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Sample records for disease spirochete adhering

  1. Association of spirochetal infection with Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Burugu, Divya; Poruri, Akhila; Burke, Jennie; Mayne, Peter J; Sapi, Eva; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is an emerging multisystem illness characterized by skin lesions with unusual filaments embedded in or projecting from epithelial tissue. Filament formation results from abnormal keratin and collagen expression by epithelial-based keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Recent research comparing MD to bovine digital dermatitis, an animal infectious disease with similar skin features, provided clues that spirochetal infection could play an important role in the human disease as it does in the animal illness. Based on histological staining, immunofluorescent staining, electron microscopic imaging and polymerase chain reaction, we report the detection of Borrelia spirochetes in dermatological tissue of  four randomly-selected MD patients. The association of MD with spirochetal infection provides evidence that this infection may be a significant factor in the illness and refutes claims that MD lesions are self-inflicted and that people suffering from this disorder are delusional. Molecular characterization of the Borrelia spirochetes found in MD patients is warranted. PMID:24715950

  2. Association of spirochetal infection with Morgellons disease

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is an emerging multisystem illness characterized by skin lesions with unusual filaments embedded in or projecting from epithelial tissue. Filament formation results from abnormal keratin and collagen expression by epithelial-based keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Recent research comparing MD to bovine digital dermatitis, an animal infectious disease with similar skin features, provided clues that spirochetal infection could play an important role in the human disease as it does in the animal illness. Based on histological staining, immunofluorescent staining, electron microscopic imaging and polymerase chain reaction, we report the detection of Borrelia spirochetes in dermatological tissue of  four randomly-selected MD patients. The association of MD with spirochetal infection provides evidence that this infection may be a significant factor in the illness and refutes claims that MD lesions are self-inflicted and that people suffering from this disorder are delusional. Molecular characterization of the Borrelia spirochetes found in MD patients is warranted. PMID:24715950

  3. Association of spirochetal infection with Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Burugu, Divya; Poruri, Akhila; Burke, Jennie; Mayne, Peter J; Sapi, Eva; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is an emerging multisystem illness characterized by skin lesions with unusual filaments embedded in or projecting from epithelial tissue. Filament formation results from abnormal keratin and collagen expression by epithelial-based keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Recent research comparing MD to bovine digital dermatitis, an animal infectious disease with similar skin features, provided clues that spirochetal infection could play an important role in the human disease as it does in the animal illness. Based on histological staining, immunofluorescent staining, electron microscopic imaging and polymerase chain reaction, we report the detection of Borrelia spirochetes in dermatological tissue of  four randomly-selected MD patients. The association of MD with spirochetal infection provides evidence that this infection may be a significant factor in the illness and refutes claims that MD lesions are self-inflicted and that people suffering from this disorder are delusional. Molecular characterization of the Borrelia spirochetes found in MD patients is warranted.

  4. Recovery of Lyme disease spirochetes from patients.

    PubMed Central

    Steere, A. C.; Grodzicki, R. L.; Craft, J. E.; Shrestha, M.; Kornblatt, A. N.; Malawista, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Since the summer of 1982, we have cultured patient specimens for Lyme disease spirochetes. Of 118 patients cultured, four specimens yielded spirochetes: two from blood, one from a skin biopsy specimen of erythema chronicum migrans (ECM), and one from cerebrospinal fluid. All four isolates appeared identical when examined with a monoclonal antibody. However, attempts to recover the spirochete from synovium or synovial fluid were unsuccessful. In addition, the organism could not be visualized in skin or synovial biopsy specimens using the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex detection system. Thus, the current yield in culturing spirochetes from patients is quite low, and it is not yet known whether the organism is still alive later in the disease when arthritis is present. PMID:6393606

  5. Infection in rabbits with the Lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed Central

    Kornblatt, A. N.; Steere, A. C.; Brownstein, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Of 33 rabbits inoculated with Lyme disease spirochetes, two developed erythema chronicum migrans at the site of inoculation. Spirochetes were seen in skin biopsies of one of the lesions with immunoperoxidase and Warthin-Starry stains. Spirochetes were also recovered from the blood of two additional rabbits two weeks post-inoculation. These findings are characteristic of early Lyme disease in humans. PMID:6393613

  6. DNA characterization of Lyme disease spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, G. P.; Steigerwalt, A. G.; Johnson, S.; Barbour, A. G.; Steere, A. C.; Robinson, I. M.; Brenner, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes (LDS) have phenotypic characteristics of both treponemes and borreliae. To ascertain whether one or more species of LDS exist, as well as their taxonomic status, we determined the DNA base (G + C) content for three strains of LDS, the DNA relatedness of ten strains isolated in the United States or Europe, and the DNA relatedness of LDS to other spirochetes. The G + C content of the three LDS strains was 28.1-29.0 mol%, most similar to those of Borellia hermsii (30.6 mol %) and Treponema hyodysenteriae (25.6 mol %) among the other spirochetes tested. DNA hybridization studies of nine LDS strains to a reference strain isolated from human blood revealed divergence (unpaired bases) within related nucleotide sequences of only 0.0-1.0 percent, indicating the strains were one species. Similarly, relatedness values of seven strains to the reference strain were high: 58-98 percent (mean, 71 percent) in 50 degrees C reactions and 50-93 percent (mean, 69 percent) in 65 degrees C reactions. Labeled DNA from B. hermsii was 30-40 percent related to three Lyme disease spirochete strains in 50 degrees C reactions and 8-10 percent related in 65 degrees C reactions. In contrast, DNA from the reference LDS strain showed relatedness of only 1 percent to DNAs of two leptospires and only 16 percent to DNA from T. hyodysenteriae. We conclude that LDS are a single species, genetically unlike treponemes or leptospires, which belong in the genus Borrelia. PMID:6516455

  7. Ixodes ricinus spirochete and European erythema chronicum migrans disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, R.; Kabatzki, J.; Boisten, H. P.; Steere, A. C.; Grodzicki, R. L.; Hartung, S.; Runne, U.

    1984-01-01

    From three endemic locations of erythema chronicum migrans disease in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, we recovered 19 isolates of a spirochete from Ixodes ricinus ticks. The infection rate in adult ticks was 16 percent. The isolated spirochete is immunologically related to the Ixodes dammini spirochete, Borrelia duttoni, and Treponema pallidum. Using indirect immunofluorescence, the sera of 90 patients with erythema chronicum migrans disease showed antibody titers against the isolated spirochete, which correlated with the clinical course. Similarly, antibodies were demonstrated in the sera of 21 patients with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. These results suggest an etiologic role for the Ixodes ricinus spriochete in European erythema chronicum migrans disease. Images FIG. 3 PMID:6393609

  8. Isolation of the Lyme disease spirochete from mammals in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Loken, K I; Wu, C C; Johnson, R C; Bey, R F

    1985-07-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes were isolated from the kidneys of two Peromyscus spp. trapped in Minnesota in September and October 1983. No spirochetes were isolated from white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), red backed voles (Clethrionomys gapperi), or shrews (Sorexy cinereus and Blarina brevicauda). This is the first report of the isolation of the Lyme disease spirochete from the midwestern United States and isolations from these animals, which were free of ticks, suggest that the Lyme disease spirochete may persist in animal organs for months. PMID:4001130

  9. Swimming Dynamics of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vig, Dhruv K.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2012-11-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, swims by undulating its cell body in the form of a traveling flat wave, a process driven by rotating internal flagella. We study B. burgdorferi’s swimming by treating the cell body and flagella as linearly elastic filaments. The dynamics of the cell are then determined from the balance between elastic and resistive forces and moments. We find that planar, traveling waves only exist when the flagella are effectively anchored at both ends of the bacterium and that these traveling flat waves rotate as they undulate. The model predicts how the undulation frequency is related to the torque from the flagellar motors and how the stiffness of the cell body and flagella affect the undulations and morphology.

  10. DNA characterization of the spirochete that causes Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, G P; Steigerwalt, A G; Johnson, S E; Barbour, A G; Steere, A C; Robinson, I M; Brenner, D J

    1984-01-01

    Lyme disease, a tick-borne disease long recognized in Europe but only recently recognized in the United States, was shown in 1982-1983 to be caused by a spirochete, the Lyme disease spirochete. Whether one or more species of the spirochete exists is unknown, as is its taxonomic status. To answer these questions, we determined (i) the DNA base (guanidine-plus-cytosine) content for five strains; (ii) the DNA relatedness of 10 strains from Europe or the United States (isolated from ticks, humans, and a mouse) by DNA hybridization (hydroxyapatite assay at 50 and 65 degrees C); and (iii) the DNA relatedness to other pathogenic spirochetes. The guanine-plus-cytosine content of the Lyme disease spirochete strains was 27.5 to 29.0 mol%, most similar to those of Borrelia hermsii (30.6 mol%) and Treponema hyodysenteriae (25.6 mol%) among the other spirochetes tested. DNA hybridization studies with 32P-labeled DNA from Lyme disease spirochete strain TLO-005, a human blood isolate, revealed divergence (unpaired bases) within related nucleotide sequences of only 0.0 to 1.0% for all nine Lyme disease spirochete strains tested for relatedness to TLO-005. Relatedness values of seven strains to TLO-005 were 58 to 98% (mean, 71%) in 50 degrees C reactions and 50 to 93% (mean, 69%) in 65 degrees C reactions. Two other strains, from which very low yields of DNA were obtained, showed less relatedness (36 to 50 degrees C, 38 to 47% at 65 degrees C). These were nonetheless considered to belong to the same species because of the low amount of divergence in the sequences related to TLO-005 and the absence of decreased relatedness in reactions done at 65 degrees Celsius compared with those done at 50 degrees Celsius. DNA from strain TLO-005 showed relatedness of 1% to DNAs of two leptospires and 16% relatedness to DNA from T. hyodysenteriae. B. hermsii DNA was 30 to 40% related to three Lyme disease spirochete strains in 50 degrees Celsius reactions. Divergence in these reactions was 16

  11. Absence of lipopolysaccharide in the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, K; Rothenberg, R J; Barbour, A G

    1987-01-01

    We were unable to demonstrate the presence of the classic enterobacterium-type lipopolysaccharide in the cells of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi B31. This finding was primarily based on chemical analysis and the absence of free lipid A upon mild acid hydrolysis of the appropriate cell extracts. These results do not preclude the possible existence of an unusual lipopolysaccharide-like compound(s) in B. burgdorferi. Images PMID:3623705

  12. Interaction of the Lyme disease spirochete with its tick vector

    PubMed Central

    Caimano, Melissa J.; Drecktrah, Dan; Kung, Faith; Samuels, D. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Summary Borrelia burgdorferi , the causative agent of Lyme disease (along with closely related genospecies), is in the deeply branching spirochete phylum. The bacterium is maintained in nature in an enzootic cycle that involves transmission from a tick vector to a vertebrate host and acquisition from a vertebrate host to a tick vector. During its arthropod sojourn, B. burgdorferi faces a variety of stresses, including nutrient deprivation. Here, we review some of the spirochetal factors that promote persistence, maintenance and dissemination of B. burgdorferi in the tick, and then focus on the utilization of available carbohydrates as well as the exquisite regulatory systems invoked to adapt to the austere environment between blood meals and to signal species transitions as the bacteria traverse their enzootic cycle. The spirochetes shift their source of carbon and energy from glucose in the vertebrate to glycerol in the tick. Regulation of survival under limiting nutrients requires the classic stringent response in which RelBbu controls the levels of the alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate and guanosine pentaphosphate (collectively termed (p)ppGpp), while regulation at the tick–vertebrate interface as well as regulation of protective responses to the blood meal require the two-component system Hk1/Rrp1 to activate production of the second messenger cyclic-dimeric-GMP (c-di-GMP). PMID:27147446

  13. An investigation of binding ability of Ixodes persulcatus Schulze Salp15 with Lyme disease spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Murase, Yusuke; Konnai, Satoru; Yamada, Shinji; Githaka, Naftaly; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Ito, Takuya; Takano, Ai; Ando, Shuji; Kawabata, Hiroki; Murata, Siro; Ohashi, Kazuhko

    2015-05-01

    Salp15, a 15-kDa tick salivary gland protein, has several suppressive modes of activity against host immunity and plays a critical role in the transmission of Lyme disease spirochetes in Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes ricinus, major vectors of Lyme disease in North America and Western Europe. Salp15 adheres to Borrelia burgdorferi and specifically interacts with its outer surface protein C (OspC), protecting the spirochete from antibody-mediated cytotoxicity and facilitating infection in the mice. Recently, we identified two Salp15 homologues, IperSalp15-1 and IperSalp15-2, in Ixodes persulcatus, a vector for Lyme disease in Japan. Here we describe the function of IperSalp15 in the transmission of Lyme borreliosis. To investigate the function of IperSalp15, recombinant IperSalp15-1 and IperSalp15-2 were prepared in bacterial and insect cells. Both were identified in the sera of tick-immunized hamsters, indicating that these are secretory proteins in exposed host animals. Solid-phase overlay and indirect fluorescence assays showed that IperSalp15 binds to OspC from B. burgdorferi, Borrelia garinii, and Borrelia afzelii. Importantly, this binding likely protected the spirochete from antibody-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. In addition, IperSalp15 tended to facilitate infection in mice. Thus, further characterization of tick molecules, including IperSalp15, could lead to the development of new strategies to prevent the transmission of tick-borne diseases.

  14. Bpur, the Lyme Disease Spirochete's PUR Domain Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jutras, Brandon L.; Chenail, Alicia M.; Carroll, Dustin W.; Miller, M. Clarke; Zhu, Haining; Bowman, Amy; Stevenson, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The PUR domain is a nucleic acid-binding motif found in critical regulatory proteins of higher eukaryotes and in certain species of bacteria. During investigations into mechanisms by which the Lyme disease spirochete controls synthesis of its Erp surface proteins, it was discovered that the borrelial PUR domain protein, Bpur, binds with high affinity to double-stranded DNA adjacent to the erp transcriptional promoter. Bpur was found to enhance the effects of the erp repressor protein, BpaB. Bpur also bound single-stranded DNA and RNA, with relative affinities RNA > double-stranded DNA > single-stranded DNA. Rational site-directed mutagenesis of Bpur identified amino acid residues and domains critical for interactions with nucleic acids, and it revealed that the PUR domain has a distinct mechanism of interaction with each type of nucleic acid ligand. These data shed light on both gene regulation in the Lyme spirochete and functional mechanisms of the widely distributed PUR domain. PMID:23846702

  15. Hide and Seek: How Lyme Disease Spirochetes Overcome Complement Attack

    PubMed Central

    Kraiczy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Overcoming the first line of the innate immune system is a general hallmark of pathogenic microbes to avoid recognition and to enter the human host. In particular, spirochetes belonging to the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex have developed various means to counter the immune response and to successfully survive in diverse host environments for a prolonged period of time. In regard to complement resistance, Borrelia utilize a plethora of immune evasion strategies involves capturing of host-derived complement regulators, terminating complement activation as well as shedding of cell-destroying complement complexes to manipulate and to expeditiously inhibit human complement. Owing to their mode of action, the interacting surface-exposed proteins identified among B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia spielmanii, and Borrelia bavariensis can be classified into at least two major categories, namely, molecules that directly interfere with distinct complement components including BBK32, CspA, BGA66, BGA71, and a CD59-like protein or molecules, which indirectly counteract complement activation by binding various complement regulators such as Factor H, Factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), Factor H-related proteins FHR-1, FHR-2, or C4Bp. The latter group of genetically and structurally unrelated proteins has been collectively referred to as “complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins” and consists of CspA, CspZ, ErpA, ErpC, ErpP, and the as yet unidentified protein p43. This review focuses on the current knowledge of immune evasion mechanisms exhibited by Lyme disease spirochetes and highlights the role of complement-interfering, infection-associated molecules playing an important part in these processes. Deciphering the immune evasion strategies may provide novel avenues for improved diagnostic approaches and therapeutic interventions. PMID:27725820

  16. Accelerated infectivity of tick-transmitted Lyme disease spirochetes to vector ticks.

    PubMed

    Shih, C M; Liu, L P

    1996-09-01

    We determined whether the span of infectivity of Lyme disease spirochetes (Borrelia burgdorferi) to vector ticks varies with the mode of infection in laboratory mice. Noninfected larval deer ticks were permitted to feed on two strains of spirochete-infected mice that had been naturally (via tick bite) and parenterally (via needle injection) infected with B. burgdorferi 2, 4, or 8 weeks earlier, and engorged ticks were dissected and examined for spirochetes by direct immunofluorescence microscopy. After initial infection, spirochetal infectivity to ticks was less efficient in needle-infected mice than in mice infected via tick bites. Tick-transmitted spirochetes develop more rapidly from the skin of infected mice and do not induce a strong antispirochete antibody response during the early stage of infection.

  17. Historic evidence to support a causal relationship between spirochetal infections and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Following previous observations a statistically significant association between various types of spirochetes and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) fulfilled Hill’s criteria in favor of a causal relationship. If spirochetal infections can indeed cause AD, the pathological and biological hallmarks of AD should also occur in syphilitic dementia. To answer this question, observations and illustrations on the detection of spirochetes in the atrophic form of general paresis, which is known to be associated with slowly progressive dementia, were reviewed and compared with the characteristic pathology of AD. Historic observations and illustrations published in the first half of the 20th Century indeed confirm that the pathological hallmarks, which define AD, are also present in syphilitic dementia. Cortical spirochetal colonies are made up by innumerable tightly spiraled Treponema pallidum spirochetes, which are morphologically indistinguishable from senile plaques, using conventional light microscopy. Local brain amyloidosis also occurs in general paresis and, as in AD, corresponds to amyloid beta. These historic observations enable us to conclude that chronic spirochetal infections can cause dementia and reproduce the defining hallmarks of AD. They represent further evidence in support a causal relationship between various spirochetal infections and AD. They also indicate that local invasion of the brain by these helically shaped bacteria reproduce the filamentous pathology characteristic of AD. Chronic infection by spirochetes, and co-infection with other bacteria and viruses should be included in our current view on the etiology of AD. Prompt action is needed as AD might be prevented. PMID:25932012

  18. Seasonal Prevalence of Lyme Disease Spirochetes in a Heterothermic Mammal, the Edible Dormouse (Glis glis)

    PubMed Central

    Fietz, Joanna; Tomiuk, Jürgen; Matuschka, Franz-Rainer

    2014-01-01

    In Europe, dormice serve as competent reservoir hosts for particular genospecies of the tick-borne agent of Lyme disease (LD) and seem to support them more efficiently than do mice or voles. The longevity of edible dormice (Glis glis) and their attractiveness for ticks may result in a predominance of LD spirochetes in ticks questing in dormouse habitats. To investigate the role of edible dormice in the transmission cycle of LD spirochetes, we sampled skin tissue from the ear pinnae of dormice inhabiting five different study sites in south western Germany. Of 501 edible dormice, 12.6% harbored DNA of LD spirochetes. Edible dormice were infected most frequently with the pathogenic LD spirochete Borrelia afzelii. The DNA of B. garinii and B. bavariensis was detected in ca. 0.5% of the examined individuals. No spirochetal DNA was detectable in the skin of edible dormice until July, 6 weeks after they generally start to emerge from their obligate hibernation. Thereafter, the prevalence of spirochetal DNA in edible dormice increased during the remaining period of their 4 to 5 months of activity, reaching nearly 40% in September. Males were more than four times more likely to harbor LD spirochetes than females, and yearlings were almost twice more likely to be infected than adults. The seasonality of the prevalence of LD spirochetes in edible dormice was pronounced and may affect their role as a reservoir host in respect to other hosts. PMID:24705325

  19. Seasonal prevalence of Lyme disease spirochetes in a heterothermic mammal, the edible dormouse (Glis glis).

    PubMed

    Fietz, Joanna; Tomiuk, Jürgen; Matuschka, Franz-Rainer; Richter, Dania

    2014-06-01

    In Europe, dormice serve as competent reservoir hosts for particular genospecies of the tick-borne agent of Lyme disease (LD) and seem to support them more efficiently than do mice or voles. The longevity of edible dormice (Glis glis) and their attractiveness for ticks may result in a predominance of LD spirochetes in ticks questing in dormouse habitats. To investigate the role of edible dormice in the transmission cycle of LD spirochetes, we sampled skin tissue from the ear pinnae of dormice inhabiting five different study sites in south western Germany. Of 501 edible dormice, 12.6% harbored DNA of LD spirochetes. Edible dormice were infected most frequently with the pathogenic LD spirochete Borrelia afzelii. The DNA of B. garinii and B. bavariensis was detected in ca. 0.5% of the examined individuals. No spirochetal DNA was detectable in the skin of edible dormice until July, 6 weeks after they generally start to emerge from their obligate hibernation. Thereafter, the prevalence of spirochetal DNA in edible dormice increased during the remaining period of their 4 to 5 months of activity, reaching nearly 40% in September. Males were more than four times more likely to harbor LD spirochetes than females, and yearlings were almost twice more likely to be infected than adults. The seasonality of the prevalence of LD spirochetes in edible dormice was pronounced and may affect their role as a reservoir host in respect to other hosts.

  20. Experimental Lyme disease in rabbits: spirochetes found in erythema migrans and blood.

    PubMed Central

    Kornblatt, A N; Steere, A C; Brownstein, D G

    1984-01-01

    In attempts to produce experimental Lyme disease, 33 rabbits were inoculated with Lyme spirochetes by tick feeding or from tick organ homogenates or cultures. Two rabbits developed erythema chronicum migrans at the site of inoculation, in one instance 2 days after injection of a tick organ homogenate and in the other instance, 17 days after feeding of infected Ixodes dammini ticks. Spirochetes were seen in skin biopsy specimens of the second lesion with Warthin-Starry and immunoperoxidase stains. Spirochetes were also recovered from blood cultures of two additional rabbits 2 weeks post-inoculation. These findings are characteristic of early Lyme disease in humans and give additional support for the spirochetal etiology of Lyme disease. Images PMID:6480108

  1. Interactions of phagocytes with the Lyme disease spirochete: role of the Fc receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Benach, J.L.; Fleit, H.B.; Habicht, G.S.; Coleman, J.L.; Bosler, E.M.; Lane, B.P.

    1984-10-01

    The phagocytic capacity of murine and human mononuclear and polymorphonuclear phagocytes (including peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils), rabbit and murine peritoneal exudate cells, and the murine macrophage cell line P388D1 against the Lyme disease spirochete was studied. All of these cells were capable of phagocytosing the spirochete; phagocytosis was measured by the uptake of radiolabeled spirochetes, the appearance of immunofluorescent bodies in phagocytic cells, and electron microscopy. Both opsonized and nonopsonized organisms were phagocytosed. The uptake of opsonized organisms by neutrophils was blocked by a monoclonal antibody specific for the Fc receptor and by immune complexes; these findings suggested that most phagocytosis is mediated by the Fc receptor. Similarly, the uptake of opsonized organisms by human monocytes was inhibited by human monomeric IgG1 and by immune complexes. These results illustrate the role of immune phagocytosis of spirochetes in host defense against Lyme disease.

  2. Refractoriness of the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) to the Lyme disease group spirochete Borrelia bissettii.

    PubMed

    Lane, R S; Mun, J; Eisen, L; Eisen, R J

    2006-08-01

    The western fence lizard, Sceloporus occidentalis, is refractory to experimental infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, one of several Lyme disease spirochetes pathogenic for humans. Another member of the Lyme disease spirochete complex, Borrelia bissettii, is distributed widely throughout North America and a similar, if not identical, spirochete has been implicated as a human pathogen in southern Europe. To determine the susceptibility of S. occidentalis to B. bissettii, 6 naïve lizards were exposed to the feeding activities of Ixodes pacificus nymphs experimentally infected with this spirochete. None of the lizards developed spirochetemias detectable by polymerase chain reaction for up to 8 wk post-tick feeding, infected nymphs apparently lost their B. bissettii infections within 1-2 wk after engorgement, and xenodiagnostic L. pacificus larvae that co-fed alongside infected nymphs did not acquire and maintain spirochetes. In contrast, 3 of 4 naïve deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) exposed similarly to feeding by 1 or more B. bissettii-infected nymphs developed patent infections within 4 wk. These and previous findings suggest that the complement system of S. occidentalis typically destroys B. burgdorferi sensu lato spirochetes present in tissues of attached and feeding I. pacificus nymphs, thereby potentially reducing the probability of transmission of these bacteria to humans or other animals by the resultant adult ticks. PMID:16995383

  3. Short report: mode of action of protective immunity to Lyme disease spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Shih, C M; Spielman, A; Telford, S R

    1995-01-01

    To determine whether protective immunity against the agent of Lyme disease may be expressed mainly within its tick vector prior to transmission, we passively immunized mice at various intervals after infected ticks had attached, and assayed such mice for evidence of spirochetal infection by xenodiagnosis one month after challenge. Groups of CD-1 mice were intraperitoneally infused with 0.5 ml of hyperimmune rabbit or mouse serum, reagents and quantities previously determined to protect against syringe-challenge with 10(6) low-passage JD1 spirochetes 12 hr after passive transfer. Comparison groups received normal rabbit serum or saline. All mice were protected from infection when infused no more than one day after infective ticks were allowed to attach. However, if infused three or five days post-tick attachment, 60-100% of the mice became infected. All mice became persistently infected when infused with saline or normal rabbit serum. We conclude that antibody is protective against tick-transmitted spirochetal infection only when passively administered before the spirochetes are deposited in the skin of the host. Ingested antibody may destroy spirochetes or interfere with activation and replication within the tick gut, or with dissemination to the salivary glands. Lyme disease vaccines may thus be uniquely effective because of the vulnerability of the spirochetal agent within its vector.

  4. Spirochetal motility and chemotaxis in the natural enzootic cycle and development of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Motaleb, Md A; Liu, Jun; Wooten, R Mark

    2015-12-01

    Two-thirds of all bacterial genomes sequenced to-date possess an organelle for locomotion, referred to as flagella, periplasmic flagella or type IV pili. These genomes may also contain a chemotaxis-signaling system which governs flagellar rotation, thus leading a coordinated function for motility. Motility and chemotaxis are often crucial for infection or disease process caused by pathogenic bacteria. Although motility-associated genes are well-characterized in some organisms, the highly orchestrated synthesis, regulation, and assembly of periplasmic flagella in spirochetes are just being delineated. Recent advances were fostered by development of unique genetic manipulations in spirochetes coupled with cutting-edge imaging techniques. These contemporary advances in understanding the role of spirochetal motility and chemotaxis in host persistence and disease development are highlighted in this review.

  5. Spirochetal motility and chemotaxis in the natural enzootic cycle and development of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Motaleb, Md A; Liu, Jun; Wooten, R Mark

    2015-12-01

    Two-thirds of all bacterial genomes sequenced to-date possess an organelle for locomotion, referred to as flagella, periplasmic flagella or type IV pili. These genomes may also contain a chemotaxis-signaling system which governs flagellar rotation, thus leading a coordinated function for motility. Motility and chemotaxis are often crucial for infection or disease process caused by pathogenic bacteria. Although motility-associated genes are well-characterized in some organisms, the highly orchestrated synthesis, regulation, and assembly of periplasmic flagella in spirochetes are just being delineated. Recent advances were fostered by development of unique genetic manipulations in spirochetes coupled with cutting-edge imaging techniques. These contemporary advances in understanding the role of spirochetal motility and chemotaxis in host persistence and disease development are highlighted in this review. PMID:26519910

  6. Wood rats and kangaroo rats: potential reservoirs of the Lyme disease spirochete in California.

    PubMed

    Lane, R S; Brown, R N

    1991-05-01

    The etiologic agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Brenner, was isolated repeatedly from dusky-footed wood rats, Neotoma fuscipes Baird, and California kangaroo rats, Dipodomys californicus Merriam, in northern California. All animals were collected in a region endemic for Lyme disease but for which the natural reservoir of B. burgdorferi was unknown. Similar attempts to isolate spirochetes from lizards, other species of rodents, jack rabbits, and deer between 1987 and 1991 were unsuccessful. Spirochetes isolated from wood rats and kangaroo rats were antigenically similar to strains of B. burgdorferi that had been isolated previously from the western black-legged tick, Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls, in California. Similar enzootic cycles involving wood rats or kangaroo rats should be sought in other regions of the United States where the reservoirs of this spirochete are unknown.

  7. Regulatory protein BBD18 of the lyme disease spirochete: essential role during tick acquisition?

    PubMed

    Hayes, Beth M; Dulebohn, Daniel P; Sarkar, Amit; Tilly, Kit; Bestor, Aaron; Ambroggio, Xavier; Rosa, Patricia A

    2014-04-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi senses and responds to environmental cues as it transits between the tick vector and vertebrate host. Failure to properly adapt can block transmission of the spirochete and persistence in either vector or host. We previously identified BBD18, a novel plasmid-encoded protein of B. burgdorferi, as a putative repressor of the host-essential factor OspC. In this study, we investigate the in vivo role of BBD18 as a regulatory protein, using an experimental mouse-tick model system that closely resembles the natural infectious cycle of B. burgdorferi. We show that spirochetes that have been engineered to constitutively produce BBD18 can colonize and persist in ticks but do not infect mice when introduced by either tick bite or needle inoculation. Conversely, spirochetes lacking BBD18 can persistently infect mice but are not acquired by feeding ticks. Through site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that abrogation of spirochete infection in mice by overexpression of BBD18 occurs only with bbd18 alleles that can suppress OspC synthesis. Finally, we demonstrate that BBD18-mediated regulation does not utilize a previously described ospC operator sequence required by B. burgdorferi for persistence in immunocompetent mice. These data lead us to conclude that BBD18 does not represent the putative repressor utilized by B. burgdorferi for the specific downregulation of OspC in the mammalian host. Rather, we suggest that BBD18 exhibits features more consistent with those of a global regulatory protein whose critical role occurs during spirochete acquisition by feeding ticks. IMPORTANCE Lyme disease, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common arthropod-borne disease in North America. B. burgdorferi is transmitted to humans and other vertebrate hosts by ticks as they take a blood meal. Transmission between vectors and hosts requires the bacterium to sense changes in the environment and adapt. However, the mechanisms

  8. Community ecology and disease risk: lizards, squirrels, and the Lyme disease spirochete in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Salkeld, Daniel J; Lane, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Vector-borne zoonotic diseases are often maintained in complex transmission cycles involving multiple vertebrate hosts and their arthropod vectors. In the state of California, U.S.A., the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which causes Lyme disease, is transmitted between vertebrate hosts by the western black-legged tick, Ixodes pacificus. Several mammalian species serve as reservoir hosts of the spirochete, but levels of tick infestation, reservoir competence, and Borrelia-infection prevalence vary widely among such hosts. Here, we model the host (lizards, Peromyscus mice, Californian meadow voles, dusky-footed wood rats, and western gray squirrels), vector, and pathogen community of oak woodlands in northwestern California to determine the relative importance of different tick hosts. Observed infection prevalence of B. burgdorferi in host-seeking I. pacificus nymphs was 1.8-5.3%, and our host-community model estimated an infection prevalence of 1.6-2.2%. The western gray squirrel (Sciurus griseus) was the only source of infected nymphs. Lizards, which are refractory to Borrelia infection, are important in feeding subadult ticks but reduce disease risk (nymphal infection prevalence). Species identity is therefore critical in understanding and determining the local disease ecology. PMID:20380218

  9. Spirochetes in the spleen of a patient with chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, M A; Azzolini, A; Tobia, F; Pesce, C M

    1989-01-01

    A 54-year-old man had intermittent evening fever, arthralgia, transient erythematous macular eruption on the skin, and splenomegaly of two year's duration. Immunofluorescence tests for Borrelia burgdorferi serum antibodies had positive results, but G-penicillin treatment was ineffective. Splenectomy with lymph node biopsy was performed to rule out lymphoproliferative disorders. Borrelia-like spirochetes were identified histologically in the spleen; this finding was consistent with persistence of B. burgdorferi organisms in inner organs in chronic Lyme disease.

  10. Gut Microbiota of the Tick Vector Ixodes scapularis Modulate Colonization of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Sukanya; Rajeevan, Nallakkandi; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Yang O.; Heisig, Julia; Pan, Jingyi; Eppler-Epstein, Rebecca; DePonte, Kathleen; Fish, Durland; Fikrig, Erol

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Arthopods, such as Ixodes ticks, serve as vectors for many human pathogens. The arthropod gut presents a pivotal microbial entry point and determines pathogen colonization and survival. We show that the gut microbiota of Ixodes scapularis, a major vector of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, influence spirochete colonization of ticks. Perturbing the gut microbiota of larval ticks reduced Borrelia colonization, with dysbiosed larvae displaying decreased expression of the transcription factor STAT. Diminished STAT expression corresponded to lower expression of peritrophin, a key glycoprotein scaffold of the glycan-rich mucus-like peritrophic matrix (PM) that separates the gut lumen from the epithelium. The integrity of the I. scapularis PM was essential for B. burgdorferi to efficiently colonize the gut epithelium. These data elucidate a functional link between the gut microbiota, STAT-signaling, and pathogen colonization in the context of the gut epithelial barrier of an arthropod vector. PMID:24439898

  11. Spatial stratification of various Lyme disease spirochetes in a Central European site.

    PubMed

    Richter, Dania; Schröder, Boris; Hartmann, Niklas K; Matuschka, Franz-Rainer

    2013-03-01

    To determine whether the genospecies composition of Lyme disease spirochetes is spatially stratified, we collected questing Ixodes ricinus ticks in neighboring plots where rodents, birds, and lizards were present as reservoir host and compared the prevalence of various genospecies. The overall prevalence of spirochetes in questing ticks varied across the study site. Borrelia lusitaniae appeared to infect adult ticks in one plot at the same frequency as did Borrelia afzelii in the other plots. The relative density of questing nymphal and adult ticks varied profoundly. Where lizards were exceedingly abundant, these vertebrates seemed to constitute the dominant host for nymphal ticks, contributing the majority of infected adult ticks. Because lizards support solely B. lusitaniae and appear to exclude other genospecies, their narrow genospecies association results in predominance of B. lusitaniae in sites where lizards are abundant, while limiting its spread to the host's habitat range. To the extent that Central European B. lusitaniae strains are nonpathogenic, the presence of numerous lizards should locally decrease risk of infection for people. Evaluation of regional risk of infection by Lyme disease spirochetes should take the spatial effect of hosts into consideration, which stratify the distribution of specifically infected ticks on a small scale.

  12. Loss of Lyme disease spirochetes from Ixodes ricinus ticks feeding on European blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Matuschka, F R; Spielman, A

    1992-03-01

    To determine whether blackbirds (Turdus merula), the most abundant and most abundantly tick-infested ecotonal bird of Central Europe, may contribute to the transmission of the Lyme disease spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi), we compared the infectivity to ticks of naturally as well as experimentally infected blackbirds and rodents. European blackbirds experience intense exposure to Ixodes ricinus ticks and to the pathogens that they transmit. In nature, subadult I. ricinus ticks found feeding on these birds generally contain no spirochetes, although infection is universal in those found on black-striped mice (Apodemus agrarius). Those found on yellow-necked mice (A. flavicollis) are less frequently infected. Ticks lose infection in the course of feeding on blackbirds and fail to infect them. Subadult I. ricinus ticks readily feed on blackbirds, black-striped mice, and jirds (Meriones unguiculatus), but engorge less fully on the bird than on the rodents. Although birds may burden human health by establishing new infestations of I. ricinus ticks, our observations indicate that particular birds may benefit health by locally diminishing transmission of the Lyme disease spirochete.

  13. Experimental infection of Columbian black-tailed deer with the Lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    Lane, R S; Berger, D M; Casher, L E; Burgdorfer, W

    1994-01-01

    The course of Borrelia burgdorferi-infection in Columbian black-tailed deer. (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus), its effect on the health of these animals, and their reservoir competence for fleas were evaluated experimentally. Four yearling females inoculated intramuscularly with 10(8) organisms of the CA4 strain of B. burgdorferi, and two yearling males unexposed to spirochetes, were monitored daily for 3 mo. Spirochetes were reisolated from the blood of three does at 14 or 70 days postinjection, and from several tissues of the fourth doe at necropsy. Considerable antigenic heterogeneity was observed among the reisolates as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Only two of the four infected deer developed significant antibodies (> or = 1:128) to B. burgdorferi with titers persisting for < or = 2 mo. Hematological values were highly variable and the degree of variation observed was much greater than that reported previously for Columbian black-tailed deer or other subspecies of mule deer. Infected deer did not manifest signs of Lyme disease. On histologic examination of eight tissues per deer, we observed a minimal hepatic lesion in all animals exposed to B. burgdorferi. No spirochetes were detected in 367 fleas (Pulex irritans) that had naturally infested these deer; thus this flea probably is an inefficient host of B. burgdorferi.

  14. Avian and mammalian hosts for spirochete-infected ticks and insects in a Lyme disease focus in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J F; Magnarelli, L A

    1984-01-01

    Spirochetes and their vectors and reservoirs were studied in a Lyme disease focus in East Haddam, Connecticut, from mid-May through September 1983. Ixodes dammini subadults were comparable in number on white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) (means = 2.9 +/- 3.6 SD) to those on 27 different species of birds (means = 2.3 +/- 4.2 SD) representing 11 families within the order Passeriformes. Less commonly found ticks on birds (means less than or equal to 0.1) were immature Ixodes dentatus and Haemaphysalis leporispalustris. Although spirochete-infected I. dammini larvae and nymphs were taken off eight and nine different species of birds, respectively, significantly fewer positive larvae were removed from birds than from white-footed mice. Spirochetes were detected in the midguts of I. dammini, Dermacentor variabilis, and H. leporispalustris and two species of insects (Cuterebra fontinella and Orchopeas leucopus). Possibly, arthropods other than I. dammini vector these spirochetes in northeastern United States. Spirochetes grew in a cell-free medium inoculated with bloods from four white-footed mice, one woodland jumping mouse (Napaeozapus insignis), one northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos), one gray catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), two prairie warblers (Dendroica discolor), one orchard oriole (Icterus spurius), one common yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas), and one American robin (Turdus migratorius). We suggest that avian hosts, like mammals, develop spirochetemias of the causative agent of Lyme disease. Erythematous tissues from a white-footed mouse were infected with spirochetes.

  15. Arthritis severity and spirochete burden are determined by serotype in the Borrelia turicatae-mouse model of Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, P M; Allred, C D; West, C S; Alvarez, R; Barbour, A G

    1997-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice infected with Borrelia turicatae, a relapsing fever agent, have a disorder that resembles disseminated Lyme disease. Two serotypes, A and B, differed in their arthritogenicity in both CB-17 SCID and C3H SCID mice. In CB-17 SCID mice infected with serotype A or B, arthritis was assessed by measurement of tibiotarsal diameter, functional ability on a beam walk test, and microscopic assessment of joint inflammation. Serotype B-infected mice had greater joint swelling, functional disability, and leukocytic infiltration in the joints than serotype A-infected mice. Joint swelling and disability peaked at 2 weeks of infection and then decreased, while leukocyte infiltration in the joints persisted. To investigate the basis for the differences in arthritogenicity of serotypes A and B, spirochete burdens in infected mice were measured by quantitative PCR of spirochete DNA in joints, direct immunofluorescence of spirochetes in joints, and counts of spirochetes in the blood. At 2 weeks of infection there were seven times more spirochetes in the joints of serotype B-infected mice than in those of serotype A-infected mice, measured by both quantitative PCR and direct enumeration. Although serotypes A and B had the same infectivity and growth rate in vivo, serotype B spirochetes were eightfold more abundant in the blood than serotype A spirochetes and produced greater fatality in newborn mice. These findings indicate that differences in disease severity in mice infected with serotype A or B are attributable to differences in the spirochete burden in the joints and blood. PMID:8975925

  16. Distribution and molecular analysis of Lyme disease spirochetes, Borrelia burgdorferi, isolated from ticks throughout California.

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, T G; Schrumpf, M E; Karstens, R H; Clover, J R; Wong, J; Daugherty, M; Struthers, M; Rosa, P A

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies describing the occurrence and molecular characteristics of Lyme disease spirochetes, Borrelia burgdorferi, from California have been restricted primarily to isolates obtained from the north coastal region of this large and ecologically diverse state. Our objective was to look for and examine B. burdorferi organisms isolated from Ixodes pacificus ticks collected from numerous regions spanning most parts of California where this tick is found. Thirty-one isolates of B. burgdorferi were examined from individual or pooled I. pacificus ticks collected from 25 counties throughout the state. One isolate was obtained from ticks collected at Wawona Campground in Yosemite National Park, documenting the occurrence of the Lyme disease spirochete in an area of intensive human recreational use. One isolate from an Ixodes neotomae tick from an additional county was also examined. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblot analysis, agarose gel electrophoresis, Southern blot analysis, and the polymerase chain reaction were used to examine the molecular and genetic determinants of these uncloned, low-passage-number isolates. All of the isolates were identified as B. burgdorferi by their protein profiles and reactivities with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, and all the isolates were typed by the polymerase chain reaction as North American-type spirochetes (B. burgdorferi sensu stricto). Although products of the ospAB locus were identified in protein analyses in all of the isolates, several isolates contained deleted forms of this locus that would result in the expression of chimeric OspA-OspB proteins. The analysis of OspC demonstrated that this protein was widely conserved among the isolates but was also quite variable in its molecular mass and the amount of it that was expressed. Images PMID:8308101

  17. Hypothetical Protein BB0569 Is Essential for Chemotaxis of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Liu, Jun; Charon, Nyles W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has five putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs). In this report, we provide evidence that a hypothetical protein, BB0569, is essential for the chemotaxis of B. burgdorferi. While BB0569 lacks significant homology to the canonical MCPs, it contains a conserved domain (spanning residues 110 to 170) that is often evident in membrane-bound MCPs such as Tar and Tsr of Escherichia coli. Unlike Tar and Tsr, BB0569 lacks transmembrane regions and recognizable HAMP and methylation domains and is similar to TlpC, a cytoplasmic chemoreceptor of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. An isogenic mutant of BB0569 constantly runs in one direction and fails to respond to attractants, indicating that BB0569 is essential for chemotaxis. Immunofluorescence, green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion, and cryo-electron tomography analyses demonstrate that BB0569 localizes at the cell poles and is required for chemoreceptor clustering at the cell poles. Protein cross-linking studies reveal that BB0569 forms large protein complexes with MCP3, indicative of its interactions with other MCPs. Interestingly, analysis of B. burgdorferi mcp mutants shows that inactivation of either mcp2 or mcp3 reduces the level of BB0569 substantially and that such a reduction is caused by protein turnover. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the domain composition and function of BB0569 are similar in some respects to those of TlpC but that these proteins are different in their cellular locations, further highlighting that the chemotaxis of B. burgdorferi is unique and different from the Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica paradigm. IMPORTANCE Spirochete chemotaxis differs substantially from the Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica paradigm, and the basis for controlling the rotation of the bundles of periplasmic flagella at each end of the cell is unknown. In recent years, Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, has

  18. Host cell heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans are ligands for OspF-related proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Bhowmick, Rudra; Coburn, Jenifer; Leong, John M

    2015-10-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, spreads from the site of the tick bite to tissues such as heart, joints and the nervous tissues. Host glycosaminoglycans, highly modified repeating disaccharides that are present on cell surfaces and in extracellular matrix, are common targets of microbial pathogens during tissue colonization. While several dermatan sulfate-binding B. burgdorferi adhesins have been identified, B. burgdorferi adhesins documented to promote spirochetal binding to heparan sulfate have not yet been identified. OspEF-related proteins (Erps), a large family of plasmid-encoded surface lipoproteins that are produced in the mammalian host, can be divided into the OspF-related, OspEF-leader peptide (Elp) and OspE-related subfamilies. We show here that a member of the OspF-related subfamily, ErpG, binds to heparan sulfate and when produced on the surface of an otherwise non-adherent B. burgdorferi strain, ErpG promotes heparan sulfate-mediated bacterial attachment to the glial but not the endothelial, synovial or respiratory epithelial cells. Six other OspF-related proteins were capable of binding heparan sulfate, whereas representative OspE-related and Elp proteins lacked this activity. These results indicate that OspF-related proteins are heparan sulfate-binding adhesins, at least one of which promotes bacterial attachment to glial cells.

  19. Reservoir competence of Microtus pennsylvanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markowski, D.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Hyland, K.E.; Hu, R.

    1998-01-01

    The reservoir competence of the meadow vole, Microtus pennsylvanicus Ord, for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Brenner was established on Patience Island, RI. Meadow voles were collected from 5 locations throughout Rhode Island. At 4 of the field sites, M. pennsylvanicus represented only 4.0% (n = 141) of the animals captured. However, on Patience Island, M. pennsylvanicus was the sole small mammal collected (n = 48). Of the larval Ixodes scapularis Say obtained from the meadow voles on Patience Island, 62% (n = 78) was infected with B. burgdorferi. Meadow voles from all 5 locations were successfully infected with B. burgdorferi in the laboratory and were capable of passing the infection to xenodiagnostic I. scapularis larvae for 9 wk. We concluded that M. pennsylvanicus was physiologically capable of maintaining B. burgdorferi infection. However, in locations where Peromyscus leucopus (Rafinesque) is abundant, the role of M. pennsylvanicus as a primary reservoir for B. burgdorferi was reduced.

  20. Susceptibility to Ticks and Lyme Disease Spirochetes Is Not Affected in Mice Coinfected with Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Maaz, Denny; Rausch, Sebastian; Richter, Dania; Krücken, Jürgen; Kühl, Anja A.; Demeler, Janina; Blümke, Julia; Matuschka, Franz-Rainer; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Small rodents serve as reservoir hosts for tick-borne pathogens, such as the spirochetes causing Lyme disease. Whether natural coinfections with other macroparasites alter the success of tick feeding, antitick immunity, and the host's reservoir competence for tick-borne pathogens remains to be determined. In a parasitological survey of wild mice in Berlin, Germany, approximately 40% of Ixodes ricinus-infested animals simultaneously harbored a nematode of the genus Heligmosomoides. We therefore aimed to analyze the immunological impact of the nematode/tick coinfection as well as its effect on the tick-borne pathogen Borrelia afzelii. Hosts experimentally coinfected with Heligmosomoides polygyrus and larval/nymphal I. ricinus ticks developed substantially stronger systemic type 2 T helper cell (Th2) responses, on the basis of the levels of GATA-3 and interleukin-13 expression, than mice infected with a single pathogen. During repeated larval infestations, however, anti-tick Th2 reactivity and an observed partial immunity to tick feeding were unaffected by concurrent nematode infections. Importantly, the strong systemic Th2 immune response in coinfected mice did not affect susceptibility to tick-borne B. afzelii. An observed trend for decreased local and systemic Th1 reactivity against B. afzelii in coinfected mice did not result in a higher spirochete burden, nor did it facilitate bacterial dissemination or induce signs of immunopathology. Hence, this study indicates that strong systemic Th2 responses in nematode/tick-coinfected house mice do not affect the success of tick feeding and the control of the causative agent of Lyme disease. PMID:26883594

  1. Antibodies of patients with Lyme disease to components of the Ixodes dammini spirochete.

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, A G; Burgdorfer, W; Grunwaldt, E; Steere, A C

    1983-01-01

    Lyme disease is an inflammatory disorder of skin, joints, nervous system, and heart. The disease is associated with a preceding tick bite and is ameliorated by penicillin treatment. A spirochete (IDS) isolated from Ixodes dammini ticks has been implicated as the etiologic agent of Lyme disease. We examined the antibody responses of Lyme disease patients to IDS lysate components in order to further understand the pathogenesis of this disease. The components were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose, reacted with patients' sera, and the bound IgG was detected with 125I-labeled protein A (western blot). We found that (a) Lyme disease patients had antibodies to IDS components (b) most patients studied had antibodies to two components with apparent subunit molecular weights of 41,000 and 60,000, and (c) the patients' antibody responses during illness and remission were specific, for the most part, for the IDS. In contrast to the findings with Lyme disease sera, sera from controls showed little reactivity with IDS components in either the western blots or a derivative solid-phase radioimmunoassay. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:6348092

  2. Temporal Changes in Outer Surface Proteins A and C of the Lyme Disease-Associated Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, during the Chain of Infection in Ticks and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, Tom G.; Piesman, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The Lyme disease-associated spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is maintained in enzootic cycles involving Ixodes ticks and small mammals. Previous studies demonstrated that B. burgdorferi expresses outer surface protein A (OspA) but not OspC when residing in the midgut of unfed ticks. However, after ticks feed on blood, some spirochetes stop making OspA and express OspC. Our current work examined the timing and frequency of OspA and OspC expression by B. burgdorferi in infected Ixodes scapularis nymphs as they fed on uninfected mice and in uninfected I. scapularis larvae and nymphs as they first acquired spirochetes from infected mice. Smears of midguts from previously infected ticks were prepared at 12- or 24-h intervals following attachment through repletion at 96 h, and spirochetes were stained for immunofluorescence for detection of antibodies to OspA and OspC. As shown previously, prior to feeding spirochetes in nymphs expressed OspA but not OspC. During nymphal feeding, however, the proportion of spirochetes expressing OspA decreased, while spirochetes expressing OspC became detectable. In fact, spirochetes rapidly began to express OspC, with the greatest proportion of spirochetes having this protein at 48 h of attachment and then with the proportion decreasing significantly by the time that the ticks had completed feeding. In vitro cultivation of the spirochete at different temperatures showed OspC to be most abundant when the spirochetes were grown at 37°C. Yet, the synthesis of this protein waned with continuous passage at this temperature. Immunofluorescence staining of spirochetes in smears of midguts from larvae and nymphs still attached or having completed feeding on infected mice demonstrated that OspA but not OspC was produced by these spirochetes recently acquired from mice. Therefore, the temporal synthesis of OspC by spirochetes only in feeding ticks that were infected prior to the blood meal suggests that this surface protein is involved in

  3. Filament formation associated with spirochetal infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2011-01-01

    Bovine digital dermatitis is an emerging infectious disease that causes lameness, decreased milk production, and weight loss in livestock. Proliferative stages of bovine digital dermatitis demonstrate keratin filament formation in skin above the hooves in affected animals. The multifactorial etiology of digital dermatitis is not well understood, but spirochetes and other coinfecting microorganisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this veterinary illness. Morgellons disease is an emerging human dermopathy characterized by the presence of filamentous fibers of undetermined composition, both in lesions and subdermally. While the etiology of Morgellons disease is unknown, there is serological and clinical evidence linking this phenomenon to Lyme borreliosis and coinfecting tick-borne agents. Although the microscopy of Morgellons filaments has been described in the medical literature, the structure and pathogenesis of these fibers is poorly understood. In contrast, most microscopy of digital dermatitis has focused on associated pathogens and histology rather than the morphology of late-stage filamentous fibers. Clinical, laboratory, and microscopic characteristics of these two diseases are compared. PMID:22253541

  4. Filament formation associated with spirochetal infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2011-01-01

    Bovine digital dermatitis is an emerging infectious disease that causes lameness, decreased milk production, and weight loss in livestock. Proliferative stages of bovine digital dermatitis demonstrate keratin filament formation in skin above the hooves in affected animals. The multifactorial etiology of digital dermatitis is not well understood, but spirochetes and other coinfecting microorganisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this veterinary illness. Morgellons disease is an emerging human dermopathy characterized by the presence of filamentous fibers of undetermined composition, both in lesions and subdermally. While the etiology of Morgellons disease is unknown, there is serological and clinical evidence linking this phenomenon to Lyme borreliosis and coinfecting tick-borne agents. Although the microscopy of Morgellons filaments has been described in the medical literature, the structure and pathogenesis of these fibers is poorly understood. In contrast, most microscopy of digital dermatitis has focused on associated pathogens and histology rather than the morphology of late-stage filamentous fibers. Clinical, laboratory, and microscopic characteristics of these two diseases are compared.

  5. Filament formation associated with spirochetal infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons disease

    PubMed Central

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2011-01-01

    Bovine digital dermatitis is an emerging infectious disease that causes lameness, decreased milk production, and weight loss in livestock. Proliferative stages of bovine digital dermatitis demonstrate keratin filament formation in skin above the hooves in affected animals. The multifactorial etiology of digital dermatitis is not well understood, but spirochetes and other coinfecting microorganisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this veterinary illness. Morgellons disease is an emerging human dermopathy characterized by the presence of filamentous fibers of undetermined composition, both in lesions and subdermally. While the etiology of Morgellons disease is unknown, there is serological and clinical evidence linking this phenomenon to Lyme borreliosis and coinfecting tick-borne agents. Although the microscopy of Morgellons filaments has been described in the medical literature, the structure and pathogenesis of these fibers is poorly understood. In contrast, most microscopy of digital dermatitis has focused on associated pathogens and histology rather than the morphology of late-stage filamentous fibers. Clinical, laboratory, and microscopic characteristics of these two diseases are compared. PMID:22253541

  6. [Treatment adherence and chronic inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Tahri, Nabil

    2007-09-01

    For inflammatory bowel disease, unlike other chronic illnesses, there are sparse data available about patients' adherence to medication. The few studies vary widely, but noncompliance rates tend to be high, about 30-40%. Psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety, and poor patient-physician relationships are the most common causes of these patients' lack of adherence. Failure to adhere to prescribed medications increases risk of relapse and of colorectal cancer. Strategies that can improve adherence include establishing a partnership with the patient, simplifying the treatment regimen and increasing awareness through education and feedback.

  7. The cyclic-di-GMP signaling pathway in the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Novak, Elizabeth A; Sultan, Syed Z; Motaleb, Md A

    2014-01-01

    In nature, the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi cycles between the unrelated environments of the Ixodes tick vector and mammalian host. In order to survive transmission between hosts, B. burgdorferi must be able to not only detect changes in its environment, but also rapidly and appropriately respond to these changes. One manner in which this obligate parasite regulates and adapts to its changing environment is through cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling. c-di-GMP has been shown to be instrumental in orchestrating the adaptation of B. burgdorferi to the tick environment. B. burgdorferi possesses only one set of c-di-GMP-metabolizing genes (one diguanylate cyclase and two distinct phosphodiesterases) and one c-di-GMP-binding PilZ-domain protein designated as PlzA. While studies in the realm of c-di-GMP signaling in B. burgdorferi have exploded in the last few years, there are still many more questions than answers. Elucidation of the importance of c-di-GMP signaling to B. burgdorferi may lead to the identification of mechanisms that are critical for the survival of B. burgdorferi in the tick phase of the enzootic cycle as well as potentially delineate a role (if any) c-di-GMP may play in the transmission and virulence of B. burgdorferi during the enzootic cycle, thereby enabling the development of effective drugs for the prevention and/or treatment of Lyme disease.

  8. Reservoir competence of native North American birds for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, H.S.; Buckley, P.A.; Balmforth, M.G.; Zhioua, E.; Mitra, Siddhartha; Buckley, F.G.

    2005-01-01

    Reservoir competence of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, was tested for six species of native North American birds: American Robin, Gray Catbird, Brown Thrasher, Eastern Towhee, Song Sparrow, and Northern Cardinal. Wild birds collected by mistnetting on Fire Island, NY, were held in a field lab in cages over water, and locally collected larval ticks were placed on the birds, harvested from the water after engorgement, and tested for infection by DFA after molting to the nymphal stage. American Robins were competent reservoirs, infecting 16.1% of larvae applied to wild-caught birds, compared to 0% of control ticks placed on uninfected lab mice. Robins that were previously infected in the lab by nymphal feeding infected 81.8% of applied larvae. Wild-caught Song Sparrows infected 4.8% of applied larvae, and 21.1% when infected by nymphal feeding. Results suggest moderate levels of reservoir competence for Northern Cardinals, lower levels for Gray Catbirds, and little evidence of reservoir competence for Eastern Towhees or Brown Thrashers. Lower infection rates in larvae applied to wild-caught birds compared to birds infected in the lab suggest that infected birds display temporal variability in infectiousness to larval ticks. Engorged larvae drop from birds abundantly during daylight hours, so the abundance of these bird species in the peridomestic environment suggests that they might contribute infected ticks to lawns and gardens.

  9. Outer Surface Protein A Protects Lyme Disease Spirochetes from Acquired Host Immunity in the Tick Vector▿

    PubMed Central

    Battisti, James M.; Bono, James L.; Rosa, Patricia A.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Schwan, Tom G.; Policastro, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi alters the expression of outer surface protein (osp) genes as the bacterium cycles between ticks and mammals. OspA is produced as borreliae enter the tick vector and remains a major surface antigen during midgut colonization. To elucidate the role of OspA in the vector, we created an insertional deletion of ospA in strain B31-A3. The ospA mutant infects mice when it is injected intradermally and is acquired by larval ticks fed on these mice, where it persists through the molt to the nymph stage. Bacterial survival rates in artificially infected tick larvae fed on naïve mice were compared with those in the vector fed on immune mice. The ospA mutant proliferates in larvae if it is exposed to blood from naïve mice, but it declines in density after larval feeding if the blood is from immune mice. When uninfected larvae are fed on B-cell-deficient mice infected with the ospA mutant, larvae show borrelial densities and persistence that are significantly greater than those fed on infected, immunocompetent mice. We conclude that OspA serves a critical antibody-shielding role during vector blood meal uptake from immune hosts and is not required for persistence in the tick vector. PMID:18779341

  10. Bpur, the Lyme disease spirochete's PUR domain protein: identification as a transcriptional modulator and characterization of nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Jutras, Brandon L; Chenail, Alicia M; Carroll, Dustin W; Miller, M Clarke; Zhu, Haining; Bowman, Amy; Stevenson, Brian

    2013-09-01

    The PUR domain is a nucleic acid-binding motif found in critical regulatory proteins of higher eukaryotes and in certain species of bacteria. During investigations into mechanisms by which the Lyme disease spirochete controls synthesis of its Erp surface proteins, it was discovered that the borrelial PUR domain protein, Bpur, binds with high affinity to double-stranded DNA adjacent to the erp transcriptional promoter. Bpur was found to enhance the effects of the erp repressor protein, BpaB. Bpur also bound single-stranded DNA and RNA, with relative affinities RNA > double-stranded DNA > single-stranded DNA. Rational site-directed mutagenesis of Bpur identified amino acid residues and domains critical for interactions with nucleic acids, and it revealed that the PUR domain has a distinct mechanism of interaction with each type of nucleic acid ligand. These data shed light on both gene regulation in the Lyme spirochete and functional mechanisms of the widely distributed PUR domain.

  11. Ultrastructural demonstration of spirochetal antigens in synovial fluid and synovial membrane in chronic Lyme disease: possible factors contributing to persistence of organisms.

    PubMed

    Nanagara, R; Duray, P H; Schumacher, H R

    1996-10-01

    To perform the first systematic electronmicroscopic (EM) and immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) study of the pathological changes and the evidence of spirochete presence in synovial membranes and synovial fluid (SF) cells of patients with chronic Lyme arthritis. EM examination was performed on four synovial membrane and eight SF cell samples from eight patients with chronic Lyme disease. Spirochetal antigens in the samples were sought by IEM using monoclonal antibody to Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A (OspA) as the immunoprobe. Prominent ultrastructural findings were surface fibrin-like material, thickened synovial lining cell layer and signs of vascular injury. Borrelia-like structures were identified in all four synovial membranes and in two of eight SF cell samples. The presence of spirochetal antigens was confirmed by IEM in all four samples studied (one synovial membrane and three SF cell samples). OspA labelling was in perivascular areas, deep synovial stroma among collagen bundles, and in vacuoles of fibroblasts in synovial membranes; and in cytophagosomes of mononuclear cells in SF cell samples. Electron microscopy adds further evidence for persistence of spirochetal antigens in the joint in chronic Lyme disease. Locations of spirochetes or spirochetal antigens both intracellulary and extracellulary in deep synovial connective tissue as reported here suggest sites at which spirochaetes may elude host immune response and antibiotic treatment.

  12. Distribution of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in Naturally and Experimentally Infected Western Gray Squirrels (Sciurus griseus)

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kelly; Salkeld, Daniel J.; Lane, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The dynamics of Borrelia burgdorferi infections within its natural hosts are poorly understood. We necropsied four wild-caught western gray squirrels (Sciurus griseus) that were acquired during a previous study that evaluated the reservoir competence of this rodent for the Lyme disease spirochete. One animal was infected experimentally, whereas the others were infected in the wild before capture. To investigate dissemination of B. burgdorferi and concurrent histopathologic lesions in different tissues, blood specimens, synovial and cerebrospinal fluid, ear-punch biopsies, and diverse tissue samples from skin and various organs were taken and examined by culture, polymerase chain reaction, and histology. Borrelia-positive cultures were obtained from three of the squirrels, that is, from skin biopsies (7 of 20 samples), ear-punch biopsies (2 of 8), and one (1 of 5) lymph node. Sequencing of amplicons confirmed B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) infection in 9 of 10 culture-positive samples and in DNA extracted from all 10 positive cultures. The experimentally infected squirrel yielded most of the positive samples. In contrast, bodily fluids, all other organ specimens from these animals, and all samples from one naturally infected squirrel were negative for Borrelia for both assays. None of the necropsied squirrels exhibited specific clinical signs associated with B. burgdorferi. Similarly, necropsy and histological examination of tissues indicated the presence of underlying infectious processes, none of which could be ascribed conclusively to B. burgdorferi infection. Based on these results, obtained from a small number of animals investigated at a single time point, we suggest that B. burgdorferi s.s. infection in S. griseus may result in rather localized dissemination of spirochetes, and that mild or nonclinical disease might be more common after several months of infection duration. Since spirochetes could be detected in squirrels 7–21 months

  13. Versatile roles of CspA orthologs in complement inactivation of serum-resistant Lyme disease spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Claudia; Koenigs, Arno; Siegel, Corinna; Hallström, Teresia; Skerka, Christine; Wallich, Reinhard; Zipfel, Peter F; Kraiczy, Peter

    2014-01-01

    CspA of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi represents a key molecule in immune evasion, protecting borrelial cells from complement-mediated killing. As previous studies focused almost exclusively on CspA of B. burgdorferi, here we investigate the different binding capacities of CspA orthologs of Borrelia burgdorferi, B. afzelii, and B. spielmanii for complement regulator factor H and plasminogen and their ability to inhibit complement activation by either binding these host-derived plasma proteins or independently by direct interaction with components involved in formation of the lethal, pore-like terminal complement complex. To further examine their function in serum resistance in vivo, a serum-sensitive B. garinii strain was used to generate spirochetes, ectopically producing functional CspA orthologs. Irrespective of their species origin, all three CspA orthologs impart resistance to complement-mediated killing when produced in a serum-sensitive B. garinii surrogate strain. To analyze the inhibitory effect on complement activation and to assess the potential to inactivate C3b by binding of factor H and plasminogen, recombinant CspA orthologs were also investigated. All three CspA orthologs simultaneously bound factor H and plasminogen but differed in regard to their capacity to inactivate C3b via bound plasmin(ogen) and inhibit formation of the terminal complement complex. CspA of B. afzelii binds plasmin(ogen) and inhibits the terminal complement complex more efficiently than CspA of B. burgdorferi and B. spielmanii. Taken together, CspA orthologs of serum-resistant Lyme disease spirochetes act as multifunctional evasion molecules that inhibit complement on two central activation levels, C3b generation and assembly of the terminal complement complex.

  14. Versatile Roles of CspA Orthologs in Complement Inactivation of Serum-Resistant Lyme Disease Spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschmidt, Claudia; Koenigs, Arno; Siegel, Corinna; Hallström, Teresia; Skerka, Christine; Wallich, Reinhard; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    CspA of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi represents a key molecule in immune evasion, protecting borrelial cells from complement-mediated killing. As previous studies focused almost exclusively on CspA of B. burgdorferi, here we investigate the different binding capacities of CspA orthologs of Borrelia burgdorferi, B. afzelii, and B. spielmanii for complement regulator factor H and plasminogen and their ability to inhibit complement activation by either binding these host-derived plasma proteins or independently by direct interaction with components involved in formation of the lethal, pore-like terminal complement complex. To further examine their function in serum resistance in vivo, a serum-sensitive B. garinii strain was used to generate spirochetes, ectopically producing functional CspA orthologs. Irrespective of their species origin, all three CspA orthologs impart resistance to complement-mediated killing when produced in a serum-sensitive B. garinii surrogate strain. To analyze the inhibitory effect on complement activation and to assess the potential to inactivate C3b by binding of factor H and plasminogen, recombinant CspA orthologs were also investigated. All three CspA orthologs simultaneously bound factor H and plasminogen but differed in regard to their capacity to inactivate C3b via bound plasmin(ogen) and inhibit formation of the terminal complement complex. CspA of B. afzelii binds plasmin(ogen) and inhibits the terminal complement complex more efficiently than CspA of B. burgdorferi and B. spielmanii. Taken together, CspA orthologs of serum-resistant Lyme disease spirochetes act as multifunctional evasion molecules that inhibit complement on two central activation levels, C3b generation and assembly of the terminal complement complex. PMID:24191298

  15. Distribution, density, and Lyme disease spirochete infection in Ixodes dammini (Acari: Ixodidae) on white-tailed deer in Maryland.

    PubMed

    Amerasinghe, F P; Breisch, N L; Azad, A F; Gimpel, W F; Greco, M; Neidhardt, K; Pagac, B; Piesman, J; Sandt, J; Scott, T W

    1992-01-01

    A Statewide survey of ticks parasitizing white-tailed deer was carried out in Maryland during November 1989 to assess the status of the deer tick, Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman & Corwin, the major vector of Lyme disease in the northeastern United States. Ticks were collected from deer carcasses brought in by hunters at 23 check stations (one per county). A total of 3,437 I. dammini were collected from 538 of 1,281 deer (42%), together with 2,013 Dermacentor albipictus (Packard) and 23 Amblyomma americanum (L.) from 34 and 0.5% of deer respectively. I. dammini prevalence ranged from 0 to 79% of deer and mean abundance from 0 to 7.3 ticks per deer at different check stations. Lyme spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Brenner, infection rates in ticks ranged from 0 to 21%, with a mean of 8%. Deer-tick density and spirochete infection rates varied with physiographic region and were low in the Appalachian, intermediate in the Piedmont, and high in the Western and Eastern Coastal Plains regions. County-based human case rates correlated positively with I. dammini abundance. We concluded that I. dammini was well established except in the mountainous western region of Maryland and was involved in Lyme disease transmission. PMID:1552529

  16. Cessation of clinical disease and spirochete shedding after tiamulin treatment in pigs experimentally infected with "Brachyspira hampsonii".

    PubMed

    Wilberts, B L; Arruda, P H; Warneke, H L; Erlandson, K R; Hammer, J M; Burrough, E R

    2014-10-01

    With the emergence of "Brachyspira hampsonii" associated with swine dysentery in North America, identification of effective treatments and interventions is a pressing need. Denagard® (tiamulin hydrogen fumarate) Liquid Concentrate 12.5% is approved in the United States for treatment of dysentery caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae at 0.006% in the water. In this study, the effectiveness of tiamulin in resolving clinical disease, eliminating viable spirochete shedding, and reducing neutrophilic colitis following infection with either "B. hampsonii" or B. hyodysenteriae was evaluated. Seventy-eight 7-week-old crossbred pigs were divided into three groups [sham-inoculated (n = 18), "B. hampsonii"-inoculated (n = 30), and B. hyodysenteriae-inoculated (n = 30)]. Each inoculum group was divided into three subgroups which received either 0.006% tiamulin, 0.018% tiamulin, or no medication. Both levels of tiamulin resolved clinical disease within 24 h of treatment initiation, eliminated spirochete shedding within 72 h of treatment initiation, and resolved and/or prevented histologic lesions in pigs infected with either Brachyspira spp.

