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Sample records for disease spirochete adhering

  1. Real-Time High Resolution 3D Imaging of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Adhering to and Escaping from the Vasculature of a Living Host

    PubMed Central

    Colarusso, Pina; Bankhead, Troy; Kubes, Paul; Chaconas, George

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes are bacteria that cause a number of emerging and re-emerging diseases worldwide, including syphilis, leptospirosis, relapsing fever, and Lyme borreliosis. They navigate efficiently through dense extracellular matrix and cross the blood–brain barrier by unknown mechanisms. Due to their slender morphology, spirochetes are difficult to visualize by standard light microscopy, impeding studies of their behavior in situ. We engineered a fluorescent infectious strain of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease pathogen, which expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP). Real-time 3D and 4D quantitative analysis of fluorescent spirochete dissemination from the microvasculature of living mice at high resolution revealed that dissemination was a multi-stage process that included transient tethering-type associations, short-term dragging interactions, and stationary adhesion. Stationary adhesions and extravasating spirochetes were most commonly observed at endothelial junctions, and translational motility of spirochetes appeared to play an integral role in transendothelial migration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of high resolution 3D and 4D visualization of dissemination of a bacterial pathogen in a living mammalian host, and provides the first direct insight into spirochete dissemination in vivo. PMID:18566656

  2. Real-time high resolution 3D imaging of the lyme disease spirochete adhering to and escaping from the vasculature of a living host.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Tara J; Norman, M Ursula; Colarusso, Pina; Bankhead, Troy; Kubes, Paul; Chaconas, George

    2008-06-20

    Pathogenic spirochetes are bacteria that cause a number of emerging and re-emerging diseases worldwide, including syphilis, leptospirosis, relapsing fever, and Lyme borreliosis. They navigate efficiently through dense extracellular matrix and cross the blood-brain barrier by unknown mechanisms. Due to their slender morphology, spirochetes are difficult to visualize by standard light microscopy, impeding studies of their behavior in situ. We engineered a fluorescent infectious strain of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease pathogen, which expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP). Real-time 3D and 4D quantitative analysis of fluorescent spirochete dissemination from the microvasculature of living mice at high resolution revealed that dissemination was a multi-stage process that included transient tethering-type associations, short-term dragging interactions, and stationary adhesion. Stationary adhesions and extravasating spirochetes were most commonly observed at endothelial junctions, and translational motility of spirochetes appeared to play an integral role in transendothelial migration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of high resolution 3D and 4D visualization of dissemination of a bacterial pathogen in a living mammalian host, and provides the first direct insight into spirochete dissemination in vivo.

  3. Association of spirochetal infection with Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Burugu, Divya; Poruri, Akhila; Burke, Jennie; Mayne, Peter J; Sapi, Eva; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is an emerging multisystem illness characterized by skin lesions with unusual filaments embedded in or projecting from epithelial tissue. Filament formation results from abnormal keratin and collagen expression by epithelial-based keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Recent research comparing MD to bovine digital dermatitis, an animal infectious disease with similar skin features, provided clues that spirochetal infection could play an important role in the human disease as it does in the animal illness. Based on histological staining, immunofluorescent staining, electron microscopic imaging and polymerase chain reaction, we report the detection of Borrelia spirochetes in dermatological tissue of  four randomly-selected MD patients. The association of MD with spirochetal infection provides evidence that this infection may be a significant factor in the illness and refutes claims that MD lesions are self-inflicted and that people suffering from this disorder are delusional. Molecular characterization of the Borrelia spirochetes found in MD patients is warranted.

  4. Association of spirochetal infection with Morgellons disease

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is an emerging multisystem illness characterized by skin lesions with unusual filaments embedded in or projecting from epithelial tissue. Filament formation results from abnormal keratin and collagen expression by epithelial-based keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Recent research comparing MD to bovine digital dermatitis, an animal infectious disease with similar skin features, provided clues that spirochetal infection could play an important role in the human disease as it does in the animal illness. Based on histological staining, immunofluorescent staining, electron microscopic imaging and polymerase chain reaction, we report the detection of Borrelia spirochetes in dermatological tissue of  four randomly-selected MD patients. The association of MD with spirochetal infection provides evidence that this infection may be a significant factor in the illness and refutes claims that MD lesions are self-inflicted and that people suffering from this disorder are delusional. Molecular characterization of the Borrelia spirochetes found in MD patients is warranted. PMID:24715950

  5. Swimming Dynamics of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vig, Dhruv K.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2012-11-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, swims by undulating its cell body in the form of a traveling flat wave, a process driven by rotating internal flagella. We study B. burgdorferi’s swimming by treating the cell body and flagella as linearly elastic filaments. The dynamics of the cell are then determined from the balance between elastic and resistive forces and moments. We find that planar, traveling waves only exist when the flagella are effectively anchored at both ends of the bacterium and that these traveling flat waves rotate as they undulate. The model predicts how the undulation frequency is related to the torque from the flagellar motors and how the stiffness of the cell body and flagella affect the undulations and morphology.

