of 12 intervention group participants and 18 waiting-list group participants completed questionnaires at baseline, post-intervention, and at a 3-wk follow-up. Subjective sleep quality was measured by a self-reported questionnaire developed for this study. The sleep quality score increased in the intervention group at post-intervention, with a significant interaction effect [F(1,28)=5.19, p=0.031]. Sleep-related behaviors also greatly increased in the intervention group at post-intervention, with a significant interaction effect [F(1,28)=7.14, p=0.012]. Sleep-onset latency reduced in the intervention group at follow-up, with a marginally significant effect [F(1,28)=3.52, p=0.071]. The Internet-based self-help program improves subjective sleep quality and sleep-onset latency among adult workers.

  3. A randomized controlled trial of guided self-help for improving the experience of caring for carers of clients with depression.

    PubMed

    McCann, Terence V; Songprakun, Wallapa; Stephenson, John

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive behaviour therapy guided self-help manual for enhancing the experience of caregiving of family carers of individuals with depression. The prevalence of depression is increasing markedly in Thailand. While primary carers give most of the support for individuals with depression, they receive little support from mental health services in this critical role. A randomized controlled trial. Carers were randomized to guided self-help (n = 27), while the control group received standard information and support (n = 27). Both groups also received a short weekly telephone call. Participants were assessed at three time points; the outcome measure was the Experience of Caregiving Inventory. A doubly multivariate analysis of variance (anova) procedure, including between-group and within-group factors, was implemented. Fieldwork was from October 2007-May 2008. Fifty-four carers completed the study and intent-to-treat analyses were undertaken. The findings showed there was a significant reduction in the total negative experience of caring, from baseline to post-treatment, in the intervention group recipients of the manual compared with the control group and treatment effects were maintained at one-month follow-up. Similarly, a significant improvement in the total positive experience of caring occurred, from baseline to post-treatment, in the intervention group in contrast with the control group and these outcomes were sustained at one-month follow-up. Guided self-help strengthen carers' positive and reduces their negative, experience of caring. The study contributes to the limited evidence base about this approach in a developing country such as Thailand. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. How to implement the Science Fair Self-Help Development Program in schools

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, D.

    1994-01-01

    This manual is intended to act as a working guide for setting up a Science Fair Volunteer Support Committee at your school. The Science Fair Volunteer Support Committee, or SFVSC, is the key component of the Science Fair Self-Help program, which was developed by Sandia National Laboratories and is designed to support a school`s science activities. The SFVSC is a team of parents and community volunteers who work in concert with a school`s teaching staff to assist and manage all areas of a school Science and Engineering Fair. The main advantage of creating such a committee is that it frees the science teachers from the organizational aspects of the fair and lets them concentrate on their job of teaching science. This manual is based on information gained through a Self-Help Development pilot program that was developed by Sandia National Laboratories during the 1991--92 school year at three Albuquerque, NM, middle schools. The manual describes the techniques that were successful in the pilot program and discusses how these techniques might be implemented in other schools. This manual also discusses problems that may be encountered, including suggestions for how they might be resolved.

  5. Hypnotic taper with or without self-help treatment of insomnia: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Belleville, Geneviève; Guay, Catherine; Guay, Bernard; Morin, Charles M

    2007-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a minimal intervention focusing on hypnotic discontinuation and cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for insomnia. Fifty-three adult chronic users of hypnotics were randomly assigned to an 8-week hypnotic taper program, used alone or combined with a self-help CBT. Weekly hypnotic use decreased in both conditions, from a nearly nightly use at baseline to less than once a week at posttreatment. Nightly dosage (in lorazepam equivalent) decreased from 1.67 mg to 0.12 mg. Participants who received CBT improved their sleep efficiency by 8%, whereas those who did not remained stable. Total wake time decreased by 52 min among CBT participants and increased by 13 min among those receiving the taper schedule alone. Total sleep time remained stable throughout withdrawal in both CBT and taper conditions. The present findings suggest that a systematic withdrawal schedule might be sufficient in helping chronic users stop their hypnotic medication. The addition of a self-help treatment focusing on insomnia, a readily available and cost-effective alternative to individual psychotherapy, produced greater sleep improvement.

  6. Guided Self-help for Eating Disorders: A Systematic Review and Metaregression.

    PubMed

    Traviss-Turner, Gemma D; West, Robert M; Hill, Andrew J

    2017-05-01

    Evidence-based self-help is a recommended first stage of treatment for mild-moderate eating disorders. The provision of guidance enhances outcome. The literature evaluating exclusively 'guided' self-help (GSH) has not been systematically reviewed. The aim was to establish the effectiveness of GSH for reducing global eating disorder psychopathology and abstinence from binge eating, compared with controls. Results were pooled using random effects meta-analysis and heterogeneity explored using metaregression. Thirty randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. Results showed an overall effect of GSH on global eating disorder psychopathology (-0.46) and binge abstinence (-0.20). There was strong evidence for an association between diagnosis of binge eating disorder and binge abstinence. Current interventions need to be adapted to address features other than binge eating. Further research is required to help us understand the effectiveness of GSH in children and young people, invariably high dropout rates and how technology can enhance interventions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  7. Enhancing motivation to change in eating disorders with an online self-help program.

    PubMed

    Leung, Sau Fong; Ma, Joyce; Russell, Janice

    2013-08-01

    Ambivalence to change is a major obstacle to treating people with eating disorders. Enhancing motivation to change can contribute to recovery from the disorders. This study used an Internet-based self-help program developed in the Asia-Pacific region to identify the motivational stages of change in people with eating disorders. It explored their perceptions of the benefits and costs of taking action against their eating disorders, and assessed their involvement in motivational enhancement exercises and their improvement in eating disorder psychopathology. A total of 185 participants, aged 16-50 years (mean age, 26.5) were involved in the open-trial program with a motivational enhancement component and completed the Motivational Stages of Change Questionnaire (MSCARED), the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire version 5 (EDE-Q5) and the Eating Disorder Inventory version 3 (EDI-3). The results show that more participants perceived the benefits of taking action against their eating disorders than the costs. Completer analysis shows that they experienced significant improvement in motivational stages of change and eating disorder psychopathology, from a baseline assessment to 1-month and 3-month follow ups. The self-help program has potential benefit for people with eating disorders and its use could be encouraged by health-care professionals to enhance the motivation to change and facilitate recovery. © 2012 The Authors; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  8. A quantitative review of self-help research with the severely and profoundly mentally retarded.

    PubMed

    Konarski, E A; Diorio, M S

    1985-01-01

    Eighty-seven studies published since 1964 through 1982 on training self-help skills to severely and profoundly mentally retarded persons were analyzed according to 19 parameters reflecting their methodological details. The results showed a steady interest in this research area over time, but 63% of the studies focused on toileting and feeding with fewer studies looking at other self-help skills. Package treatments composed primarily of accelerative techniques were most frequently used to train these skills. Methodologically, it was found that these studies typically involved profoundly mentally retarded people (33% of studies) who were trained by residential staff (69% of studies) in institutional settings (63% of studies). The results also indicated an increase over time in the number of studies rated acceptable on the reliability and design parameters. Finally, very few studies reported assessments of generalization, maintenance, or social validity. It was concluded that, (a) researchers need to broaden their interests in terms of settings, trainers, and behaviors studied to best meet the needs of this population, (b) the experimental quality of this literature is improving, and (c) the social impact of observed behavior changes has yet to be fully explored.

  9. Self-Help Booklets for Preventing Postpartum Smoking Relapse: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Vani Nath; Meade, Cathy D.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Lopez Khoury, Elena N.; Sutton, Steven K.; Lee, Ji-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We tested a series of self-help booklets designed to prevent postpartum smoking relapse. Methods. We recruited 700 women in months 4 through 8 of pregnancy, who quit smoking for their pregnancy. We randomized the women to receive either (1) 10 Forever Free for Baby and Me (FFB) relapse prevention booklets, mailed until 8 months postpartum, or (2) 2 existing smoking cessation materials, as a usual care control (UCC). Assessments were completed at baseline and at 1, 8, and 12 months postpartum. Results. We received baseline questionnaires from 504 women meeting inclusion criteria. We found a main effect for treatment at 8 months, with FFB yielding higher abstinence rates (69.6%) than UCC (58.5%). Treatment effect was moderated by annual household income and age. Among lower income women (< $30 000), treatment effects were found at 8 and 12 months postpartum, with respective abstinence rates of 72.2% and 72.1% for FFB and 53.6% and 50.5% for UCC. No effects were found for higher income women. Conclusions. Self-help booklets appeared to be efficacious and offered a low-cost modality for providing relapse-prevention assistance to low-income pregnant and postpartum women. PMID:22994170

  10. Communication disability in Fiji: Community self-help and help-seeking support.

    PubMed

    Hopf, Suzanne C; McLeod, Sharynne; McDonagh, Sarah H; Wang, Cen; Rakanace, Epenisa N

    2017-07-07

    To understand how a Fijian community supports people with communication disability (PWCD) and whether their support is associated with participant demographics. Thematic analysis of 144 questionnaires that asked about participants' actions to support a fictional child and adult with communication disability. Participant responses fell into two categories: what they would do directly (self-help) and people and places where they would seek assistance (help-seeking). Self-help behaviours included: making a change to their own communication style or mode; trying to change their own and others' behaviour; teaching new skills; praying; changing the physical environment; seeking information independently; assessing or observing; and, using traditional medicine, western medicine, or traditional belief practices. Help-seeking behaviours included seeking help from: other community members; education professionals; a professional in another country; spiritual leaders; traditional belief practitioners; traditional medicine practitioners; western health care practitioners; or, an alternative provider (e.g. home, orphanage, nursing home). Younger participants and those of iTaukei Fijian ethnicity were more likely to seek help from other community members. This Fijian community actively supports people with communication disability within available networks. Development of speech-language pathology services for people with communication disability living in similar communities should harness the informal knowledge within these networks.

  11. Guided self-help interventions for mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Sophie; Heyman, Isobel; Coughtrey, Anna; Simmonds, Jess; Varadkar, Sophia; Stephenson, Terence; DeJong, Margaret; Shafran, Roz

    2016-11-04

    Rates of mental health disorders are significantly greater in children with physical illnesses than in physically well children. Children with neurological conditions, such as epilepsy, are known to have particularly high rates of mental health disorders. Despite this, mental health problems in children with neurological conditions have remained under-recognised and under-treated in clinical settings. Evidence-based guided self-help interventions are efficacious in reducing symptoms of mental health disorders in children, but their efficacy in reducing symptoms of common mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions has not been investigated. We aim to pilot a guided self-help intervention for the treatment of mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions. A pilot randomised controlled trial with 18 patients with neurological conditions and mental health disorders will be conducted. Participants attending specialist neurology clinics at a National UK Children's Hospital will be randomised to receive guided self-help for common mental health disorders or to a 12-week waiting list control. Participants in the treatment group will receive 10 sessions of guided self-help delivered over the telephone. The waiting list control group will receive the intervention after a waiting period of 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure is reduction in symptoms of mental health disorders. Exclusion criteria are limited to those at significant risk of harm to self or others, the presence of primary mental health disorder other than anxiety, depression or disruptive behaviour (e.g. psychosis, eating disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder) or intellectual disability at a level meaning potential participants would be unable to access the intervention. The study has ethical approval from the Camden and Islington NHS Research Ethics Committee, registration number 14.LO.1353. Results will be disseminated to patients, the wider public, clinicians and

  12. Evaluation of social-cognitive versus stage-matched, self-help physical activity interventions at the workplace.

    PubMed

    Griffin-Blake, C Shannon; DeJoy, David M

    2006-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of stage-matched vs. social-cognitive physical activity interventions in a work setting. Both interventions were designed as minimal-contact, self-help programs suitable for large-scale application. Randomized trial. Participants were randomized into one of the two intervention groups at baseline; the follow-up assessment was conducted 1 month later. A large, public university in the southeastern region of the United States. Employees from two academic colleges within the participating institution were eligible to participate: 366 employees completed the baseline assessment; 208 of these completed both assessments (baseline and follow-up) and met the compliance criteria. Printed, self-help exercise booklets (12 to 16 pages in length) either (1) matched to the individual's stage of motivational readiness for exercise adoption at baseline or (2) derived from social-cognitive theory but not matched by stage. Standard questionnaires were administered to assess stage of motivational readiness for physical activity; physical activity participation; and exercise-related processes of change, decisional balance, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and goal satisfaction. The two interventions were equally effective in moving participants to higher levels of motivational readiness for regular physical activity. Among participants not already in maintenance at baseline, 34.9% in the stage-matched condition progressed, while 33.9% in the social-cognitive group did so (chi2 = not significant). Analyses of variance showed that the two treatment groups did not differ in terms of physical activity participation, cognitive and behavioral process use, decisional balance, or the other psychological constructs. For both treatment groups, cognitive process use remained high across all stages, while behavioral process use increased at the higher stages. The pros component of decisional balance did not vary across stage, whereas cons decreased significantly

  13. Mexican American women's perspectives on a culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy guided self-help program for binge eating.

    PubMed

    Shea, Munyi; Cachelin, Fary M; Gutierrez, Guadalupe; Wang, Sherry; Phimphasone, Phoutdavone

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) among Latinas is comparable to those of the general population; however, few interventions and treatment trial research have focused on this group. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for binge eating related disorders. CBT-based guided self-help (CBTgsh)-a low-cost minimal intervention-has also been shown effective in improving binge eating related symptom, but the effectiveness of the CBTgsh among ethnic minority women is not well understood. Cultural adaptation of evidence-based treatments can be an important step for promoting treatment accessibility and engagement among underserved groups. This qualitative study was part of a larger investigation that examined the feasibility and efficacy of a culturally adapted CBTgsh program among Mexican American women with binge eating disorders. Posttreatment focus groups were conducted with 12 Mexican American women with BN or BED who participated in the intervention. Data were analyzed with the grounded theory methodology (Corbin & Strauss, 2008). Three themes emerged from the data: (a) eating behavior and body ideals are socially and culturally constructed, (b) multifaceted support system is crucial to Mexican American women's treatment engagement and success, and (c) the culturally adapted CBTgsh program is feasible and relevant to Mexican American women's experience, but it can be strengthened with increased family and peer involvement. The findings provide suggestions for further adaptation and refinement of the CBTgsh, and implications for future research as well as early intervention for disordered eating in organized care settings.