  17. Alzheimer’s Disease: Assessing the Role of Spirochetes, Biofilms, the Immune System, and Amyloid-β with Regard to Potential Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Herbert B.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an infectious disease caused by spirochetes, and these spirochetes form biofilms, which attract the innate immune system. The innate immune system first responder, Toll-like receptor 2, generates both NF-κB and TNF-α which try to kill the spirochetes in the biofilm, but cannot penetrate the “slime”. NF-κB is also responsible for the generation of amyloid-β (Aβ) which itself is anti-microbial. Aβ cannot penetrate the biofilm either, and its accumulation leads to destruction of the cerebral neurocircuitry. Treatment with penicillin (as in tertiary syphilis, the comparator to AD) is outlined; a biofilm dispersing agent may need to be added to the protocol. PMID:27372648

  18. Alzheimer's Disease: Assessing the Role of Spirochetes, Biofilms, the Immune System, and Amyloid-β with Regard to Potential Treatment and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Allen, Herbert B

    2016-06-27

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an infectious disease caused by spirochetes, and these spirochetes form biofilms, which attract the innate immune system. The innate immune system first responder, Toll-like receptor 2, generates both NF-κB and TNF-α which try to kill the spirochetes in the biofilm, but cannot penetrate the "slime". NF-κB is also responsible for the generation of amyloid-β (Aβ) which itself is anti-microbial. Aβ cannot penetrate the biofilm either, and its accumulation leads to destruction of the cerebral neurocircuitry. Treatment with penicillin (as in tertiary syphilis, the comparator to AD) is outlined; a biofilm dispersing agent may need to be added to the protocol. PMID:27372648

  19. Outer membrane proteins of pathogenic spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul A.; Haake, David A.; Adler, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes are the causative agents of several important diseases including syphilis, Lyme disease, leptospirosis, swine dysentery, periodontal disease and some forms of relapsing fever. Spirochetal bacteria possess two membranes and the proteins present in the outer membrane are at the site of interaction with host tissue and the immune system. This review describes the current knowledge in the field of spirochetal outer membrane protein (OMP) biology. What is known concerning biogenesis and structure of OMPs, with particular regard to the atypical signal peptide cleavage sites observed amongst the spirochetes, is discussed. We examine the functions that have been determined for several spirochetal OMPs including those that have been demonstrated to function as adhesins, porins or to have roles in complement resistance. A detailed description of the role of spirochetal OMPs in immunity, including those that stimulate protective immunity or that are involved in antigenic variation, is given. A final section is included which covers experimental considerations in spirochetal outer membrane biology. This section covers contentious issues concerning cellular localization of putative OMPs, including determination of surface exposure. A more detailed knowledge of spirochetal OMP biology will hopefully lead to the design of new vaccines and a better understanding of spirochetal pathogenesis. PMID:15449605

  20. Stage-specific global alterations in the transcriptomes of Lyme disease spirochetes during tick feeding and following mammalian host adaptation.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Radha; Caimano, Melissa J; Luthra, Amit; Axline, David; Corona, Arianna; Iacobas, Dumitru A; Radolf, Justin D; Schwartz, Ira

    2015-02-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, is maintained in nature within an enzootic cycle involving a mammalian reservoir and an Ixodes sp. tick vector. The transmission, survival and pathogenic potential of B. burgdorferi depend on the bacterium's ability to modulate its transcriptome as it transits between vector and reservoir host. Herein, we employed an amplification-microarray approach to define the B. burgdorferi transcriptomes in fed larvae, fed nymphs and in mammalian host-adapted organisms cultivated in dialysis membrane chambers. The results show clearly that spirochetes exhibit unique expression profiles during each tick stage and during cultivation within the mammal; importantly, none of these profiles resembles that exhibited by in vitro grown organisms. Profound shifts in transcript levels were observed for genes encoding known or predicted lipoproteins as well as proteins involved in nutrient uptake, carbon utilization and lipid synthesis. Stage-specific expression patterns of chemotaxis-associated genes also were noted, suggesting that the composition and interactivities of the chemotaxis machinery components vary considerably in the feeding tick and mammal. The results as a whole make clear that environmental sensing by B. burgdorferi directly or indirectly drives an extensive and tightly integrated modulation of cell envelope constituents, chemotaxis/motility machinery, intermediary metabolism and cellular physiology. These findings provide the necessary transcriptional framework for delineating B. burgdorferi regulatory pathways throughout the enzootic cycle as well as defining the contribution(s) of individual genes to spirochete survival in nature and virulence in humans.

  1. Strain-Specific Variation of the Decorin-Binding Adhesin DbpA Influences the Tissue Tropism of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Benoit, Vivian; Yang, Xiuli; Martínez-Herranz, Raúl; Pal, Utpal; Leong, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes demonstrate strain- and species-specific differences in tissue tropism. For example, the three major Lyme disease spirochete species, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and B. afzelii, are each most commonly associated with overlapping but distinct spectra of clinical manifestations. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the most common Lyme spirochete in the U.S., is closely associated with arthritis. The attachment of microbial pathogens to cells or to the extracellular matrix of target tissues may promote colonization and disease, and the Lyme disease spirochete encodes several surface proteins, including the decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding adhesin DbpA, which vary among strains and have been postulated to contribute to strain-specific differences in tissue tropism. DbpA variants differ in their ability to bind to its host ligands and to cultured mammalian cells. To directly test whether variation in dbpA influences tissue tropism, we analyzed murine infection by isogenic B. burgdorferi strains that encode different dbpA alleles. Compared to dbpA alleles of B. afzelii strain VS461 or B. burgdorferi strain N40-D10/E9, dbpA of B. garinii strain PBr conferred the greatest decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding activity, promoted the greatest colonization at the inoculation site and heart, and caused the most severe carditis. The dbpA of strain N40-D10/E9 conferred the weakest decorin- and GAG-binding activity, but the most robust joint colonization and was the only dbpA allele capable of conferring significant joint disease. Thus, dbpA mediates colonization and disease by the Lyme disease spirochete in an allele-dependent manner and may contribute to the etiology of distinct clinical manifestations associated with different Lyme disease strains. This study provides important support for the long-postulated model that strain-specific variations of Borrelia surface proteins influence tissue tropism. PMID:25079227

  2. Strain-specific variation of the decorin-binding adhesin DbpA influences the tissue tropism of the lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Benoit, Vivian; Yang, Xiuli; Martínez-Herranz, Raúl; Pal, Utpal; Leong, John M

    2014-07-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes demonstrate strain- and species-specific differences in tissue tropism. For example, the three major Lyme disease spirochete species, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and B. afzelii, are each most commonly associated with overlapping but distinct spectra of clinical manifestations. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the most common Lyme spirochete in the U.S., is closely associated with arthritis. The attachment of microbial pathogens to cells or to the extracellular matrix of target tissues may promote colonization and disease, and the Lyme disease spirochete encodes several surface proteins, including the decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding adhesin DbpA, which vary among strains and have been postulated to contribute to strain-specific differences in tissue tropism. DbpA variants differ in their ability to bind to its host ligands and to cultured mammalian cells. To directly test whether variation in dbpA influences tissue tropism, we analyzed murine infection by isogenic B. burgdorferi strains that encode different dbpA alleles. Compared to dbpA alleles of B. afzelii strain VS461 or B. burgdorferi strain N40-D10/E9, dbpA of B. garinii strain PBr conferred the greatest decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding activity, promoted the greatest colonization at the inoculation site and heart, and caused the most severe carditis. The dbpA of strain N40-D10/E9 conferred the weakest decorin- and GAG-binding activity, but the most robust joint colonization and was the only dbpA allele capable of conferring significant joint disease. Thus, dbpA mediates colonization and disease by the Lyme disease spirochete in an allele-dependent manner and may contribute to the etiology of distinct clinical manifestations associated with different Lyme disease strains. This study provides important support for the long-postulated model that strain-specific variations of Borrelia surface proteins influence tissue tropism.

  3. Bacterial Heterogeneity Is a Requirement for Host Superinfection by the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Rogovskyy, Artem S.

    2014-01-01

    In nature, mixed Borrelia burgdorferi infections are common and possibly can be acquired by either superinfection or coinfection. Superinfection by heterologous B. burgdorferi strains has been established experimentally, although the ability of homologous B. burgdorferi clones to superinfect a host has not been studied in detail. Information regarding any potential immune barriers to secondary infection also currently is unavailable. In the present study, the ability to superinfect various mouse models by homologous wild-type clones was examined and compared to superinfection by heterologous strains. To assess the ability of homologous B. burgdorferi clones to successfully superinfect a mouse host, primary- and secondary-infecting spirochetes were recovered via in vitro cultivation of collected blood or tissue samples. This was accomplished by generating two different antibiotic-resistant versions of the wild-type B31-A3 clone in order to distinguish superinfecting B. burgdorferi from primary-infecting spirochetes. The data demonstrate an inability of homologous B. burgdorferi to superinfect immunocompetent mice as opposed to heterologous strains. Attempts to superinfect different types of immunodeficient mice with homologous B. burgdorferi indicate that the murine innate immune system represents a major barrier to intrastrain superinfection. Consequently, the possibility of innate immunity as a driving force for B. burgdorferi heterogeneity during the enzootic cycle is discussed. PMID:25114120

  4. Efficacy of an experimental azithromycin cream for prophylaxis of tick-transmitted lyme disease spirochete infection in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Piesman, Joseph; Hojgaard, Andrias; Ullmann, Amy J; Dolan, Marc C

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to oral prophylaxis for the prevention of tick transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, we tested antibiotic cream prophylactic formulations in a murine model of spirochete infection. A 4% preparation of doxycycline cream afforded no protection, but a single application of 4% azithromycin cream was 100% protective when applied directly to the tick bite site at the time of tick removal. Indeed, the azithromycin cream was 100% effective when applied at up to 3 days after tick removal and protected 74% of mice exposed to tick bite when applied at up to 2 weeks after tick removal. Azithromycin cream was also protective when applied at a site distal to the tick bite site, suggesting that it was having a systemic effect in addition to a local transdermal effect. Mice that were protected from tick-transmitted infection did not seroconvert and did not infect larval ticks on xenodiagnosis. Azithromycin cream formulations appear to hold promise for Lyme disease prophylaxis. PMID:24165183

  5. Efficacy of an experimental azithromycin cream for prophylaxis of tick-transmitted lyme disease spirochete infection in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Piesman, Joseph; Hojgaard, Andrias; Ullmann, Amy J; Dolan, Marc C

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to oral prophylaxis for the prevention of tick transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, we tested antibiotic cream prophylactic formulations in a murine model of spirochete infection. A 4% preparation of doxycycline cream afforded no protection, but a single application of 4% azithromycin cream was 100% protective when applied directly to the tick bite site at the time of tick removal. Indeed, the azithromycin cream was 100% effective when applied at up to 3 days after tick removal and protected 74% of mice exposed to tick bite when applied at up to 2 weeks after tick removal. Azithromycin cream was also protective when applied at a site distal to the tick bite site, suggesting that it was having a systemic effect in addition to a local transdermal effect. Mice that were protected from tick-transmitted infection did not seroconvert and did not infect larval ticks on xenodiagnosis. Azithromycin cream formulations appear to hold promise for Lyme disease prophylaxis.

  6. Cyclic di-GMP modulates gene expression in Lyme disease spirochetes at the tick-mammal interface to promote spirochete survival during the blood meal and tick-to-mammal transmission.

    PubMed

    Caimano, Melissa J; Dunham-Ems, Star; Allard, Anna M; Cassera, Maria B; Kenedy, Melisha; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete, couples environmental sensing and gene regulation primarily via the Hk1/Rrp1 two-component system (TCS) and Rrp2/RpoN/RpoS pathways. Beginning with acquisition, we reevaluated the contribution of these pathways to spirochete survival and gene regulation throughout the enzootic cycle. Live imaging of B. burgdorferi caught in the act of being acquired revealed that the absence of RpoS and the consequent derepression of tick-phase genes impart a Stay signal required for midgut colonization. In addition to the behavioral changes brought on by the RpoS-off state, acquisition requires activation of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthesis by the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS; B. burgdorferi lacking either component is destroyed during the blood meal. Prior studies attributed this dramatic phenotype to a metabolic lesion stemming from reduced glycerol uptake and utilization. In a head-to-head comparison, however, the B. burgdorferi Δglp mutant had a markedly greater capacity to survive tick feeding than B. burgdorferi Δhk1 or Δrrp1 mutants, establishing unequivocally that glycerol metabolism is only one component of the protection afforded by c-di-GMP. Data presented herein suggest that the protective response mediated by c-di-GMP is multifactorial, involving chemotactic responses, utilization of alternate substrates for energy generation and intermediary metabolism, and remodeling of the cell envelope as a means of defending spirochetes against threats engendered during the blood meal. Expression profiling of c-di-GMP-regulated genes through the enzootic cycle supports our contention that the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS functions primarily, if not exclusively, in ticks. These data also raise the possibility that c-di-GMP enhances the expression of a subset of RpoS-dependent genes during nymphal transmission.

  7. Cyclic di-GMP Modulates Gene Expression in Lyme Disease Spirochetes at the Tick-Mammal Interface To Promote Spirochete Survival during the Blood Meal and Tick-to-Mammal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Dunham-Ems, Star; Allard, Anna M.; Cassera, Maria B.; Kenedy, Melisha; Radolf, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete, couples environmental sensing and gene regulation primarily via the Hk1/Rrp1 two-component system (TCS) and Rrp2/RpoN/RpoS pathways. Beginning with acquisition, we reevaluated the contribution of these pathways to spirochete survival and gene regulation throughout the enzootic cycle. Live imaging of B. burgdorferi caught in the act of being acquired revealed that the absence of RpoS and the consequent derepression of tick-phase genes impart a Stay signal required for midgut colonization. In addition to the behavioral changes brought on by the RpoS-off state, acquisition requires activation of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthesis by the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS; B. burgdorferi lacking either component is destroyed during the blood meal. Prior studies attributed this dramatic phenotype to a metabolic lesion stemming from reduced glycerol uptake and utilization. In a head-to-head comparison, however, the B. burgdorferi Δglp mutant had a markedly greater capacity to survive tick feeding than B. burgdorferi Δhk1 or Δrrp1 mutants, establishing unequivocally that glycerol metabolism is only one component of the protection afforded by c-di-GMP. Data presented herein suggest that the protective response mediated by c-di-GMP is multifactorial, involving chemotactic responses, utilization of alternate substrates for energy generation and intermediary metabolism, and remodeling of the cell envelope as a means of defending spirochetes against threats engendered during the blood meal. Expression profiling of c-di-GMP-regulated genes through the enzootic cycle supports our contention that the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS functions primarily, if not exclusively, in ticks. These data also raise the possibility that c-di-GMP enhances the expression of a subset of RpoS-dependent genes during nymphal transmission. PMID:25987708

  8. Plaques of Alzheimer's disease originate from cysts of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Alan B

    2006-01-01

    Here is hypothesized a truly revolutionary notion that rounded cystic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi are the root cause of the rounded structures called plaques in the Alzheimer brain. Rounded "plaques' in high density in brain tissue are emblematic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Plaques may be conceptualized as rounded "pock mark-like" areas of brain tissue injury. In this century, in brain tissue of AD, plaques are Amyloid Plaques according to the most up to date textbooks. In the last century, however, Dr. Alois Alzheimer did not require amyloid as the pathogenesis for either the disease or for the origin of its plaques. Surely, amyloid is an event in AD, but it may not be the primal cause of AD. Indeed in plaques, amyloid is regularly represented by the "congophilic core" structure which is so named because the waxy amyloid material binds the congo red stain and is congophilic. However an accepted subset of plaques in AD is devoid of a congophilic amyloid core region (these plaques "cotton wool" type plaques, lack a central congophilic core structure). Furthermore, there is "plaque diversity" in Alzheimer's; small, medium and large plaques parallel variable cystic diameters for Borrelia burgdorferi. Perturbations of AD plaque structure (i.e. young plaques devoid of a central core and older plaques with or without a central core structure) offer room for an alternate pathway for explanation of ontogeny of the plaque structures. If amyloid is not required to initiate all of the possible plaques in Alzheimer's, is it possible that amyloid just a by product of a more fundamental primal path to dementia? If a byproduct status is assigned to amyloid in the realm of plaque formation, then is amyloid also an epiphenomenon rather than a primary pathogenesis for Alzheimer's disease. In the "anatomy is destiny" model, cysts of borrelia are always round. Why then not accept roundness as a fundamental "structure determines function" argument for the answer to the mystery of

  9. Molecular identification of Salp15, a key salivary gland protein in the transmission of lyme disease spirochetes, from Ixodes persulcatus and Ixodes pacificus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Hojgaard, Andrias; Biketov, Sergey F; Shtannikov, Alexander V; Zeidner, Nordin S; Piesman, Joseph

    2009-11-01

    Salp15 is a multifunctional protein, vital to the tick in its need to obtain vertebrate host blood without stimulating a host inflammatory and immune response. The Salpl5 protein from both Ixodes scapularis Say and Ixodes ricinus (L.), the principal vectors of the Lyme disease spirochete in eastern North America and Europe, respectively, have been well characterized and found to bind the murine CD4 receptor, DC-SIGN, and the OspC protein of Borrelia burgdorferi. In the current study, we characterized the full salp15 gene in Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls and Ixodes persulcatus Schulze, the principal vectors of Lyme disease spirochetes in western North America and Asia, respectively. In comparing the Salp15 protein of all four principal vector ticks of public health importance for the transmission of Lyme disease spirochetes, we find the 53 C-terminal amino acids to have a high degree of similarity. There are at least three clades in the tree of Salp15 and its homologues, probably representing a multigene family.

  10. The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi induces inflammation and apoptosis in cells from dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB), caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, affects both the peripheral and the central nervous systems. Radiculitis or nerve root inflammation, which can cause pain, sensory loss, and weakness, is the most common manifestation of peripheral LNB in humans. We previously reported that rhesus monkeys infected with B. burgdorferi develop radiculitis as well as inflammation in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), with elevated levels of neuronal and satellite glial cell apoptosis in the DRG. We hypothesized that B. burgdorferi induces inflammatory mediators in glial and neuronal cells and that this inflammatory milieu precipitates glial and neuronal apoptosis. Methods To model peripheral neuropathy in LNB we incubated normal rhesus DRG tissue explants with live B. burgdorferi ex vivo and identified immune mediators, producer cells, and verified the presence of B. burgdorferi in tissue sections by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. We also set up primary cultures of DRG cells from normal adult rhesus macaques and incubated the cultures with live B. burgdorferi. Culture supernatants were subjected to multiplex ELISA to detect immune mediators, while the cells were evaluated for apoptosis by the in situ TUNEL assay. A role for inflammation in mediating apoptosis was assessed by evaluating the above phenomena in the presence and absence of various concentrations of the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone. As Schwann cells ensheath the dorsal roots of the DRG, we evaluated the potential of live B. burgdorferi to induce inflammatory mediators in human Schwann cell (HSC) cultures. Results Rhesus DRG tissue explants exposed to live B. burgdorferi showed localization of CCL2 and IL-6 in sensory neurons, satellite glial cells and Schwann cells while IL-8 was seen in satellite glial cells and Schwann cells. Live B. burgdorferi induced elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8 and CCL2 in HSC and DRG cultures and apoptosis of sensory

  11. Host cell heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans are ligands for OspF-related proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Bhowmick, Rudra; Coburn, Jenifer; Leong, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi , the agent of Lyme disease, spreads from the site of the tick bite to tissues such as heart, joints and the nervous system. Host glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), highly modified repeating disaccharides that are present on cell surfaces and in extracellular matrix, are common targets of microbial pathogens during tissue colonization. While several dermatan sulfate-binding B. burgdorferi adhesins have been identified, B. burgdorferi adhesins documented to promote spirochetal binding to heparan sulfate have not yet been identified. OspEF-related proteins (Erps), a large family of plasmid-encoded surface lipoproteins that are produced in the mammalian host, can be divided into the OspF-related, OspEF leader peptide (Elp), and OspE-related subfamilies. We show here that a member of the OspF-related subfamily, ErpG, binds to heparan sulfate, and when produced on the surface of an otherwise nonadherent B. burgdorferi strain, ErpG promotes heparan sulfate-mediated bacterial attachment to glial but not endothelial, synovial or respiratory epithelial cells. Six other OspF-related proteins were capable of binding heparan sulfate, whereas representative OspE-related and Elp proteins lacked this activity. These results indicate that OspF-related proteins are heparan sulfate-binding adhesins, at least one of which promotes bacterial attachment to glial cells. PMID:25864455

  12. Nuclear Markers Reveal Predominantly North to South Gene Flow in Ixodes scapularis, the Tick Vector of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Van Zee, Janice; Piesman, Joseph F.; Hojgaard, Andrias; Black IV, William Cormack

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes scapularis, the tick vector of the Lyme disease spirochete, is distributed over most of the eastern United States, but >80% of all Lyme disease cases occur in the northeast. The role that genetic differences between northern and southern tick populations play in explaining this disparate distribution of Lyme disease cases is unclear. The present study was conducted with 1,155 SNP markers in eight nuclear genes; the 16S mitochondrial gene was examined for comparison with earlier studies. We examined 350 I. scapularis from 7 states covering a representative area of the species. A demographic analysis using Bayesian Extended Skyline Analysis suggested that I. scapularis populations in Mississippi and Georgia began expanding 500,000 years ago, those in Florida and North Carolina 200,000 years ago and those from Maryland and New Jersey only during the past 50,000 years with an accompanying bottleneck. Wisconsin populations only began expanding in the last 20,000 years. Analysis of current migration patterns suggests large amounts of gene flow in northern collections and equally high rates of gene flow among southern collections. In contrast there is restricted and unidirectional gene flow between northern and southern collections, mostly occurring from northern into southern populations. Northern populations are characterized by nymphs that quest above the leaf litter, are easy to collect by flagging, frequently feed on mammals such as rodents and shrews, commonly attach to people, and about 25% of which are infected with B. burgdorferi. If there is a genetic basis for these behaviors, then the patterns detected in this study are of concern because they suggest that northern I. scapularis populations with a greater ability to vector B. burgdorferi to humans are expanding south. PMID:26536360

  13. Prevalence of the Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, in Blacklegged Ticks, Ixodes scapularis at Hamilton-Wentworth, Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John D.; Anderson, John F.; Durden, Lance A.; Smith, Morgan L.; Manord, Jodi M.; Clark, Kerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease has emerged as a major health concern in Canada, where the etiological agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), a spirochetal bacterium, is typically spread by the bite of certain ticks. This study explores the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. in blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis, collected at Dundas, Ontario (a locality within the region of Hamilton-Wentworth). Using passive surveillance, veterinarians and pet groomers were asked to collect blacklegged ticks from dogs and cats with no history of travel. Additionally, I. scapularis specimens were submitted from local residents and collected by flagging. Overall, 12 (41%) of 29 blacklegged ticks were infected with B. burgdorferi s.l. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing, two borrelial amplicons were characterized as B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), a genospecies pathogenic to humans and certain domestic animals. Notably, three different vertebrate hosts each had two engorged I. scapularis females removed on the same day and, likewise, one cat had three repeat occurrences of this tick species. These multiple infestations suggest that a population of I. scapularis may be established in this area. The local public health unit has been underreporting the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l.-infected I. scapularis in the area encompassing Dundas. Our findings raise concerns about the need to erect tick warning signs in parkland areas. Veterinarians, medical professionals, public health officials, and the general public must be vigilant that Lyme disease-carrying blacklegged ticks pose a public health risk in the Dundas area and the surrounding Hamilton-Wentworth region. PMID:27226771

  14. Adherence with drug therapy in the rheumatic diseases Part one: a review of adherence rates.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jackie

    2005-01-01

    Drug therapy plays a major role in the management of many rheumatic diseases and is particularly important in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) because of the significant rates of morbidity and mortality (Pincus, 1995). Understanding of the pathogenesis of RA has led to the development of new and more effective drugs (Emery et al., 1999), but the ultimate efficacy of any drug therapy depends upon the patient's decision to take it. There is widespread agreement that many people with rheumatic disease do not adhere to their medication regimens (Deyo et al., 1981; Belcon et al., 1984; Pullar et al., 1988; Hill et al., 2001). Research has demonstrated that 50% of women taking hormone replacement therapy for the prevention of osteoporosis discontinue treatment after a year (Fordham, 2000) and similar rates of discontinuation are found in other chronic diseases (Haynes et al., 1996, 2000). This is bewildering as, in asymptomatic illnesses such as hypertension and diabetes, the expectation is that levels of adherence would be lower than in diseases where pain and stiffness are present. The picture becomes even more confusing when we consider the findings from a recent multi-country study of RA, which found no association between adherence and disease severity, nor with the treatment prescribed (Viller et al., 1999). In chronic disease poor adherence is commonplace. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes this and has recently stated that 'poor adherence to treatment of chronic diseases is a worldwide problem of striking magnitude' and cites adherence to long-term therapy for chronic illnesses in developed countries averaging just 50% (WHO, 2003). The first part of this two part review focuses on adherence with drug therapy, and the second part discusses different methods of measuring it. PMID:17041995

  15. What ticks do under your skin: two-photon intravital imaging of Ixodes scapularis feeding in the presence of the lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    Bockenstedt, Linda K; Gonzalez, David; Mao, Jialing; Li, Ming; Belperron, Alexia A; Haberman, Ann

    2014-03-01

    Lyme disease, due to infection with the Ixodes-tick transmitted spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common tick-transmitted disease in the northern hemisphere. Our understanding of the tick-pathogen-vertebrate host interactions that sustain an enzootic cycle for B. burgdorferi is incomplete. In this article, we describe a method for imaging the feeding of Ixodes scapularis nymphs in real-time using two-photon intravital microscopy and show how this technology can be applied to view the response of Lyme borrelia in the skin of an infected host to tick feeding.

  16. What Ticks Do Under Your Skin: Two-Photon Intravital Imaging of Ixodes Scapularis Feeding in the Presence of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Bockenstedt, Linda K.; Gonzalez, David; Mao, Jialing; Li, Ming; Belperron, Alexia A.; Haberman, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, due to infection with the Ixodes-tick transmitted spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common tick-transmitted disease in the northern hemisphere. Our understanding of the tick-pathogen-vertebrate host interactions that sustain an enzootic cycle for B. burgdorferi is incomplete. In this article, we describe a method for imaging the feeding of Ixodes scapularis nymphs in real-time using two-photon intravital microscopy and show how this technology can be applied to view the response of Lyme borrelia in the skin of an infected host to tick feeding. PMID:24600332

  17. HrpA, an RNA helicase involved in RNA processing, is required for mouse infectivity and tick transmission of the Lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    Salman-Dilgimen, Aydan; Hardy, Pierre-Olivier; Radolf, Justin D; Caimano, Melissa J; Chaconas, George

    2013-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi must differentially express genes and proteins in order to survive in and transit between its tick vector and vertebrate reservoir. The putative DEAH-box RNA helicase, HrpA, has been recently identified as an addition to the spirochete's global regulatory machinery; using proteomic methods, we demonstrated that HrpA modulates the expression of at least 180 proteins. Although most bacteria encode an HrpA helicase, RNA helicase activity has never been demonstrated for HrpAs and the literature contains little information on the contribution of this protein to bacterial physiology or pathogenicity. In this work, we report that B. burgdorferi HrpA has RNA-stimulated ATPase activity and RNA helicase activity and that this enzyme is essential for both mammalian infectivity by syringe inoculation and tick transmission. Reduced infectivity of strains carrying mutations in the ATPase and RNA binding motif mutants suggests that full virulence expression requires both ATPase and coupled helicase activity. Microarray profiling revealed changes in RNA levels of two-fold, or less in an hrpA mutant versus wild-type, suggesting that the enzyme functions largely or exclusively at the post-transcriptional level. In this regard, northern blot analysis of selected gene products highly regulated by HrpA (bb0603 [p66], bba74, bb0241 [glpK], bb0242 and bb0243 [glpA]) suggests a role for HrpA in the processing and translation of transcripts. In addition to being the first demonstration of RNA helicase activity for a bacterial HrpA, our data indicate that the post-transcriptional regulatory functions of this enzyme are essential for maintenance of the Lyme disease spirochete's enzootic cycle.

  18. Genome Stability of Lyme Disease Spirochetes: Comparative Genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmids

    SciTech Connect

    Casjens S. R.; Dunn J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Schutzer, S. E.; Gilcrease, E. B.; Huang, W. M.; Vujadinovic, M.; Aron, J. K.; Vargas, L. C.; Freeman, S.; Radune, D.; Weidman, J. F.; Dimitrov, G. I.; Khouri, H. M.; Sosa, J. E.; Halpin, R. A.; Fraser, C. M.

    2012-03-14

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33-40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi {approx}900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short {le}20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant.

  19. [Concept analysis of medication adherence in patients with chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Ying; Chen, Hsing-Mei

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacotherapy plays an important role in the management of chronic diseases. However, many patients with chronic disease do not adhere to their medication regimen. This results in worsening symptoms and frequent re-hospitalizations. As a result, healthcare providers may view these patients as bad. Medication adherence is a complex concept. Analyzing this concept may assist nurses to improve patient-centered care. This paper uses Walker & Avant's method to conduct a concept analysis of medication adherence. Results show the defining attributes of medication adherence as: (1) knowing and agreeing to the medication; (2) communicating and negotiating the regimen; and (3) active, continuous involvement in and appraisal of the treatment effect. Identified antecedents of medication adherence included the patient having: (1) a prescribed medication regimen; (2) cognitive and action abilities in her / his role as a patient; and (3) level of preparation for medication treatment. Identified consequences of medication adherence include: (1) improving symptom control; (2) decreasing re-hospitalizations and mortality; (3) reducing medical care costs; (4) restoring self-esteem; and (5) diminishing depression. It is hoped that this concept analysis provides a reference for nurses to achieve a better understanding of medication adherence and further improve nursing practice. PMID:24899565

  20. Global repression of host-associated genes of the Lyme disease spirochete through post-transcriptional modulation of the alternative sigma factor RpoS.

    PubMed

    Dulebohn, Daniel P; Hayes, Beth M; Rosa, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, is a vector-borne pathogen that transits between Ixodes ticks and vertebrate hosts. During the natural infectious cycle, spirochetes must globally adjust their transcriptome to survive in these dissimilar environments. One way B. burgdorferi accomplishes this is through the use of alternative sigma factors to direct transcription of specific genes. RpoS, one of only three sigma factors in B. burgdorferi, controls expression of genes required during tick-transmission and infection of the mammalian host. How spirochetes switch between different sigma factors during the infectious cycle has remained elusive. Here we establish a role for a novel protein, BBD18, in the regulation of the virulence-associated sigma factor RpoS. Constitutive expression of BBD18 repressed transcription of RpoS-dependent genes to levels equivalent to those observed in an rpoS mutant. Consistent with the global loss of RpoS-dependent transcripts, we were unable to detect RpoS protein. However, constitutive expression of BBD18 did not diminish the amount of rpoS transcript, indicating post-transcriptional regulation of RpoS by BBD18. Interestingly, BBD18-mediated repression of RpoS is independent of both the rpoS promoter and the 5' untranslated region, suggesting a mechanism of protein destabilization rather than translational control. We propose that BBD18 is a novel regulator of RpoS and its activity likely represents a first step in the transition from an RpoS-ON to an RpoS-OFF state, when spirochetes transition from the host to the tick vector.

  1. Spirochete motility and morpholgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, Nyles

    2004-03-01

    Spirochetes have a unique structure, and as a result their motility is different from that of other bacteria. These organisms can swim in a highly viscous, gel-like medium, such as that found in connective tissue, that inhibits the motility of most other bacteria. In spirochetes, the organelles for motility, the periplasmic flagella, reside inside the cell within the periplasmic space. A given periplasmic flagellum is attached only at one end of the cell, and depending on the species, may or may not overlap in the center of the cell. The number of periplasmic flagella varies from species to species. These structures have been shown to be directly involved in motility and function by rotating within the periplasmic space (1). The present talk focuses on the spirochete that causes Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi. In many bacterial species, cell shape is usually dictated by the peptidoyglycan layer of the cell wall. In the first part of the talk, results will be presented that the morphology of B. burgdorferi is the result of a complex interaction between the cell cylinder and the internal periplasmic flagella resulting in a cell with a flat-wave morphology. Backward moving, propagating waves enable these bacteria to swim and translate in a given direction. Using targeted mutagenesis, we inactivated the gene encoding the major periplasmic flagellar filament protein FlaB. The resulting flaB mutants not only were non-motile, but were rod-shaped (2). Western blot analysis indicated that flaB was no longer synthesized, and electron microscopy revealed that the mutants were completely deficient in periplasmic flagella. Our results indicate that the periplasmic flagella of B. burgdorferi have a skeletal function. These organelles dynamically interact with the rod-shaped cell cylinder to enable the cell to swim, and to confer in part its flat-wave morphology The latter part of the talk concerns the basis for asymmetrical rotation of the periplasmic flagella of B

  2. Use of T7 RNA polymerase to direct expression of outer Surface Protein A (OspA) from the Lyme disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, John J.; Lade, Barbara N.

    1991-01-01

    The OspA gene from a North American strain of the Lyme disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, was cloned under the control of transciption and translation signals from bacteriophage T7. Full-length OspA protein, a 273 amino acid (31kD) lipoprotein, is expressed poorly in Escherichia coli and is associated with the insoluble membrane fraction. In contrast, a truncated form of OspA lacking the amino-terminal signal sequence which normally would direct localization of the protein to the outer membrane is expressed at very high levels (less than or equal to 100 mg/liter) and is soluble. The truncated protein was purified to homogeneity and is being tested to see if it will be useful as an immunogen in a vaccine against Lyme disease. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the secondary structure and study conformational changes in the protein. Studies underway with other surface proteins from B burgdorferi and a related spirochete, B. hermsii, which causes relapsing fever, leads us to conclude that a strategy similar to that used to express the truncated OspA can provide a facile method for producing variations of Borrelia lipoproteins which are highly expressed in E. coli and soluble without exposure to detergents.

  3. Flagellar motility of the pathogenic spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Wolgemuth, Charles W

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial pathogens are often classified by their toxicity and invasiveness. The invasiveness of a given bacterium is determined by how capable the bacterium is at invading a broad range of tissues in its host. Of mammalian pathogens, some of the most invasive come from a group of bacteria known as the spirochetes, which cause diseases, such as syphilis, Lyme disease, relapsing fever and leptospirosis. Most of the spirochetes are characterized by their distinct shapes and unique motility. They are long, thin bacteria that can be shaped like flat-waves, helices, or have more irregular morphologies. Like many other bacteria, the spirochetes use long, helical appendages known as flagella to move; however, the spirochetes enclose their flagella in the periplasm, the narrow space between the inner and outer membranes. Rotation of the flagella in the periplasm causes the entire cell body to rotate and/or undulate. These deformations of the bacterium produce the force that drives the motility of these organisms, and it is this unique motility that likely allows these bacteria to be highly invasive in mammals. This review will describe the current state of knowledge on the motility and biophysics of these organisms and provide evidence on how this knowledge can inform our understanding of spirochetal diseases. PMID:26481969

  4. Flagellar motility of the pathogenic spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens are often classified by their toxicity and invasiveness. The invasiveness of a given bacterium is determined by how capable the bacterium is at invading a broad range of tissues in its host. Of mammalian pathogens, some of the most invasive come from a group of bacteria known as the spirochetes, which cause diseases such as syphilis, Lyme disease, relapsing fever and leptospirosis. Most of the spirochetes are characterized by their distinct shapes and unique motility. They are long, thin bacteria that can be shaped like flat-waves, helices, or have more irregular morphologies. Like many other bacteria, the spirochetes use long, helical appendages known as flagella to move; however, the spirochetes enclose their flagella in the periplasm, the narrow space between the inner and outer membranes. Rotation of the flagella in the periplasm causes the entire cell body to rotate and/or undulate. These deformations of the bacterium produce the force that drives the motility of these organisms, and it is this unique motility that likely allows these bacteria to be highly invasive in mammals. This review will describe the current state of knowledge on the motility and biophysics of these organisms and provide evidence on how this knowledge can inform our understanding of spirochetal diseases. PMID:26481969

  5. Stage-Specific Global Alterations in the Transcriptomes of Lyme Disease Spirochetes During Tick Feeding and Following Mammalian Host-Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Radha; Caimano, Melissa J.; Luthra, Amit; Axline, David; Corona, Arianna; Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Radolf, Justin D.; Schwartz, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, is maintained in nature within an enzootic cycle involving a mammalian reservoir and an Ixodes sp. tick vector. The transmission, survival and pathogenic potential of B. burgdorferi depend on the bacterium’s ability to modulate its transcriptome as it transits between vector and reservoir host. Herein, we employed an amplification-microarray approach to define the B. burgdorferi transcriptomes in fed larvae, fed nymphs and in mammalian host-adapted organisms cultivated in dialysis membrane chambers. The results show clearly that spirochetes exhibit unique expression profiles during each tick stage and during cultivation within the mammal; importantly, none of these profiles resembles that exhibited by in vitro-grown organisms. Profound shifts in transcript levels were observed for genes encoding known or predicted lipoproteins as well as proteins involved in nutrient uptake, carbon utilization and lipid synthesis. Stage-specific expression patterns of chemotaxis-associated genes also were noted, suggesting that the composition and interactivities of the chemotaxis machinery components vary considerably in the feeding tick and mammal. The results as a whole make clear that environmental sensing by B. burgdorferi directly or indirectly drives an extensive and tightly integrated modulation of cell envelope constituents, chemotaxis/motility machinery, intermediary metabolism and cellular physiology. These findings provide the necessary transcriptional framework for delineating B. burgdorferi regulatory pathways throughout the enzootic cycle as well as defining the contribution(s) of individual genes to spirochete survival in nature and virulence in humans. PMID:25425211

  6. Treatment Adherence in Adolescents With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The Collective Impact of Barriers to Adherence and Anxiety/Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Wendy N.; Denson, Lee A.; Baldassano, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Knowledge of factors impacting adolescents’ ability to adhere to their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) regimen is limited. The current study examines the collective impact of barriers to adherence and anxiety/depressive symptoms on adolescent adherence to the IBD regimen. Methods Adolescents (n = 79) completed measures of barriers to adherence, adherence, and anxiety/depressive symptoms at one of two specialty pediatric IBD clinics. Results Most adolescents reported barriers to adherence and 1 in 8 reported borderline or clinically elevated levels of anxiety/depressive symptoms. Anxiety/depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between barriers to adherence and adherence. Post hoc probing revealed a significant, additive effect of higher anxiety/depressive symptoms in the barriers–adherence relationship, with adherence significantly lower among adolescents with higher barriers and higher anxiety/depressive symptoms. Conclusions In order to optimize adherence in adolescents, interventions should target not only barriers to adherence but also any anxiety/depressive symptoms that may negatively impact efforts to adhere to recommended treatment. PMID:22080456

  7. Non-communicable diseases and adherence to Mediterranean diet.

    PubMed

    Caretto, Antonio; Lagattolla, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) also known as chronic diseases last for a long time and progress generally slow. Major non-communicable diseases are cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes. Unhealthy lifestyles and food behaviours play an important role for determining such diseases. The change in unhealthy behaviours or the maintenance of healthy lifestyles has enormous value in the reduction of diseases and longer life expectancy not only on an individual level but for the community as a whole. Recent meta-analyses reported Mediterranean diet to be an optimal diet when adopted as a whole, in order to preserve and maintain a good health status. A greater adherence score to the Mediterranean diet (2-point increase) was related to induce an 8% reduction in overall mortality, a 10% reduced risk of CVD and a 4% reduction in neoplastic diseases. However, there is no direct method in quantifying and evaluating adherence, therefore a large number of indirect indices in several studies have been proposed, with a last unifying score. Recently more and more e-health techniques such as web communication or desktop publishing (DVDs and so on) are being used, obtaining good results in the Mediterranean diet adherence. For successfully changing the unhealthy lifestyles and food behaviours of the population, interventions at all levels are needed with the cooperation of Institutions, mass media, agricultural and food industry and healthcare professionals guided by expert scientific societies.

  8. ENHANCE—(Electronic Hydroxyurea Adherence): A Protocol to Increase Hydroxyurea Adherence in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chisolm, Deena J; O’Brien, Sarah H

    2016-01-01

    Background Hydroxyurea (HU) is the only disease-modifying medication for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). HU can reduce SCD-related complications but only 35% to 50% of pediatric patients adhere to HU at the rates achieved in clinical trials and this limits its clinical effectiveness. Mobile Directly Observed Therapy (Mobile DOT) is a pilot-tested, electronic, multidimensional, HU adherence intervention that targets many components of the Health Behavior Model. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of Mobile DOT on HU adherence in children with SCD. The objective of our study is to inform the development of future adherence interventions and pediatric SCD protocols. Methods This is a single-arm crossover study of pediatric patients with SCD. Participants self-record videos of their daily HU administrations and receive text message alerts to take HU, feedback on their HU adherence, and incentives when they achieve adherence goals during the 6-month Mobile DOT phase. Participants’ HU adherence during the Mobile DOT phase is compared with their baseline HU adherence (6 months prior to study entry) and to their HU adherence 6 months after completing the Mobile DOT phase. The primary outcome of this study is HU adherence measured by medication possession ratio. Results The trial is ongoing. Preliminary review of participant satisfaction results suggest that most participants can complete Mobile DOT in less than 5 minutes per day and are satisfied with the intervention. Conclusions If effective, the Mobile DOT strategy will increase HU adherence and this could improve patients’ clinical outcomes and reduce costs of care. PMID:27697749

  9. [Adherence to cardioprotective medications in coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Scardi, Sabino; Mazzone, Carmine; Di Lenarda, Andrea

    2009-04-01

    Treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease relies on evidence-based medications such as beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers, aspirin and statins, which are considered cornerstones to control symptoms, improve quality of life, reduce future events, and prolong survival. In spite of the clear benefits of therapy, previous studies have shown differences between the large randomized populations and the "real world" about long-term treatment in terms of efficacy, tolerability, costs, side effects and drug interactions. Moreover, a different awareness of the patient's compliance has been highlighted in relation to the setting (hospital, family doctor, etc.). The analysis and assessment of the prescription and efficacy of therapy for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease represent one of the most important challenges for the healthcare system, because reliable data are necessary to verify usefulness and results of therapy, prescribed at discharge after an acute coronary syndrome and/or coronary artery bypass graft, but above all the actual application of treatments should be pursued in every clinical setting. The Cardiology School of the Trieste University has constituted a working group of cardiology students that during the year 2009 will enroll and follow for 1 year all patients with coronary artery disease discharged from the Cardiovascular Department and Emergency Unit of the University Hospital of Trieste to assess: (1) if evidence-based medicine for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease is applied in the Trieste area; (2) adherence to prescribed treatment; (3) factors that are associated with non-adherence and consequences of non-adherence. PMID:19475879

  10. Wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) as a host of ixodid ticks, lice, and Lyme disease spirochetes (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato) in California state parks.

    PubMed

    Lane, Robert S; Kucera, Thomas F; Barrett, Reginald H; Mun, Jeomhee; Wu, Chunling; Smith, Vincent S

    2006-10-01

    Rio Grande wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) were evaluated as potential hosts of ixodid ticks, lice, and Lyme disease spirochetes (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato [s.l.]) in three state parks in Sonoma County, California, USA, during 2003 and 2004. In total, 113 birds were collected, 50 (44.2%) of which were found to be infested by 361 ixodid ticks representing three species: the western black-legged tick (Ixodes pacificus, n=248), the rabbit tick (Haemaphysalis leporispalustris, n=112), and one American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis). Year-round the prevalence of all ticks combined was unrelated to the age or sex of turkeys, and the prevalence of infestation by I. pacificus (35.4%) was significantly higher than it was for either H. leporispalustris (14.2%) or D. variabilis (0.9%). The proportion of the two prevalent tick species differed significantly by life stage with 86.3% of the I. pacificus and 82.1% of the H. leporispalustris enumerated being nymphs and larvae, respectively. Three species of lice were collected, including the chicken body louse Menacanthus stramineus (12.5% of total), Chelopistes meleagridis (37.5% of total), and Oxylipeurus polytrapezius (50% of total). The records for all three ticks are the first ever from wild turkeys, and those for the lice are the first from this host in the far-western United States. Wild turkeys potentially were exposed to the feeding activities of I. pacificus nymphs infected with B. burgdorferi s.l. as 15% of host-seeking nymphs (n=200) collected in woodlands used by turkeys as roosting or foraging areas were infected mainly with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.). However, only one (1%) of 90 turkey blood specimens tested by PCR contained B. burgdorferi s.s., and four in vitro, complement-protein assays demonstrated that domestic turkey serum is moderately bacteriolytic for this spirochete. Taken together, these findings indicate that wild turkeys are important avian hosts of I. pacificus nymphs

  11. The unique paradigm of spirochete motility and chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Charon, Nyles W.; Cockburn, Andrew; Li, Chunhao; Liu, Jun; Miller, Kelly A.; Miller, Michael R.; Motaleb, Md.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Spirochete motility is enigmatic: It differs from the motility of most other bacteria in that the entire bacterium is involved in translocation in the absence of external appendages. Using the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) as a model system, we explore the current research on spirochete motility and chemotaxis. Bb has periplasmic flagella (PFs) subterminally attached to each end of the protoplasmic cell cylinder, and surrounding the cell is an outer membrane. These internal helically shaped PFs allow the spirochete to swim by generating backward-moving waves by rotation. Exciting advances using cryoelectron microscopy tomography are presented with respect to in situ analysis of cell, PF, and motor structure. In addition, advances in the dynamics of motility, chemotaxis, gene regulation, and the role of motility and chemotaxis in the life cycle of Bb are summarized. The results indicate that the motility paradigms of flagellated bacteria do not apply to these unique bacteria. PMID:22994496

  12. The unique paradigm of spirochete motility and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Charon, Nyles W; Cockburn, Andrew; Li, Chunhao; Liu, Jun; Miller, Kelly A; Miller, Michael R; Motaleb, Md A; Wolgemuth, Charles W

    2012-01-01

    Spirochete motility is enigmatic: It differs from the motility of most other bacteria in that the entire bacterium is involved in translocation in the absence of external appendages. Using the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) as a model system, we explore the current research on spirochete motility and chemotaxis. Bb has periplasmic flagella (PFs) subterminally attached to each end of the protoplasmic cell cylinder, and surrounding the cell is an outer membrane. These internal helix-shaped PFs allow the spirochete to swim by generating backward-moving waves by rotation. Exciting advances using cryoelectron tomography are presented with respect to in situ analysis of cell, PF, and motor structure. In addition, advances in the dynamics of motility, chemotaxis, gene regulation, and the role of motility and chemotaxis in the life cycle of Bb are summarized. The results indicate that the motility paradigms of flagellated bacteria do not apply to these unique bacteria.

  13. Invasion of oral and aortic tissues by oral spirochete Treponema denticola in ApoE(-/-) mice causally links periodontal disease and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chukkapalli, Sasanka S; Rivera, Mercedes F; Velsko, Irina M; Lee, Ju-Youn; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Donghang; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Gangula, Pandu R; Lucas, Alexandra R; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2014-05-01

    Treponema denticola is a predominantly subgingival oral spirochete closely associated with periodontal disease and has been detected in atherosclerosis. This study was designed to evaluate causative links between periodontal disease induced by chronic oral T. denticola infection and atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic ApoE(-/-) mice. ApoE(-/-) mice (n = 24) were orally infected with T. denticola ATCC 35404 and were euthanized after 12 and 24 weeks. T. denticola genomic DNA was detected in oral plaque samples, indicating colonization of the oral cavity. Infection elicited significantly (P = 0.0172) higher IgG antibody levels and enhanced intrabony defects than sham infection. T. denticola-infected mice had higher levels of horizontal alveolar bone resorption than sham-infected mice and an associated significant increase in aortic plaque area (P ≤ 0.05). Increased atherosclerotic plaque correlated with reduced serum nitric oxide (NO) levels and increased serum-oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels compared to those of sham-infected mice. T. denticola infection altered the expression of genes known to be involved in atherosclerotic development, including the leukocyte/endothelial cell adhesion gene (Thbs4), the connective tissue growth factor gene (Ctgf), and the selectin-E gene (Sele). Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed T. denticola clusters in both gingival and aortic tissue of infected mice. This is the first study examining the potential causative role of chronic T. denticola periodontal infection and vascular atherosclerosis in vivo in hyperlipidemic ApoE(-/-) mice. T. denticola is closely associated with periodontal disease and the rapid progression of atheroma in ApoE(-/-) mice. These studies confirm a causal link for active oral T. denticola infection with both atheroma and periodontal disease. PMID:24566627

  14. Borrelia burgdorferi Spirochetes Induce Mast Cell Activation and Cytokine Release

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, Jeffrey; Nickell, Steven P.

    1999-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is introduced into human hosts via tick bites. Among the cell types present in the skin which may initially contact spirochetes are mast cells. Since spirochetes are known to activate a variety of cell types in vitro, we tested whether B. burgdorferi spirochetes could activate mast cells. We report here that freshly isolated rat peritoneal mast cells or mouse MC/9 mast cells cultured in vitro with live or freeze-thawed B. burgdorferi spirochetes undergo low but detectable degranulation, as measured by [5-3H] hydroxytryptamine release, and they synthesize and secrete the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In contrast to findings in previous studies, where B. burgdorferi-associated activity was shown to be dependent upon protein lipidation, mast cell TNF-α release was not induced by either lipidated or unlipidated recombinant OspA. This activity was additionally shown to be protease sensitive and surface expressed. Finally, comparisons of TNF-α-inducing activity in known low-, intermediate-, and high-passage B. burgdorferi B31 isolates demonstrated passage-dependent loss of activity, indicating that the activity is probably plasmid encoded. These findings document the presence in low-passage B. burgdorferi spirochetes of a novel lipidation-independent activity capable of inducing cytokine release from host cells. PMID:10024550

  15. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural detection of intestinal spirochetes in Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Kuwano, Atsutoshi; Ueno, Takanori; Katayama, Yoshinari; Ohya, Tatsuo; Taharaguchi, Sadao; Yamamoto, Shinji; Umemura, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yoshiharu; Kadota, Koichi

    2005-03-01

    Studies of equine intestinal spirochetes have long focused on intestinal contents alone, but intestinal spirochetosis has been reported recently in a 21-month-old Thoroughbred colt in Japan. To define the clinical and pathological significances of intestinal spirochetosis in several horses, an epizootiologic survey with histologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural methods was conducted for Brachyspira antigen-containing intestinal spirochetes in 12 diseased or injured Thoroughbred horses, aged from 35 days to 17 years. Brachyspira antigen-containing spirochetes were found in 7 of 12 horses (58.3%) and were more frequent in the cecum than in other parts of the bowel. It was not clear whether the infection was clinically related to diarrhea or dysentery, but histopathology revealed a close association between the bacterial infection and epithelial hyperplasia. Crypt epithelium consisted mainly of goblet cells and showed frequent mitosis throughout its length. Inflammatory cells and congestion were also present. There were numerous spirochetes in the crypts, and some invaded the cecal and colonic epithelia and underlying lamina propria. Ultrastructurally, the spirochetes were divided into 4 types. Three types were identified in degenerative epithelial cells or intracellularly. Brachyspira antigen-containing intestinal spirochetes invading the mucosa were capable of causing epithelial hyperplasia in the cecum and colon in the horses. The findings in this study will increase awareness of the importance of intestinal spirochetosis and may also be helpful for diagnosis and treatment of this condition. PMID:15825495

  16. Composite, large spirochetes from microbial mats: spirochete structure review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Ashen, J. B.; Sole, M.; Guerrero, R.

    1993-01-01

    Phenomena previously unknown in free-living spirochetes are reported: large-sized cells with variable diameter (length to 100 microns, width between 0.4 and 3.0 microns), composite structure (smaller spirochetes inside larger ones), and positive phototropic behavior. These bacteria, Spirosymplokos, are compared with all other spirochete genera. The large spirochete, grown in mixed culture, was studied live and by transmission EM. The protoplasmic cylinder was replete with spherical granules 20-32 nm in diameter, and three to six periplasmic 26-nm flagella were inserted subterminally. Comparably granulated and flagellated small spirochetes were located inside the protoplasmic cylinder and in the periplasm of the large ones. When exposed to air, movement became erratic, protoplasmic cylinders retracted to lie folded inside the outer membrane, and refractile membranous structures formed. From one to four structures per still-moving spirochete were seen. Spirosymplokos was enriched from laboratory samples exposed to oxygen-rich and desiccating, but not dry, conditions for at least 4 mo after removal of microbial mat from the field.

  17. Composite, large spirochetes from microbial mats: spirochete structure review.

    PubMed Central

    Margulis, L; Ashen, J B; Solé, M; Guerrero, R

    1993-01-01

    Phenomena previously unknown in free-living spirochetes are reported: large-sized cells with variable diameter (length to 100 microns, width between 0.4 and 3.0 microns), composite structure (smaller spirochetes inside larger ones), and positive phototropic behavior. These bacteria, Spirosymplokos, are compared with all other spirochete genera. The large spirochete, grown in mixed culture, was studied live and by transmission EM. The protoplasmic cylinder was replete with spherical granules 20-32 nm in diameter, and three to six periplasmic 26-nm flagella were inserted subterminally. Comparably granulated and flagellated small spirochetes were located inside the protoplasmic cylinder and in the periplasm of the large ones. When exposed to air, movement became erratic, protoplasmic cylinders retracted to lie folded inside the outer membrane, and refractile membranous structures formed. From one to four structures per still-moving spirochete were seen. Spirosymplokos was enriched from laboratory samples exposed to oxygen-rich and desiccating, but not dry, conditions for at least 4 mo after removal of microbial mat from the field. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8346204

  18. Geographic uniformity of the Lyme disease spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) and its shared history with tick vector (Ixodes scapularis) in the Northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wei-Gang; Dykhuizen, Daniel E; Acosta, Michael S; Luft, Benjamin J

    2002-03-01

    Over 80% of reported cases of Lyme disease in the United States occur in coastal regions of northeastern and mid-Atlantic states. The genetic structure of the Lyme disease spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) and its main tick vector (Ixodes scapularis) was studied concurrently and comparatively by sampling natural populations of I. scapularis ticks along the East Coast from 1996 to 1998. Borrelia is genetically highly diverse at the outer surface protein ospC. Since Borrelia is highly clonal, the ospC alleles can be used to define clones. A newly designed reverse line blotting (RLB) assay shows that up to 10 Borrelia clones can infect a single tick. The clone frequencies in Borrelia populations are the same across the Northeast. On the other hand, I. scapularis populations show strong regional divergence (among northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and southern states) as well as local differentiation. The high genetic diversity within Borrelia populations and the disparity in the genetic structure between Borrelia and its tick vector are likely consequences of strong balancing selection on local Borrelia clones. Demographically, both Borrelia and I. scapularis populations in the Northeast show the characteristics of a species that has recently expanded from a population bottleneck. Major geological and ecological events, such as the last glacial maximum (18,000 years ago) and the modern-day expansion of tick habitats, are likely causes of the observed "founder effects" for the two organisms in the Northeast. We therefore conclude that the genetic structure of B. burgdorferi has been intimately shaped by the natural history of its main vector, the northern lineage of I. scapularis ticks. PMID:11901105

  19. Using communication skills to improve adherence in children with chronic disease: the adherence equation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Paul L P; Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A

    2013-12-01

    Nonadherence to maintenance medication is common in paediatric chronic conditions. Despite the common belief that nonadherence is therapy-resistant, and the apparent lack of evidence for successful interventions to improve adherence, there is, in fact, a considerable body of evidence suggesting that adherence can be improved by applying specific communicative consultation skills. These can be summarized as the adherence equation: adherence=follow-up+dialogue+barriers and beliefs+empathy and education => concordance. Close follow-up of children with a chronic condition is needed to establish a therapeutic partnership with the family. Teaching self management skills is not a unidirectional process of providing information, but requires a constructive and collaborative dialogue between the medical team and the family. Identifying barriers to adherence can be achieved in a non-confrontational manner, by showing a genuine interest what the patient's views and preferences are. In particular, parental illness perceptions and medication beliefs should be identified, because they are strong drivers of nonadherence. Through empathic evidence-based education, such perceptions and beliefs can be modified. By applying these strategies, concordance between the child's family and the medical team can be achieved, resulting in optimal adherence to the jointly created treatment plan.

  20. A comparative study of mammalian and reptilian alternative pathway of complement-mediated killing of the Lyme disease spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi).

    PubMed

    Kuo, M M; Lane, R S; Giclas, P C

    2000-12-01

    The potential bactericidal activity of the alternative complement pathway of mammalian and reptilian sera to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) was evaluated in vitro. Complement-mediated killing was observed when cultured spirochetes were inoculated into sera from the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) and from the southern alligator lizard (Elgaria multicarinata), but not when they were inoculated into serum from either the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) or from humans. Spirochetes were still alive after 4 hr in lizard serum that had been preheated at 56 C for 30 min to inactivate complement. Furthermore, when lizard serum was chelated with 10 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid to block all complement activation, borreliacidal activity was arrested. When lizard serum was chelated with 10 mM ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid plus 4 mM MgCl2 to block only classical complement pathway activation, >85% of spirochetes were immobilized within 1 hr. Differences in B. burgdorferi s.s. mortality were not observed when chelators with or without MgCl2 were added to serum from either deer mice or humans. Proteins comprising the alternative complement pathway are responsible for the borreliacidal activity observed in the blood of S. occidentalis and E. multicarinata. PMID:11191895

  1. Suboptimal inhaler medication adherence and incorrect technique are common among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishna B; Percival, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are routinely prescribed one or more inhaled medications. Adherence to inhaler medications and correct inhaler device technique are crucial to successful COPD management. The goals of this study were to estimate adherence and inhaler technique in a cohort of COPD patients. This was an observational study conducted on a sample of 150 COPD patients. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS). Inhaler technique was assessed using standardized checklists. Clinical data were collected using a proforma. Of the 150 patients (mean age 70.3 years, 52% male), 58% reported suboptimal adherence (MARS ≤ 24). High adherence to therapy (MARS = 25) was associated with older age (p = 0.001), but not any of the other studied variables. Medication non-adherence was not associated with COPD exacerbations. Errors (≥ 1) in inhaler technique were common across all of the types of inhaler devices reportedly used by patients, with the highest proportion of errors among Turbuhaler users (83%) and the least proportion of errors among Handihaler users (50%). No clinical variables were associated with errors in inhaler technique. Suboptimal adherence and errors in inhaler technique are common among COPD patients. No clinical variables to assist in the prediction of medication non-adherence and poor inhaler technique were identifiable. Consequently, regular assessment of medication adherence and inhaler technique should be incorporated into routine clinical practice to facilitate improved health outcomes among patients with COPD. PMID:26396159

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of the spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Paster, B J; Dewhirst, F E; Weisburg, W G; Tordoff, L A; Fraser, G J; Hespell, R B; Stanton, T B; Zablen, L; Mandelco, L; Woese, C R

    1991-01-01

    The 16S rRNA sequences were determined for species of Spirochaeta, Treponema, Borrelia, Leptospira, Leptonema, and Serpula, using a modified Sanger method of direct RNA sequencing. Analysis of aligned 16S rRNA sequences indicated that the spirochetes form a coherent taxon composed of six major clusters or groups. The first group, termed the treponemes, was divided into two subgroups. The first treponeme subgroup consisted of Treponema pallidum, Treponema phagedenis, Treponema denticola, a thermophilic spirochete strain, and two species of Spirochaeta, Spirochaeta zuelzerae and Spirochaeta stenostrepta, with an average interspecies similarity of 89.9%. The second treponeme subgroup contained Treponema bryantii, Treponema pectinovorum, Treponema saccharophilum, Treponema succinifaciens, and rumen strain CA, with an average interspecies similarity of 86.2%. The average interspecies similarity between the two treponeme subgroups was 84.2%. The division of the treponemes into two subgroups was verified by single-base signature analysis. The second spirochete group contained Spirochaeta aurantia, Spirochaeta halophila, Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, Spirochaeta litoralis, and Spirochaeta isovalerica, with an average similarity of 87.4%. The Spirochaeta group was related to the treponeme group, with an average similarity of 81.9%. The third spirochete group contained borrelias, including Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia anserina, Borrelia hermsii, and a rabbit tick strain. The borrelias formed a tight phylogenetic cluster, with average similarity of 97%. THe borrelia group shared a common branch with the Spirochaeta group and was closer to this group than to the treponemes. A single spirochete strain isolated fromt the shew constituted the fourth group. The fifth group was composed of strains of Serpula (Treponema) hyodysenteriae and Serpula (Treponema) innocens. The two species of this group were closely related, with a similarity of greater than 99%. Leptonema illini

  3. A validated measure of adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Natalie A; Kronenberger, William G; Hampton, Kisha C; Bloom, Ellen M; Rampersad, Angeli G; Roberson, Christopher P; Shapiro, Amy D

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic prophylaxis is a mainstay in sickle cell disease management. However, adherence is estimated at only 66%. This study aimed to develop and validate a Sickle Cell Antibiotic Adherence Level Evaluation (SCAALE) to promote systematic and detailed adherence evaluation. Methods A 28-item questionnaire was created, covering seven adherence areas. General Adherence Ratings from the parent and one health care provider and medication possession ratios were obtained as validation measures. Results Internal consistency was very good to excellent for the total SCAALE (α=0.89) and four of the seven subscales. Correlations between SCAALE scores and validation measures were strong for the total SCAALE and five of the seven subscales. Conclusion The SCAALE provides a detailed, quantitative, multidimensional, and global measurement of adherence and can promote clinical care and research. PMID:27354768

  4. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Illness and Medication Beliefs are Associated with Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Krauskopf, Katherine; Federman, Alex D; Kale, Minal S; Sigel, Keith M; Martynenko, Melissa; O'Conor, Rachel; Wolf, Michael S; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2015-04-01

    Almost half of patients with COPD do not adhere to their medications. Illness and medication beliefs are important determinants of adherence in other chronic diseases. Using the framework of the Common Sense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM), we determined associations between potentially modifiable beliefs and adherence to COPD medications in a cohort of English- and Spanish-speaking adults with COPD from New York and Chicago. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Illness and medication beliefs along CSM domains were evaluated using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and the Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ). Unadjusted analysis (with Cohen's d effect sizes) and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the relationship between illness and medication beliefs with adherence. The study included 188 participants (47% Black, 13% Hispanics); 109 (58%) were non-adherent. Non-adherent participants were younger (p < 0.001), more likely to be Black or Hispanic (p = 0.001), to have reported low income (p = 0.02), and had fewer years of formal education (p = 0.002). In unadjusted comparisons, non-adherent participants reported being more concerned about their COPD (p = 0.011; Cohen's d = 0.43), more emotionally affected by the disease (p = 0.001; Cohen's d = 0.54), and had greater concerns about COPD medications (p < 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.81). In adjusted analyses, concerns about COPD medications independently predicted non-adherence (odds ratio: 0.52, 95% confidence interval: 0.36-0.75). In this cohort of urban minority adults, concerns about medications were associated with non-adherence. Future work should explore interventions to influence patient adherence by addressing concerns about the safety profile and long-term effects of COPD medications.

  5. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Illness and Medication Beliefs are Associated with Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Krauskopf, Katherine; Federman, Alex D; Kale, Minal S; Sigel, Keith M; Martynenko, Melissa; O’Conor, Rachel; Wolf, Michael S; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Almost half of patients with COPD do not adhere to their medications. Illness and medication beliefs are important determinants of adherence in other chronic diseases. Using the framework of the Common Sense Model of Self Regulation (CSM), we determined associations between potentially modifiable beliefs and adherence to COPD medications in a cohort of English- and Spanish-speaking adults with COPD from New York and Chicago. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Illness and medication beliefs along CSM domains were evaluated using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and the Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ). Unadjusted analysis (with Cohen’s d effect sizes) and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the relationship between illness and medication beliefs with adherence. The study included 188 participants (47% Black, 13% Hispanics); 109 (58%) were adherent. Non-adherent participants were younger (p<0.001), more likely to be Black or Hispanic (p=0.001), to have reported low income (p=0.02), and had fewer years of formal education (p=0.002). In unadjusted comparisons, non-adherent participants reported being more concerned about their COPD (p=0.011; Cohen’s d=0.43), more emotionally affected by the disease (p=0.001; Cohen’s d=0.54), and had greater concerns about COPD medications (p<0.001, Cohen’s d=0.81). In adjusted analyses, concerns about COPD medications independently predicted non-adherence (odds ratio: 0.52, 95% confidence interval: 0.36–0.75). In this cohort of urban minority adults, concerns about medications were associated with non-adherence. Future work should explore interventions to influence patient adherence by addressing concerns about the safety profile and long-term effects of COPD medications. PMID:24960306

  6. Interaction of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi with Brain Parenchyma Elicits Inflammatory Mediators from Glial Cells as Well as Glial and Neuronal Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Geeta; Borda, Juan T.; Dufour, Jason; Kaushal, Deepak; Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Lackner, Andrew A.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, often manifests by causing neurocognitive deficits. As a possible mechanism for Lyme neuroborreliosis, we hypothesized that B. burgdorferi induces the production of inflammatory mediators in the central nervous system with concomitant neuronal and/or glial apoptosis. To test our hypothesis, we constructed an ex vivo model that consisted of freshly collected slices from brain cortex of a rhesus macaque and allowed live B. burgdorferi to penetrate the tissue. Numerous transcripts of genes that regulate inflammation as well as oligodendrocyte and neuronal apoptosis were significantly altered as assessed by DNA microarray analysis. Transcription level increases of 7.43-fold (P = 0.005) for the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α and 2.31-fold (P = 0.016) for the chemokine interleukin (IL)-8 were also detected by real-time-polymerase chain reaction array analysis. The immune mediators IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, COX-2, and CXCL13 were visualized in glial cells in situ by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Concomitantly, significant proportions of both oligodendrocytes and neurons undergoing apoptosis were present in spirochete-stimulated tissues. IL-6 production by astrocytes in addition to oligodendrocyte apoptosis were also detected, albeit at lower levels, in rhesus macaques that had received in vivo intraparenchymal stereotaxic inoculations of live B. burgdorferi. These results provide proof of concept for our hypothesis that B. burgdorferi produces inflammatory mediators in the central nervous system, accompanied by glial and neuronal apoptosis. PMID:18832582

  7. Interaction of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi with brain parenchyma elicits inflammatory mediators from glial cells as well as glial and neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Geeta; Borda, Juan T; Dufour, Jason; Kaushal, Deepak; Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Lackner, Andrew A; Philipp, Mario T

    2008-11-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, often manifests by causing neurocognitive deficits. As a possible mechanism for Lyme neuroborreliosis, we hypothesized that B. burgdorferi induces the production of inflammatory mediators in the central nervous system with concomitant neuronal and/or glial apoptosis. To test our hypothesis, we constructed an ex vivo model that consisted of freshly collected slices from brain cortex of a rhesus macaque and allowed live B. burgdorferi to penetrate the tissue. Numerous transcripts of genes that regulate inflammation as well as oligodendrocyte and neuronal apoptosis were significantly altered as assessed by DNA microarray analysis. Transcription level increases of 7.43-fold (P = 0.005) for the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha and 2.31-fold (P = 0.016) for the chemokine interleukin (IL)-8 were also detected by real-time-polymerase chain reaction array analysis. The immune mediators IL-6, IL-8, IL-1beta, COX-2, and CXCL13 were visualized in glial cells in situ by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Concomitantly, significant proportions of both oligodendrocytes and neurons undergoing apoptosis were present in spirochete-stimulated tissues. IL-6 production by astrocytes in addition to oligodendrocyte apoptosis were also detected, albeit at lower levels, in rhesus macaques that had received in vivo intraparenchymal stereotaxic inoculations of live B. burgdorferi. These results provide proof of concept for our hypothesis that B. burgdorferi produces inflammatory mediators in the central nervous system, accompanied by glial and neuronal apoptosis. PMID:18832582

  8. Spirochete antigens persist near cartilage after murine Lyme borreliosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Bockenstedt, Linda K; Gonzalez, David G; Haberman, Ann M; Belperron, Alexia A

    2012-07-01

    An enigmatic feature of Lyme disease is the slow resolution of musculoskeletal symptoms that can continue after treatment, with some patients developing an inflammatory arthritis that becomes refractory to antibiotic therapy. Using intravital microscopy and the mouse model of Lyme borreliosis, we observed that Borrelia burgdorferi antigens, but not infectious spirochetes, can remain adjacent to cartilage for extended periods after antibiotic treatment. B. burgdorferi was not recovered by culture or xenodiagnosis with ticks after antibiotic treatment of WT mice and all but one of the immunodeficient mice with heightened pathogen burden due to impaired TLR responsiveness. Amorphous GFP+ deposits were visualized by intravital microscopy in the entheses of antibiotic-treated mice infected with GFP-expressing spirochetes and on the ear cartilage surface in sites where immunofluorescence staining detected spirochete antigens. Naive mice were not infected by tissue transplants from antibiotic-treated mice even though transplants contained spirochete DNA. Tissue homogenates from antibiotic-treated mice induced IgG reactive with B. burgdorferi antigens after immunization of naive mice and stimulated TNF-α production from macrophages in vitro. This is the first direct demonstration that inflammatory B. burgdorferi components can persist near cartilaginous tissue after treatment for Lyme disease. We propose that these deposits could contribute to the development of antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis.