  6. Chronic inflammation and amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease -- role of Spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Miklossy, Judith

    2008-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with dementia, brain atrophy and the aggregation and accumulation of a cortical amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta). Chronic bacterial infections are frequently associated with amyloid deposition. It had been known from a century that the spirochete Treponema pallidum can cause dementia in the atrophic form of general paresis. It is noteworthy that the pathological hallmarks of this atrophic form are similar to those of AD. Recent observations showed that bacteria, including spirochetes contain amyloidogenic proteins and also that Abeta deposition and tau phosphorylation can be induced in or in vivo following exposure to bacteria or LPS. Bacteria or their poorly degradable debris are powerful inflammatory cytokine inducers, activate complement, affect vascular permeability, generate nitric oxide and free radicals, induce apoptosis and are amyloidogenic. All these processes are involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Old and new observations, reviewed here, indicate that to consider the possibility that bacteria, including several types of spirochetes highly prevalent in the population at large or their persisting debris may initiate cascade of events leading to chronic inflammation and amyloid deposition in AD is important, as appropriate antibacterial and antiinflammatory therapy would be available to prevent dementia.

  7. The Cross-Talk between Spirochetal Lipoproteins and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kelesidis, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Spirochetal diseases such as syphilis, Lyme disease, and leptospirosis are major threats to public health. However, the immunopathogenesis of these diseases has not been fully elucidated. Spirochetes interact with the host through various structural components such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS), surface lipoproteins, and glycolipids. Although spirochetal antigens such as LPS and glycolipids may contribute to the inflammatory response during spirochetal infections, spirochetes such as Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi lack LPS. Lipoproteins are most abundant proteins that are expressed in all spirochetes and often determine how spirochetes interact with their environment. Lipoproteins are pro-inflammatory, may regulate responses from both innate and adaptive immunity and enable the spirochetes to adhere to the host or the tick midgut or to evade the immune system. However, most of the spirochetal lipoproteins have unknown function. Herein, the immunomodulatory effects of spirochetal lipoproteins are reviewed and are grouped into two main categories: effects related to immune evasion and effects related to immune activation. Understanding lipoprotein-induced immunomodulation will aid in elucidating innate immunopathogenesis processes and subsequent adaptive mechanisms potentially relevant to spirochetal disease vaccine development and to inflammatory events associated with spirochetal diseases. PMID:25071771

  8. Bpur, the Lyme Disease Spirochete's PUR Domain Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jutras, Brandon L.; Chenail, Alicia M.; Carroll, Dustin W.; Miller, M. Clarke; Zhu, Haining; Bowman, Amy; Stevenson, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The PUR domain is a nucleic acid-binding motif found in critical regulatory proteins of higher eukaryotes and in certain species of bacteria. During investigations into mechanisms by which the Lyme disease spirochete controls synthesis of its Erp surface proteins, it was discovered that the borrelial PUR domain protein, Bpur, binds with high affinity to double-stranded DNA adjacent to the erp transcriptional promoter. Bpur was found to enhance the effects of the erp repressor protein, BpaB. Bpur also bound single-stranded DNA and RNA, with relative affinities RNA > double-stranded DNA > single-stranded DNA. Rational site-directed mutagenesis of Bpur identified amino acid residues and domains critical for interactions with nucleic acids, and it revealed that the PUR domain has a distinct mechanism of interaction with each type of nucleic acid ligand. These data shed light on both gene regulation in the Lyme spirochete and functional mechanisms of the widely distributed PUR domain. PMID:23846702

  9. Historic evidence to support a causal relationship between spirochetal infections and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Following previous observations a statistically significant association between various types of spirochetes and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) fulfilled Hill’s criteria in favor of a causal relationship. If spirochetal infections can indeed cause AD, the pathological and biological hallmarks of AD should also occur in syphilitic dementia. To answer this question, observations and illustrations on the detection of spirochetes in the atrophic form of general paresis, which is known to be associated with slowly progressive dementia, were reviewed and compared with the characteristic pathology of AD. Historic observations and illustrations published in the first half of the 20th Century indeed confirm that the pathological hallmarks, which define AD, are also present in syphilitic dementia. Cortical spirochetal colonies are made up by innumerable tightly spiraled Treponema pallidum spirochetes, which are morphologically indistinguishable from senile plaques, using conventional light microscopy. Local brain amyloidosis also occurs in general paresis and, as in AD, corresponds to amyloid beta. These historic observations enable us to conclude that chronic spirochetal infections can cause dementia and reproduce the defining hallmarks of AD. They represent further evidence in support a causal relationship between various spirochetal infections and AD. They also indicate that local invasion of the brain by these helically shaped bacteria reproduce the filamentous pathology characteristic of AD. Chronic infection by spirochetes, and co-infection with other bacteria and viruses should be included in our current view on the etiology of AD. Prompt action is needed as AD might be prevented. PMID:25932012