  14. Short-term effectiveness of web-based guided self-help for phobic outpatients: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kok, Robin N; van Straten, Annemieke; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Cuijpers, Pim

    2014-09-29

    Internet-based guided self-help has been successfully used in the general population, but it is unknown whether this method can be effectively used in outpatient clinics for patients waiting for face-to-face psychotherapy for phobias. The aim was to assess the clinical effectiveness of Phobias Under Control, an Internet-based intervention based on exposure therapy with weekly guidance. We conducted a randomized controlled trial, recruiting 212 outpatients scheduled to receive face-to-face psychotherapy for any type of phobia at an outpatient clinic. Participants suffering from at least 1 DSM-IV or ICD-10 classified phobia (social phobia, agoraphobia with or without panic disorder, and/or specific phobia as ascertained by a telephone interview at baseline) were randomly allocated to either a 5-week Internet-based guided self-help program based on exposure therapy with weekly student support followed by face-to-face psychotherapy (n=105) or a wait-list control group followed by face-to-face psychotherapy (n=107). Primary outcome was the Fear Questionnaire (FQ). Secondary outcomes were the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Center of Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (CES-D). Assessments took place by telephone at baseline (T0) and on the Internet at posttest (T1, self-assessment at 5 weeks after baseline). Missing data at T1 were imputed. At posttest, analysis of covariance on the intention-to-treat sample showed significant but small effect sizes between intervention and control groups on the FQ (d=0.35, P=.02), CES-D (d=0.34, P=.03), and a nonsignificant effect size on the BAI (d=0.28. P=.05). Although initial acceptance was good, high nonresponse was observed, with 86 of 212 participants (40.5%) lost to follow-up at T1 and only 14 of 105 (13.3%) intervention participants finishing all 5 weeks. Phobias Under Control is modestly effective in lowering phobic and depressive symptoms in a relatively short period and may be clinically beneficial when implemented in

  15. Short-Term Effectiveness of Web-Based Guided Self-Help for Phobic Outpatients: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    van Straten, Annemieke; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Cuijpers, Pim

    2014-01-01

    Background Internet-based guided self-help has been successfully used in the general population, but it is unknown whether this method can be effectively used in outpatient clinics for patients waiting for face-to-face psychotherapy for phobias. Objective The aim was to assess the clinical effectiveness of Phobias Under Control, an Internet-based intervention based on exposure therapy with weekly guidance. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial, recruiting 212 outpatients scheduled to receive face-to-face psychotherapy for any type of phobia at an outpatient clinic. Participants suffering from at least 1 DSM-IV or ICD-10 classified phobia (social phobia, agoraphobia with or without panic disorder, and/or specific phobia as ascertained by a telephone interview at baseline) were randomly allocated to either a 5-week Internet-based guided self-help program based on exposure therapy with weekly student support followed by face-to-face psychotherapy (n=105) or a wait-list control group followed by face-to-face psychotherapy (n=107). Primary outcome was the Fear Questionnaire (FQ). Secondary outcomes were the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Center of Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (CES-D). Assessments took place by telephone at baseline (T0) and on the Internet at posttest (T1, self-assessment at 5 weeks after baseline). Missing data at T1 were imputed. Results At posttest, analysis of covariance on the intention-to-treat sample showed significant but small effect sizes between intervention and control groups on the FQ (d=0.35, P=.02), CES-D (d=0.34, P=.03), and a nonsignificant effect size on the BAI (d=0.28. P=.05). Although initial acceptance was good, high nonresponse was observed, with 86 of 212 participants (40.5%) lost to follow-up at T1 and only 14 of 105 (13.3%) intervention participants finishing all 5 weeks. Conclusions Phobias Under Control is modestly effective in lowering phobic and depressive symptoms in a relatively short period and

  16. Self-help, mutual aid and chronic patients' clubs in Croatia, Yugoslavia: discussion paper.

    PubMed Central

    Kulcar, Z

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the clubs for patients with hypertension which have operated effectively in parts of Croatia and Slovenia (Yugoslavia) for more than 15 years, with many thousands of patients enrolling voluntarily. Based on the principle of self-help, yet involving the regular participation of members of a patient's own primary health team, they increase compliance with long-term treatment regimens and improve the quality of life. Such programmes are capable of reducing the amount of time devoted by a medical practitioner while increasing the effectiveness of treatments. If they are to succeed, it is essential to ensure regular club meetings, social activities and encouragement to each individual member to find a role and to continue attending for as long as possible. A new life style and consequent benefits to health are obtained only through long membership. PMID:2041007

  17. NO-FEAR Airlines: A Computer-aided Self-help Treatment for Flying Phobia.

    PubMed

    Quero, Soledad; Campos, Daniel; Riera Del Amo, Antonio; Bretón-López, Juana; Tortella-Feliu, Miquel; Baños, Rosa Ma; Botella, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    In vivo exposure is the treatment of choice for specific phobias. However, this treatment is linked to a number of limitations in its implementation. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies for improving treatment adherence, acceptance, and dissemination of evidence-based treatments. Information and Communication Technologies, specifically, computerized programs boast advantages in treating flying phobia. NO-FEAR Airlines is a Computer-aided Self-help Treatment for this problem, which can be self-applied via Internet. NO-FEAR Airlines treatment protocol comprises three therapeutic components: psychoeducation, exposure and overlearning. Exposure is carried out through 6 scenarios that are composed by images and real sounds related to a flight in process. The aim of the present work is to describe NO-FEAR Airlines program.

  18. Effects of a Guided Internet-Delivered Self-Help Intervention for Adolescents With Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Voerman, Jessica S; Remerie, Sylvia; Westendorp, Tessa; Timman, Reinier; Busschbach, Jan J V; Passchier, Jan; de Klerk, Cora

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is effective in reducing the frequency and intensity of chronic pain in adolescents. However, CBT seems not to be considered acceptable by all adolescents. The main aim of our study was therefore to evaluate the effects of guided Internet-delivered self-help for adolescents with chronic pain. Adolescents (N = 69) were assessed on the outcome measures of pain, coping, disability, catastrophizing, rewarding of pain behavior by parents, and quality of life. Measures were taken 7 weeks before treatment and at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up. Multilevel modeling was used for longitudinal analysis of the data. Pain intensity, interference caused by pain, rewarding of pain behavior by parents, and sleep problems significantly decreased during the intervention. The quality-of-life scores for pain, general behavior, mental health, family activities, and health changes also significantly improved during the intervention. With regard to coping, only problem-focused avoidance behavior significantly increased. No significant differences were found for pain-related disability and pain catastrophizing. Contrary to expectations, guided Internet-delivered self-help for chronic pain is difficult to use in adolescents, resulting in treatment attrition and loss to follow-up. Dutch Trial Register NTR1926. The results of this trial suggest that Internet-based self-management is effective in decreasing pain intensity in adolescents with chronic pain. Because the intervention is grounded in CBT, we expect the underlying mechanism to be a change in self-management skills and in the ability of challenging dysfunctional thoughts. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 41 CFR 102-75.595 - What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance use... Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.595 What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or...

  20. 41 CFR 102-75.555 - Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance for low-income individuals or... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.555 Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or...

  1. 41 CFR 102-75.595 - What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance use... Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.595 What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or...

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.555 - Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance for low-income individuals or... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.555 Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or...

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.600 - What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? 102-75.600 Section 102... Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.600 What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? In the absence of...

  4. 41 CFR 102-75.560 - Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance purposes is... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.560 Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help...

  5. 41 CFR 102-75.555 - Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance for low-income individuals or... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.555 Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or...

  6. 41 CFR 102-75.595 - What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance use... Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.595 What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or...

  7. 41 CFR 102-75.600 - What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? 102-75.600 Section 102... Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.600 What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? In the absence of...

  8. 41 CFR 102-75.595 - What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance use... Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.595 What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or...

  9. 41 CFR 102-75.560 - Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance purposes is... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.560 Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help...

  10. 41 CFR 102-75.600 - What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? 102-75.600 Section 102... Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.600 What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? In the absence of...

  11. 41 CFR 102-75.600 - What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? 102-75.600 Section 102... Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.600 What happens if HUD does not approve any applications for self-help housing or housing assistance use? In the absence of...

  12. 41 CFR 102-75.555 - Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance for low-income individuals or... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.555 Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or...

  13. 41 CFR 102-75.560 - Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance purposes is... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.560 Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help...

  14. 41 CFR 102-75.560 - Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance purposes is... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.560 Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help...

  15. 7 CFR Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of... - Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants B Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B-1 Exhibit B-1... Assistance Grants Exhibit B will be used by all Technical Assistance (TA) Grantees obtaining self-help TA...

  16. Effectiveness and cost-utility of a guided self-help exercise program for patients treated with total laryngectomy: protocol of a multi-center randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Femke; Cnossen, Ingrid C; Eerenstein, Simone E J; Coupé, Veerle M H; Witte, Birgit I; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Doornaert, Patricia; Braunius, Weibel W; De Bree, Remco; Hardillo, José A U; Honings, Jimmie; Halmos, György B; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2016-08-02

    Total laryngectomy with or without adjuvant (chemo)radiation often induces speech, swallowing and neck and shoulder problems. Speech, swallowing and shoulder exercises may prevent or diminish these problems. The aim of the present paper is to describe the study, which is designed to investigate the effectiveness and cost-utility of a guided self-help exercise program built into the application "In Tune without Cords" among patients treated with total laryngectomy. Patients, up to 5 years earlier treated with total laryngectomy with or without (chemo)radiation will be recruited for participation in this study. Patients willing to participate will be randomized to the intervention or control group (1:1). Patients in the intervention group will be provided access to a guided self-help exercise program and a self-care education program built into the application "In Tune without Cords". Patients in the control group will only be provided access to the self-care education program. The primary outcome is the difference in swallowing quality (SWAL-QOL) between the intervention and control group. Secondary outcome measures address speech problems (SHI), shoulder disability (SDQ), quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30, QLQ-H&N35 and EQ-5D), direct and indirect costs (adjusted iMCQ and iPCQ measures) and self-management (PAM). Patients will be asked to complete these outcome measures at baseline, immediately after the intervention or control period (i.e. at 3 months follow-up) and at 6 months follow-up. This randomized controlled trial will provide knowledge on the effectiveness of a guided self-help exercise program for patients treated with total laryngectomy. In addition, information on the value for money of such an exercise program will be provided. If this guided self-help program is (cost)effective for patients treated with total laryngectomy, the next step will be to implement this exercise program in current clinical practice. NTR5255 Protocol version 4 date September

  17. Development and preliminary testing of a web-based, self-help application for disaster-affected families.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Erica K; Gros, Kirstin; Welsh, Kyleen E; McCauley, Jenna; Resnick, Heidi S; Danielson, Carla K; Price, Matthew; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

    2016-09-01

    Technology-based self-help interventions have the potential to increase access to evidence-based mental healthcare, especially for families affected by natural disasters. However, development of these interventions is a complex process and poses unique challenges. Usability testing, which assesses the ability of individuals to use an application successfully, can have a significant impact on the quality of a self-help intervention. This article describes (a) the development of a novel web-based multi-module self-help intervention for disaster-affected adolescents and their parents and (b) a mixed-methods formal usability study to evaluate user response. A total of 24 adolescents were observed, videotaped, and interviewed as they used the depressed mood component of the self-help intervention. Quantitative results indicated an above-average user experience, and qualitative analysis identified 120 unique usability issues. We discuss the challenges of developing self-help applications, including design considerations and the value of usability testing in technology-based interventions, as well as our plan for widespread dissemination.

  18. A Survey of Attitudes towards Computerized Self-Help for Eating Disorders within a Community-Based Sample.

    PubMed

    McClay, Carrie-Anne; Waters, Louise; Schmidt, Ulrike; Williams, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) is an eating disorder with many physical, psychological and social consequences. Guided self-help (GSH) is recommended in the treatment of BN (NICE, 2004). One of the ways in which to provide GSH is via the internet using evidence-based packages with regular support from a clinician or trained support worker. The aim of this community-based survey was to investigate attitudes towards online self-help for eating disorders and the support required whilst using such an approach. Two-hundred and fifty-three participants with bulimic symptoms completed the survey. The sample was recruited primarily online. The mean age was 29.11 years (SD = 8.67; min = 16, max = 64). Attitudes towards online self-help (SH) for eating disorders were very positive. The inclusion of some form of support to accompany such an intervention was important to the majority of participants. Remote mediums of support such as e-mail, a forum and text messaging were most often selected as helpful. Most participants expressed a preference for weekly support contacts and for flexible support lengths that could respond to support needs as required. Online self-help for eating disorders is a desirable treatment option for many individuals. The information gathered regarding preferences in the type, medium, duration and frequency of support could be used in the development of future self-help strategies in order to maximize uptake, retention and outcomes.

  19. Development and preliminary testing of a web-based, self-help application for disaster-affected families

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Erica K; Gros, Kirstin; Welsh, Kyleen E; McCauley, Jenna; Resnick, Heidi S; Danielson, Carla K; Price, Matthew; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Technology-based self-help interventions have the potential to increase access to evidence-based mental healthcare, especially for families affected by natural disasters. However, development of these interventions is a complex process and poses unique challenges. Usability testing, which assesses the ability of individuals to use an application successfully, can have a significant impact on the quality of a self-help intervention. This article describes (a) the development of a novel web-based multi-module self-help intervention for disaster-affected adolescents and their parents and (b) a mixed-methods formal usability study to evaluate user response. A total of 24 adolescents were observed, videotaped, and interviewed as they used the depressed mood component of the self-help intervention. Quantitative results indicated an above-average user experience, and qualitative analysis identified 120 unique usability issues. We discuss the challenges of developing self-help applications, including design considerations and the value of usability testing in technology-based interventions, as well as our plan for widespread dissemination. PMID:25933798

  20. A systematic review of techniques and effects of self-help interventions for tinnitus: Application of taxonomies from health psychology.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Kate; Sereda, Magdalena; Coulson, Neil; El Refaie, Amr; Hoare, Derek J

    2016-07-01

    Self-help interventions are followed by people independently with minimal or no therapist contact. This review aims to assess the effectiveness of self-help interventions for adults with chronic tinnitus and systematically identify the self-help techniques used. Systematic review and application of health psychology taxonomies. Electronic database searches were conducted, supplemented by citation searching and hand-searching of key journals. Prospective controlled trials, which used measures of tinnitus distress, functional management, anxiety, depression, and quality of life, were included. Michie et al's behaviour change techniques (BCTs) taxonomy and Taylor et al's PRISMS taxonomy of self-management components were applied to describe interventions. Five studies were included, providing low-to-moderate levels of evidence. Randomized controlled trial studies were too few and heterogeneous for meta-analysis to be performed. Studies comparing self-help interventions to therapist-guided interventions and assessing non tinnitus-specific psychosocial outcomes and functional management were lacking. Fifteen BCTs and eight self-management components were identified across interventions. A lack of high-quality and homogeneous studies meant that confident conclusions could not be drawn regarding the efficacy of self-help interventions for tinnitus. Better reporting and categorization of intervention techniques is needed for replication in research and practice and to facilitate understanding of intervention mechanisms.