  9. [Modifying habits and treatment adherence, essential for controlling the chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Pisano González, Marta M; González Pisano, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic adherence is defined as the extent to which a person's behavior (taking medications, following a diet and changes in lifestyle) coincides with health recommendations (WHO, 2004). We can deduce that is a multiple, complex and changing phenomenon, that there can be total or partial adherence to a treatment, and depending on timing and circumstances. Lack of adherence is a worrying problem; due to its great magnitude and complexity (over two hundred factors) it is responsible for the increased morbid-mortality, complications, hospital admissions, health costs, and dissatisfaction of the user and health professionals. In this paper we develop effective interventions in changing habits and improving adherence: cognitive (education and improved communication), behavior and motivation. Interventions areas include pharmacological treatments, habits and life style, as well as social and family support. The most effective model emphasizes self-care and self-responsibility of the user to manage their disease and increase adherence. PMID:24369770

  10. Cristispira from oyster styles: complex morphology of large symbiotic spirochetes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Nault, L.; Sieburth, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Crystalline styles (digestive organs) of bivalve mollusks provide the habitat for highly motile bacteria. Styles from freshly-collected oysters, Crassostrea virginica, were studied by electron microscopy; Cristispira spirochetes were abundant in these organs. Detailed study reveals these spirochetes to be among the most complex prokaryotic cells known. More than 600 periplasmic flagella and an adhering outer lipoprotein membrane (e.g., a 270 degrees sillon) form the ultrastructural basis for the "crista," first described by light microscopy. Unique rosette structures corresponding to the "chambers" or "ovoid inclusions" of light microscopy were detected at the periphery of all protoplasmic cylinders. Polar organelles and linearly aligned flagellar insertions are conspicuous. In size and complexity, Cristispira more resembles Pillotina, Diplocalyx, Clevelandina and Hollandina (large spirochetes symbiotic in termites) than it does Treponema. Cristispira pectinis (Gross, 1910), the type species; Spirillum ostrea (Noguchi, 1921); and another, less frequent bacterial symbiont are the predominant inhabitants of the dense style matrix. The ultrastructure of the spirillum and an electron micrograph of the third bacterium are shown.

  11. Impact of decreasing copayments on medication adherence within a disease management environment.

    PubMed

    Chernew, Michael E; Shah, Mayur R; Wegh, Arnold; Rosenberg, Stephen N; Juster, Iver A; Rosen, Allison B; Sokol, Michael C; Yu-Isenberg, Kristina; Fendrick, A Mark

    2008-01-01

    This paper estimates the effects of a large employer's value-based insurance initiative designed to improve adherence to recommended treatment regimens. The intervention reduced copayments for five chronic medication classes in the context of a disease management (DM) program. Compared to a control employer that used the same DM program, adherence to medications in the value-based intervention increased for four of five medication classes, reducing nonadherence by 7-14 percent. The results demonstrate the potential for copayment reductions for highly valued services to increase medication adherence above the effects of existing DM programs.

  12. Destruction of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi round-body propagules (RBs) by the antibiotic Tigecycline

    PubMed Central

    Brorson, Øystein; Brorson, Sverre-Henning; Scythes, John; MacAllister, James; Wier, Andrew; Margulis, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Persistence of tissue spirochetes of Borrelia burgdorferi as helices and round bodies (RBs) explains many erythema-Lyme disease symptoms. Spirochete RBs (reproductive propagules also called coccoid bodies, globular bodies, spherical bodies, granules, cysts, L-forms, sphaeroplasts, or vesicles) are induced by environmental conditions unfavorable for growth. Viable, they grow, move and reversibly convert into motile helices. Reversible pleiomorphy was recorded in at least six spirochete genera (>12 species). Penicillin solution is one unfavorable condition that induces RBs. This antibiotic that inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis cures neither the second “Great Imitator” (Lyme borreliosis) nor the first: syphilis. Molecular-microscopic techniques, in principle, can detect in animals (insects, ticks, and mammals, including patients) helices and RBs of live spirochetes. Genome sequences of B. burgdorferi and Treponema pallidum spirochetes show absence of >75% of genes in comparison with their free-living relatives. Irreversible integration of spirochetes at behavioral, metabolic, gene product and genetic levels into animal tissue has been documented. Irreversible integration of spirochetes may severely impair immunological response such that they persist undetected in tissue. We report in vitro inhibition and destruction of B. burgdorferi (helices, RBs = “cysts”) by the antibiotic Tigecycline (TG; Wyeth), a glycylcycline protein-synthesis inhibitor (of both 30S and 70S ribosome subunits). Studies of the pleiomorphic life history stages in response to TG of both B. burgdorferi and Treponema pallidum in vivo and in vitro are strongly encouraged. PMID:19843691

  13. Interventions to enhance adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults

    PubMed Central

    Desroches, Sophie; Lapointe, Annie; Ratté, Stéphane; Gravel, Karine; Légaré, France; Turcotte, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been recognized that poor adherence can be a serious risk to the health and wellbeing of patients, and greater adherence to dietary advice is a critical component in preventing and managing chronic diseases. Objectives To assess the effects of interventions for enhancing adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults. Search methods We searched the following electronic databases up to 29 September 2010: The Cochrane Library (issue 9 2010), PubMed, EMBASE (Embase.com), CINAHL (Ebsco) and PsycINFO (PsycNET) with no language restrictions. We also reviewed: a) recent years of relevant conferences, symposium and colloquium proceedings and abstracts; b) web-based registries of clinical trials; and c) the bibliographies of included studies. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated interventions enhancing adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults. Studies were eligible if the primary outcome was the client’s adherence to dietary advice. We defined ‘client’ as an adult participating in a chronic disease prevention or chronic disease management study involving dietary advice. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of the studies. They also assessed the risk of bias and extracted data using a modified version of the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group data extraction template. Any discrepancies in judgement were resolved by discussion and consensus, or with a third review author. Because the studies differed widely with respect to interventions, measures of diet adherence, dietary advice, nature of the chronic diseases and duration of interventions and follow-up, we conducted a qualitative analysis. We classified included studies according to the function of the intervention and present results in a narrative table using vote counting for each category of intervention. Main results

  14. Systemic Arterial Hypertension in the Emergency Service: medication adherence and understanding of this disease

    PubMed Central

    Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Oliveira, Gabriella Novelli; Andrade, Thaisa Fernanda Landim; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to identify the epidemiological profile of hypertension patients, how much they understand about the disease and the rate of adherence to treatment by these patients who had been hospitalized in the Brazilian emergency service. Methods: this cross-sectional study was performed with 116 patients, both male and female and aged over 18 years, who had been hospitalized in the Emergency Service of a University Hospital between March and June, 2013. The studied variables were data referring to socio-demographics, comorbidities, physical activity and knowledge regarding the disease. Patient adherence to treatment and the identification of the barriers were respectively evaluated using the Morisky test and the Brief Medication Questionnaire. Results: most of the patients involved in this study were women (55%), with white skin color (55%), married (51%), retirees or pensioners (64%) and with a low educational level (58%). Adherence to treatment, in most cases (55%), was moderate and the most prevalent adherence barrier was recall (67%). When medication was acquired at no cost to the patient, there was greater adherence to treatment. Conclusion: this study's patients had a moderate understanding about the disease. The high correlation between the number of drugs used and the recall barrier suggests that monotherapy is an option that can facilitate treatment adherence and reduce how often the patients forget to take their medication. PMID:26626007

  15. Measuring beliefs about gluten free diet adherence in adult coeliac disease using the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Kirby; Mullan, Barbara

    2011-04-01

    The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) was used to elicit the salient beliefs about gluten free diet (GFD) adherence in adults with coeliac disease (CD) and to design a TPB questionnaire to predict adherence levels. This questionnaire was administered to 265 CD participants with adherence and quality of life (QOL) measures, a GFD knowledge test, and self-reported psychiatric history. Regression analyses were used to test the fit of the TPB in predicting adherence, and to determine the nature of the relationships between adherence, QOL, knowledge, and psychiatric history. The TPB combined with self-reported depression and anxiety, and QOL explained significant variance in intention (41.0%) and adherence (33.7%). Poorer dietary adherence and psychiatric history were also associated with lower QOL. Findings suggest that the TPB provides an adequate model for predicting GFD adherence in CD, and the presence of psychiatric conditions represents a potential intervention target to improve adherence and QOL.

  16. Measuring beliefs about gluten free diet adherence in adult coeliac disease using the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Kirby; Mullan, Barbara

    2011-04-01

    The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) was used to elicit the salient beliefs about gluten free diet (GFD) adherence in adults with coeliac disease (CD) and to design a TPB questionnaire to predict adherence levels. This questionnaire was administered to 265 CD participants with adherence and quality of life (QOL) measures, a GFD knowledge test, and self-reported psychiatric history. Regression analyses were used to test the fit of the TPB in predicting adherence, and to determine the nature of the relationships between adherence, QOL, knowledge, and psychiatric history. The TPB combined with self-reported depression and anxiety, and QOL explained significant variance in intention (41.0%) and adherence (33.7%). Poorer dietary adherence and psychiatric history were also associated with lower QOL. Findings suggest that the TPB provides an adequate model for predicting GFD adherence in CD, and the presence of psychiatric conditions represents a potential intervention target to improve adherence and QOL. PMID:21277925

  17. Practical Strategies for Enhancing Adherence to Treatment Regimen in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenley, Rachel N.; Kunz, Jennifer H.; Walter, Jennifer; Hommel, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    Promoting adherence to treatment among pediatric and adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a critical yet challenging task for health care providers. Several existing interventions to enhance adherence among individuals with IBD offer useful information about practical strategies to enhance adherence. The current review article has 3 goals. First, the review provides a context for understanding treatment regimen adherence in IBD by reviewing key definitional, measurement, and conceptual challenges in this area. Next, published studies focused on interventions to enhance adherence in IBD are briefly summarized, followed by a synthesis of practical adherence promotion strategies for use in IBD by health care providers. Strategies are distinguished by the level of evidence supporting their utility as well as by age group. Finally, recommendations for future research to facilitate the development and implementation of practical, evidence-based strategies for adherence promotion in IBD are provided. Findings from the literature review suggest that strategies including education, regimen simplification, and use of reminder systems and organizational strategies (e.g., pill boxes) are likely to be best suited for addressing accidental nonadherence. In contrast, addressing motivational issues, teaching problem-solving skills, and addressing problematic patterns of family functioning are more likely to benefit individuals displaying intentional nonadherence. PMID:23635715

  18. Predictors of adherence to diabetes medications: the role of disease and medication beliefs.

    PubMed

    Mann, Devin M; Ponieman, Diego; Leventhal, Howard; Halm, Ethan A

    2009-06-01

    Despite the effectiveness of drug therapy in diabetes management high rates of poor adherence persist. The purpose of this study was to identify potentially modifiable patient disease and medication beliefs associated with poor medication adherence among people with diabetes. A cohort of patients with diabetes was recruited from an urban primary-care clinic in New York City. Patients were interviewed in English or Spanish about: disease beliefs, medication beliefs, regimen complexity, diabetes knowledge, depression, self-efficacy, and medication adherence (Morisky scale). Logistic regression was used to identify multivariate predictors of poor medication adherence (Morisky > 1). Patients (n = 151) had diabetes for an average of 13 years with a mean HgA1C of 7.6 (SD 1.7). One-in-four (28%) were poor adherers to their diabetes medicines. In multivariate analyses, predictors of poor medication adherence were: believing you have diabetes only when your sugar is high (OR = 7.4;2-27.2), saying there was no need to take medicine when the glucose was normal (OR = 3.5;0.9-13.7), worrying about side-effects of diabetes medicines (OR = 3.3;1.3-8.7), lack of self-confidence in controlling diabetes (OR = 2.8;1.1-7.1), and feeling medicines are hard to take (OR = 14.0;4.4-44.6). Disease and medication beliefs inconsistent with a chronic disease model of diabetes were significant predictors of poor medication adherence. These suboptimal beliefs are potentially modifiable and are logical targets for educational interventions to improve diabetes self-management. PMID:19184390

  19. The flagellar cytoskeleton of the spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Wolgemuth, Charles W; Charon, Nyles W; Goldstein, Stuart F; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2006-01-01

    The recent discoveries of prokaryotic homologs of all three major eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins (actin, tubulin, intermediate filaments) have spurred a resurgence of activity in the field of bacterial morphology. In spirochetes, however, it has long been known that the flagellar filaments act as a cytoskeletal protein structure, contributing to their shape and conferring motility on this unique phylum of bacteria. Therefore, revisiting the spirochete cytoskeleton may lead to new paradigms for exploring general features of prokaryotic morphology. This review discusses the role that the periplasmic flagella in spirochetes play in maintaining shape and producing motility. We focus on four species of spirochetes: Borrelia burgdorferi, Treponema denticola, Treponema phagedenis and Leptonema (formerly Leptospira) illini. In spirochetes, the flagella reside in the periplasmic space. Rotation of the flagella in the above species by a flagellar motor induces changes in the cell morphology that drives motility. Mutants that do not produce flagella have a markedly different shape than wild-type cells. PMID:16983197

  20. Treatment adherence to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in Chinese patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yunfei; Yin, Rulan; Fu, Ting; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Guo, Genkai; Li, Liren; Gu, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients using disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) may lead to joint damage and function loss. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore Chinese RA patients’ adherence rates and investigate potential risk factors for nonadherence. Methods A total of 122 RA patients were recruited from the Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University from January 2014 to April 2015. Patients were asked to complete a set of standardized self-report questionnaires (Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Short Form-36 questionnaire, 28-joint Disease Activity Score, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Visual Analog Scale). Independent samples t-tests, chi-square analyses, and logistic regression modeling were used to analyze these data. Results Based on Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology, 38% of the patients adhered to DMARDs. Adherence was associated with education, income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs. Other demographic and clinical characteristics were not associated with adherence. Logistic regression models identified income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs as predictors of medication nonadherence. Conclusion In this study, 62% of patients with RA were not adherent to their DMARD prescription. Education, income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs were associated with medication adherence, and income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs were independent predictors of medication adherence in patients with RA. These findings could help medical personnel develop helpful interventions to improve adherence in RA patients by paying more attention to the patients with these accompanying risk factors and, finally, improve RA patients’ quality of life. PMID:27217726

  1. Lyme arthritis. Spirochetes found in synovial microangiopathic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Y. E.; Duray, P. H.; Steere, A. C.; Kashgarian, M.; Buza, J.; Malawista, S. E.; Askenase, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    In 17 patients with Lyme disease, synovial specimens, obtained by synovectomy or needle biopsy, showed nonspecific villous hypertrophy, synovial cell hyperplasia, prominent microvasculature, lymphoplasmacellular infiltration, and sometimes lymphoid follicles. The larger surgically obtained specimens also showed striking deposition of fibrin in synovial stroma and a form of endarteritis obliterans. In 2 patients, spirochetes were seen in and around blood vessels by the Dieterle silver stain. Compared with 55 cases of other synovial disease, obliterative microvascular lesions were seen only in Lyme synovia, but marked stromal deposition of fibrin seemed nonspecific. These findings imply that the Lyme spirochete may survive for years in affected synovium and may be directly responsible for the microvascular injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3966535

  2. The Seven Stages of Man: The Role of Developmental Stage on Medication Adherence in Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Costello, Richard W; Foster, Juliet M; Grigg, Jonathan; Eakin, Michelle N; Canonica, Walter; Yunus, Fasail; Ryan, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    The circumstances and drivers of the decision to initiate, implement, or persist with a medication differ for individuals at each developmental stage. For school-age children with asthma, the social environment of their family's cultural beliefs and the influence of peer networks and school policies are strong determinants of medication adherence. The stage of adolescence can be a particularly challenging time because there is a reduction in parental supervision of asthma management as the young person strives to become more autonomous. To illustrate the importance of such factors, adherence interventions in children and young adults with asthma have used peer-based supports and social supports, particularly social media platforms. In older patients, it is internal rather than external factors and age-related decline that pose challenges to medication adherence. Seniors face the challenges of polypharmacy, reduced social support, increased isolation, and loss of cognitive function. Strategies to promote adherence must be tailored to the developmental stage and respective behavioral determinants of the target group. This review considers the different attitudes toward medication and the different adherence behaviors in young and elderly patients with chronic respiratory conditions, specifically asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Opportunities to intervene to optimize adherence are suggested. PMID:27587315

  3. Treatment Adherence in Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Perceptions from Adolescent Patients and Their Families

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Kevin A.; Odell, Shannon; Sander, Emily; Baldassano, Robert N.; Barg, Frances K.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine patient- and parent-perceived factors that impact adherence to inflammatory bowel disease treatment using a qualitative descriptive individual interview approach. Sixteen adolescents and their parents were recruited from May through August 2007 and interviewed about medication adherence using an open-ended semi-structured interview format. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded into themes. Parent-child dyads identified forgetting, interfering activities, parent-child conflict and oppositional behaviour, and inadequate planning for treatment as challenges to adherence. Participants reported that family support and good parent-child relationships, routines, monitoring and reminding, and organizational tools such as pill boxes facilitated treatment adherence. Other issues that emerged included immediacy of treatment effects and parent-adolescent responsibility for treatment. Patients and parents experience a number of challenges related to adherence within behavioural, educational, organizational, and health belief domains. Behavioural interventions should focus on these issues, reduction of perceived barriers, and effective transition of responsibility for treatment adherence. Future research considerations are discussed. PMID:21143544

  4. Strategies to improve adherence to medications for cardiovascular diseases in socioeconomically disadvantaged populations: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Laba, Tracey-Lea; Bleasel, Jonathan; Brien, Jo-Anne; Cass, Alan; Howard, Kirsten; Peiris, David; Redfern, Julie; Salam, Abdul; Usherwood, Tim; Jan, Stephen

    2013-09-10

    Medication non-adherence poses a major barrier to reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden globally, and is increasingly recognised as a socioeconomically determined problem. Strategies promoting CVD medication adherence appear of moderate effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Potentially, 'one-size-fits-all' measures are ill-equipped to address heterogeneous adherence behaviour between social groups. This review aims to determine the effects of strategies to improve adherence to CVD-related medications in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. Randomised/quasi-randomised controlled trials (1996-June 2012, English), testing strategies to increase adherence to CVD-related medications prescribed to adult patients who may experience health inequity (place of residence, occupation, education, or socioeconomic position) were reviewed. 772 abstracts were screened, 111 full-text articles retrieved, and 16 full-text articles reporting on 14 studies, involving 7739 patients (age range 41-66 years), were included. Methodological and clinical heterogeneity precluded quantitative data synthesis. Studies were thematically grouped by targeted outcomes; underlying interventions and policies were classified using Michie et al.'s Behaviour Change Wheel. Contrasting with patient or physician/practice strategies, those simultaneously directed at patients and physicians/practices resulted in statistically significant improvements in relative adherence (16-169%). Comparative cost and cost-effectiveness analyses from three studies did not find cost-saving or cost-effective strategies. Unlike much current evidence in general populations, promising evidence exists about what strategies improve adherence in disadvantaged groups. These strategies were generally complex: simultaneously targeting patients and physicians; addressing social, financial, and treatment-related adherence barriers; and supported by broader guidelines, regulatory and communication-based policies. Given their

  5. Alexithymia, Assertiveness and Psychosocial Functioning in HIV: Implications for Medication Adherence and Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Roger C; Ironson, Gail; Antoni, Michael; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Schneiderman, Neil

    2016-02-01

    Psychosocial function and adherence to antiretroviral regimen are key factors in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease management. Alexithymia (AL) is a trait deficit in the ability to identify and describe feelings, emotions and bodily sensations. A structural equation model was used to test whether high levels of AL indirectly relate to greater non-adherent behavior and HIV disease severity via psychosocial dysfunction. Blood draws for HIV-1 viral load and CD4 T-lymphocyte, along with psychosocial surveys were collected from 439 HIV positive adults aged 18-73 years. The structural model supports significant paths from: (1) AL to non-active patient involvement, psychological distress, and lower social support, (2) psychological distress and non-active involvement to non-adherent behavior, and (3) non-adherence to greater HIV disease severity (CFI = .97, RMSEA = .04, SRMR = .05). A second model confirmed the intermediary effect of greater patient assertiveness on the path from AL to social support and non-active patient involvement (CFI = .94, RMSEA = .04, SRMR = .05). Altogether, AL is indirectly linked with HIV disease management through it's association with poor psychosocial function, however greater patient assertiveness buffers the negative impact of AL on relationship quality with healthcare providers and members of one's social support network.

  6. Alexithymia, Assertiveness and Psychosocial Functioning in HIV: Implications for Medication Adherence and Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Roger C; Ironson, Gail; Antoni, Michael; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Schneiderman, Neil

    2016-02-01

    Psychosocial function and adherence to antiretroviral regimen are key factors in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease management. Alexithymia (AL) is a trait deficit in the ability to identify and describe feelings, emotions and bodily sensations. A structural equation model was used to test whether high levels of AL indirectly relate to greater non-adherent behavior and HIV disease severity via psychosocial dysfunction. Blood draws for HIV-1 viral load and CD4 T-lymphocyte, along with psychosocial surveys were collected from 439 HIV positive adults aged 18-73 years. The structural model supports significant paths from: (1) AL to non-active patient involvement, psychological distress, and lower social support, (2) psychological distress and non-active involvement to non-adherent behavior, and (3) non-adherence to greater HIV disease severity (CFI = .97, RMSEA = .04, SRMR = .05). A second model confirmed the intermediary effect of greater patient assertiveness on the path from AL to social support and non-active patient involvement (CFI = .94, RMSEA = .04, SRMR = .05). Altogether, AL is indirectly linked with HIV disease management through it's association with poor psychosocial function, however greater patient assertiveness buffers the negative impact of AL on relationship quality with healthcare providers and members of one's social support network. PMID:26143246

  7. Symbiotic spirochetes in the termite hindgut: phylogenetic identification of ectosymbiotic spirochetes of oxymonad protists.

    PubMed

    Iida; Ohkuma; Ohtoko; Kudo

    2000-10-01

    Some species of protists inhabiting the hindgut of lower-termites have a large number of ectosymbiotic spirochetes on the cell surface. The phylogenetic positions of the ectosymbiotic spirochetes of three oxymonad protists, Dinenympha porteri in the gut of Reticulitermes speratus, and Pyrsonympha sp. and Dinenympha sp. in Hodotermopsis sjoestedti, were investigated without cultivation of these organisms. Protist fractions carefully collected with a micromanipulator were used as templates for the amplification of small subunit ribosomal RNA genes (SSU rDNA). The phylogenetic tree inferred from the nucleotide sequences of the SSU rDNA showed that they were affiliated with the Treponema cluster of spirochetes and they were divided into two clusters. One was grouped together with the spirochetal sequences reported previously from the gut of termites and the other was related to the Treponema bryantii subgroup of treponemes (denoted as termite Treponema clusters I and II, respectively). Whole-cell in situ hybridization using a fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotide probe specific for the group of sequences in cluster II identified most of the ectosymbiotic spirochetes of the oxymonad protists in the gut of R. speratus and H. sjoestedti. However, not all of the ectosymbiotic spirochetes could be detected by means of this cluster II group-specific probe and the population of ectosymbiotic spirochetes of cluster II was different among the oxymonad species. In the case of D. porteri, an oligonucleotide probe specific for one member of cluster II recognized a portion of the ectosymbiotic spirochetes of cluster II, and their population was also different depending on the cell-type of D. porteri in terms of the attachment of ectosymbiotic spirochetes. The results indicate that the spirochetes of cluster II and probably those of a part of cluster I can be assigned to ectosymbiotic species of oxymonad protists and that the population of ectosymbiotic spirochetes associated with a

  8. Relapsing Fever Spirochetes Retain Infectivity After Prolonged in vitro Cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Schrumpf, Merry E.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Policastro, Paul F.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Borrelia hermsii and Borrelia burgdorferi, two closely related spirochetes, are the etiological agents of tick-borne relapsing fever and Lyme disease, respectively. Previous studies have shown the loss of infectivity of B. burgdorferi is associated with in vitro cultivation. This diminished infectivity of B. burgdorferi has occurred as early as three in vitro passages, and the loss of plasmids have been observed with these less virulent to noninfective cultures. The effects of long-term in vitro cultivation on B. hermsii have not been investigated. However, understanding the degree of genomic degradation during in vitro cultivation is important for investigating pathogenic mechanisms of spirochetes. In this study, we analyzed the effects of continuous in vitro cultivation on the genomic composition and infectivity of B. hermsii and B. turicatae. We report that all seven isolates of B. hermsii and the one isolate of B. turicatae examined retained infectivity in mice after 1 year of continuous in vitro cultivation. Furthermore, there were few apparent differences in the plasmid profiles after long-term cultivation. Two isolates of B. hermsii remained infective after high passage despite losing a portion of the 200-kb linear plasmid containing the fhbA gene encoding the factor H binding protein. Also, sequence analysis of multiple B. hermsii isolates demonstrated two types of fhbA with complete congruence with the two genomic groups of B. hermsii spirochetes. Therefore, these results suggest that relapsing fever spirochetes are genetically stable during in vitro cultivation, and the fhbA-containing segment of DNA that is lost during cultivation is not required for infection. PMID:18637723

  9. Improving medication adherence with a targeted, technology-driven disease management intervention.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David B; Allison, Wanda; Chen, Joyce C; Demand, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Treatment adherence is critical in managing chronic disease, but achieving it remains an elusive goal across many prevalent conditions. As part of its care management strategy, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina (BCBSSC) implemented the Longitudinal Adherence Treatment Evaluation program, a behavioral intervention to improve medication adherence among members with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes. The objectives of this study were to 1) assess the effectiveness of telephonic intervention in influencing reinitiation of medication therapy, and 2) evaluate the rate and timing of medication reinitiation. BCBSSC applied algorithms against pharmacy claims data to identify patients prescribed targeted medications who were 60 or more days overdue for refills. This information was provided to care managers to address during their next patient contact. Care managers received focused training on techniques for medication behavior change, readiness to change, motivational interviewing, and active listening. Training also addressed common barriers to adherence and available resources, including side effect management, mail order benefits, drug assistance programs, medication organizers, and reminder systems. Overdue refills were tracked for 12 months, with medication reinitiation followed for an additional 3 months. In the intervention group, 94 patients were identified with 123 instances of late medication refills. In the age- and gender-matched comparison group, 61 patients were identified with 76 late refills. The intervention group had a significantly higher rate of medication reinitiation (59.3%) than the control group (42.1%; P < 0.05). Time to reinitiation was significantly shorter in the intervention group, 59.5 (+/- 69.0) days vs. 107.4 (+/- 109) days for the control group (P < 0.05). This initiative demonstrated that a targeted disease management intervention promoting patient behavior change increased the number of patients who reinitiated therapy after a

  10. Impact of mHealth Chronic Disease Management on Treatment Adherence and Patient Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hamine, Saee; Faulx, Dunia; Green, Beverly B; Ginsburg, Amy Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to chronic disease management is critical to achieving improved health outcomes, quality of life, and cost-effective health care. As the burden of chronic diseases continues to grow globally, so does the impact of non-adherence. Mobile technologies are increasingly being used in health care and public health practice (mHealth) for patient communication, monitoring, and education, and to facilitate adherence to chronic diseases management. Objective We conducted a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the effectiveness of mHealth in supporting the adherence of patients to chronic diseases management (“mAdherence”), and the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of mAdherence tools and platforms in chronic disease management among patients and health care providers. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, and EBSCO databases for studies that assessed the role of mAdherence in chronic disease management of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and chronic lung diseases from 1980 through May 2014. Outcomes of interest included effect of mHealth on patient adherence to chronic diseases management, disease-specific clinical outcomes after intervention, and the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of mAdherence tools and platforms in chronic disease management among target end-users. Results In all, 107 articles met all inclusion criteria. Short message service was the most commonly used mAdherence tool in 40.2% (43/107) of studies. Usability, feasibility, and acceptability or patient preferences for mAdherence interventions were assessed in 57.9% (62/107) of studies and found to be generally high. A total of 27 studies employed randomized controlled trial (RCT) methods to assess impact on adherence behaviors, and significant improvements were observed in 15 of those studies (56%). Of the 41 RCTs that measured effects on disease-specific clinical outcomes, significant improvements between groups were reported in 16 studies (39

  11. European hospital adherence to GOLD recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation admissions.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C Michael; Lopez-Campos, Jose Luis; Pozo-Rodriguez, Francisco; Hartl, Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Understanding how European care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) admissions vary against guideline standards provides an opportunity to target appropriate quality improvement interventions. In 2010-2011 an audit of care against the 2010 'Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease' (GOLD) standards was performed in 16 018 patients from 384 hospitals in 13 countries. Clinicians prospectively identified consecutive COPD admissions over a period of 8 weeks, recording clinical care measures on a web-based data tool. Data were analysed comparing adherence to 10 key management recommendations. Adherence varied between hospitals and across countries. The lack of available spirometry results and variable use of oxygen and non-invasive ventilation (NIV) are high impact areas identified for improvement. PMID:23729193

  12. Acute responses to exercise training and relationship with exercise adherence in moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Amanda K; Wardini, Rima; Chan-Thim, Emilie; Bacon, Simon L; Lavoie, Kim L; Pepin, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of our study were to (i) compare, in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, acute responses to continuous training at high intensity (CTHI), continuous training at ventilatory threshold (CTVT) and interval training (IT); (ii) examine associations between acute responses and 12-week adherence; and (iii) investigate whether the relationship between acute responses and adherence is mediated/moderated by affect/vigour. Thirty-five COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second = 60.2 ± 15.8% predicted), underwent baseline assessments, were randomly assigned to CTHI, CTVT or IT, were monitored throughout about before training, and underwent 12 weeks of exercise training during which adherence was tracked. Compared with CTHI, CTVT was associated with lower respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate and respiratory rate (RR), while IT induced higher [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]maximal voluntary ventilation, RR and lower pulse oxygen saturation. From pre- to post-exercise, positive affect increased (F = 9.74, p < 0.001) and negative affect decreased (F = 6.43, p = 0.005) across groups. CTVT reported greater end-exercise vigour compared to CTHI (p = 0.01) and IT (p = 0.02). IT exhibited lowest post-exercise vigour (p = 0.04 versus CTHI, p = 0.02 versus CTVT) and adherence rate (F = 6.69, p = 0.004). Mean [Formula: see text] (r = -0.466, p = 0.007) and end-exercise vigour (r = 0.420, p = 0.017) were most strongly correlated with adherence. End-exercise vigour moderated the relationship between [Formula: see text] and adherence (β = 2.74, t(32) = 2.32, p = 0.03). In summary, CTHI, CTVT and IT improved affective valence from rest to post-exercise and induced a significant 12-week exercise training effect. However, they elicited different acute physiological responses, which in turn were associated with differences in 12-week adherence to the target training intensity. This association was moderated by acute end-exercise vigour.

  13. Dietitians’ Perspectives on Interventions to Enhance Adherence to Dietary Advice for Chronic Diseases in Adults

    PubMed Central

    DESROCHES, SOPHIE; LAPOINTE, ANNIE; DESCHÊNES, SARAH-MAUDE; BISSONNETTE-MAHEUX, VÉRONIQUE; GRAVEL, KARINE; THIRSK, JAYNE; LÉGARÉ, FRANCE

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess dietitians’ perspectives on the importance and applicability of interventions to enhance adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults in the Canadian context. Methods Based on a Cochrane systematic review, we identified 8 promising interventions for enhancing adherence to dietary advice: behavioural contracts, exchange lists, feedback based on self-monitoring, individualized menu suggestions, multiple interventions, portion size awareness, telephone follow-up, and videos. Thirty-two dietitians then completed a 3-round Delphi study by responding to an electronic questionnaire asking them to rate the importance and applicability in their practice of the 8 interventions on a 7-point Likert scale. Results Using a ≥75% level of agreement, 4 interventions showed strong consensus: multiple interventions, feedback based on self-monitoring, portion size awareness, and videos. Among these, the most significant were (means ± SD for importance and applicability, respectively) feedback based on self-monitoring (6.97 ± 0.18 and 6.72 ± 0.46), portion size awareness (6.69 ± 0.54 and 6.75 ± 0.51), and multiple interventions (6.94 ± 0.25 and 6.81 ± 0.40). Conclusions These findings can guide the development of educational training sessions for dietitians to help them provide practice-relevant interventions that will increase the likelihood that patients adhere to their advice regarding prevention and management of chronic diseases. PMID:26280789

  14. Adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) and risk of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Hekmatdoost, Azita; Shamsipour, Ali; Meibodi, Mohammad; Gheibizadeh, Newsha; Eslamparast, Tannaz; Poustchi, Hossein

    2016-12-01

    This case-control study was conducted to examine the association between adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and risk of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) development in 102 patients with newly diagnosed NAFLD and 204 controls. Adherence to DASH-style diet was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire, and a DASH diet score based on food and nutrients emphasized or minimized in the DASH diet. Participants in the top quartile of DASH diet score were 30% less likely to have NAFLD (OR: 0.0.70; 95% CI: 0.61, 0.80); however, more adjustment for dyslipidemia and body mass index changed the association to non-significant (OR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.73, 1.12). In conclusion, we found an inverse relationship between the DASH-style diet and risk of NAFLD. Prospective studies are needed to confirm this association.

  15. Suppression of fibroblast proliferation by oral spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Boehringer, H; Taichman, N S; Shenker, B J

    1984-01-01

    Soluble sonic extracts of several strains of Treponema denticola and Treponema vincentii were examined for their abilities to alter proliferation of both murine and human fibroblasts. We found that sonic extracts of all tested strains of T. denticola caused a dose-dependent inhibition of murine and human fibroblast proliferation when assessed by both DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation) and direct cell counts. T. vincentii had only a minimal inhibitory effect at comparable doses. No inhibition was observed when sonic extracts were added simultaneously with [3H]thymidine, indicating that suppression was not due to the presence of excessive amounts of cold thymidine in the extract, nonspecific effects on thymidine utilization by the cells (transport and incorporation), or degradation of label. RNA ([3H]uridine incorporation) and protein ([3H]leucine incorporation) synthesis were similarly altered after exposure to the T. denticola sonic extracts. There was no effect on cell viability as measured by trypan blue exclusion. Inhibition could be reversed by extensive washing of the cells within the first few hours of exposure to sonic extracts. Preliminary characterization and purification indicated that the inhibitory factor(s) is not endotoxin since it is heat labile, and elutes in a single, well-defined peak on a Sephadex G-150 chromatography column corresponding to a molecular weight of approximately 50,000. Since oral spirochetes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontal disorders, it is possible that they contribute to the disease process by inhibition of fibroblast growth and therefore may, at least in part, account for the loss of collagen seen in diseased tissue. PMID:6735466

  16. Bacterial Amyloid and DNA are Important Constituents of Senile Plaques: Further Evidence of the Spirochetal and Biofilm Nature of Senile Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Judith

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that spirochetes form clumps or micro colonies in vitro and in vivo. Cortical spirochetal colonies in syphilitic dementia were considered as reproductive centers for spirochetes. Historic and recent data demonstrate that senile plaques in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are made up by spirochetes. Spirochetes, are able to form biofilm in vitro. Senile plaques are also reported to contain elements of biofilm constituents. We expected that AβPP and Aβ (the main components of senile plaques) also occur in pure spirochetal biofilms, and bacterial DNA (an important component of biofilm) is also present in senile plaques. Histochemical, immunohistochemical, and in situ hybridization techniques and the TUNEL assay were used to answer these questions. The results obtained demonstrate that Aβ and DNA, including spirochete-specific DNA, are key components of both pure spirochetal biofilms and senile plaques in AD and confirm the biofilm nature of senile plaques. These results validate validate previous observations that AβPP and/or an AβPP-like amyloidogenic protein are an integral part of spirochetes, and indicate that bacterial and host derived Aβ are both constituents of senile plaques. DNA fragmentation in senile plaques further confirms their bacterial nature and provides biochemical evidence for spirochetal cell death. Spirochetes evade host defenses, locate intracellularly, form more resistant atypical forms and notably biofilms, which contribute to sustain chronic infection and inflammation and explain the slowly progressive course of dementia in AD. To consider co-infecting microorganisms is equally important, as multi-species biofilms result in a higher resistance to treatments and a more severe dementia. PMID:27314530

  17. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    SciTech Connect

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  18. Adherence to recommendations for fruit and vegetable intake, ethnicity and ischemic heart disease mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sangita; Vik, Shelly A.; Pakseresht, Mohammedreza; Kolonel, Laurence N

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Ischemic heart disease (IHD) accounts for one-third of annual deaths in the U.S. and mortality rates vary by ethnicity. The association between adherence to dietary guidelines for fruit and vegetable intake with IHD mortality among different ethnic groups has not previously been examined. Methods and results A prospective cohort design was used to examine the incidence of fatal IHD among participants in the Multiethnic Cohort Study. Participants included 164,617 men and women from five ethnic groups: African American, Native Hawaiian, Japanese American, Latino, and Caucasian. Cox proportional hazards models, stratified by ethnicity and sex, were used to examine associations between adherence with recommended dietary guidelines for fruit and vegetable intake and risk for fatal IHD. The results did not provide evidence that the association between adherence with dietary recommendations for fruit or vegetable intake and IHD mortality varies by ethnicity. Pooled data did provide evidence that adhering to the recommendations for vegetables lowered risk among men (RR Z 0.84, 95% CI: 0.74e0.96) and women (RR Z 0.80, 95% CI: 0.69e0.94). No significant effects were observed for fruit intake. Conclusions The effect of dietary intake of fruit and vegetables did not vary by ethnicity, providing evidence that recommendations do not need to be individualized for these special populations. The protective effect observed for vegetable intake among both sexes confirms previous findings and supports the evidence base for promoting diet modification in this direction. PMID:23725771

  19. GAPDH gene diversity in spirochetes: a paradigm for genetic promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Figge, R M; Cerff, R

    2001-12-01

    In this study we have determined gap sequences from nine different spirochetes. Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences in the context of all other available eubacterial and a selection of eukaryotic Gap sequences demonstrated that the eubacterial glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene diversity encompasses at least five highly distinct gene families. Within these gene families, spirochetes show an extreme degree of sequence divergence that is probably the result of several lateral gene transfer events between spirochetes and other eubacterial phyla, and early gene duplications in the eubacterial ancestor. A Gap1 sequence from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum has recently been shown to be closely related to GapC sequences from Euglenozoa. Here we demonstrate that several other spirochetal species are part of this cluster, supporting the conclusion that an interkingdom gene transfer from spirochetes to Euglenozoa must have occurred. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the GAPDH genes present in the protists Parabasalia may also be of spirochetal descent.

  20. The Effectiveness of Mobile Phone Text Messaging in Improving Medication Adherence for Patients with Chronic Diseases: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ershad Sarabi, Roghayeh; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Jamshidi Orak, Roohangiz; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz

    2016-01-01

    Context Medication non-adherence is a commonly observed problem in the self-administration of treatment, regardless of the disease type. Text messaging reminders, as electronic reminders, provide an opportunity to improve medication adherence. In this study, we aimed to provide evidence addressing the question of whether text message reminders were effective in improving patients’ adherence to medication. Evidence Acquisition We carried out a systematic literature search, using the five electronic bibliographic databases: PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane central register of controlled trials. Studies were included on the basis of whether they examined the benefits and effects of short-message service (SMS) interventions on medication adherence. Results The results of this systematic review indicated that text messaging interventions have improved patients’ medication adherence rate (85%, 29.34). Included in the review, those who had problems with adherence, or those whom text messaging was most helpful had HIV, asthma, diabetes, schizophrenia and heart disease (73.5%). The period of intervention varied from 1 week to 14 months. The most common study design was randomized controlled trials (RCTs) (66%) carried out in the developed countries. Conclusions This study demonstrated the potential of mobile phone text messaging for medication non-adherence problem solving. PMID:27437126

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Crohn's Disease-Associated Adherent-Invasive E. coli Strain LF82

    PubMed Central

    de Vallée, Amélie; Dossat, Carole; Vacherie, Benoit; Zineb, El Hajji; Segurens, Beatrice; Barbe, Valerie; Sauvanet, Pierre; Neut, Christel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Medigue, Claudine; Mojica, Francisco J. M.; Peyret, Pierre; Bonnet, Richard; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2010-01-01

    Background Ileal lesions of Crohn's disease (CD) patients are abnormally colonized by pathogenic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) able to invade and to replicate within intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Principal Findings We report here the complete genome sequence of E. coli LF82, the reference strain of adherent-invasive E. coli associated with ileal Crohn's disease. The LF82 genome of 4,881,487 bp total size contains a circular chromosome with a size of 4,773,108 bp and a plasmid of 108,379 bp. The analysis of predicted coding sequences (CDSs) within the LF82 flexible genome indicated that this genome is close to the avian pathogenic strain APEC_01, meningitis-associated strain S88 and urinary-isolated strain UTI89 with regards to flexible genome and single nucleotide polymorphisms in various virulence factors. Interestingly, we observed that strains LF82 and UTI89 adhered at a similar level to Intestine-407 cells and that like LF82, APEC_01 and UTI89 were highly invasive. However, A1EC strain LF82 had an intermediate killer phenotype compared to APEC-01 and UTI89 and the LF82 genome does not harbour most of specific virulence genes from ExPEC. LF82 genome has evolved from those of ExPEC B2 strains by the acquisition of Salmonella and Yersinia isolated or clustered genes or CDSs located on pLF82 plasmid and at various loci on the chromosome. Conclusion LF82 genome analysis indicated that a number of genes, gene clusters and pathoadaptative mutations which have been acquired may play a role in virulence of AIEC strain LF82. PMID:20862302

  2. Quality of life of coronary artery disease patients after the implementation of planning strategies for medication adherence 1

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Laura Bacelar de Araujo; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus; São-João, Thaís Moreira; Gallani, Maria Cecilia; Cornélio, Marilia Estevam

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to compare the general and specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) between the Intervention (IG) and Control (CG) groups of coronary artery disease patients after the implementation of Action Planning and Coping Planning strategies for medication adherence and to verify the relationship between adherence and HRQoL. METHOD: this was a controlled and randomized study. RESULTS: the sample (n=115) was randomized into two groups, IG (n=59) and CG (n=56). Measures of medication adherence and general and specific HRQoL were obtained in the baseline and after two months of monitoring. CONCLUSION: the findings showed that the combination of intervention strategies - Action Planning and Coping Planning for medication adherence did not affect the HRQoL of coronary artery disease patients in outpatient monitoring. PMID:25806626

  3. Exposure of black-legged kittiwakes to Lyme disease spirochetes: dynamics of the immune status of adult hosts and effects on their survival.

    PubMed

    Chambert, Thierry; Staszewski, Vincent; Lobato, Elisa; Choquet, Rémi; Carrie, Cécile; McCoy, Karen D; Tveraa, Torkild; Boulinier, Thierry

    2012-09-01

    1. Despite a growing interest in wildlife disease ecology, there is a surprising lack of knowledge about the exposure dynamics of individual animals to naturally circulating infectious agents and the impact of such agents on host life-history traits. 2. The exploration of these questions requires detailed longitudinal data on individual animals that can be captured multiple times during their life but also requires being able to account for several sources of uncertainty, notably the partial observation or recapture of individuals at each sampling occasion. 3. We use a multi-year dataset to (i) assess the potential effect of exposure to the tick-borne agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Bbsl), on adult apparent survival for one of its natural long-lived hosts, the Black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla), and (ii) investigate the temporal dynamics of individual immunological status in kittiwakes to infer the rate of new exposure and the persistence of the immune response. Using a multi-event modelling approach, potential uncertainties arising from partial observations were explicitly taken into account. 4. The potential impact of Bbsl on kittiwake survival was also evaluated via an experimental approach: the apparent survival of a group of breeding birds treated with an antibiotic was compared with that of a control group. 5. No impact of exposure to Bbsl was detected on adult survival in kittiwakes, in either observational or experimental data. 6. An annual seroconversion rate (from negative to positive) of 1·5% was estimated, but once an individual became seropositive, it remained so with a probability of 1, suggesting that detectable levels of anti-Bbsl antibodies persist for multiple years. 7. These results, in combination with knowledge on patterns of exposure to the tick vector of Bbsl, provide important information for understanding the spatio-temporal nature of the interaction between this host and several of its parasites. Furthermore

  4. Health system barriers and facilitators to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Amitava; Khandelwal, Shweta; Nambiar, Lavanya; Saxena, Malvika; Peck, Victoria; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Faria Neto, Jose Rocha; Quinto, Katherine Curi; Smyth, Andrew; Leong, Darryl; Werba, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Secondary prevention is cost-effective for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but uptake is suboptimal. Understanding barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary prevention for CVD at multiple health system levels may inform policy. Objectives To conduct a systematic review of barriers and facilitators to adherence/persistence to secondary CVD prevention medications at health system level. Methods Included studies reported effects of health system level factors on adherence/persistence to secondary prevention medications for CVD (coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease). Studies considered at least one of β blockers, statins, angiotensin–renin system blockers and aspirin. Relevant databases were searched from 1 January 1966 until 1 October 2015. Full texts were screened for inclusion by 2 independent reviewers. Results Of 2246 screened articles, 25 studies were included (12 trials, 11 cohort studies, 1 cross-sectional study and 1 case–control study) with 132 140 individuals overall (smallest n=30, largest n=63 301). 3 studies included upper middle-income countries, 1 included a low middle-income country and 21 (84%) included high-income countries (9 in the USA). Studies concerned established CVD (n=4), cerebrovascular disease (n=7) and coronary heart disease (n=14). Three studies considered persistence and adherence. Quantity and quality of evidence was limited for adherence, persistence and across drug classes. Studies were concerned with governance and delivery (n=19, including 4 trials of fixed-dose combination therapy, FDC), intellectual resources (n=1), human resources (n=1) and health system financing (n=4). Full prescription coverage, reduced copayments, FDC and counselling were facilitators associated with higher adherence. Conclusions High-quality evidence on health system barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary prevention medications for CVD is lacking, especially for low-income settings. Full prescription coverage

  5. Lack of Adherence to Evidence-based Treatment Guidelines for Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prevots, D. Rebecca; Gallagher, Jack; Heap, Kylee; Gupta, Renu; Griffith, David

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: The 2007 American Thoracic Society (ATS) and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) recommend that patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (PNTM) disease caused by Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) or M. abscessus be treated with a macrolide-based multidrug antibiotic regimen until sputum culture negative for 1 year. After 6 years, the degree of adherence to recommended guidelines among physicians remains unknown. Objective: To describe antibiotic treatment practices among physicians treating patients with PNTM in the United States. Methods: A nationally representative sample of 1,286 U.S. physicians was contacted in December 2011 through January 2012; 582 of the responding physicians were treating patients with PNTM and were eligible to participate. Physicians were asked to extract medical record data on the last four patients they treated in the past year with PNTM disease from either MAC or M. abscessus. Treatment patterns were assessed for all patients by NTM species and physician specialty, and compared with the 2007 recommended ATS/IDSA guidelines. Main Results: Questionnaires were completed by 349 physicians on 915 patients with PNTM, including 744 (81%) with MAC and 174 (19%) with M. abscessus; 3 patients were positive for both. Physicians treated 76 (44%) patients with M. abscessus and 411 (55%) patients with MAC. Only 13% of antibiotic regimens prescribed to patients with MAC met ATS/IDSA guidelines, 56% did not include a macrolide, and 16% were for macrolide monotherapy. Among patients with M. abscessus, 64% of regimens prescribed did not include a macrolide. Conclusions: Adherence to the 2007 ATS/IDSA guidelines for treating PNTM disease is poor. Across all physician specialties evaluated, suboptimal or potentially harmful antibiotic regimens were commonly prescribed. PMID:24236749

  6. Adherence to Mediterranean diet and its relation with cardiovascular diseases in Turkish population

    PubMed Central

    Hoşcan, Yeşim; Yiğit, Fatma; Müderrisoğlu, Haldun

    2015-01-01

    Mediterranean diet (MD) is considered a model for healthy eating. However, prospective evidence in Turkey evaluating the relationship between MD and cardiovascular events is scarce. We surveyed the adherence of Alanya population to MD and its association with coronary heart diseases (CHD). The study population consisted of participants in Alanya, a region placed southern Turkey. Followed-up 900 participants (52 percent women) initially free of CHD during 5.1 years. The general dietary habits of study population were detected with a food frequency questionnaire. Data obtained from that questionnaire were tested with Mediterranean diet score in order to find out the relevance to Mediterranean diet. A MD score (scale 0-8) was computed reflecting high ratio of monounsaturated to saturated fat; high intake of legumes, cereals, vegetables, and fruits; low intakes of meat and it’s products, milk and dairy products. Scoring < 5 was defined as Low-MD consuming, while 5+ as High-MD consuming. We observed 25 incident cases of CHD. Consumption of High-MD was 21% in men and 19% in women. The risk for myocardial infarction, coronary bypass, coronary angioplasty, and any cardiovascular disease in men increased by 1.3 (P = 0.02), 1.4 (P = 0.03), 1.5 (P = 0.01), and 1.3 (P = 0.02), respectively, for each MD score decrease. In women, the risk for myocardial infarction and angioplasty increased by 1.3 (P = 0.02) and 1.5 (P = 0.01), respectively, for each MD score decrease. The risk for coronary bypass, and any cardiovascular disease in women, crude odds ratios ranged from 1.1 to 1.3 but were not statistically significant. The current rate of MD in Alanya is fairly low. There is an inverse association between adherence to MD and the incidence of fatal and non-fatal CHD in initially healthy adults. PMID:25932246

  7. Adherence of Myxobolus cerebralis myxospores to waders: Implications for disease dissemination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gates, K.K.; Guy, C.S.; Zale, A.V.; Horton, T.B.

    2008-01-01

    The vectors involved in the spread of whirling disease, which is caused by Myxobolus cerebralis, are only partly understood. However, the parasite has rapidly become established in many regions, suggesting that it is easily disseminated. We gained insight into transport vectors by examining the surface porosity of common wading equipment materials and the adherence of M. cerebralis myxospores to them. Interstitial spaces within rubber, felt, lightweight nylon, and neoprene were measured on scanning electron microscope images. Myxospores were applied to each material, the material was rinsed, and the myxospores recovered to assess adherence. The mean interstitial space size of rubber was the smallest (2.0 ??m), whereas that of felt was the largest (31.3 ??m). The highest recovery rates were from rubber and the glass control. Percent myxospore recovery varied by material, the recovery from felt being lower than that from all other materials. The potential for felt to carry even small numbers of myxospores suggests that the introduction of M. cerebralis by felt-soled wading boots is possible. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  8. Understanding Host-Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli Interaction in Crohn's Disease: Opening Up New Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Massier, Sébastien; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Billard, Elisabeth; Barnich, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    A trillion of microorganisms colonize the mammalian intestine. Most of them have coevolved with the host in a symbiotic relationship and some of them have developed strategies to promote their replication in the presence of competing microbiota. Recent evidence suggests that perturbation of the microbial community favors the emergence of opportunistic pathogens, in particular adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) that can increase incidence and severity of gut inflammation in the context of Crohn's disease (CD). This review will report the importance of AIEC as triggers of intestinal inflammation, focusing on their impact on epithelial barrier function and stimulation of mucosal inflammation. Beyond manipulation of immune response, restoration of gut microbiota as a new treatment option for CD patients will be discussed. PMID:25580435

  9. Adherence to anti-Parkinson drug therapy in the "REASON" sample of Italian patients with Parkinson's disease: the linguistic validation of the Italian version of the "Morisky Medical Adherence Scale-8 items".

    PubMed

    Fabbrini, G; Abbruzzese, G; Barone, P; Antonini, A; Tinazzi, M; Castegnaro, G; Rizzoli, S; Morisky, D E; Lessi, P; Ceravolo, R

    2013-11-01

    Information about patients' adherence to therapy represents a primary issue in Parkinson's disease (PD) management. To perform the linguistic validation of the Italian version of the self-rated 8-Item Morisky Medical Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) and to describe in a sample of Italian patients affected by PD the adherence to anti-Parkinson drug therapy and the association between adherence and some socio-demographic and clinical features. MMAS-8 was translated into Italian language by two independent Italian mother-tongue translators. The consensus version was then back-translated by an English mother-tongue translator. This translation process was followed by a consensus meeting between the authors of translation and investigators and then by two comprehension tests. The translated version of the MMAS-8 scale was then administered at the baseline visit of the "REASON" study (Italian Study on the Therapy Management in Parkinson's disease: Motor, Non-Motor, Adherence and Quality Of Life Factors) in a large sample of PD patients. The final version of the MMAS-8 was easily understood. Mean ± SD MMAS-8 score was 6.1 ± 1.2. There were no differences in adherence to therapy in relationship to disease severity, gender, educational level or decision to change therapy. The Italian version of MMAS-8, the key tool of the REASON study to assess the adherence to therapy, has shown to be understandable to patients with PD. Patients enrolled in the REASON study showed medium therapy adherence. PMID:23728715

  10. Evaluation of a Group-Based Behavioral Intervention to Promote Adherence in Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Kevin A.; Hente, Elizabeth A.; Odell, Shannon; Herzer, Michele; Ingerski, Lisa M.; Guilfoyle, Shanna M.; Denson, Lee A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To pilot test the feasibility and acceptability of a family-based group behavioral intervention to improve medication adherence in adolescents diagnosed with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Methods Participants were 40 adolescents age 11-18 years diagnosed with IBD and their primary caregivers, who were randomized to either a 4-session Family-Based Group Behavioral Treatment or Usual Care over a 6-week period. Adherence was measured using a mutli-method, multi-informant assessment involving caregiver- and patient-report, pill count data, and electronic monitoring. Results Adherence rates ranged from 66-89% for 6-MP/azathioprine and 51-93% for mesalamine across assessment methods. The intervention was feasible, as evidenced by the 99% treatment session attendance rate, and acceptable based on patient and caregiver report. Repeated measures ANOVA tests revealed nonsignificant differences between the conditions from baseline to post-treatment assessments for pill count, electronic monitor, and primary caregiver-reported adherence (p's> .05). There was a statistically significant improvement in patient-reported mesalamine adherence represented by a significant main effect for Condition (F = 22.24, p< .01; δ = .79) and Condition X Time interaction (F = 13.32, p< .05; δ = .69). Conclusions Findings suggest potential for use of behavioral intervention to improve medication adherence in this population. This intervention may be more effective with more complex regimens (e.g., multiple doses per day) such as those prescribed with mesalamine. Further research is needed to examine this type of intervention in more diverse samples with more active disease. Use of alternative adherence measurement approaches, including electronic pill boxes and/or real-time self-report (e.g., via text messaging, electronic diaries, etc.) is also recommended. PMID:21989119

  11. Efficacy of a multifactorial intervention on therapeutic adherence in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic adherence of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is poor. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a multifactorial intervention on improving the therapeutic adherence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with scheduled inhalation therapy. Methods The study design consisted of a randomised controlled trial in a primary care setting. 146 patients diagnosed with COPD were randomly allocated into two groups using the block randomisation technique. One-year follow-ups with three visits were performed. The intervention consisted of motivational aspects related to adherence (beliefs and behaviour) in the form of group and individual interviews, cognitive aspects in the form of information about the illness and skills in the form of training in inhalation techniques. Cognitive-emotional aspects and training in inhalation techniques were reinforced during all visits of the intervention group. The main outcome measure was adherence to the medication regimen. Therapeutic adherence was determined by the percentage of patients classified as good adherent as evaluated by dose or pill count. Results Of the 146 participants (mean age 69.8 years, 91.8% males), 41.1% reported adherence (41.9% of the control group and 40.3% of the intervention group). When multifactorial intervention was applied, the reported adherence was 32.4% for the control group and 48.6% for the intervention group, which showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.046). Number needed to treat is 6.37. In the intervention group, cognitive aspects increased by 23.7% and skilled performance of inhalation techniques increased by 66.4%. The factors related to adherence when multifactorial intervention was applied were the number of exacerbations (OR = 0.66), visits to health centre (OR = 0.93) and devices (OR = 2.4); illness severity (OR = 0.67), beta-2-adrenergic (OR = 0.16) and xantine (OR = 0.19) treatment

  12. Reviewing molecular adaptations of Lyme borreliosis spirochetes in the context of reproductive fitness in natural transmission cycles.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Jean I

    2009-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is caused by a group of pathogenic spirochetes - most often Borrelia burgdorferi, B. afzelii, and B. garinii - that are vectored by hard ticks in the Ixodes ricinus-persulcatus complex, which feed on a variety of mammals, birds, and lizards. Although LB is one of the best-studied vector-borne zoonoses, the annual incidence in North America and Europe leads other vector-borne diseases and continues to increase. What factors make the LB system so successful, and how can researchers hope to reduce disease risk - either through vaccinating humans or reducing the risk of contacting infected ticks in nature? Discoveries of molecular interactions involved in the transmission of LB spirochetes have accelerated recently, revealing complex interactions among the spirochete-tick-vertebrate triad. These interactions involve multiple, and often redundant, pathways that reflect the evolution of general and specific mechanisms by which the spirochetes survive and reproduce. Previous reviews have focused on the molecular interactions or population biology of the system. Here molecular interactions among the LB spirochete, its vector, and vertebrate hosts are reviewed in the context of natural maintenance cycles, which represent the ecological and evolutionary contexts that shape these interactions. This holistic system approach may help researchers develop additional testable hypotheses about transmission processes, interpret laboratory results, and guide development of future LB control measures and management. PMID:19368764

  13. Reviewing molecular adaptations of Lyme borreliosis spirochetes in the context of reproductive fitness in natural transmission cycles

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jean I.

    2009-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is caused by a group of pathogenic spirochetes – most often Borrelia burgdorferi, B. afzelii, and B. garinii – that are vectored by hard ticks in the Ixodes ricinus-persulcatus complex, which feed on a variety of mammals, birds, and lizards. Although LB is one of the best-studied vector-borne zoonoses, the annual incidence in North America and Europe leads other vector-borne diseases and continues to increase. What factors make the LB system so successful, and how can researchers hope to reduce disease risk – either through vaccinating humans or reducing the risk of contacting infected ticks in nature? Discoveries of molecular interactions involved in the transmission of LB spirochetes have accelerated recently, revealing complex interactions among the spirochete-tick-vertebrate triad. These interactions involve multiple, and often redundant, pathways that reflect the evolution of general and specific mechanisms by which the spirochetes survive and reproduce. Previous reviews have focused on the molecular interactions or population biology of the system. Here molecular interactions among the LB spirochete, its vector, and vertebrate hosts are reviewed in the context of natural maintenance cycles, which represent the ecological and evolutionary contexts that shape these interactions. This holistic system approach may help researchers develop additional testable hypotheses about transmission processes, interpret laboratory results, and guide development of future LB control measures and management. PMID:19368764

  14. Diet and Exercise Adherence and Practices among Medically Underserved Patients with Chronic Disease: Variation across Four Ethnic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orzech, Kathryn M.; Vivian, James; Huebner Torres, Cristina; Armin, Julie; Shaw, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors interact to create barriers to dietary and exercise plan adherence among medically underserved patients with chronic disease, but aspects related to culture and ethnicity are underexamined in the literature. Using both qualitative ("n" = 71) and quantitative ("n" = 297) data collected in a 4-year, multimethod study among patients with…

  15. Periplasmal Physics: The Rotational Dynamics of Spirochetal Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Greg

    2012-02-01

    Spirochetes are distinguished by the location of their flagella, which reside within the periplasm: the tiny space between the bacterial cell wall and the outer membrane. In Borrelia burgdorferi/ (the causative agent of Lyme Disease), rotation of the flagella leads to cellular undulations that drive swimming. Exactly how these shape changes arise due to the forces and torques acting between the flagella and the cell body is unknown. By applying low-Reynolds number hydrodynamic theory to the motion of an elastic flagellum rotating in the periplasm, we show that the flagella are most likely separated from the bacterial cell wall by a lubricating layer of fluid. We obtain analytical solutions for the force and torque on the rotating flagellum through lubrication analysis, as well as through scaling analysis, and find results are in close agreement numerical simulations. (Joint work with J. Yang and C.W. Wolgemuth.)

  16. Adherence to recommendations by infectious disease consultants and its influence on outcomes of intravenous antibiotic-treated hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Consultation to infectious diseases specialists (ID), although not always performed by treating physicians, is part of hospital’s daily practice. This study analyses adherence by treating physicians to written ID recommendations (inserted in clinical records) and its effect on outcome in hospitalized antibiotic-treated patients in a tertiary hospital in Spain. Methods A prospective, randomized, one-year study was performed. Patients receiving intravenous antimicrobial therapy prescribed by treating physicians for 3 days were identified and randomised to intervention (insertion of written ID recommendations in clinical records) or non-intervention. Appropriateness of empirical treatments (by treating physicians) was classified as adequate, inadequate or unnecessary. In the intervention group, adherence to recommendations was classified as complete, partial or non-adherence. Results A total of 1173 patients were included, 602 in the non-intervention and 571 in the intervention group [199 (34.9%) showing complete adherence, 141 (24.7%) partial adherence and 231 (40.5%) non-adherence to recommendations]. In the multivariate analysis for adherence (R2 Cox=0.065, p=0.009), non-adherence was associated with prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis (p=0.004; OR=0.37, 95%CI=0.19-0.72). In the multivariate analysis for clinical failure (R2 Cox=0.126, p<0.001), Charlson index (p<0.001; OR=1.19, 95%CI=1.10-1.28), malnutrition (p=0.006; OR=2.00, 95%CI=1.22-3.26), nosocomial infection (p<0.001; OR=4.12, 95%CI=2.27-7.48) and length of hospitalization (p<0.001; OR=1.01, 95%CI=1.01-1.02) were positively associated with failure, while complete adherence (p=0.001; OR=0.35, 95%CI=0.19-0.64) and adequate initial treatment (p=0.010; OR=0.39, 95%CI=0.19-0.80) were negatively associated. Conclusions Adherence to ID recommendations by treating physicians was associated with favorable outcome, in turn associated with shortened length of hospitalization. This may have important health

  17. Lanthanum carbonate oral powder: satisfaction, preference and adherence in French and Spanish patients with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Michael; de Sequera, Patricia; Clair, François; Pedersini, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Phosphate binders, such as lanthanum carbonate, control elevated serum-phosphate levels in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Lanthanum carbonate is available in oral powder and tablet form. The aim of this survey was to investigate satisfaction with, preference for, and adherence to lanthanum carbonate oral powder in patients with ESRD. Scope Patients from France and Spain who had been taking lanthanum carbonate powder for at least 4 weeks, and who had experience of other phosphate binders of any formulation, were asked to complete an online or telephone survey. Treatment satisfaction was measured using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication-9; preference was measured using 5-point Likert scale agreement ratings; and adherence was measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4. Data were evaluated using bivariate analyses. Findings Overall, 160 patients participated (80 per country). Lanthanum carbonate powder was reported to have a higher effectiveness rating (p<0.05), be more convenient (p<0.05), and provide a higher level of satisfaction (p<0.01) than previous binders. There was an overall preference for lanthanum carbonate powder over previous binders of any formulation (p<0.001). Adherence to medication was similar for all binders analysed: 66.3% of French patients adhered to lanthanum carbonate powder, and 65.0% adhered to previous binder treatment (p=not significant); 52.5% of Spanish patients adhered to lanthanum carbonate powder, and 56.3% adhered to previous binder treatment (p=not significant). Limitations The survey enrolled patients who had already experienced phosphate binders before the study began. Information on patient preferences for and adherence to previous phosphate binders was therefore based on the patients’ memories of these experiences, which may have been subject to change over time. Although most participants completed the online survey in this study, a telephone survey was used for

  18. Mobilifilum chasei: morphology and ecology of a spirochete from an intertidal stratified microbial mat community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.; Stolz, J.; Craft, F.; Esteve, I.; Guerrero, R.

    1990-01-01

    Spirochetes were found in the lower anoxiphototrophic layer of a stratified microbial mat (North Pond, Laguna Figueroa, Baja California, Mexico). Ultra-structural analysis of thin sections of field samples revealed spirochetes approximately 0.25 micrometer in diameter with 10 or more periplasmic flagella, leading to the interpretation that these spirochetes bear 10 flagellar insertions on each end. Morphometric study showed these free-living spirochetes greatly resemble certain symbiotic ones, i.e., Borrelia and certain termite spirochetes, the transverse sections of which are presented here. The ultrastructure of this spirochete also resembles Hollandina and Diplocalyx (spirochetes symbiotic in arthropods) more than it does Spirochaeta, the well known genus of mud-dwelling spirochetes. The new spirochete was detected in mat material collected both in 1985 and in 1987. Unique morphology (i.e., conspicuous outer coat of inner membrane, large number of periplasmic flagella) and ecology prompt us to name a new free-living spirochete.

  19. Effect of an Educational Program on Adherence to Therapeutic Regimen among Chronic Kidney Disease Stage5 (CKD5) Patients under Maintenance Hemodialysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deif, Hala I. Abo; Elsawi, Khiria; Selim, Mohga; NasrAllah, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease on health care services worldwide is growing and the increased development of educational interventions which help patients to better manage their conditions is evident internationally. It has been recognized that poor adherence can be a serious risk to the health and wellbeing of patients. Adherence to fluid…

  20. Strategies to promote adherence to nutritional advice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a narrative review and commentary

    PubMed Central

    Beto, Judith A; Schury, Katherine A; Bansal, Vinod K

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) requires extensive changes to food and lifestyle. Poor adherence to diet, medications, and treatments has been estimated to vary between 20% and 70%, which in turn can contribute to increased mortality and morbidity. Delivering effective nutritional advice in patients with CKD coordinates multiple diet components including calories, protein, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and fluid. Dietary intake studies have shown difficulty in adhering to the scope and complexity of the CKD diet parameters. No single educational or clinical strategy has been shown to be consistently effective across CKD populations. Highest adherence has been observed when both diet and education efforts are individualized to each patient and adapted over time to changing lifestyle and CKD variables. This narrative review and commentary summarizes nutrition education literature and published strategies for providing nutritional advice in CKD. A cohort of practical and effective strategies for increasing dietary adherence to nutritional advice are provided that include communicating with “talking control” principles, integrating patient-owned technology, acknowledging the typical food pattern may be snacking rather than formal meals, focusing on a single goal rather than multiple goals, creating active learning and coping strategies (frozen sandwiches, visual hands-on activities, planting herb gardens), and involving the total patient food environment. PMID:26893578

  1. Adherence to a home-based exercise program and incidence of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Shinji, S; Shigeru, M; Ryusei, U; Mitsuru, M; Shigehiro, K

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between adherence to a home-based exercise program and the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated 102 patients with type 2 diabetes aged 35 to 75 years, and followed them prospectively for 17.2 months. Before enrollment, all patients received a traditional exercise prescription. The exercise program consisted of a daily walking exercise at home for 20 - 30 minutes. Self-reported adherence to the exercise program and the incidence of CVD were confirmed by information obtained from telephone interviews. There were 38 dropouts among the patients in the exercise program. Dropouts were significantly younger than completers. The rate of obesity was significantly higher among the dropouts than among the completers. No differences were observed between the two groups for gender, history of CVD and other clinical characteristics. During the follow-up, we documented 8 new cases of CVD. The incidence of CVD during the follow-up was 1.56 percent among the program completers and 18.4 percent among the dropouts. Adherence to the home-based exercise was inversely related to the incidence of CVD (p < 0.01). These associations persisted after adjustment for age and other covariates. In conclusion, adherence to an exercise program is associated with a reduced incidence of CVD among patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:17436204

  2. Health and Nutrition Literacy and Adherence to Treatment in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Chronic Kidney Disease and Hypertension, North Carolina, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Maria; Rak, Eniko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to treatment and dietary restrictions is important for health outcomes of patients with chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension. The relationship of adherence with nutritional and health literacy in children, adolescents, and young adults is not well understood. The current study examined the relationship of health literacy, nutrition knowledge, nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance, and medication adherence in a sample of children and young people with chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension. Methods We enrolled 74 patients (aged 7–29 y) with a diagnosis of chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension from the University of North Carolina Kidney Center. Participants completed instruments of nutrition literacy (Disease-Specific Nutrition Knowledge Test), health literacy (Newest Vital Sign), nutrition behavior (Nutrition Knowledge–Behavior Concordance Scale), and medication adherence (Morisky Medication Adherence Scale). Linear and binary logistic regressions were used to test the associations. Results In univariate comparisons, nutrition knowledge was significantly higher in people with adequate health literacy. Medication adherence was related to nutrition knowledge and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance. Multivariate regression models demonstrated that knowledge of disease-specific nutrition restrictions did not significantly predict nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance scores. In logistic regression, knowledge of nutrition restrictions did not significantly predict medication adherence. Lastly, health literacy and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance were significant predictors of medication adherence. Conclusion Nutrition knowledge and health literacy skills are positively associated. Nutrition knowledge, health literacy, and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance are positively related to medication adherence. Future research should focus on additional factors that may predict

  3. Forces and Torques on Rotating Spirochete Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Huber, Greg; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2011-12-01

    Spirochetes are a unique group of motile bacteria that are distinguished by their helical or flat-wave shapes and the location of their flagella, which reside within the tiny space between the bacterial cell wall and the outer membrane (the periplasm). In Borrelia burgdorferi, rotation of the flagella produces cellular undulations that drive swimming. How these shape changes arise due to the forces and torques that act between the flagella and the cell body is unknown. It is possible that resistive forces come from friction or from fluid drag, depending on whether or not the flagella are in contact with the cell wall. Here, we consider both of these cases. By analyzing the motion of an elastic flagellum rotating in the periplasmic space, we show that the flagella are most likely separated from the bacterial cell wall by a lubricating layer of fluid. This analysis then provides drag coefficients for rotation and sliding of a flagellum within the periplasm.