  10. Seasonal prevalence of Lyme disease spirochetes in a heterothermic mammal, the edible dormouse (Glis glis).

    PubMed

    Fietz, Joanna; Tomiuk, Jürgen; Matuschka, Franz-Rainer; Richter, Dania

    2014-06-01

    In Europe, dormice serve as competent reservoir hosts for particular genospecies of the tick-borne agent of Lyme disease (LD) and seem to support them more efficiently than do mice or voles. The longevity of edible dormice (Glis glis) and their attractiveness for ticks may result in a predominance of LD spirochetes in ticks questing in dormouse habitats. To investigate the role of edible dormice in the transmission cycle of LD spirochetes, we sampled skin tissue from the ear pinnae of dormice inhabiting five different study sites in south western Germany. Of 501 edible dormice, 12.6% harbored DNA of LD spirochetes. Edible dormice were infected most frequently with the pathogenic LD spirochete Borrelia afzelii. The DNA of B. garinii and B. bavariensis was detected in ca. 0.5% of the examined individuals. No spirochetal DNA was detectable in the skin of edible dormice until July, 6 weeks after they generally start to emerge from their obligate hibernation. Thereafter, the prevalence of spirochetal DNA in edible dormice increased during the remaining period of their 4 to 5 months of activity, reaching nearly 40% in September. Males were more than four times more likely to harbor LD spirochetes than females, and yearlings were almost twice more likely to be infected than adults. The seasonality of the prevalence of LD spirochetes in edible dormice was pronounced and may affect their role as a reservoir host in respect to other hosts.

  11. Seasonal Prevalence of Lyme Disease Spirochetes in a Heterothermic Mammal, the Edible Dormouse (Glis glis)

    PubMed Central

    Fietz, Joanna; Tomiuk, Jürgen; Matuschka, Franz-Rainer

    2014-01-01

    In Europe, dormice serve as competent reservoir hosts for particular genospecies of the tick-borne agent of Lyme disease (LD) and seem to support them more efficiently than do mice or voles. The longevity of edible dormice (Glis glis) and their attractiveness for ticks may result in a predominance of LD spirochetes in ticks questing in dormouse habitats. To investigate the role of edible dormice in the transmission cycle of LD spirochetes, we sampled skin tissue from the ear pinnae of dormice inhabiting five different study sites in south western Germany. Of 501 edible dormice, 12.6% harbored DNA of LD spirochetes. Edible dormice were infected most frequently with the pathogenic LD spirochete Borrelia afzelii. The DNA of B. garinii and B. bavariensis was detected in ca. 0.5% of the examined individuals. No spirochetal DNA was detectable in the skin of edible dormice until July, 6 weeks after they generally start to emerge from their obligate hibernation. Thereafter, the prevalence of spirochetal DNA in edible dormice increased during the remaining period of their 4 to 5 months of activity, reaching nearly 40% in September. Males were more than four times more likely to harbor LD spirochetes than females, and yearlings were almost twice more likely to be infected than adults. The seasonality of the prevalence of LD spirochetes in edible dormice was pronounced and may affect their role as a reservoir host in respect to other hosts. PMID:24705325

  12. Hide and Seek: How Lyme Disease Spirochetes Overcome Complement Attack

    PubMed Central

    Kraiczy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Overcoming the first line of the innate immune system is a general hallmark of pathogenic microbes to avoid recognition and to enter the human host. In particular, spirochetes belonging to the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex have developed various means to counter the immune response and to successfully survive in diverse host environments for a prolonged period of time. In regard to complement resistance, Borrelia utilize a plethora of immune evasion strategies involves capturing of host-derived complement regulators, terminating complement activation as well as shedding of cell-destroying complement complexes to manipulate and to expeditiously inhibit human complement. Owing to their mode of action, the interacting surface-exposed proteins identified among B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia spielmanii, and Borrelia bavariensis can be classified into at least two major categories, namely, molecules that directly interfere with distinct complement components including BBK32, CspA, BGA66, BGA71, and a CD59-like protein or molecules, which indirectly counteract complement activation by binding various complement regulators such as Factor H, Factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), Factor H-related proteins FHR-1, FHR-2, or C4Bp. The latter group of genetically and structurally unrelated proteins has been collectively referred to as “complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins” and consists of CspA, CspZ, ErpA, ErpC, ErpP, and the as yet unidentified protein p43. This review focuses on the current knowledge of immune evasion mechanisms exhibited by Lyme disease spirochetes and highlights the role of complement-interfering, infection-associated molecules playing an important part in these processes. Deciphering the immune evasion strategies may provide novel avenues for improved diagnostic approaches and therapeutic interventions. PMID:27725820