  1. Community self-help and the homeless poor in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Balchin, P

    2002-06-01

    Finding realistic housing solutions that are able to respond to the realities of poverty in the developing, or newly industrializing, world are frequently distinct from those suited to the developed world due to levels of poverty and differing welfare regimes. This requires a different understanding of the concept of housing and shelter for developing and developed countries. Population increase and emerging habitation patterns in parts of Latin America have required that policy-makers review traditional 'top down' approaches to the way the homeless poor are treated and how self-help or 'bottom up' schemes are increasingly seen as a sustainable way forward in providing affordable housing options to both governments and communities. Over the last decades, mass in-migration to cities has put pressure on governments to provide public housing--but two major problems arose: firstly, governments found it difficult to finance the increasing demand for public housing, and secondly, the nature of employment and the informal economy in the developing world meant that this new housing was often too costly for the urban poor, in some cases increasing homelessness still further. Recent policy developments tend to favour supporting what the poor are and have been able to achieve for themselves, with appropriate government support. Upgrading shack settlements is now recognised as a community driven and cost-effective response that can, if appropriately supported, offer an initial and sustainable solution to urban housing need by tapping into additional non-governmental sources of funding. In the absence of a major public sector housing stock to meet demand, governments are also recognising that self-help housing schemes for families able to access funding and resources offer a further innovative approach to meeting housing need. The nature of housing and shelter in the developing world requires a unique response so that it remains attainable and affordable to the poor. Neo

  2. The Effect of a Community-Based Self-Help Intervention Korean Americans With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Miyong T.; Kim, Kim B.; Huh, Boyun; Nguyen, Tam; Han, Hae-Ra; Bone, Lee R.; Levine, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Korean Americans are one of the most underserved ethnic/linguistic minority groups owing to cultural and institutional barriers; there is an urgent need for culturally competent diabetes management programs in the Korean American community for those with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a community-based, culturally tailored, multimodal behavioral intervention program in an ethnic/linguistic minority group with type 2 diabetes. Design A RCT with waitlist comparison based on the Predisposing, Reinforcing, and Enabling Constructs in Education/environmental Diagnosis and Evaluation (PRECEDE)–Policy, Regulatory, and Organizational Constructs in Educational and Environmental Development (PROCEED) and self-help models. Data were collected between September 2010 and June 2013 and were analyzed in August–December 2014. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Setting/participants In a naturally occurring community setting, a total of 250 Korean Americans with type 2 diabetes were randomized into an intervention group (n=120) or a control group (n=130). Intervention The intervention consisted of key self-management skill-building activities through 12 hours of group education sessions, followed by integrated counseling and behavioral coaching by a team of RNs and community health workers. Main outcome measures Primary (clinical) outcomes were hemoglobin A1c, glucose, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein at baseline and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Secondary (psychosocial and behavioral) outcomes included diabetes-related quality of life, self-efficacy, adherence to diabetes management regimen, and health literacy. Results During the 12-month project, the intervention group demonstrated 1.0%–1.3% (10.9–14.2 mmol/mol) reductions in hemoglobin A1c, whereas the control group achieved reductions of 0.5%–0.7% (5.5–7.7 mmol/mol). The differences between the two groups were statistically significant. The

  3. Internet-based self-help treatment for depression in multiple sclerosis: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Boeschoten, Rosa E; Dekker, Joost; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Polman, Chris H; Collette, Emma H; Cuijpers, Pim; Beekman, Aartjan T F; van Oppen, Patricia

    2012-09-11

    Depression in MS patients is frequent but often not treated adequately. An important underlying factor may be physical limitations that preclude face-to-face contact. Internet-based treatment showed to be effective for depressive symptoms in general and could thus be a promising tool for treatment in MS. Here, we present a study protocol to investigate the effectiveness of a 5 week Internet-based self-help problem solving treatment (PST) for depressive symptoms in MS patients in a randomized controlled trial. We aim to include 166 MS patients with moderate to severe depressive symptoms who will be randomly assigned to an Internet-based intervention (with or without supportive text-messages) or waiting list control group. The primary outcome is the change in depressive symptoms defined by a change in the sum score on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Secondary outcomes will include measures of anxiety, fatigue, cognitive functioning, physical and psychological impact of MS, quality of life, problem solving skills, social support, mastery, satisfaction and compliance rate. Assessments will take place at baseline (T0), within a week after the intervention (T1), at four months (T2) and at ten months follow-up (T3: only the intervention group). The control group will be measured at the same moments in time. Analysis will be based on the intention-to-treat principle. If shown to be effective, Internet-based PST will offer new possibilities to reach and treat MS patients with depressive symptoms and to improve the quality of care. The Dutch Cochrane Center, NTR2772.

  4. Sustaining mother tongue medium education: An inter-community self-help framework in Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiatoh, Blasius A.

    2011-12-01

    Advocating mother tongue education implies recognising the centrality of linguistic and cultural diversity in quality and accessible education planning and delivery. In minority linguistic settings, this need becomes particularly urgent. Decades of exclusive promotion of foreign languages have rendered the educational system incapable of guaranteeing maximum quality, accessibility and equity. Also, due to long periods of marginalisation and disempowerment, most indigenous communities are unable to undertake viable self-reliant educational initiatives. As a result, planning and management of education is not adapted to the needs and realities of target populations. What such an educational approach has succeeded in achieving is to cultivate a culture of near-total dependence and consumerism. In minority language situations where mother tongue education is still primarily in the hands of private institutions and individuals, successful planning also means influencing the perceptions and attitudes of indigenous people and systematically integrating them into the educational process. This paper discusses grass-roots mother tongue education in Cameroon. It focuses on the inter-community self-help initiative as a local response framework and argues that this initiative is a strong indication of the desire of communities to learn and promote learning in their own languages.

  5. Attitudes concerning involuntary treatment of mania: results of a survey within self-help organizations.

    PubMed

    Borgeat, François; Zullino, Daniele

    2004-05-01

    - The objective of the study was to determine the level of involuntary treatment that mood disorder patients and their families wish in the event of a manic or hypomanic episode. - A survey was conducted within two self-help organizations during two conventions gathering over 500 patients, along with families and caregivers. A clinical vignette depicting an uncollaborative hypomanic patient beginning to endanger his professional and financial situation and to put undue stress upon his family was presented and followed by an eight-item questionnaire. The level of coercive treatment seen as appropriate was measured by visual analogue scales. - The 503 respondents disagreed partially with the statement that the patient should decide by himself about his hospitalization and partially favored some involuntary treatment over treatment refusal. There was no difference between patients, relatives and caregivers related to acceptance of coercive hospitalization and treatment. Respondents assigned a major role to treating teams and family members in decisions for coercive treatment. - Most respondents (including a majority of patients) support a moderate degree of coercive treatment in the event of a hypomanic or manic state. Surveys of opinions from concerned people could influence, practice, legislation and possibly advance directives that could be written by patients or patients organizations.

  6. The Role of Motivation in Family-Based Guided Self-Help Treatment for Pediatric Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Gregory J.; Crow, Scott J.; Rock, Cheryl L.; Boutelle, Kerri N.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Identifying factors associated with effective treatment for childhood obesity is important to improving weight loss outcomes. The current study investigated whether child or parent motivation throughout the course of treatment predicted reductions in BMI. Methods: Fifty 8- to 12-year-old children with overweight and obesity (BMI percentiles 85–98%) and their parents participated in a guided self-help weight loss program, which included 12 brief sessions across 5 months. Parents and interventionists reported on child and parent motivation level at each session. Multilevel slopes-as-outcome models were used to examine growth trajectories for both child and parent BMI across sessions. Results: Greater interventionist-rated child motivation predicted greater reductions in child BMI; parent motivation did not. However, interventionist-rated parent motivation predicted greater reductions in parent BMI, and its impact on BMI became more pronounced over the course of treatment, such that sustained motivation was more important than initial motivation. Children who were older, Latino, or who had lower initial BMIs had slower reductions in BMI. Conclusions: This study suggests that motivation may be an important predictor of reduced BMI in child obesity treatment, with sustained motivation being more important than initial motivation. In particular, interventionist-rated, but not parent-rated, motivation is a robust predictor of child and parent BMI outcomes. Future research may evaluate whether motivational interventions can enhance outcome, with particular attention to improving outcomes for Latino children. PMID:25181608

  7. The role of motivation in family-based guided self-help treatment for pediatric obesity.

    PubMed

    Accurso, Erin C; Norman, Gregory J; Crow, Scott J; Rock, Cheryl L; Boutelle, Kerri N

    2014-10-01

    Identifying factors associated with effective treatment for childhood obesity is important to improving weight loss outcomes. The current study investigated whether child or parent motivation throughout the course of treatment predicted reductions in BMI. Fifty 8- to 12-year-old children with overweight and obesity (BMI percentiles 85-98%) and their parents participated in a guided self-help weight loss program, which included 12 brief sessions across 5 months. Parents and interventionists reported on child and parent motivation level at each session. Multilevel slopes-as-outcome models were used to examine growth trajectories for both child and parent BMI across sessions. Greater interventionist-rated child motivation predicted greater reductions in child BMI; parent motivation did not. However, interventionist-rated parent motivation predicted greater reductions in parent BMI, and its impact on BMI became more pronounced over the course of treatment, such that sustained motivation was more important than initial motivation. Children who were older, Latino, or who had lower initial BMIs had slower reductions in BMI. This study suggests that motivation may be an important predictor of reduced BMI in child obesity treatment, with sustained motivation being more important than initial motivation. In particular, interventionist-rated, but not parent-rated, motivation is a robust predictor of child and parent BMI outcomes. Future research may evaluate whether motivational interventions can enhance outcome, with particular attention to improving outcomes for Latino children.

  8. Regression analysis for multiple-disease group testing data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boan; Bilder, Christopher R.; Tebbs, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Group testing, where individual specimens are composited into groups to test for the presence of a disease (or other binary characteristic), is a procedure commonly used to reduce the costs of screening a large number of individuals. Group testing data are unique in that only group responses may be available, but inferences are needed at the individual level. A further methodological challenge arises when individuals are tested in groups for multiple diseases simultaneously, because unobserved individual disease statuses are likely correlated. In this paper, we propose new regression techniques for multiple-disease group testing data. We develop an expectation-solution based algorithm that provides consistent parameter estimates and natural large-sample inference procedures. Our proposed methodology is applied to chlamydia and gonorrhea screening data collected in Nebraska as part of the Infertility Prevention Project and to prenatal infectious disease screening data from Kenya. PMID:23703944

  9. Regression analysis for multiple-disease group testing data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boan; Bilder, Christopher R; Tebbs, Joshua M

    2013-12-10

    Group testing, where individual specimens are composited into groups to test for the presence of a disease (or other binary characteristic), is a procedure commonly used to reduce the costs of screening a large number of individuals. Group testing data are unique in that only group responses may be available, but inferences are needed at the individual level. A further methodological challenge arises when individuals are tested in groups for multiple diseases simultaneously, because unobserved individual disease statuses are likely correlated. In this paper, we propose new regression techniques for multiple-disease group testing data. We develop an expectation-solution based algorithm that provides consistent parameter estimates and natural large-sample inference procedures. We apply our proposed methodology to chlamydia and gonorrhea screening data collected in Nebraska as part of the Infertility Prevention Project and to prenatal infectious disease screening data from Kenya. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Overcoming Perfectionism: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial of an Internet-Based Guided Self-Help Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Intervention

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Perfectionism is elevated across, and increases risk for, a range of psychological disorders as well as having a direct negative effect on day-to-day function. A growing body of evidence shows that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) reduces perfectionism and psychological disorders, with medium to large effect sizes. Given the increased desire for Web-based interventions to facilitate access to evidence-based therapy, Internet-based CBT self-help interventions for perfectionism have been designed. Existing Web-based interventions have not included personalized guidance which has been shown to improve outcome rates. Objective To assess the efficacy of an Internet-based guided self-help CBT intervention for perfectionism at reducing symptoms of perfectionism and psychological disorders posttreatment and at 6-month follow-up. Methods A randomized controlled trial method is employed, comparing the treatment arm (Internet-based guided self-help CBT) with a waiting list control group. Outcomes are examined at 3 time points, T1 (baseline), T2 (postintervention at 12 weeks), T3 (follow-up at 24 weeks). Participants will be recruited through universities, online platforms, and social media and if eligible will be randomized using an automatic randomizer. Results Data will be analyzed to estimate the between group (intervention, control) effect on perfectionism, depression, and anxiety. Completer and intent-to-treat analyses will be conducted. Additional analysis will be conducted to investigate whether the number of modules completed is associated with change. Data collection should be finalized by December 2016, with submission of results for publication expected in mid-year 2017. Results will be reported in line with recommendations in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials Statement for Randomized Controlled Trials of Electronic and Mobile Health Applications and Online TeleHealth (CONSORT-EHEALTH). Conclusions Findings will contribute to the

  11. Overcoming Perfectionism: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial of an Internet-Based Guided Self-Help Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Intervention.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Radha; Egan, Sarah; Wade, Tracey; Andersson, Gerhard; Shafran, Roz

    2016-11-11

    Perfectionism is elevated across, and increases risk for, a range of psychological disorders as well as having a direct negative effect on day-to-day function. A growing body of evidence shows that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) reduces perfectionism and psychological disorders, with medium to large effect sizes. Given the increased desire for Web-based interventions to facilitate access to evidence-based therapy, Internet-based CBT self-help interventions for perfectionism have been designed. Existing Web-based interventions have not included personalized guidance which has been shown to improve outcome rates. To assess the efficacy of an Internet-based guided self-help CBT intervention for perfectionism at reducing symptoms of perfectionism and psychological disorders posttreatment and at 6-month follow-up. A randomized controlled trial method is employed, comparing the treatment arm (Internet-based guided self-help CBT) with a waiting list control group. Outcomes are examined at 3 time points, T1 (baseline), T2 (postintervention at 12 weeks), T3 (follow-up at 24 weeks). Participants will be recruited through universities, online platforms, and social media and if eligible will be randomized using an automatic randomizer. Data will be analyzed to estimate the between group (intervention, control) effect on perfectionism, depression, and anxiety. Completer and intent-to-treat analyses will be conducted. Additional analysis will be conducted to investigate whether the number of modules completed is associated with change. Data collection should be finalized by December 2016, with submission of results for publication expected in mid-year 2017. Results will be reported in line with recommendations in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials Statement for Randomized Controlled Trials of Electronic and Mobile Health Applications and Online TeleHealth (CONSORT-EHEALTH). Findings will contribute to the literature on treatment of perfectionism, the effect of

  12. The Self-help Online against Suicidal thoughts (SOS) trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mühlmann, Charlotte; Madsen, Trine; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Kerkhof, Ad; Nordentoft, Merete; Erlangsen, Annette

    2017-01-28

    Suicidal thoughts are common, causing distress for millions of people all over the world. However, people with suicidal thoughts might not access support due to financial restraints, stigma or a lack of available treatment offers. Self-help programs provided online could overcome these barriers, and previous efforts show promising results in terms of reducing suicidal thoughts. This study aims to examine the effectiveness of an online self-help intervention in reducing suicidal thoughts among people at risk of suicide. The Danish Self-help Online against Suicidal thoughts (SOS) trial is a partial replication of a previously conducted Dutch trial. A randomized, waiting-list controlled trial with 1:1 allocation ratio will be carried out. A total of 438 people with suicidal thoughts will be recruited from the Danish suicide hotline, The Lifeline's, website and allocated to the intervention condition (N = 219) or the control condition (N = 219). The intervention condition consists of a 6-week, Internet-based self-help therapy intervention. The format of the intervention is self-help, but the participants can be guided by the trial manager. The control condition consists of a waiting-list assignment for 32 weeks. The primary outcomes are frequency and intensity of suicidal thoughts. Secondary outcome measures include depressive symptoms, hopelessness, worrying, quality of life, costs related to health care utilization and production loss. Number of deliberate self-harm episodes, suicides and deaths will, as well as the participant's evaluation of the intervention and the experience of negative effects, be investigated. Assessments will be conducted over the intervention website through self-report questionnaires at baseline, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 6 weeks and 32 weeks (6 months post intervention). If we find the intervention to be linked to reductions in suicidal thoughts, this will strengthen the evidence that online self-help interventions are relevant tools for

  13. Media-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy and behavioural therapy (self-help) for anxiety disorders in adults.

    PubMed

    Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Montgomery, Paul

    2013-09-09

    Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problems. They are chronic and unremitting. Effective treatments are available, but access to services is limited. Media-delivered behavioural and cognitive behavioural interventions (self-help) aim to deliver treatment with less input from professionals compared with traditional therapies. To assess the effects of media-delivered behavioural and cognitive behavioural therapies for anxiety disorders in adults. Published and unpublished studies were considered without restriction by language or date. The Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Review Group's Specialized Register (CCDANCTR) was searched all years to 1 January 2013. The CCDANCTR includes relevant randomised controlled trials from the following bibliographic databases: The Cochrane Library (all years), EMBASE (1974 to date), MEDLINE (1950 to date) and PsycINFO (1967 to date). Complementary searches were carried out on Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to 23 February 2013) and PsycINFO (1987 to February, Week 2, 2013), together with International trial registries (the trials portal of the World Health Organization (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov). Reference lists from previous meta-analyses and reports of randomised controlled trials were checked, and authors were contacted for unpublished data. Randomised controlled trials of media-delivered behavioural or cognitive behavioural therapy in adults with anxiety disorders (other than post-traumatic stress disorder) compared with no intervention (including attention/relaxation controls) or compared with face-to-face therapy. Both review authors independently screened titles and abstracts. Study characteristics and outcomes were extracted in duplicate. Outcomes were combined using random-effects models, and tests for heterogeneity and for small study bias were conducted. We examined subgroup differences by type of disorder, type of intervention provided, type of media, and recruitment methods used. One hundred and

  14. Randomized controlled trial evaluation of a tailored leaflet and SMS text message self-help intervention for pregnant smokers (MiQuit).