  4. Forces and Torques on Rotating Spirochete Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Huber, Greg; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Spirochetes are a unique group of motile bacteria that are distinguished by their helical or flat-wave shapes and the location of their flagella, which reside within the tiny space between the bacterial cell wall and the outer membrane (the periplasm). In Borrelia burgdorferi, rotation of the flagella produces cellular undulations that drive swimming. How these shape changes arise due to the forces and torques that act between the flagella and the cell body is unknown. It is possible that resistive forces come from friction or from fluid drag, depending on whether or not the flagella are in contact with the cell wall. Here, we consider both of these cases. By analyzing the motion of an elastic flagellum rotating in the periplasmic space, we show that the flagella are most likely separated from the bacterial cell wall by a lubricating layer of fluid. This analysis then provides drag coefficients for rotation and sliding of a flagellum within the periplasm. PMID:22243185

  5. Escherichia coli isolated from a Crohn's disease patient adheres, invades, and induces inflammatory responses in polarized intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Allen, Christopher A; Taormina, Joanna; Swidsinski, Alexander; Tutt, Christopher B; Jezek, G Eric; Islas-Islas, Martha; Torres, Alfredo G

    2008-07-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the intestinal tract are a major health concern both in the United States and around the world. Evidence now suggests that a new category of Escherichia coli, designated Adherent Invasive E. coli (AIEC) is highly prevalent in Crohn's Disease (CD) patients. AIEC strains have been shown to colonize and adhere to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). However, the role AIEC strains play in the induction of an inflammatory response is not known. Therefore, we examined several E. coli strains (designated LF82, O83:H1, 6604 and 6655) that were isolated from CD patients for their ability to induce inflammation in two IEC, Caco-2BBe and T-84 cells. Results showed that each strain had varying abilities to adhere to and invade IEC as well as induced cytokine secretion from polarized IEC. However, E. coli O83:H1 displayed the best characteristics of AIEC strains as compared to the prototype AIEC strain LF82, inducing cytokine secretion from IEC and promoting immune cell migration through IEC. Upon further analysis, E. coli O83:H1 did not harbor virulence genes present in known pathogenic intestinal organisms. Further characterization of E. coli O83:H1 virulence determinants showed that a non-flagellated O83:H1 strain significantly decreased the organism's ability to adhere to and invade both IEC and elicit IEC cytokine secretion compared to the wild type and complemented strains. These findings demonstrate that E. coli O83:H1 possesses the characteristics of the AIEC LF82 strain that may contribute to the low-grade, chronic inflammation observed in Crohn's disease. PMID:17900983

  6. Targeting Medication Non-Adherence Behavior in Selected Autoimmune Diseases: A Systematic Approach to Digital Health Program Development

    PubMed Central

    van Mierlo, Trevor; Fournier, Rachel; Ingham, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background 29 autoimmune diseases, including Rheumatoid Arthritis, gout, Crohn’s Disease, and Systematic Lupus Erythematosus affect 7.6-9.4% of the population. While effective therapy is available, many patients do not follow treatment or use medications as directed. Digital health and Web 2.0 interventions have demonstrated much promise in increasing medication and treatment adherence, but to date many Internet tools have proven disappointing. In fact, most digital interventions continue to suffer from high attrition in patient populations, are burdensome for healthcare professionals, and have relatively short life spans. Objective Digital health tools have traditionally centered on the transformation of existing interventions (such as diaries, trackers, stage-based or cognitive behavioral therapy programs, coupons, or symptom checklists) to electronic format. Advanced digital interventions have also incorporated attributes of Web 2.0 such as social networking, text messaging, and the use of video. Despite these efforts, there has not been little measurable impact in non-adherence for illnesses that require medical interventions, and research must look to other strategies or development methodologies. As a first step in investigating the feasibility of developing such a tool, the objective of the current study is to systematically rate factors of non-adherence that have been reported in past research studies. Methods Grounded Theory, recognized as a rigorous method that facilitates the emergence of new themes through systematic analysis, data collection and coding, was used to analyze quantitative, qualitative and mixed method studies addressing the following autoimmune diseases: Rheumatoid Arthritis, gout, Crohn’s Disease, Systematic Lupus Erythematosus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Studies were only included if they contained primary data addressing the relationship with non-adherence. Results Out of the 27 studies, four non-modifiable and 11 modifiable

  7. What's in a name? Concordance is better than adherence for promoting partnership and self-management of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Randall, Sue; Neubeck, Lis

    2016-01-01

    The choice of language health professionals use to discuss self-management of chronic disease is important and influences patients' self-management. The words compliance, adherence and concordance are used to discuss patients' agreement with prescribed treatment plans, but have different tone and meanings. Models of care linked to the words compliance and adherence are underpinned by interactions between patients and healthcare providers that merely reinforce instructions about treatments. The 'patient-professional partnership' is introduced as a model by Bodenheimer et al. (2002, p. 2469) whereby true partnership working should be an opportunity to pool the expertise of both parties to arrive at mutually agreed goals in concordance. The impact these words might have on partnership working is important in defining the patient-health professional relationship, and for the patients' healthcare outcomes and the potential effect on healthcare utilisation. PMID:27150465

  8. Medication adherence and visit-to-visit variability of systolic blood pressure in African Americans with chronic kidney disease in the AASK trial.

    PubMed

    Hong, K; Muntner, P; Kronish, I; Shilane, D; Chang, T I

    2016-01-01

    Lower adherence to antihypertensive medications may increase visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure (VVV of BP), a risk factor for cardiovascular events and death. We used data from the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) trial to examine whether lower medication adherence is associated with higher systolic VVV of BP in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease (CKD). Determinants of VVV of BP were also explored. AASK participants (n=988) were categorized by self-report or pill count as having perfect (100%), moderately high (75-99%), moderately low (50-74%) or low (<50%) proportion of study visits with high medication adherence over a 1-year follow-up period. We used multinomial logistic regression to examine determinants of medication adherence, and multivariable-adjusted linear regression to examine the association between medication adherence and systolic VVV of BP, defined as the coefficient of variation or the average real variability (ARV). Participants with lower self-reported adherence were generally younger and had a higher prevalence of comorbid conditions. Compared with perfect adherence, moderately high, moderately low and low adherence was associated with 0.65% (±0.31%), 0.99% (±0.31%) and 1.29% (±0.32%) higher systolic VVV of BP (defined as the coefficient of variation) in fully adjusted models. Results were qualitatively similar when using ARV or when using pill counts as the measure of adherence. Lower medication adherence is associated with higher systolic VVV of BP in African Americans with hypertensive CKD; efforts to improve medication adherence in this population may reduce systolic VVV of BP.

  9. Development and cultural adaptation of the Spanish version of the End Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (SESRD-AQ).

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmee; Evangelista, Lorraine S

    2013-01-01

    We previously developed and validated the End-Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (ESRD-AQ) to measure adherence behaviors (e.g., hemodialysis attendance, medication use, fluid restrictions, and diet) of patients on maintenance hemodialysis. To determine whether the ESRD-AQ can be used to measure adherence behaviors in non-English-speaking patients, we translated and adapted the ESRD-AQ into Spanish (SESRD-AQ) using forward and backward translation and cultural adaptation of the content. Validity and reliability were measured using item-level content validity indexes, intraclass correlation coefficients, and known-group analysis. All validity indices were within an acceptable range; strong test-retest stability existed across all items, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.82 to 1.00. The developed SESRD-AQ is a valid assessment tool for use among Spanish-speaking patients on maintenance hemodialysis. This instrument refinement and validation process can be replicated with other maintenance hemodialysis population groups.

  10. Better Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Could Mitigate the Adverse Consequences of Obesity on Cardiovascular Disease: The SUN Prospective Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Eguaras, Sonia; Toledo, Estefanía; Hernández-Hernández, Aitor; Cervantes, Sebastián; Martínez-González, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Strong observational evidence supports the association between obesity and cardiovascular events. In elderly high-risk subjects, the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) was reported to counteract the adverse cardiovascular effects of adiposity. Whether this same attenuation is also present in younger subjects is not known. We prospectively examined the association between obesity and cardiovascular clinical events (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death) after 10.9 years follow-up in 19,065 middle-aged men and women (average age 38 year) according to their adherence to the MedDiet (<6 points or ≥6 points in the Trichopoulou’s Mediterranean Diet Score). We observed 152 incident cases of cardiovascular disease (CVD). An increased risk of CVD across categories of body mass index (BMI) was apparent if adherence to the MedDiet was low, with multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs): 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 0.93–2.25) for ≥25 – <30 kg/m2 of BMI and 2.00 (1.04–3.83) for ≥30 kg/m2 of BMI, compared to a BMI < 25 kg/m2. In contrast, these estimates were 0.77 (0.35–1.67) and 1.15 (0.39–3.43) with good adherence to MedDiet. Better adherence to the MedDiet was associated with reduced CVD events (p for trend = 0.029). Our results suggest that the MedDiet could mitigate the harmful cardiovascular effect of overweight/obesity. PMID:26556370

  11. Adherence to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and the effects of exposure misclassification on the risk of hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva, Carlos G.; Kaltenbach, Lisa; Arbogast, Patrick G.; Mitchel, Edward F.; Griffin, Marie R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Describe the effect of different exposure classification strategies for disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) on drug-outcome associations. Methods We studied the association between DMARD initiation and all-cause hospitalizations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (1995-2005). Initiators of DMARDs and oral glucocorticoids were followed a maximum of 180 days. We compared two strategies for exposure classification: 1) A persistent exposure required (PER) approach, in which follow-up stopped when the regimen changed; and, 2) A persistent exposure ignored (PEI) approach, in which follow-up continued despite regimen changes. For PEI, adherence was assessed using the medication possession ratio. All-cause hospitalization risk was compared among RA regimen initiators using Cox models and methotrexate as the reference. Results We identified 28906 episodes of medication initiation. In PER analyses, TNFα-antagonists did not increase hospitalization risk compared with methotrexate, whereas leflunomide did (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.1-1.67). Glucocorticoids increased hospitalization risk (HR: 1.29, 1.54 and 2.03 for low, medium and high doses, respectively). PEI results were similar to PER except that infliximab initiation increased the risk of hospitalization compared with methotrexate (HR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.19-1.8), and most other effects were closer to the null. In PEI, adherence ranged from 73% for etanercept to 6% for glucocorticoids. Adherence to methotrexate was 59%. Conclusions Compared with methotrexate initiation, initiation of leflunomide or glucocorticoids consistently increased all-cause hospitalizations in the first 180 days of use. Most PER and PEI estimates were similar; observed differences in risk between these methods were likely due to differences in adherence. PMID:20191470

  12. Better Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Could Mitigate the Adverse Consequences of Obesity on Cardiovascular Disease: The SUN Prospective Cohort.

    PubMed

    Eguaras, Sonia; Toledo, Estefanía; Hernández-Hernández, Aitor; Cervantes, Sebastián; Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2015-11-01

    Strong observational evidence supports the association between obesity and cardiovascular events. In elderly high-risk subjects, the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) was reported to counteract the adverse cardiovascular effects of adiposity. Whether this same attenuation is also present in younger subjects is not known. We prospectively examined the association between obesity and cardiovascular clinical events (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death) after 10.9 years follow-up in 19,065 middle-aged men and women (average age 38 year) according to their adherence to the MedDiet (<6 points or ≥6 points in the Trichopoulou's Mediterranean Diet Score). We observed 152 incident cases of cardiovascular disease (CVD). An increased risk of CVD across categories of body mass index (BMI) was apparent if adherence to the MedDiet was low, with multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs): 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 0.93-2.25) for ≥25 - <30 kg/m² of BMI and 2.00 (1.04-3.83) for ≥30 kg/m² of BMI, compared to a BMI < 25 kg/m². In contrast, these estimates were 0.77 (0.35-1.67) and 1.15 (0.39-3.43) with good adherence to MedDiet. Better adherence to the MedDiet was associated with reduced CVD events (p for trend = 0.029). Our results suggest that the MedDiet could mitigate the harmful cardiovascular effect of overweight/obesity. PMID:26556370

  13. Guideline Adherence in Outpatient Clinics for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Results from a Clinical Audit

    PubMed Central

    López-Campos, Jose L.; Abad Arranz, Maria; Calero-Acuña, Carmen; Romero-Valero, Fernando; Ayerbe-García, Ruth; Hidalgo-Molina, Antonio; Aguilar-Pérez-Grovas, Ricardo I.; García-Gil, Francisco; Casas-Maldonado, Francisco; Caballero-Ballesteros, Laura; Sánchez-Palop, María; Pérez-Tejero, Dolores; Segado, Alejandro; Calvo-Bonachera, Jose; Hernández-Sierra, Bárbara; Doménech, Adolfo; Arroyo-Varela, Macarena; González-Vargas, Francisco; Cruz-Rueda, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Previous clinical audits of COPD have provided relevant information about medical intervention in exacerbation admissions. The present study aims to evaluate adherence to current guidelines in COPD through a clinical audit. Methods This is a pilot clinical audit performed in hospital outpatient respiratory clinics in Andalusia, Spain (eight provinces with more than 8 million inhabitants), including 9 centers (20% of the public centers in the area) between 2013 and 2014. Cases with an established diagnosis of COPD based on risk factors, clinical symptoms, and a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.70 were deemed eligible. The performance of the outpatient clinics was benchmarked against three guidance documents available at the time of the audit. The appropriateness of the performance was categorized as excellent (>80%), good (60−80%), adequate (40−59%), inadequate (20−39%), and highly inadequate (<20%). Results During the audit, 621 clinical records were audited. Adherence to the different guidelines presented a considerable variability among the different participating hospitals, with an excellent or good adherence for symptom recording, MRC or CAT use, smoking status evaluation, spirometry, or bronchodilation therapy. The most outstanding areas for improvement were the use of the BODE index, the monitoring of treatments, the determination of alpha1-antitrypsin, the performance of exercise testing, and vaccination recommendations. Conclusions The present study reflects the situation of clinical care for COPD patients in specialized secondary care outpatient clinics. Adherence to clinical guidelines shows considerable variability in outpatient clinics managing COPD patients, and some aspects of the clinical care can clearly be improved. PMID:26985822

  14. Efficacy and safety of a multifactor intervention to improve therapeutic adherence in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): protocol for the ICEPOC study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low therapeutic adherence to medication is very common. Clinical effectiveness is related to dose rate and route of administration and so poor therapeutic adherence can reduce the clinical benefit of treatment. The therapeutic adherence of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is extremely poor according to most studies. The research about COPD adherence has mainly focussed on quantifying its effect, and few studies have researched factors that affect non-adherence. Our study will evaluate the effectiveness of a multifactor intervention to improve the therapeutic adherence of COPD patients. Methods/Design A randomized controlled clinical trial with 140 COPD diagnosed patients selected by a non-probabilistic method of sampling. Subjects will be randomly allocated into two groups, using the block randomization technique. Every patient in each group will be visited four times during the year of the study. Intervention: Motivational aspects related to adherence (beliefs and behaviour): group and individual interviews; cognitive aspects: information about illness; skills: inhaled technique training. Reinforcement of the cognitive-emotional aspects and inhaled technique training will be carried out in all visits of the intervention group. Discussion Adherence to a prescribed treatment involves a behavioural change. Cognitive, emotional and motivational aspects influence this change and so we consider the best intervention procedure to improve adherence would be a cognitive and emotional strategy which could be applied in daily clinical practice. Our hypothesis is that the application of a multifactor intervention (COPD information, dose reminders and reinforcing audiovisual material, motivational aspects and inhalation technique training) to COPD patients taking inhaled treatment will give a 25% increase in the number of patients showing therapeutic adherence in this group compared to the control group. We will evaluate the effectiveness

  15. Medication Adherence Patterns after Hospitalization for Coronary Heart Disease. A Population-Based Study Using Electronic Records and Group-Based Trajectory Models

    PubMed Central

    Librero, Julián; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel; Peiró, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify adherence patterns over time and their predictors for evidence-based medications used after hospitalization for coronary heart disease (CHD). Patients and Methods We built a population-based retrospective cohort of all patients discharged after hospitalization for CHD from public hospitals in the Valencia region (Spain) during 2008 (n = 7462). From this initial cohort, we created 4 subcohorts with at least one prescription (filled or not) from each therapeutic group (antiplatelet, beta-blockers, ACEI/ARB, statins) within the first 3 months after discharge. Monthly adherence was defined as having ≥24 days covered out of 30, leading to a repeated binary outcome measure. We assessed the membership to trajectory groups of adherence using group-based trajectory models. We also analyzed predictors of the different adherence patterns using multinomial logistic regression. Results We identified a maximum of 5 different adherence patterns: 1) Nearly-always adherent patients; 2) An early gap in adherence with a later recovery; 3) Brief gaps in medication use or occasional users; 4) A slow decline in adherence; and 5) A fast decline. These patterns represented variable proportions of patients, the descending trajectories being more frequent for the beta-blocker and ACEI/ARB cohorts (16% and 17%, respectively) than the antiplatelet and statin cohorts (10% and 8%, respectively). Predictors of poor or intermediate adherence patterns were having a main diagnosis of unstable angina or other forms of CHD vs. AMI in the index hospitalization, being born outside Spain, requiring copayment or being older. Conclusion Distinct adherence patterns over time and their predictors were identified. This may be a useful approach for targeting improvement interventions in patients with poor adherence patterns. PMID:27551748

  16. Global ecology and epidemiology of Borrelia garinii spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Comstedt, Pär; Jakobsson, Tobias; Bergström, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a tick-transmitted infectious disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s. l.). In Europe, three different Borrelia species are the main causative agents of LB: B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), Borrelia afzelii, and Borrelia garinii. The latter depends heavily on birds as its main reservoir hosts. In fact, birds can act both as biological carriers of Borrelia and transporters of infected ticks. The seasonal migration of many bird species not only aid in the spread of B. garinii to new foci but also influence the high level of diversity found within this species. B. garinii have been isolated not only from terrestrial birds in Europe, but also from seabirds worldwide, and homology between isolates in these two different infection cycles suggests an overlap and exchange of strains. In addition, it has been shown that birds can maintain and spread B. garinii genotypes associated with LB in humans. This review article discusses the importance of birds in the ecology and epidemiology of B. garinii spirochetes. PMID:22957111

  17. Endemic Foci of the Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever Spirochete Borrelia crocidurae in Mali, West Africa, and the Potential for Human Infection

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, Tom G.; Anderson, Jennifer M.; Lopez, Job E.; Fischer, Robert J.; Raffel, Sandra J.; McCoy, Brandi N.; Safronetz, David; Sogoba, Nafomon; Maïga, Ousmane; Traoré, Sékou F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Tick-borne relapsing fever spirochetes are maintained in endemic foci that involve a diversity of small mammals and argasid ticks in the genus Ornithodoros. Most epidemiological studies of tick-borne relapsing fever in West Africa caused by Borrelia crocidurae have been conducted in Senegal. The risk for humans to acquire relapsing fever in Mali is uncertain, as only a few human cases have been identified. Given the high incidence of malaria in Mali, and the potential to confuse the clinical diagnosis of these two diseases, we initiated studies to determine if there were endemic foci of relapsing fever spirochetes that could pose a risk for human infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated 20 villages across southern Mali for the presence of relapsing fever spirochetes. Small mammals were captured, thin blood smears were examined microscopically for spirochetes, and serum samples were tested for antibodies to relapsing fever spirochetes. Ornithodoros sonrai ticks were collected and examined for spirochetal infection. In total, 11.0% of the 663 rodents and 14.3% of the 63 shrews tested were seropositive and 2.2% of the animals had active spirochete infections when captured. In the Bandiagara region, the prevalence of infection was higher with 35% of the animals seropositive and 10% infected. Here also Ornithodoros sonrai were abundant and 17.3% of 278 individual ticks tested were infected with Borrelia crocidurae. Fifteen isolates of B. crocidurae were established and characterized by multi-locus sequence typing. Conclusions/Significance The potential for human tick-borne relapsing fever exists in many areas of southern Mali. PMID:23209863

  18. Variable Tick Protein in Two Genomic Groups of the Relapsing Fever Spirochete Borrelia hermsii in Western North America

    PubMed Central

    Porcella, Stephen F.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Anderson, Donald E.; Gilk, Stacey D.; Bono, James L.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2005-01-01

    Borrelia hermsii is the primary cause of tick-borne relapsing fever in North America. When its tick vector, Ornithodoros hermsi, acquires these spirochetes from the blood of an infected mammal, the bacteria switch their outer surface from one of many bloodstream variable major proteins (Vmps) to a unique protein, Vtp (Vsp33). Vtp may be critical for successful tick transmission of B. hermsii; however, the gene encoding this protein has been described previously in only one isolate. Here we identified and sequenced the vtp gene in 31 isolates of B. hermsii collected over 40 years from localities throughout much of its known geographic distribution. Seven major Vtp types were found. Little or no sequence variation existed within types, but between them significant variation was observed, similar to the pattern of diversity described for the outer surface protein C (OspC) gene in Lyme disease spirochetes. The pattern of sequence relatedness among the Vtp types was incongruent in two branches compared to two genomic groups identified among the isolates by multilocus sequence typing of the 16S rRNA, flaB, gyrB, and glpQ genes. Therefore, both horizontal transfer and recombination within and between the two genomic groups were responsible for some of the variation observed in the vtp gene. O. hermsi ticks were capable of transmitting spirochetes in the newly identified genomic group. Therefore, given the longevity of the tick vector and persistent infection of spirochetes in ticks, these arthropods rather than mammals may be the likely host where the exchange of spirochetal DNA occurs. PMID:16177341

  19. Medication adherence: WHO cares?

    PubMed

    Brown, Marie T; Bussell, Jennifer K

    2011-04-01

    The treatment of chronic illnesses commonly includes the long-term use of pharmacotherapy. Although these medications are effective in combating disease, their full benefits are often not realized because approximately 50% of patients do not take their medications as prescribed. Factors contributing to poor medication adherence are myriad and include those that are related to patients (eg, suboptimal health literacy and lack of involvement in the treatment decision-making process), those that are related to physicians (eg, prescription of complex drug regimens, communication barriers, ineffective communication of information about adverse effects, and provision of care by multiple physicians), and those that are related to health care systems (eg, office visit time limitations, limited access to care, and lack of health information technology). Because barriers to medication adherence are complex and varied, solutions to improve adherence must be multifactorial. To assess general aspects of medication adherence using cardiovascular disease as an example, a MEDLINE-based literature search (January 1, 1990, through March 31, 2010) was conducted using the following search terms: cardiovascular disease, health literacy, medication adherence, and pharmacotherapy. Manual sorting of the 405 retrieved articles to exclude those that did not address cardiovascular disease, medication adherence, or health literacy in the abstract yielded 127 articles for review. Additional references were obtained from citations within the retrieved articles. This review surveys the findings of the identified articles and presents various strategies and resources for improving medication adherence.

  20. Sexual transmission of Lyme disease: challenging the tickborne disease paradigm.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Raphael B; Middelveen, Marianne J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has become a major worldwide epidemic. In this article, we explore the clinical, epidemiological and experimental evidence for sexual transmission of Lyme disease in animal models and humans. Although the likelihood of sexual transmission of the Lyme spirochete remains speculative, the possibility of Lyme disease transmission via intimate human contact merits further study.

  1. Tick Surveillance for Relapsing Fever Spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi in Hokkaido, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; Nakao, Minoru; Ito, Takuya; Andoh, Masako; Maeda, Ken; Watarai, Masahisa; Sato, Kozue; Kawabata, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    During 2012–2013, a total of 4325 host-seeking adult ticks belonging to the genus Ixodes were collected from various localities of Hokkaido, the northernmost island of Japan. Tick lysates were subjected to real-time PCR assay to detect borrelial infection. The assay was designed for specific detection of the Relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi and for unspecific detection of Lyme disease-related spirochetes. Overall prevalence of B. miyamotoi was 2% (71/3532) in Ixodes persulcatus, 4.3% (5/117) in Ixodes pavlovskyi and 0.1% (1/676) in Ixodes ovatus. The prevalence in I. persulcatus and I. pavlovskyi ticks were significantly higher than in I. ovatus. Co-infections with Lyme disease-related spirochetes were found in all of the tick species. During this investigation, we obtained 6 isolates of B. miyamotoi from I. persulcatus and I. pavlovskyi by culture in BSK-M medium. Phylogenetic trees of B. miyamotoi inferred from each of 3 housekeeping genes (glpQ, 16S rDNA, and flaB) demonstrated that the Hokkaido isolates were clustered with Russian B. miyamotoi, but were distinguishable from North American and European B. miyamotoi. A multilocus sequence analysis using 8 genes (clpA, clpX, nifS, pepX, pyrG, recG, rplB, and uvrA) suggested that all Japanese B. miyamotoi isolates, including past isolates, were genetically clonal, although these were isolated from different tick and vertebrate sources. From these results, B. miyamotoi-infected ticks are widely distributed throughout Hokkaido. Female I. persulcatus are responsible for most human tick-bites, thereby I. persulcatus is likely the most important vector of indigenous relapsing fever from tick bites in Hokkaido. PMID:25111141

  2. A Multifaceted Nurse- and Web-Based Intervention for Improving Adherence to Treatment in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease: Rationale and Design of the MIRROR Trial

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to medication is one of the limitations in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, thereby increasing the risk of premature death, hospital admissions, and related costs. There is a need for simple and easy-to-implement interventions that are based on patients’ perspectives, beliefs, and perceptions of their illness and medication. Objective The objective is to test the effectivity of this intervention to improve medication adherence in patients with established cardiovascular disease, that is, in secondary prevention. Methods In this study the effect of a personalized visualization of cardiovascular risk levels through a website aiming at supporting self management in combination with a group consultation and communication intervention by a nurse on adherence to treatment in 600 patients with manifest cardiovascular diseases will be assessed. The health belief model was chosen as main theoretical model for the intervention. Results Primary outcome is adherence to treatment calculated by refill data. Secondary outcomes include the Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire and the Modified Morisky Scale. Patients are followed for one year. Results are expected by 2015. Conclusions This study assesses adherence to treatment in a high-risk cardiovascular population by applying an intervention that addresses patients’ capacity and practical barriers as well as patients’ beliefs and perceptions of their illness and medication. ClinicalTrial ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01449695; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01449695 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6kCzkIKH3) PMID:27624877

  3. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform.

  4. Detection of a Borrelia miyamotoi sensu lato relapsing-fever group spirochete from Ixodes pacificus in California.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jeomhee; Eisen, Rebecca J; Eisen, Lars; Lane, Robert S

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether host-seeking nymphs and adults of the western blacklegged tick, Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls, the primary vector of Lyme disease spirochetes in far-western North America, are infected naturally with relapsing-fever group spirochetes in Mendocino County, California. Relapsing-fever group borreliae were detected in four (1.7%) of 234 nymphal and two (0.7%) of 282 adult host-seeking I. pacificus ticks by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA and flagellin genes, respectively, exhibiting 99 and 98.5% sequence homology to Borrelia miyamotoi Fukunaga. Phylogenetic analysis based on these two genes revealed that the borreliae detected in these ticks belong to the relapsing-fever group and that these are closely related to, if not identical with, B. miyamotoi. PMID:16506458

  5. Adherence to the 2006 American Heart Association Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk reduction is associated with bone health in older Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and osteoporosis are 2 major public health problems that share common pathophysiological mechanisms. It is possible that strategies to reduce CVD risk may also benefit bone health. We tested the hypothesis that adherence to the 2006 American Heart Association Diet and Li...

  6. Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial to assess the feasibility of an open label intervention to improve hydroxyurea adherence in youth with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Smaldone, Arlene; Findley, Sally; Bakken, Suzanne; Matiz, L. Adriana; Rosenthal, Susan L.; Jia, Haomiao; Matos, Sergio; Manwani, Deepa; Green, Nancy S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Community health workers (CHW) are increasingly recognized as a strategy to improve health outcomes for the underserved with chronic diseases but has not been formally explored in adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD). SCD primarily affects African American, Hispanic and other traditionally underserved populations. Hydroxyurea (HU), an oral, once-daily medication, is the only approved therapeutic drug for sickle cell disease and markedly reduces symptoms, morbidity and mortality and improves quality of life largely by increasing hemoglobin F blood levels. This paper presents the rationale, study design and protocol for an open label randomized controlled trial to improve parent-youth partnerships in self-management and medication adherence to HU in adolescents with SCD. Methods/Design A CHW intervention augmented by text messaging was designed for adolescents with SCD ages 10–18 years and their parents to improve daily HU adherence. Thirty adolescent parent dyads will be randomized with 2:1 intervention group allocation. Intervention dyads will establish a relationship with a culturally aligned CHW to identify barriers to HU use, identify cues to build a habit, and develop a dyad partnership to improve daily HU adherence and achieve their individualized “personal best” hemoglobin F target. Intervention feasibility, acceptability and efficacy will be assessed via a 2-site trial. Outcomes of interest are HU adherence, dyad self-management communication, quality of life, and resource use. Discussion Despite known benefits, poor HU adherence is common. If feasible and acceptable, the proposed intervention may improve health of underserved adolescents with SCD by enhancing long-term HU adherence. PMID:27327779

  7. Phylogenetic position and in situ identification of ectosymbiotic spirochetes on protists in the termite gut.

    PubMed

    Noda, Satoko; Ohkuma, Moriya; Yamada, Akinori; Hongoh, Yuichi; Kudo, Toshiaki

    2003-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships, diversity, and in situ identification of spirochetes in the gut of the termite Neotermes koshunensis were examined without cultivation, with an emphasis on ectosymbionts attached to flagellated protists. Spirochetes in the gut microbial community investigated so far are related to the genus Treponema and divided into two phylogenetic clusters. In situ hybridizations with a 16S rRNA-targeting consensus oligonucleotide probe for one cluster (known as termite Treponema cluster I) detected both the ectosymbiotic spirochetes on gut protists and the free-swimming spirochetes in the gut fluid of N. koshunensis. The probe for the other cluster (cluster II), which has been identified as ectosymbionts on gut protists of two other termite species, Reticulitermes speratus and Hodotermopsis sjoestedti, failed to detect any spirochete population. The absence of cluster II spirochetes in N. koshunensis was confirmed by intensive 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clone analysis, in which remarkably diverse spirochetes of 45 phylotypes were identified, almost all belonging to cluster I. Ectosymbiotic spirochetes of the three gut protist species Devescovina sp., Stephanonympha sp., and Oxymonas sp. in N. koshunensis were identified by their 16S rDNA and by in situ hybridizations using specific probes. The probes specific for these ectosymbionts did not receive a signal from the free-swimming spirochetes. The ectosymbionts were dispersed in cluster I of the phylogeny, and they formed distinct phylogenetic lineages, suggesting multiple origins of the spirochete attachment. Each single protist cell harbored multiple spirochete species, and some of the spirochetes were common among protist species. The results indicate complex relationships of the ectosymbiotic spirochetes with the gut protists.

  8. Predictors of Long-Term Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Cardiovascular Disease in the SAVE Study

    PubMed Central

    Chai-Coetzer, Ching Li; Luo, Yuan-Ming; Antic, Nick A.; Zhang, Xi-Long; Chen, Bao-Yuan; He, Quan-Ying; Heeley, Emma; Huang, Shao-Guang; Anderson, Craig; Zhong, Nan-Shan; McEvoy, R. Doug

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine the clinical variables that best predict long- term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence among patients with cardiovascular disease who have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Design: 12-mo prospective within-trial observational study. Setting: Centers in China, Australia, and New Zealand participating in the Sleep Apnea cardioVascular Endpoints (SAVE) study. Patients: There were 275 patients age 45-70 y with cardiovascular disease (i.e., previously documented transient ischemic attack, stroke, or coronary artery disease) and OSA (4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI) > 12) who were randomized into the CPAP arm of the SAVE trial prior to July 1, 2010. Methods: Age, sex, country of residence, type of cardiovascular disease, baseline ODI, severity of sleepiness, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores plus CPAP side effects and adherence at 1 mo were entered in univariate analyses in an attempt to identify factors predictive of CPAP adherence at 12 mo. Variables with P < 0.2 were then included in a multivariate analysis using a linear mixed model with sites as a random effect and 12-mo CPAP use as the dependent outcome variable. Measurements and Results: CPAP adherence at 1, 6, and 12 mo was (mean ± standard deviation) 4.4 ± 2.0, 3.8 ± 2.3, and 3.3 ± 2.4 h/night, respectively. CPAP use at 1 mo (effect estimate ± standard error, 0.65 ± 0.07 per h increase, P < 0.001) and side effects at 1 mo (-0.24 ± 0.092 per additional side effect, P = 0.009) were the only independent predictors of 12- mo CPAP adherence. Conclusion: Continuous positive airway pressure use in patients with coexisting cardiovascular disease and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea decreases significantly over 12 months. This decline can be predicted by early patient experiences with continuous positive airway pressure (i.e., adherence and side effects at 1 month), raising the possibility that intensive early interventions could

  9. Do Brazilian scientific journals promote the adherence of Chagas disease researchers to international ethical principles?

    PubMed

    Malafaia, Guilherme; Guilhem, Dirce; Talvani, André

    2013-01-01

    The ethical aspects of the Brazilian publications about human Chagas disease (CD) developed between 1996 and 2010 and the policy adopted by Brazilian medical journals were analyzed. Articles were selected on the SciELO Brazil data basis, and the evaluation of ethical aspects was based on the normative contents about ethics in research involving human experimentation according to the Brazilian resolution of the National Health Council no. 196/1996. The editorial policies of the section "Instructions to authors" were analyzed. In the period of 1996-2012, 58.9% of articles involving human Chagas disease did not refer to the fulfillment of the ethical aspects concerning research with human beings. In 80% of the journals, the requirements and confirmation of the information about ethical aspects in the studies of human CD were not observed. Although a failure in this type of service is still observed, awareness has been raised in federal agencies, educational institutions/research and publishing groups to standardize the procedures and ethical requirements for the Brazilian journals, reinforcing the fulfillment of the ethical parameters, according to the resolution of NHC no. 196/1996.

  10. Adherence to hydroxyurea medication by children with sickle cell disease (SCD) using an electronic device: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Susumu; Kodjebacheva, Gergana; Scherrer, Tammy; Rice, Gary; Grigorian, Matthew; Blankenship, Jeremy; Onwuzurike, Nkechi

    2016-08-01

    Adherence to hydroxyurea (HU) is a significant modifying factor in sickle cell vaso-occlusive pain. We conducted a study using an electronic medication container-monitor-reminder device (GlowCap™) to track adherence and determine whether use of this device affected rates of HU adherence. Subjects were regular attendees to our clinic. They were given a 37-item questionnaire and were asked to use a GlowCap containing HU. When the device cap is opened, it makes a remote "medication taken" record. The device also provides usage reminder in the form of lights and alarm sounds if the cap opening is delayed. Nineteen subjects participated in the survey, and 17 in the intervention phase. Of the 17, 12 had reliable adherence data. Seventeen caregivers of patients and two patients completed the survey. Two most common barriers to adherence identified were lack of reminders and absence of medicine home delivery. The intervention component of this study, which used both the electronic (GlowCap) method and medication possession ratio showed that the median adherence rate for the 12 patients evaluated was 85 %. The GlowCap device accurately kept a record of adherence rates. This device may be an effective tool for increasing HU medication adherence. PMID:27225236

  11. Organized spirochetal behavior in human subgingival plaques - A virulence factor in periodontal infections?

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The organization and behavior of spirochetes in human subgingival plaques was studied with phase-contrast microscopy. Wet-mounts of non-dispersed subgingival microbial specimens from deep pockets of 10 persons with untreated adult periodontitis revealed “brush formations” with outer coatings of closely-massed spirochetes exhibiting synchronized motility. Monolayers of closely-packed spirochetes co-aggregated with “brush formation” monofilaments were obtained by using mineral oil as a mounting medium for wet-mount preparations. Spirochetes were observed to produce collectively coordinated metachronal wave patterns with their cell movements along the outer surfaces of the “brush formation” monofilaments, rather than flexing independently and at random. Organized spirochetal activity in subgingival plaques may serve as a virulence factor contributing to the periodontopathic potential of spirochetes and/or other microbial species. PMID:26336331

  12. Regions with higher Medicare Part D spending show better drug adherence, but not lower medicare costs for two diseases.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Bruce; Shoemaker, J Samantha; Dai, Mingliang; Davidoff, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    A quarter-century of research on geographic variation in Medicare costs has failed to find any positive association between high spending and better health outcomes. We conducted this study using a 5 percent random sample of Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes or heart failure in 2006 and 2007 to see whether there was any correlation between geographic variation in Part D spending and good medication-taking behavior-and, if so, whether that correlation resulted in reduced Medicare Parts A and B spending on diabetes and heart failure treatments. We found that beneficiaries residing in areas characterized by higher adjusted drug spending had significantly more "therapy days"-days with recommended medications on hand-than did beneficiaries in lower-spending areas. However, we did not find that this factor translated into short-term savings in Medicare treatment costs for these two diseases. This result might not be surprising, since returns from medication adherence can take years to manifest. At the same time, discovering which regional factors are responsible for differences in drug spending and medication practices should be a high priority. If the observed differences are related to poor physician communication or lack of good care coordination, then appropriately designed policy tools-including accountable care organizations, medical homes, and provider quality reporting initiatives-might help address them.

  13. Benefit and adherence of the disease management program "diabetes 2": a comparison of Turkish immigrants and German natives with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Anna Christin; Kofahl, Christopher

    2014-09-17

    There is an ongoing debate about equity and equality in health care, and whether immigrants benefit equally from services as the non-immigrant population. The study focuses on benefits from and adherence to the diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2) disease management program (DMP) among Turkish immigrants in Germany. So far, it has not been researched whether this group benefits from enrollment in the DMP as well as diabetics from the non-immigrant population. Data on the non-immigrant sample (N = 702) stem from a survey among members of a German health insurance, the Turkish immigrant sample (N = 102) was recruited in the area of Hamburg. Identical questions in both surveys enable comparing major components. Regarding process quality, Turkish diabetics do not differ from the non-immigrant sample; moreover, they have significantly more often received documentation and diabetes training. In terms of outcome quality however, results display a greater benefit on behalf of the non-immigrant sample (e.g., blood parameters and body mass index), and they also met more of the DMP criteria. This underlines the need of diabetics with Turkish background for further education and information in order to become the empowered patient as is intended by the DMP as well as to prevent comorbidities.

  14. Evidence-based medication adherence in Hispanic patients with systolic heart failure in a disease management program.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Kathy; Beltran, Julieta; Tamariz, Leonardo; Julian, Elyse; Dias, Andre; Trahan, Pat; Arcement, Lee

    2010-01-01

    The Hispanic population is the fastest growing minority in the United States, yet there is a paucity of data regarding patient follow-up in heart failure disease management programs (HFDMPs) and evidence-based medication adherence. The purpose of this study is to measure the compliance of evidence-based medication use, specifically measuring angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and beta-blockers (BBs) in the Hispanic population, and compare these data to the white and black population. The authors conducted a cross-sectional study of 561 patients enrolled in an HFDMP at Jackson Medical Hospital in Miami, Florida. At the first visit, 82% of Hispanic, 75% of white, and 79% of black patients were taking ACEIs/ARBs, but only 21% of Hispanic, 35% of white, and 32% of black patients were taking target doses. Hispanic patients are as compliant with ACEI/ARB and BB regimens as are the white and black populations in HFDMPs in a setting of similar socioeconomic features.

  15. New infectious spirochete isolated from short-tailed shrews and white-footed mice.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J F; Johnson, R C; Magnarelli, L A; Hyde, F W; Andreadis, T G

    1987-08-01

    A spirochete with two periplasmic flagella was isolated from the blood or tissues of spleens and kidneys from short-tailed shrews (Blarina brevicauda) and white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) in Connecticut and Minnesota. After inoculation, the shrew-mouse spirochete infected Swiss mice and Syrian hamsters. This spirochete is morphologically and serologically distinct from the species of Treponema, Borrelia, Leptospira, and Spirochaeta examined. PMID:3305565

  16. Predictors of adherence to screening guidelines for chronic diseases of lifestyle, cancers, and HIV in a health-insured population in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Adonis, Leegale; Basu, Debashis; Luiz, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Adherence to screening guidelines has been widely accepted to reduce morbidity, mortality, and cost outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of adherence to screening guidelines for chronic diseases of lifestyle (CDL), cancers, and HIV in a health-insured population in South Africa, some of whom voluntarily opt into a wellness program that incentivizes screening. Method A cross-sectional study for the period 2007–2011 was conducted using a random sample of 170,471 health insurance members from a single insurer. Adherence to screening guidelines was calculated from medical claims data. Results Adherence to screening guidelines ranged from 1.1% for colorectal cancer to 40.9% for cholesterol screening. Members of the wellness program were up to three times more likely to screen for diseases (odds ratio [OR]=3.2 for HIV screening, confidence interval [CI]=2.75–3.73). Plan type (full comprehensive plan) was most strongly associated with cholesterol screening (OR=3.53, CI=3.27–3.80), and most negatively associated (hospital-only core plan) with cervical cancer screening (OR= 0.44, CI=0.28–0.70). Gender was a negative predictor for glucose screening (OR=0.88, CI=0.82–0.96). Provincial residence was most strongly associated with cervical cancer screening (OR=1.89, CI=0.65–5.54). Conclusion Adherence to screening recommendations was <50%. Plan type, gender, provincial residence, and belonging to an incentivized wellness program were associated with disproportionate utilization of screening services, even with equal payment access. PMID:24647130

  17. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  18. Papillomatous pastern dermatitis with spirochetes and Pelodera strongyloides in a Tennessee Walking Horse.

    PubMed

    Rashmir-Raven, A M; Black, S S; Rickard, L G; Akin, M

    2000-05-01

    Papillomatous digital dermatitis is a common disease in cattle. The pastern dermatitis observed in a horse shared many of the gross characteristics of papillomatous digital dermatitis in cattle. Lesions included a mixture of proliferative and erosive changes, with a verrucose appearance in some areas. Microscopic similarities included pseudoepitheliomatous and papillomatous epidermal hyperplasia with hyperkeratosis, spongiosis of the epidermis, and intraepidermal spirochetes. The horse was also concurrently infected with Pelodera strongyloides. Papillomatous digital dermatitis in cattle is associated with poor husbandry practices. The environment of the affected horse was heavily contaminated with urine, manure, and other organic debris. Verrucous pododermatitis of horses may be the same as or similar to bovine papillomatous digital dermatitis, and these conditions have similar etiologies.

  19. Differential regulation of the multiple flagellins in spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhao; Sal, Melanie; Marko, Michael; Charon, Nyles W

    2010-05-01

    The expression of flagellin genes in most bacteria is typically regulated by the flagellum-specific sigma(28) factor FliA, and an anti-sigma(28) factor, FlgM. However, the regulatory hierarchy in several bacteria that have multiple flagellins is more complex. In these bacteria, the flagellin genes are often transcribed by at least two different sigma factors. The flagellar filament in spirochetes consists of one to three FlaB core proteins and at least one FlaA sheath protein. Here, the genetically amenable bacterium Brachyspira hyodysenteriae was used as a model spirochete to investigate the regulation of its four flagellin genes, flaA, flaB1, flaB2, and flaB3. We found that the flaB1 and flaB2 genes are regulated by sigma(28), whereas the flaA and flaB3 genes are controlled by sigma(70). The analysis of a flagellar motor switch fliG mutant further supported this proposition; in the mutant, the transcription of flaB1 and flaB2 was inhibited, but that of flaA and flaB3 was not. In addition, the continued expression of flaA and flaB3 in the mutant resulted in the formation of incomplete flagellar filaments that were hollow tubes and consisted primarily of FlaA. Finally, our recent studies have shown that each flagellin unit contributes to the stiffness of the periplasmic flagella, and this stiffness directly correlates with motility. The regulatory mechanism identified here should allow spirochetes to change the relative ratio of these flagellin proteins and, concomitantly, vary the stiffness of their flagellar filament.

  20. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  1. Treatment acceptance and adherence in HIV disease: patient identity and the perceived impact of physician–patient communication

    PubMed Central

    Laws, M Barton; Rose, Gary S; Bezreh, Tanya; Beach, Mary Catherine; Taubin, Tatiana; Kogelman, Laura; Gethers, Marcia; Wilson, Ira B

    2012-01-01

    Studies have found that physician–patient relationships and communication quality are related to medication adherence and outcomes in HIV care. Few qualitative studies exist of how people living with HIV experience clinical communication about their self-care behavior. Eight focus groups with people living with HIV in two US cities were conducted. Participants responded to a detailed discussion guide and to reenactments of actual physician–patient dialogue about antiretroviral adherence. The 82 participants were diverse in age, sex, and ethnicity. Most had been living with HIV for many years and had stable relationships with providers. They appreciated providers who knew and cared about their personal lives, who were clear and direct about instructions, and who were accessible. Most had struggled to overcome addiction, emotional turmoil, and/or denial before gaining control over their lives and becoming adherent to medications. They made little or no causal attribution for their transformation to any outside agency, including their providers. They generally saw medication adherence as a function of autonomous motivation. Successful coping with HIV with its prevalent behavioral comorbidities, stigma, and other challenges requires a transformation of identity and internalization of motivation to maintain health. Effective methods for clinicians to support such development are needed. PMID:23271898

  2. A structured exercise programme during haemodialysis for patients with chronic kidney disease: clinical benefit and long-term adherence

    PubMed Central

    Anding, Kirsten; Bär, Thomas; Trojniak-Hennig, Joanna; Kuchinke, Simone; Krause, Rolfdieter; Rost, Jan M; Halle, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Long-term studies regarding the effect of a structured physical exercise programme (SPEP) during haemodialysis (HD) assessing compliance and clinical benefit are scarce. Study design A single-centre clinical trial, non-randomised, investigating 46 patients with HD (63.2±16.3 years, male/female 24/22, dialysis vintage 4.4 years) performing an SPEP over 5 years. The SPEP (twice/week for 60 min during haemodialysis) consisted of a combined resistance (8 muscle groups) and endurance (supine bicycle ergometry) training. Exercise intensity was continuously adjusted to improvements of performance testing. Changes in endurance and resistance capacity, physical functioning and quality of life (QoL) were analysed over 1 year in addition to long-term adherence and economics of the programme over 5 years. Average power per training session, maximal strength tests (maximal exercise repetitions/min), three performance-based tests for physical function, SF36 for QoL were assessed in the beginning and every 6 months thereafter. Results 78% of the patients completed the programme after 1 year and 43% after 5 years. Participants were divided—according to adherence to the programme—into three groups: (1) high adherence group (HA, >80% of 104 training sessions within 12 months), (2) moderate adherence (MA, 60–80%), and 3. Low adherence group (LA, <60%)) with HA and MA evaluated quantitatively. One-year follow-up data revealed significant (p<0.05) improvement for both groups in all measured parameters: exercise capacity (HA: 55%, MA: 45%), strength (HA: >120%, MA: 40–50%), QoL in three scores of SF36 subscales and physical function in the three tests taken between 11% and 31%. Moreover, a quantitative correlation analysis revealed a close association (r=0.8) between large improvement of endurance capacity and weak physical condition (HA). Conclusions The exercise programme described improves physical function significantly and can be integrated

  3. Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  4. Spirochete attachment ultrastructure: Implications for the origin and evolution of cilia.

    PubMed

    Wier, Andrew M; Sacchi, Luciano; Dolan, Michael F; Bandi, Claudio; Macallister, James; Margulis, Lynn

    2010-02-01

    The fine structure of spirochete attachments to the plasma membrane of anaerobic protists displays variations here interpreted as legacies of an evolutionary sequence analogous to that from free-living spirochetes to undulipodia (eukaryotic "flagella" and homologous structures). Attached spirochetes form a vestment, a wriggling fringe of motile cells at the edge of the plasma membrane of unidentified cellulolytic protist cells in the hypertrophied hindgut of the digestive system of Mastotermes darwiniensis, the large wood-feeding termite from northern Australia. From the membrane extend both undulipodia and a complex of comparably sized (10-12 microm x 0.2-0.3 microm) ectosymbiotic spirochetes that resembles unruly ciliated epithelium. In the intestines are helical (swimming) and round-body morphotypes. Round bodies (RBs) are slow or immotile spirochetes, propagules known to revert to typical swimming helices under culture conditions favorable for growth. The surfaces of both the spirochete gram-negative eubacteria and the parabasalid protists display distinctive attachment structures. The attached hypertrophied structures, some of which resemble ciliate kinetids, are found consistently at sites where the spirochete termini contact the protist plasma membranes. PMID:20203251

  5. Spirochete attachment ultrastructure: Implications for the origin and evolution of cilia.

    PubMed

    Wier, Andrew M; Sacchi, Luciano; Dolan, Michael F; Bandi, Claudio; Macallister, James; Margulis, Lynn

    2010-02-01

    The fine structure of spirochete attachments to the plasma membrane of anaerobic protists displays variations here interpreted as legacies of an evolutionary sequence analogous to that from free-living spirochetes to undulipodia (eukaryotic "flagella" and homologous structures). Attached spirochetes form a vestment, a wriggling fringe of motile cells at the edge of the plasma membrane of unidentified cellulolytic protist cells in the hypertrophied hindgut of the digestive system of Mastotermes darwiniensis, the large wood-feeding termite from northern Australia. From the membrane extend both undulipodia and a complex of comparably sized (10-12 microm x 0.2-0.3 microm) ectosymbiotic spirochetes that resembles unruly ciliated epithelium. In the intestines are helical (swimming) and round-body morphotypes. Round bodies (RBs) are slow or immotile spirochetes, propagules known to revert to typical swimming helices under culture conditions favorable for growth. The surfaces of both the spirochete gram-negative eubacteria and the parabasalid protists display distinctive attachment structures. The attached hypertrophied structures, some of which resemble ciliate kinetids, are found consistently at sites where the spirochete termini contact the protist plasma membranes.

  6. Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Spirochetes in Wild Birds in Northwestern California: Associations with Ecological Factors, Bird Behavior and Tick Infestation

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Erica A.; Eisen, Lars; Eisen, Rebecca J.; Fedorova, Natalia; Hasty, Jeomhee M.; Vaughn, Charles; Lane, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Although Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) are found in a great diversity of vertebrates, most studies in North America have focused on the role of mammals as spirochete reservoir hosts. We investigated the roles of birds as hosts for subadult Ixodes pacificus ticks and potential reservoirs of the Lyme disease spirochete B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) in northwestern California. Overall, 623 birds representing 53 species yielded 284 I. pacificus larvae and nymphs. We used generalized linear models and zero-inflated negative binomial models to determine associations of bird behaviors, taxonomic relationships and infestation by I. pacificus with borrelial infection in the birds. Infection status in birds was best explained by taxonomic order, number of infesting nymphs, sampling year, and log-transformed average body weight. Presence and counts of larvae and nymphs could be predicted by ground- or bark-foraging behavior and contact with dense oak woodland. Molecular analysis yielded the first reported detection of Borrelia bissettii in birds. Moreover, our data suggest that the Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla), a non-resident species, could be an important reservoir for B. burgdorferi s.s. Of 12 individual birds (9 species) that carried B. burgdorferi s.l.-infected larvae, no birds carried the same genospecies of B. burgdorferi s.l. in their blood as were present in the infected larvae removed from them. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Our study is the first to explicitly incorporate both taxonomic relationships and behaviors as predictor variables to identify putative avian reservoirs of B. burgdorferi s.l. Our findings underscore the importance of bird behavior to explain local tick infestation and Borrelia infection in these animals, and suggest the potential for bird-mediated geographic spread of vector ticks and spirochetes in the far-western United States. PMID:25714376

  7. Isolation and characterization of Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes from digital dermatitis lesions in Swedish dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Märit; Bergsten, Christer; Fernström, Lise-Lotte; Höök, Helena; Johansson, Karl-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Background Digital dermatitis in cattle is an emerging infectious disease. Ulcerative lesions are typically located on the plantar skin between the heel bulbs and adjacent to the coronet. Spirochetes of the genus Treponema are found in high numbers in the lesions and are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to obtain pure cultures of spirochetes from cattle with digital dermatitis and to describe them further. Methods Tissue samples and swabs from active digital dermatitis lesions were used for culturing. Pure isolates were subjected to, molecular typing through 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and an intergenic spacer PCR developed for Treponema spp. as well as API-ZYM and antimicrobial susceptibility tests. The antimicrobial agents used were tiamulin, valnemulin, tylosin, aivlosin, lincomycin and doxycycline. Results Seven spirochete isolates from five herds were obtained. Both 16S rRNA gene sequences, which were identical except for three polymorphic nucleotide positions, and the intergenic spacer PCR indicated that all isolates were of one yet unnamed species, most closely related to Treponema phagedenis. The enzymatic profile and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern were also similar for all isolates. However it was possible to separate the isolates through their PFGE and RAPD banding pattern. Conclusion This is the first report on isolation of a Treponema sp. from cattle with digital dermatitis in Scandinavia. The phylotype isolated has previously been cultured from samples from cattle in the USA and the UK and is closely related to T. phagedenis. While very similar, the isolates in this study were possible to differentiate through PFGE and RAPD indicating that these methods are suitable for subtyping of this phylotype. No antimicrobial resistance could be detected among the tested isolates. PMID:18937826

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato spirochetes in wild birds in northwestern California: associations with ecological factors, bird behavior and tick infestation.

    PubMed

    Newman, Erica A; Eisen, Lars; Eisen, Rebecca J; Fedorova, Natalia; Hasty, Jeomhee M; Vaughn, Charles; Lane, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Although Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) are found in a great diversity of vertebrates, most studies in North America have focused on the role of mammals as spirochete reservoir hosts. We investigated the roles of birds as hosts for subadult Ixodes pacificus ticks and potential reservoirs of the Lyme disease spirochete B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) in northwestern California. Overall, 623 birds representing 53 species yielded 284 I. pacificus larvae and nymphs. We used generalized linear models and zero-inflated negative binomial models to determine associations of bird behaviors, taxonomic relationships and infestation by I. pacificus with borrelial infection in the birds. Infection status in birds was best explained by taxonomic order, number of infesting nymphs, sampling year, and log-transformed average body weight. Presence and counts of larvae and nymphs could be predicted by ground- or bark-foraging behavior and contact with dense oak woodland. Molecular analysis yielded the first reported detection of Borrelia bissettii in birds. Moreover, our data suggest that the Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla), a non-resident species, could be an important reservoir for B. burgdorferi s.s. Of 12 individual birds (9 species) that carried B. burgdorferi s.l.-infected larvae, no birds carried the same genospecies of B. burgdorferi s.l. in their blood as were present in the infected larvae removed from them. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Our study is the first to explicitly incorporate both taxonomic relationships and behaviors as predictor variables to identify putative avian reservoirs of B. burgdorferi s.l. Our findings underscore the importance of bird behavior to explain local tick infestation and Borrelia infection in these animals, and suggest the potential for bird-mediated geographic spread of vector ticks and spirochetes in the far-western United States.

  9. Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi nov. gen., nov. sp.: variable-diameter composite spirochete from microbial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.; Ashen, J.; Sole, M.; Margulis, L.

    1993-01-01

    Large (up to 100 micrometers long), loosely coiled, free-living spirochetes with variable diameters (from 0.4 to 3 micrometers in the same cell) were seen at least 40 times between August 1990 and January 1993. These spirochetes were observed in mud water and enrichment media from highly specific habitats in intertidal evaporite flats at three disjunct localities, one in Spain and two in Mexico. All three are sites of commercial saltworks. Associated with Microcoleus chthonoplastes the large spirochetes from Spain display phototaxis and a composite organization. Shorter and smaller-diameter spirochetes are seen inside both healthy and spent periplasm of larger ones. Small spirochetes attached to large ones have been observed live. From two to twelve spirochete protoplasmic cylinders were seen inside a single common outer membrane. A distinctive granulated cytoplasm in which the granules are of similar diameter (20-32 nanometers) to that of the flagella (26 nanometers) was present. Granule diameters were measured in thin section and in negatively-stained whole-mount preparations. Based on their ultrastructure, large size, variable diameter, number of flagella (3 to 6), and phototactic behavior these unique spirochetes are formally named Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi. Under anoxic (or low oxygen) conditions they formed blooms in mixed culture in media selective for spirochetes. Cellobiose was the major carbon source in 80% seawater, the antibiotic rifampicin was added, mat from the original field site was present and tubes were incubated in the light at from 18-31 degrees C. Within 1-2 weeks populations of the large spirochete developed at 25 degrees C but they could not be transferred to fresh medium.

  10. An efficient method for enumerating oral spirochetes using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Orth, Rebecca; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil; Dashper, Stuart; Walsh, Katrina; Reynolds, Eric

    2010-02-01

    Spirochetes, such as Treponema denticola, are thin walled, helical, motile bacteria. They are notoriously difficult to enumerate due to their thinness and the difficulties associated with culturing them. Here we have developed a modified oral bacterial growth medium (OBGM) that significantly improves the cultivation of T. denticola compared with a previously published growth medium. Three methods for the enumeration of T. denticola, semi-solid growth medium colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, DNA analysis and flow cytometry, are described and compared. Enumeration of T. denticola using the semi-solid agar method resulted in a positive linear relationship with absorbance of the culture (R(2)=0.9423). However, the semi-solid agar method was found to consistently underestimate (by 50 fold) the T. denticola cell density compared to previously published data. DNA analysis of T. denticola cultures reliably and consistently resulted in a positive linear relationship with absorbance (R(2)=0.9360), giving a calculated cell density of 6.9 x 10(8)cells/mL at an absorbance of 0.2 at 650 nm. Flow cytometry was also found to result in a positive linear relationship with absorbance (R(2)=0.9874), giving a calculated cell density of 6.6 x 10(8)cells/mL at an absorbance of 0.2 at 650 nm. In comparing all of these enumeration methods, the flow cytometry method was found to have distinct advantages, as it is accurate, rapid, and could distinguish between live and dead bacteria. Thus flow cytometry is a recommended means for the rapid and reliable enumeration of viable spirochetes from culture.

  11. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process. PMID:23326202

  12. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process.

  13. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease

    PubMed Central

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process. PMID:23326202

  14. Improving physician's adherence to completing vaccination schedules for patients with type 2 diabetes attending non-communicable diseases clinics in West Bay Health Center, Qatar.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Hassan; Bashwar, Zelaikha; Al-Ali, Amal; Salem, Mohamed; Abdelbagi, Isameldin

    2015-01-01

    Incomplete vaccination for patients with type 2 diabetes attending non-communicable diseases (NCD) clinics is an issue that could affect patient's health and wellness negatively and puts patients at high risk of serious diseases. We aimed to improve physicians adherence to complete vaccination schedule for patients with type 2 diabetes attending NCD clinics in west bay health center according to American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendation by 25% by January 2015. In the pre-intervention phase: the quality improvement team designed a checklist to collect the percentage of physician's adherence of prescription of the recommended vaccination for patients with type 2 diabetes. The percentage of complete vaccination in patients with diabetes attending NCD clinic in West Bay Health Center was 20% . In the intervention phase the intervention was in the form of: the creation a vaccination form and attached to the (NCD) progress note; to distribute and remind the physicians about the ADA guidelines vaccination recommendations; a summary of the vaccination schedule developed and attached to (NCD) form; development of vaccination reminder posters and posters in the waiting area, nurse station, and physician clinics and education and orientation sessions for NCD clinic staff. In the post-intervention phase the average percentage of complete vaccination in patients with diabetes attending NCD clinic in West Bay Health Center increased to 69%.

  15. Improving physician's adherence to completing vaccination schedules for patients with type 2 diabetes attending non-communicable diseases clinics in West Bay Health Center, Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Hassan; Bashwar, Zelaikha; Al-Ali, Amal; Salem, Mohamed; Abdelbagi, Isameldin

    2015-01-01

    Incomplete vaccination for patients with type 2 diabetes attending non-communicable diseases (NCD) clinics is an issue that could affect patient's health and wellness negatively and puts patients at high risk of serious diseases. We aimed to improve physicians adherence to complete vaccination schedule for patients with type 2 diabetes attending NCD clinics in west bay health center according to American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendation by 25% by January 2015. In the pre-intervention phase: the quality improvement team designed a checklist to collect the percentage of physician's adherence of prescription of the recommended vaccination for patients with type 2 diabetes. The percentage of complete vaccination in patients with diabetes attending NCD clinic in West Bay Health Center was 20% . In the intervention phase the intervention was in the form of: the creation a vaccination form and attached to the (NCD) progress note; to distribute and remind the physicians about the ADA guidelines vaccination recommendations; a summary of the vaccination schedule developed and attached to (NCD) form; development of vaccination reminder posters and posters in the waiting area, nurse station, and physician clinics and education and orientation sessions for NCD clinic staff. In the post-intervention phase the average percentage of complete vaccination in patients with diabetes attending NCD clinic in West Bay Health Center increased to 69%. PMID:26732463

  16. Lyme Disease Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi , in Syrian hamsters. J Parasitol 85: 426-30. Moody KD, ... that enables public health officials to look for trends and take actions to reduce disease and improve ...

  17. Susceptibility of the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) to the Lyme borreliosis spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi).

    PubMed

    Lane, R S

    1990-01-01

    Attempts to infect juvenile and adult western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis) with the Lyme borreliosis spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) were largely unsuccessful. Spirochetes could not be isolated from the blood and various tissues of 14 lizards 21-32 days after they had been inoculated ip (n = 8) or sc (n = 6) with 10(6) or 10(8) B. burgdorferi representing 3 tick isolates, although 1 lizard apparently developed a transitory spirochetemia lasting 2 days. Similarly, spirochetes could not be detected in the blood or tissues of 5 lizards fed upon by 2- greater than 8 infected larvae or nymphs of the western black-legged tick (Ixodes pacificus). Sixty-five blood samples from 59 lizards in an endemic area and various tissues from 20 of the same lizards were also assayed for B. burgdorferi with negative results. The implications of these findings for the maintenance of this spirochete in natural foci are discussed. PMID:2301709

  18. First isolation of the relapsing fever spirochete, Borrelia hermsii, from a domestic dog

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ashley L.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Fischer, Robert J.; Bellinghausen, Michael; Stevenson, Connie; Schwan, Tom G.

    2014-01-01

    In North America, tick-borne relapsing fever of humans is most frequently caused by infection with the spirochete Borrelia hermsii. Prior to our investigation, this spirochete was not known to infect dogs although another species, Borrelia turicatae, has been isolated from domestic canids in Florida and Texas. A clinically ill dog in Washington, USA, was spirochetemic upon examination. Spirochetes were isolated from the dog’s serum and examined by PCR and multi-locus sequence typing. DNA sequences for 7 loci all typed the spirochete as B. hermsii and a member of genomic group II of this species. Therefore, companion dogs that reside in rustic cabins in higher elevation forests are at risk of infection with B. hermsii. PMID:24252262

  19. Understanding the Impact of Hazardous and Harmful Use of Alcohol and/or Other Drugs on ARV Adherence and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kader, Rehana; Govender, Rajen; Seedat, Soraya; Koch, John Randy; Parry, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the impact of hazardous and harmful use of alcohol and/or other drugs on ARV adherence and disease progression among HIV patients. A cross-sectional study design was used. A total of 1503 patients attending HIV clinics in Cape Town, South Africa were screened for problematic substance use. A sub-sample of 607 patients (303 patients who screened positive for problematic substance use and 304 who did not) participated in this study. Hazardous or harmful alcohol use and problematic drug use predicted missing and stopping ARVs which, in turn, was associated with a decrease in CD4 counts and more rapid HIV-disease progression and poorer health outcomes in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The findings of this study underscore the need for an integrated approach to managing substance-use disorders in PLWHA. PMID:25933422

  20. A novel flagellar sheath protein, FcpA, determines filament coiling, translational motility and virulence for the Leptospira spirochete.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Elsio A; Figueira, Cláudio P; Benaroudj, Nadia; Hu, Bo; Tong, Brian A; Trajtenberg, Felipe; Liu, Jun; Reis, Mitermayer G; Charon, Nyles W; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Picardeau, Mathieu; Ko, Albert I

    2016-08-01

    Leptospira are unique among bacteria based on their helical cell morphology with hook-shaped ends and the presence of periplasmic flagella (PF) with pronounced spontaneous supercoiling. The factors that provoke such supercoiling, as well as the role that PF coiling plays in generating the characteristic hook-end cell morphology and motility, have not been elucidated. We have now identified an abundant protein from the pathogen L. interrogans, exposed on the PF surface, and named it Flagellar-coiling protein A (FcpA). The gene encoding FcpA is highly conserved among Leptospira and was not found in other bacteria. fcpA(-) mutants, obtained from clinical isolates or by allelic exchange, had relatively straight, smaller-diameter PF, and were not able to produce translational motility. These mutants lost their ability to cause disease in the standard hamster model of leptospirosis. Complementation of fcpA restored the wild-type morphology, motility and virulence phenotypes. In summary, we identified a novel Leptospira 36-kDa protein, the main component of the spirochete's PF sheath, and a key determinant of the flagella's coiled structure. FcpA is essential for bacterial translational motility and to enable the spirochete to penetrate the host, traverse tissue barriers, disseminate to cause systemic infection and reach target organs. PMID:27113476

  1. Neutrophil extracellular traps entrap and kill Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto spirochetes and are not affected by Ixodes ricinus tick saliva.

    PubMed

    Menten-Dedoyart, Catherine; Faccinetto, Céline; Golovchenko, Maryna; Dupiereux, Ingrid; Van Lerberghe, Pierre-Bernard; Dubois, Sophie; Desmet, Christophe; Elmoualij, Benaissa; Baron, Frédéric; Rudenko, Nataliia; Oury, Cécile; Heinen, Ernst; Couvreur, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    Lyme disease is caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. They are transmitted mainly by Ixodes ricinus ticks. After a few hours of infestation, neutrophils massively infiltrate the bite site. They can kill Borrelia via phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and hydrolytic enzymes. However, factors in tick saliva promote propagation of the bacteria in the host even in the presence of a large number of neutrophils. The neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) consists in the extrusion of the neutrophil's own DNA, forming traps that can retain and kill bacteria. The production of reactive oxygen species is apparently associated with the onset of NETs (NETosis). In this article, we describe NET formation at the tick bite site in vivo in mice. We show that Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto spirochetes become trapped and killed by NETs in humans and that the bacteria do not seem to release significant nucleases to evade this process. Saliva from I. ricinus did not affect NET formation by human neutrophils or its stability. However, it greatly decreased neutrophil reactive oxygen species production, suggesting that a strong decrease of hydrogen peroxide does not affect NET formation. Finally, round bodies trapped in NETs were observed, some of them staining as live bacteria. This observation could help contribute to a better understanding of the early steps of Borrelia invasion and erythema migrans formation after tick bite. PMID:23109724

  2. A novel flagellar sheath protein, FcpA, determines filament coiling, translational motility and virulence for the Leptospira spirochete.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Elsio A; Figueira, Cláudio P; Benaroudj, Nadia; Hu, Bo; Tong, Brian A; Trajtenberg, Felipe; Liu, Jun; Reis, Mitermayer G; Charon, Nyles W; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Picardeau, Mathieu; Ko, Albert I

    2016-08-01

    Leptospira are unique among bacteria based on their helical cell morphology with hook-shaped ends and the presence of periplasmic flagella (PF) with pronounced spontaneous supercoiling. The factors that provoke such supercoiling, as well as the role that PF coiling plays in generating the characteristic hook-end cell morphology and motility, have not been elucidated. We have now identified an abundant protein from the pathogen L. interrogans, exposed on the PF surface, and named it Flagellar-coiling protein A (FcpA). The gene encoding FcpA is highly conserved among Leptospira and was not found in other bacteria. fcpA(-) mutants, obtained from clinical isolates or by allelic exchange, had relatively straight, smaller-diameter PF, and were not able to produce translational motility. These mutants lost their ability to cause disease in the standard hamster model of leptospirosis. Complementation of fcpA restored the wild-type morphology, motility and virulence phenotypes. In summary, we identified a novel Leptospira 36-kDa protein, the main component of the spirochete's PF sheath, and a key determinant of the flagella's coiled structure. FcpA is essential for bacterial translational motility and to enable the spirochete to penetrate the host, traverse tissue barriers, disseminate to cause systemic infection and reach target organs.

  3. Cosmopolitan distribution of the large composite microbial mat spirochete, Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Navarrete, A.; Sole, M.

    1998-01-01

    Inocula from organic-rich black muds immediately underlying intertidal laminated microbial mats dominated by Microcoleus chthonoplastes yielded large, variable diameter spirochetes. These unusual spirochetes, previously reported only from the Alfacs Peninsula at the delta of the Ebro river in northeast Spain, contain striking arrays of cytoplasmic granules packed into their protoplasmic cylinders. On several occasions, both in summer and winter, the huge spirochetes were recognized in samples from mats growing in the Sippewissett salt marsh at Woods Hole Massachusetts. They were also seen in similar samples from microbial mats at North Pond, Laguna Figueroa, Baja California Norte, Mexico. The identity of these spirochetes was confirmed by electron microscopy: number and disposition of flagella, composite structure, measurements of their distinctive cytoplasmic granules. The granules, larger, more conspicuous and present in addition to ribosomes, are hypothesized to contain ATPases. As culture conditions worsen, these spirochetes retract into membrane-bounded round bodies in which they form refractile inclusions. From morphology and behavior we conclude the North American spirochetes from both Atlantic and Pacific intertidal microbial mats are indistinguishable from those at the delta of the Ebro river. We conclude a cosmopolitan distribution for Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi.

  4. Cotransmission of Divergent Relapsing Fever Spirochetes by Artificially Infected Ornithodoros hermsi▿†

    PubMed Central

    Policastro, Paul F.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2011-01-01

    The soft tick Ornithodoros hermsi, which ranges in specific arboreal zones of western North America, acts as a vector for the relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia hermsii. Two genomic groups (genomic group I [GGI] and GGII) of B. hermsii are differentiated by multilocus sequence typing yet are codistributed in much of the vector's range. To test whether the tick vector can be infected via immersion, noninfected, colony-derived O. hermsi larvae were exposed to reduced-humidity conditions before immersion in culture suspensions of several GGI and GGII isolates. We tested for spirochetes in ticks by immunofluorescence microscopy and in mouse blood by quantitative PCR of the vtp locus to differentiate spirochete genotypes. The immersed larval ticks were capable of spirochete transmission to mice at the first nymphal feeding. Tick infection with mixed cultures of isolates DAH (vtp-6) (GGI) and MTW-2 (vtp-5) (GGII) resulted in ticks that caused spirochetemias in mice consisting of MTW-2 or both DAH and MTW-2. These findings show that this soft tick species can acquire B. hermsii by immersion in spirochete suspensions, that GGI and GGII isolates can coinfect the tick vector by this method, and that these spirochetes can be cotransmitted to a rodent host. PMID:21965393

  5. Detection of relapsing fever spirochetes (Borrelia hermsii and Borrelia coriaceae) in free-ranging mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) from Nevada, United States.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Nathan C; Teglas, Mike B; Stewart, Kelley M; Wasley, Tony; Wolff, Peregrine L

    2012-02-01

    Surveillance of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus, Rafinesque, 1917) populations for tick-borne diseases has helped define the distribution of these pathogens and their subsequent risk of transmission to humans and domestic animals. We surveyed three mule deer herds across the state of Nevada for infection with relapsing fever Borrelia spp. spirochetes. Bacterial prevalence varied by the county where deer were sampled but Borrelia spirochetes were detected in 7.7% of all deer sampled. Infected deer were identified in every location from which mule deer samples were obtained. Sequencing of the Borrelia intergenic spacer gene (IGS) revealed that one individual was infected with Borrelia coriaceae and all others were infected with Borrelia hermsii. The vector of B. hermsii, Ornithodoros hermsi (Acari: Argasidae, Wheeler, Herms, and Meyer, 1935), feeds primarily on wild rodents and has not been identified infesting deer. Additionally, Ornithodoros coriaceus (Acari: Argasidae, Koch, 1844), which readily feeds on deer and is frequently infected with B. coriaceae, has not been shown to be a competent vector for B. hermsii. Our data represent the first sylvatic evidence of B. hermsii infection in mule deer. Additionally, our data provide evidence that infection with relapsing fever spirochetes in Nevada is wide ranging in the state's deer populations.

  6. Intravital Imaging of Vascular Transmigration by the Lyme Spirochete: Requirement for the Integrin Binding Residues of the B. burgdorferi P66 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Devender; Ristow, Laura C.; Shi, Meiqing; Mukherjee, Priyanka; Caine, Jennifer A.; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kubes, Paul; Coburn, Jenifer; Chaconas, George

    2015-01-01

    Vascular extravasation, a key step in systemic infection by hematogenous microbial pathogens, is poorly understood, but has been postulated to encompass features similar to vascular transmigration by leukocytes. The Lyme disease spirochete can cause a variety of clinical manifestations, including arthritis, upon hematogenous dissemination. This pathogen encodes numerous surface adhesive proteins (adhesins) that may promote extravasation, but none have yet been implicated in this process. In this work we report the novel use of intravital microscopy of the peripheral knee vasculature to study transmigration of the Lyme spirochete in living Cd1d-/-mice. In the absence of iNKT cells, major immune modulators in the mouse joint, spirochetes that have extravasated into joint-proximal tissue remain in the local milieu and can be enumerated accurately. We show that BBK32, a fibronectin and glycosaminoglycan adhesin of B. burgdorferi involved in early steps of endothelial adhesion, is not required for extravasation from the peripheral knee vasculature. In contrast, almost no transmigration occurs in the absence of P66, an outer membrane protein that has porin and integrin adhesin functions. Importantly, P66 mutants specifically defective in integrin binding were incapable of promoting extravasation. P66 itself does not promote detectable microvascular interactions, suggesting that vascular adhesion of B. burgdorferi mediated by other adhesins, sets the stage for P66-integrin interactions leading to transmigration. Although integrin-binding proteins with diverse functions are encoded by a variety of bacterial pathogens, P66 is the first to have a documented and direct role in vascular transmigration. The emerging picture of vascular escape by the Lyme spirochete shows similarities, but distinct differences from leukocyte transmigration. PMID:26684456

  7. Coeliac disease and the gluten-free diet: a review of the burdens; factors associated with adherence and impact on health-related quality of life, with specific focus on adolescence.

    PubMed

    White, L E; Bannerman, E; Gillett, P M

    2016-10-01

    Adherence and non-adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) may impact negatively on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Understanding the factors that influence compliance could help inform management and also guide support. With a particular focus on adolescence, this narrative review critiques current literature on the burdens associated with following a GFD and the factors associated with adherence. Studies highlight a variety of burdens faced by individuals with coeliac disease, including the cost, access and availability of gluten-free (GF) foods, as well as the dilemmas experienced when eating out, travelling and socialising with friends. A number of studies report that adolescents face stigmatisation and feel isolated in social situations and at school. Additional burdens that are highlighted are a lack of knowledge regarding CD and GFD difficulties in interpreting food labels, as well as dissatisfaction with the organoleptic properties of GF foods. Factors associated with poor adherence in adolescence include older age, an absence of immediate symptoms, difficulties eating out and poor palatability of GF foods. Conversely, better emotional support and stronger organisation skills have been associated with superior adherence. Significant associations have been reported between HRQoL measures and adherence, although the findings are inconsistent. Limitations in research methodologies exist and data are restricted to just a few countries. Further research specific to adolescence is required to identify independent predictors of adherence.

  8. Adherence to Methotrexate therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Nasim; Ahmad, Nighat Mir; Saeed, Muhammad Ahmed; Khan, Saira; Batool, Shabnam; Farman, Sumaira

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine adherence to methotrexate (MTX) therapy in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and to identify factors that promote either adherence or non adherence. Methods: One hundred Rheumatoid Arthritis patients on MTX for at least two months were enrolled. Questionnaire was completed by direct interview. Details recorded were, demographics (age, sex, education, monthly income), disease duration, duration on MTX and current dose. Disease Activity Score on 28 joint counts (DAS 28) at the current visit, concomitant drugs taken and number of doses of MTX missed in the previous 8 weeks were noted. Non adherence was defined as omission of any three or more prescribed doses of MTX in previous 8 week. Patients were asked for the factors that motivated their adherence to MTX as well as factors for non adherence. Presence of side effects due to MTX was also recorded. Result: Non adherence was found among 23% of cases. Patients of low socioeconomic group (p <0.0001) and on MTX for longer duration (p <0.001) had higher non adherence. Non adherent patients had significantly higher disease activity as measured by DAS 28 (p<0.001). Good counseling and education by the doctor was a strong predictor of adherence (p <0.001). Lack of affordability (p <0.001); lack of availability at local pharmacy (p <0.001); lack of family support (p <0.001) and lack of awareness regarding need and importance of MTX (p < 0.001were found as significant factors for non adherence. Conclusion: MTX non adherence in RA is noted in about one fourth of study group. Various economical and social issues lead to non adherence but good patient education and counseling by doctor could promote adherence in this study group. PMID:27182251

  9. Exercise and Motor Training in People with Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review of Participant Characteristics, Intervention Delivery, Retention Rates, Adherence, and Adverse Events in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Natalie E.; Sherrington, Catherine; Suriyarachchi, Gayanthi D.; Paul, Serene S.; Song, Jooeun; Canning, Colleen G.

    2012-01-01

    There is research evidence that exercise and motor training are beneficial for people with Parkinson's disease (PD), and clinicians seek to implement optimal programs. This paper summarizes important factors about the nature and reporting of randomized controlled trials of exercise and/or motor training for people with PD which are likely to influence the translation of research into clinical practice. Searches identified 53 relevant trials with 90 interventions conducted for an average duration of 8.3 (SD 4.2) weeks. Most interventions were fully supervised (74%) and conducted at a facility (79%). Retention rates were high with 69% of interventions retaining ≥85% of their participants; however adherence was infrequently reported, and 72% of trials did not report adverse events. Overall, the labor-intensive nature of most interventions tested in these trials and the sparse reporting of adherence and adverse events are likely to pose difficulties for therapists attempting to balance benefits and costs when selecting protocols that translate to sustainable clinical practice for people with PD. PMID:22191077

  10. Exercise and motor training in people with Parkinson's disease: a systematic review of participant characteristics, intervention delivery, retention rates, adherence, and adverse events in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Allen, Natalie E; Sherrington, Catherine; Suriyarachchi, Gayanthi D; Paul, Serene S; Song, Jooeun; Canning, Colleen G

    2012-01-01

    There is research evidence that exercise and motor training are beneficial for people with Parkinson's disease (PD), and clinicians seek to implement optimal programs. This paper summarizes important factors about the nature and reporting of randomized controlled trials of exercise and/or motor training for people with PD which are likely to influence the translation of research into clinical practice. Searches identified 53 relevant trials with 90 interventions conducted for an average duration of 8.3 (SD 4.2) weeks. Most interventions were fully supervised (74%) and conducted at a facility (79%). Retention rates were high with 69% of interventions retaining ≥85% of their participants; however adherence was infrequently reported, and 72% of trials did not report adverse events. Overall, the labor-intensive nature of most interventions tested in these trials and the sparse reporting of adherence and adverse events are likely to pose difficulties for therapists attempting to balance benefits and costs when selecting protocols that translate to sustainable clinical practice for people with PD.

  11. Treatment adherence in psychoses.

    PubMed

    David, Anthony S

    2010-12-01

    A well-conducted randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve treatment adherence in psychosis published in this issue shows beneficial effects on self- and observer-rated adherence and trends towards fewer hospital readmissions. Partial adherence is the single most important barrier to optimal treatment. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines on adherence need to be revised.

  12. Desmosomal molecules in and out of adhering junctions: normal and diseased States of epidermal, cardiac and mesenchymally derived cells.

    PubMed

    Pieperhoff, Sebastian; Barth, Mareike; Rickelt, Steffen; Franke, Werner W

    2010-01-01

    Current cell biology textbooks mention only two kinds of cell-to-cell adhering junctions coated with the cytoplasmic plaques: the desmosomes (maculae adhaerentes), anchoring intermediate-sized filaments (IFs), and the actin microfilament-anchoring adherens junctions (AJs), including both punctate (puncta adhaerentia) and elongate (fasciae adhaerentes) structures. In addition, however, a series of other junction types has been identified and characterized which contain desmosomal molecules but do not fit the definition of desmosomes. Of these special cell-cell junctions containing desmosomal glycoproteins or proteins we review the composite junctions (areae compositae) connecting the cardiomyocytes of mature mammalian hearts and their importance in relation to human arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies. We also emphasize the various plakophilin-2-positive plaques in AJs (coniunctiones adhaerentes) connecting proliferatively active mesenchymally-derived cells, including interstitial cells of the heart and several soft tissue tumor cell types. Moreover, desmoplakin has also been recognized as a constituent of the plaques of the complexus adhaerentes connecting certain lymphatic endothelial cells. Finally, we emphasize the occurrence of the desmosomal transmembrane glycoprotein, desmoglein Dsg2, out of the context of any junction as dispersed cell surface molecules in certain types of melanoma cells and melanocytes. This broadening of our knowledge on the diversity of AJ structures indicates that it may still be too premature to close the textbook chapters on cell-cell junctions. PMID:20671973

  13. Bisphosphonates adherence for treatment of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a disease of bone metabolism in which bisphosphonates (BPS) are the most common medications used in its treatment, whose main objective is to reduce the risk of fractures. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis. Methods Systematic review of articles on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis, indexed on MEDLINE (via PubMed) databases, from inception of databases until January 2013. Search terms were “Adherence, Medication” (MeSH term), “Bisphosphonates” (MeSH term), and “Osteoporosis” (MeSH term). Results Of the 78 identified studies, 27 met the eligibility criteria. Identified studies covered a wide range of aspects regarding adherence and associated factors, adherence and fracture, adherence and BPs dosage. The studies are mostly observational, conducted with women over 45 years old, showing low rates of adherence to treatment. Several factors may influence adherence: socio-economic and cultural, participation of physicians when guidance is given to the patient, the use of bone turnover markers, and use of generic drugs. The monthly dosage is associated with greater adherence compared to weekly dosage. Conclusions Considering the methodological differences between the studies, the results converge to show that adherence to treatment of osteoporosis with BPs is still inadequate. Further experimental studies are needed to evaluate the adherence and suggest new treatment options. PMID:23705998

  14. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently.

  15. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  16. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  17. Self-reported adherence to a home-based exercise program among patients affected by psoriatic arthritis with minimal disease activity.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Triggianese, Paola; Conigliaro, Paola; Santoro, Matteo; Lucchetti, Ramona; Perricone, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    More than half of all patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) exhibit progressive erosive arthritis, associated with severe functional impairment and psychosocial disability. Biologics have been suggested to be more effective in inducing minimal disease activity" (MDA) than disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Behavioral patient education appears to be more effective in encouraging patients to increase their physical activity (PA) levels. The aim of the study was to evaluate the benefits of home-based exercises program on disease activity and quality of life in MDA-PsA patients treated with an anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and DMARD therapy. We observed a self-reported adherence rate to home-based exercise of 76.6% and data showed the impact of the exercise program on self-reported health and mental assessment. A positive relationship between patient and therapist is crucial, influencing the quality of the performance, the emotional support, and increasing motivation in PsA patients.

  18. Free-living spirochetes from Cape Cod microbial mats detected by electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teal, T. H.; Chapman, M.; Guillemette, T.; Margulis, L.

    1996-01-01

    Spirochetes from microbial mats and anaerobic mud samples collected in salt marshes were studied by light microscopy, whole mount and thin section transmission electron microscopy. Enriched in cellobiose-rifampin medium, selective for Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, seven distinguishable spirochete morphotypes were observed. Their diameters ranged from 0.17 micron to > 0.45 micron. Six of these morphotypes came from southwest Cape Cod, Massachusetts: five from Microcoleus-dominated mat samples collected at Sippewissett salt marsh and one from anoxic mud collected at School Street salt marsh (on the east side of Eel Pond). The seventh morphotype was enriched from anoxic mud sampled from the north central Cape Cod, at the Sandy Neck salt marsh. Five of these morphotypes are similar or identical to previously described spirochetes (Leptospira, Spirochaeta halophila, Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi and Treponema), whereas the other two have unique features that suggest they have not been previously described. One of the morphotypes resembles Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi (the largest free-living spirochete described), in its large variable diameter (0.4-3.0 microns), cytoplasmic granules, and spherical (round) bodies with composite structure. This resemblance permits its tentative identification as a Sippewissett strain of Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi. Microbial mats samples collected in sterile Petri dishes and stored dry for more than four years yielded many organisms upon rewetting, including small unidentified spirochetes in at least 4 out of 100 enrichments.

  19. Immune Evasion and Recognition of the Syphilis Spirochete in Blood and Skin of Secondary Syphilis Patients: Two Immunologically Distinct Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Adriana R.; Ramirez, Lady G.; Zuluaga, Ana V.; Pillay, Allan; Abreu, Christine; Valencia, Carlos A.; La Vake, Carson; Cervantes, Jorge L.; Dunham-Ems, Star; Cartun, Richard; Mavilio, Domenico; Radolf, Justin D.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical syndrome associated with secondary syphilis (SS) reflects the propensity of Treponema pallidum (Tp) to escape immune recognition while simultaneously inducing inflammation. Methods To better understand the duality of immune evasion and immune recognition in human syphilis, herein we used a combination of flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transcriptional profiling to study the immune response in the blood and skin of 27 HIV(-) SS patients in relation to spirochetal burdens. Ex vivo opsonophagocytosis assays using human syphilitic sera (HSS) were performed to model spirochete-monocyte/macrophage interactions in vivo. Results Despite the presence of low-level spirochetemia, as well as immunophenotypic changes suggestive of monocyte activation, we did not detect systemic cytokine production. SS subjects had substantial decreases in circulating DCs and in IFNγ-producing and cytotoxic NK-cells, along with an emergent CD56−/CD16+ NK-cell subset in blood. Skin lesions, which had visible Tp by IHC and substantial amounts of Tp-DNA, had large numbers of macrophages (CD68+), a relative increase in CD8+ T-cells over CD4+ T-cells and were enriched for CD56+ NK-cells. Skin lesions contained transcripts for cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α), chemokines (CCL2, CXCL10), macrophage and DC activation markers (CD40, CD86), Fc-mediated phagocytosis receptors (FcγRI, FcγR3), IFN-β and effector molecules associated with CD8 and NK-cell cytotoxic responses. While HSS promoted uptake of Tp in conjunction with monocyte activation, most spirochetes were not internalized. Conclusions Our findings support the importance of macrophage driven opsonophagocytosis and cell mediated immunity in treponemal clearance, while suggesting that the balance between phagocytic uptake and evasion is influenced by the relative burdens of bacteria in blood and skin and the presence of Tp subpopulations with differential capacities for binding opsonic antibodies. They also

  20. Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Rocco, Daniela Marisa; García-Bournissen, Facundo

    2015-11-01

    Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%). Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction.

  1. Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Rocco, Daniela Marisa; García-Bournissen, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%). Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction. PMID:26587586

  2. Benefit and Adherence of the Disease Management Program “Diabetes 2”: A Comparison of Turkish Immigrants and German Natives with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, Anna Christin; Kofahl, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about equity and equality in health care, and whether immigrants benefit equally from services as the non-immigrant population. The study focuses on benefits from and adherence to the diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2) disease management program (DMP) among Turkish immigrants in Germany. So far, it has not been researched whether this group benefits from enrollment in the DMP as well as diabetics from the non-immigrant population. Data on the non-immigrant sample (N = 702) stem from a survey among members of a German health insurance, the Turkish immigrant sample (N = 102) was recruited in the area of Hamburg. Identical questions in both surveys enable comparing major components. Regarding process quality, Turkish diabetics do not differ from the non-immigrant sample; moreover, they have significantly more often received documentation and diabetes training. In terms of outcome quality however, results display a greater benefit on behalf of the non-immigrant sample (e.g., blood parameters and body mass index), and they also met more of the DMP criteria. This underlines the need of diabetics with Turkish background for further education and information in order to become the empowered patient as is intended by the DMP as well as to prevent comorbidities. PMID:25233016

  3. TLR1/TLR2 heterodimers play an important role in the recognition of Borrelia spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Oosting, Marije; Ter Hofstede, Hadewych; Sturm, Patrick; Adema, Gosse J; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; van der Meer, Jos W M; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2011-01-01

    After infection with Borrelia species, the risk for developing Lyme disease varies significantly between individuals. Recognition of Borrelia by the immune system is mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as TLRs. While TLR2 is the main recognition receptor for Borrelia spp., little is known about the role of TLR1 and TLR6, which both can form functionally active heterodimers with TLR2. Here we investigated the recognition of Borrelia by both murine and human TLR1 and TLR6. Peritoneal macrophages from TLR1- and TLR6- gene deficient mice were isolated and exposed to Borrelia. Human PBMCs were stimulated with Borrelia with or without specific TLR1 and TLR6 blocking using specific antibodies. Finally, the functional consequences of TLR polymorphisms on Borrelia-induced cytokine production were assessed. Splenocytes isolated from both TLR1-/- and TLR6-/- mice displayed a distorted Th1/Th2 cytokine balance after stimulation with B.burgdorferi, while no differences in pro-inflammatory cytokine production were observed. In contrast, blockade of TLR1 with specific neutralizing antibodies led to decreased cytokine production by human PBMCs after exposure to B.burgdorferi. Blockade of human TLR6 did not lead to suppression of cytokine production. When PBMCs from healthy individuals bearing polymorphisms in TLR1 were exposed to B.burgdorferi, a remarkably decreased in vitro cytokine production was observed in comparison to wild-type controls. TLR6 polymorphisms lead to a minor modified cytokine production. This study indicates a dominant role for TLR1/TLR2 heterodimers in the induction of the early inflammatory response by Borrelia spirochetes in humans. PMID:21998742

  4. [Biological and biochemical characteristics of the oral spirochetes isolated from the focus of marginal periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, K; Saito, K; Suzuki, M; Watanabe, T

    1989-02-01

    Since they are found to be increased in lesions of acute necrotic ulcerative gingivitis or marginal periodontitis, agents for these diseases. In the present study, 38 pure cultured strains were obtained as a result of isolation and culture of samples collected from lesions of marginal periodontitis (periodontal pokets), and the biological and biochemical characteristics of these strains were investigated. 1) Light microscopy (including dark-field microscopy) and transmission electron microscopy (negative staining) were used for observation of the morphology and cellular structure of the strains. The cells had a spiral shape, and showed active movement. Based on the above findings the cultured strains were all confirmed to be spirochetes of small to medium size, being 0.08-0.24 micron in width. 2) Growth and motility of the strains were investigated on various types of culture medium. Intense growth and movement were noted in strains cultured in bovine liver exudate medium containing horse serum (pH 7.2) at 37 degrees C under anaerobic conditions produced by the evacuation-replacement method (95% N2, 5% CO2) for 3-7 days after inoculation. 3) Thirty-five strains were positive for indole production and decomposition of urea, mucin, hippuric acid and esculin. Production of hydrogen sulfied was observed in 31 strains. In decomposition tests for 17 carbohydrates, 17 strains were positive for galactose and 14 strains were positive for glucose, while 11 strains were positive for dextrin and 10 strains for fructose upon decomposition of soluble starch. Other carbohydrates were also decomposed by a few strains. 4) In an investigation of the production of alcohol and lower fatty acids, among the metabolic products detected by gas chromatography, a large amount of acetic acid and small amounts of ethanol, lactic acid, propionic acid, pyruvic acid were observed. 5) The results of enzyme activity tests using an API ZYM system indicated relatively high activities of esterase

  5. Spirochete from the Rabbit Tick, Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard) I. Isolation and Preliminary Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Edgar G.; Gerloff, Robert K.; Burgdorfer, Willy

    1968-01-01

    An unidentified spirochete, referred to as the 277F agent, was isolated from Haemaphysalis leporispalustris ticks from two cottontail rabbits by inoculation of the tick suspension into embryonated chicken eggs. Because of its minute width (0.1 μ), the organism was difficult to see when stained by the Giemsa method, but was readily demonstrated by silver impregnation or fluorescent-antibody procedures. In dark-field microscopy, the spirochetes appeared uniformly and rather tightly coiled, and exhibited typical corkscrewlike motility. After yolk-sac inoculation, the agent was highly lethal for chick embryos and was recovered in large quantity from several embryonic tissues and fluids. It could also be maintained in nonfertile eggs and in an enriched liquid medium. This previously undescribed spirochete could pass through Berkefeld N but not Seitz EK filters. It was relatively resistant to heat and to penicillin or sulfadiazine, but was markedly inhibited by streptomycin, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and homologous neutralizing antiserum. Of several species of animals tested for susceptibility to this spirochete, only the snowshoe hare gave evidence of infection. Images PMID:4171295

  6. Antigenic Targets of the Bovine Humoral Response to PDD-associated Spirochetes Change with Subsequent Exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Papillomatous digital dermatitis (PDD), also known as hairy heel wart, is a major cause of lameness of cows in the U.S. dairy industry. Cattle are known to mount a humoral response to spirochetes isolated from PDD lesions. This study was undertaken to evaluate the progression of the bovine humoral i...

  7. Papillomatous Digital Dermatitis Spirochetes Suppress the Bovine Macrophage Innate Immune Response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Papillomatous digital dermatitis (PDD) is a polymicrobial infection in soft tissue adjacent to the hoof and is the leading cause of lameness in dairy cattle. Treponema phagedenis-like (TPL) spirochetes are a constant feature of PDD lesions and are localized deep in infected tissue. Host-cell respon...

  8. Carrageenan Gum and Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli in a Piglet Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Impact on Intestinal Mucosa-associated Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Munyaka, Peris M.; Sepehri, Shadi; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) including Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic conditions characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. Adherent invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) pathotype has been increasingly implicated in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. In a 21-day study, we investigated the effects of AIEC strain UM146 inoculation on microbiota profile of the ileal, cecal, ascending and descending colon in a pig model of experimental colitis. Carrageenan gum (CG) was used to induce colitis in weaner piglets whereas AIEC strain UM146 previously isolated from a CD patient was included to investigate a cause or consequence effect in IBD. Treatments were: (1) control; (2) CG; (3) AIEC strain UM146; and (4) CG+UM146. Pigs in groups 2 and 4 received 1% CG in drinking water from day 1 of the study while pigs in groups 3 and 4 were inoculated with UM146 on day 8. Following euthanization on day 21, tissue mucosal scrapings were collected and used for DNA extraction. The V4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA gene was then subjected to Illumina sequencing. Microbial diversity, composition, and the predicted functional metagenome were determined in addition to short chain fatty acids profiles in the digesta and inflammatory cytokines in the intestinal tissue. CG-induced colitis decreased bacterial species richness and shifted community composition. At the phylum level, an increase in Proteobacteria and Deferribacteres and a decrease in Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were observed in CG and CGUM146 compared to control and UM146. The metabolic capacity of the microbiome was also altered in CG and CGUM146 compared to UM146 and control in the colon. We demonstrated that CG resulted in bacterial dysbiosis and shifted community composition similar to what has been previously observed in IBD patients. However, AIEC strain UM146 alone did not cause any clear changes compared to CG or control in our experimental IBD pig model. PMID:27092122

  9. Adherence to guidelines in gynecologic cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Ferron, Gwenael; Martinez, Alejandra; Gladieff, Laurence; Mery, Eliane; David, Isabelle; Delannes, Martine; Montastruc, Marion; Balagué, Gisèle; Picaud, Laetitia; Querleu, Denis

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the available evidence documenting the prognostic role of adherence to guidelines in gynecologic cancers. A systematic review of the PubMed database using "guideline," "adherence," and "cancer" was carried out on February 25, 2014. Two thousand one hundred twenty-three publications were identified. Only publications addressing the question of adherence to recommendations regarding surgical care and multidisciplinary management of gynecologic cancers were selected. Six studies were identified in endometrial cancer, 4 in ovarian cancer, and none in cervical cancer. Adoption of guidelines is an effective tool for disease control and must consequently be considered as a process measure of quality cancer care. It is urgent to develop reliable and reproducible tools to assess adherence to guidelines based on level 1 evidence in gynecologic cancer then to carry out investigations to document the prognostic impact of compliance with guidelines. The time has come to include adherence to guidelines in quality assurance programs. PMID:25340292

  10. Impact of patient-selected care buddies on adherence to HIV care, disease progression and conduct of daily life among pre-antiretroviral HIV-infected patients in Rakai, Uganda: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Nakigozi, Gertrude; Makumbi, Fredrick E.; Bwanika, John Baptist; Atuyambe, Lynn; Reynolds, Steven J.; Kigozi, Godfrey; Nalugoda, Fred; Chang, Larry W.; Kiggundu, Valerian; Serwadda, David; Wawer, Maria J.; Gray, Ronald H.; Kamya, Moses R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Data are limited on effects of household or community support persons (“care buddies”) on enrolment into and adherence to pre-antiretroviral HIV care. We assessed the impact of care buddies on adherence to HIV clinic appointments, HIV progression and conduct of daily life among pre-ART HIV-infected individuals in Rakai, Uganda. Methods 1209 HIV infected pre-ART patients aged ≥15 years were randomized to standard of care (SOC) (n = 604) or patient-selected care buddy (PSCB) (n= 605) and followed at 6 and 12 months. Outcomes were adherence to clinic visits; HIV disease progression and self-reported conduct of daily life. Incidence and prevalence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were used to assess outcomes in the intent-to-treat and as-treated analyses. Results Baseline characteristics were comparable. In the ITT analysis both arms were comparable with respect to adherence to CD4 monitoring visits (adjPRR 0.98, 95%CI 0.93-1.04, p=0.529) and HIV progression (adjPRR=1.00, 95%CI 0.77-1.31, p=0.946). Good conduct of daily life was significantly higher in the PSCB than the SOC arm (adjPRR 1.08, 95%CI 1.03-1.13, p=0.001). More men (61%) compared to women (30%) selected spouses/partners as buddies (p<0.0001.) 22% of PSCB arm participants discontinued use of buddies. Conclusion In pre-ART persons, having care buddies improved the conduct of daily life of the HIV infected patients but had no effect on HIV disease progression and only limited effect on clinic appointment adherence. PMID:26039929

  11. A current and historical perspective on disparities in US childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccine adherence and in rates of invasive pneumococcal disease: Considerations for the routinely-recommended, pediatric PCV dosing schedule in the United States

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, John M; Utt, Eric A; Hill, Nina M; Welch, Verna L; Power, Edward; Sylvester, Gregg C

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that reducing the US 4-dose PCV13 schedule to a 3-dose schedule may provide cost savings, despite more childhood pneumococcal disease. The study also stressed that dose reduction should be coupled with improved PCV adherence, however, US PCV uptake has leveled-off since 2008. An estimated 24–36% of US children aged 5–19 months are already receiving a reduced PCV schedule (i.e., missing ≥1 dose). This raises a practical concern that, under a reduced, 3-dose schedule, a similar proportion of children may receive ≤2 doses. It is also unknown if a reduced, 3-dose PCV schedule in the United States will afford the same disease protection as 3-dose schedules used elsewhere, given lower US PCV adherence. Finally, more assurance is needed that, under a reduced schedule, racial, socioeconomic, and geographic disparities in PCV adherence will not correspond with disproportionately higher rates of pneumococcal disease among poor or minority children. PMID:26376039

  12. "They just come, pick and go." The Acceptability of Integrated Medication Adherence Clubs for HIV and Non Communicable Disease (NCD) Patients in Kibera, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Venables, Emilie; Edwards, Jeffrey K.; Baert, Saar; Etienne, William; Khabala, Kelly; Bygrave, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The number of people on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the long-term management of HIV in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is continuing to increase, along with the prevalence of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs). The need to provide large volumes of HIV patients with ART has led to significant adaptations in how medication is delivered, but access to NCD care remains limited in many contexts. Medication Adherence Clubs (MACs) were established in Kibera, Kenya to address the large numbers of patients requiring chronic HIV and/or NCD care. Stable NCD and HIV patients can now collect their chronic medication every three months through a club, rather than through individual clinic appointments. Methodology We conducted a qualitative research study to assess patient and health-care worker perceptions and experiences of MACs in the urban informal settlement of Kibera, Kenya. A total of 106 patients (with HIV and/or other NCDs) and health-care workers were purposively sampled and included in the study. Ten focus groups and 19 in-depth interviews were conducted and 15 sessions of participant observation were carried out at the clinic where the MACs took place. Thematic data analysis was conducted using NVivo software, and coding focussed on people’s experiences of MACs, the challenges they faced and their perceptions about models of care for chronic conditions. Results MACs were considered acceptable to patients and health-care workers because they saved time, prevented unnecessary queues in the clinic and provided people with health education and group support whilst they collected their medication. Some patients and health-care workers felt that MACs reduced stigma for HIV positive patients by treating HIV as any other chronic condition. Staff and patients reported challenges recruiting patients into MACs, including patients not fully understanding the eligibility criteria for the clubs. There were also some practical challenges during the

  13. Serum Concentrations of Insulin, Ghrelin, Adiponectin, Leptin, Leptin Receptor and Lipocalin-2 in Children with Celiac Disease Who Do and Do Not Adhere to a Gluten-Free Diet

    PubMed Central

    Janas, Roman M.; Rybak, Anna; Wierzbicka-Rucińska, Aldona; Socha, Piotr; Śnitko, Rafał; Szaflarska-Popławska, Anna; Stolarczyk, Anna; Oralewska, Beata; Cytra-Jarocka, Elżbieta; Iwańczak, Barbara; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Cichy, Wojciech; Czaja-Bulsa, Grażyna; Socha, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The roles of the many bioactive peptides in the pathogenesis of celiac disease remain unclear. To evaluate the serum concentrations of insulin, ghrelin, adiponectin, leptin, leptin receptor, and lipocalin-2 in children with celiac disease who do and do not adhere to a gluten-free diet (GFD, intermittent adherence). Methods Prepubertal, pubertal, and adolescent celiac children were included in this study (74 girls and 53 boys on a GFD and 80 girls and 40 boys off of a GFD). Results Insulin levels in prepubertal (9.01±4.43 μIU/mL), pubertal (10.3±3.62 μIU/mL), and adolescent (10.8±4.73 μIU/mL) girls were higher than those in boys (5.88±2.02, 8.81±2.88, and 8.81±2.26 μIU/mL, respectively) and were neither age-dependent nor influenced by a GFD. Prepubertal children off of a GFD exhibited higher ghrelin levels than prepubertal children on a GFD. Adiponectin levels were not age-, sex- nor GFD-dependent. Adherence to a GFD had no effect on the expression of leptin, leptin receptor, and lipocalin-2. Conclusions Adherence to a GFD had no influence on the adiponectin, leptin, leptin receptor, and lipocalin-2 concentrations in celiac children, but a GFD decreased highly elevated ghrelin levels in prepubertal children. Further studies are required to determine whether increased insulin concentrations in girls with celiac disease is suggestive of an increased risk for hyperinsulinemia. PMID:27074817

  14. Virulence Factors of the Oral Spirochete Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Dashper, S.G.; Seers, C.A.; Tan, K.H.; Reynolds, E.C.

    2011-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that treponemes are involved in the etiology of several chronic diseases, including chronic periodontitis as well as other forms of periodontal disease. There are interesting parallels with other chronic diseases caused by treponemes that may indicate similar virulence characteristics. Chronic periodontitis is a polymicrobial disease, and recent animal studies indicate that co-infection of Treponema denticola with other periodontal pathogens can enhance alveolar bone resorption. The bacterium has a suite of molecular determinants that could enable it to cause tissue damage and subvert the host immune response. In addition to this, it has several non-classic virulence determinants that enable it to interact with other pathogenic bacteria and the host in ways that are likely to promote disease progression. Recent advances, especially in molecular-based methodologies, have greatly improved our knowledge of this bacterium and its role in disease. PMID:20940357

  15. Emerging technologies for electronic monitoring of adherence, inhaler competence, and true adherence.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, John N; Nicholls, Clare

    2015-04-01

    Despite the availability of effective treatments for respiratory disorders, disease control is often suboptimal, due in part to the failure of patients to adhere to prescribed regimens, or to demonstrate competence with the often complex steps in the administration of inhaled medications. The cost of poor true adherence, a combined measure of adherence and inhaler competence, is considerable, both economically and in terms of health-related impact. While patient education is recognized as essential, there exist many barriers to healthcare professional-led monitoring and promotion of true adherence. Successful intervention remains a challenging task, dependent upon understanding and addressing the distinct issues associated with poor adherence and inhaler competence, and lessening the perceived burden on healthcare professionals. Electronic monitors provide an accurate and objective indication of adherence and may also be of value in assessing inhaler competence. The information provided by such devices is a helpful aid to understanding the challenging nature of true adherence, and may be crucial to the development and assessment of true adherence promoting interventions. This article provides a background to the impact of suboptimal adherence and inhaler competence, and the challenges associated with the promotion of true adherence, with an emphasis on respiratory therapies. Contemporary electronic monitors of adherence and inhaler competence are critically reviewed, and case studies of emerging technologies are provided to illustrate the use of innovative monitoring devices in the promotion of true adherence in practice. Potential future directions, including increased targeting and individualization, enhanced coordination of care, and a greater focus on inhaler competence are considered to be important additions to currently available technologies in this rapidly evolving field.

  16. THE RESISTANCE OF SPIROCHETES TO THE ACTION OF HEXAMETHYLENETETRAMINE DERIVATIVES AND MERCURIAL AND ARSENIC COMPOUNDS.

    PubMed

    Akatsu, S

    1917-03-01

    The majority of the 76 new compounds possessed spirocheticidal powers ranging between 1: 1,000 (30) to 1:2,500 (14), while only 2 attained the power of 1:5,000, 1 of 1: 25,000, and 2 of 1: 50,000. On the other hand, 8 killed the spirochetes in a dilution of 1: 750, 10 in 1:500, 7 in 1:250. 1 in 1: 100, and 1 in 1:50. It may be mentioned that the 2 (M1, M4) of 1:50,000 and 1 (M7) of 1:25,000 belong to the mercury compounds, and that mercuric chloride kills the organisms in a dilution of 1: 100,000 under the same experimental conditions. It is also interesting to compare some of the more common chemicals and therapeutic reagents. Phenol is spirocheticidal in a dilution of 1: 2,500, lysol in 1: 5,000, formalin in 1: 750, salvarsan in 1: 7,500, and neosalvarsan in 1: 2,500. Thus, of the new compounds there are at least 14 which have the same spirocheticidal power in vitro as has neosalvarsan. It is of interest to note that nine compounds possessing the 1:1,000 spirocheticidal power showed only one-tenth of the antiseptic action when tested upon Bacillus dysenteriae and Streptococcus, while some showed an even greater difference in this respect. Nos. 16, 21, 29, 218, and 244 were effective in a dilution of 1:2,500 for spirochetes and in a 1:100 or lower dilution for the bacteria just referred to. Preparations 46 and 84 appear to exert about the same effect both on the spirochetes and the bacteria, neither being very strong. Atoxyl killed the spirochetes in a 1:50 dilution. One of the most striking results was obtained with various hemolytic substances. Neufeld and von Prowazek found that spirochetes, unlike bacteria in general, are highly susceptible to the lytic action of sodium taurocholate and saponin, and they considered that this phenomenon was of differential diagnostic value in determining plant and animal organisms. Their observations were confirmed by Gonder, who found, however, that spirochetes, especially treponemata, offer a great deal of resistance at the

  17. Susceptibility of Various Species of Rodents to the Relapsing Fever Spirochete, Borrelia hermsii.

    PubMed

    Burgdorfer, W; Mavros, A J

    1970-09-01

    In a study to determine susceptibility to Borrelia hermsii of various rodents commonly found in or near places where human cases of relapsing fever occurred, chipmunks (Eutamias amoenus), pine squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus richardsoni), flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus), Columbian ground squirrels (Spermophilus columbianus columbianus), golden-mantled ground squirrels (S. lateralis tescorum), wood rats (Neotoma cinerea cinerea), white-footed deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), and meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) were exposed to spirochetes either by bites of infected Ornithodoros hermsi or by injection of infectious tick suspensions. Daily microscopic examination of blood samples revealed that pine squirrels, chipmunks, and meadow voles responded with spirochetemias of various degrees and length. Pine squirrels were most susceptible and experienced long-lasting and severe spirochetemias accompanied by typical signs of illness. Flying squirrels, Columbian ground squirrels, golden-mantled ground squirrels, wood rats, and white-footed deer mice did not develop demonstrable spirochetal infection. PMID:16557828

  18. Susceptibility of Various Species of Rodents to the Relapsing Fever Spirochete, Borrelia hermsii

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorfer, Willy; Mavros, Anthony J.

    1970-01-01

    In a study to determine susceptibility to Borrelia hermsii of various rodents commonly found in or near places where human cases of relapsing fever occurred, chipmunks (Eutamias amoenus), pine squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus richardsoni), flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus), Columbian ground squirrels (Spermophilus columbianus columbianus), golden-mantled ground squirrels (S. lateralis tescorum), wood rats (Neotoma cinerea cinerea), white-footed deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), and meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) were exposed to spirochetes either by bites of infected Ornithodoros hermsi or by injection of infectious tick suspensions. Daily microscopic examination of blood samples revealed that pine squirrels, chipmunks, and meadow voles responded with spirochetemias of various degrees and length. Pine squirrels were most susceptible and experienced long-lasting and severe spirochetemias accompanied by typical signs of illness. Flying squirrels, Columbian ground squirrels, golden-mantled ground squirrels, wood rats, and white-footed deer mice did not develop demonstrable spirochetal infection. Images PMID:16557828

  19. Spirochete and protist symbionts of a termite (Mastotermes electrodominicus) in Miocene amber.

    PubMed

    Wier, Andrew; Dolan, Michael; Grimaldi, David; Guerrero, Ricardo; Wagensberg, Jorge; Margulis, Lynn

    2002-02-01

    Extraordinary preservation in amber of the Miocene termite Mastotermes electrodominicus has led to the discovery of fossil symbiotic microbes. Spirochete bacteria and wood-digesting protists were identified in the intestinal tissue of the insect. Fossil wood (xylem: developing vessel-element cells, fibers, pit connections), protists (most likely xylophagic amitochondriates), an endospore (probably of the filamentous intestinal bacterium Arthromitus = Bacillus), and large spirochetes were seen in thin section by light and transmission electron microscopy. The intestinal microbiota of the living termite Mastotermes darwiniensis, a genus now restricted to northern Australia, markedly resembles that preserved in amber. This is a direct observation of a 20-million-year-old xylophagus termite fossil microbial community.

  20. Spirochete and protist symbionts of a termite (Mastotermes electrodominicus) in Miocene amber

    PubMed Central

    Wier, Andrew; Dolan, Michael; Grimaldi, David; Guerrero, Ricardo; Wagensberg, Jorge; Margulis, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Extraordinary preservation in amber of the Miocene termite Mastotermes electrodominicus has led to the discovery of fossil symbiotic microbes. Spirochete bacteria and wood-digesting protists were identified in the intestinal tissue of the insect. Fossil wood (xylem: developing vessel-element cells, fibers, pit connections), protists (most likely xylophagic amitochondriates), an endospore (probably of the filamentous intestinal bacterium Arthromitus = Bacillus), and large spirochetes were seen in thin section by light and transmission electron microscopy. The intestinal microbiota of the living termite Mastotermes darwiniensis, a genus now restricted to northern Australia, markedly resembles that preserved in amber. This is a direct observation of a 20-million-year-old xylophagus termite fossil microbial community. PMID:11818534

  1. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF AXIAL FIBRILS, OUTER ENVELOPE, AND CELL DIVISION OF CERTAIN ORAL SPIROCHETES

    PubMed Central

    Listgarten, M. A.; Socransky, S. S.

    1964-01-01

    Listgarten, M. A. (Harvard School of Dental Medicine and Forsyth Dental Center, Boston, Mass.), and S. S. Socransky. Electron microscopy of axial fibrils, outer envelope, and cell division of certain oral spirochetes. J. Bacteriol. 88:1087–1103. 1964.—The ultrastructure of axial fibrils and outer envelopes of a number of oral spirochetes was studied in thin sections and by negative contrast. The axial fibrils measured 150 to 200 A in diameter. Only one end of each fibril was inserted subterminally into the protoplasmic cylinder by means of a 400 A wide disc. The free ends of fibrils inserted near one end of the cylinder extended toward, and overlapped in close apposition, the free ends of fibrils inserted at the other end. In thin sections, some axial fibrils showed a substructure, suggestive of a dense central core. The outer envelopes of most spirochetes appeared to consist of 80 A wide polygonal structural subunits. However, in one large spirochete, the outer envelope demonstrated a “pin-striped” pattern. Cell division in a pure culture of Treponema microdentium was studied by negative contrast. Results suggested that this organism divides by transverse fission, the outer envelope being last to divide. During the course of division, new axial fibrils appeared to originate on either side of the point of constriction of the protoplasmic cylinder. Flagellalike extensions which were found in rapidly dividing organisms were due to protruding axial fibrils, and appeared to be the result of cell division. Some evidence is presented to support the concept of a homologous origin for axial fibrils and flagella. Images PMID:14219024

  2. Diversity of cultivable and uncultivable oral spirochetes from a patient with severe destructive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Choi, B K; Paster, B J; Dewhirst, F E; Göbel, U B

    1994-05-01

    To determine the genetic diversity of cultivable and uncultivable spirochetes in the gingival crevice of a patient with severe periodontitis, partial 16S rRNA genes were cloned from PCR-amplified products of DNA and RNA extracted from a subgingival plaque sample. Approximately 500 bp were amplified in PCRs by using universally conserved primers with polylinker tails. Purified PCR products were cloned into Escherichia coli by using the plasmid vector pUC19. The resultant clone library was screened by colony hybridization with a radiolabeled, treponeme-specific oligonucleotide probe. The 16S rRNA inserts of 81 spirochetal clones were then sequenced by standard procedures. Sequences were compared with 16S rRNA sequences of 35 spirochetes, including the four known cultivable oral treponeme species. The analysis revealed an unexpected diversity of oral treponemes from a single patient. When 98% or greater sequence similarity was used as the definition of a species-level cluster, the clone sequences were found to represent 23 species. When 92% similarity was used as the definition, the clones fell into eight major groups, only two of which contained named species, Treponema vincentii and Treponema denticola, while Treponema pectinovorum and Treponema socranskii were not represented in any cluster. Seven of the 81 spirochetal clones were found to contain chimeric 16S rRNA sequences. In situ fluorescence hybridization with a fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled oligonucleotide probe specific for one of the new species representing cluster 19 was used to identify cells of the target species directly in clinical samples.

  3. Canaleparolina darwiniensis, gen. nov., sp. nov., and other pillotinaceous spirochetes from insects.

    PubMed

    Wier, A; Ashen, J; Margulis, L

    2000-12-01

    We describe two new pillotinaceous spirochetes (Canaleparolina darwiniensis, Diplocalyx cryptotermitidis) and identify for the first time Hollandina pterotermitidis from both the subterranean termite Cryptotermes cavifrons and the wood-eating cockroach Cryptocercus punctulatus based on morphometric analysis of transmission electron micrographic thin sections. C. darwiniensis, gen. nov., sp. nov., limited to near Darwin, Australia, invariably is present on the surface of the treponeme-studded trichomonad Mixotricha paradoxa, a consistent inhabitant of the hindgut of healthy termite Mastotermes darwiniensis. The spirochete both attached to the surface of protists and free-swimming in the paunch (hindgut) lumen of the insect has 16 periplasmic flagella (16:32:16) and imbricated wall structures that resemble flattened crenulations of Pillotina. The flagella surround half the protoplasmic cylinder. C. darwiniensis is the largest (0.5 microm diameter x 25 microm length) of the three epibiotic bacteria (two spirochetes, one rod) that comprise the complex cortex of its host Mixotricha paradoxa. Several criteria distinguish Diplocalyx cryptotermitidis sp. nov. isolated from Cryptotermes cavifrons intestine: smaller diameter, fewer flagella, absence of inner and outer coats of the outer membrane, wider angle subtended by its flagella and, most notably, cytoplasmic tubule-associated centers, which are periodic electron dense spheres within the protoplasmic cylinder from which emanate cytoplasmic tubules up to 24 nm in diameter. This is also the first report of abundant populations of Hollandina in Cryptotermes cavifrons (those populations belong to the species H. pterotermitidis). Morphometric analysis of the first thin sections of any spirochetes (published nearly 40 years ago by A.V. Grimstone) permits us to identify the large (0.9 microm diameter) free-swimming intestinal symbiont of Cryptocercus punctulatus also as Hollandina pterotermitidis.

  4. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) and spirochetes (spirochaetaceae: spirochaetales) recovered from birds on a Georgia Barrier Island.

    PubMed

    Durden, L A; Oliver, J H; Kinsey, A A

    2001-03-01

    From September 1997 through July 1999, 300 individuals and 46 species of birds were mist-netted and screened for ticks and spirochetes on St. Catherine's Island, Liberty County, GA. Seventy-six (25%) of the birds were parasitized by a meal intensity of 4.6 ticks. Seasonally, more birds were infested with ticks during the summer (50% in 1998, 34% in 1999) than in spring (15% in 1998, 11% in 1999) or fall (21% in 1997, 20% in 1998), mainly because of severe infestations on some birds by immature stages of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.), during this season. Eight species ofticks were recovered from 14 species of birds during this study: A. americanum (74 nymphs, 168 larvae); the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say (11 nymphs, 28 larvae), the Gulf Coast tick, Amblyomma maculatum Koch (two nymphs, 29 larvae); Ixodes minor Neumann (16 larvae); the rabbit tick. Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard) (one nymph, 14 larvae); the bird tick Ixodes brunneus Koch (two larvae); the American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis (Say) (one nymph); and Ixodes affinis Neumann (one larva). The Carolina wren was parasitized by more species of ticks (seven) than any other bird species, followed by the northern cardinal (five), white-throated sparrow (four) and painted bunting (three). Spirochetes were isolated in BSK II medium from one tick (a nymphal A. americanum) and from skin biopsies of 12 (4%) of the individual birds (three downy woodpeckers, three northern waterthrushes, two Carolina wrens, one American redstart, one pine warbler, one Swainson's thrush, and one white-eyed vireo) all in fall 1997. This concentrated phenology of spirochete isolations might reflect periodic amplification or recrudescence of spirochetes in reservoir avian hosts. PMID:11296828

  5. Survey of birds and lizards for ixodid ticks (Acari) and spirochetal infection in northern California.

    PubMed

    Manweiler, S A; Lane, R S; Block, W M; Morrison, M L

    1990-11-01

    A total of 138 birds (24 species) was captured in an oak woodland between December 1988 and June 1989 at the University of California, Sierra Foothill Range Field Station, Yuba County, Calif. Ticks were not found on 71 birds captured between December 1988 and March 1989. Five subadult Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls were removed from 3 of 67 birds caught between April and June 1989. These three birds, an orange-crowned warbler (Vermivora celata (Say], a lazuli bunting (Passerina amoena (Say], and a chipping sparrow (Spizella passerina (Bechstein], represent new host records for I. pacificus in California. Tissues from two ticks and thick blood films prepared from 126 birds tested negative for spirochetes by direct immunofluorescence (DI). A total of 172 larval and 197 nymphal I. pacificus was removed from 15 of 16 western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis Baird & Girard) caught between April and June 1989 in the same location as were birds. Thick blood films prepared from all 16 lizards and tissue smears from 334 of the ticks (143 larvae and 191 nymphs) were DI test-negative for spirochetes. One (1.1%) of 93 adult I. pacificus collected at the bird-lizard capture site in February 1989 was infected with spirochetes that resembled B. burgdorferi. PMID:2280384

  6. Patient Education and Adherence to Aerosol Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ari, Arzu

    2015-06-01

    Nonadherence to prescribed medications results in disease instability and poor clinical control, with increases in hospital admissions, emergency room visits, school/work absenteeism, morbidity, and mortality. Poor patient adherence to therapy can be due to lack of cognition, competence, or contrivance. Patients who have not been trained or fail to understand use of drug and device combinations (cognition) often do not have the ability to use an aerosol device correctly (competence). Many patients have the competence to use the device correctly and know why they should use the device in the way they were taught; however, they still contrive to use it in an ineffective and suboptimal manner that reduces its efficiency and effectiveness. Ensuring effective aerosol therapy and optimizing its role in disease management involve not only delivery of aerosolized medications to the lungs, but also understanding why, when, and how to use the medications, competence to use the device, motivation to adhere to therapy, and not contriving to use the device in a way that will prevent effective drug delivery. This paper explains some of the problems with patient education and adherence to aerosol therapy and suggests strategies to evaluate, monitor, and improve patient adherence effectively in primary care. Factors affecting patient adherence to prescribed medications, effective educational interventions, and strategies to promote patient adherence to aerosol therapy are also discussed.

  7. Adherence to Insulin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sarbacker, G Blair; Urteaga, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    IN BRIEF Six million people with diabetes use insulin either alone or in combination with an oral medication. Many barriers exist that lead to poor adherence with insulin. However, there is an underwhelming amount of data on interventions to address these barriers and improve insulin adherence. Until pharmacological advancements create easier, more acceptable insulin regimens, it is imperative to involve patients in shared decision-making. PMID:27574371

  8. Short communication: minimum bactericidal concentration of disinfectants evaluated for bovine digital dermatitis-associated Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Hartshorn, R E; Thomas, E C; Anklam, K; Lopez-Benavides, M G; Buchalova, M; Hemling, T C; Döpfer, D

    2013-05-01

    The bacterial spirochetes, Treponema spp., are thought to be a major contributor to the etiology of bovine digital dermatitis (DD), a skin disease with worldwide economic impact. Hoofbath strategies are commonly used in an attempt to control and prevent the development of DD and continuing research has been done to develop an optimal hoofbath strategy for this purpose. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol that can be used as part of the screening process for candidate hoofbath disinfectants. This protocol allows an accurate determination of the in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of a series of disinfectants for Treponema microorganisms. Assays were performed in triplicate for each of the disinfectants at 30-s and 10-min exposure times and exposed to 10 and 20% manure (vol/vol). The results of this study can be used to categorize disinfectants based on the effect of exposure and manure concentration regarding their ability to inhibit Treponema growth. This information can then aid in optimizing strategies for hoofbath-based control of DD development and spread.

  9. Assessing adherence factors in patients under topical treatment: development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ).

    PubMed

    Zschocke, Ina; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Lotzin, Annett; Karakasili, Eleni; Reich, Kristian

    2014-04-01

    Medication adherence rates strongly depend on favorable disease outcomes. It is known that medication adherence rates are lower for topical treatment than for systemic treatment. However, to date no validated instrument for the assessment of adherence factors in topical treatment is available. The aim of this study was to develop a new questionnaire to assess adherence risk factors in topical treatment. The development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ) and Patient Preference Questionnaire (PPQ) was based on a systematic literature review, and qualitative patient focus interviews and expert focus groups' input. The psychometric properties and comprehensibility of the TTAQ and PPQ were assessed in a feasibility study with 59 psoriasis patients. Our first preliminary results indicate that the TTAQ and PPQ are psychometrically sound and reliable measures for the assessment of factors influencing topical treatment adherence. The questionnaires are currently being further developed and various parameters (e.g., time point of assessment) are currently being tested in an exploratory pilot study with ca. 2,000 psoriasis patients receiving topical treatment in a European clinical trial. The use of the final versions of TTAQ and PPQ in clinical practice may facilitate the early identification of specific non-adherence factors in patients under topical treatment, which could enable designing and applying adherence-enhancing interventions according to the patient's individual needs.

  10. Adherence to diabetes medication in individuals with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, Paul; Patel, Hiren; Ganguli, Rohan

    2014-02-01

    Introduction: Despite the importance of medication adherence for the effective treatment of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), little research has examined adherence with diabetes medication treatment in schizophrenia. The purpose of this systematic review was to 1) evaluate rates of adherence and determinants of adherence with medication for T2DM in individuals with schizophrenia, and, where possible, 2) examine the relationship between medication adherence and glycemic control. Methods: Studies were included if they presented information on dosing regimens and adherence or compliance rates for T2DM and included samples where at least 50% of the participants were individuals with schizophrenia. Results: Six studies were included in this review that predominantly examined men over the age of 50 years. Studies confirmed that many individuals with schizophrenia were not adhering to their diabetes medication as adherence rates ranged from 51-85%. Two studies that compared medication adherence in individuals with and without schizophrenia found those with the mental illness had higher rates of adherence. One study reported that blood glucose control levels were not statistically different between those who did and did not adhere to their medication, indicating more research is necessary in this area. Factors that improved adherence included disease and medical service and medication related factors. Conclusions: Interventions to increase diabetes medication adherence in schizophrenia need to address disease and medical service and medication related factors. Further research needs to examine diabetes medication adherence in women, younger individuals, and those recently diagnosed with diabetes as these individuals have been underrepresented in the literature.

  11. The antibody response in Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Craft, J. E.; Grodzicki, R. L.; Shrestha, M.; Fischer, D. K.; García-Blanco, M.; Steere, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    We determined the antibody response against the Ixodes dammini spirochete in Lyme disease patients by indirect immunofluorescence and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The specific IgM response became maximal three to six weeks after disease onset, and then declined, although titers sometimes remained elevated during later disease. Specific IgM levels correlated directly with total serum IgM. The specific IgG response, often delayed initially, was nearly always present during neuritis and arthritis, and frequently remained elevated after months of remission. Although results obtained by indirect immunofluorescence and the ELISA were similar, the ELISA was more sensitive and specific. Cross-reactive antibodies from patients with other spirochetal infections were blocked by absorption of sera with Borrelia hermsii, but titers of Lyme disease sera were also decreased. To further characterize the specificity of the humoral immune response against the I. dammini spirochete, 35S-methionine-labeled spirochetal antigens were identified by immunoprecipitation with sera from Lyme arthritis patients. These polypeptides had molecular weights of 62, 60, 47, 37, 22, 18, and 15 kDa, and were not recognized by control sera. We conclude that the ELISA, without absorption, is the best method to assay the humoral immune response in Lyme disease, and we have identified methionine-containing spirochetal polypeptides that may be important in Lyme arthritis. PMID:6393607

  12. Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Leo, Gualtiero; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-02-01

    Adherence is a major issue in any medical treatment. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is particularly affected by a poor adherence because a flawed application prevents the immunological effects that underlie the clinical outcome of the treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1990s, and the early studies suggested that adherence and compliance to such a route of administration was better than the traditional subcutaneous route. However, the recent data from manufacturers revealed that only 13% of patients treated with SLIT reach the recommended 3-year duration. Therefore, improved adherence to SLIT is an unmet need that may be achieved by various approaches. The utility of patient education and accurate monitoring during the treatment was demonstrated by specific studies, while the success of technology-based tools, including online platforms, social media, e-mail, and a short message service by phone, is currently considered to improve the adherence. This goal is of pivotal importance to fulfill the object of SLIT that is to modify the natural history of allergy, ensuring a long-lasting clinical benefit, and a consequent pharmaco-economic advantage, when patients complete at least a 3-year course of treatment. PMID:26758865

  13. Molecular sources of residual cardiovascular risk, clinical signals, and innovative solutions: relationship with subclinical disease, undertreatment, and poor adherence: implications of new evidence upon optimizing cardiovascular patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Residual risk, the ongoing appreciable risk of major cardiovascular events (MCVE) in statin-treated patients who have achieved evidence-based lipid goals, remains a concern among cardiologists. Factors that contribute to this continuing risk are atherogenic non-low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles and atherogenic processes unrelated to LDL cholesterol, including other risk factors, the inherent properties of statin drugs, and patient characteristics, ie, genetics and behaviors. In addition, providers, health care systems, the community, public policies, and the environment play a role. Major statin studies suggest an average 28% reduction in LDL cholesterol and a 31% reduction in relative risk, leaving a residual risk of about 69%. Incomplete reductions in risk, and failure to improve conditions that create risk, may result in ongoing progression of atherosclerosis, with new and recurring lesions in original and distant culprit sites, remodeling, arrhythmias, rehospitalizations, invasive procedures, and terminal disability. As a result, identification of additional agents to reduce residual risk, particularly administered together with statin drugs, has been an ongoing quest. The current model of atherosclerosis involves many steps during which disease may progress independently of guideline-defined elevations in LDL cholesterol. Differences in genetic responsiveness to statin therapy, differences in ability of the endothelium to regenerate and repair, and differences in susceptibility to nonlipid risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, hypertension, and molecular changes associated with obesity and diabetes, may all create residual risk. A large number of inflammatory and metabolic processes may also provide eventual therapeutic targets to lower residual risk. Classically, epidemiologic and other evidence suggested that raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol would be cardioprotective. When LDL cholesterol is aggressively lowered to targets, low HDL

  14. Identification of Endosymbiotic Methanogen and Ectosymbiotic Spirochetes of Gut Protists of the Termite Coptotermes formosanus.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Jun-Ichi; Noda, Satoko; Hongoh, Yuichi; Ui, Sadaharu; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2008-01-01

    Prokaryotic associations with gut protists of the termite Coptotermes formosanus were investigated based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. An endosymbiotic methanogen of Spirotrichonympha leidyi phylogenetically grouped with endosymbionts of other gut protists in the genus Methanobrevibacter, seemed to be unrelated to the host protist phylogeny. Three different lineages of ectosymbiotic spirochetes in the genus Treponema were identified in single cells of Holomastigotoides mirabile, indicating their simultaneous occurrence. Although these symbionts represented mere minor populations in the gut, their phylogenetic assignments suggest a common symbiotic relationship involving H(2) metabolism.

  15. Adherence to treatment in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Taddeo, Danielle; Egedy, Maud; Frappier, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Health care professionals must be alert to the high prevalence of low adherence to treatment during adolescence. Low adherence increases morbidity and medical complications, contributes to poorer quality of life and an overuse of the health care system. Many different factors have an impact on adherence. However, critical factors to consider in teens are their developmental stage and challenges, emotional issues and family dysfunction. Direct and indirect methods have been described to assess adherence. Eliciting an adherence history is the most useful way for clinicians to evaluate adherence, and could be the beginning of a constructive dialogue with the adolescent. Interventions to improve adherence are multiple – managing mental health issues appropriately, building a strong relationship, customizing the treatment regimen if possible, empowering the adolescent to deal with adherence issues, providing information, ensuring family and peer support, and motivational enhancement therapy. Evaluation of adherence at regular intervals should be an important aspect of health care for adolescents. PMID:19119348

  16. Interventional tools to improve medication adherence: review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Elísio; Giardini, Anna; Savin, Magda; Menditto, Enrica; Lehane, Elaine; Laosa, Olga; Pecorelli, Sergio; Monaco, Alessandro; Marengoni, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Medication adherence and persistence is recognized as a worldwide public health problem, particularly important in the management of chronic diseases. Nonadherence to medical plans affects every level of the population, but particularly older adults due to the high number of coexisting diseases they are affected by and the consequent polypharmacy. Chronic disease management requires a continuous psychological adaptation and behavioral reorganization. In literature, many interventions to improve medication adherence have been described for different clinical conditions, however, most interventions seem to fail in their aims. Moreover, most interventions associated with adherence improvements are not associated with improvements in other outcomes. Indeed, in the last decades, the degree of nonadherence remained unchanged. In this work, we review the most frequent interventions employed to increase the degree of medication adherence, the measured outcomes, and the improvements achieved, as well as the main limitations of the available studies on adherence, with a particular focus on older persons. PMID:26396502

  17. Characterization of a Novel Relapsing Fever Spirochete in the Midgut, Coxal Fluid, and Salivary Glands of the Bat Tick Carios kelleyi

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, Sandra J.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Gill, James S.; Piesman, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Bat ticks, Carios kelleyi, from Iowa were examined for the presence of relapsing fever group borreliae. A novel spirochete was characterized by DNA sequence analysis of polymerase chain reaction amplicons for the 16S rRNA, flaB, and glpQ genes in either triturated tick pools or single ticks. All loci and the concatenated DNA sequence of 3,289 bases identified the Carios bacterium as a relapsing fever spirochete most closely related to, but distinct from, Borrelia turicatae. Spirochetes reactive with a Borrelia-specific monoclonal antibody were observed microscopically in the coxal fluid and salivary glands from one tick. These data confirm the presence of a novel species of relapsing fever spirochete in bat ticks and the potential for new enzootic foci for endemic relapsing fever that warrants further investigation. The name Borrelia johnsonii is proposed for this novel spirochete in honor of Dr. Russell C. Johnson. PMID:19281412

  18. The use of incentives to reinforce medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    DeFulio, Anthony; Silverman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Objective Poor medication adherence is a longstanding problem, and is especially pertinent for individuals with chronic conditions or diseases. Adherence to medications can improve patient outcomes and greatly reduce the cost of care. The purpose of the present review is to describe the literature on the use of incentives as applied to the problem of medication adherence. Methods We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed empirical evaluations of incentives provided to patients contingent upon medication adherence. Results This review suggests that incentive-based medication adherence interventions can be very effective, but there are few controlled studies. The studies on incentive-based medication adherence interventions most commonly feature patients taking medication for drug or alcohol dependence, HIV, or latent tuberculosis. Across studies that reported percent adherence comparisons, incentives increased adherence by a mean of 20 percentage points, but effects varied widely. Cross-study comparisons indicate a positive relationship between the value of the incentive and the impact of the intervention. Post-intervention evaluations were rare, but tended to find that adherence effects diminish after the interventions are discontinued. Conclusions Incentive-based medication adherence interventions are promising but understudied. A significant challenge for research in this area is the development of sustainable and cost-effective long-term interventions. PMID:22580095

  19. Towards tailored and targeted adherence assessment to optimise asthma management.

    PubMed

    van Boven, Job F M; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; van der Molen, Thys; Chavannes, Niels H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to emphasise the need for a more comprehensive and tailored approach to manage the broad nature of non-adherence, to personalise current asthma management. Although currently several methods are available to measure the extent of asthma patients' adherence, the vast majority do not incorporate confirmation of the actual inhalation, dose and inhalation technique. Moreover, most current measures lack detailed information on the individual consequences of non-adherence and on when and how to take action if non-adherence is identified. Notably, one has to realise there are several forms of non-adherence (erratic non-adherence, intelligent non-adherence and unwitting non-adherence), each requiring a different approach. To improve asthma management, more accurate methods are needed that integrate measures of non-adherence, asthma disease control and patient preferences. Integrating information from the latest inhaler devices and patient-reported outcomes using mobile monitoring- and feedback systems ('mHealth') is considered a promising strategy, but requires careful implementation. Key issues to be considered before large-scale implementation include patient preferences, large heterogeneity in patient and disease characteristics, economic consequences, and long-term persistence with new digital technologies.

  20. Towards tailored and targeted adherence assessment to optimise asthma management

    PubMed Central

    van Boven, Job FM; Trappenburg, Jaap CA; van der Molen, Thys; Chavannes, Niels H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to emphasise the need for a more comprehensive and tailored approach to manage the broad nature of non-adherence, to personalise current asthma management. Although currently several methods are available to measure the extent of asthma patients’ adherence, the vast majority do not incorporate confirmation of the actual inhalation, dose and inhalation technique. Moreover, most current measures lack detailed information on the individual consequences of non-adherence and on when and how to take action if non-adherence is identified. Notably, one has to realise there are several forms of non-adherence (erratic non-adherence, intelligent non-adherence and unwitting non-adherence), each requiring a different approach. To improve asthma management, more accurate methods are needed that integrate measures of non-adherence, asthma disease control and patient preferences. Integrating information from the latest inhaler devices and patient-reported outcomes using mobile monitoring- and feedback systems (‘mHealth’) is considered a promising strategy, but requires careful implementation. Key issues to be considered before large-scale implementation include patient preferences, large heterogeneity in patient and disease characteristics, economic consequences, and long-term persistence with new digital technologies. PMID:26181850

  1. [Challenges of adolescents' adherence to therapy].

    PubMed

    Brand, P L P; Kaptein, A A; Janssens, L P F; Klok, T

    2016-01-01

    Non-adherence occurs at any age, in all chronic diseases, and has a major impact on clinical outcomes. Non-adherence is primarily determined by perceptions of illness and medication beliefs. During puberty, adolescents attain independence from their parents and attach to their peers. This complicates successful self-management of chronic illness, because the adolescents avoid standing out from their peers. Discussion of barriers hindering successful self-management in adolescents can be promoted by seeing the patient alone, without the parents being present, and by acknowledging the patient's independence and responsibilities. PMID:27581866

  2. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov.: A New Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1, was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.22 x 10-15 micron. Growth was observed over the temperature range of 10 C to 44 C (optimum 37 C), NaCl concentration range of greater than 1 - 12 % (wt/vol) (optimum 3%), and pH range 7.5 - 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. Main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain AspG1 is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species among the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA_392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  3. Determinants of methotrexate adherence in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Ellen; De Gucht, Veronique; Maes, Stan; Van Camp, Yoleen; De Clerck, Luc S

    2016-05-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, weekly intake of methotrexate (MTX) is the basic drug treatment. This observational study aims to investigate how many RA patients are adherent in terms of MTX intake and to identify determinants of non-adherence. Intake of MTX (orally or via injection) was recorded in 129 RA patients with an electronic monitoring system (MEMS(®)) during 16 weeks. In addition, two adherence questionnaires, the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS-5) and the Compliance-Questionnaire-Rheumatology (CQR) as well as a visual analogue scale (VAS) measuring MTX adherence, were administered to these patients. As possible determinants of adherence, data on demographics, disease and treatment characteristics, depression, illness cognitions, motivation, and social support were collected. Of all participants, 58 % were fully adherent and 75 % skipped at most one dose during 16 weeks. A better mental health status and suffering from comorbidities had a positive effect on adherence, while living alone had a negative effect. These three predictors explained 30 % of the variance in MTX adherence. Of the three self-report medication adherence measures, the VAS correlated the highest with the results of the electronic monitoring system (r = 0.552, p = 0.01). A relatively high adherence rate was observed in RA patients treated with MTX. The determinants identified by this study could be used to screen patients at risk for non-adherence. A simple VAS scale seems to be an acceptable way for a preliminary screening of MTX adherence. PMID:26781783

  4. Bovine Immune Response to Papillomatous Digital Dermatitis (PDD)-Associated Spirochetes are Skewed in Isolate Reactivity and Subclass Elicitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Papillomatous digital dermatitis (PDD), also known as hairy heel wart, is a growing cause of lameness of cows in the U.S. dairy industry. Previous work using lesion material from a dairy farm in Iowa resulted in the isolation of four different Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes (1A, 3...