    PubMed

    Naughton, Felix; Prevost, A Toby; Gilbert, Hazel; Sutton, Stephen

    2012-05-01

    Study aims were to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a tailored self-help smoking cessation intervention for pregnant smokers (MiQuit). Secondary aims were to assess whether MiQuit affected cognitive determinants of quitting and to provide a range of potential effect sizes of the intervention effect on smoking abstinence. A randomized controlled trial was undertaken in which pregnant smokers were allocated to either receive MiQuit, a tailored self-help leaflet followed by an 11-week program of tailored text messages, or to a control group, receiving a nontailored self-help leaflet. Participants were 207 pregnant smokers identified by community midwives across 7 NHS Trusts (United Kingdom). At 3-month follow-up, intervention acceptability, cognitive determinants of quitting, and smoking outcomes (self-reported and cotinine-validated 7-day point prevalence abstinence) were assessed. Feasibility: 94% (95% CI 89%-99%) of MiQuit participants reported receiving both intervention components. Acceptability: 9% (95% CI 4%-15%) of MiQuit participants opted to discontinue the text messages. Mechanism: compared with controls, MiQuit participants were more likely to set a quit date (p = .049) and reported higher levels of self-efficacy (p = .024), harm beliefs (p = .052), and determination to quit (p = .019). Potential efficacy: self-reported abstinence-MiQuit 22.9%, control 19.6%; odds ratio (OR) = 1.22, 95% CI 0.62-2.41; cotinine-validated abstinence-MiQuit 12.5%, control 7.8%; OR = 1.68, 95% CI 0.66-4.31. Delivering tailored smoking cessation support to pregnant smokers via leaflet and text message is feasible and acceptable. The positive effects of MiQuit on cognitive determinants and the likelihood of setting a quit date are encouraging. A larger efficacy trial is warranted.

  15. Predicting Meaningful Outcomes to Medication and Self-Help Treatments for Binge Eating Disorder in Primary Care: The Significance of Early Rapid Response

    PubMed Central

    Grilo, Carlos M.; White, Marney A.; Masheb, Robin M.; Gueorguieva, Ralitza

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examined rapid response among obese patients with binge-eating disorder (BED) in a randomized clinical trial testing anti-obesity medication and self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy (shCBT), alone and in combination, in primary-care settings. Method 104 obese patients with BED were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: sibutramine, placebo, shCBT+sibutramine, or shCBT+placebo. Treatments were delivered by generalist primary-care physicians and the medications were given double-blind. Independent assessments were performed by trained and monitored doctoral research-clinicians monthly throughout treatment, post-treatment (4 months), and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups (i.e., 16 months after randomization). Rapid response, defined as ≥65% reduction in binge-eating by the fourth treatment week, was used to predict outcomes. Results Rapid response characterized 47% of patients. Rapid response was unrelated to demographic and baseline clinical characteristics. Rapid response was significantly associated prospectively with remission from binge eating at post-treatment (51% versus 9% for non-rapid responders), 6-month (53% vs 23.6%), and 12-month (46.9% vs 23.6%) follow-ups. Mixed effects model analyses revealed rapid response was significantly associated with greater decreases in binge-eating, eating-disorder psychopathology, depression, and percent weight loss. Discussion Our findings, based on a diverse obese patient group receiving medication and self-help CBT treatments for BED in primary care settings, indicate that patients who have a rapid response achieve good clinical outcomes through 12-month follow-ups after ending treatments. Rapid response represents a strong prognostic indicator of clinically meaningful outcomes even in low intensity medication and self-help interventions. Rapid response has important clinical implications for stepped-care treatment models for BED. Clinical Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00537810 PMID

  16. A report on the WHO working group on Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Janca, A

    1999-01-01

    In order to raise awareness of the public health importance of Parkinson's disease, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has recently established a Working Group on Parkinson's Disease and included it in the framework of the WHO Global Initiative on Neurology and Public Health. The first meeting of this international expert group produced a set of recommendations covering the following aspects of Parkinson's disease: epidemiology; organisation of services and treatment; education, training and information, and direct and indirect costs of care. An independent international research project entitled Global Parkinson's Disease Survey has recently been launched in response to the recommendations of the WHO Working Group on Parkinson's Disease. This paper summarises the recommendations of this WHO Working Group and outlines objectives, methods and preliminary pilot results of the Global Parkinson's Disease Survey.

  17. Expanding the limits of bibliotherapy for panic disorder: randomized trial of self-help without support but with a clear deadline.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Sara; Carlbring, Per; Cuijpers, Pim; Andersson, Gerhard

    2010-09-01

    Cognitive behavioral bibliotherapy for panic disorder has been found to be less effective without therapist support. In this study, participants were randomized to either unassisted bibliotherapy (n=20) with a scheduled follow-up telephone interview or to a waiting list control group (n=19). Following a structured psychiatric interview, participants in the treatment group were sent a self-help book consisting of 10 chapters based on cognitive behavioral strategies for the treatment of panic disorder. No therapist contact of any kind was provided during the treatment phase, which lasted for 10 weeks. Results showed that the treatment group had, in comparison to the control group, improved on all outcome measures at posttreatment and at 3-month follow-up. The tentative conclusion drawn from these results is that pure bibliotherapy with a clear deadline can be effective for people suffering from panic disorder with or without agoraphobia.

  18. Parental guided self-help family based treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lock, James; Darcy, Alison; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Vierhile, Molly; Sadeh-Sharvit, Shiri

    2017-09-01

    Family-based treatment (FBT) is an evidence-based treatment for adolescent anorexia nervosa (AN), but many families cannot access it. This study evaluated feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary treatment effects of a parental guided self-help (GSH) version of FBT for adolescent AN. This was a case-series design. Parents of medically stable adolescents (11-18 years) with DSM-5 AN were recruited over 12 months. Parents received online training in parental GSH FBT and 12 20-30 min GSH sessions by phone or online over 6 months. Recruitment, dropout, changes in weight, and eating-related psychopathology were assessed. Analyses used mixed modeling that included all data for all participants. Of the 19 families that participated, most were white (94%) and from intact families (88%). Baseline median BMI (mBMI) percent was 85.01% (SD = 4.31). Participants' mBMI percent increased to 97.31% (SD ± 7.48) at the end of treatment (EOT) (ES = 2.06; CI= 0.13-3.99). Eating-related psychopathology improved by EOT (ES = 0.58; CI=.04-1.21). Dropout rate was 21% during treatment and 33% during follow-up. Parental GSH-FBT is feasible and acceptable to families willing to undertake online treatment. Follow-up data was only available for nine families (47%); thus further systematic evaluation is required before reaching conclusions about the efficacy of this approach. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy with minimal therapist contact for social phobia: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Jonathan S; Moore, Elizabeth L; Braddock, Autumn E; Harrington, Diana L

    2009-03-01

    Due to treatment accessibility and cost issues, interest in self-help programs (e.g., bibliotherapy, telehealth) for common psychological disorders is growing. Research supporting the efficacy of such a program for social anxiety, however, is limited. The present study examined the efficacy of an 8-week self-directed cognitive behavioral treatment with minimal therapist involvement for social phobia based on a widely available self-help book. Twenty-one adults with social phobia initially received either treatment (i.e. assigned readings in the workbook with limited therapist contact) or were wait-listed. Wait-listed patients eventually received the same self-directed treatment. Results revealed that the self-help/minimal therapist contact treatment was superior to wait-list on most outcome measures. Across the entire sample, reductions in social anxiety, global severity, general anxiety, and depression were observed at posttest and 3-month follow-up. These findings provide preliminary support for using this self-help workbook for individuals with mild to moderate social anxiety in conjunction with infrequent therapist visits to reinforce the treatment principles. Study limitations and future directions are discussed.

  20. 75 FR 62849 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... investment of $15,000 per dwelling unit. Low-income homebuyers contribute a minimum of 100 hours of sweat... self-help housing program. Sweat equity can include, but is not limited to, assisting in the painting... administrative tasks. Donated volunteer labor is also required. The SHOP funds together with the sweat equity...

  1. 76 FR 48876 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... investment of $15,000 per dwelling unit. Low-income homebuyers contribute a minimum of 100 hours of sweat... self-help housing program. Sweat equity can include, but is not limited to, assisting in the painting... administrative tasks. Donated volunteer labor is also required. The SHOP funds together with the sweat equity...

  2. How To Land the Best Jobs in School Administration: The Self-Help Workbook for Practicing and Aspiring School Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosmoski, Georgia J.

    This self-help workbook is written for those who intend to seek a position in school administration. It is designed to help with each step of the job-search process and provides tips on writing a professional letter of intent and resume and advice on how to optimize personal and professional strengths. The information in the workbook was derived…

  3. A Decade of Advice for Women and Men in the Best-Selling Self-Help Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Holm, Kristen E.; Haddock, Shelley A.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a content analysis of the top ten self-help books on the New York Times best-seller list over a ten year period to determine the degree to which the books empower individuals to resist gender-based socialization messages. The four best sellers contained advice for both genders to behave consistently with traditional gender socialization,…

  4. Using an Instructional Package Including Video Technology To Teach Self-Help Skills to Elementary Students with Mental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Jacqueline M.; Collins, Belva C.; Schuster, John W.

    2001-01-01

    A study investigated the effectiveness of a treatment package that included video technology (e.g., video modeling and video prompting) to teach 3 self-help skills (cleaning sunglasses, putting on a wrist watch, and zipping a jacket) to 3 elementary students with mental disabilities. Results indicate the treatment package was effective. (Contains…

  5. Internet-Based Self-Help Career Assessments and Interventions: Challenges and Implications for Evidence-Based Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gati, Itamar; Asulin-Peretz, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    A major characteristic of the 21st century with significant implications on career decision making is the growing prevalence of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). Challenges involving ICT-based self-assessment and self-help interventions aimed at facilitating career decision making are discussed. Specifically, this article focuses…

  6. A Decade of Advice for Women and Men in the Best-Selling Self-Help Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Holm, Kristen E.; Haddock, Shelley A.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a content analysis of the top ten self-help books on the New York Times best-seller list over a ten year period to determine the degree to which the books empower individuals to resist gender-based socialization messages. The four best sellers contained advice for both genders to behave consistently with traditional gender socialization,…

  7. Reliability and Validity of the SAINT: A Guided Self-Help Tool for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Eddie; Chester, Rebecca; Tsakanikos, Elias; McCarthy, Jane; Craig, Tom; Bouras, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the main psychometric properties of the Self Assessment and Intervention (SAINT), a unique and recently developed Guided Self-Help tool for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Fifty-four adults with ID identified with symptoms of anxiety and/or depression completed the study. They were between 18 and 77 years old…

  8. Randomized Controlled Trial Examining the Effectiveness of a Tailored Self-Help Smoking-Cessation Intervention for Postsecondary Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Heather E.; Lawrance, Kelli-an G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Between September 2002 and February 2003, the authors assessed the effectiveness of a new, age-tailored, self-help smoking-cessation program for college students. Participants: College student smokers (N = 216) from 6 Ontario universities participated. Methods: The researchers used a randomized controlled trial with a 3-month telephone…

  9. Reliability and Validity of the SAINT: A Guided Self-Help Tool for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Eddie; Chester, Rebecca; Tsakanikos, Elias; McCarthy, Jane; Craig, Tom; Bouras, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the main psychometric properties of the Self Assessment and Intervention (SAINT), a unique and recently developed Guided Self-Help tool for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Fifty-four adults with ID identified with symptoms of anxiety and/or depression completed the study. They were between 18 and 77 years old…

  10. A Review of Treatments for Deficits in Social Skills and Self-Help Skills in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Lorna; Healy, Olive

    2012-01-01

    Deficits in social skills and self-help skills present significant challenges for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Much research in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has been devoted to treatments for deficits in social skills and there exist a number of extensive reviews on the research in this area. Some research has…

  11. Randomized Controlled Trial Examining the Effectiveness of a Tailored Self-Help Smoking-Cessation Intervention for Postsecondary Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Heather E.; Lawrance, Kelli-an G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Between September 2002 and February 2003, the authors assessed the effectiveness of a new, age-tailored, self-help smoking-cessation program for college students. Participants: College student smokers (N = 216) from 6 Ontario universities participated. Methods: The researchers used a randomized controlled trial with a 3-month telephone…

  12. Internet-Based Self-Help Career Assessments and Interventions: Challenges and Implications for Evidence-Based Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gati, Itamar; Asulin-Peretz, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    A major characteristic of the 21st century with significant implications on career decision making is the growing prevalence of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). Challenges involving ICT-based self-assessment and self-help interventions aimed at facilitating career decision making are discussed. Specifically, this article focuses…

  13. A Review of Treatments for Deficits in Social Skills and Self-Help Skills in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Lorna; Healy, Olive

    2012-01-01

    Deficits in social skills and self-help skills present significant challenges for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Much research in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has been devoted to treatments for deficits in social skills and there exist a number of extensive reviews on the research in this area. Some research has…

  14. 76 FR 67759 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for Fiscal Year 2011 AGENCY: Office of Community Planning and Development, HUD. ACTION... and Urban Development Reform Act of 1989, this announcement notifies the public of funding decisions...

  15. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart I of... - Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement C Exhibit C to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. C Exhibit C to Subpart I of Part 1944—Amendment to...

  16. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart I of... - Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Amendment to Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Agreement C Exhibit C to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. C Exhibit C to Subpart I of Part 1944—Amendment to...

  17. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart I of... - Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (TA) Grants B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944...) ________, 19__ 1. a. Name of Grantee:(2) ___ b. Address:(3) ___ c. Area the grant serves:(4) ___ 2. Date of...