  5. Medication adherence: process for implementation

    PubMed Central

    Mendys, Phil; Zullig, Leah L; Burkholder, Rebecca; Granger, Bradi B; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2014-01-01

    Improving medication adherence is a critically important, but often enigmatic objective of patients, providers, and the overall health care system. Increasing medication adherence has the potential to reduce health care costs while improving care quality, patient satisfaction and health outcomes. While there are a number of papers that describe the benefits of medication adherence in terms of cost, safety, outcomes, or quality of life, there are limited reviews that consider how best to seamlessly integrate tools and processes directed at improving medication adherence. We will address processes for implementing medication adherence interventions with the goal of better informing providers and health care systems regarding the safe and effective use of medications. PMID:25114513

  6. Lyme Disease: A Challenge for Outdoor Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitcombe, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Describes signs and symptoms of Lyme disease; life cycle and feeding habits of the deer tick (Ixodes dammini), which transmits the spirochete bacterium; tick control measures; outdoor precautions; and veterinary considerations. Discusses the disease's potential impact on outdoor education, and suggests a reasoned, nonhysterical approach. Contains…

  7. Complex Population Structure of Lyme Borreliosis Group Spirochete Borrelia garinii in Subarctic Eurasia

    PubMed Central

    Comstedt, Pär; Asokliene, Loreta; Eliasson, Ingvar; Olsen, Björn; Wallensten, Anders; Bunikis, Jonas; Bergström, Sven

    2009-01-01

    Borrelia garinii, a causative agent of Lyme borreliosis in Europe and Asia, is naturally maintained in marine and terrestrial enzootic cycles, which primarily involve birds, including seabirds and migratory passerines. These bird groups associate with, correspondingly, Ixodes uriae and Ixodes ricinus ticks, of which the latter species may bite and transmit the infection to humans. Studies of the overlap between these two natural cycles of B. garinii have been limited, in part due to the absence of representative collections of this spirochete's samples, as well as of the lack of reliable measure of the genetic heterogeneity of its strains. As a prerequisite for understanding the epidemiological correlates of the complex maintenance of B. garinii, the present study sought to assess the diversity and phylogenetic relationships of this species' strains from its natural hosts and patients with Lyme borreliosis from subarctic Eurasia. We used sequence typing of the partial rrs-rrl intergenic spacer (IGS) of archived and prospective samples of B. garinii from I. uriae ticks collected predominantly on Commander Islands in North Pacific, as well as on the islands in northern Sweden and arctic Norway. We also typed B. garinii samples from patients with Lyme borreliosis and I. ricinus ticks infesting migratory birds in southern Sweden, or found questing in selected sites on the islands in the Baltic Sea and Lithuania. Fifty-two (68%) of 77 B. garinii samples representing wide geographical range and associated with I. ricinus and infection of humans contributed 12 (60%) of total 20 identified IGS variants. In contrast, the remaining 25 (32%) samples recovered from I. uriae ticks from a few islands accounted for as many as 10 (50%) IGS types, suggesting greater local diversity of B. garinii maintained by seabirds and their ticks. Two IGS variants of the spirochete in common for both tick species were found in I. ricinus larvae from migratory birds, an indication that B

  8. HIV Treatment Adherence, Drug Resistance, Virologic Failure: Evolving Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Nachega, Jean B.; Marconi, Vincent C.; van Zyl, Gert U.; Gardner, Edward M.; Preiser, Wolfgang; Hong, Steven Y.; Mills, Edward J.; Gross, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) has been shown to be a major determinant of virologic failure, emergence of drug resistant virus, disease progression, hospitalizations, mortality, and health care costs. While high adherence levels can be achieved in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings following initiation of cART, long-term adherence remains a challenge regardless of available resources. Barriers to optimal adherence may originate from individual (biological, socio-cultural, behavioral), pharmacological, and societal factors. Although patients and providers should continuously strive for maximum adherence to cART, there is accumulating evidence that each class of antiretroviral therapy has specific adherence-drug resistance relationship characteristics allowing certain regimens more flexibility than others. There is not a universally accepted measure for cART adherence, since each method has distinct advantages and disadvantages including cost, complexity, accuracy, precision, intrusiveness and bias. Development of a real-time cART adherence monitoring tool will enable the development of novel, pre-emptive adherence-improving strategies. The application of these strategies may ultimately prove to be the most cost-effective method to reduce morbidity and mortality for the individual and decrease the likelihood of HIV transmission and emergence of resistance in the community. PMID:21406048

  9. Maximizing patient adherence for optimal outcomes in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Bewley, A; Page, B

    2011-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, disabling disease in which adherence to treatment is often poor. The aim of this article is to highlight the problem of adherence to long-term treatment in psoriasis and the factors that contribute to it, and to discuss how adherence, and thus outcomes, can be improved. This article is based on a presentation given by the authors at a satellite symposium held during the 19th Congress of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 6-10 October, 2010, in Gothenburg, Sweden. Adherence to topical medication is a major problem in psoriasis. Not only are prescriptions not being filled by patients (primary adherence) but topical medications are not being used as recommended (secondary adherence). The issue is complex due to the many factors which affect adherence, including efficacy, ease of use and convenience of application, and the healthcare professional-patient relationship. Due to the nature of the disease, patients suffer poor self-image and feel stigmatized, particularly when psoriasis is present on a visible part of the body. Consequently, the negative impact of psoriasis on patient quality of life underlies many adherence issues. It is therefore important for treatment to address the psychological aspects as well as the physical symptoms of psoriasis. Improvements in several areas of disease management may lead to benefits in medication adherence and hence clinical benefit. Prescribing therapy in line with patient preference for treatment vehicle and improving the healthcare professional-patient relationship may be key factors. Nurses have an important role in educating patients and delivering long-term care. This individualized, personal, approach may help improve treatment adherence, outcomes, and the quality of life for patients with psoriasis. PMID:21507078

  10. Materials Adherence Experiment: Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, P.P.; Landis, G.A.; Oberle, L.G.

    1997-12-31

    NASA`s Mars Pathfinder mission, launched December 4, 1996, reflects a new philosophy of exploiting new technologies to reduce mission cost and accelerate the pace of space exploration. Pathfinder will demonstrate a variety of new technologies aimed at reducing the cost of Mars exploration. Chief among these will be the demonstration of a solar-powered spacecraft on the surface of Mars. The Materials Adherence Experiment on Pathfinder was designed to measure the degradation of solar arrays due to dust settling out of the atmosphere and blocking light to the solar array, lowering the array power output.

  11. Pulling on adhered vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ana-Suncana; Goennenwein, Stefanie; Lorz, Barbara; Seifert, Udo; Sackmann, Erich

    2004-03-01

    A theoretical model describing pulling of vesicles adhered in a contact potential has been developed. Two different regimes have been recognized. For weak to middle-strength adhesive potentials, locally stable shapes are found in a range of applied forces, separated from the free shape by an energy barrier. The phase diagram contains regions with either a unique bound shape or an additional meta-stable shape. Upon pulling, these shapes unbind discontinuously since the vesicle disengage from the surface while still possessing a finite adhesion area (Smith 2003a). In a strong adhesion regime, a competition between adhesion and tether formation is observed. A critical onset force is identified where a tether spontaneously appears as a part of a second order shape transition. Further growth of a tether is followed by a detachment process which terminates at a finite force when a vesicle continuously unbinds from the substrate (Smith 2003b). Both critical forces, as well as all shape parameters, are calculated as a function of the reduced volume and the strength of adhesive potential. Analogous experimental study has been performed where a vertical magnetic tweezers are used in combination with micro-interferometric and confocal techniques to reproduce the same symmetry as in the theoretical investigation. Giant vesicles are bound to the substrate by numerous specific bonds formed between ligands and receptors incorporated into the vesicle and the substrate, respectively. Application of a constant force is inducing a new thermodynamic equilibrium of the system where the vesicle is partially unbound from the substrate (Goennenwein 2003). The shapes of vesicles are compared prior and during application of the force. Very good agreement is obtained, particularly in the middle-strength adhesion regime (Smith 2003c). References: 1. A.-S. Smith, E. Sackmann, U. Seifert: Effects of a pulling force on the shape of a bound vesicle, Europhys. Lett., 64, 2 (2003). 2. A.-S. Smith

  12. What the newspapers say about medication adherence: a content analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigates the coverage of adherence to medicine by the UK and US newsprint media. Adherence to medicine is recognised as an important issue facing healthcare professionals and the newsprint media is a key source of health information, however, little is known about newspaper coverage of medication adherence. Methods A search of the newspaper database Nexis®UK from 2004–2011 was performed. Content analysis of newspaper articles which referenced medication adherence from the twelve highest circulating UK and US daily newspapers and their Sunday equivalents was carried out. A second researcher coded a 15% sample of newspaper articles to establish the inter-rater reliability of coding. Results Searches of newspaper coverage of medication adherence in the UK and US yielded 181 relevant articles for each country. There was a large increase in the number of scientific articles on medication adherence in PubMed® over the study period, however, this was not reflected in the frequency of newspaper articles published on medication adherence. UK newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report the benefits of adherence (p = 0.005), whereas US newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report adherence issues in the elderly population (p = 0.004) and adherence associated with diseases of the central nervous system (p = 0.046). The most commonly reported barriers to adherence were patient factors e.g. poor memory, beliefs and age, whereas, the most commonly reported facilitators to adherence were medication factors including simplified regimens, shorter treatment duration and combination tablets. HIV/AIDS was the single most frequently cited disease (reported in 20% of newspaper articles). Poor quality reporting of medication adherence was identified in 62% of newspaper articles. Conclusion Adherence is not well covered in the newspaper media despite a significant presence in the medical literature. The mass media have the

  13. Moving cystic fibrosis care from rescue to prevention by embedding adherence measurement in routine care.

    PubMed

    Wildman, Martin J; Hoo, Zhe Hui

    2014-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis [CF] is a chronic disease in which preventative treatment with nebulised antibiotics can reduce pulmonary exacerbations that otherwise require rescue therapy. However, adherence is low. Making adherence to maintenance treatment visible is a crucial step towards improving adherence. In this article, we discuss how adherence data can be used to support Quality Improvement in CF through behaviour change in both people with cystic fibrosis and their clinical teams. PMID:24835307

  14. Longterm decrease in the CD57 lymphocyte subset in a patient with chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Raphael B; Burrascano, Joseph; Winger, Edward

    2002-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tickborne illness caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. In a previous report we described a decrease in the CD57 lymphocyte subset in patients with chronic Lyme disease. We have now identified a patient with chronic relapsing and remitting symptoms of Lyme disease who had decreased levels of CD57 lymphocytes over 10 years. This observation represents the longest duration of an immunologic abnormality ever documented in chronic Lyme disease. The CD57 lymphocyte subset appears to be a useful marker of longterm infection with the Lyme disease spirochete.

  15. The old problem of adherence: research on treatment adherence and its relevance for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Wright, M T

    2000-12-01

    The international published research on patient adherence was selectively reviewed with the goal of determining its relevance for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. Results show that not adhering to treatment regimes is so widespread that no combination of sociodemographic variables is reliably predictive of patients' not following doctors' orders. Achieving 100% adherence for any treatment or patient group does not appear to be realistic. Characteristics of the patient's situation, of the given therapy, and of the disease itself affect adherence. In addition, the patient-doctor relationship and the context of the treatment are important. Often overlooked are the existential dimensions of meaning, self-determination and quality of life which are particularly important for the chronically ill. Treatment needs to be negotiated individually with each patient on the basis of an open therapeutic relationship and with the help of multidimensional interventions. Lessons from the discourse on safer sex can steer adherence research and practice away from a behavioural and reductionist approach toward the context and meaning of treatment. PMID:11177448

  16. Measurement of Psychiatric Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Velligan, Dawn; Weiden, Peter J.; Valenstein, Marcia; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence to medications for mental disorders substantially limits treatment effectiveness and results in higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and disability. Accurate measurement of medication adherence is important not only in adherence research, but also in clinical trials in which medications are being evaluated, and in clinical practice where failure to detect nonadherence results in premature medication changes, unnecessary polypharmacy, and greater likelihoods of functional deteriorations and hospitalizations. This is a review of psychiatric treatment adherence methods and measures arising from a meeting on “Methodological Challenges in Psychiatric Treatment Adherence Research” held on September 27-28, 2007 in Bethesda, MD and organized by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Methods This paper reviews the range of modalities currently available for assessing adherence behavior including pill counts, pharmacy records, technology-assisted monitoring, biological assays, and a range of self-report and interviewer-rated scales. Measures of adherence attitudes are also reviewed. Results Each of the adherence measures described are imperfect estimates of actual medication ingestion but each provides informative estimates of adherence or the attitudinal factors associated with adherence. Measure selection depends on a range of factors including the patient sample, the context in which the measure is being used, and the clinical outcomes expected from various levels of nonadherence. The use of multiple measures of adherence is encouraged to balance the limitations of individual measures. Conclusion While adherence assessment has become increasingly sophisticated in recent years there remains a need for refinement and expansion on currently available methods and measures. PMID:21109048

  17. Coexistence of Bacterial Sulfide Oxidizers, Sulfate Reducers, and Spirochetes in a Gutless Worm (Oligochaeta) from the Peru Margin

    PubMed Central

    Blazejak, Anna; Erséus, Christer; Amann, Rudolf; Dubilier, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Olavius crassitunicatus is a small symbiont-bearing worm that occurs at high abundance in oxygen-deficient sediments in the East Pacific Ocean. Using comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we examined the diversity and phylogeny of bacterial symbionts in two geographically distant O. crassitunicatus populations (separated by 385 km) on the Peru margin (water depth, ∼300 m). Five distinct bacterial phylotypes co-occurred in all specimens from both sites: two members of the γ-Proteobacteria (Gamma 1 and 2 symbionts), two members of the δ-Proteobacteria (Delta 1 and 2 symbionts), and one spirochete. A sixth phylotype belonging to the δ-Proteobacteria (Delta 3 symbiont) was found in only one of the two host populations. Three of the O. crassitunicatus bacterial phylotypes are closely related to symbionts of other gutless oligochaete species; the Gamma 1 phylotype is closely related to sulfide-oxidizing symbionts of Olavius algarvensis, Olavius loisae, and Inanidrilus leukodermatus, the Delta 1 phylotype is closely related to sulfate-reducing symbionts of O. algarvensis, and the spirochete is closely related to spirochetal symbionts of O. loisae. In contrast, the Gamma 2 phylotype and the Delta 2 and 3 phylotypes belong to novel lineages that are not related to other bacterial symbionts. Such a phylogenetically diverse yet highly specific and stable association in which multiple bacterial phylotypes coexist within a single host has not been described previously for marine invertebrates. PMID:15746360

  18. A Novel Surface Antigen of Relapsing Fever Spirochetes Can Discriminate between Relapsing Fever and Lyme Borreliosis▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Job E.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Raffel, Sandra J.; McCoy, Brandi N.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2010-01-01

    In a previous immunoproteome analysis of Borrelia hermsii, candidate antigens that bound IgM antibodies from mice and patients infected with relapsing fever spirochetes were identified. One candidate that was identified is a hypothetical protein with a molecular mass of 57 kDa that we have designated Borrelia immunogenic protein A (BipA). This protein was further investigated as a potential diagnostic antigen for B. hermsii given that it is absent from the Borrelia burgdorferi genome. The bipA locus was amplified and sequenced from 39 isolates of B. hermsii that had been acquired from western North America. bipA was also expressed as a recombinant fusion protein. Serum samples from mice and patients infected with B. hermsii or B. burgdorferi were used to confirm the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein in patients infected with relapsing fever spirochetes. Lastly, in silico and experimental analysis indicated that BipA is a surface-exposed lipoprotein in B. hermsii. These findings enhance the capabilities of diagnosing infection with relapsing fever spirochetes. PMID:20147497

  19. Uncultivated cyanobacteria, Chloroflexus-like inhabitants, and spirochete-like inhabitants of a hot spring microbial mat.

    PubMed Central

    Weller, R; Bateson, M M; Heimbuch, B K; Kopczynski, E D; Ward, D M

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences retrieved as cDNA (16S rcDNA) from the Octopus Spring cyanobacterial mat has permitted phylogenetic characterization of some uncultivated community members, expanding our knowledge or diversity within this microbial community. Two new cyanobacterial 16S rRNA sequences were discovered, raising to four the number of cyanobacterial sequence types known to occur in the mat. None of the sequences found is that of the cultivated thermophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus lividus. A new 16S rRNA sequence characteristic of green nonsulfur bacteria and their relatives was discovered, raising to two the number of such sequences known to exist in the mat. Both are unique among the 16S rRNA sequences of cultivated members of this group, including an Octopus Spring isolate of Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Heliothrix oregonensis, whose sequences we report herein. Two spirochete-like 16S rRNA sequences were discovered. One can be placed in the leptospira subdivision of the spirochete group, but the other has such a loose affiliation with the spirochete group that it might actually belong to an as yet unrecognized subdivision or even to a new eubacterial line of descent. PMID:1282313

  20. Spirochaeta coccoides sp. nov., a Novel Coccoid Spirochete from the Hindgut of the Termite Neotermes castaneus †

    PubMed Central

    Dröge, Stefan; Fröhlich, Jürgen; Radek, Renate; König, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    A novel spirochete strain, SPN1, was isolated from the hindgut contents of the termite Neotermes castaneus. The highest similarities (about 90%) of the strain SPN1 16S rRNA gene sequence are with spirochetes belonging to the genus Spirochaeta, and thus, the isolate could not be assigned to the so-called termite clusters of the treponemes or to a known species of the genus Spirochaeta. Therefore, it represents a novel species, which was named Spirochaeta coccoides. In contrast to all other known validly described spirochete species, strain SPN1 shows a coccoid morphology and is immotile. The isolated strain is obligately anaerobic and ferments different mono-, di-, and oligosaccharides by forming formate, acetate, and ethanol as the main fermentation end products. Furthermore, strain SPN1 is able to grow anaerobically with yeast extract as the sole carbon and energy source. The fastest growth was obtained at 30°C, the temperature at which the termites were also grown. The cells possess different enzymatic activities that are involved in the degradation of lignocellulose in the termite hindgut, such as β-d-glucosidase, α-l-arabinosidase, and β-d-xylosidase. Therefore, they may play an important role in the digestion of breakdown products from cellulose and hemicellulose in the termite gut. PMID:16391069

  1. Improving adherence to oral cancer therapy in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    McCue, Debbie A; Lohr, Lisa K; Pick, Amy M

    2014-05-01

    Adherence to oral chemotherapy regimens maximizes their effectiveness and minimizes any potential toxicities. Factors specifically related to the treatment, patient, and health care provider may influence medication adherence. Treatment-related factors include the complexity of the regimen, the cost of therapy, the possibility of side effects, and the delay in treatment benefits. Meanwhile, patients may not have an adequate support system or an understanding of the need for the medication, and providers may not fully succeed in communicating the importance of adherence and the types of side effects that may occur. Nonadherence may lead to an increased risk of toxicity, decreased effectiveness, and increased utilization of health care resources. Although various methods for measuring adherence are available, self-reporting is the most widely used. Studies describing adherence in a broad range of cancers are reviewed. Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia has been revolutionized by the development of oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are highly effective in managing the disease when taken consistently. However, nonadherence is relatively common and can lead to reduced rates of response and increased medical costs. Similar effects of nonadherence on outcome and cost have also been observed in patients with various other hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Interventions to improve adherence to oral chemotherapy regimens include communication about the importance of adherence and the potential consequences of nonadherence, simplification of the patient's medication schedule (if possible), and inclusion of a caregiver or family member in the conversation. Written materials should always be provided to accompany verbal instructions. This review summarizes factors influencing medication adherence, impact of nonadherence on patient outcomes, methods for measuring adherence, previous studies of nonadherence in patients with cancer, common barriers to access, and

  2. Determinants of patient adherence: a review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Kardas, Przemyslaw; Lewek, Pawel; Matyjaszczyk, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A number of potential determinants of medication non-adherence have been described so far. However, the heterogenic quality of existing publications poses the need for the use of a rigorous methodology in building a list of such determinants. The purpose of this study was a systematic review of current research on determinants of patient adherence on the basis of a recently agreed European consensus taxonomy and terminology. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, IPA, and PsycINFO were systematically searched for systematic reviews published between 2000/01/01 and 2009/12/31 that provided determinants on non-adherence to medication. The searches were limited to reviews having adherence to medication prescribed by health professionals for outpatient as a major topic. Results: Fifty-one reviews were included in this review, covering 19 different disease categories. In these reviews, exclusively assessing non-adherence to chronic therapies, 771 individual factor items were identified, of which most were determinants of implementation, and only 47—determinants of persistence with medication. Factors with an unambiguous effect on adherence were further grouped into 8 clusters of socio-economic-related factors, 6 of healthcare team- and system-related factors, 6 of condition-related factors, 6 of therapy-related factors, and 14 of patient-related factors. The lack of standardized definitions and use of poor measurement methods resulted in many inconsistencies. Conclusions: This study provides clear evidence that medication non-adherence is affected by multiple determinants. Therefore, the prediction of non-adherence of individual patients is difficult, and suitable measurement and multifaceted interventions may be the most effective answer toward unsatisfactory adherence. The limited number of publications assessing determinants of persistence with medication, and lack of those providing determinants of adherence to short-term treatment identify

  3. Interventions to improve adherence to lipid lowering medication

    PubMed Central

    Schedlbauer, Angela; Schroeder, Knut; Peters, Tim; Fahey, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid lowering drugs are still widely underused, despite compelling evidence about their effectiveness in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Poor patient adherence to medication regimen is a major factor in the lack of success in treating hyperlipidaemia. In this review we focus on interventions, which encourage patients at risk of heart disease or stroke to take lipid lowering medication regularly. Objectives To assess the effect of interventions aiming at improved adherence to lipid lowering drugs, focusing on measures of adherence and clinical outcomes. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo and CINAHL. Date of most recent search was in February 2003. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of adherence-enhancing interventions to lipid lowering medication in adults for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in an ambulatory setting. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers extracted data independently and assessed studies according to criteria outlined by the Cochrane Reviewers’ Handbook. Main results The eight studies found contained data on 5943 patients. Interventions could be stratified into four categories: 1. simplification of drug regimen, 2. patient information/education, 3. intensified patient care such as reminding and 4. complex behavioural interventions such as group sessions. Change in adherence ranged from −3% to 25% (decrease in adherence by 3% to increase in adherence by 25%). Three studies reported significantly improved adherence through simplification of drug regimen (category 1), improved patient information/education (category 2) and reminding (category 3). The fact that the successful interventions were evenly spread across the categories, does not suggest any advantage of one particular type of intervention. The methodological and analytical quality was

  4. Molecular sources of residual cardiovascular risk, clinical signals, and innovative solutions: relationship with subclinical disease, undertreatment, and poor adherence: implications of new evidence upon optimizing cardiovascular patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Residual risk, the ongoing appreciable risk of major cardiovascular events (MCVE) in statin-treated patients who have achieved evidence-based lipid goals, remains a concern among cardiologists. Factors that contribute to this continuing risk are atherogenic non-low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles and atherogenic processes unrelated to LDL cholesterol, including other risk factors, the inherent properties of statin drugs, and patient characteristics, ie, genetics and behaviors. In addition, providers, health care systems, the community, public policies, and the environment play a role. Major statin studies suggest an average 28% reduction in LDL cholesterol and a 31% reduction in relative risk, leaving a residual risk of about 69%. Incomplete reductions in risk, and failure to improve conditions that create risk, may result in ongoing progression of atherosclerosis, with new and recurring lesions in original and distant culprit sites, remodeling, arrhythmias, rehospitalizations, invasive procedures, and terminal disability. As a result, identification of additional agents to reduce residual risk, particularly administered together with statin drugs, has been an ongoing quest. The current model of atherosclerosis involves many steps during which disease may progress independently of guideline-defined elevations in LDL cholesterol. Differences in genetic responsiveness to statin therapy, differences in ability of the endothelium to regenerate and repair, and differences in susceptibility to nonlipid risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, hypertension, and molecular changes associated with obesity and diabetes, may all create residual risk. A large number of inflammatory and metabolic processes may also provide eventual therapeutic targets to lower residual risk. Classically, epidemiologic and other evidence suggested that raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol would be cardioprotective. When LDL cholesterol is aggressively lowered to targets, low HDL

  5. Cellular immune findings in Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, L. H.; Moffat, C. M.; Steere, A. C.; Dwyer, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    From 1981 through 1983, we did the first testing of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. Active established Lyme disease was often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal, and a heightened response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and Lyme spirochetal antigens. Thus, a major feature of the immune response during active disease seems to be a lessening of suppression, but it is not yet known whether this response plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:6240164

  6. Detection and genetic characterization of relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi in Estonian ticks.

    PubMed

    Geller, Julia; Nazarova, Lidia; Katargina, Olga; Järvekülg, Lilian; Fomenko, Natalya; Golovljova, Irina

    2012-01-01

    During the years 2008-2010 I. ricinus and I. persulcatus ticks were collected from 64 sites in mainland Estonia and on the island Saaremaa. Presence of B. miyamotoi was found in 0.9% (23/2622) of ticks. The prevalence in I. persulcatus and I. ricinus ticks differed significantly, 2.7% (15/561) and 0.4% (8/2061), respectively. The highest prevalence rates were in found South-Eastern Estonia in an area of I. persulcatus and I. ricinus sympatry and varied from 1.4% (1/73) to 2.8% (5/178). Co-infections with B. burgdorferi s.l. group spirochetes and tick-borne encephalitis virus were also revealed. Genetic characterization of partial 16S rRNA, p66 and glpQ genes demonstrated that Estonian sequences belong to two types of B. miyamotoi and cluster with sequences from Europe and the European part of Russia, as well as with sequences from Siberia, Asia and Japan, here designated as European and Asian types, respectively. Estonian sequences of the European type were obtained from I. ricinus ticks only, whereas the Asian type of B. miyamotoi was shown for both tick species in the sympatric regions.

  7. Detection and Genetic Characterization of Relapsing Fever Spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi in Estonian Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Julia; Nazarova, Lidia; Katargina, Olga; Järvekülg, Lilian; Fomenko, Natalya; Golovljova, Irina

    2012-01-01

    During the years 2008–2010 I. ricinus and I. persulcatus ticks were collected from 64 sites in mainland Estonia and on the island Saaremaa. Presence of B. miyamotoi was found in 0.9% (23/2622) of ticks. The prevalence in I. persulcatus and I. ricinus ticks differed significantly, 2.7% (15/561) and 0.4% (8/2061), respectively. The highest prevalence rates were in found South-Eastern Estonia in an area of I. persulcatus and I. ricinus sympatry and varied from 1.4% (1/73) to 2.8% (5/178). Co-infections with B. burgdorferi s.l. group spirochetes and tick-borne encephalitis virus were also revealed. Genetic characterization of partial 16S rRNA, p66 and glpQ genes demonstrated that Estonian sequences belong to two types of B. miyamotoi and cluster with sequences from Europe and the European part of Russia, as well as with sequences from Siberia, Asia and Japan, here designated as European and Asian types, respectively. Estonian sequences of the European type were obtained from I. ricinus ticks only, whereas the Asian type of B. miyamotoi was shown for both tick species in the sympatric regions. PMID:23251652

  8. Factors affecting adherence to a raw vegan diet.

    PubMed

    Link, Lilli B; Jacobson, Judith S

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence and identify predictors of adherence to a raw vegan diet (i.e., uncooked plant foods) following a stay at a raw vegan institute. In this cohort study of guests at a raw vegan institute, subjects completed written questionnaires upon arrival and 12 weeks later. Of 107 eligible guests, 84 participated. Mean age was 54 years, 23 were male, and 73 white. Fifty-one completed the 12-week follow-up. Eight (16%) reported their diet to be 80% raw vegan at baseline and 14 (28%) at follow-up. Based on a raw vegan dietary adherence score (range 0-42) created for this study, mean adherence (SD) increased from 15.1 (5.4) to 17.0 (5.8) over 12 weeks (p=0.03). Baseline predictors of adherence included: education (beta=0.95), severity of disease (beta=0.98), and self-efficacy to adhere (beta=0.72). Future interventions that evaluate this diet should address self-efficacy, an important, potentially remediable predictor of adherence.

  9. Factors affecting adherence to a raw vegan diet

    PubMed Central

    Link, Lilli B.; Jacobson, Judith S.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence and identify predictors of adherence to a raw vegan diet (i.e., uncooked plant foods) following a stay at a raw vegan institute. In this cohort study of guests at a raw vegan institute, subjects completed written questionnaires upon arrival and 12 weeks later. Of 107 eligible guests, 84 participated. Mean age was 54 years, 23 were male, and 73 white. Fifty-one completed the 12-week follow-up. Eight (16%) reported their diet to be ≥80% raw vegan at baseline and 14 (28%) at follow-up. Based on a raw vegan dietary adherence score (range 0-42) created for this study, mean adherence (SD) increased from 15.1 (5.4) to 17.0 (5.8) over 12 weeks (p=0.03). Baseline predictors of adherence included: education (β=0.95), severity of disease (β=0.98), and self-efficacy to adhere (β=0.72). Future interventions that evaluate this diet should address self-efficacy, an important, potentially remediable predictor of adherence. PMID:18243943

  10. Simultaneous measurement of the viability, aggregation, and live and dead adherence of Streptococcus crista, Streptococcus mutans and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in human saliva in relation to indices of caries, dental plaque and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Rudney, J D; Staikov, R K

    2002-05-01

    Salivary proteins have multiple functions and many share similar functions, which may be why it has been difficult to relate variations in their concentrations to oral health and ecology. An alternative is to focus on variations in the major functions of saliva. An hydroxyapatite-coated microplate model has been developed that simultaneously measures saliva-promoted bacterial viability, bacterial aggregation, and live and dead bacterial adherence, while simulating oral temperature and shearing forces from swallowing. That model was applied to resting whole and stimulated parotid saliva from 149 individuals, using representative strains of Streptococcus crista, S. mutans, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Two major factors were defined by multivariate analysis (this was successful only for whole-saliva). One factor was correlated with aggregation, live adherence and dead adherence for all three strains; the other was correlated with total viability of all three strains. Participants were grouped <25th percentile and >75th percentile for each factor. Those groups were compared for clinical indices of oral health. Caries scores were significantly lower in those with high scores for aggregation-adherence, regardless of whether total viability scores were low or high. Live bacteria always predominated on surfaces when live and dead adherence scores were expressed as ratios. However, participants with high scores for aggregation-adherence showed significantly more dead adherent bacteria than those with low scores (these ratios were uncorrelated with total viability). This finding may indicate that extreme differences in the ability to kill bacteria on surfaces can influence caries risk.

  11. Treponema pallidum Lipoprotein TP0435 Expressed in Borrelia burgdorferi Produces Multiple Surface/Periplasmic Isoforms and mediates Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kamfai; Nasereddin, Thayer; Alter, Laura; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Giacani, Lorenzo; Parveen, Nikhat

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete to colonize various tissues requires the presence of surface-exposed adhesins that have been difficult to identify due to the inability to culture and genetically manipulate T. pallidum. Using a Borrelia burgdorferi-based heterologous system and gain-in-function approach, we show for the first time that a highly immunogenic lipoprotein TP0435 can be differentially processed into multiple isoforms with one variant stochastically displayed on the spirochete surface. TP0435 was previously believed to be exclusively located in T. pallidum periplasm. Furthermore, non-adherent B. burgdorferi strain expressing TP0435 acquires the ability to bind to a variety of host cells including placental cells and exhibits slow opsonophagocytosis in vitro similar to poor ex vivo phagocytosis of T. pallidum by host macrophages reported previously. This phenomenon of production of both surface and periplasmic immunogenic lipoprotein isoforms has possible implications in immune evasion of the obligate pathogen T. pallidum during infection. PMID:27161310

  12. Measurement of adherent cell mass and growth

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kidong; Millet, Larry J.; Kim, Namjung; Li, Huan; Jin, Xiaozhong; Popescu, Gabriel; Aluru, N. R.; Hsia, K. Jimmy; Bashir, Rashid

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of physical properties of cells such as their mass and stiffness has been of great interest and can have profound implications in cell biology, tissue engineering, cancer, and disease research. For example, the direct dependence of cell growth rate on cell mass for individual adherent human cells can elucidate the mechanisms underlying cell cycle progression. Here we develop an array of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) resonant mass sensors that can be used to directly measure the biophysical properties, mass, and growth rate of single adherent cells. Unlike conventional cantilever mass sensors, our sensors retain a uniform mass sensitivity over the cell attachment surface. By measuring the frequency shift of the mass sensors with growing (soft) cells and fixed (stiff) cells, and through analytical modeling, we derive the Young’s modulus of the unfixed cell and unravel the dependence of the cell mass measurement on cell stiffness. Finally, we grew individual cells on the mass sensors and measured their mass for 50+ hours. Our results demonstrate that adherent human colon epithelial cells have increased growth rates with a larger cell mass, and the average growth rate increases linearly with the cell mass, at 3.25%/hr. Our sensitive mass sensors with a position-independent mass sensitivity can be coupled with microscopy for simultaneous monitoring of cell growth and status, and provide an ideal method to study cell growth, cell cycle progression, differentiation, and apoptosis. PMID:21068372

  13. Adherence to preventive recommendations: experience of a cohort presenting for executive health care.

    PubMed

    Shippee, Nathan D; Mullan, Rebecca J; Nabhan, Mohammed; Kermott, Cindy A; Hagen, Philip T; Rhodes, Deborah J; Montori, Victor M; Murad, M Hassan

    2012-04-01

    Adherence to recommended preventive services and immunizations in adults is suboptimal and often associated with socioeconomic status, race, and access to care. The aim of this study is to evaluate adherence in a cohort without these barriers to ascertain realistically optimal adherence rates and to examine remaining barriers among relatively advantaged individuals. Specifically, it employed a sample of 6889 patients presenting for executive health care from 2005 to 2009. Adherence varied across colorectal cancer screening (79%), mammography (89%), cervical cancer screening (91%), tetanus immunization (82%), and pneumococcal vaccination (62%). Multivariate logistic regressions revealed that age, education, alcohol use concerns, and being married were positively associated with adherence to certain services. Individuals without the usual barriers to care have variable, less-than-ideal rates of adherence to preventive services, which correlate with some health behaviors and demographics. Understanding the predictors of adherence may inform quality improvement processes aimed at optimizing disease prevention.

  14. Improving adherence to medication regimens for children with asthma and its effect on clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    da Costa, I G; Rapoff, M A; Lemanek, K; Goldstein, G L

    1997-01-01

    We examined the effects of a combined education and token system intervention to improve adherence to inhaled corticosteroids for an 8-year-old girl and a 10-year-old boy with asthma. Adherence was measured by an electronic chronolog monitor, and disease outcome was assessed by repeated pulmonary function testing. A withdrawal design demonstrated improved adherence and, for 1 child, an associated improvement in pulmonary function occurred. Methodological and clinical implications are discussed, including variables other than adherence that may affect disease outcome.

  15. Physiology and nutrition of Treponema primitia, an H2/CO2-acetogenic spirochete from termite hindguts.

    PubMed

    Graber, Joseph R; Breznak, John A

    2004-03-01

    Treponema primitia strains ZAS-1 and ZAS-2, the first spirochetes to be isolated from termite hindguts (J. R. Leadbetter, T. M. Schmidt, J. R. Graber, and J. A. Breznak, Science 283:686-689, 1999), were examined for nutritional, physiological, and biochemical properties relevant to growth and survival in their natural habitat. In addition to using H(2) plus CO(2) as substrates, these strains were capable of homoacetogenic growth on mono- and disaccharides and (in the case of ZAS-2) methoxylated benzenoids. Cells were also capable of mixotrophic growth (i.e., simultaneous utilization of H(2) and organic substrates). Cell extracts of T. primitia possessed enzyme activities of the Wood/Ljungdahl (acetyl coenzyme A) pathway of acetogenesis, including tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes of the methyl group-forming branch. However, a folate compound was required in the medium for growth. ZAS-1 and ZAS-2 growing on H(2) plus CO(2) displayed H(2) thresholds of 650 and 490 ppmv, respectively. Anoxic cultures of ZAS-1 and ZAS-2 maintained growth after the addition of as much as 0.5% (vol/vol) O(2) to the headspace atmosphere. Cell extracts exhibited NADH and NADPH peroxidase and NADH oxidase activities but neither catalase nor superoxide dismutase activity. Results indicate that (i) T. primitia is able to exploit a variety of substrates derived from the food of its termite hosts and in so doing contributes to termite nutrition via acetogenesis, (ii) in situ growth of T. primitia is likely dependent on secretion of a folate compound(s) by other members of the gut microbiota, and (iii) cells possess enzymatic adaptations to oxidative stress, which is likely to be encountered in peripheral regions of the termite hindgut. PMID:15006747

  16. A Presentation of Lyme Disease: Pseudotumor Cerebri.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Burcu; İncecik, Faruk; Hergüner, Özlem M; Alabaz, Derya; Beşen, Şeyda

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is caused by a tick-transmitted spirochete, B. burgdorferi. It can present with both central and peripheral nervous system manifestations, including aseptic meningitis, meningoencephalitis, Bell's palsy and other cranial neuropathies, radiculoneuritis, and myelitis. However, pseudotumor cerebri associated with Lyme disease is rare. Here, we report a eight-year-old girl with the unusual manifestation of pseudotumor cerebri associated Lyme disease. PMID:27411423

  17. The last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA): Acquisition of cytoskeletal motility from aerotolerant spirochetes in the Proterozoic Eon

    PubMed Central

    Margulis, Lynn; Chapman, Michael; Guerrero, Ricardo; Hall, John

    2006-01-01

    We develop a symbiogenetic concept of the origin of eukaryotic intracellular motility systems from anaerobic but aerotolerant spirochetes in sulfide-rich environments. The last eukaryotic common ancestors (LECAs) have extant archaeprotist descendants: motile nucleated cells with Embden-Meyerhof glycolysis and substrate-level phosphorylation that lack the α-proteobacterial symbiont that became the mitochondrion. Swimming and regulated O2-tolerance via sulfide oxidation already had been acquired by sulfidogenic wall-less archaebacteria (thermoplasmas) after aerotolerant cytoplasmic-tubule-containing spirochetes (eubacteria) attached to them. Increasing stability of sulfide-oxidizing/sulfur-reducing consortia analogous to extant sulfur syntrophies (Thiodendron) led to fusion. The eubacteria–archaebacteria symbiosis became permanent as the nucleus evolved by prokaryotic recombination with membrane hypertrophy, analogous to Gemmata obscuriglobus and other δ-proteobacteria with membrane-bounded nucleoids. Histone-coated DNA, protein-synthetic RNAs, amino-acylating, and other enzymes were contributed by the sulfidogen whereas most intracellular motility derives from the spirochete. From this redox syntrophy in anoxic and microoxic Proterozoic habitats LECA evolved. The nucleus originated by recombination of eu- and archaebacterial DNA that remained attached to eubacterial motility structures and became the microtubular cytoskeleton, including the mitotic apparatus. Direct LECA descendants include free-living archaeprotists in anoxic environments: archamoebae, metamonads, parabasalids, and some mammalian symbionts with mitosomes. LECA later acquired the fully aerobic Krebs cycle-oxidative phosphorylation-mitochondrial metabolism by integration of the protomitochondrion, a third α-proteobacterial symbiont from which the ancestors to most protoctists, all fungi, plants, and animals evolved. Secondarily anaerobic eukaryotes descended from LECA after integration of this

  18. Program Spending to Increase Adherence: South African Cervical Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.; Denny, Lynette A.; De Souza, Michelle; Kuhn, Louise; Goldie, Sue J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Adherence is crucial for public health program effectiveness, though the benefits of increasing adherence must ultimately be weighed against the associated costs. We sought to determine the relationship between investment in community health worker (CHW) home visits and increased attendance at cervical cancer screening appointments in Cape Town, South Africa. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an observational study of 5,258 CHW home visits made in 2003–4 as part of a community-based screening program. We estimated the functional relationship between spending on these visits and increased appointment attendance (adherence). Increased adherence was noted after each subsequent CHW visit. The costs of making the CHW visits was based on resource use including both personnel time and vehicle-related expenses valued in 2004 Rand. The CHW program cost R194,018, with 1,576 additional appointments attended. Adherence increased from 74% to 90%; 55% to 87%; 48% to 77%; and 56% to 80% for 6-, 12-, 24-, and 36-month appointments. Average per-woman costs increased by R14–R47. The majority of this increase occurred with the first 2 CHW visits (90%, 83%, 74%, and 77%; additional cost: R12–R26). Conclusions/Significance We found that study data can be used for program planning, identifying spending levels that achieve adherence targets given budgetary constraints. The results, derived from a single disease program, are retrospective, and should be prospectively replicated. PMID:19492097

  19. Adherence Determinants in Cystic Fibrosis: Cluster Analysis of Parental Psychosocial, Religious, and/or Spiritual Factors

    PubMed Central

    Szczesniak, Rhonda D.; Britton, LaCrecia L.; Siracusa, Christopher M.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Chini, Barbara A.; Dimitriou, Sophia M.; Seid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Cystic fibrosis is a progressive disease requiring a complex, time-consuming treatment regimen. Nonadherence may contribute to an acceleration of the disease process. Spirituality influences some parental healthcare behaviors and medical decision-making. Objectives: We hypothesized that parents of children with cystic fibrosis, when classified into groups based on adherence rates, would share certain psychosocial and religious and/or spiritual variables distinguishing them from other adherence groups. Methods: We conducted a multisite, prospective, observational study focused on parents of children younger than 13 years old at two cystic fibrosis center sites (Site 1, n = 83; Site 2, n = 59). Religious and/or spiritual constructs, depression, and marital adjustment were measured by using previously validated questionnaires. Determinants of adherence included parental attitude toward treatment, perceived behavioral norms, motivation, and self-efficacy. Adherence patterns were measured with the Daily Phone Diary, a validated instrument used to collect adherence data. Cluster analysis identified discrete adherence patterns, including parents’ completion of more treatments than prescribed. Measurements and Main Results: For airway clearance therapy, four adherence groups were identified: median adherence rates of 23%, 52%, 77%, and 120%. These four groups differed significantly for parental depression, sanctification of their child’s body, and self-efficacy. Three adherence groups were identified for nebulized medications: median adherence rates of 35%, 82%, and 130%. These three groups differed significantly for sanctification of their child’s body and self-efficacy. Conclusions: Our results indicated that parents in each group shared psychosocial and religious and/or spiritual factors that differentiated them. Therefore, conversations about adherence likely should be tailored to baseline adherence patterns. Development of efficacious

  20. Lyme disease and the orthopaedic implications of lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian G; Cruz, Aristides I; Milewski, Matthew D; Shapiro, Eugene D

    2011-02-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in the United States and Europe. Increased awareness of the clinical manifestations of the disease is needed to improve detection and treatment. In the acute and late stages, Lyme disease may be difficult to distinguish from other disease processes. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of Lyme disease are directly related to the Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete and its effects on the integumentary, neurologic, cardiac, and musculoskeletal systems. Lyme arthritis is a common clinical manifestation of Lyme disease and should be considered in the evaluation of patients with monoarticular or pauciarticular joint complaints in a geographic area in which Lyme disease is endemic. Management of Lyme arthritis involves eradication of the spirochete with antibiotics. Generally, the prognosis is excellent. Arthroscopic synovectomy is reserved for refractory cases that do not respond to antibiotics.

  1. OspA immunization decreases transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes from infected Peromyscus leucopus mice to larval Ixodes scapularis ticks.

    PubMed

    Tsao, J; Barbour, A G; Luke, C J; Fikrig, E; Fish, D

    2001-01-01

    Recombinant outer surface protein A (OspA) vaccination of wild animal reservoirs has potential application for reducing Borrelia burgdorferi transmission in nature and subsequent risk of human infection. As a major reservoir host, the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) is a candidate for a vaccination program designed to reduce infection prevalence in vector ticks. In this study we characterized the effect of various levels of immunization with recombinant OspA-glutathione transferase fusion protein on transmission dynamics from infected P. leucopus to larval ticks. Control mice were vaccinated with glutathione transferase alone. All mice were experimentally infected with B. burgdorferi before vaccination. The immune responses of the immunized mice were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibodies to OspA. Transmission of B. burgdorferi from infected mice was determined by xenodiagnosis with uninfected larval ticks. Spirochetes in ticks were counted by direct immunofluorescence assay. The concentration of antibody to OspA increased with each OspA vaccination but most markedly after the first and second vaccinations. In comparison with control mice, there was reduced transmission by OspA-vaccinated mice to uninfected ticks. One, two, or three doses of OspA reduced infection prevalence in xenodiagnostic ticks by 48%, 92%, or 99% and the numbers of spirochetes per tick by 84%, 98%, or 99%, respectively. This study suggests that vaccination of P. leucopus with OspA could reduce transmission to the tick vector in nature despite prior infection of the reservoir host.

  2. Sensitivity of Lyme Borreliosis Spirochetes to Serum Complement of Regular Zoo Animals: Potential Reservoir Competence of Some Exotic Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ticha, Lucie; Golovchenko, Maryna; Oliver, James H; Grubhoffer, Libor; Rudenko, Nataliia

    2016-01-01

    Reaction of vertebrate serum complement with different Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species is used as a basis in determining reservoir hosts among domesticated and wild animals. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia garinii, and Borrelia afzelii were tested for their sensitivity to sera of exotic vertebrate species housed in five zoos located in the Czech Republic. We confirmed that different Borrelia species have different sensitivity to host serum. We found that tolerance to Borrelia infection possessed by hosts might differ among individuals of the same genera or species and is not affected by host age or sex. Of all zoo animals included in our study, carnivores demonstrated the highest apparent reservoir competency for Lyme borreliosis spirochetes. We showed that selected exotic ungulate species are tolerant to Borrelia infection. For the first time we showed the high tolerance of Siamese crocodile to Borrelia as compared to the other studied reptile species. While exotic vertebrates present a limited risk to the European human population as reservoirs for the causative agents of Lyme borreliosis, cases of incidental spillover infection could lead to successful replication of the pathogens in a new host, changing the status of selected exotic species and their role in pathogen emergence or maintenance. The question if being tolerant to pathogen means to be a competent reservoir host still needs an answer, simply because the majority of exotic animals might never be exposed to spirochetes in their natural environment. PMID:26783940

  3. Sensitivity of Lyme Borreliosis Spirochetes to Serum Complement of Regular Zoo Animals: Potential Reservoir Competence of Some Exotic Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ticha, Lucie; Golovchenko, Maryna; Oliver, James H; Grubhoffer, Libor; Rudenko, Nataliia

    2016-01-01

    Reaction of vertebrate serum complement with different Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species is used as a basis in determining reservoir hosts among domesticated and wild animals. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia garinii, and Borrelia afzelii were tested for their sensitivity to sera of exotic vertebrate species housed in five zoos located in the Czech Republic. We confirmed that different Borrelia species have different sensitivity to host serum. We found that tolerance to Borrelia infection possessed by hosts might differ among individuals of the same genera or species and is not affected by host age or sex. Of all zoo animals included in our study, carnivores demonstrated the highest apparent reservoir competency for Lyme borreliosis spirochetes. We showed that selected exotic ungulate species are tolerant to Borrelia infection. For the first time we showed the high tolerance of Siamese crocodile to Borrelia as compared to the other studied reptile species. While exotic vertebrates present a limited risk to the European human population as reservoirs for the causative agents of Lyme borreliosis, cases of incidental spillover infection could lead to successful replication of the pathogens in a new host, changing the status of selected exotic species and their role in pathogen emergence or maintenance. The question if being tolerant to pathogen means to be a competent reservoir host still needs an answer, simply because the majority of exotic animals might never be exposed to spirochetes in their natural environment.

  4. Proline iminopeptidase from the outer cell envelope of the human oral spirochete Treponema denticola ATCC 35405.

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, K K; Chen, C Y; Mäkinen, P L

    1996-01-01

    Certain periodontopathic organisms have been shown to exhibit high activity of proline iminopeptidase (PIPase). The human oral spirochete Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 was found to contain an easily extractable, novel PIPase (EC 3.4.11.5), which was purified to a sodium dodecyl sulfate- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-pure form by means of fast protein liquid chromatographic procedures. The range of the minimum monomeric molecular mass (280 amino acid residues) of the PIPase, based on amino acid analysis, was 30.35 to 30.39 kDa, but the likely in vivo form of the enzyme is a tetramer (minimum mass, 120.2 to 120.4 kDa). The molecular masses based on laser desorption mass spectrometry were 36.058 kDa for the monomer and 72.596 kDa for a dimer. The PIPase cleaves specifically the Pro-Y bond in dipeptides where Y is preferably Arg or Lys. Pro-Gln, Pro-Asn, and Pro-Ala were also good substrates, while Pro-Glu was hydrolyzed slowly and Pro-Asp was not hydrolyzed at all. Tripeptides were poor substrates or were not hydrolyzed (an exception was Pro-Gly-Gly, which cleaved at a moderate rate). Larger molecules, such as poly-L-Pro, were not hydrolyzed. The T. denticola enzyme can be regarded as a true PIPase, since replacing Pro in Pro-Y with other amino acid residues resulted in no hydrolysis. The activity of the PIPase may depend on an active carboxyl group and on an active seryl residue but not on metal cations. Diethylpyrocarbonate inactivated the enzyme in a reaction that was not reversible upon addition of NH2OH. The enzyme contains a relatively large percentage (ca. 15%) of proline residues. The dominance of the PIPase activity among aminopeptidase activities present in T. denticola and the proposed location of the enzyme in the outer cell envelope suggest that it has a vital function in the propagation of the cells within their biological niche (inflamed human periodontal tissues). The biologic role of the PIPase may be envisaged as in the termination of the

  5. Medication Adherence and Readmission In Medicare Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuting; Kaplan, Cameron M.; Baik, Seo Hyon; Chang, Chung-Chou H.; Lave, Judith R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between 6-month medication adherence and 1-year down-stream heart-disease related readmission among patients who survived a myocardial infarction (MI). Study Design Retrospective, nested case-control analysis of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries who were discharged alive post-MI in 2008 (n = 168,882). Methods Patients in the case group had their first heart-disease related readmission post-MI discharge during 6-9 months and/or 9-12 months. We then used propensity score matching mechanism to identify patients in the control group who had similar characteristics, but did not have a readmission in the same time window. Adherence was defined as the average 6-month medication possession ratio (MPR) prior to the first date of the time-window of defining readmission. Results After controlling for demographic, insurance coverage and clinical characteristics, patients who had a heart-disease related readmission had worse adherence, with MPR of 0.70 and 0.74 in the case and control groups. Odds ratio of MPR ≥0.75 was 0.79 (95% CI 0.75-0.83) among those with a readmission relative to those without. Conclusion Our study shows that better 6-month medication adherence may reduce heart-disease related readmissions within a year after an MI. PMID:25651604

  6. Streptococcus Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, Angela H.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Streptococci readily colonize mucosal tissues in the nasopharynx; the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts; and the skin. Each ecological niche presents a series of challenges to successful colonization with which streptococci have to contend. Some species exist in equilibrium with their host, neither stimulating nor submitting to immune defenses mounted against them. Most are either opportunistic or true pathogens responsible for diseases such as pharyngitis, tooth decay, necrotizing fasciitis, infective endocarditis, and meningitis. Part of the success of streptococci as colonizers is attributable to the spectrum of proteins expressed on their surfaces. Adhesins enable interactions with salivary, serum, and extracellular matrix components; host cells; and other microbes. This is the essential first step to colonization, the development of complex communities, and possible invasion of host tissues. The majority of streptococcal adhesins are anchored to the cell wall via a C-terminal LPxTz motif. Other proteins may be surface anchored through N-terminal lipid modifications, while the mechanism of cell wall associations for others remains unclear. Collectively, these surface-bound proteins provide Streptococcus species with a “coat of many colors,” enabling multiple intimate contacts and interplays between the bacterial cell and the host. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated direct roles for many streptococcal adhesins as colonization or virulence factors, making them attractive targets for therapeutic and preventive strategies against streptococcal infections. There is, therefore, much focus on applying increasingly advanced molecular techniques to determine the precise structures and functions of these proteins, and their regulatory pathways, so that more targeted approaches can be developed. PMID:19721085

  7. Improving Patient's Primary Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Bouvet, Sophie; Roux-Marson, Clarisse; Arnaud, Fabrice; Castelli, Christel; Ray, Valérie; Kinowski, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quality of transitions of care is one of the first concerns in patient safety. Redesigning the discharge process to incorporate clinical pharmacy activities could reduce the incidence of postdischarge adverse events by improving medication adherence. The present study investigated the value of pharmacist counseling sessions on primary medication adherence after hospital discharge. This study was conducted in a 1844-bed hospital in France. It was divided in an observational period and an interventional period of 3 months each. In both periods, ward-based clinical pharmacists performed medication reconciliation and inpatient follow-up. In interventional period, initial counseling and discharge counseling sessions were added to pharmaceutical care. The primary medication adherence was assessed by calling community pharmacists 7 days after patient discharge. We compared the measure of adherence between the patients from the observational period (n = 201) and the interventional period (n = 193). The rate of patients who were adherent increased from 51.0% to 66.7% between both periods (P < 0.01). When discharge counseling was performed (n = 78), this rate rose to 79.7% (P < 0.001). The multivariate regression performed on data from both periods showed that age of at least 78 years old, and 3 or less new medications on discharge order were predictive factors of adherence. New medications ordered at discharge represented 42.0% (n = 1018/2426) of all medications on discharge order. The rate of unfilled new medications decreased from 50.2% in the observational period to 32.5% in the interventional period (P < 10−7). However, patients included in the observational period were not significantly more often readmitted or visited the emergency department than the patients who experienced discharge counseling during the interventional period (45.3% vs. 46.2%; P = 0.89). This study highlights that discharge counseling sessions are

  8. Lyme Disease: What the Wilderness Provider Needs to Know.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Vakkalanka, J Priyanka; Holstege, Christopher P; Mead, Paul S

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem tickborne illness caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi and is the most common vectorborne disease in the United States. Prognosis after initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy is typically good if treated early. Wilderness providers caring for patients who live in or travel to high-incidence Lyme disease areas should be aware of the basic biology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of Lyme disease.

  9. ADHERENCE AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS IN NORTHERN GREECE

    PubMed Central

    Zioga, Efrosini; Kazakos, Kyriakos; Dimopoulos, Evagelos; Koutras, Christos; Marmara, Kalliopi; Marmara, Eleni-Efrosini; Marmaras, Athanasios; Lavdaniti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adherence as a concept includes various types of health-related behavior. Better medical adherence leads to improved disease control and fewer diabetes–related complications. Quality of life and medication adherence are interrelated. Patients with diabetes who adhere to their treatment can experience an improvement in quality of life and vice versa. Aim: To assess treatment adherence in patients with type II diabetes, as well as the connection between adherence and quality of life. Methodology: A descriptive non-experimental study was conducted in a provincial hospital in Northern Greece. The sample examined was a convenience sample consisting of 108 patients with type II diabetes mellitus. They completed the “Diabetes Self-Care Activities Questionnaire” and SF-36 “Quality of Life Questionnaire”. Results: Participants demonstrated good adherence to diet and blood test / blood glucose test routines, but did not experience high levels of quality of life. The type of treatment affected the adherence to blood tests with a statistically significant difference (p=0,000). Also, marital status affected mental health with a statistically significant difference (p=0,032). The adherence sub scales are correlated with the all domains of quality of life. Conclusions: According to our findings, it is important to plan interventions to enhance adherence to other types of treatment and to help patients to further improve their quality of life. PMID:27698597

  10. ADHERENCE AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS IN NORTHERN GREECE

    PubMed Central

    Zioga, Efrosini; Kazakos, Kyriakos; Dimopoulos, Evagelos; Koutras, Christos; Marmara, Kalliopi; Marmara, Eleni-Efrosini; Marmaras, Athanasios; Lavdaniti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adherence as a concept includes various types of health-related behavior. Better medical adherence leads to improved disease control and fewer diabetes–related complications. Quality of life and medication adherence are interrelated. Patients with diabetes who adhere to their treatment can experience an improvement in quality of life and vice versa. Aim: To assess treatment adherence in patients with type II diabetes, as well as the connection between adherence and quality of life. Methodology: A descriptive non-experimental study was conducted in a provincial hospital in Northern Greece. The sample examined was a convenience sample consisting of 108 patients with type II diabetes mellitus. They completed the “Diabetes Self-Care Activities Questionnaire” and SF-36 “Quality of Life Questionnaire”. Results: Participants demonstrated good adherence to diet and blood test / blood glucose test routines, but did not experience high levels of quality of life. The type of treatment affected the adherence to blood tests with a statistically significant difference (p=0,000). Also, marital status affected mental health with a statistically significant difference (p=0,032). The adherence sub scales are correlated with the all domains of quality of life. Conclusions: According to our findings, it is important to plan interventions to enhance adherence to other types of treatment and to help patients to further improve their quality of life.

  11. Improving medication adherence in migraine treatment.

    PubMed

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Rains, Jeanetta A; Nicholson, Robert A; Lipton, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    Medication adherence is integral to successful treatment of migraine and other headache. The existing literature examining medication adherence in migraine is small, and the methodologies used to assess adherence are limited. However, these studies broadly suggest poor adherence to both acute and preventive migraine medications, with studies using more objective monitoring reporting lower adherence rates. Methods for improving medication adherence are described, including organizational strategies, provider-monitoring and self-monitoring of adherence, regimen strategies, patient education, self-management skills training (e.g., stimulus control, behavioral contracts), and cognitive-behavioral therapy techniques. The article concludes by discussing the future of research regarding adherence to medications for migraine and other headaches.

  12. The emergence of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Steere, Allen C.; Coburn, Jenifer; Glickstein, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Since its identification nearly 30 years ago, Lyme disease has continued to spread, and there have been increasing numbers of cases in the northeastern and north central US. The Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, causes infection by migration through tissues, adhesion to host cells, and evasion of immune clearance. Both innate and adaptive immune responses, especially macrophage- and antibody-mediated killing, are required for optimal control of the infection and spirochetal eradication. Ecological conditions favorable to the disease, and the challenge of prevention, predict that Lyme disease will be a continuing public health concern. PMID:15085185

  13. The emergence of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Steere, Allen C; Coburn, Jenifer; Glickstein, Lisa

    2004-04-01

    Since its identification nearly 30 years ago, Lyme disease has continued to spread, and there have been increasing numbers of cases in the northeastern and north central US. The Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, causes infection by migration through tissues, adhesion to host cells, and evasion of immune clearance. Both innate and adaptive immune responses, especially macrophage- and antibody-mediated killing, are required for optimal control of the infection and spirochetal eradication. Ecological conditions favorable to the disease, and the challenge of prevention, predict that Lyme disease will be a continuing public health concern.

  14. Brevinema andersonii gen. nov., sp. nov., an infectious spirochete isolated from the short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda) and the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Defosse, D L; Johnson, R C; Paster, B J; Dewhirst, F E; Fraser, G J

    1995-01-01

    A spirochete which infects short-tailed shrews (Blarina brevicauda) and white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) has been shown previously to be ultrastructurally and serologically distinct from other spirochetes. Two of the original isolates from Connecticut and Minnesota and 16 new isolates obtained from shrews captured in Minnesota were characterized phenotypically and genetically in this study. A comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA sequences of two shrew isolates and one mouse isolate and the 16S rRNA sequences of 16 other spirochetes and Escherichia coli revealed that these organisms exhibited low levels of similarity (range of similarity values, 73.9 to 77.8%; average level of similarity, 74.7%). The shrew and mouse isolates which we examined formed a deeply branching subgroup that was clearly distinct from the other genera of spirochetes examined. These and other results indicated that the new spirochetes represent a unique taxon in the order Spirochaetales. Accordingly, we propose that they should be classified as members of a new genus, Brevinema. The three strains of Brevinema which we examined had 16S rRNA sequences that were nearly identical. We also compared these isolates by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, fatty acid and enzyme analyses, restriction endonuclease analysis, and Southern hybridization and found that the levels of genetic and phenotypic homogeneity among the strains were very high. We concluded that the isolates which we examined were members of a single species, for which we propose the name Brevinema andersonii. The type strain of Brevinema andersonii is CT11616 (= ATCC 43811).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7857811

  15. Medication Routines and Adherence Among Hypertensive African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Abida; Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Seixas, Azizi; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Lai, Dejian

    2015-01-01

    Poor adherence to prescribed medication regimens remains an important challenge preventing successful treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. While studies have documented differences in the time of day or weekday vs weekend on medication adherence, no study has examined whether having a medication-taking routine contributes to increased medication adherence. The purpose of this study was to: (1) identify patients’ sociodemographic factors associated with consistent medication-taking routine; (2) examine associations between medication-taking consistency, medication adherence, and blood pressure (BP) control. The study included black patients with hypertension (n = 190; 22 men and 168 women; age, mean±standard deviation 54 ± 12.08 years) who completed a practice-based randomized controlled trial. Findings showed that medication-taking consistency was significantly associated with better medication adherence (F = 9.54, P = .002). Associations with the consistency index were not statistically significant for diastolic BP control (odds ratio, 1.319; 95% confidence interval, 0.410–4.246; P = .642) and systolic BP control (odds ratio, 0.621; 95% confidence interval, 0.195–1.974; P = .419). PMID:25952495

  16. Under-prescribing and non-adherence to medications after coronary bypass surgery in older adults: strategies to improve adherence.

    PubMed

    Sengstock, David; Vaitkevicius, Peter; Salama, Ahmed; Mentzer, Robert M

    2012-02-01

    The focus for this clinical review is under-prescribing and non-adherence to medication guidelines in older adults after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. Non-adherence occurs in all age groups, but older adults have a unique set of challenges including difficulty hearing, comprehending, and remembering instructions; acquiring and managing multiple medications; and tolerating drug-drug and drug-disease interactions. Still, non-adherence leads to increased morbidity, mortality, and costs to the healthcare system. Factors contributing to non-adherence include failure to initiate therapy before hospital discharge; poor education about the importance of each medication by hospital staff; poor education about medication side effects; polypharmacy; multiple daily dosing; excessive cost; and the physician's lack of knowledge of clinical indicators for use of medications. To improve adherence, healthcare systems must ensure that (i) all patients are prescribed the appropriate medications at discharge; (ii) patients fill and take these medications post-operatively; and (iii) patients continue long-term use of these medications. Interventions must target central administrative policies within healthcare institutions, the difficulties facing providers, as well as the concerns of patients. Corrective efforts need to be started early during the hospitalization and involve practitioners who can follow patients after the date on which surgical care is no longer needed. A solid, ongoing relationship between patients and their primary-care physicians and cardiologists is essential. This review summarizes the post-operative medication guidelines for CABG surgery, describes barriers that limit the adherence to these guidelines, and suggests possible avenues to improve medication adherence in older cardiac surgery patients. PMID:22239673

  17. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  18. Adherence to GOLD guideline treatment recommendations among pulmonologists in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Elif; Guclu, Salih Zeki; Kibar, Isil; Ocal, Ulku; Yilmaz, Veysel; Celik, Onur; Cimen, Filiz; Topcu, Fusun; Orhun, Meltem; Tereci, Hikmet; Konya, Aylin; Ar, Idilhan; Saryal, Sevgi

    2015-01-01

    Background Low adherence to Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guideline recommendations has been reported worldwide. There has been no study on the adherence to GOLD guidelines for COPD treatment in Turkey. Objectives To investigate the rates of adherence to GOLD 2010 guidelines for COPD treatment among pulmonologists. Design A multi-center, cross-sectional, observational study was carried out in eleven pulmonary outpatient clinics across Turkey. Adherence to GOLD was evaluated through hospital records. Demographic and clinical data were recorded. Results Study included 719 patients (mean age: 62.9±9.7 years; males 85.4%) of whom 16 was classified as GOLD Stage I, 238 as II, 346 as III, and 119 as IV, and only 59.5% received appropriate treatment. Rates of guideline adherence varied across GOLD stages (I, 6.3%; II, 14.7%; III, 84.4%; and IV, 84%). Causes of inappropriate therapies were overtreatment (Stage I, 100% and Stage II, 91.1%), undertreatment (Stage III, 3.3% and Stage IV, 10.9%) and lack of treatment (Stage II, 3.8%; Stage III, 2.3%; and Stage IV, 5.9%). The most preferred regimen (43.4%) was long-acting β2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid-long-acting muscarinic antagonist. Overall, 614 patients (89%) received treatment containing inhaled corticosteroid. Conclusion Pulmonologists in Turkey have low rates of adherence to GOLD guidelines in COPD treatment. Inappropriateness of therapies was due to overtreatment in early stages and excessive use of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) in all disease stages. PMID:26715844

  19. Cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wu; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas; Chang, Eddie

    2006-07-31

    Neuronal networks have been widely used for neurophysiology, drug discovery and toxicity testing. An essential prerequisite for future widespread application of neuronal networks is the development of efficient cryopreservation protocols to facilitate their storage and transportation. Here is the first report on cryopreservation of mammalian adherent neuronal networks. Dissociated spinal cord cells were attached to a poly-d-lysine/laminin surface and allowed to form neuronal networks. Adherent neuronal networks were embedded in a thin film of collagen gel and loaded with trehalose prior to transfer to a freezing medium containing DMSO, FBS and culture medium. This was followed by a slow rate of cooling to -80 degrees C for 24 h and then storage for up to 2 months in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C. The three components: DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading combined provided the highest post-thaw viability, relative to individual or two component protocols. The post-thaw cells with this protocol demonstrated similar neuronal and astrocytic markers and morphological structure as those detected in unfrozen cells. Fluorescent dye FM1-43 staining revealed active recycling of synaptic vesicles upon depolarizing stimulation in the post-thaw neuronal networks. These results suggest that a combination of DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading can significantly improve conventional slow-cooling methods in cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

  20. Aggregate versus day level association between methamphetamine use and HIV medication non-adherence among gay and bisexual men

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Kowalczyk, William; Botsko, Michael; Tomassilli, Julia; Golub, Sarit A.