  18. Internet-based cognitive behavioural self-help for premenstrual syndrome: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kues, Johanna N; Janda, Carolyn; Kleinstäuber, Maria; Weise, Cornelia

    2014-12-02

    With a prevalence of 3 to 8% among women of reproductive age, severe premenstrual symptoms are very common. Symptoms range from emotional and cognitive to physical changes. Severe symptoms (that is, premenstrual syndrome) can have a strong impact on everyday functioning and quality of life. Impairment can be as serious as that of dysthymic disorders. Many affected women receive either no treatment at all or are unsatisfied with their treatment. Although there is some evidence for the reduction of distress through cognitive behavioural therapy, there are only a small number of randomised controlled trials carefully investigating the efficacy of this psychotherapeutic approach. Thus, this study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive behavioural self-help treatment for women suffering from premenstrual syndrome. The study is conducted as a randomised controlled trial. The complex diagnostic assessment includes the completion of a symptom diary over two consecutive cycles and a telephone interview. Eligible women are randomly assigned to either a treatment or a wait-list control group. The intervention is based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and is provided via the internet. It consists of 14 different modules on which participants work over 8 consecutive weeks. In addition to written information, participants receive email feedback from a clinical psychologist on a weekly basis. Participants assigned to the wait-list receive the treatment after the end of the waiting period (8 weeks). The primary outcome measure is the Premenstrual Syndrome Impairment Measure. Secondary outcomes include the Premenstrual Syndrome Coping Measure, the Short-Form Social Support Questionnaire, the Questionnaire for the Assessment of Relationship Quality, and the Perceived Stress Scale. Data is collected during the premenstrual (luteal) phase at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 6-month follow-up. So far, there is no study investigating internet-based cognitive

  19. A web-based self-help intervention for partners of cancer patients based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: a protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Köhle, Nadine; Drossaert, Constance H C; Schreurs, Karlein M G; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T

    2015-03-28

    There is a growing recognition that cancer not only affects the lives of the patients, but also the lives of their partners. Partners of cancer patients are highly involved in the illness trajectory by providing informal care and they often experience distress. However, supporting interventions for this group are scarce and existing interventions bear several limitations. On the basis of the need for theory- and evidence-based supportive interventions for partners of cancer patients, the web-based self-help intervention Hold on, for each other has been developed. This intervention is based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. The primary objective of the RCT is to investigate the (cost-) effectiveness of the intervention. Additional goals are (1) to examine if psychological flexibility, self-compassion, mastery, supportive behavior, posttraumatic growth and resilience are mediators of the intervention's effects on the partners' mental health; (2) to examine the moderating effects of the socio demographics (age, gender, education, working situation, family situation) and disease-related characteristics of the patients (sort of cancer, stage of disease, duration and treatment of cancer); and (3) to investigate to what extend participants are satisfied with the intervention, which parts of the intervention are mostly used, and how adherent the users are. A three-armed randomized controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted to compare two versions of the intervention Hold on, for each other with a waiting list control condition. Both intervention conditions contain the same content and differ only with regard to the form of professional support (personal support versus automatic support). Adult partners of cancer patients with mild to moderate depressive and anxiety symptoms, will be recruited through a multi-component strategy. Online measurements by self-assessment will be made on four measurement points (prior to randomization (baseline-measurement) and 3, 6 and 12

  20. The role of psychological flexibility in a self-help acceptance and commitment therapy intervention for psychological distress in a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fledderus, Martine; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Fox, Jean-Paul; Schreurs, Karlein M G; Spinhoven, Philip

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the role of psychological flexibility, as a risk factor and as a process of change, in a self-help Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention for adults with mild to moderate depression and anxiety. Participants were randomized to the self-help programme with e-mail support (n=250), or to a waiting list control group (n=126). All participants completed measures before and after the intervention to assess depression, anxiety and psychological flexibility. Participants in the experimental condition also completed these measures during the intervention (after three and six weeks) and at a three-month follow-up. With multilevel modelling, it was shown that the effects of the intervention on psychological distress were stronger for participants with higher levels of psychological flexibility. Furthermore, our study showed that improved psychological flexibility mediated the effects of the ACT intervention. With a cross-lagged panel design, it was shown that especially improvements in psychological flexibility in the last three sessions of the intervention were important for further reductions in anxiety. To conclude, our study showed the importance of targeting psychological flexibility during an ACT intervention for a reduction in depressive and anxiety symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Feasibility, Acceptability, and Efficacy of Delivering Internet-Based Self-Help and Guided Self-Help Interventions for Generalized Anxiety Disorder to Indian University Students: Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Michelle G; Ruzek, Josef I; Kuhn, Eric; Manjula, M; Jones, Megan; Thomas, Neil; Abbott, Jo-Anne M; Sharma, Smita; Taylor, C. Barr

    2015-01-01

    Background Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most common mental disorders among university students; however, many students go untreated due to treatment costs, stigma concerns, and limited access to trained mental health professionals. These barriers are heightened in universities in India, where there are scant mental health care services and severe stigma surrounding help seeking. Objective To evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of Internet-based, or “online,” cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)-based unguided and guided self-help interventions (using the programs GAD Online and Lantern, respectively) to reduce GAD symptoms in students with clinical and subthreshold GAD and, ultimately, reduce the prevalence and incidence of GAD among the student population. Methods Students will be recruited via 3 colleges in Hyderabad, India, and referred for a campus-wide online screening. Self-report data will be collected entirely online. A total of 300 qualifying students will be randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive GAD Online, Lantern, or to be in a wait-list control condition, stratified by clinical and subthreshold GAD symptomatology. Students will complete a postintervention assessment after 3 months and a follow-up assessment 6 months later, at which point students in the wait-list control condition will receive one of the programs. The primary outcome is GAD symptom severity at 3 months postintervention. Secondary outcomes include GAD caseness at 9 months, other anxiety and depression symptoms, self-efficacy, and functional measures (eg, sleep, social functioning) at 3 and 9 months, respectively. Primary analyses will be differences between each of the intervention groups and the wait-list control group, analyzed on an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis using mixed-design ANOVA. Results The study commenced in February 2015. The sample was recruited over a 3-week period at each college. The trial is expected to end in December 2015

  2. Effect of a Web-Based Guided Self-help Intervention for Prevention of Major Depression in Adults With Subthreshold Depression: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Buntrock, Claudia; Ebert, David Daniel; Lehr, Dirk; Smit, Filip; Riper, Heleen; Berking, Matthias; Cuijpers, Pim

    2016-05-03

    Evidence-based treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD) are not very successful in improving functional and health outcomes. Attention has increasingly been focused on the prevention of MDD. To evaluate the effectiveness of a web-based guided self-help intervention for the prevention of MDD. Two-group randomized clinical trial conducted between March 1, 2013, and March 4, 2015. Participants were recruited in Germany from the general population via a large statutory health insurance company (ie, insurance funded by joint employer-employee contributions). Participants included 406 self-selected adults with subthreshold depression (Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score ≥16, no current MDD according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders [Fourth Edition, Text Revision] criteria). All participants had unrestricted access to usual care (visits to the primary care clinician) and were randomized to either a web-based guided self-help intervention (cognitive-behavioral and problem-solving therapy supported by an online trainer; n = 202) or a web-based psychoeducation program (n = 204). The primary outcome was time to onset of MDD in the intervention group relative to the control group over a 12-month follow-up period as assessed by blinded diagnostic raters using the telephone-administered Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis Disorders at 6- and 12-month follow-up, covering the period to the previous assessment. Among 406 randomized patients (mean age, 45 years; 73.9% women), 335 (82%) completed the telephone follow-up at 12 months. Fifty-five participants (27%) in the intervention group experienced MDD compared with 84 participants (41%) in the control group. Cox regression analyses controlling for baseline depressive symptom severity revealed a hazard ratio of 0.59 (95% CI, 0.42-0.82; P = .002) at 12-month follow-up. The number needed to treat to avoid 1 new case of MDD was 5.9 (95% CI, 3.9-14.6). Among

  3. Internet-based guided self-help for glioma patients with depressive symptoms: design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Among glioma patients, depression is estimated to be more prevalent than in both the general population and the cancer patient population. This can have negative consequences for both patients and their primary informal caregivers (e.g., a spouse, family member or close friend). At present, there is no evidence from randomized controlled trials for the effectiveness of psychological treatment for depression in glioma patients. Furthermore, the possibility of delivering mental health care through the internet has not yet been explored in this population. Therefore, a randomized controlled trial is warranted to evaluate the effects of an internet-based, guided self-help intervention for depressive symptoms in glioma patients. Methods/design The intervention is based on problem-solving therapy. An existing 5-week course is adapted for use by adult glioma patients with mild to moderate depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiology Studies Depression Scale score ≥12). Sample size calculations yield 126 glioma patients to be included, who are randomly assigned to either the intervention group or a waiting list control group. In addition, we aim to include 63 patients with haematological cancer in a non-central nervous system malignancy control group. Assessments take place at baseline, after 6 and 12 weeks, and after 6 and 12 months. Primary outcome measure is the change in depressive symptoms. Secondary outcome measures include health-related quality of life, fatigue, costs and patient satisfaction. In addition, all patients are asked to assign a primary informal caregiver, who does not participate in the intervention but who is asked to complete similar assessments. Their mood, health-related quality of life and fatigue is evaluated as well. Discussion This is the first study to evaluate the effects of problem-solving therapy delivered through the internet as treatment for depressive symptoms in glioma patients. If proven effective, this treatment will

  4. Prevention of depression and anxiety in adolescents: a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy and mechanisms of Internet-based self-help problem-solving therapy.

    PubMed

    Hoek, Willemijn; Schuurmans, Josien; Koot, Hans M; Cuijpers, Pim

    2009-10-12

    Even though depression and anxiety are highly prevalent in adolescence, youngsters are not inclined to seek help in regular healthcare. Therapy through the Internet, however, has been found to appeal strongly to young people. The main aim of the present study is to examine the efficacy of preventive Internet-based guided self-help problem-solving therapy with adolescents reporting depressive and anxiety symptoms. A secondary objective is to test potential mediating and moderating variables in order to gain insight into how the intervention works and for whom it works best. This study is a randomized controlled trial with an intervention condition group and a wait-list control group. The intervention condition group receives Internet-based self-help problem-solving therapy. Support is provided by a professional and delivered through email. Participants in the wait-list control group receive the intervention four months later. The study population consists of adolescents (12-18-year-olds) from the general population who report mild to moderate depressive and/or anxiety symptoms and are willing to complete a self-help course. Primary outcomes are symptoms of depression and anxiety. Secondary outcomes are quality of life, social anxiety, and cost-effectiveness. The following variables are examined for their moderating role: demographics, motivation, treatment credibility and expectancy, externalizing behaviour, perceived social support from parents and friends, substance use, the experience of important life events, physical activity, the quality of the therapeutic alliance, and satisfaction. Mediator variables include problem-solving skills, worrying, mastery, and self-esteem. Data are collected at baseline and at 3 weeks, 5 weeks, 4 months, 8 months, and 12 months after baseline. Both intention-to-treat and completer analyses will be conducted. This study evaluates the efficacy and mechanisms of Internet-based problem-solving therapy for adolescents. If Internet

  5. Redefining meaningful age groups in the context of disease.

    PubMed

    Geifman, Nophar; Cohen, Raphael; Rubin, Eitan

    2013-12-01

    Age is an important factor when considering phenotypic changes in health and disease. Currently, the use of age information in medicine is somewhat simplistic, with ages commonly being grouped into a small number of crude ranges reflecting the major stages of development and aging, such as childhood or adolescence. Here, we investigate the possibility of redefining age groups using the recently developed Age-Phenome Knowledge-base (APK) that holds over 35,000 literature-derived entries describing relationships between age and phenotype. Clustering of APK data suggests 13 new, partially overlapping, age groups. The diseases that define these groups suggest that the proposed divisions are biologically meaningful. We further show that the number of different age ranges that should be considered depends on the type of disease being evaluated. This finding was further strengthened by similar results obtained from clinical blood measurement data. The grouping of diseases that share a similar pattern of disease-related reports directly mirrors, in some cases, medical knowledge of disease-age relationships. In other cases, our results may be used to generate new and reasonable hypotheses regarding links between diseases.

  6. Infectious Disease and Grouping Patterns in Mule Deer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Infectious disease dynamics are determined, to a great extent, by the social structure of the host. We evaluated sociality, or the tendency to form groups, in Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus) from a chronic wasting disease (CWD) endemic area in Saskatchewan, Canada, to better understand factors that may affect disease transmission. Using group size data collected on 365 radio-collared mule deer (2008–2013), we built a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) to evaluate whether factors such as CWD status, season, habitat and time of day, predicted group occurrence. Then, we built another GLMM to determine factors associated with group size. Finally, we used 3 measures of group size (typical, mean and median group sizes) to quantify levels of sociality. We found that mule deer showing clinical signs of CWD were less likely to be reported in groups than clinically healthy deer after accounting for time of day, habitat, and month of observation. Mule deer groups were much more likely to occur in February and March than in July. Mixed-sex groups in early gestation were larger than any other group type in any season. Groups were largest and most likely to occur at dawn and dusk, and in open habitats, such as cropland. We discuss the implication of these results with respect to sociobiology and CWD transmission dynamics. PMID:27007808

  7. Living Confidently With HIV - A Self-Help Book for People Living With HIV Shaw Liz Living Confidently With HIV - A Self-Help Book for People Living With HIV 270pp Blue Stallion Publications 9781904127093 1904127096 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2010-08-11

    Many self-help books are written by people who have little or no experience of the subject. Fortunately this book does not fall into that category. The authors are four clinical psychologists with extensive experience of working with people who are HIV positive. Their book is a guide for those newly diagnosed with HIV, giving information on what to expect and what to do.

  8. Feasibility of Group Voice Therapy for Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searl, Jeff; Wilson, Kristel; Haring, Karen; Dietsch, Angela; Lyons, Kelly; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose was to demonstrate the feasibility of executing treatment tasks focused on increasing loudness in a group format for individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). A second purpose was to report preliminary pre-to-post treatment outcomes for individuals with PD immediately after they complete the group program. Methods:…

  9. Feasibility of Group Voice Therapy for Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searl, Jeff; Wilson, Kristel; Haring, Karen; Dietsch, Angela; Lyons, Kelly; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose was to demonstrate the feasibility of executing treatment tasks focused on increasing loudness in a group format for individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). A second purpose was to report preliminary pre-to-post treatment outcomes for individuals with PD immediately after they complete the group program. Methods:…

  10. Can reduce--the effects of chat-counseling and web-based self-help, web-based self-help alone and a waiting list control program on cannabis use in problematic cannabis users: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Michael P; Haug, Severin; Wenger, Andreas; Berg, Oliver; Sullivan, Robin; Beck, Thilo; Stark, Lars

    2013-11-14

    In European countries, including Switzerland, as well as in many states worldwide, cannabis is the most widely used psychoactive substance after alcohol and tobacco. Although approximately one in ten users develop serious problems of dependency, only a minority attends outpatient addiction counseling centers. The offer of a combined web-based self-help and chat counseling treatment could potentially also reach those users who hesitate to approach such treatment centers and help them to reduce their cannabis use. This paper presents the protocol for a three-armed randomized controlled trial that will test the effectiveness of a web-based self-help intervention in combination with, or independent of, tailored chat counseling compared to a waiting list in reducing or enabling the abstention from cannabis use in problematic users. The primary outcome will be the weekly quantity of cannabis used. Secondary outcome measures will include the number of days per week on which cannabis is used, the severity of cannabis use disorder, the severity of cannabis dependence, cannabis withdrawal symptoms, cannabis craving, the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other non-cannabis illicit drugs, changes in mental health symptoms, and treatment retention. The self-help intervention will consist of 8 modules designed to reduce cannabis use based on the principles of motivational interviewing, self-control practices, and methods of cognitive behavioral therapy. The two additional individual chat-counseling sessions in the additional chat condition will be based on the same therapy approaches and tailored to participants' self-help information data and personal problems. The predictive validity of participants' baseline characteristics on treatment retention and outcomes will be explored. To the best of our knowledge, this will be the first randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of online self-help therapy in combination or without chat counseling in reducing or enabling the

  11. Can reduce - the effects of chat-counseling and web-based self-help, web-based self-help alone and a waiting list control program on cannabis use in problematic cannabis users: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In European countries, including Switzerland, as well as in many states worldwide, cannabis is the most widely used psychoactive substance after alcohol and tobacco. Although approximately one in ten users develop serious problems of dependency, only a minority attends outpatient addiction counseling centers. The offer of a combined web-based self-help and chat counseling treatment could potentially also reach those users who hesitate to approach such treatment centers and help them to reduce their cannabis use. Methods/design This paper presents the protocol for a three-armed randomized controlled trial that will test the effectiveness of a web-based self-help intervention in combination with, or independent of, tailored chat counseling compared to a waiting list in reducing or enabling the abstention from cannabis use in problematic users. The primary outcome will be the weekly quantity of cannabis used. Secondary outcome measures will include the number of days per week on which cannabis is used, the severity of cannabis use disorder, the severity of cannabis dependence, cannabis withdrawal symptoms, cannabis craving, the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other non-cannabis illicit drugs, changes in mental health symptoms, and treatment retention. The self-help intervention will consist of 8 modules designed to reduce cannabis use based on the principles of motivational interviewing, self-control practices, and methods of cognitive behavioral therapy. The two additional individual chat-counseling sessions in the additional chat condition will be based on the same therapy approaches and tailored to participants’ self-help information data and personal problems. The predictive validity of participants’ baseline characteristics on treatment retention and outcomes will be explored. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, this will be the first randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of online self-help therapy in combination or without chat

  12. Feasibility of guided cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) self-help for childhood anxiety disorders in primary care.