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine use is associated with HIV infection, especially among gay and bisexual men. Methamphetamine use contributes to disease progression both directly, by increasing viral load and damaging the immune system, and indirectly, by decreasing medication adherence. Research examining the association of methamphetamine use and non-adherence has traditionally compared groups of users and nonusers on adherence, compared methamphetamine use between participants above or below some threshold level of adherence (e.g. >90% dose adherence), or examined aggregate relationships. Using Timeline Follow-back procedures, the present study examined aggregate, threshold, and day-level associations of methamphetamine use with non-adherence in 210 HIV-positive gay and bisexual methamphetamine-using men. Methamphetamine use was not associated with adherence behavior at the aggregate-level, but methamphetamine use on a given day was associated with 2.3 times the odds of non-adherence on that day. Threshold results were equivocal. These data suggest that the methamphetamine and non-adherence relationship is complicated: non-adherence is more likely to occur on days in which methamphetamine is used, but participants reported more non-adherence days in which methamphetamine was not used. This seeming paradox generates questions about the selection of analytical techniques and has important implications for behavioral interventions targeting substance use and adherence among HIV-positive individuals. PMID:23553345

  1. Statin adherence and risk of acute cardiovascular events among women: a cohort study accounting for time-dependent confounding affected by previous adherence

    PubMed Central

    Lavikainen, Piia; Helin-Salmivaara, Arja; Eerola, Mervi; Fang, Gang; Hartikainen, Juha; Huupponen, Risto; Korhonen, Maarit Jaana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies on the effect of statin adherence on cardiovascular events in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease have adjusted for time-dependent confounding, but potentially introduced bias into their estimates as adherence and confounders were measured simultaneously. We aimed to evaluate the effect when accounting for time-dependent confounding affected by previous adherence as well as time sequence between factors. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Finnish healthcare registers. Participants Women aged 45–64 years initiating statin use for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in 2001–2004 (n=42 807). Outcomes Acute cardiovascular event defined as a composite of acute coronary syndrome and acute ischaemic stroke was our primary outcome. Low-energy fractures were used as a negative control outcome to evaluate the healthy-adherer effect. Results During the 3-year follow-up, 474 women experienced the primary outcome event and 557 suffered a low-energy fracture. The causal HR estimated with marginal structural model for acute cardiovascular events for all the women who remained adherent (proportion of days covered ≥80%) to statin therapy during the previous adherence assessment year was 0.78 (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.94) when compared with everybody remaining non-adherent (proportion of days covered <80%). The result was robust against alternative model specifications. Statin adherers had a potentially reduced risk of experiencing low-energy fractures compared with non-adherers (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.76 to 1.07). Conclusions Our study, which took into account the time dependence of adherence and confounders, as well as temporal order between these factors, is support for the concept that adherence to statins in women in primary prevention decreases the risk of acute cardiovascular events by about one-fifth in comparison to non-adherence. However, part of the observed effect of statin adherence on acute cardiovascular events

  2. Spirochaeta Americana Sp. Nov., A new Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The Gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.2 - 0.22 X 8-15 microns. Growth was observed over the following ranges: temperature 10 C to 44 C; optimum +37 C; NaCl concentration 2 - 12 % (w/v); optimum NaCl3 % and pH 8 - 10.5; optimum pH 9.5. The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. The main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain ASpG(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, and rifampin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%, genome size is 2.98 x l0(exp 9) Daltons, Tm of the genomic DNA is 68 +/- 2 C, and DNA-DNA hybridization with the most closely related species, Spirocheta alkalica Strain Z-7491(sup T), exhibited 48.7% homology. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  3. Association between patients’ beliefs and oral antidiabetic medication adherence in a Chinese type 2 diabetic population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Liu, Naifeng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to identify, using the theory of planned behavior (TPB), patients’ beliefs about taking oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) as prescribed, and to measure the correlations between beliefs and medication adherence. Patients and methods We performed a cross-sectional study of type 2 diabetic patients using structured questionnaires in a Chinese tertiary hospital. A total of 130 patients were enrolled to be interviewed about TPB variables (behavioral, normative, and control beliefs) relevant to medication adherence. Medication adherence was assessed using the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Spearman’s rank correlation was used to assess the association between TPB and MMAS-8. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between different variables and MMAS-8, with statistical significance determined at P<0.05. Results From 130 eligible Chinese patients with an average age of 60.6 years and a male proportion of 50.8%, a nonsignificant relationship between behavioral, normative, and the most facilitating control beliefs and OAD adherence was found in our study. Having the OADs on hand (P=0.037) was the only facilitating control belief associated with adherence behavior. Being away from home or eating out (P=0.000), not accepting the disease (P=0.000), ignorance of life-long drug adherence (P=0.038), being busy (P=0.001), or poor memory (P=0.008) were control belief barriers found to be correlated with poor adherence. TPB is the only important determinant influencing OAD adherence among all the factors (P=0.011). Conclusion The results indicate that the TPB model could be used to examine adherence to OADs. One facilitating control belief, and most of the barrier control beliefs of TPB were related to medication adherence among Chinese type 2 diabetes inpatients. It will be helpful to understand patients’ self-medication and provide methods to develop instruments for identifying

  4. Understanding the life experience of people on hemodialysis: adherence to treatment and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Guerrerro, Verónica; Plazas, Maria del Pilar Camargo; Cameron, Brenda L; Salas, Anna Valeria Santos; González, Carmen Gloria Cofre

    2014-01-01

    This hermeneutic-phenomenological study explores the lived experiences of patients on hemodialysis in regard to the adherence to treatment and quality of life. Fifteen patients were interviewed, including six women and nine men from three dialysis centers in Chile. Two main themes derived from the analysis: 1) embracing the disease and dialysis, and 2) preventing progression of the disease through treatment management. The findings suggest that patients recognize adherence to treatment and quality of life as conditions that derive from self-care and environmental conditions, which the healthcare provider must constantly assess for care planning to improve the adherence and quality of life in this population.

  5. Practice what you preach? An exploratory multilevel study on rheumatoid arthritis guideline adherence by rheumatologists

    PubMed Central

    Lesuis, N; den Broeder, A A; Hulscher, M E J L; van Vollenhoven, R F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess variation in and determinants of rheumatologist guideline adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in daily practice. Methods In this retrospective observational study, guideline adherence in the first year of treatment was assessed for 7 predefined parameters on diagnostics, treatment and follow-up in all adult patients with RA with a first outpatient clinic visit at the study centre, from September 2009 to March 2011. Variation in guideline adherence was assessed on parameter and rheumatologist level. Determinants for guideline adherence were assessed in patients (demographic characteristics, rheumatoid factor (RF) and/or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (aCCP) positivity, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, erosive disease, comorbidity and the number of available disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment options) and rheumatologists (demographic and practice characteristics, guideline knowledge and agreement, outcome expectancy, cognitive bias, thinking style, numeracy and personality). Results A total of 994 visits in 137 patients with RA were reviewed. Variation in guideline adherence among parameters was present (adherence between 21% and 72%), with referral to the physician assistant as lowest scoring and referral to a specialised nurse as highest scoring parameter. Variation in guideline adherence among rheumatologists was also present (adherence between 22% and 100%). Patient sex, the number of DMARD options, presence of erosions, comorbidity, RF/aCCP positivity, type of patient and the rheumatologists' scientific education status were associated with adherence to 1 or more guideline parameters. Conclusions Guideline adherence varied considerably among the guideline parameters and rheumatologists, showing that there is room for improvement. Guideline adherence in our sample was related to several patient and rheumatologist determinants. PMID:27252892

  6. Collaboration between family physicians and community pharmacists to enhance adherence to chronic medications

    PubMed Central

    Laubscher, Tessa; Evans, Charity; Blackburn, Dave; Taylor, Jeff; McKay, Shari

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To ascertain the opinions of family physicians about medication adherence in patients with chronic diseases and the role of community pharmacists in improving adherence to chronic medications, as well as their opinions on increased collaboration with pharmacists to enhance medication adherence. DESIGN A self-administered postal survey of 19 questions, with opinions collected by ordinal (5-point Likert scale) and open responses. SETTING Saskatchewan. PARTICIPANTS Two hundred and eighty-six family physicians working in Saskatchewan in January 2008. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Descriptive statistics of physicians’ opinions on the following: medication adherence in patients with chronic diseases; their current interaction with community pharmacists; and potential collaborative strategies to promote medication adherence. RESULTS The response rate was 39.4%. Approximately 75% of the physicians acknowledged that nonadherence to chronic medications was a problem among their patients. Medication costs and side effects were identified as the 2 most common reasons for medication nonadherence. Only one-quarter of physicians communicated regularly with community pharmacists about adherence issues; most of these physicians were rural physicians. Most physicians agreed that increased collaboration with pharmacists would improve adherence, although support for potential interactions with pharmacists varied. Concerns were expressed about time required by physicians and financial reimbursement. Physicians in practice for less than 10 years and those practising in rural areas were more willing to share clinical information and communicate with pharmacists to promote medication adherence. CONCLUSION Saskatchewan family physicians appreciate the importance of medication nonadherence but currently seldom interact with community pharmacists on this issue. They believe that pharmacists have a role in supporting patients with medication adherence and indicate a willingness

  7. Role of depressive symptoms and self-efficacy of medication adherence in Korean patients after successful percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Son, Youn-Jung; Kim, Sun-Hee; Park, Jin-Hee

    2014-12-01

    This cross-sectional study sought to identify the prevalence of medication adherence and to explore the role of depression and self-efficacy on medication adherence among patients with coronary artery diseases. Participants were recruited among outpatients who successfully underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stent at academic medical centres in Cheonan, South Korea. Medication adherence was evaluated by the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale using a validated Korean version. Prevalence of non-adherent to medication was 60.3%. With non-depressed and high self-efficacy as reference and after adjusting for age and gender, the models showed that those with depression and low self-efficacy are more likely to be non-adherent to medication. Therefore, future studies should focus on the development of interventions designed to reduce depression and increase self-efficacy for improving patient adherence to cardiovascular medications following PCI.

  8. Prospective study of vaginal dilator use adherence and efficacy following radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ethel; Kelvin, Joanne F.; Thom, Bridgette; Riedel, Elyn; Tom, Ashlyn; Carter, Jeanne; Alektiar, Kaled; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Vaginal stenosis (VS) after pelvic radiotherapy can impair long-term quality of life. We prospectively assessed adherence and efficacy of VD use as the primary and secondary objectives, respectively. Material and methods Women with gastrointestinal (n=63) and gynecologic (n=46) cancers self-reported use and VD size in monthly diaries for 12 months after radiotherapy. Adherence was measured as actual VD use out of recommended times over 12 months (3×/week × 52 weeks = 156). Results Among 109 participants, aged 28–81 years (median, 58 years), mean percent adherence over 12 months was 42% (95% confidence interval [CI], 36%–48%). Adherence was highest in the first quarter (56%), but fell to 25% by the fourth. Disease type, treatment sequence, and chemotherapy were predictors of adherence (all P<.05). Eighty-two percent maintained pre-RT VD size at 12 months; of 49% with decrease in VD size at 1 month post-RT, 71% returned to pre-RT VD size at 12 months. Disease type, younger age, and increased adherence at 6 months were associated with maintaining or returning to pre-RT size at 12 months (all P≤.05). Conclusions VD use is effective in minimizing VS, but adherence at 12 months was poor. Studies evaluating methods of improving adherence and determining the optimal frequency and duration of use are needed. PMID:26164775

  9. Adherence to long-term anticoagulation treatment, what is known and what the future might hold.

    PubMed

    Abdou, John K; Auyeung, Vivian; Patel, Jignesh P; Arya, Roopen

    2016-07-01

    Adherence to medication, commonly reported as being 50% in chronic diseases, is of great concern in healthcare. Medication non-adherence is particularly apparent in chronic diseases, where treatment is often preventative and may provide little or no symptomatic relief or feedback for the patient. A lot of research has been undertaken to describe the extent of non-adherence to long-term anticoagulation therapy, particularly with vitamin K antagonists and more recently with direct oral anticoagulants. However, the literature is scarce with respect to describing adherence to anticoagulation in terms of the behavioural aspects that influence medicine use. Utilizing the COM-B (capability, opportunity, motivation and behaviour) psychological model of non-adherence, we present the available evidence, not only in terms of describing the extent of the non-adherence problem, but also describing why patients do not adhere, offering theory-driven and evidence-based solutions to improve long-term adherence to chronic anticoagulation therapy. Lessons learned are not only applicable within the field of anticoagulation but throughout haematology.

  10. Association of Continuity of Primary Care and Statin Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Warren, James R.; Falster, Michael O.; Tran, Bich; Jorm, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Deficiencies in medication adherence are a major barrier to effectiveness of chronic condition management. Continuity of primary care may promote adherence. We assessed the association of continuity of primary care with adherence to long-term medication as exemplified by statins. Research Design We linked data from a prospective study of 267,091 Australians aged 45 years and over to national data sets on prescription reimbursements, general practice claims, hospitalisations and deaths. For participants having a statin dispense within 90 days of study entry, we computed medication possession ratio (MPR) and usual provider continuity index (UPI) for the subsequent two years. We used multivariate Poisson regression to calculate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between tertiles of UPI and MPR adjusted for socio-demographic and health-related patient factors, including age, gender, remoteness of residence, smoking, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, prior heart disease and speaking a language other than English at home. We performed a comparison approach using propensity score matching on a subset of the sample. Results 36,144 participants were eligible and included in the analysis among whom 58% had UPI greater than 75%. UPI was significantly associated with 5% increased MPR for statin adherence (95% CI 1.04–1.06) for highest versus lowest tertile. Dichotomised analysis using a cut-off of UPI at 75% showed a similar effect size. The association between UPI and statin adherence was independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. Stratification analyses further showed a stronger association among those who were new to statins (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.15–1.54). Conclusions Greater continuity of care has a positive association with medication adherence for statins which is independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. PMID:26448561

  11. Adherence to therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Luis-Emilio; Alvarez, María; Dilla, Tatiana; Gil-Guillén, Vicente; Orozco-Beltrán, Domingo

    2013-12-01

    Adherence to therapy is defined as the extent to which a person's behavior in taking medication, following a diet, and/or executing lifestyle changes, corresponds with agreed recommendations from a healthcare provider. Patients presenting with type 2 diabetes mellitus are initially encouraged to maintain a healthy diet and exercise regimen, followed by early medication that generally includes one or more oral hypoglycemic agents and later may include an injectable treatment. To prevent the complications associated with type 2 diabetes, therapy frequently also includes medications for control of blood pressure, dyslipidemia and other disorders, since patients often have more than three or four chronic conditions. Despite the benefits of therapy, studies have indicated that recommended glycemic goals are achieved by less than 50% of patients, which may be associated with decreased adherence to therapies. As a result, hyperglycemia and long-term complications increase morbidity and premature mortality, and lead to increased costs to health services. Reasons for nonadherence are multifactorial and difficult to identify. They include age, information, perception and duration of disease, complexity of dosing regimen, polytherapy, psychological factors, safety, tolerability and cost. Various measures to increase patient satisfaction and increase adherence in type 2 diabetes have been investigated. These include reducing the complexity of therapy by fixed-dose combination pills and less frequent dosing regimens, using medications that are associated with fewer adverse events (hypoglycemia or weight gain), educational initiatives with improved patient-healthcare provider communication, reminder systems and social support to help reduce costs. In the current narrative review, factors that influence adherence to different therapies for type 2 diabetes are discussed, along with outcomes of poor adherence, the economic impact of nonadherence, and strategies aimed at improving

  12. SP 03-1 POLYPILL STRATEGY TO IMPROVED ADHERENCE.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2016-09-01

    Among individuals with established CVD, multiple medications (aspirin, blood pressure lowering drugs and statins) are required to manage CVD and it is well established that non adherence to prescribed treatments is substantial in the long term. Such discontinuation of CV-preventive medications and low adherence rates has been shown to affect the success of CVD prevention efforts. In low- and middle income countries only less than 20% patients receive recommended therapy for CVD prevention, but even in high-income countries treatment coverage in the community is only about 50% in those with heart disease and 35% in those with stroke. Patients adherence to CV drugs is likely to be adversely affected by a number of factors including patients' beliefs, complexity of medication regime, lack of understanding of their condition or medication, and medication cost and associated clinic visits cost. Fixed-dose combination (FDC) polypill therapy may reduce these treatment gaps by reducing cost, complexity, therapeutic inertia, and low adherence. There are several mechanisms whereby an FDC strategy may enhance adherence. These encompass ease of prescription, overcoming physician inertia, patient acceptability, packaged delivery, and ease of taking. Recent evidence from well-designed randomized controlled trials (UMPIRE, Kanyini-GAP, IMPACT) and meta-analysis (SPACE collaboration) of RCTs have shown that access to FDC polypill in patients with CVD or similarly high risk improved adherence, BP, and cholesterol levels. These trials have shown that physicians are willing to prescribe polypill to this group of patients by involving them in the trial, and at the end of the study more patients were taking the FDC treatment. In order to achieve substantial reduction of CVD burden, immediate use of FDC/polypill in secondary prevention is indicated; however, the evidence in primary prevention needs to be adjudicated. PMID:27642921

  13. Adherence and Persistence With Oral Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Older Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer in CALGB 49907: Adherence Companion Study 60104

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Ann H.; Archer, Laura; Kornblith, Alice B.; Gralow, Julie; Grenier, Debjani; Perez, Edith; Wolff, Antonio C.; Wang, Xiaofei; Kastrissios, Helen; Berry, Donald; Hudis, Clifford; Winer, Eric; Muss, Hyman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patient adherence is critical in evaluating the effectiveness of an oral therapy. We sought to measure adherence among women randomly assigned to capecitabine in a preplanned substudy of a multicenter clinical trial. Patients and Methods Cancer and Leukemia Group B study CALGB 49907 was a randomly assigned trial comparing standard chemotherapy versus oral chemotherapy with capecitabine in patients age 65 years or older with early-stage breast cancer. We used microelectronic monitoring system (MEMS) caps on participants' capecitabine bottles to record pill bottle openings. Capecitabine was given in two divided daily doses for 14 consecutive days of a 21-day cycle for six cycles. Adherence was calculated as the number of doses taken divided by doses expected, taking into account toxicity-related dosing changes. A participant was defined as adherent if 80% or more of expected doses were recorded by MEMS. Results Overall, 161 patients were enrolled. Median age was 71 years (range, 65 to 89 years); 124 patients (83%) persisted with capecitabine to completion of planned protocol therapy. Adherence was 78% across all cycles, and adherence did not vary by cycle (P = .32). Twenty-five percent of participants took fewer than 80% of expected doses and were nonadherent. In a logistic regression model, participants with node-negative disease (P = .01) and mastectomy (P = .01) were more likely to be nonadherent. Adherence was not related to age, tumor stage, or hormone receptor status. Adherence was not significantly associated with relapse-free survival or grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Conclusion Most older women with early-stage breast cancer were adherent to short-term oral chemotherapy in a randomized clinical trial. Age was not associated with adherence. PMID:20368559

  14. Does adherence therapy improve medication adherence among patients with schizophrenia? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Anna; Kozel, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    Non-adherence to medication is highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. Adherence therapy aims to improve medication adherence of these patients by applying techniques of cognitive behavioural therapy, psycho-education, and motivational interviewing. Even though adherence therapy is frequently discussed and researched, its effectiveness is still uncertain. This paper aims to review the effectiveness of adherence therapy on the medication adherence of patients with schizophrenia. To this end, six electronic databases were systematically searched for randomized, controlled trials on adherence therapy from January 2002 to March 2013. Four trials met the inclusion criteria and were incorporated into the review. The findings suggest that adherence therapy does not improve patients' medication adherence in comparison to treatment as usual or a control intervention. However, all the studies reviewed showed high-adherence ratings at baseline. Thus, further well-designed studies that target adherence therapy to patients who are non-adherent to their medication are needed for a more profound understanding of its effectiveness. In addition, if adherence therapy is aimed not only at improving medication adherence, but also to reach an agreement whereby the patient's decision not to take his medication is accepted, the shared decision-making process needs to be assessed as well.

  15. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens.

  16. Nervous System Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-12-01

    Nervous system involvement occurs in 10% to 15% of patients infected with the tick-borne spirochetes Borrelia burgdorferi, B afzelii, and B garinii. Peripheral nervous system involvement is common. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement, most commonly presenting with lymphocytic meningitis, causes modest cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis. Parenchymal CNS infection is rare. If the CNS is invaded, however, measuring local production of anti-B burgdorferi antibodies in the CSF provides a useful marker of infection. Most cases of neuroborreliosis can be cured with oral doxycycline; parenteral regimens should be reserved for patients with particularly severe disease.

  17. Soil adherence to human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Driver, J.H.; Konz, J.J.; Whitmyre, G.K. )

    1989-12-01

    Dermal exposure to soils contaminated with toxic chemicals represents a potential public health hazard. These soils, contaminated with chemicals such as PCBs and dioxins, may be found at various locations throughout the US. Furthermore, dermal contact with pesticide-containing particles and contaminated soil particles is of importance for exposures to agricultural workers who reenter fields after pesticide application. With respect to dermal exposure to pesticide-contaminated particulate matter, several occurrences of human toxicity to ethyl parathion in citrus groves have been reported. These exposures resulted from dermal contact with high concentrations of the toxic transformation product paraoxon in soil dust contaminated as a result of application of pesticide to the overhead foliage of trees. To assess dermal exposure to chemically-contaminated soil at sites of concern, dermal adherence of soil must be determined prior to the assessment of dermal absorption. The purpose of the experiment reported herein was to determine the amount of soil (mg/cm{sup 2}) that adheres to adult hands under various soil conditions. These conditions include the type of soil, the organic content of the soil, and the particle size of the soil.

  18. Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Catsburg, Chelsea; Miller, Anthony B; Rohan, Thomas E

    2014-11-15

    Healthy eating patterns and keeping physically active are potentially more important for chronic disease prevention than intake or exclusion of specific food items or nutrients. To this end, many health organizations routinely publish dietary and lifestyle recommendations aimed at preventing chronic disease. Using data from the Canadian National Breast Screening Study, we investigated the association between breast cancer risk and adherence to two sets of guidelines specific for cancer prevention, namely the American Cancer Society (ACS) Guidelines and the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) Recommendations. At baseline, 49,613 women completed dietary and lifestyle questionnaires and height and weight measurements were taken. During a mean follow-up of 16.6 years, 2,503 incident cases of breast cancer were ascertained. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of meeting each guideline, and number of guidelines met, with breast cancer risk. The two sets of guidelines yielded similar results. Specifically, adherence to all six ACS guidelines was associated with a 31% reduction in breast cancer risk when compared to subjects adhering to at most one guideline (HR=0.69; 95% CI=0.49-0.97); similarly, adherence to six or seven of the WCRF/AICR guidelines was also associated with a 31% reduction in breast cancer risk (HR=0.69; 95% CI=0.47-1.00). Under either classification, meeting each additional guideline was associated with a 4-6% reduction in breast cancer risk. These results suggest that adherence to cancer prevention guidelines is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer.

  19. Early behavioral adherence predicts short and long-term weight loss in the POUNDS LOST study.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Donald A; Anton, Stephen D; Han, Hongmei; Champagne, Catherine M; Allen, Ray; Leblanc, Eric; Ryan, Donna H; Rood, Jennifer; McManus, Katherine; Laranjo, Nancy; Carey, Vincent J; Loria, Catherine M; Bray, George A; Sacks, Frank M

    2010-08-01

    The primary aim of this study was to test the association of early (first 6 months) adherence related to diet, self-monitoring, and attendance with changes in adiposity and cardiovascular risk factors. This study used data from the 24-month POUNDS LOST trial that tested the efficacy of four dietary macronutrient compositions for short-and long-term weight loss. A computer tracking system was used to record data on eight indicator variables related to adherence. Using canonical correlations at the 6 and 24 month measurement periods, early behavioral adherence was associated with changes in percent weight loss and waist circumference at 6 months (R = 0.52) and 24 months (R = 0.37), but was not associated with cardiovascular disease risk factor levels. Early dietary adherence was associated with changes in insulin at 6 months (R = 0.19), but not at 24 months (R = 0.08, ns). Early dietary adherence was not associated with changes in adiposity.

  20. Promoting patient uptake and adherence in cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Philippa; Taylor, Fiona; Beswick, Andrew; Wise, Frances; Moxham, Tiffany; Rees, Karen; Ebrahim, Shah

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation is an important component of recovery from coronary events but uptake and adherence to such programmes are below the recommended levels. This aim is to update a previous non-Cochrane systematic review which examined interventions that may potentially improve cardiac patient uptake and adherence in rehabilitation or its components and concluded that there is insufficient evidence to make specific recommendations. Objectives To determine the effects of interventions to increase patient uptake of, and adherence to, cardiac rehabilitation. Search methods A previous systematic review identified studies published prior to June 2001. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (Issue 4 2007), MEDLINE (2001 to January 2008), EMBASE (2001 to January 2008), CINAHL (2001 to January 2008), PsycINFO (2001 to January 2008), Web of Science: ISI Proceedings (2001 to April 2008), and NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) databases (Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE)) from 2001 to January 2008. Reference lists of identified systematic reviews and randomised control trials (RCTs) were also checked for additional studies. Selection criteria Adults with myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, heart failure, angina, or coronary heart disease eligible for cardiac rehabilitation and randomised or quasi-randomised trials of interventions to increase uptake or adherence to cardiac rehabilitation or any of its component parts. Only studies reporting a measure of adherence were included. Data collection and analysis Titles and abstracts of all identified references were screened for eligibility by two reviewers independently and full papers of potentially relevant trials were obtained and checked. Included studies were assessed for risk of bias by two reviewers. Main results Ten

  1. Improving hand hygiene adherence among nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Allen, Marianne; Fowler, Kimberly A

    2011-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study explored initial and sustained effects of educational and behavioral interventions on hand hygiene adherence and the relationships between hand hygiene adherence and health care-associated infections. Education paired with positive reinforcement behavioral interventions significantly improved hand hygiene adherence after the first month (χ² = 4.27; P = .039); however, the improvement was not sustained over 6 months. There were no significant differences in infection rates between the treatment and control groups. PMID:20407392

  2. Patient adherence issues in the treatment of hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Larrey, Dominique; Ripault, Marie-Pierre; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The current standard-of-care treatments for chronic hepatitis C, based on a bitherapy that combines peginterferon alpha-2a or -2b and ribavirin for all genotypes, and on a triple therapy with the addition of an antiprotease specifically for genotype 1, are associated with a limited adherence that decreases their efficacy. The main factors limiting adherence are difficulties in taking the treatment and side effects that worsen the quality of life of the patients. Programs of therapeutic education are essential to improve adherence, quality of life, likelihood of viral suppression, improvement of liver disease, and decrease of late complications. Therapeutic education should be understood as an acquisition of decisional, technical, and social competency with the purpose of making the patient able to make health choices, realize their own life plans, and use health care resources in the best manner. The patient should be placed in the center of an organization, comprising various care workers who include social service professionals and medical staff. For hepatitis C, therapeutic education may be separated into three phases: a first phase corresponding to the educative diagnosis; a second phase corresponding to support during treatment; and the third phase corresponding to support after treatment. Therapeutic education is performed using various instruments and methods specifically adapted to the needs and expectations of individual patients. Upcoming treatments for hepatitis C, with evidence for high efficacy, few side effects, and shorter duration, will certainly change the landscape of adherence and the management of therapeutic education. PMID:24920888

  3. Patient adherence issues in the treatment of hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Larrey, Dominique; Ripault, Marie-Pierre; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The current standard-of-care treatments for chronic hepatitis C, based on a bitherapy that combines peginterferon alpha-2a or -2b and ribavirin for all genotypes, and on a triple therapy with the addition of an antiprotease specifically for genotype 1, are associated with a limited adherence that decreases their efficacy. The main factors limiting adherence are difficulties in taking the treatment and side effects that worsen the quality of life of the patients. Programs of therapeutic education are essential to improve adherence, quality of life, likelihood of viral suppression, improvement of liver disease, and decrease of late complications. Therapeutic education should be understood as an acquisition of decisional, technical, and social competency with the purpose of making the patient able to make health choices, realize their own life plans, and use health care resources in the best manner. The patient should be placed in the center of an organization, comprising various care workers who include social service professionals and medical staff. For hepatitis C, therapeutic education may be separated into three phases: a first phase corresponding to the educative diagnosis; a second phase corresponding to support during treatment; and the third phase corresponding to support after treatment. Therapeutic education is performed using various instruments and methods specifically adapted to the needs and expectations of individual patients. Upcoming treatments for hepatitis C, with evidence for high efficacy, few side effects, and shorter duration, will certainly change the landscape of adherence and the management of therapeutic education. PMID:24920888

  4. Population structure of the lyme borreliosis spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in the western black-legged tick (Ixodes pacificus) in Northern California.

    PubMed

    Girard, Yvette A; Travinsky, Bridgit; Schotthoefer, Anna; Fedorova, Natalia; Eisen, Rebecca J; Eisen, Lars; Barbour, Alan G; Lane, Robert S

    2009-11-01

    Factors potentially contributing to the lower incidence of Lyme borreliosis (LB) in the far-western than in the northeastern United States include tick host-seeking behavior resulting in fewer human tick encounters, lower densities of Borrelia burgdorferi-infected vector ticks in peridomestic environments, and genetic variation among B. burgdorferi spirochetes to which humans are exposed. We determined the population structure of B. burgdorferi in over 200 infected nymphs of the primary bridging vector to humans, Ixodes pacificus, collected in Mendocino County, CA. This was accomplished by sequence typing the spirochete lipoprotein ospC and the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (IGS). Thirteen ospC alleles belonging to 12 genotypes were found in California, and the two most abundant, ospC genotypes H3 and E3, have not been detected in ticks in the Northeast. The most prevalent ospC and IGS biallelic profile in the population, found in about 22% of ticks, was a new B. burgdorferi strain defined by ospC genotype H3. Eight of the most common ospC genotypes in the northeastern United States, including genotypes I and K that are associated with disseminated human infections, were absent in Mendocino County nymphs. ospC H3 was associated with hardwood-dominated habitats where western gray squirrels, the reservoir host, are commonly infected with LB spirochetes. The differences in B. burgdorferi population structure in California ticks compared to the Northeast emphasize the need for a greater understanding of the genetic diversity of spirochetes infecting California LB patients. PMID:19783741

  5. Lyme Disease Presenting with Multiple Cranial Nerve Deficits: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Baker, Keith; Jeanmonod, Donald; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted multisystem inflammatory disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. With more than 25,000 CDC reported cases annually, it has become the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. We report a case of 38-year-old man with Lyme disease presenting with simultaneous palsy of 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves. PMID:27635267

  6. Lyme Disease Presenting with Multiple Cranial Nerve Deficits: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Baker, Keith; Jeanmonod, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted multisystem inflammatory disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. With more than 25,000 CDC reported cases annually, it has become the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. We report a case of 38-year-old man with Lyme disease presenting with simultaneous palsy of 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves.

  7. Lyme Disease Presenting with Multiple Cranial Nerve Deficits: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Baker, Keith; Jeanmonod, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted multisystem inflammatory disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. With more than 25,000 CDC reported cases annually, it has become the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. We report a case of 38-year-old man with Lyme disease presenting with simultaneous palsy of 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves. PMID:27635267

  8. Histamine increases sickle erythrocyte adherence to endothelium.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Matthew C; Eckman, James R; Wick, Timothy M

    2006-02-01

    Complications of sickle cell anaemia include vascular occlusion triggered by the adherence of sickle erythrocytes to endothelium in the postcapillary venules. Adherence can be promoted by inflammatory mediators that induce endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression and arrest flowing erythrocytes. The present study characterised the effect of histamine stimulation on the kinetics of sickle cell adherence to large vessel and microvascular endothelium under physiological flow. Increased sickle cell adherence was observed within minutes of endothelial activation by histamine and reached a maximum value within 30 min. At steady state, sickle cell adherence to histamine-stimulated endothelium was 47 +/- 4 adherent cells/mm(2), 2.6-fold higher than sickle cell adherence to unstimulated endothelial cells. Histamine-induced sickle cell adherence occurred rapidly and transiently. Studies using histamine receptor agonists and antagonists suggest that histamine-induced sickle cell adhesion depends on simultaneous stimulation of the H(2) and H(4) histamine receptors and endothelial P-selectin expression. These data show that histamine release may promote sickle cell adherence and vaso-occlusion. In vivo histamine release should be studied to determine its role in sickle complications and whether blocking of specific histamine receptors may prevent clinical complications or adverse effects from histamine release stimulated by opiate analgesic treatment.

  9. Medication Adherence: A Call for Action

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, Hayden B.; Granger, Bradi B.; Mendys, Phil; Brindis, Ralph; Burkholder, Rebecca; Czajkowski, Susan M.; Daniel, Jodi G.; Ekman, Inger; Ho, Michael; Johnson, Mimi; Kimmel, Stephen E.; Liu, Larry Z; Musaus, John; Shrank, William H.; Buono, Elizabeth Whalley; Weiss, Karen; Granger, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Poor adherence to efficacious cardiovascular related medications has led to considerable morbidity, mortality, and avoidable health care costs. This paper provides results of a recent think tank meeting in which various stakeholder groups representing key experts from consumers, community health providers, the academic community, decision-making government officials (FDA, NIH, etc), and industry scientists met to evaluate the current status of medication adherence and provide recommendations for improving outcomes. Below, we review the magnitude of the problem of medication adherence, prevalence, impact, and cost. We then summarize proven effective approaches and conclude with a discussion of recommendations to address this growing and significant public health issue of medication non adherence. PMID:21884856

  10. Antihypertensive medication adherence among elderly Chinese Americans.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Hui; Mao, Chia-Ling; Wey, Mercy

    2010-10-01

    This study explored the level of antihypertensive medication adherence and examined certain demographic attributes and influential factors in relation to antihypertensive medication nonadherence among Chinese American elders using a descriptive cross-sectional survey design. Findings revealed that 52% of the elderly Chinese Americans adhered to their antihypertensive medications. Gender, education, years of residency in the United States, years of diagnosed hypertension, and perceived safety of taking antihypertensive medications did not contribute to the differences in medication adherence. Forgetfulness, medication adverse effects, language difficulties, and cultural barriers were the influential factors that hinder antihypertensive medication adherence. Developing effective and culturally appropriate strategies for Chinese American elders is recommended.

  11. Correlates of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Katryna; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Balderson, Benjamin H.; Mahoney, Christine; Catz, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-infected older African Americans experience higher mortality rates compared to their white counterparts. This disparity may be partly attributable to the differences in ART adherence by different racial and gender groups. The purpose of this study was to describe demographic, psychosocial, and HIV disease-related factors that influence ART adherence and to determine whether race and gender impact ART adherence among HIV-infected adults aged 50 years and older. Methods This descriptive study involved a secondary analysis of baseline data from 426 participants in “PRIME,” a telephone-based ART adherence and quality-of-life intervention trial. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between independent variables and ART adherence. Results Higher annual income and increased self-efficacy were associated with being ≥95% ART adherent. Race and gender were not associated with ART adherence. Conclusion These findings indicated that improvements in self-efficacy for taking ART may be an effective strategy to improve adherence regardless of race or gender. PMID:27071744

  12. What We Mean When We Talk About Adherence in Respiratory Medicine.

    PubMed

    Vrijens, Bernard; Dima, Alexandra L; Van Ganse, Eric; van Boven, Job F M; Eakin, Michelle N; Foster, Juliet M; de Bruin, Marijn; Chisholm, Alison; Price, David

    2016-01-01

    Adequate medication adherence is key for optimal benefit of pharmacological treatments. A wealth of research has been conducted to understand and identify opportunities to intervene to improve medication adherence, but variations in adherence definitions within prior research have led to ambiguity in study findings. The lack of a standard taxonomy hinders the development of cumulative science in adherence research. This article reviews the newly established Ascertaining Barriers to Compliance (ABC) taxonomy for medication adherence with a particular focus on its relevance and applicability within the context of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management. Building on traditional definitions and concepts within medication adherence, the ABC taxonomy considers the temporal sequence of steps a patient must undertake to be defined as "adherent to treatment": (A) initiation, (B) implementation, and (C) persistence. We explain the clinical and research relevance of differentiating between these phases, point to differences in its applicability in observational and experimental research, review strengths and limitations of available measures, and highlight recent findings on specific determinants of these behaviors. Finally, we provide recommendations for research and practice with a view to supporting and sign posting opportunities to improve future respiratory medication adherence and associated research. PMID:27587314

  13. Geriatric syndromes are potential determinants of the medication adherence status in prevalent dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Geriatric syndromes (GS) exhibit high prevalence in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under chronic dialysis irrespective of age. We sought to determine whether GS influences medication adherence in ESRD patients. Methods. A prospective cohort of chronic dialysis patients was assembled. The presence of GS components, including frailty/prefrailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition, were ascertained through a validated questionnaire, electronic records and chart abstraction, and laboratory tests. The severity of medication non-adherence was defined using the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed targeting MMAS results and incorporating relevant clinical features and GS. Results. The prevalence of frailty/pre-frailty, polypharmacy, and hypoalbuminemia/ malnutrition among the enrolled participants was 66.7%, 94%, and 14%, respectively. The average MMAS scores in these dialysis patients were 2 ± 1.7 (range, 0–6), with only 15.7% exhibiting high medication adherence. Multiple regression analyses showed that the absence of frailty/pre-frailty (P = 0.01) were significantly associated with poorer medication adherence, while the presence of polypharmacy (P = 0.02) and lower serum albumin, a potential sign of malnutrition (P = 0.03), were associated with poor adherence in another model. Conclusion. This study is among the very few reports addressing GS and medication adherence, especially in ESRD patients. Interventions targeting frailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition might potentially improve the medication non-adherence and symptom control in these pill-burdened patients. PMID:27326380

  14. Impact of oral antipsychotic medication adherence on healthcare resource utilization among schizophrenia patients with Medicare coverage.

    PubMed

    Offord, Steve; Lin, Jay; Wong, Bruce; Mirski, Dario; Baker, Ross A

    2013-12-01

    Nonadherence to antipsychotic medications is widespread and compromises the outcome of patients with schizophrenia. Using the MarketScan Medicare claims database, this study examined the impact of medication adherence on healthcare utilization among Medicare insured schizophrenia patients. The study population was separated into two cohorts defined by medication adherence, one with a medication possession ratio (MPR) ≥0.7 (high adherence) and the other with a MPR <0.7(low adherence). Of the 354 patients identified, 126 (36 %) had high adherence (mean ± SD MPR 0.94 ± 0.09) and 228 (64 %) had low adherence (MPR 0.24 ± 0.19). All cause hospitalizations (0.68 vs. 0.44; p = 0.015) and length of stay (LOS) (7.0 vs. 2.6 days; p = 0.005), and relapse hospitalizations (0.22 vs. 0.11; p = 0.028) and LOS (3.2 vs. 0.7 days; p = 0.027) were greater among patients with low adherence. Low adherent Medicare insured patients with schizophrenia require significantly more inpatient care and represent a patient population in which effective interventions are needed to improve disease management.

  15. Adherence to cardiovascular medications in the South Asian population: A systematic review of current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Akeroyd, Julia M; Chan, Winston J; Kamal, Ayeesha K; Palaniappan, Latha; Virani, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review methods of assessing adherence and strategies to improve adherence to cardiovascular disease (CVD) medications, among South Asian CVD patients. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of English language studies that examined CVD medication adherence in South Asian populations from 1966 to April 1, 2015 in SCOPUS and PubMed. Working in duplicate, we identified 61 studies. After exclusions, 26 studies were selected for full text review. Of these, 17 studies were included in the final review. We abstracted data on several factors including study design, study population, method of assessing adherence and adherence rate. RESULTS: These studies were conducted in India (n = 11), Pakistan (n = 3), Bangladesh (n = 1), Nepal (n = 1) and Sri Lanka (n = 1). Adherence rates ranged from 32%-95% across studies. Of the 17 total publications included, 10 focused on assessing adherence to CVD medications and 7 focused on assessing the impact of interventions on medication adherence. The validated Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) was used as the primary method of assessing adherence in five studies. Three studies used validated questionnaires similar to the MMAS, and one study utilized Medication Event Monitoring System caps, with the remainder of the studies utilizing pill count and self-report measures. As expected, studies using non-validated self-report measures described higher rates of adherence than studies using validated scale measurements and pill count. The included intervention studies examined the use of polypill therapy, provider education and patient counseling to improve medication adherence. CONCLUSION: The overall medication adherence rates were low in the region, which suggest a growing need for future interventions to improve adherence. PMID:26730300

  16. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  17. Adherence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, G C; Young, T; Ross, R F; Rosenbusch, R F

    1990-03-01

    This work was an attempt to develop an in vitro adherence model for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, using monolayers of human and porcine lung fibroblasts and porcine kidney cells. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae grown in Friis mycoplasma broth was radiolabeled with 35[S]-methionine, washed, concentrated, and inoculated on the monolayers. After 15 minutes of centrifugation to facilitate adherence, monolayers were washed 3 times, dissolved with 0.1N NaOH, and suspended in scintillation liquid, and the radioactivity was determined in a liquid scintillation counter. Adherence, measured as a percentage of counts added, varied according to the mycoplasma strain and the cell line used. Comparison of strains J, 144L, and 232 of M hyopneumoniae revealed 7.5 +/- 5.9, 31.9 +/- 13, and 9.6 +/- 5% adherence to porcine kidney cells, respectively. Slightly different, but proportionally the same relationships were obtained with swine or human fibroblasts. Adherence was decreased slightly by repeated washings of the mycoplasma-treated cell monolayers; however, a plateau was reached, indicating irreversibility of the adherence process. Pretreatment of cell monolayers with nonlabeled organisms substantially blocked adherence by labeled organisms. Dilution of labeled organisms resulted in an increased proportion adhering. Therefore, it appears that the adherence was a receptor-dependent event. Treatment of the mycoplasmas with trypsin prior to the inoculation of monolayers resulted in a marked reduction in adherence. Treatment of the mycoplasmas with hyperimmune swine serum against M hyopneumoniae or normal swine serum resulted in 80 to 90% reduction of adherence; however, no inhibition occurred when mycoplasmas were treated with purified IgG from the hyperimmune serum.

  18. Intent-to-adhere and adherence to malaria prevention recommendations in two travel clinics.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Irit; Grefat, Rami; Ephros, Moshe; Rishpon, Shmuel

    2015-01-01

    Malaria infects 30,000 travelers annually worldwide. At greatest risk are those who travel for long duration. Prevention of malaria includes chemoprophylaxis. This prospective study on 121 travelers who visited two travel clinics shows that adherence to prophylactic treatment was low, especially in long duration trips, and that adherence rate could be predicted by the much more available intent-to-adhere rate.

  19. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2016-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they result from proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in epithelial tissue. Culture, histopathological and molecular evidence of spirochetal infection associated with MD has been presented in several published studies using a variety of techniques. Spirochetes genetically identified as Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto predominate as the infective agent in most of the Morgellons skin specimens studied so far. Other species of Borrelia including Borrelia garinii, Borrelia miyamotoi, and Borrelia hermsii have also been detected in skin specimens taken from MD patients. The optimal treatment for MD remains to be determined. PMID:27789971

  20. Circular and linear plasmids of Lyme disease spirochetes have extensive homology: characterization of a repeated DNA element.

    PubMed Central

    Zückert, W R; Meyer, J

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned three copies of a repeated DNA segment from Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strain B31, present on both circular and linear plasmids of this and other B. burgdorferi sensu lato strains. The DNA sequences are characterized by a highly homologous segment containing two open reading frames (ORFs), ORF-A and ORF-B. Five additional ORFs can be found on the slightly less homologous flanking sequences: ORF-G on the opposite strand upstream of ORF-A, and ORF-C, ORF-D, ORF-E, and ORF-F downstream of ORF-B. The 4.6-kb-long element containing ORF-A through ORF-E is flanked by approximately 180-bp-long imperfect inverted repeats (IRs). The putative gene product of ORF-C displays homology to proteins involved in plasmid maintenance in a number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. ORF-E features several short, highly homologous direct repeats. ORF-A, ORF-B, and ORF-D are homologous to three ORFs on a recently described 8.3-kb circular plasmid of Borrelia afzelii Ip21 that are flanked by similar IRs (J. J. Dunn, S. R. Buchstein, L.-L. Butler, S. Fisenne, D. S. Polin, B. N. Lade, and B. J. Luft, J. Bacteriol. 176:2706-2717,1994). ORF-C and ORF-E, however, are missing from this region on the Ip21 plasmid. Furthermore, the repeated DNA element as defined by the IRs is present in opposite orientations relative to the flanking sequences on the B31 and Ip21 plasmids. PMID:8636030

  1. Delayed onset of the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction in doxycycline-treated disease: a case report and review of its histopathology and implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Pooja; Gregory, Neal A; Zelger, Bernhard; Carlson, J Andrew

    2015-06-01

    The Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction (JHR) is a transient inflammatory syndrome triggered hours after the start of antibiotic treatment of spirochete infections, namely syphilis. Clinically, JHR manifests as an abrupt onset of constitutional symptoms and exacerbation of cutaneous lesions that resolve without intervention. JHR's pathogenesis is unclear and it is histopathologically rarely reported. Herein, the authors report a 47-year-old woman, with solitary erythema migrans and positive Lyme disease serology, who presented for medical care 14 days after commencement of doxycycline therapy. She complained of malaise, facial flushing, gingival erythema, and acquisition of additional plaques characterized by swelling, increased erythema, pruritus, and exfoliative scale. Punch biopsies demonstrated subacute to chronic spongiotic psoriasiform reaction patterns with a superficial lymphocytic infiltrate. By Borrelia-specific immunohistochemistry, spirochetes were found in the deep dermis, unassociated with inflammation, and focally in the upper spinous layer, associated with spongiosis. Borrelia burgdorferi DNA was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction. Doxycycline was discontinued, and symptoms and signs resolved within a few days. Liberation of endotoxin-like materials (eg, lipoproteins) from degenerating spirochetes and concomitant cytokine production is the suspected cause of JHR and supported by the finding of lesional spirochetes. Alternatively, a reversal reaction with a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction is also a plausible cause based on spirochetes found in the lymphocytic spongiotic dermatitis. PMID:25033009

  2. A Review of Treatment Adherence Measurement Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Garland, Ann F.

    2013-01-01

    Fidelity measurement is critical for testing the effectiveness and implementation in practice of psychosocial interventions. Adherence is a critical component of fidelity. The purposes of this review were to catalogue adherence measurement methods and assess existing evidence for the valid and reliable use of the scores that they generate and the…

  3. In vitro susceptibility and a new point mutation associated with tylosin-resistance in Japanese canine intestinal spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Prapasarakul, Nuvee; Ochi, Kozo; Adachi, Yoshikazu

    2003-12-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of six commonly used antimicrobial agents against 29 isolates of intestinal spirochetes isolated from dogs in Japan were examined by the agar dilution technique. In addition, the genetic basis of tylosin resistance in in vitro selected resistant mutants of two reference strains and three tylosin-susceptible field isolates obtained by three successive subcultures on blood agar containing 1 microg/ml of tylosin was investigated. Carbadox was the most active (MIC: < 0.00625) of all the antimicrobial agents. Although all the isolates were susceptible to tylosin, some were resistant to erythromycin. Tiamulin, lincomycin and dimetridazole were also very active against the isolates. All the resistant isolates did not harbor any plasmids. In vitro selected tylosin-resistant mutants of previously tylosin-susceptible isolates showed a new mutation in which their adenine at the base position equivalent to 2062 of 23S rDNA of Escherichia coli has been replaced by cytosine. These findings may both provide guidance towards the proper choice of antimicrobial agents for the treatment of canine intestinal spirochetosis, and add to the understanding of the genetic basis of tylosin resistance. PMID:14709813

  4. Predictors of non-adherence to follow-up visits and deferasirox chelation therapy among jordanian adolescents with Thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Al-Kloub, Manal Ibrahim; A Bed, Mona A; Al Khawaldeh, Omar A; Al Tawarah, Yasin M; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2014-10-01

    Poor adherence to treatment can have negative effects on outcomes and heath care cost. However, little is known about the factors that impact adherence to deferasirox chelation therapy. The aims of this study were to identify rates and predictors of non-adherence to medical regimen among thalassemia major adolescents on deferasirox oral chelation therapy by using subjective (self-reporting) and objective (serum ferritin and follow-up visits) measures. Convenient samples of 164 adolescents, aged 12-19 years were recruited from three National Thalassemia Centers in Jordan. Patients were interviewed using a four-section questionnaire and the medical records were checked. Results indicated that rate of adherence according to self-report was (73%); while to follow-up medical appointments and serum ferritin level rates was 57% and 47%, respectively. One-third of participant adolescents (n = 52) were psychologically impaired. Multivariate analysis showed that factors affecting adolescent non-adherence to deferasirox chelation therapy is different from that affecting adherence to follow-up visits. In general, adolescents more than 16 years old, presence of sibling with thalassemia, lack of parental monitoring, lower family income, decrease frequency of blood transfusion, and psychological impairment were found significant predictors of non-adherence among adolescents. Disease knowledge was not associated with adherence status of the adolescents. Clinician should be aware of high prevalence of low adherence to chelation therapy during adolescent years. Nurses need to regularly assess, monitor, and promote adherence behavior that might impact patients' outcomes.

  5. Motivating patient adherence to allergic rhinitis treatments.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2015-03-01

    Patient nonadherence significantly burdens the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR). Fewer than half of prescribed doses of intranasal corticosteroid medication are taken. The challenges for immunotherapies are even greater. While sustained treatment for 3 to 5 years is required for full benefit, most patients receiving immunotherapy, either subcutaneous or sublingual, stop treatment within the first year. Although research into interventions to improve AR adherence is lacking, lessons learned from adherence interventions in other chronic health conditions can be applied to AR. Two well-established, overriding models of care-the chronic care model and patient-centered care-can improve adherence. The patient-centered care model includes important lessons for allergy providers in their daily practice, including understanding and targeting modifiable barriers to adherence. Additionally, recent studies have begun to leverage health information and communication technologies to reach out to patients and promote adherence, extending patient-centered interventions initiated by providers during office visits.

  6. Motivating patient adherence to allergic rhinitis treatments.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2015-03-01

    Patient nonadherence significantly burdens the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR). Fewer than half of prescribed doses of intranasal corticosteroid medication are taken. The challenges for immunotherapies are even greater. While sustained treatment for 3 to 5 years is required for full benefit, most patients receiving immunotherapy, either subcutaneous or sublingual, stop treatment within the first year. Although research into interventions to improve AR adherence is lacking, lessons learned from adherence interventions in other chronic health conditions can be applied to AR. Two well-established, overriding models of care-the chronic care model and patient-centered care-can improve adherence. The patient-centered care model includes important lessons for allergy providers in their daily practice, including understanding and targeting modifiable barriers to adherence. Additionally, recent studies have begun to leverage health information and communication technologies to reach out to patients and promote adherence, extending patient-centered interventions initiated by providers during office visits. PMID:25956611

  7. Methamphetamine use and neuropsychiatric factors are associated with antiretroviral non-adherence.

    PubMed

    Moore, David J; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Woods, Steven Paul; Ellis, Ronald J; Atkinson, J Hampton; Heaton, Robert K; Grant, Igor

    2012-01-01

    The present study assesses the impact of methamphetamine (METH) on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among HIV+ persons, as well as examines the contribution of neurocognitive impairment and other neuropsychiatric factors [i.e., major depressive disorder (MDD), antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), and attention deficit disorder (ADHD)] for ART non-adherence. We examined HIV+ persons with DSM-IV-diagnosed lifetime history of METH abuse/dependence (HIV+ /METH+ ; n=67) as compared to HIV+ participants with no history of METH abuse/dependence (HIV+ /METH - ; n=50). Ancillary analyses compared these groups with a small group of HIV+ /METH+ persons with current METH abuse/dependence (HIV+ /CU METH+ ; n=8). Non-adherence was defined as self-report of any skipped ART dose in the last four days. Neurocognitive functioning was assessed with a comprehensive battery, covering seven neuropsychological domains. Lifetime METH diagnosis was associated with higher rates of detectable levels of plasma and CSF HIV RNA. When combing groups (i.e., METH+ and METH- participants), univariate analyses indicated co-occurring ADHD, ASPD, and MDD predicted ART non-adherence (p's < 0.10; not lifetime METH status or neurocognitive impairment). A significant multivariable model including these variables indicated that only MDD uniquely predicted ART non-adherence after controlling for the other variables (p<0.05). Ancillary analyses indicated that current METH users (use within 30 days) were significantly less adherent (50% prevalence of non-adherence) than lifetime METH+ users and HIV+ /METH- participants and that neurocognitive impairment was associated with non-adherence (p's < 0.05). METH use disorders are associated with worse HIV disease outcomes and ART medication non-adherence. Interventions often target substance use behaviors alone to enhance antiretroviral treatment outcomes; however, in addition to targeting substance use behaviors, interventions to improve ART adherence may

  8. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy and Virologic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The often cited need to achieve ≥95% (nearly perfect) adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for successful virologic outcomes in HIV may present a barrier to initiation of therapy in the early stages of HIV. This meta-analysis synthesized 43 studies (27,905 participants) performed across >26 countries, to determine the relationship between cut-off point for optimal adherence to ART and virologic outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect model to calculate pooled odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The mean rate of patients reporting optimal adherence was 63.4%. Compared with suboptimal adherence, optimal adherence was associated with a lower risk of virologic failure (0.34; 95% CI: 0.26–0.44). There were no significant differences in the pooled odds ratios among different optimal adherence thresholds (≥98–100%, ≥95%, ≥80–90%). Study design (randomized controlled trial vs observational study) (regression coefficient 0.74, 95% CI: 0.04–1.43, P < 0.05) and study region (developing vs developed countries; regression coefficient 0.56, 95% CI: 0.01–1.12, P < 0.05) remained as independent predictors of between-study heterogeneity, with more patients with optimal adherence from developing countries or randomized controlled trials experiencing virologic failure. The threshold for optimal adherence to achieve better virologic outcomes appears to be wider than the commonly used cut-off point (≥95% adherence). The cut-off point for optimal adherence could be redefined to a slightly lower level to encourage the prescribing ART at an early stage of HIV infection. PMID:27082595

  9. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks `outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  10. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks 'outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  11. Adherence to Treatment and Factors Affecting Adherence of Epileptic Patients at Yirgalem General Hospital, Southern Ethiopia: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hasiso, Temesgen Yohannes; Desse, Tigestu Alemu

    2016-01-01

    Background Non adherence of epileptic patients to antiepileptic medication often leads to an increased risk of seizures and worsening of disease, death and increased health care costs. Objective to assess adherence to treatment and factors affecting adherence of epileptic patients at Yirgalem General Hospital, Southern Ethiopia. Methods and Materials We conducted a cross-sectional study on epileptic patients from February 9 to 22, 2015. Data were collected from patients ≥18 years old. Adherence was measured using the eight-item Morisky’s medication adherence scale. All consecutive patients coming to epilepsy clinic during the study period were interviewed until the calculated sample size (210) was obtained. We collected patient demographics, perception about epilepsy and adherence to medication(s). We used chi-square tests and a binary logistic regression model for statistical analysis. Statistical significance was considered at P<0.05. Results out of a total of 210 participants, 194 were willing to participate and were studied. Of the 194 participants, 109 (56.2%) were males. The mean age of the participants was 33.62±11.44 years; range 18 to 66 years. The majority, 123(63.41%), of the participants were taking two antiepileptic medications. Sixty two (32%) of the participants were adherent to their treatment. The most common reported reasons for non-adherence were forgetfulness 49(75.4%) and run out of pills 7(10.8%). Factors that affect medication adherence are epilepsy treatment for <1 year (P = 0.011), epilepsy treatment for 1–3 years (P = 0.002), epilepsy treatment for 3–5 years (P = 0.007), being married (P = 0.006), grade 9–12 education (P = 0.028), college or university education (P = 0.002) and absence of co-morbidity (P = 0.008). Conclusions The rate of adherence observed in this study was low. The most common reason for non- adherence was forgetfulness. Therefore, the hospital should devise strategies to improve adherence of epileptic patients

  12. Adherence to antihypertensive medications and health outcomes among newly treated hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Esposti, Luca Degli; Saragoni, Stefania; Benemei, Silvia; Batacchi, Paolo; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Di Bari, Mauro; Marchionni, Niccolò; Sturani, Alessandra; Buda, Stefano; Esposti, Ezio Degli

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate adherence to antihypertensive therapy (AHT) and the association between adherence to AHT, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity in a large cohort of patients newly treated with antihypertensives in a clinical practice setting. Methods: An administrative database kept by the Local Health Unit of Florence (Italy) listing patient baseline characteristics, drug prescription, and hospital admission information was used to perform a population-based retrospective study including patients newly treated with antihypertensives, ≥18 years of age, with a first prescription between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2006. Patients using antihypertensives for secondary prevention of CV disease, occasional spot users, and patients with early CV events, were excluded from the study cohort. Adherence to AHT was calculated and classified as poor, moderate, good, and excellent. A Cox regression model was conducted to determine the association among adherence to AHT and risk of all-cause mortality, stroke, or acute myocardial infarction. Results: A total of 31,306 patients, 15,031 men (48.0%), and 16,275 women (52.0%), with a mean age of 60.2 ± 14.5 years was included in the study. Adherence to AHT was poor in 8038 patients (25.7% of included patients), moderate in 4640 (14.8%), good in 5651 (18.1%), and excellent in 12,977 (41.5%). Compared with patients with poor adherence (hazard ratio [HR] = 1), the risk of all-cause death, stroke, or acute myocardial infarction was significantly lower in patients with good (HR = 0.69, P < 0.001) and excellent adherence (HR = 0.53, P < 0.001). Conclusions: These findings indicate that suboptimal adherence to AHT occurs in a substantial proportion of patients and is associated with poor health outcomes already in primary prevention of CV diseases. For health authorities, this preliminary evidence underlines the need for monitoring and improving medication adherence in clinical practice. PMID:21935332

  13. Adherence to prophylaxis and quality of life in children and adolescents with severe haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    García-Dasí, M; Aznar, J A; Jiménez-Yuste, V; Altisent, C; Bonanad, S; Mingot, E; Lucía, F; Giménez, F; López, M Fernanda; Marco, P; Pérez, R; Fernández, M Á; Paloma, M J; Galmes, B; Herrero, S; García-Talavera, J A

    2015-07-01

    Treatment adherence in adolescents with chronic diseases is around 50%, and failure is more common in preventive therapy. In haemophilia, contradictory results are reported by the published studies. The objective of this study was to evaluate adherence with factor VIII (FVIII) prophylaxis in Spanish patients with severe haemophilia A between age 6 and 20 years. Data were collected retrosp-ectively in the previous 2 years. The primary endpoint was the absolute adherence index (AAI), and the endpoints were related to clinical status, age, prophylaxis regimen, responsibility for factor administration and quality of life (QoL), assessed by the Haemo-QoL questionnaires. A total of 78 patients from 14 Spanish hospitals were recruited. Adherence ranged between -64.4 and 66.7 (mean -3.08). No differences were observed between children and adolescents (7.11 vs. 6.39; P = 0.809). A statistically significant association (P < 0.010) between infra adherent group and target joint was found, as was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.010) between the number of bleeding episodes experienced by the adherent group (mean 1.4) and by infra adherents (mean 4.5). There was no significant difference between AAI and prophylactic regimen (6.35 vs. 6.96, P = 0.848), neither between AAI and the person responsible for factor administration (5.57 vs. 8.79, P = 0.326). The Haemo-QoL scores (8-12 years) were related to adherence level (P < 0.05). Adherence was approximately ideal and patients perceived a high QoL. Because of the repercussions for compliance, it is essential to work during puberty on emotional and self-acceptance aspects of the disease, as well as coping, and the patient's family, school and health team relationships.

  14. Machine learning classification of medication adherence in patients with movement disorders using non-wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Conrad S; Behoora, Ishan; Nembhard, Harriet Black; Lewis, Mechelle; Sterling, Nicholas W; Huang, Xuemei

    2015-11-01

    Medication non-adherence is a major concern in the healthcare industry and has led to increases in health risks and medical costs. For many neurological diseases, adherence to medication regimens can be assessed by observing movement patterns. However, physician observations are typically assessed based on visual inspection of movement and are limited to clinical testing procedures. Consequently, medication adherence is difficult to measure when patients are away from the clinical setting. The authors propose a data mining driven methodology that uses low cost, non-wearable multimodal sensors to model and predict patients' adherence to medication protocols, based on variations in their gait. The authors conduct a study involving Parkinson's disease patients that are "on" and "off" their medication in order to determine the statistical validity of the methodology. The data acquired can then be used to quantify patients' adherence while away from the clinic. Accordingly, this data-driven system may allow for early warnings regarding patient safety. Using whole-body movement data readings from the patients, the authors were able to discriminate between PD patients on and off medication, with accuracies greater than 97% for some patients using an individually customized model and accuracies of 78% for a generalized model containing multiple patient gait data. The proposed methodology and study demonstrate the potential and effectiveness of using low cost, non-wearable hardware and data mining models to monitor medication adherence outside of the traditional healthcare facility. These innovations may allow for cost effective, remote monitoring of treatment of neurological diseases.

  15. Improving medication adherence in hypercholesterolemia: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gatwood, Justin; Bailey, James E

    2014-01-01

    Medication nonadherence is a prevalent public health issue that contributes to significant medical costs and detrimental health outcomes. This is especially true in patients with hypercholesterolemia, a condition affecting millions of American adults and one that is associated with increased risk for coronary and cerebrovascular events. Considering the magnitude of outcomes related to this disease, the medical community has placed significant emphasis on addressing the treatment for high cholesterol, and progress has been made in recent years. However, poor adherence to therapy continues to plague health outcomes and more must be understood and done to address suboptimal medication taking. Here we provide an overview of the reasons for poor medication adherence in patients with hypercholesterolemia and describe recent efforts to curb nonadherence. Suggested approaches for improving medication taking in patients with high cholesterol are also provided to guide practitioners, patients, and payers. PMID:25395859

  16. Intelligent mobile support for therapy adherence and behavior change.

    PubMed

    Klein, Michel; Mogles, Nataliya; van Wissen, Arlette

    2014-10-01

    Mobile applications have proven to be promising tools for supporting people in adhering to their health goals. Although coaching and reminder apps abound, few of them are based on established theories of behavior change. In the present work, a behavior change support system is presented that uses a computational model based on multiple psychological theories of behavior change. The system determines the user's reason for non-adherence using a mobile phone app and an online lifestyle diary. The user automatically receives generated messages with persuasive, tailored content. The system was designed to support chronic patients with type 2 diabetes, HIV, and cardiovascular disease, but can be applied to many health and lifestyle domains. The main focus of this work is the development of the model and the underlying reasoning method. Furthermore, the implementation of the system and some preliminary results of its functioning will be discussed.

  17. [The role of dermatologist in adherence to treatment].

    PubMed

    Misery, L

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to treatment is often partial in the course of chronic cutaneous disease but can be improved by the dermatologist. Patient participation in the therapeutic decision is indispensable. Dialogue between patient and dermatologist should provide an understanding of the patient's expectations of the treatment, his or her preferences, and which treatment can be integrated into the patient's lifestyle, and should also provide the patient with an understanding of what the treatment can provide and what its disadvantages may be. The approach to poor compliance differs depending on whether or not it is intentional, with all points between obviously possible. Repeated consultations can maintain and enhance the relation between physician and patient, each visit stimulating adherence to the treatment.The language used by the dermatologist should be clear and simple, adapted to each patient. The simplest, most effective, and best tolerated treatments are followed best.

  18. Predictors and Profiles of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among African American Adolescents and Young Adult Males Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Gross, Israel Moses; Hosek, Sybil; Richards, Maryse Heather; Fernandez, M Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is crucial for thwarting HIV disease progression and reducing secondary HIV transmission, yet youth living with HIV (YLH) struggle with adherence. The highest rates of new HIV infections in the United States occur in young African American men. A sample of 387 HIV-positive young African American males on ART was selected from a cross-sectional assessment of (YLH) receiving medical care within the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN) from 2010 to 2012 (12-24 years old, median 22.00, SD 2.08). Participants completed self-reported adherence, demographic, health, and psychosocial measures. Sixty-two percent self-reported 100% ART adherence. Optimal data analysis identified frequency of cannabis use during the past 3 months as the strongest independent predictor of adherence, yielding moderate effect strength sensitivity (ESS) = 27.1, p < 0.001. Among participants with infrequent cannabis use, 72% reported full adherence; in contrast, only 45% of participants who used cannabis frequently reported full adherence. Classification tree analysis (CTA) was utilized to improve classification accuracy and to identify the pathways of ART adherence and nonadherence. The CTA model evidenced a 38% improvement above chance for correctly classifying participants as ART adherent or nonadherent. Participants most likely to be adherent were those with low psychological distress and minimal alcohol use (82% were adherent). Participants least likely to be adherent were those with higher psychological distress and engaged in weekly cannabis use (69% were nonadherent). Findings suggest multiple profiles of ART adherence for young African American males living with HIV and argue for targeted psychosocial interventions. PMID:27410496

  19. Potential role of native and exotic deer and their associated ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) in the ecology of Lyme disease in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Lane, R S; Burgdorfer, W

    1986-12-01

    The relationship of native Columbian Black-tailed Deer, two species of exotic deer (Axis and Fallow), and their ticks to the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, was studied in coastal and inland areas of northern California, USA. Spirochetemias were detected in 27% of Black-tailed Deer, 50% of Axis Deer, and 56% of Fallow Deer collected in late fall and winter. Antibody prevalence was 38% in Black-tailed Deer, 24% in Fallow Deer, and 6% in Axis Deer. One to 3 tick species were collected from each species of deer, and 2 tick species were flagged from vegetation; of these, only the Western Black-legged Tick, Ixodes pacificus, was found to contain spirochetes. These findings suggest that all 3 deer species may be important hosts of spirochetes, possibly B. burgdorferi, and reconfirm that I. pacificus is the primary vector of the latter in California.

  20. [Lyme disease: an update].

    PubMed

    García Meléndez, Martha Elena; Skinner Taylor, Cassandra; Salas Alanís, Julio César; Ocampo Candiani, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease is an emerging infection caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. It is the most common vector-borne disease in the USA and Europe, and it is transmitted to humans through the bite of ticks of the genus Ixodes. Its animal reservoirs are the white-tailed deer, the white-footed mouse, and other small mammals. It is considered the new "great imitator", with its diagnosis being a major challenge. Traditionally it is divided into four stages, early localized disease, early disseminated, late disease, and the post-Lyme syndrome. Clinical manifestations may be both cutaneous and systemic, and can have cardiovascular, neurological, and musculoskeletal involvement. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings and can be confirmed by serologic studies (ELISA and Western Blot). The best preventive method is to avoid exposure to vectors. The aim of treatment with antibiotics (doxycycline and cephalosporins) is to relieve symptoms and prevent sequelae.

  1. Knowledge about hypertension and factors associated with the non-adherence to drug therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Mayckel da Silva; Reiners, Annelita Almeida Oliveira; Marcon, Sonia Silva

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to identify the degree of knowledge of people with hypertension concerning the disease and to verify the factors associated with the non-adherence to anti-hypertensive drug therapy. Method Cross sectional study, involving 422 people. Data collection took place at their homes, between December 2011 and March 2012, through interviews using the following instruments: Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ-Q), Medication Regimen Complexity Index (MRCI) and a guide with questions related to sociodemographic profile, satisfaction with healthcare service and knowledge about the disease. Results 42.6% did not adhere to the drug therapy and 17.7% had poor knowledge about the disease. Factors associated with the non-adherence were: complex drug therapy, poor knowledge about the disease and dissatisfaction with the healthcare service. Conclusion The findings reinforce that the complex drug therapy prescriptions, little knowledge about the disease and dissatisfaction with the healthcare service have influence on the process of non-adherence to anti-hypertensive drug therapy. PMID:25029062

  2. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications in Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Behnood-Rod, Azin; Rabbanifar, Omid; Pourzargar, Pirouz; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Saadat, Habibollah; Moharamzad, Yashar; Morisky, Donald E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Appropriate adherence to medication is still a challenging issue for hypertensive patients. We determined adherence to antihypertensive(s) and its associated factors among 280 Iranian patients. Methods. They were recruited consecutively from private and university health centers and pharmacies in four cities. The validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was administered to measure adherence. Results. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.75 (±1.88). About half of the sample (139 cases, 49.6%) showed low adherence (MMAS-8 score < 6). There was a negative linear association between the MMAS-8 score and systolic BP (r = -0.231, P < 0.001) as well as diastolic BP (r = -0.280, P < 0.001). In linear regression model, overweight/obesity (B = -0.52, P = 0.02), previous history of admission to emergency services due to hypertensive crisis (B = -0.79, P = 0.001), and getting medication directly from drugstore without refill prescription in hand (B = -0.51, P = 0.04) were factors recognized to have statistically significant association with the MMAS-8 score. Conclusion. Antihypertensive adherence was unsatisfactory. We suggest that health care providers pay special attention and make use of the aforementioned findings in their routine visits of hypertensive patients to recognize those who are vulnerable to poor adherence. PMID:27069676

  3. Assessing medication adherence in the elderly: which tools to use in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    MacLaughlin, Eric J; Raehl, Cynthia L; Treadway, Angela K; Sterling, Teresa L; Zoller, Dennis P; Bond, Chester A

    2005-01-01

    Adherence to prescribed medication regimens is difficult for all patients and particularly challenging for the elderly. Medication adherence demands a working relationship between a patient or caregiver and prescriber that values open, honest discussion about medications, i.e. the administration schedule, intended benefits, adverse effects and costs. Although nonadherence to medications may be common among the elderly, fundamental reasons leading to nonadherence vary among patients. Demographic characteristics may help to identify elderly patients who are at risk for nonadherence. Inadequate or marginal health literacy among the elderly is common and warrants assessment. The number of co-morbid conditions and presence of cognitive, vision and/or hearing impairment may predispose the elderly to nonadherence. Similarly, medications themselves may contribute to nonadherence secondary to adverse effects or costs. Especially worrisome is nonadherence to 'less forgiving' drugs that, when missed, may lead to an adverse event (e.g. withdrawal symptoms) or disease exacerbation. Traditional methods for assessing medication adherence are unreliable. Direct questioning at the patient interview may not provide accurate assessments, especially if closed-ended, judgmental questions are posed. Prescription refill records and pill counts often overestimate true adherence rates. However, if elders are asked to describe how they take their medicines (using the Drug Regimen Unassisted Grading Scale or MedTake test tools), adherence problems can be identified in a non-threatening manner. Medication nonadherence should be suspected in elders who experience a decline in functional abilities. Predictors of medication nonadherence include specific disease states, such as cardiovascular diseases and depression. Technological aids to assessing medication adherence are available, but their utility is, thus far, primarily limited to a few research studies. These computerised devices, which

  4. MPC-polymer reduces adherence and biofilm formation by oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hirota, K; Yumoto, H; Miyamoto, K; Yamamoto, N; Murakami, K; Hoshino, Y; Matsuo, T; Miyake, Y

    2011-07-01

    Oral biofilms such as dental plaque cause dental caries and periodontitis, as well as aspiration pneumonia and infectious endocarditis by translocation. Hence, the suppression of oral biofilm formation is an issue of considerable importance. Mechanical removal, disinfectants, inhibition of polysaccharide formation, and artificial sugar have been used for the reduction of oral biofilm. From the viewpoint of the inhibition of bacterial adherence, we investigated whether aqueous biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-polymer can reduce streptococcal colonization and biofilm formation. We examined the effects of MPC-polymer on streptococcal adherence to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and oral epithelial cells, and the adherence of Fusobacterium nucleatum to streptococcal biofilm. MPC-polymer application markedly inhibited both the adherence and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and streptococcal adherence to oral epithelial cells, and reduced the adherence of F. nucleatum to streptococcal biofilms. A small-scale clinical trial revealed that mouthrinsing with MPC-polymer inhibited the increase of oral bacterial numbers, especially of S. mutans. These findings suggest that MPC-polymer is a potent inhibitor of bacterial adherence and biofilm development, and may be useful to prevent dental-plaque-related diseases. (UMIN Clinical Trial Registry UMIN000003471).