    PubMed

    Creswell, Cathy; Hentges, Francoise; Parkinson, Monika; Sheffield, Paul; Willetts, Lucy; Cooper, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Anxiety disorders in childhood are common, disabling and run a chronic course. Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is effective but expensive and trained therapists are scarce. Guided self-help treatments may be a means of widening access to treatment. This study aimed to examine the feasibility of guided CBT self-help in primary care for childhood anxiety disorders, specifically in terms of therapist adherence, patient and therapist satisfaction and clinical gain.Participants were children aged between five and 12 years referred to two primary child and adolescent mental health services (PCAMHSs) in Oxfordshire, UK, who met diagnostic criteria for a primary anxiety disorder. Of the 52 eligible children, 41 anxious children were assessed for anxiety severity and interference before and after receiving CBT self-help delivered via a parent (total therapy time = five hours) by primary mental health workers (PMHWs). Therapy sessions were rated for treatment adherence and parents and PMHWs completed satisfaction questionnaires after treatment completion. Over 80% of therapy sessions were rated at a high level of treatment adherence. Parents and PMHWs reported high satisfaction with the treatment. Sixty-one percent of the children assessed no longer met the criteria for their primary anxiety disorder diagnosis following treatment, and 76% were rated as 'much'/'very much' improved on the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. There were significant reductions on parent and child report measures of anxiety symptoms, interference and depression. Preliminary exploration indicated that parental anxiety was associated with child treatment outcome. The findings suggest that guided CBT self-help represents a promising treatment for childhood anxiety in primary care.

  13. Using Personal Ads and Online Self-Help Groups to Teach Content Analysis in a Research Methods Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Jerry; Dillon, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes methods for teaching content analysis as part of the Research sequence in social work education. Teaching content analysis is used to develop research skills as well as to promote students' knowledge and critical thinking and about new information technology resources that are being increasingly used by the general public. The…

  14. Using Personal Ads and Online Self-Help Groups to Teach Content Analysis in a Research Methods Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Jerry; Dillon, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes methods for teaching content analysis as part of the Research sequence in social work education. Teaching content analysis is used to develop research skills as well as to promote students' knowledge and critical thinking and about new information technology resources that are being increasingly used by the general public. The…

  15. The effect of Self-Help Groups on access to maternal health services: evidence from rural India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The main challenge for achieving universal health coverage in India is ensuring effective coverage of poor and vulnerable communities in the face of high levels of income and gender inequity in access to health care. Drawing on the social capital generated through women’s participation in community organizations like SHGs can influence health outcomes. To date, evidence about the impact of SHGs on health outcomes has been derived from pilot-level interventions, some using randomised controlled trials and other rigorous methods. While the evidence from these studies is convincing, our study is the first to analyse the impact of SHGs at national level. Methods We analyzed the entire dataset from the third national District Level Household Survey from 601 districts in India to assess the impact of the presence of SHGs on maternal health service uptake. The primary predictor variable was presence of a SHG in the village. The outcome variables were: institutional delivery; feeding new-borns colostrum; knowledge about family planning methods; and ever used family planning. We controlled for respondent education, wealth, heard or seen health messages, availability of health facilities and the existence of a village health and sanitation committee. Results Stepwise logistic regression shows respondents from villages with a SHG were 19 per cent (OR: 1.19, CI: 1.13-1.24) more likely to have delivered in an institution, 8 per cent (OR: 1.08, CI: 1.05-1.14) more likely to have fed newborns colostrum, have knowledge (OR: 1.48, CI 1.39 – 1.57) and utilized (OR: 1.19, CI 1.11 – 1.27) family planning products and services. These results are significant after controlling for individual and village-level heterogeneities and are consistent with existing literature that the social capital generated through women’s participation in SHGs influences health outcome. Conclusion The study concludes that the presence of SHGs in a village is associated with higher knowledge of family planning and maternal health service uptake in rural India. To achieve the goal of improving public health nationally, there is a need to understand more fully the benefits of systematic collaboration between the public health community and these grassroots organizations. PMID:23714337

  16. 41 CFR 102-75.620 - What happens if property that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance use requirement is found to be... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing...

  17. 41 CFR 102-75.555 - Which Federal agency receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... receives the property assigned for self-help housing or housing assistance for low-income individuals or... Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance...

  18. 41 CFR 102-75.560 - Who notifies eligible public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... public agencies that real property to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance purposes is... Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance...

  19. 41 CFR 102-75.595 - What responsibilities do landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... landholding agencies have concerning properties to be used for self-help housing or housing assistance use... Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.595 What...

  20. 41 CFR 102-75.620 - What happens if property that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance use requirement is found to be... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.620 What happens if property that was transferred to meet a...

  1. 41 CFR 102-75.620 - What happens if property that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance use requirement is found to be... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.620 What happens if property that was transferred to meet a...

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.620 - What happens if property that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance use requirement is found to be... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.620 What happens if property that was transferred to meet a...

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.620 - What happens if property that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... that was transferred to meet a self-help housing or housing assistance use requirement is found to be... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.620 What happens if property that was transferred to meet a...

  4. 7 CFR Exhibit E to Subpart I of... - Guidance for Recipients of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants (Section 523 of Housing Act of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Guidance for Recipients of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants (Section 523 of Housing Act of 1949) E Exhibit E to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. E Exhibit E to...

  5. 7 CFR Exhibit E to Subpart I of... - Guidance for Recipients of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants (Section 523 of Housing Act of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Guidance for Recipients of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants (Section 523 of Housing Act of 1949) E Exhibit E to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. E Exhibit E to...

  6. 7 CFR Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of... - Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to Subpart I of Part 1944—Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants B Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture...

  7. 7 CFR Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of... - Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to Subpart I of Part 1944—Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants B Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture...

  8. 7 CFR Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of... - Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to Subpart I of Part 1944—Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants B Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture...

  9. 7 CFR Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of... - Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to Subpart I of Part 1944—Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Instructions for Preparation of Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants B Exhibit B-1 to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture...

  10. A pragmatic randomized controlled trial of a guided self-help intervention versus a waiting list control in a routine primary care mental health service.

    PubMed

    Lucock, Mike; Kirby, Rebecca; Wainwright, Nigel

    2011-09-01

    OBJECTIVES. To evaluate the effectiveness of a two session guided self-help (GSH) intervention provided by primary care graduate mental health workers (PCGMHWs) in a primary care mental health service. DESIGN. Pragmatic randomized trial, with a wait list control design. METHOD. Patients presenting with significant anxiety and depression problems were given one or more self-help booklets at screening and randomly allocated to an immediate (ITG) or delayed treatment group (DTG). Following this, a two-session GSH intervention was provided by one of two PCGMHWs, with a review session to decide on the need for further intervention. The DTG began the intervention 8 weeks after the screening and the primary outcome was Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) scores after 8 weeks. RESULTS. A total of 63 patients were allocated to the ITG, 59 to the DTG. Analysis of covariance, carried out on an intention to treat basis, showed a significant treatment effect, F(1,98) = 15, p < .001, and a comparison of means at 8 weeks showed a significant difference, t(116) = 2.1 (95% CI [1.1, 5.9]), p= .042 with an effect size, d= 0.375. Taking the two groups together, CORE-OM scores for patients who completed the intervention reduced between screening and the review session by an average of 7.9 (95% CI [6.3, 9.5]), effect size of 1.2. Between screening and the review session, 47% showed a reliable and clinically significant improvement. CONCLUSIONS. The study provides some support for the effectiveness of a two-session GSH intervention and a stepped-care service model. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Study protocol of a multicentre randomised controlled trial of self-help cognitive behaviour therapy for working women with menopausal symptoms (MENOS@Work).

    PubMed

    Hunter, Myra S; Hardy, Claire; Norton, Sam; Griffiths, Amanda

    2016-10-01

    Hot flushes and night sweats (HFNS) - the main symptoms of the menopause transition - can reduce quality of life and are particularly difficult to manage at work. A cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) intervention has been developed specifically for HFNS that is theoretically based and shown to reduce significantly the impact of HFNS in several randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Self-help CBT has been found to be as effective as group CBT for these symptoms, but these interventions are not widely available in the workplace. This paper describes the protocol of an RCT aiming to assess the efficacy of CBT for menopausal symptoms implemented in the workplace, with a nested qualitative study to examine acceptability and feasibility. One hundred menopausal working women, aged 45-60 years, experiencing bothersome HFNS for two months will be recruited from several (2-10) large organisations into a multicentre randomised controlled trial. Women will be randomly assigned to either treatment (a self-help CBT intervention lasting 4 weeks) or to a no treatment-wait control condition (NTWC), following a screening interview, consent, and completion of a baseline questionnaire. All participants will complete follow-up questionnaires at 6 weeks and 20 weeks post-randomisation. The primary outcome is the rating of HFNS; secondary measures include HFNS frequency, mood, quality of life, attitudes to menopause, HFNS beliefs and behaviours, work absence and presenteeism, job satisfaction, job stress, job performance, disclosure to managers and turnover intention. Adherence, acceptability and feasibility will be assessed at 20 weeks post-randomisation in questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Upon trial completion, the control group will also be offered the intervention. This is the first randomised controlled trial of a self-management intervention tailored for working women who have troublesome menopausal symptoms. Clin.Gov NCT02623374. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  12. An internet-based self-help intervention for older adults after marital bereavement, separation or divorce: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Brodbeck, Jeannette; Berger, Thomas; Znoj, Hans Joerg

    2017-01-13

    Marital bereavement and separation or divorce are among the most stressful critical life events in later life. These events require a dissolution of social and emotional ties, adjustments in daily routine and changes in identity and perspectives for the future. After a normative grief or distress reaction, most individuals cope well with the loss. However, some develop a prolonged grief reaction. Internet-based self-help interventions have proved beneficial for a broad range of disorders, including complicated grief. Based on the task model and the dual-process model of coping with bereavement, we developed a guided internet-based self-help intervention for individuals who experienced marital bereavement, separation or divorce at least 6 months prior to enrolment. The intervention consists of 10 text-based self-help sessions and one supportive email a week. The primary purpose of this study is the evaluation of the feasibility and efficacy of the intervention compared with a waiting control group. The secondary purpose is to compare the effects in bereaved and separated participants. Furthermore, we aim to analyze other predictors, moderators and mediators of the outcome, such as age, psychological distress and intensity of use of the intervention. The design is a randomized controlled trial with a waiting control condition of 12 weeks and a 24-weeks follow-up. At least 72 widowed or separated participants will be recruited via our study website and internet forums. Primary outcomes are reductions in grief symptoms, depression and psychological distress. Secondary outcome measures are related to loneliness, satisfaction with life, embitterment and the sessions. The trial will provide insights into the acceptance and efficacy of internet-based interventions among adults experiencing grief symptoms, psychological distress and adaptation problems in daily life after spousal bereavement, separation or divorce. Findings will add to existing knowledge by (1) evaluating

  13. Bayesian inference for disease prevalence using negative binomial group testing

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Nicholas A.; Tebbs, Joshua M.

    2011-01-01

    Group testing, also known as pooled testing, and inverse sampling are both widely used methods of data collection when the goal is to estimate a small proportion. Taking a Bayesian approach, we consider the new problem of estimating disease prevalence from group testing when inverse (negative binomial) sampling is used. Using different distributions to incorporate prior knowledge of disease incidence and different loss functions, we derive closed form expressions for posterior distributions and resulting point and credible interval estimators. We then evaluate our new estimators, on Bayesian and classical grounds, and apply our methods to a West Nile Virus data set. PMID:21259308

  14. Men participating in a weight-loss intervention are able to implement key dietary messages, but not those relating to vegetables or alcohol: the Self-Help, Exercise and Diet using Internet Technology (SHED-IT) study.

    PubMed

    Collins, Clare E; Morgan, Philip J; Warren, Janet M; Lubans, David R; Callister, Robin

    2011-01-01

    To describe dietary changes in men participating in an obesity intervention as part of the Self-Help, Exercise and Diet using Information Technology (SHED-IT) study. An assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial comparing Internet (n 34) v. information-only groups (n 31) with 6-month follow-up. Dietary intake assessed by FFQ, reporting usual consumption of seventy-four foods and six alcoholic beverages using a 10-point frequency scale. A single portion size (PSF) factor was calculated based on photographs to indicate usual serving sizes. The campus community of the University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Sixty-five overweight/obese men (43 % students, 42 % non-academic general staff, 15 % academic staff; mean age 35.9 (sd 11.1) years, mean BMI 30.6 (sd 2.8) kg/m2). The average PSF decreased significantly over time (χ2 = 20.9, df = 5, P < 0.001) with no differences between groups. While both groups reduced mean daily energy intake (GLM χ2 = 34.5, df = 3, P < 0.001), there was a trend towards a greater reduction in the Internet group (GLM χ2 = 3.3, P = 0.07). Both groups reduced percentage of energy from fat (P < 0.05), saturated fat (P < 0.001) and energy-dense/nutrient-poor items (P < 0.05), with no change in dietary fibre or alcohol (P > 0.05). Although men reported some positive dietary changes during weight loss, they did not increase vegetable intakes nor decrease alcohol consumption, while saturated fat, fibre and Na intakes still exceeded national targets. Future interventions for men should promote specific food-based guidelines to target improvements in their diet-related risk factor profile for chronic diseases.

  15. Evaluating the efficacy of a web-based self-help intervention with and without chat counseling in reducing the cocaine use of problematic cocaine users: the study protocol of a pragmatic three-arm randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Michael P; Maier, Larissa J; Wenger, Andreas; Stark, Lars; Berg, Oliver; Beck, Thilo; Quednow, Boris B; Haug, Severin

    2015-07-10

    Web-based self-help interventions that aim to reduce problematic substance use are able to reach "hidden" consumer groups in the general population who often fear stigmatization and thus avoid institutional addiction treatment. In Western European countries, including Switzerland, cocaine is the most widely used psychoactive substance after alcohol, tobacco, and cannabis. Although approximately one in six users develop serious problems of dependency, only a minority seeks help from psychiatrists or in outpatient counseling centers or psychiatric hospitals. Offering web-based therapy treatment may potentially reach users who hesitate to approach institutional treatment services and help them reduce their cocaine use before they get into more serious trouble. The study will use a three-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) design to test the efficacy of a web-based self-help intervention with or without guided chat counseling compared with that of a waiting list control condition in reducing or stopping cocaine use. The primary outcome measure will be the weekly quantity of cocaine used. Secondary outcome measures will include the number of cocaine use days in the past 30 days, the severity of cocaine dependence, the use of alcohol, tobacco, and/or other illicit drugs, changes in mental health symptoms, and treatment retention. The self-help intervention will consist of eight modules that are designed to reduce cocaine use and depression symptoms. These modules are based on the principles of Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, such as Behavioral Self-Management. The three individual chat therapy sessions will be based on the same therapy approaches and will be tailored to participants' self-help data and aim to assist the reinstatement of social rewards and the improvement of social support and relationships. This study will be the first RCT to test the effectiveness of a web-based self-help intervention in combination with or without

  16. Evaluating the effectiveness and efficacy of unguided internet-based self-help intervention for the prevention of depression: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lintvedt, Ove K; Griffiths, Kathleen M; Sørensen, Kristian; Østvik, Andreas R; Wang, Catharina E A; Eisemann, Martin; Waterloo, Knut

    2013-01-01

    The Internet has the potential to increase the capacity and accessibility of mental health services. This study aimed to investigate whether an unguided Internet-based self-help intervention delivered without human support or guidance can reduce symptoms of depression in young people at risk of depression. The study also aimed to explore the usage of such sites in a real-life setting, to estimate the effects of the intervention for those who received a meaningful intervention dose and to evaluate user satisfaction. Young adults were recruited by means of a screening survey sent to all students at the University of Tromsø. Of those responding to the survey, 163 students (mean age 28.2 years) with elevated psychological distress were recruited to the trial and randomized to an Internet intervention condition or the waiting list control group. The Internet condition comprised a depression information website and a self-help Web application delivering automated cognitive behavioural therapy. The participants in the waiting list condition were free to access formal or informal help as usual. Two-thirds of the users who completed the trial initially reported an unmet need for help. The findings demonstrated that an unguided intervention was effective in reducing symptoms of depression and negative thoughts and in increasing depression literacy in young adults. Significant improvements were found at 2-month follow up. Internet-based interventions can be effective without tracking and thus constitute a minimal cost intervention for reaching a large number of people. User satisfaction among participants was high. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Predicting meaningful outcomes to medication and self-help treatments for binge-eating disorder in primary care: The significance of early rapid response.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Carlos M; White, Marney A; Masheb, Robin M; Gueorguieva, Ralitza

    2015-04-01

    We examined rapid response among obese patients with binge-eating disorder (BED) in a randomized clinical trial testing antiobesity medication and self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy (shCBT), alone and in combination, in primary-care settings. One hundred four obese patients with BED were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments: sibutramine, placebo, shCBT + sibutramine, or shCBT + placebo. Treatments were delivered by generalist primary-care physicians and the medications were given double-blind. Independent assessments were performed by trained and monitored doctoral research clinicians monthly throughout treatment, posttreatment (4 months), and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups (i.e., 16 months after randomization). Rapid response, defined as ≥65% reduction in binge eating by the fourth treatment week, was used to predict outcomes. Rapid response characterized 47% of patients, was unrelated to demographic and baseline clinical characteristics, and was significantly associated, prospectively, with remission from binge eating at posttreatment (51% vs. 9% for nonrapid responders), 6-month (53% vs. 23.6%), and 12-month (46.9% vs. 23.6%) follow-ups. Mixed-effects model analyses revealed that rapid response was significantly associated with greater decreases in binge-eating or eating-disorder psychopathology, depression, and percent weight loss. Our findings, based on a diverse obese patient group receiving medication and shCBT for BED in primary-care settings, indicate that patients who have a rapid response achieve good clinical outcomes through 12-month follow-ups after ending treatment. Rapid response represents a strong prognostic indicator of clinically meaningful outcomes, even in low-intensity medication and self-help interventions. Rapid response has important clinical implications for stepped-care treatment models for BED. clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00537810 (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. FYI: Services to Poor Families; Controlling Infectious Diseases; Parent Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Today, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Discusses services and resources available for families, parents, and child care providers. Describes a National Resource Center for Children in Poverty; a guide for controlling infectious diseases among young children in day care; a directory of parent support groups; and reports of a link between household pesticides and childhood leukemia. (BB)

  19. FYI: Services to Poor Families; Controlling Infectious Diseases; Parent Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Today, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Discusses services and resources available for families, parents, and child care providers. Describes a National Resource Center for Children in Poverty; a guide for controlling infectious diseases among young children in day care; a directory of parent support groups; and reports of a link between household pesticides and childhood leukemia. (BB)

  20. Men's experience of a guided self-help intervention for hot flushes associated with prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Grunfeld, E A; Hunter, M S; Yousaf, O

    2017-04-01

    Up to 80% of men who receive androgen deprivation therapy report hot flushes and for many these are associated with reduced quality of life. However it is recognised that there are a number of barriers to men's engagement with support to manage symptoms and improve quality of life. This qualitative study was embedded within a larger randomised controlled trial (MANCAN) of a guided self-help cognitive behavioural intervention to manage hot flushes resulting among men receiving androgen deprivation therapy. The study aimed to explore the engagement and experiences with the guided self-help intervention. Twenty men recruited from the treatment arm of the MANCAN trial participated in a semi-structured interview exploring acceptability of the intervention, factors affecting engagement and perceived usefulness of the intervention. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a Framework approach. Over two thirds of respondents (69%) reported reading the intervention booklet in full and over 90% reporting practising the relaxation CD at least once a week. Analysis of the interviews identified three super-ordinate themes and these related to changes in hot flush symptomatology (learned to cope with hot flushes in new ways), the skills that participants had derived from the intervention (promoting relaxation and reducing stressors), and to a broader usefulness of the intervention (broader impact of the intervention and skills). The present study identified positive engagement with a guided self-help intervention and that men applied the skills developed through the intervention to help them undertake general lifestyle changes. Psycho-educational interventions (e.g. cognitive behaviour therapy, relaxation, and positive lifestyle elements) offer the potential to be both effective and well received by male cancer survivors.

  1. Disease Manifestations and Pathogenic Mechanisms of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Timothy C.; McArthur, Jason D.; Cole, Jason N.; Gillen, Christine M.; Henningham, Anna; Sriprakash, K. S.; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L.; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), causes mild human infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo and serious infections such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Furthermore, repeated GAS infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, including acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, acute rheumatic fever, and rheumatic heart disease. Combined, these diseases account for over half a million deaths per year globally. Genomic and molecular analyses have now characterized a large number of GAS virulence determinants, many of which exhibit overlap and redundancy in the processes of adhesion and colonization, innate immune resistance, and the capacity to facilitate tissue barrier degradation and spread within the human host. This improved understanding of the contribution of individual virulence determinants to the disease process has led to the formulation of models of GAS disease progression, which may lead to better treatment and intervention strategies. While GAS remains sensitive to all penicillins and cephalosporins, rising resistance to other antibiotics used in disease treatment is an increasing worldwide concern. Several GAS vaccine formulations that elicit protective immunity in animal models have shown promise in nonhuman primate and early-stage human trials. The development of a safe and efficacious commercial human vaccine for the prophylaxis of GAS disease remains a high priority. PMID:24696436

  2. Complementary medicine, self-help, and lifestyle interventions for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and the OCD spectrum: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sarris, Jerome; Camfield, David; Berk, Michael

    2012-05-01

    In Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) current standard pharmacotherapies may be of limited efficacy. Non-conventional interventions such as Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM), self-help techniques, and lifestyle interventions are commonly used by sufferers of OCD, however to date no systematic review of this specific area exists. We conducted a systematic review of studies using CAM, self-help, and lifestyle interventions for treatment of OCD and trichotillomania (TTM). PubMed, PsycINFO, China Academic Journals Full-text Database, The Cochrane Library and CINAHL were searched (up to Jan 11th 2011), for controlled clinical trials using non-conventional interventions for OCD. A quality analysis using a purpose-designed scale and an estimation of effect sizes (Cohen's d) where data was available, were also calculated. The literature search revealed 14 studies that met inclusion criteria. Methodological quality of nutraceutical studies (nutrients and herbal medicines) were rated as high (mean 8.6/10), whereas mind-body or self-help studies were poorer (mean 6.1/10). In OCD, tentative evidentiary support from methodologically weak studies was found for mindfulness meditation (d=0.63), electroacupuncture (d=1.16), and kundalini yoga (d=1.61). Better designed studies using the nutrient glycine (d=1.10), and traditional herbal medicines milk thistle (insufficient data for calculating d) and borage (d=1.67) also revealed positive results. A rigorous study showed that N-acetylcysteine (d=1.31) was effective in TTM, while self-help technique "movement decoupling" also demonstrated efficacy (d=0.94). Mixed evidence was found for myo-inositol (mean d=0.98). Controlled studies suggest that St John's wort, EPA, and meridian-tapping are ineffective in treating OCD. While several studies were positive, these were un-replicated and commonly used small samples. This precludes firm confidence in the strength of clinical effect. Preliminary evidence however is encouraging

  3. Combining attention training with cognitive-behavior therapy in Internet-based self-help for social anxiety: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Guided Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT) has been found to be effective for social anxiety disorder (SAD) by several independent research groups. However, since the extent of clinically significant change demonstrated leaves room for improvement, new treatments should be developed and investigated. A novel treatment, which has generally been found to be effective, is cognitive bias modification (CBM). This study aims to evaluate the combination of CBM and ICBT. It is intended that two groups will be compared; one group randomized to receiving ICBT and CBM towards threat cues and one group receiving ICBT and control training. We hypothesize that the group receiving ICBT plus CBM will show superior treatment outcomes. Methods/design Participants with SAD (N = 128), will be recruited from the general population. A composite score combining the scores obtained from three social anxiety questionnaires will serve as the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures include self-reported depression and quality of life. All treatments and assessments will be conducted via the Internet and measurement points will be baseline, Week 2, post-treatment, and 4 months post-treatment. Discussion There is no direct evidence of the effects of combining CBM and ICBT in SAD. Adding attention-training sessions to ICBT protocols could increase the proportion of participants who improve and recover through Internet-based self-help. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01570400 PMID:23497513

  4. Combining attention training with cognitive-behavior therapy in Internet-based self-help for social anxiety: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Johanna; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2013-03-08

    Guided Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT) has been found to be effective for social anxiety disorder (SAD) by several independent research groups. However, since the extent of clinically significant change demonstrated leaves room for improvement, new treatments should be developed and investigated. A novel treatment, which has generally been found to be effective, is cognitive bias modification (CBM). This study aims to evaluate the combination of CBM and ICBT. It is intended that two groups will be compared; one group randomized to receiving ICBT and CBM towards threat cues and one group receiving ICBT and control training. We hypothesize that the group receiving ICBT plus CBM will show superior treatment outcomes. Participants with SAD (N = 128), will be recruited from the general population. A composite score combining the scores obtained from three social anxiety questionnaires will serve as the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures include self-reported depression and quality of life. All treatments and assessments will be conducted via the Internet and measurement points will be baseline, Week 2, post-treatment, and 4 months post-treatment. There is no direct evidence of the effects of combining CBM and ICBT in SAD. Adding attention-training sessions to ICBT protocols could increase the proportion of participants who improve and recover through Internet-based self-help. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01570400.

  5. Effects of a sleep education program with self-help treatment on sleeping patterns and daytime sleepiness in Japanese adolescents: A cluster randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Norihisa; Tanaka, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Subjective insufficient sleep and delayed sleep-wake patterns have been reported as the primary causes for daytime sleepiness, a reasonably significant and prevalent problem for adolescents worldwide. Systematic reviews have indicated that the success of sleep education programs has thus far been inconsistent, due to the lack of a tailored approach that allows for evaluation of individual differences in behavior patterns. One way to resolve this problem is to assess the individual sleep behaviors of adolescents by using a checklist containing the recommended behaviors for promoting sleep health. Such self-help education programs have already been implemented for elementary school children, school nurses and the elderly. The present study aimed to verify the effects of a sleep education program with supplementary self-help treatment, based on a checklist of sleep-promoting behaviors, in addition to evaluation of changes in sleeping patterns, sleep-promoting behaviors and daytime sleepiness in adolescents. A cluster randomized controlled trial involving 5 Japanese junior high schools was conducted, and 243 students (sleep education: n = 122; waiting list: n = 121; 50.6% female; 7th grade) were included in the final analysis. The sleep education group was provided with information on proper sleep health and sleep-promoting behaviors. The students in this group were asked to practice one sleep-promoting behavior as a goal for 2 weeks and to monitor their practice using sleep diaries. Both pre- and post-treatment questionnaires were administered to students in order to assess knowledge of sleep-promoting behaviors, sleeping patterns and daytime functioning. Students in the sleep education group showed significant improvement in their knowledge of sleep health (F1,121 = 648.05, p < 0.001) and in their sleep-promoting behaviors (F1,121 = 55.66, p < 0.001). Bedtime on both school nights (F1,121 = 50.86, p < 0.001) and weekends (F1,121 = 15.03, p < 0.001), sleep

  6. A self-help behavioral activation treatment for geriatric depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Moss, Kathryn; Scogin, Forrest; Di Napoli, Elizabeth; Presnell, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated behavioral activation (BA) bibliotherapy as a treatment for late-life depressive symptoms. BA bibliotherapy was administered using Addis and Martell's Overcoming depression one step at a time as a stand-alone treatment that was completed by participants (N=26) over a 4-week period [Addis, M.E., & Martell, C.R. (2004). Overcoming depression one step at a time. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.]. Results of an immediate intervention group were compared with those of a delayed treatment control group and treatment response for both groups was evaluated at 1-month follow-up. Primary outcome results showed that symptoms on a clinician-rated measure of depressive symptoms, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, were significantly lower at post-treatment for those who received immediate BA bibliotherapy compared with those who were in the delayed treatment control condition. However, self-reported depressive symptoms (a secondary outcome measured via the Geriatric Depression Scale), were not significantly different at this period. Because study control was lost after the delayed treatment group received the intervention, within-subjects analyses examining both treatment groups combined showed that clinician-rated depressive symptoms significantly decreased from pre-treatment to both post-treatment and 1-month follow-up. Self-reported depressive symptoms were significantly lower from pre-treatment to 1-month follow-up. These findings suggest that BA may be useful in treating mild or subthreshold depressive symptoms in an older adult population.

  7. A systematic review and meta-analysis of self-help therapeutic interventions for obsessive-compulsive disorder: Is therapeutic contact key to overall improvement?

    PubMed

    Pearcy, Caitlin P; Anderson, Rebecca A; Egan, Sarah J; Rees, Clare S

    2016-06-01

    The presence of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can result in low quality of life, with significant impairments in social and occupational functioning. An increase in the dissemination of self-help programs has been observed in the treatment of OCD, and has provided improved accessibility to treatment. The present study examined the efficacy of self-help interventions for OCD in the context of therapeutic contact. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies were identified through computerised database searches. Self-help format (bibliotherapy, internet-based, computerised), and therapeutic contact were examined for their effect on treatment outcomes. Eighteen studies targeting self-help for OCD met inclusion criteria with 1570 participants. The average post-treatment effect size (Hedges' g) of self-help interventions on primary outcomes was .51 (95% CI: .41 to 0.61). Subgroup analysis revealed large effect sizes for minimal-contact self-help (g = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.66 to 1.17), moderate effect sizes for predominantly self-help (g = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.40 to 0.96), and small effect sizes for self-administered self-help (g = 0.33, 95% CI: .18 to 0.47). A large variation of treatment approaches, amount of therapeutic contact, and risk of bias within each study may account for the large magnitude in effect sizes across studies. Additionally, the long-term follow-up effects of treatment approaches were not examined. A growing body of literature supporting to the use of self-help treatments for OCD is evident, however, further investigation through use of randomised controlled trials is required, particularly the use of stepped care and long-term effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Internet-based treatment for Romanian adults with panic disorder: protocol of a randomized controlled trial comparing a Skype-guided with an unguided self-help intervention (the PAXPD study).