  5. Staphylococcus aureus adheres to human intestinal mucus but can be displaced by certain lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vesterlund, Satu; Karp, Matti; Salminen, Seppo; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2006-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that Staphylococcus aureus may colonize the intestinal tract, especially among hospitalized patients. As Staph. aureus has been found to be associated with certain gastrointestinal diseases, it has become important to study whether this bacterium can colonize the intestinal tract and if so, whether it is possible to prevent colonization. Adhesion is the first step in colonization; this study shows that Staph. aureus adheres to mucus from resected human intestinal tissue. Certain lactic acid bacteria (LAB), mainly commercial probiotics, were able to reduce adhesion and viability of adherent Staph. aureus. In displacement assays the amount of adherent Staph. aureus in human intestinal mucus was reduced 39-44% by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii. Moreover, adherent Lactobacillus reuteri, Lc. lactis and P. freudenreichii reduced viability of adherent Staph. aureus by 27-36%, depending on the strain, after 2 h incubation. This was probably due to the production of organic acids and hydrogen peroxide and possibly in the case of L. reuteri to the production of reuterin. This study shows for the first time that Staph. aureus can adhere to human intestinal mucus and adherent bacteria can be displaced and killed by certain LAB strains via in situ production of antimicrobial substances.

  6. An ontology for factors affecting tuberculosis treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ogundele, Olukunle Ayodeji; Moodley, Deshendran; Pillay, Anban W; Seebregts, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Adherence behavior is a complex phenomenon influenced by diverse personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that may vary between communities in different regions. Understanding the factors that influence adherence behavior is essential in predicting which individuals and communities are at risk of nonadherence. This is necessary for supporting resource allocation and intervention planning in disease control programs. Currently, there is no known concrete and unambiguous computational representation of factors that influence tuberculosis (TB) treatment adherence behavior that is useful for prediction. This study developed a computer-based conceptual model for capturing and structuring knowledge about the factors that influence TB treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Methods An extensive review of existing categorization systems in the literature was used to develop a conceptual model that captured scientific knowledge about TB adherence behavior in SSA. The model was formalized as an ontology using the web ontology language. The ontology was then evaluated for its comprehensiveness and applicability in building predictive models. Conclusion The outcome of the study is a novel ontology-based approach for curating and structuring scientific knowledge of adherence behavior in patients with TB in SSA. The ontology takes an evidence-based approach by explicitly linking factors to published clinical studies. Factors are structured around five dimensions: factor type, type of effect, regional variation, cross-dependencies between factors, and treatment phase. The ontology is flexible and extendable and provides new insights into the nature of and interrelationship between factors that influence TB adherence. PMID:27175067

  7. Cost-effectiveness of adherence-enhancing interventions: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Simon-Tuval, Tzahit; Neumann, Peter J; Greenberg, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Low patient adherence to health-related interventions is a major barrier to achieving healthcare goals and is associated with very high avoidable costs. Although several studies suggest that adherence-enhancing interventions can improve health outcomes, economic evaluations of these interventions are scarce. Systematic reviews published to date are limited to interventions to enhance adherence to pharmaceuticals or to specific diseases and interventions. The authors' objective was to examine the evidence regarding the cost-effectiveness of adherence-enhancing interventions in healthcare and what conclusion could be drawn about these interventions. The present systematic review included 43 original studies and assessed the current evidence regarding the cost-effectiveness of a broad array of interventions aimed at enhancing adherence to medications, medical devices, screening tests and lifestyle behaviors. The authors found that although the majority of adherence-enhancing interventions were cost-effective or cost-saving, variation exists within different intervention types. Further research on the sustainability of adherence improvements is needed in order to accurately evaluate interventions' long-term benefits.

  8. Factors influencing non-adherence to tuberculosis treatment in Jepara, central Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rondags, Angelique; Himawan, Ari Budi; Metsemakers, Job Fm; Kristina, Tri Nur

    2014-07-01

    One of the most serious problems for tuberculosis (TB) control is non-adherence to TB treatment. We studied the factors influencing non-adherence to TB treatment in Indonesia to inform TB treatment adherence strategies. We con- ducted semi-structured interviews with non-adherent patients and key informants in Jepara, Central Java, Indonesia. Three major themes were found in reasons for non-adherence to TB treatment: 1) knowledge about TB, 2) knowledge about TB treatment and 3) choosing and changing a health care treatment facility. Respondents had an inadequate knowledge about TB and its treatment. Feeling healthy and having financial problems were the most common reasons for TB treatment non-adherence. Respondents sought treatment from many different health care providers, and often changed the treatment facility location. TB treatment adherence might improve by providing better education about the disease and its treatment to those undergoing treatment. Providing information about where to receive treatment and that treatment is free could also improve compliance.

  9. Lyme disease: a unique human model for an infectious etiology of rheumatic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Malawista, S. E.; Steere, A. C.; Hardin, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Lyme disease is a complex immune-mediated multi-system disorder that is infectious in origin and inflammatory or "rheumatic" in expression. Through its epidemiologic characteristics, large numbers of a seasonally synchronized patient population are readily available for prospective study. Lyme disease has a known clinical onset ("zero time"), marked by the characteristic expanding skin lesion, erythema chronicum migrans, and a clearly defined pre-articular phase. At least some manifestations of the disorder are responsive to antibiotics, and the causative agent--a spirochete--is now known. These advantages make Lyme disease unique as a human model for an infectious etiology of rheumatic disease. PMID:6516449

  10. Direct demonstration of antigenic substitution of Borrelia burgdorferi ex vivo: exploration of the paradox of the early immune response to outer surface proteins A and C in Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The outer surface proteins (Osps) of Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, are principle targets of protective immune responses against this organism. Whereas most North American strains of B. burgdorferi in culture express an abundant amount of Osp A, antibodies to this protein are either absent or only weakly detected in the sera of naturally infected patients or experimentally infected mice. In contrast, Osp C, which has variable expression on cultured organisms; elicits an early, strong humoral response. To examine this paradox, we have studied the in vivo adaptation of a cloned population of B. burgdorferi strain N40 during the early course of experimental murine borreliosis. As in human disease, antibodies to Osp A were only weakly present in the early immune repertoire after murine inoculation with low dose (10(3)) spirochetes. In contrast, antibodies to Osp C were prominent, even though on cultured spirochetes Osp C mRNA and protein expression could not be detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or indirect immunofluorescence, respectively. These observations led us to investigate the expression of Osp A and Osp C in vivo. By direct fluorescent staining of uncultured spirochetes ex vivo and by PCR amplification of spirochetal mRNA, we show that Osp C is indeed expressed by some spirochetes after infection in the mouse. Spirochetes expressing Osp A could also be detected within the first 2 wk of infection, but not at 30 d. Osp A mRNA, although present at day 14 of infection, could not be amplified by RT-PCR at day 30, suggesting that the expression of this Osp is transient. This further implies that the late burst in Osp A antibodies in both mice and humans may be anamnestic. These results indicate that either Osp C is upregulated on spirochetes after infection, or Osp C- expressing spirochetes expand preferentially over those expressing Osp A during infection. These results have important implications for

  11. [Guideline adherence - is more always better?].

    PubMed

    Nothacker, M J

    2016-09-01

    Guidelines play an increasing role in the health system. Guidelines are intended to provide guidance in the sense of ‟corridors for action and decision", whereby in certain justified cases actions can - or even must - deviate from them. "Cookbook medicine" is not the aim of guidelines.Guideline adherence can not necessarily be equated with guideline conformity. Adherence presumes an agreed treatment goal between patient and physician and focuses the behavior of the patient. Based on current studies on guideline adherence, the use of the term in studies on urological tumors is analyzed.

  12. Lyme disease: the promise of Big Data, companion diagnostics and precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Raphael B; Johnson, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has become a major worldwide epidemic. Recent studies based on Big Data registries show that >300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease each year in the USA, and up to two-thirds of individuals infected with B. burgdorferi will fail conventional 30-year-old antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease. In addition, animal and human evidence suggests that sexual transmission of the Lyme spirochete may occur. Improved companion diagnostic tests for Lyme disease need to be implemented, and novel treatment approaches are urgently needed to combat the epidemic. In particular, therapies based on the principles of precision medicine could be modeled on successful “designer drug” treatment for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C virus infection featuring targeted protease inhibitors. The use of Big Data registries, companion diagnostics and precision medicine will revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease.

  13. Lyme disease: the promise of Big Data, companion diagnostics and precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Raphael B; Johnson, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has become a major worldwide epidemic. Recent studies based on Big Data registries show that >300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease each year in the USA, and up to two-thirds of individuals infected with B. burgdorferi will fail conventional 30-year-old antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease. In addition, animal and human evidence suggests that sexual transmission of the Lyme spirochete may occur. Improved companion diagnostic tests for Lyme disease need to be implemented, and novel treatment approaches are urgently needed to combat the epidemic. In particular, therapies based on the principles of precision medicine could be modeled on successful "designer drug" treatment for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C virus infection featuring targeted protease inhibitors. The use of Big Data registries, companion diagnostics and precision medicine will revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease. PMID:27672336

  14. Lyme disease: the promise of Big Data, companion diagnostics and precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Raphael B; Johnson, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has become a major worldwide epidemic. Recent studies based on Big Data registries show that >300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease each year in the USA, and up to two-thirds of individuals infected with B. burgdorferi will fail conventional 30-year-old antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease. In addition, animal and human evidence suggests that sexual transmission of the Lyme spirochete may occur. Improved companion diagnostic tests for Lyme disease need to be implemented, and novel treatment approaches are urgently needed to combat the epidemic. In particular, therapies based on the principles of precision medicine could be modeled on successful “designer drug” treatment for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C virus infection featuring targeted protease inhibitors. The use of Big Data registries, companion diagnostics and precision medicine will revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease. PMID:27672336

  15. Lyme disease: the promise of Big Data, companion diagnostics and precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Raphael B; Johnson, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has become a major worldwide epidemic. Recent studies based on Big Data registries show that >300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease each year in the USA, and up to two-thirds of individuals infected with B. burgdorferi will fail conventional 30-year-old antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease. In addition, animal and human evidence suggests that sexual transmission of the Lyme spirochete may occur. Improved companion diagnostic tests for Lyme disease need to be implemented, and novel treatment approaches are urgently needed to combat the epidemic. In particular, therapies based on the principles of precision medicine could be modeled on successful "designer drug" treatment for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C virus infection featuring targeted protease inhibitors. The use of Big Data registries, companion diagnostics and precision medicine will revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease.

  16. The association between combination antiretroviral adherence and AIDS-defining conditions at HIV diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Abara, Winston E; Xu, Junjun; Adekeye, Oluwatoyosi A; Rust, George

    2016-08-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has changed the clinical course of HIV. AIDS-defining conditions (ADC) are suggestive of severe or advanced disease and are a leading cause of HIV-related hospitalizations and death among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in the USA. Optimal adherence to cART can mitigate the impact of ADC and disease severity on the health and survivability of PLWHA. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between ADC at HIV diagnosis and optimal adherence among PLWHA. Using data from the 2008 and 2009 Medicaid data from 29 states, we identified individuals, between 18 and 49 years, recently infected with HIV and with a cART prescription. Frequencies and descriptive statistics were conducted to characterize sample. Univariate and multivariable Poisson regression analyses were employed to evaluate the association optimal cART adherence (defined as ≥ 95% study days covered by cART) and ADC at HIV diagnosis (≥1 ADC) were assessed. Approximately 17% of respondents with ADC at HIV diagnosis reported optimal cART adherence. After adjusting for covariates, respondents with an ADC at HIV diagnosis were less likely to report optimal cART adherence (adjusted prevalence ratio (APR) = 0.64, 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.54-0.75). Among the covariates, males (APR=1.10, 95% CI, 1.02-1.19) compared to females were significantly more likely to report optimal adherence while younger respondents, 18-29 years (APR=0.67, 95% CI, 0.57-0.77), 30-39 years (APR=0.86, 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) compared to older respondents were significantly less likely to report optimal adherence. PLWHA with ADC at HIV diagnosis are at risk of suboptimal cART adherence. Multiple adherence strategies that include healthcare providers, case managers, and peer navigators should be utilized to improve cART adherence and optimize health outcomes among PLWHA with ADC at HIV diagnosis. Targeted adherence programs and services are required to address

  17. Psychological factors predict adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis; findings from a systematic review of rates, predictors and associations with patient-reported and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bluett, James; Barton, Anne; Hyrich, Kimme L; Cordingley, Lis; Verstappen, Suzanne M M

    2016-01-01

    Treatment response to methotrexate (MTX) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is not universal and non-adherence may partially explain this. The aims of this systematic review were to: (1) summarise existing rates of adherence to MTX, (2) identify predictors of adherence to MTX, and (3) assess the association between non-adherence and patient outcomes. The authors conducted a systematic search of papers published from January 1980 to February 2015 in PubMed, PsycINFO, EMBASE and CINAHL databases. Studies were eligible for inclusion if: (1) MTX was used as monotherapy or in combination with other therapies, (2) MTX was used in an RA or inflammatory polyarthritis population, (3) adherence was defined and measured as the extent to which patients followed their MTX regimen during the period of prescription, and (4) it was an original piece of research. In total, 10 studies met the inclusion criteria and 8 were evaluated as high quality. Rates of adherence ranged from 59% to 107%, and exposed differences in definitions of adherence, study methodologies and sample heterogeneity. A number of potential predictors of MTX adherence were identified; the strongest being related to beliefs in the necessity and efficacy of MTX, absence of low mood, mild disease and MTX monotherapy. Furthermore, 3 studies tested the association of adherence with disease activity as an outcome measure; all 3 found non-adherence associated with poor treatment response. This systematic review shows the importance of adherence to MTX treatment and summarises the associated modifiable factors. PMID:26848403

  18. Formative research for mhealth HIV adherence: the iHAART app

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Rochelle K.; Ranney, Megan L.; Boyer, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative research was conducted to adapt and develop an mHealth app for HIV patients with histories of substance abuse. The app provides reactive, visual representations of adherence rates, viral load and CD4 counts. Two sets of focus groups were conducted with 22 participants. The first concentrated on use of reminder system and opinions about ideal adherence features. Results informed adaptation of an existing system, which was then presented to participants in the second set of focus groups. We describe participant responses to candidate app characteristics and their understanding of the HIV disease state based on these changing images. Qualitative results indicate that a balance of provided and requested information is important to maintain interest and support adherence. App characteristics and information can provoke positive and negative reactions and these emotional responses may affect adherence. Conclusion: User understanding of, and reaction to, app visual content was essential to adaptation and design. PMID:26644783

  19. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Positive Airway Pressure Therapy Adherence in a Sleep Center

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Loretta J.; Dace, Gayla A.; Colvin, Ryan M.; Ojile, Joseph; Collop, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy adherence in commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers presenting to a sleep center. Methods: A retrospective chart review of 120 drivers evaluated for obstructive sleep apnea OSA and 53 initiated on PAP therapy in a single sleep center over a one-year period (2012); PAP therapy data were collected up to 1 year. Results: Early PAP usage best predicted adherence up to 1 year (p < 0.0001) compared to patient factors, OSA disease characteristics, and treatment elements analyzed. The proportion of participants adherent to therapy was 68.0% at 1 week, decreasing to 39.6% at 1 year, with 31.1% lost to follow-up by 1 year. In the group categorized based on adherence at week 1, 80.6% were adherent at 1 month, decreasing to 52.8% at 1 year. For the group non-adherent at 1 week, 29.4% were adherent at 1 month, decreasing to 11.7% at 1 year. Participants were predominantly male (75.8%), middle-aged (median 50.5 years), and African American (71.7%). Of those referred to the sleep center, 86.7% had OSA (median apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] or respiratory event index [REI] 20.1), with 51.0% of the OSA group having an AHI or REI > 20 and initiating PAP therapy. Conclusions: Early PAP utilization patterns predicted one year adherence for our CMV driver population within a sleep clinic setting. OSA testing of these CMV drivers after occupational health referral identifies high proportions of undiagnosed OSA, with approximately half requiring PAP therapy based on current published treatment recommendations. Citation: Colvin LJ, Dace GA, Colvin RM, Ojile J, Collop N. Commercial motor vehicle driver positive airway pressure therapy adherence in a sleep center. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(4):477–485. PMID:26715403

  20. Internet-based adherence interventions for treatment of chronic disorders in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Alexandria M; Farhangian, Michael E; Feldman, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment adherence is a ubiquitous challenge in medicine, particularly in the adolescent population with chronic disorders. Web-based adherence interventions may be particularly useful in adolescents, due to their familiarity with and frequent use of the Internet. Objective To review web-based interventions used to improve adherence to medication in adolescent patients with chronic disorders. Methods A PubMed search was performed for full-text, English, clinical trials in adolescents using keywords “adherence” or “compliance”, “Internet” or “web”, and “treatment” from inception until November 2014. Articles were selected if they involved using the Internet to provide support to adolescents to help improve their adherence to treatment, excluding those focused on solely providing medical services through the Internet and articles focusing on preventative care, rather than treatment of an illness. Results Fourteen studies were found concentrating on chronic adolescent disorders. Interventions included online surveys, physician chat lines, monitoring programs, and interactive programs. All interventions experienced either greater improvement in adherence or another disease control measure or no statistically significant difference compared with the control group (in-clinic visits). Limitations Few clinical trials studying web-based interventions to improve adherence in adolescents were found. Due to not having one standard outcome measured in all of the studies, it was also difficult comparing the effectiveness of the interventions. Conclusion Web-based interventions play a role in improving adherence in adolescents with chronic disorders by being more time saving and cost effective compared with in-clinic visits. Further research focusing on adherence interventions using the Internet is necessary to determine the ideal ways of utilizing the Internet to improve adherence in adolescents with chronic disorders. PMID:26113787

  1. Medication adherence behaviors of Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Carr-Lopez, Sian M; Shek, Allen; Lastimosa, Janine; Patel, Rajul A; Woelfel, Joseph A; Galal, Suzanne M; Gundersen, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication adherence is crucial for positive outcomes in the management of chronic conditions. Comprehensive medication consultation can improve medication adherence by addressing intentional and unintentional nonadherence. The Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit has eliminated some cost barriers. We sought to examine variables that impact self-reported medication adherence behaviors in an ambulatory Medicare-beneficiary population and to identify the factors that influence what information is provided during a pharmacist consultation. Methods Medicare beneficiaries who attended health fairs in northern California were offered medication therapy management (MTM) services during which demographic, social, and health information, and responses to survey questions regarding adherence were collected. Beneficiaries were also asked which critical elements of a consultation were typically provided by their community pharmacist. Survey responses were examined as a function of demographic, socioeconomic, and health-related factors. Results Of the 586 beneficiaries who were provided MTM services, 575 (98%) completed the adherence questions. Of responders, 406 (70%) reported taking medications “all of the time”. Of the remaining 169 (30%), the following reasons for nonadherence were provided: 123 (73%) forgetfulness; 18 (11%) side effects; and 17 (10%) the medication was not needed. Lower adherence rates were associated with difficulty paying for medication, presence of a medication-related problem, and certain symptomatic chronic conditions. Of the 532 who completed survey questions regarding the content of a typical pharmacist consultation, the topics included: 378 (71%) medication name and indication; 361 (68%) administration instructions; 307 (58%) side effects; 257 (48%) missed-dose instructions; and 245 (46%) interactions. Subsidy recipients and non-English speakers were significantly less likely to be counseled on drug name, indication, and side

  2. Bayesian population modeling of drug dosing adherence.

    PubMed

    Fellows, Kelly; Stoneking, Colin J; Ramanathan, Murali

    2015-10-01

    Adherence is a frequent contributing factor to variations in drug concentrations and efficacy. The purpose of this work was to develop an integrated population model to describe variation in adherence, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence to dosing regimens. The hybrid Markov chain-von Mises method for modeling adherence in individual subjects was extended to the population setting using a Bayesian approach. Four integrated population models for overall adherence, the two-state Markov chain transition parameters, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence were formulated and critically compared. The Markov chain-Monte Carlo algorithm was used for identifying distribution parameters and for simulations. The model was challenged with medication event monitoring system data for 207 hypertension patients. The four Bayesian models demonstrated good mixing and convergence characteristics. The distributions of adherence, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence were markedly non-normal and diverse. The models varied in complexity and the method used to incorporate inter-dependence with the preceding dose in the two-state Markov chain. The model that incorporated a cooperativity term for inter-dependence and a hyperbolic parameterization of the transition matrix probabilities was identified as the preferred model over the alternatives. The simulated probability densities from the model satisfactorily fit the observed probability distributions of adherence, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence parameters in the sample patients. The model also adequately described the median and observed quartiles for these parameters. The Bayesian model for adherence provides a parsimonious, yet integrated, description of adherence in populations. It may find potential applications in clinical trial simulations and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling. PMID:26319548

  3. Adherence of Staphylococcus epidermidis to intraocular lenses.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, P. G.; Elliot, T. S.; McTaggart, L.

    1989-01-01

    We have demonstrated, with an in vitro model, that Staphylococcus epidermidis is able to colonise intraocular lenses. Adherent organisms were quantitated by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and viable counting. Bacterial adherence was associated with production of a polysaccharide glycocalyx. Organisms which were attached to the lenses were resistant to apparently bactericidal concentrations of antibiotics, as determined by conventional testing. We speculate on the role of colonisation in the pathogenesis of endophthalmitis. Images PMID:2751971

  4. Adherence to treatment and monitoring tools: what's new?

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Maria; Baiardini, Ilaria; Solidoro, Paolo; Braido, Fulvio

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a serious global health problem affecting all age groups, with global prevalence. Although controller medications are usually highly-effective asthma treatments, patient adherence remains poor, and under-use is associated with greater health resource use, morbidity, and mortality. Up to 70-80% of patients cannot use their inhaler correctly, and similar proportions of health professionals are unable to demonstrate its correct use. A recent paper by Foster et al. explored the effectiveness of two briefs GPs' delivered intervention in improving adherence to asthma treatment and diseases control in patients with uncontrolled moderate/severe persistent asthma, in real-community setting. The results suggested that inhaler reminders may represent an effective strategy for improving adherence in primary care compared with a behavioral intervention or usual care, although this may not be reflected in differences in levels of asthma control. Studies in larger population are needed in order to test the efficacy of available technology on asthma outcomes in all age stages. PMID:27427393

  5. Religious Beliefs in Schizophrenia: Their Relevance for Adherence to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Borras, L; Mohr, S; Brandt, P-Y; Gilliéron, C; Eytan, A; Huguelet, P

    2007-01-01

    The study examined how religious beliefs and practices impact upon medication and illness representations in chronic schizophrenia. One hundred three stabilized patients were included in Geneva's outpatient public psychiatric facility in Switzerland. Interviews were conducted to investigate spiritual and religious beliefs and religious practices and religious coping. Medication adherence was assessed through questions to patients and to their psychiatrists and by a systematic blood drug monitoring. Thirty-two percent of patients were partially or totally nonadherent to oral medication. Fifty-eight percent of patients were Christians, 2% Jewish, 3% Muslim, 4% Buddhist, 14% belonged to various minority or syncretic religious movements, and 19% had no religious affiliation. Two thirds of the total sample considered spirituality as very important or even essential in everyday life. Fifty-seven percent of patients had a representation of their illness directly influenced by their spiritual beliefs (positively in 31% and negatively in 26%). Religious representations of illness were prominent in nonadherent patients. Thirty-one percent of nonadherent patients and 27% of partially adherent patients underlined an incompatibility or contradiction between their religion and taking medication, versus 8% of adherent patients. Religion and spirituality contribute to shaping representations of disease and attitudes toward medical treatment in patients with schizophrenia. This dimension should be on the agenda of psychiatrists working with patients with schizophrenia. PMID:17213479

  6. API ZYM system for identification of Bacteroides spp., Capnocytophaga spp., and spirochetes of oral origin.

    PubMed Central

    Laughon, B E; Syed, S A; Loesche, W J

    1982-01-01

    A total of 80 oral strains of Bacteroides gingivalis, B. asaccharolyticus, B. melaninogenicus subsp. intermedius, B. melaninogenicus subsp. melaninogenicus, Capnocytophaga, Treponema denticola, and T. vincentii were characterized with the API ZYM system for 19 enzyme activities. Comparison of anaerobic and aerobic incubation with nine reference strains of these organisms showed no important differences. The key differential tests for black-pigmented Bacteroides strains and treponemes of oral origin were trypsin, alpha-glucosidase, and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase. All Capnocytophaga strains produced distinctive aminopeptidase activities but varied in their glycosidic capabilities. The presence of a trypsin-like activity in B. gingivalis, T. denticola, and a group of Capnocytophaga strains may contribute to tissue destruction in periodontal disease. PMID:6764781

  7. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy During and After Pregnancy: Cohort Study on Women Receiving Care in Malawi's Option B+ Program

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Andreas D.; Msukwa, Malango T.; Egger, Matthias; Tenthani, Lyson; Tweya, Hannock; Jahn, Andreas; Gadabu, Oliver J.; Tal, Kali; Salazar-Vizcaya, Luisa; Estill, Janne; Spoerri, Adrian; Phiri, Nozgechi; Chimbwandira, Frank; van Oosterhout, Joep J.; Keiser, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Background. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is crucial to preventing mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and ensuring the long-term effectiveness of ART, yet data are sparse from African routine care programs on maternal adherence to triple ART. Methods. We analyzed data from women who started ART at 13 large health facilities in Malawi between September 2011 and October 2013. We defined adherence as the percentage of days “covered” by pharmacy claims. Adherence of ≥90% was deemed adequate. We calculated inverse probability of censoring weights to adjust adherence estimates for informative censoring. We used descriptive statistics, survival analysis, and pooled logistic regression to compare adherence between pregnant and breastfeeding women eligible for ART under Option B+, and nonpregnant and nonbreastfeeding women who started ART with low CD4 cell counts or World Health Organization clinical stage 3/4 disease. Results. Adherence was adequate for 73% of the women during pregnancy, for 66% in the first 3 months post partum, and for about 75% during months 4–21 post partum. About 70% of women who started ART during pregnancy and breastfeeding adhered adequately during the first 2 years of ART, but only about 30% of them had maintained adequate adherence at every visit. Risk factors for inadequate adherence included starting ART with an Option B+ indication, at a younger age, or at a district hospital or health center. Conclusions. One-third of women retained in the Option B+ program adhered inadequately during pregnancy and breastfeeding, especially soon after delivery. Effective interventions to improve adherence among women in this program should be implemented. PMID:27461920

  8. Interventions to increase adherence to acne treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Alexander, Tiffany M; Nadkarni, Anish; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence to acne medication is poor and is a major reason why treatment plans are ineffective. Recognizing solutions to nonadherence is critical. Objective The purpose of this study is to describe the hurdles associated with acne nonadherence and to provide mechanisms on how to ameliorate them. Methods PubMed database was searched. Of the 419 search results, 29 articles were reviewed to identify hurdles to adherence and corresponding solutions. Results Hurdles to primary nonadherence where the medication is not even started, include lack of knowledge, confusion about usage, weak physician–patient relationship, fear of adverse reactions, and cost. Secondary nonadherence hurdles where the medication is started but is not taken as directed include lack of results, complex regimens, side effects, busy lifestyle, forgetfulness, inconvenience, and psychiatric comorbidity. Solutions to these hurdles include treatment simplification, technology, and dynamic education. Limitations Adherence is affected by numerous factors, but available literature analyzing acne adherence and interventions to improve adherence to treatment is limited. Conclusion There are several hurdles in adhering to acne treatment. Recognition of these hurdles and finding appropriate solutions may be as important to treatment outcomes as choosing the right medication to prescribe. PMID:27784999

  9. Patient Perceptions of Voice Therapy Adherence

    PubMed Central

    van Leer, Eva; Connor, Nadine P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Patient perspectives of behavioral voice therapy, including perspectives of treatment adherence, have not been formally documented. Because treatment adherence is to a large extent determined by patient beliefs, assessment of patient perspectives is integral to the study of adherence. Methods Fifteen patients who had undergone at least 2 sessions of direct voice therapy for a variety of voice disorders/complaints were interviewed about their perspectives on voice therapy, with a particular focus on adherence. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed for content according to qualitative methods. Results Three common content themes emerged from the transcripts: Voice Therapy is Hard, Make it Happen, and The Match Matters. Findings are compared to reports of patient experiences in other behavioral interventions such as diet and exercise, and related to existing theoretical models of behavior change and the therapeutic process. Conclusion This study yields information toward the development of scales to measure adherence-related constructs and strategies to improve treatment adherence in voice therapy. PMID:19775866

  10. Treatment Adherence of Tuberculosis Patients Attending Two Reference Units in Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Eyene, Juan; Momo, Juan Carlos; Biyé, Lucia; Esono, Teodoro; Ondó Mba Ayecab, Marcial; Benito, Agustín; Aparicio, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial Guinea has one of the highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) in Africa. Incomplete adherence to TB treatment has been identified as one of the most serious remaining problem in tuberculosis control. The following study is aimed at determining the adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Equatorial Guinea and its determinants, as well as at assessing the knowledge of the people about the disease. In this cross-sectional study, participants were recruited by non-probabilistic consecutive sampling amongst patients who attended the reference units for TB in Bata and Malabo between March and July 2015. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Adherence to treatment and knowledge about TB were assessed by Morisky-Green-Levine and Batalla tests and a questionnaire on adherence related factors specifically prepared for this research. Descriptive statistics were computed to summarize the data and bivariate analyses by adherence profile were performed with χ2 test for categorical data. A total of 98 patients with TB were interviewed. 63.27% of interviewees had good knowledge about TB (Batalla test) while 78.57% of respondents were adherent according to the Morisky-Green-Levine test. A low educational level, lack of family support and lack of medical advice about the disease were significantly associated to lower adherence level. Patients with re-infection (due to relapse or treatment failure) and those who have suffered from drug shortages were also less adherents. The National Programme for TB Control should consider improving the early diagnosis and follow-up of TB cases, as well as the implementation of all components of DOTS (Directly observed Treatment, short-course) strategy all over the country. PMID:27622461

  11. Treatment Adherence of Tuberculosis Patients Attending Two Reference Units in Equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    Fagundez, Gabriela; Perez-Freixo, Hugo; Eyene, Juan; Momo, Juan Carlos; Biyé, Lucia; Esono, Teodoro; Ondó Mba Ayecab, Marcial; Benito, Agustín; Aparicio, Pilar; Herrador, Zaida

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial Guinea has one of the highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) in Africa. Incomplete adherence to TB treatment has been identified as one of the most serious remaining problem in tuberculosis control. The following study is aimed at determining the adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Equatorial Guinea and its determinants, as well as at assessing the knowledge of the people about the disease. In this cross-sectional study, participants were recruited by non-probabilistic consecutive sampling amongst patients who attended the reference units for TB in Bata and Malabo between March and July 2015. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Adherence to treatment and knowledge about TB were assessed by Morisky-Green-Levine and Batalla tests and a questionnaire on adherence related factors specifically prepared for this research. Descriptive statistics were computed to summarize the data and bivariate analyses by adherence profile were performed with χ2 test for categorical data. A total of 98 patients with TB were interviewed. 63.27% of interviewees had good knowledge about TB (Batalla test) while 78.57% of respondents were adherent according to the Morisky-Green-Levine test. A low educational level, lack of family support and lack of medical advice about the disease were significantly associated to lower adherence level. Patients with re-infection (due to relapse or treatment failure) and those who have suffered from drug shortages were also less adherents. The National Programme for TB Control should consider improving the early diagnosis and follow-up of TB cases, as well as the implementation of all components of DOTS (Directly observed Treatment, short-course) strategy all over the country. PMID:27622461

  12. Treatment Adherence of Tuberculosis Patients Attending Two Reference Units in Equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    Fagundez, Gabriela; Perez-Freixo, Hugo; Eyene, Juan; Momo, Juan Carlos; Biyé, Lucia; Esono, Teodoro; Ondó Mba Ayecab, Marcial; Benito, Agustín; Aparicio, Pilar; Herrador, Zaida

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial Guinea has one of the highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) in Africa. Incomplete adherence to TB treatment has been identified as one of the most serious remaining problem in tuberculosis control. The following study is aimed at determining the adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Equatorial Guinea and its determinants, as well as at assessing the knowledge of the people about the disease. In this cross-sectional study, participants were recruited by non-probabilistic consecutive sampling amongst patients who attended the reference units for TB in Bata and Malabo between March and July 2015. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Adherence to treatment and knowledge about TB were assessed by Morisky-Green-Levine and Batalla tests and a questionnaire on adherence related factors specifically prepared for this research. Descriptive statistics were computed to summarize the data and bivariate analyses by adherence profile were performed with χ2 test for categorical data. A total of 98 patients with TB were interviewed. 63.27% of interviewees had good knowledge about TB (Batalla test) while 78.57% of respondents were adherent according to the Morisky-Green-Levine test. A low educational level, lack of family support and lack of medical advice about the disease were significantly associated to lower adherence level. Patients with re-infection (due to relapse or treatment failure) and those who have suffered from drug shortages were also less adherents. The National Programme for TB Control should consider improving the early diagnosis and follow-up of TB cases, as well as the implementation of all components of DOTS (Directly observed Treatment, short-course) strategy all over the country.

  13. Identification of weakly beta-hemolytic porcine spirochetes by biochemical reactions, PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and species-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Tatsuo; Araki, Hiroshi; Sueyoshi, Masuo

    2008-08-01

    We examined the usefulness of PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and species-specific PCR combined with a newly devised rapid biochemical test using microplates for identifying weakly beta-hemolytic intestinal spirochetes (WBHIS) isolated from pigs. WBHIS strains showing atypical biochemical characteristics were decisively identified at the species level by PCR-RFLP and species-specific PCR. Identification of WBHIS at the species level in routine diagnostic work will certainly contribute to clarifying the pathogenicity of WBHIS.

  14. Increasing adherence to topical therapy in psoriasis through use of solution medication.

    PubMed

    Hill, Dane; Farhangian, Michael E; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Patient outcomes and clinical improvement are closely related to topical medication adherence, and is especially important in chronic dermatological diseases such as psoriasis. About one-fifth of patients undergoing topical treatment were dissatisfied with its convenience for various reasons. Providers can help increase adherence through selecting the correct medication vehicle, involving family members or friends in the patient's mediation application, and explaining likely side effects to the patient prior to use of the medication. Increased inherence will lead to better psoriasis disease control. PMID:27617530

  15. The impact of using musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging and other influencing factors on medication adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kanta; Raza, Karim; Gill, Paramjit; Greenfield, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication can ease symptoms and limit disease progression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Despite this, nonadherence to medication is common in RA. We explored the determinants of high and low adherence to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in patients with RA and provide suggestions on approaches to improving adherence to DMARDs. Methods Patients with RA were identified from those who had previously participated in a questionnaire measuring levels of medication adherence. Twenty patients participated (ten high and ten low adherers, as determined by responses to the Medication Adherence Report Scale). In-depth individual semistructured interviews were undertaken until data saturation was reached. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using a constant comparative method. Results Four main themes related to adherence were identified: 1) symptom severity; 2) illness perception; 3) perceived benefits and risks of DMARDs; and 4) the quality and quantity of information about RA and DMARDs. In addition, patients’ suggestions about strategies to optimize adherence to DMARDs were captured and they fell within the following themes: 1) musculoskeletal ultrasound to explain the disease process and to provide objective feedback about the extent to which their disease activity is being effectively controlled; 2) better explanations of the consequences of poorly controlled RA; and 3) a good relationship with the health professional. Conclusion Patients’ beliefs about medicines, perceptions about RA, and level of satisfaction with information about DMARDs influenced their adherence to DMARDs. The use of musculoskeletal ultrasound to image the inflamed joint may help to improve patient adherence to DMARDs. PMID:27366054

  16. Weight loss intervention adherence and factors promoting adherence: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lemstra, Mark; Bird, Yelena; Nwankwo, Chijioke; Rogers, Marla; Moraros, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Adhering to weight loss interventions is difficult for many people. The majority of those who are overweight or obese and attempt to lose weight are simply not successful. The objectives of this study were 1) to quantify overall adherence rates for various weight loss interventions and 2) to provide pooled estimates for factors associated with improved adherence to weight loss interventions. Methods We performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of all studies published between January 2004 and August 2015 that reviewed weight loss intervention adherence. Results After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria and checking the methodological quality, 27 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The overall adherence rate was 60.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 53.6–67.2). The following three main variables were found to impact adherence: 1) supervised attendance programs had higher adherence rates than those with no supervision (rate ratio [RR] 1.65; 95% CI 1.54–1.77); 2) interventions that offered social support had higher adherence than those without social support (RR 1.29; 95% CI 1.24–1.34); and 3) dietary intervention alone had higher adherence than exercise programs alone (RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.19–1.35). Conclusion A substantial proportion of people do not adhere to weight loss interventions. Programs supervising attendance, offering social support, and focusing on dietary modification have better adherence than interventions not supervising attendance, not offering social support, and focusing exclusively on exercise. PMID:27574404

  17. The Respiratory Pathogen Moraxella catarrhalis Targets Collagen for Maximal Adherence to Host Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Birendra; Alvarado-Kristensson, Maria; Johansson, Martin; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Mörgelin, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory pathogen that causes acute otitis media in children and is associated with exacerbations in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The first step in M. catarrhalis colonization is adherence to the mucosa, epithelial cells, and extracellular matrix (ECM). The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of M. catarrhalis interactions with collagens from various angles. Clinical isolates (n = 43) were tested for collagen binding, followed by a detailed analysis of protein-protein interactions using recombinantly expressed proteins. M. catarrhalis-dependent interactions with collagen produced by human lung fibroblasts and tracheal tissues were studied by utilizing confocal immunohistochemistry and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. A mouse smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) model was used to estimate the adherence of M. catarrhalis in vivo. We found that all M. catarrhalis clinical isolates tested adhered to fibrillar collagen types I, II, and III and network-forming collagens IV and VI. The trimeric autotransporter adhesins ubiquitous surface protein A2 (UspA2) and UspA2H were identified as major collagen-binding receptors. M. catarrhalis wild type adhered to human tracheal tissue and collagen-producing lung fibroblasts, whereas UspA2 and UspA2H deletion mutants did not. Moreover, in the COPD mouse model, bacteria devoid of UspA2 and UspA2H had a reduced level of adherence to the respiratory tract compared to the adherence of wild-type bacteria. Our data therefore suggest that the M. catarrhalis UspA2 and UspA2H-dependent interaction with collagens is highly critical for adherence in the host and, furthermore, may play an important role in the establishment of disease. PMID:27006460

  18. Improving Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy with Triggered Real Time Text Message Reminders: the China through Technology Study (CATS)

    PubMed Central

    Sabin, Lora L.; DeSilva, Mary Bachman; Gill, Christopher J.; Li, Zhong; Vian, Taryn; Wubin, Xie; Feng, Cheng; Keyi, Xu; Guanghua, Lan; Haberer, Jessica E.; Bangsberg, David R.; Yongzhen, Li; Hongyan, Lu; Gifford, Allen L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Real-time adherence monitoring is now possible through medication storage devices equipped with cellular technology. We assessed the effect of triggered cell phone reminders and counseling utilizing objective adherence data on antiretroviral (ART) adherence among Chinese HIV-infected patients. Methods We provided ART patients in Nanning, China, with a medication device (“Wisepill”) to monitor their ART adherence electronically. After 3 months, we randomized subjects within optimal (≥95%) and suboptimal (<95%) adherence strata to intervention vs. control arms. In months 4–9, intervention subjects received individualized reminders triggered by late dose-taking (no device-opening by 30 minutes past dose time), and counseling using device-generated data. Controls received no reminders or data-informed counseling. We compared post-intervention proportions achieving optimal adherence, mean adherence, and clinical outcomes. Results Of 120 subjects enrolled, 116 (96.7%) completed the trial. Pre-intervention, optimal adherence was similar in intervention vs. control arms (63.5% vs. 58.9%, respectively; p=0.60). In the last intervention month, 87.3% vs. 51.8% achieved optimal adherence (risk ratio (RR) 1.7, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.3–2.2); mean adherence was 96.2% vs. 89.1% (p=0.003). Among pre-intervention suboptimal adherers, 78.3% vs. 33.3% (RR 2.4, CI 1.2–4.5) achieved optimal adherence; mean adherence was 93.3% vs. 84.7% (p=0.039). Proportions were 92.5% and 62.9% among optimal adherers, respectively (RR 1.5, CI 1.1–1.9); mean adherence was 97.8% vs. 91.7% (p=0.028). Post-intervention differences in clinical outcomes were not significant. Conclusion Real-time reminders significantly improved ART adherence in this population. This approach appears promising for managing HIV and other chronic diseases and warrants further investigation and adaptation in other settings. PMID:25886927

  19. Therapeutic passive vaccination against chronic Lyme disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhong, W; Stehle, T; Museteanu, C; Siebers, A; Gern, L; Kramer, M; Wallich, R; Simon, M M

    1997-11-11

    Passive and active immunization against outer surface protein A (OspA) has been successful in protecting laboratory animals against subsequent infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Antibodies (Abs) to OspA convey full protection, but only when they are present at the time of infection. Abs inactivate spirochetes within the tick and block their transmission to mammals, but do not affect established infection because of the loss of OspA in the vertebrate host. Our initial finding that the presence of high serum titers of anti-OspC Abs (5 to 10 microg/ml) correlates with spontaneous resolution of disease and infection in experimentally challenged immunocompetent mice suggested that therapeutic vaccination with OspC may be feasible. We now show that polyclonal and monospecific mouse immune sera to recombinant OspC, but not to OspA, of B. burgdorferi resolve chronic arthritis and carditis and clear disseminated spirochetes in experimentally infected C.B.-17 severe combined immunodeficient mice in a dose-dependent manner. This was verified by macroscopical and microscopical examination of affected tissues and recultivation of spirochetes from ear biopsies. Complete resolution of disease and infection was achieved, independent of whether OspC-specific immune sera (10 microg OspC-specific Abs) were repeatedly given (4x in 3- to 4-day intervals) before the onset (day 10 postinfection) or at the time of fully established arthritis and carditis (days 19 or 60 postinfection). The results indicate that in mice spirochetes constitutively express OspC and are readily susceptible to protective OspC-specific Abs throughout the infection. Thus, an OspC-based vaccine appears to be a candidate for therapy of Lyme disease.

  20. Condition Self-Management in Pediatric Spina Bifida: A Longitudinal Investigation of Medical Adherence, Responsibility-Sharing, and Independence Skills

    PubMed Central

    Psihogios, Alexandra M.; Kolbuck, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate rates of medical adherence, responsibility, and independence skills across late childhood and adolescence in youth with spina bifida (SB) and to explore associations among these disease self-management variables. Method 111 youth with SB, their parents, and a health professional participated at two time points. Informants completed questionnaires regarding medical adherence, responsibility-sharing, and child independence skills. Results Youth gained more responsibility and independence skills across time, although adherence rates did not follow a similar trajectory. Increased child medical responsibility was related to poorer adherence, and father-reported independence skills were associated with increased child responsibility. Conclusions This study highlights medical domains that are the most difficult for families to manage (e.g., skin checks). Although youth appear to gain more autonomy across time, ongoing parental involvement in medical care may be necessary to achieve optimal adherence across adolescence. PMID:26002195

  1. The diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Bair, G O

    1992-09-01

    Lyme disease has probably been reported for at least 80 years, with the cause unknown until the discovery of the Ixodes ricinus complex tick-borne spirochete B. burgdorferi. The incidence of diagnosed cases appears to be increasing in Kansas and elsewhere. A negative laboratory test does not exclude the possibility of the disease. At present, no accurate laboratory screen for the illness is available. The diagnosis must be considered when acute or chronic clinical manifestations reviewed in this paper appear in patients. Additional clinical criteria and modified CDC guidelines are proposed to help clinicians determine who should be treated. Current treatment recommendations are presented. PMID:1447864

  2. [Poor medication adherence and worsening of heart failure--a vicious circle].

    PubMed

    Fikenzer, K; Knoll, A; Lenski, D; Schulz, M; Böhm, M; Laufs, U

    2014-11-01

    Despite of markedly improved options for treatment, chronic heart failure is associated with recurrent worsening of symptoms. Poor medication adherence has adverse effects on frequency and progression of congestive heart failure. There are three relevant areas of problems that could be aggravated by each other:There is the problem of changes in pharmacokinetics in worsening heart failure. Proportional to the severity of heart failure, there is an existing intestinal edema and changes of intestinal bacterial colonization that may affect a drug's absorption and, hence, its efficacy.Depression and impaired cognitive function is quite common in patients with chronic heart failure. Depression both predicts hospitalization and mortality rate as well as poor medication adherence in CHF. Compared to stable CHF patients, cognitive function deteriorates significantly while decompensation leading to impaired medication adherence.Shown by recent studies, there is a higher risk for poor medication adherence after a cardiovascular event.Poor medication adherence is associated with an increased rate of cardiovascular events not only in heart failure, but also in all cardiovascular diseases. Hence, there is a need for specific and long term interventions to improve medication adherence at an early stage. PMID:25390627

  3. Influence of the First Consultation on Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV-infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Peyre, Marion; Gauchet, Aurélie; Roustit, Matthieu; Leclercq, Pascale; Epaulard, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physician attitude influences the way patients cope with diagnosis and therapy in chronic severe diseases such as cancer. Previous studies showed that such an effect exists in HIV care; it is likely that it begins with the first contact with a physician. Objective: We aimed to explore in HIV-infected persons their perception of the first consultation they had with an HIV specialist (PFC-H), and whether this perception correlates with adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Method: The study was conducted in Grenoble University Hospital, France, a tertiary care center. Every antiretroviral-experienced patient was asked to freely complete a self-reported, anonymous questionnaire concerning retrospective PFC-H, present adherence (Morisky scale), and present perceptions and beliefs about medicine (BMQ scale). Results: One hundred and fifty-one questionnaires were available for evaluation. PFC-H score and adherence were correlated, independently from age, gender, and numbers of pill(s) and of pill intake(s) per day. BMQ score also correlated with adherence; structural equation analysis suggested that the effect of PFC-H on adherence is mediated by positive beliefs. Conclusion: These results suggest that for HIV-infected persons, the perceptions remaining from the first consultation with an HIV specialist physician influence important issues such as adherence and perception about medicine. Physicians must be aware of this potentially long-lasting effect. PMID:27708747

  4. Being as an iceberg: hypertensive treatment adherence experiences in southeast of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Dehghan, Mahlagha; Iranmanesh, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment adherence is often an important issue in the management of hypertension. Deep understanding of adherence behavior as well as its influential factors can expand knowledge about treatment adherence among hypertensives. Objective The aim of this study was to explore patients, their families, and healthcare providers’ experiences about hypertension treatment adherence in southeast of Iran. Design A qualitative study was conducted to explore the experience of patients, family members, and healthcare providers (n=18) by using a conventional content analysis. The purposive sampling method was used. Data were collected through semi-structured and deep interviews. Results Data analysis showed that hypertensive treatment adherence in an Iranian context is like an iceberg with two subthemes. The first subtheme relates to the upper and clear part of this iceberg and it consists of two categories, including 1) healthy and 2) unhealthy regimens. The second subtheme associates with under-water and unanticipated part and it consists of four categories, including 1) the nature of disease and treatment, 2) the individual resources, 3) the healthcare organization, and 4) the socio-cultural environment. Conclusions The treatment adherence features emerged in this study can be useful in designing and developing context-based hypertension interventions. Further qualitative and quantitative studies with a closer collaboration between the social, natural, and medical sciences in other Iranian populations are needed to confirm the findings. PMID:26395925

  5. Does treatment adherence correlates with health related quality of life? findings from a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although medication adherence and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are two different outcome measures, it is believed that adherence to medication leads to an improvement in overall HRQoL. The study aimed to evaluate the association between medication adherence and HRQoL. Methods A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study design was undertaken with hypertension patients attending public hospitals in Quetta city, Pakistan. HRQoL was measured by Euroqol EQ-5D. Medication adherence was assessed by the Drug Attitude Inventory. Descriptive statistics was used to tabulate demographic and disease-related information. Spearmans correlation was used to assess the association between the study variables. All analysis was performed using SPSS 17.0. Results Among 385 study patients, the mean age (SD) was 39.02 (6.59), with 68.8% of males dominating the entire cohort. The mean (SD) duration of hypertension was 3.010.939years. Forty percent (n=154) had a bachelors degree level of education with 34.8% (n=134) working in the private sector. A negative and weak correlation (0.77) between medication adherence and EQ-5D was reported. In addition, a negative weak correlation (0.120) was observed among medication adherence and EQ-VAS. Conclusions Correlations among the study variables were negligible and negative. Hence, there is no apparent relationship between the variables. PMID:22545950

  6. Different patterns of expression and of IL-10 modulation of inflammatory mediators from macrophages of Lyme disease-resistant and -susceptible mice.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Aarti; Dixit, Saurabh; Embers, Monica; Gautam, Rajeev; Philipp, Mario T; Singh, Shree R; Morici, Lisa; Dennis, Vida A

    2012-01-01

    C57BL/6J (C57) mice develop mild arthritis (Lyme disease-resistant) whereas C3H/HeN (C3H) mice develop severe arthritis (Lyme disease-susceptible) after infection with the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. We hypothesized that susceptibility and resistance to Lyme disease, as modeled in mice, is associated with early induction and regulation of inflammatory mediators by innate immune cells after their exposure to live B. burgdorferi spirochetes. Here, we employed multiplex ELISA and qRT-PCR to investigate quantitative differences in the levels of cytokines and chemokines produced by bone marrow-derived macrophages from C57 and C3H mice after these cells were exposed ex vivo to live spirochetes or spirochetal lipoprotein. Upon stimulation, the production of both cytokines and chemokines was up-regulated in macrophages from both mouse strains. Interestingly, however, our results uncovered two distinct patterns of spirochete- and lipoprotein-inducible inflammatory mediators displayed by mouse macrophages, such that the magnitude of the chemokine up-regulation was larger in C57 cells than it was in C3H cells, for most chemokines. Conversely, cytokine up-regulation was more intense in C3H cells. Gene transcript analyses showed that the displayed patterns of inflammatory mediators were associated with a TLR2/TLR1 transcript imbalance: C3H macrophages expressed higher TLR2 transcript levels as compared to those expressed by C57 macrophages. Exogenous IL-10 dampened production of inflammatory mediators, especially those elicited by lipoprotein stimulation. Neutralization of endogenously produced IL-10 increased production of inflammatory mediators, notably by macrophages of C57 mice, which also displayed more IL-10 than C3H macrophages. The distinct patterns of pro-inflammatory mediator production, along with TLR2/TLR1 expression, and regulation in macrophages from Lyme disease-resistant and -susceptible mice suggests itself as a blueprint to further investigate

  7. One-year adherence to oral antihyperglycemic medication and risk prediction of patient outcomes for adults with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Carola A.; Rapold, Roland; Brüngger, Beat; Reich, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Medication adherence is essential in preventing adverse intermediate outcomes, but little is known on hard outcomes. The aims of this study were to determine the 1-year adherence to oral antihyperglycemic drugs (OADs) and to predict the risk of subsequent health outcomes among (non)adherent patients with diabetes. Using a large Swiss healthcare claims database from 2011 to 2014, we identified all patients aged ≥18 years with diabetes and treated with at least 1 OAD prescription. Adherence to OADs was measured as the proportion of days covered (PDC) over 1 year and subdivided into 2 categories: adherent (PDC ≥ 80%), nonadherent (PDC < 80%). We estimated the relative risk of hospitalization and mortality at follow-up using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Based on a sample of 26,713 patients, adherence to OADs was quite low: 42% of the patients achieved a PDC of ≥80% during the 1-year observation period. A 7% reduction in the hospitalization risk and a 10% reduction in the risk of mortality could be observed in adherent patients compared to nonadherent patients (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93 [95% CI, 0.89–0.97]; HR, 0.90 [95% CI, 0.82–0.99]). Subgroup analysis showed that an intensified diabetes therapy had no significant influence on the risk of both outcomes in adherent patients. Poor medication adherence increases the risk of subsequent hospitalizations and premature mortality in patient with diabetes, regardless of disease severity and comorbidities. This emphasizes the need for an earlier identification of patients with poor medication adherence. The awareness of physicians and patients regarding the importance of adherence in diabetes treatment should be increased. PMID:27368004

  8. Relationship of adherence determinants and parental spirituality in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Grossoehme, Daniel H; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; VanDyke, Rhonda; Thurmond, Sophia; Seid, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The course of cystic fibrosis (CF) progression in children is affected by parent adherence to treatment plans. The Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) posits that intentions are the best behavioral predictors and that intentions reasonably follow from beliefs ("determinants"). Determinants are affected by multiple "background factors," including spirituality. This study's purpose was to understand whether two parental adherence determinants (attitude towards treatment and self-efficacy) were associated with spirituality (religious coping and sanctification of the body). We hypothesized that parents' attitudes toward treatment adherence are associated with these spiritual constructs. A convenience sample of parents of children with CF aged 3-12 years (n = 28) participated by completing surveys of adherence and spirituality during a regular outpatient clinic visit. Type and degree of religious coping was examined using principal component analysis. Adherence measures were compared based on religious coping styles and sanctification of the body using unpaired t-tests. Collaborative religious coping was associated with higher self-efficacy for completing airway clearance (M = 1070.8; SD = 35.8; P = 0.012), for completing aerosolized medication administration (M = 1077.1; SD = 37.4; P = 0.018), and for attitude towards treatment utility (M = 38.8; SD = 2.36; P = 0.038). Parents who attributed sacred qualities to their child's body (e.g., "blessed" or "miraculous") had higher mean scores for self-efficacy (airway clearance, M = 1058.6; SD = 37.7; P = 0.023; aerosols M = 1070.8; SD = 41.6; P = 0.020). Parents for whom God was manifested in their child's body (e.g., "My child's body is created in God's image") had higher mean scores for self-efficacy for airway clearance (M = 1056.4; SD = 59.0; P = 0.039), aerosolized medications (M = 1068.8; SD = 42.6; P = 0.033) and treatment utility (M

  9. Relationship of Adherence Determinants and Parental Spirituality in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Grossoehme, Daniel H.; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; VanDyke, Rhonda; Thurmond, Sophia; Seid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary The course of cystic fibrosis (CF) progression in children is affected by parent adherence to treatment plans. The Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) posits that intentions are the best behavioral predictors and that intentions reasonably follow from beliefs (“determinants”). Determinants are affected by multiple “background factors,” including spirituality. This study’s purpose was to understand whether two parental adherence determinants (attitude towards treatment and self-efficacy) were associated with spirituality (religious coping and sanctification of the body). We hypothesized that parents’ attitudes toward treatment adherence are associated with these spiritual constructs. A convenience sample of parents of children with CF aged 3–12 years (n = 28) participated by completing surveys of adherence and spirituality during a regular outpatient clinic visit. Type and degree of religious coping was examined using principal component analysis. Adherence measures were compared based on religious coping styles and sanctification of the body using unpaired t-tests. Collaborative religious coping was associated with higher self-efficacy for completing airway clearance (M = 1070.8; SD = 35.8; P = 0.012), for completing aerosolized medication administration (M = 1077.1; SD = 37.4; P = 0.018), and for attitude towards treatment utility (M = 38.8; SD = 2.36; P = 0.038). Parents who attributed sacred qualities to their child’s body (e.g., “blessed” or “miraculous”) had higher mean scores for self-efficacy (airway clearance, M = 1058.6; SD = 37.7; P = 0.023; aerosols M = 1070.8; SD = 41.6; P = 0.020). Parents for whom God was manifested in their child’s body (e.g., “My child’s body is created in God’s image”) had higher mean scores for self-efficacy for airway clearance (M = 1056.4; SD = 59.0; P = 0.039), aerosolized medications (M = 1068.8; SD = 42.6; P = 0.033) and treatment utility (M = 38.8; SD = 2.4; P = 0.025). Spiritual

  10. Ingestible Biosensors for Real-Time Medical Adherence Monitoring: MyTMed

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Peter R.; Rosen, Rochelle K.; Boyer, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    Medication nonadherence complicates the management and treatment of chronic disease. Nonadherence to medications is associated with significant mortality, accelerated disease progression, and increased health care costs. My/Treatment/Medication (MyTMed) is a novel adherence monitoring system that obtains direct measures of medication adherence/nonadherence. MyTMed consists of 1) a “digital pill” with a radiofrequency emitter that activates on contact with gastric pH; 2) a relay Hub that captures the radiofrequency signal and transmits it to 3) a cloud based server that connects patient and physicians via a bidirectional interface. In our increasingly mobile world, MyTMed is able to provide medication ingestion data and deliver interventions in real time that support adherence. We describe the patient-centered design of MyTMed as well as the behavioral theory supporting the interface architecture. PMID:27182206

  11. Adherence-related issues in adolescents and young adults with hematological disorders.

    PubMed

    Leader, Avi; Raanani, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Nonadherence to medical recommendations is a widespread problem well documented in a multitude of clinical settings. Nonadherence may adversely affect clinical outcomes such as survival and quality of life and increase health-care-related costs. An understanding of the factors driving nonadherence is key to developing effective adherence-enhancing interventions (AEIs). There are ongoing attempts in contemporary adherence research to better define the various components of adherence, to find optimal measures of adherence and correlations with clinical outcomes, and to create a classification system for AEIs. Nonadherence is also widely prevalent among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with chronic hematological diseases, affecting up to 50% of patients and increasing with age. Combined use of objective (i.e. electronic monitoring, EM) and subjective (i.e. self-report) measures of adherence may be the preferred approach to assess adherence. The unique physical, social and emotional aspects of the AYA life stage are closely related to intricate causes of nonadherence in AYAs such as problems in transition to adult care. Until proven otherwise, the empirical target in AYAs with hematological disorders should be perfect adherence. Multilevel AEIs, EM feedback and behavioral interventions are among the most effective types of AEIs. Despite the magnitude of the problem, only a handful of AEIs have been evaluated among AYAs with hematological disorders. Thus, this is a field with unmet needs warranting high-quality trials using standardized and well-specified assessment methods and interventions. This review discusses the prevalence, definition, causes and clinical implications of nonadherence among AYAs with hematological disorders, along with strategies to measure and improve adherence. PMID:25228561

  12. Adherence-related issues in adolescents and young adults with hematological disorders.

    PubMed

    Leader, Avi; Raanani, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Nonadherence to medical recommendations is a widespread problem well documented in a multitude of clinical settings. Nonadherence may adversely affect clinical outcomes such as survival and quality of life and increase health-care-related costs. An understanding of the factors driving nonadherence is key to developing effective adherence-enhancing interventions (AEIs). There are ongoing attempts in contemporary adherence research to better define the various components of adherence, to find optimal measures of adherence and correlations with clinical outcomes, and to create a classification system for AEIs. Nonadherence is also widely prevalent among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with chronic hematological diseases, affecting up to 50% of patients and increasing with age. Combined use of objective (i.e. electronic monitoring, EM) and subjective (i.e. self-report) measures of adherence may be the preferred approach to assess adherence. The unique physical, social and emotional aspects of the AYA life stage are closely related to intricate causes of nonadherence in AYAs such as problems in transition to adult care. Until proven otherwise, the empirical target in AYAs with hematological disorders should be perfect adherence. Multilevel AEIs, EM feedback and behavioral interventions are among the most effective types of AEIs. Despite the magnitude of the problem, only a handful of AEIs have been evaluated among AYAs with hematological disorders. Thus, this is a field with unmet needs warranting high-quality trials using standardized and well-specified assessment methods and interventions. This review discusses the prevalence, definition, causes and clinical implications of nonadherence among AYAs with hematological disorders, along with strategies to measure and improve adherence.

  13. Poor adherence and low persistency rates for hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance in patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christina; Chen, Vincent; Vu, Vinh; Le, An; Nguyen, Linda; Zhao, Changqing; Wong, Carrie R; Nguyen, Nghia; Li, Jiayi; Zhang, Jian; Trinh, Huy; Nguyen, Mindie H

    2016-08-01

    Our goal was to examine rates and predictors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) surveillance adherence and persistency, since studies of such adherence and persistency in patients with chronic hepatitis (CHB) are currently limited.Consecutive CHB patients (N = 1329) monitored for ≥1 year at 4 US clinics from January 1996 to July 2013 were retrospectively studied. Surveillance adherence was evaluated based on the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases guidelines. Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze surveillance persistency of 510 patients who had initially fair adherence (having at least annual surveillance imaging with further follow-up).Mean age was 48, with the majority being male (58%), Asian (92%), foreign-born (95%), and medically insured (97%). Patients with cirrhosis and those seen at university liver clinics were more likely to have optimal HCC surveillance than those without cirrhosis and those seen at community clinics (38.4% vs 21.6%, P <0.001 and 33.5% vs 14.4%, P < 0.001, respectively). HCC diagnosed in optimally adherent patients trended toward smaller tumor size (P < 0.08). On multivariate analysis also inclusive of age, sex, clinical visits, cirrhosis, clinic setting and antiviral therapy use, strong independent predictors for having at least annual imaging were a history of more frequent clinical visits (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, P < 0.001) and university-based care (OR = 5.2, P < 0.001). Even for those with initially fair adherence, persistency dropped to 70% at 5 years.Adherence and persistency to HCC surveillance in CHB patients is generally poor. More frequent clinic visits and university-based settings were significant and strong predictors of at least annual HCC surveillance adherence. PMID:27583921

  14. A study of adherence to the AAO-HNS "Clinical Practice Guideline: Adult Sinusitis".

    PubMed

    Darrat, Ilaaf; Yaremchuk, Kathleen; Payne, Spencer; Nelson, Michelle

    2014-08-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to determine if physicians in otolaryngology practice adhered to the clinical practice guideline for adult sinusitis that had been issued by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) 3 years earlier. We analyzed data obtained from the charts of 90 adults who had presented to an otolaryngology outpatient department with a diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS), or acute viral rhinosinusitis (AVRS); there were 76 cases of CRS, 11 cases of ABRS, and 3 cases of AVRS. Our goal was to ascertain how closely the treating physician had adhered to the AAO-HNS recommendations with respect to diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of these diseases. The study group was made up of 10 otolaryngologists. We evaluated 7 clinical practice metrics for CRS, 7 metrics for ABRS, and 3 for AVRS. We found that individual physician adherence rates for cases of CRS ranged from 0 to 100%; average scores for the 7 metrics ranged from 4 to 88%. For cases of ABRS, adherence scores ranged from 0 to 100%; average scores for the 7 metrics ranged from 0 to 41%. For AVRS, the rate of adherence for all 3 metrics was 0%. This study revealed wide variations in adherence to the AAO-HNS guideline, but overall adherence was generally poor. Adherence appeared to be worse for the acute types of rhinosinusitis than for chronic rhinosinusitis. In view of these findings, a worksheet was developed that clinicians could use to improve compliance with the guidelines.

  15. Poor adherence and low persistency rates for hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Christina; Chen, Vincent; Vu, Vinh; Le, An; Nguyen, Linda; Zhao, Changqing; Wong, Carrie R.; Nguyen, Nghia; Li, Jiayi; Zhang, Jian; Trinh, Huy; Nguyen, Mindie H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our goal was to examine rates and predictors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) surveillance adherence and persistency, since studies of such adherence and persistency in patients with chronic hepatitis (CHB) are currently limited. Consecutive CHB patients (N = 1329) monitored for ≥1 year at 4 US clinics from January 1996 to July 2013 were retrospectively studied. Surveillance adherence was evaluated based on the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases guidelines. Kaplan–Meier method was used to analyze surveillance persistency of 510 patients who had initially fair adherence (having at least annual surveillance imaging with further follow-up). Mean age was 48, with the majority being male (58%), Asian (92%), foreign-born (95%), and medically insured (97%). Patients with cirrhosis and those seen at university liver clinics were more likely to have optimal HCC surveillance than those without cirrhosis and those seen at community clinics (38.4% vs 21.6%, P <0.001 and 33.5% vs 14.4%, P < 0.001, respectively). HCC diagnosed in optimally adherent patients trended toward smaller tumor size (P < 0.08). On multivariate analysis also inclusive of age, sex, clinical visits, cirrhosis, clinic setting and antiviral therapy use, strong independent predictors for having at least annual imaging were a history of more frequent clinical visits (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, P < 0.001) and university-based care (OR = 5.2, P < 0.001). Even for those with initially fair adherence, persistency dropped to 70% at 5 years. Adherence and persistency to HCC surveillance in CHB patients is generally poor. More frequent clinic visits and university-based settings were significant and strong predictors of at least annual HCC surveillance adherence. PMID:27583921

  16. Poor adherence and low persistency rates for hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance in patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christina; Chen, Vincent; Vu, Vinh; Le, An; Nguyen, Linda; Zhao, Changqing; Wong, Carrie R; Nguyen, Nghia; Li, Jiayi; Zhang, Jian; Trinh, Huy; Nguyen, Mindie H

    2016-08-01

    Our goal was to examine rates and predictors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) surveillance adherence and persistency, since studies of such adherence and persistency in patients with chronic hepatitis (CHB) are currently limited.Consecutive CHB patients (N = 1329) monitored for ≥1 year at 4 US clinics from January 1996 to July 2013 were retrospectively studied. Surveillance adherence was evaluated based on the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases guidelines. Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze surveillance persistency of 510 patients who had initially fair adherence (having at least annual surveillance imaging with further follow-up).Mean age was 48, with the majority being male (58%), Asian (92%), foreign-born (95%), and medically insured (97%). Patients with cirrhosis and those seen at university liver clinics were more likely to have optimal HCC surveillance than those without cirrhosis and those seen at community clinics (38.4% vs 21.6%, P <0.001 and 33.5% vs 14.4%, P < 0.001, respectively). HCC diagnosed in optimally adherent patients trended toward smaller tumor size (P < 0.08). On multivariate analysis also inclusive of age, sex, clinical visits, cirrhosis, clinic setting and antiviral therapy use, strong independent predictors for having at least annual imaging were a history of more frequent clinical visits (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, P < 0.001) and university-based care (OR = 5.2, P < 0.001). Even for those with initially fair adherence, persistency dropped to 70% at 5 years.Adherence and persistency to HCC surveillance in CHB patients is generally poor. More frequent clinic visits and university-based settings were significant and strong predictors of at least annual HCC surveillance adherence.

  17. Medication adherence in patients in treatment for rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus in a university hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Prudente, Luciana Resende; Diniz, Juliana de Souza; Ferreira, Tatyana Xavier Almeida Matteucci; Lima, Dione Marçal; Silva, Nílzio Antônio; Saraiva, Guylherme; Silveira, Erika Aparecida; Dewulf, Nathalie de Lourdes Souza; Amaral, Rita Goreti

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence is essential for the control of symptoms and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the study was to investigate medication adherence in outpatients in treatment for RA and SLE in a university hospital in Brazil. This was a quantitative, cross-sectional analytical study. A total of 92 patients (55 RA patients and 37 SLE patients) were included in the study. A structured questionnaire for patients’ interview and a form for collecting data from medical records were used for data collection. Adherence to drug treatment was assessed by the Morisky scale questionnaire. Data storage and analysis were performed using Epi Info 3.5.4 and statistical analysis by Stata/SE 12.0. The Pearson’s chi-squared test and Fisher’s exact test were applied for statistical and bivariate analyses. For multivariate data analysis the Poisson regression and the Wald test were used. The prevalence of adherence to drug treatment was 16.4% in RA patients and 45.9% in SLE patients. The final model of the multivariate analysis demonstrated associations between medication adherence and the following covariates for both RA and SLE groups: duration of therapy for rheumatic disease at the institution greater than 15 years and presence of more than six chronic comorbidities. The parameter “acquisition of medication at the high-cost pharmacy” was differently associated with medication adherence by group, and for the SLE group, living outside the city of Goiânia was a protective factor associated with adherence. This study demonstrated a low prevalence of medication adherence in patients in treatment for RA and SLE treated at this institution. These findings will serve as a base for future studies to elucidate what factors may positively or negatively affect medication adherence in this population. In addition, multidisciplinary approaches are needed to enhance adherence to drug treatment in patients in treatment for

  18. Lyme disease: review.