    PubMed

    Ciuca, Amalia Maria; Berger, Thomas; Crişan, Liviu George; Miclea, Mircea

    2016-01-14

    Efficacy of self-help internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for anxiety disorders has been confirmed in several randomized controlled trials. However, the amount and type of therapist guidance needed in ICBT are still under debate. Previous studies have shown divergent results regarding the role of therapist guidance and its impact on treatment outcome. This issue is central to the development of ICBT programs and needs to be addressed directly. The present study aims to compare the benefits of regular therapist guidance via online real-time audio-video communication (i.e. Skype) to no therapist guidance during a 12-week Romanian self-help ICBT program for Panic Disorder. Both treatments are compared to a waiting-list control group. A parallel group randomized controlled trial is proposed. The participants, 192 Romanian adults fulfilling diagnostic criteria for panic disorder according to a diagnostic interview, conducted via secured Skype or telephone, are randomly assigned to one of the three conditions: independent use of the internet-based self-help program PAXonline, the same self-help treatment with regular therapist support via secured Skype, and waiting-list control group. The primary outcomes are severity of self-report panic symptoms (PDSS-SR) and diagnostic status (assessors are blind to group assignment), at the end of the intervention (12 weeks) and at follow-up (months 3 and 6). The secondary measures address symptoms of comorbid anxiety disorders, depression, quality of life, adherence and satisfaction with ICBT. Additional measures of socio-demographic characteristics, personality traits, treatment expectancies, catastrophic cognitions, body vigilance and working alliance are considered as potential moderators and/ or mediators of treatment outcome. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first effort to investigate the efficacy of a self-help internet-based intervention with therapist guidance via real-time video

  9. Modeling Disease Progression via Fused Sparse Group Lasso

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiayu; Liu, Jun; Narayan, Vaibhav A.; Ye, Jieping

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder associated with aging. Understanding how the disease progresses and identifying related pathological biomarkers for the progression is of primary importance in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of Alzheimer’s disease. In this paper, we develop novel multi-task learning techniques to predict the disease progression measured by cognitive scores and select biomarkers predictive of the progression. In multi-task learning, the prediction of cognitive scores at each time point is considered as a task, and multiple prediction tasks at different time points are performed simultaneously to capture the temporal smoothness of the prediction models across different time points. Specifically, we propose a novel convex fused sparse group Lasso (cFSGL) formulation that allows the simultaneous selection of a common set of biomarkers for multiple time points and specific sets of biomarkers for different time points using the sparse group Lasso penalty and in the meantime incorporates the temporal smoothness using the fused Lasso penalty. The proposed formulation is challenging to solve due to the use of several non-smooth penalties. One of the main technical contributions of this paper is to show that the proximal operator associated with the proposed formulation exhibits a certain decomposition property and can be computed efficiently; thus cFSGL can be solved efficiently using the accelerated gradient method. To further improve the model, we propose two non-convex formulations to reduce the shrinkage bias inherent in the convex formulation. We employ the difference of convex (DC) programming technique to solve the non-convex formulations. We have performed extensive experiments using data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed progression models in comparison with existing methods for disease progression. We also perform

  10. Effectiveness of a Web-Based Guided Self-help Intervention for Outpatients With a Depressive Disorder: Short-term Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kenter, Robin Maria Francisca; Cuijpers, Pim; Beekman, Aartjan; van Straten, Annemieke

    2016-03-31

    Research has convincingly demonstrated that symptoms of depression can be reduced through guided Internet-based interventions. However, most of those studies recruited people form the general population. There is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness when delivered in routine clinical practice in outpatient clinics. The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to study patients with a depressive disorder (as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Disorders, fourth edition), as assessed by trained interviewers with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, who registered for treatment at an outpatient mental health clinic. We aimed to examine the effectiveness of guided Internet-based self-help before starting face-to-face treatment. We recruited 269 outpatients, aged between 18 and 79 years, from outpatient clinics and randomly allocated them to Internet-based problem solving therapy (n=136), with weekly student support, or to a control condition, who remained on the waitlist with a self-help booklet (control group; n=133). Participants in both conditions were allowed to take up face-to-face treatment at the outpatient clinics afterward. We measured the primary outcome, depressive symptoms, by Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D). Secondary outcome measures were the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Anxiety subscale (HADS-A), Insomnia Severity Index questionnaire (ISI), and EuroQol visual analog scale (EQ-5D VAS). All outcomes were assessed by telephone at posttest (8 weeks after baseline). Posttest measures were completed by 184 (68.4%) participants. We found a moderate to large within-group effect size for both the intervention (d=0.75) and the control (d=0.69) group. However, the between-group effect size was very small (d=0.07), and regression analysis on posttreatment CES-D scores revealed no significant differences between the groups (b=1.134, 95% CI -2.495 to 4.763). The per-protocol analysis (

  11. Effectiveness of a Web-Based Guided Self-help Intervention for Outpatients With a Depressive Disorder: Short-term Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cuijpers, Pim; Beekman, Aartjan; van Straten, Annemieke

    2016-01-01

    Background Research has convincingly demonstrated that symptoms of depression can be reduced through guided Internet-based interventions. However, most of those studies recruited people form the general population. There is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness when delivered in routine clinical practice in outpatient clinics. Objective The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to study patients with a depressive disorder (as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Disorders, fourth edition), as assessed by trained interviewers with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, who registered for treatment at an outpatient mental health clinic. We aimed to examine the effectiveness of guided Internet-based self-help before starting face-to-face treatment. Methods We recruited 269 outpatients, aged between 18 and 79 years, from outpatient clinics and randomly allocated them to Internet-based problem solving therapy (n=136), with weekly student support, or to a control condition, who remained on the waitlist with a self-help booklet (control group; n=133). Participants in both conditions were allowed to take up face-to-face treatment at the outpatient clinics afterward. We measured the primary outcome, depressive symptoms, by Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D). Secondary outcome measures were the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Anxiety subscale (HADS-A), Insomnia Severity Index questionnaire (ISI), and EuroQol visual analog scale (EQ-5D VAS). All outcomes were assessed by telephone at posttest (8 weeks after baseline). Results Posttest measures were completed by 184 (68.4%) participants. We found a moderate to large within-group effect size for both the intervention (d=0.75) and the control (d=0.69) group. However, the between-group effect size was very small (d=0.07), and regression analysis on posttreatment CES-D scores revealed no significant differences between the groups (b=1.134, 95% CI –2

  12. Re-Evaluation Co-Counseling: A Method of Peer Self Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockman, Ilene F.

    The college and university counseling center traditionally employs standard techniques in helping students, faculty, and staff in overcoming problems of mental stress (Berman, 1972). A technique suitable to both individual and group sessions, but rarely utilized is Re-Evaluation Co-Counseling or R.C. For the past twenty years, R.C. has gained an…

  13. Re-Evaluation Co-Counseling: A Method of Peer Self Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockman, Ilene F.

    The college and university counseling center traditionally employs standard techniques in helping students, faculty, and staff in overcoming problems of mental stress (Berman, 1972). A technique suitable to both individual and group sessions, but rarely utilized is Re-Evaluation Co-Counseling or R.C. For the past twenty years, R.C. has gained an…

  14. Impact of self-help weight loss resources with or without online support on the dietary intake of overweight and obese men: the SHED-IT randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Blomfield, Rebecca L; Collins, Clare E; Hutchesson, Melinda J; Young, Myles D; Jensen, Megan E; Callister, Robin; Morgan, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Obese men are more likely to have poor dietary patterns compared to women, increasing diet-related chronic disease risk. The impact of a male-only weight loss intervention on dietary intakes is under-evaluated. The aim was to determine whether overweight/obese men randomised to self-help paper-based resources with or without online support, achieved greater improvements in diet compared with Wait-list controls at 3 and 6 months following a gender tailored weight-loss intervention. Dietary intake was assessed using a 120-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), in a secondary analysis of a three-arm weight loss RCT grounded in Social Cognitive Theory; (1) RESOURCES: gender-tailored weight loss resources (DVD, handbooks, pedometer, tape measure); (2) Online: resources plus website and efeedback, (3) Wait-list control. Energy, total fat, saturated fat, and carbohydrate intakes decreased in the online group, which differed significantly from controls at 3- and 6-month follow-up (P<0.05). There was a significant reduction in energy, fat and carbohydrate intakes in the Resource group at 3 and 6 months, but no difference from controls (P>0.05). In the online group there was an increase in %energy from core foods and decrease in %energy from energy-dense nutrient-poor foods (P<0.05) that was significantly different compared to controls at 3 and 6 months (P<0.05). Results suggest that men randomised to the SHED-IT intervention arms were able to implement key dietary messages up to 6 months compared to controls. Future interventions should include targeted and gender-tailored messages as a strategy to improve men's dietary intake within weight loss interventions. Copyright © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Predictors of cessation treatment outcome and treatment moderators among smoking parents receiving quitline counselling or self-help material.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Kathrin; Otten, Roy; Kleinjan, Marloes; Bricker, Jonathan B; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2014-12-01

    Several cessation treatments effectively enhance cessation, but it is not always clear which treatment may be most suitable for a particular client. We examined predictors of treatment outcome and treatment moderators among smoking parents in the Netherlands. We conducted secondary analyses of a randomized controlled trial in which smoking parents received either quitline counselling (n=256) or a self-help brochure (n=256). Data collection was completed in October 2012. Endpoints were 7-day point prevalence abstinence and 6-month prolonged abstinence at 12-month follow-up. Potential predictors and moderators included socio-demographic characteristics, smoking-related variables, and child-related variables. Male gender, higher employment status, lower daily cigarette consumption, higher levels of confidence in quitting, presence of a child with a chronic respiratory illness, and wanting to quit for the health of one's child predicted abstinence at 12months. Significant treatment moderators were intention to quit and educational level. Quitline counselling was effective regardless of intention to quit and educational level, but self-help material was less effective among less motivated and lower educated parents. Certain subgroups of smokers, such as parents who are concerned about the health of their child, are particularly receptive to cessation support. Individual characteristics should be considered in treatment selections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Handheld Devices and Video Modeling to Enhance the Learning of Self-Help Skills in Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Joseph E; Morgan, Michele; Barnett, Veronica; Spreat, Scott

    2015-04-01

    The viewing of videos is a much-studied intervention to teach self-help, social, and vocational skills. Many of the studies to date looked at video modeling using televisions, computers, and other large screens. This study looked at the use of video modeling on portable handheld devices to teach hand washing to three adolescent students with an autism spectrum disorder. Three students participated in this 4-week study conducted by occupational therapists. Baseline data were obtained for the first student for 1 week, the second for 2 weeks, and the third for 3 weeks; videos were introduced when the participants each finished the baseline phase. Given the cognitive and motor needs of the participants, the occupational therapist set the player so that the participants only had to press the play button to start the video playing. The participants were able to hold the players and view at distances that were most appropriate for their individual needs and preferences. The results suggest that video modeling on a handheld device improves the acquisition of self-help skills.

  17. Internet-based guided self-help for university students with anxiety, depression and stress: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Day, Victor; McGrath, Patrick J; Wojtowicz, Magdalena

    2013-07-01

    Anxiety, depression and stress, often co-occurring, are the psychological problems for which university students most often seek help. Moreover there are many distressed students who cannot, or choose not to, access professional help. The present study evaluated the efficacy of an internet-based guided self-help program for moderate anxiety, depression and stress. The program was based on standard cognitive behavior therapy principles and included 5 core modules, some of which involved options for focusing on anxiety and/or depression and/or stress. Trained student coaches provided encouragement and advice about using the program via e-mail or brief weekly phone calls. Sixty-six distressed university students were randomly assigned to either Immediate Access or a 6-week Delayed Access condition. Sixty-one percent of Immediate Access participants completed all 5 core modules, and 80% of all participants completed the second assessment. On the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales-21, Immediate Access participants reported significantly greater reductions in depression (ηp(2)=. 07), anxiety (ηp(2)=. 08) and stress (ηp(2)=. 12) in comparison to participants waiting to do the program, and these improvements were maintained at a six month follow-up. The results suggest that the provision of individually-adaptable, internet-based, self-help programs can reduce psychological distress in university students. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Culturally Adapted Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for Binge Eating: A Feasibility Study with Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Cachelin, Fary M.; Shea, Munyi; Phimphasone, Phoutdavone; Wilson, G. Terence; Thompson, Douglas R.; Striegel, Ruth H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective was to test feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral self-help program to treat binge eating and related problems in Mexican Americans. Participants were 31 women recruited from the Los Angeles area and diagnosed with binge eating disorder, recurrent binge eating or bulimia nervosa. Participants completed a culturally adapted version of a CBT-based self-help program with 8 guidance sessions over a 3-month period. Treatment efficacy was evaluated in terms of binge eating, psychological functioning, and weight loss. Intent-to-treat analyses revealed 35.5% abstinence from binge eating at post-treatment and 38.7% diagnostic remission. Results indicated significant pre-treatment to post-treatment improvement on distress level, BMI, eating disorder psychopathology, and self-esteem. Satisfaction with the program was high. Findings demonstrate that the program is acceptable, feasible, and efficacious in reducing binge eating and associated symptoms for Mexican American women. Study provides “proof of concept” for implementation of culturally adapted forms of evidence-based programs. PMID:25045955

  19. How to treat the untreated: effectiveness of a self-help metacognitive training program (myMCT) for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Steffen; Jelinek, Lena; Hauschildt, Marit; Naber, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in the understanding and treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), many patients undergoing interventions display incomplete symptom reduction. Our research group has developed a self-help manual entitled “My Metacognitive Training for OCD” (myMCT) aimed at raising patients' awareness about cognitive biases that seem to subserve OCD. The training is particularly intended for patients currently unable or unwilling to attend standard therapy, or in cases where such a treatment option is not available. For the present study, 86 individuals suffering from OCD were recruited over the Internet. Following the initial assessment participants were either immediately emailed the myMCT manual or allocated to a waitlist group. After 4 weeks, a second assessment was performed. The myMCT group showed significantly greater improvement for OCD symptoms according to the Y-BOCS total score compared with the waitlist group (d =.63), particularly for obsessions (d=.69). Medium to strong differences emerged for the OCI-R (d =.70) and the BDI-SF (d =.50). The investigation provides the first evidence for the effectiveness of the myMCT for OCD. PMID:20623925

  20. Study protocol of the CAREST-trial: a randomised controlled trial on the (cost-) effectiveness of a CBT-based online self-help training for fear of cancer recurrence in women with curatively treated breast cancer.

    PubMed

    van Helmondt, Sanne Jasperine; van der Lee, Marije Liesbeth; de Vries, Jolanda

    2016-07-25

    One of the most prevalent long-term consequences of surviving breast cancer is fear of cancer recurrence (FCR), which is associated with higher (mental) healthcare costs and lower surveillance rates. The majority of breast cancer survivors report a need for professional help in dealing with FCR. An easy-accessible and cost-effective evidence-based psychological intervention for reducing FCR is lacking. In the current study an online self-help training to reduce FCR will be evaluated. In addition, the secondary aim of this study is to identify factors that predict whether women can benefit from the online self-help training or not. A multi-centre, parallel-groups, randomised controlled trial will be conducted to evaluate the (cost-) effectiveness of the CAREST-trial. A sample of 454 women with curatively treated breast cancer will be recruited from 8 hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants will be randomised to the intervention or usual care group (1:1). Self-report measures will be completed at baseline, 3 (post-intervention), 9, and 24 months. Primary outcome is FCR severity; secondary outcomes are healthcare costs, health status, and psychological distress. The online tailored self-help training "Less fear after cancer" is based on cognitive behavioural therapy and consists of 2 basic modules (psycho-education; basic principles of cognitive behavioural therapy) and 4 optional modules (rumination; action; relaxation; reassurance) to choose from. Each module consists of an informative part (texts, videos, audio files) and a practical part (exercises). For every patient, the intervention will be available for three months. Personal online support by an e-mail coach is available. Online self-help training may be an easy-accessible and cost-effective treatment to reduce the impact of FCR at an early stage in a large group of breast cancer survivors. A strength is the 24 months follow-up period in the health economic evaluation. The results of the study will