  13. Enhanced Adhesion and OspC Protein Synthesis of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia Burgdorferi Cultivated in a Host-Derived Tissue Co-Culture System.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ece; Sigal, Leonard H

    2013-06-01

    The adhesion process of Borrelia burgdorferi to susceptible host cell has not yet been completely understood regarding the function of OspA, OspB and OspC proteins and a conflict exists in the infection process. The adhesion rates of pathogenic (low BSK medium passaged or susceptible rat joint tissue co-cultivated) or non-pathogenic Borrelia burgdorferi (high BSK medium passaged) isolate (FNJ) to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured on coverslips and the synthesis of OspA and OspC proteins were investigated to analyze the infection process of this bacterium. In-vitro study. Spirochetes were cultured in BSK medium or in a LEW/N rat tibiotarsal joint tissue feeder layer supported co-culture system using ESG co-culture medium and labelled with 3H-adenine for 48 hours. SDS-PAGE, Western Blotting, Immunogold A labeling as well as radiolabeling experiments were used to compare pathogenic or non pathogenic spirochetes during the adhesion process. Tissue co-cultured B. burgdorferi adhered about ten times faster than BSK-grown spirochetes. Trypsin inhibited attachment to HUVEC and co-culture of trypsinized spirochetes with tissues reversed the inhibition. Also, the synthesis of OspC protein by spirochetes was increased in abundance after tissue co-cultures, as determined by SDS-PAGE and by electron microscopy analysis of protein A-immunogold staining by anti-OspC antibodies. OspA protein was synthesized in similar quantities in all Borrelia cultures analyzed by the same techniques. Low BSK passaged or tissue co-cultured pathogenic Lyme disease spirochetes adhere to HUVEC faster than non-pathogenic high BSK passaged forms of this bacterium. Spirochetes synthesized OspC protein during host tissue-associated growth. However, we did not observe a reduction of OspA synthesis during host tissue co-cultivation in vitro.

  14. Interactions of phagocytes with the Lyme disease spirochete: role of the Fc receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Benach, J.L.; Fleit, H.B.; Habicht, G.S.; Coleman, J.L.; Bosler, E.M.; Lane, B.P.

    1984-10-01

    The phagocytic capacity of murine and human mononuclear and polymorphonuclear phagocytes (including peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils), rabbit and murine peritoneal exudate cells, and the murine macrophage cell line P388D1 against the Lyme disease spirochete was studied. All of these cells were capable of phagocytosing the spirochete; phagocytosis was measured by the uptake of radiolabeled spirochetes, the appearance of immunofluorescent bodies in phagocytic cells, and electron microscopy. Both opsonized and nonopsonized organisms were phagocytosed. The uptake of opsonized organisms by neutrophils was blocked by a monoclonal antibody specific for the Fc receptor and by immune complexes; these findings suggested that most phagocytosis is mediated by the Fc receptor. Similarly, the uptake of opsonized organisms by human monocytes was inhibited by human monomeric IgG1 and by immune complexes. These results illustrate the role of immune phagocytosis of spirochetes in host defense against Lyme disease.

  15. Spirochetal motility and chemotaxis in the natural enzootic cycle and development of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Motaleb, Md A; Liu, Jun; Wooten, R Mark

    2015-12-01

    Two-thirds of all bacterial genomes sequenced to-date possess an organelle for locomotion, referred to as flagella, periplasmic flagella or type IV pili. These genomes may also contain a chemotaxis-signaling system which governs flagellar rotation, thus leading a coordinated function for motility. Motility and chemotaxis are often crucial for infection or disease process caused by pathogenic bacteria. Although motility-associated genes are well-characterized in some organisms, the highly orchestrated synthesis, regulation, and assembly of periplasmic flagella in spirochetes are just being delineated. Recent advances were fostered by development of unique genetic manipulations in spirochetes coupled with cutting-edge imaging techniques. These contemporary advances in understanding the role of spirochetal motility and chemotaxis in host persistence and disease development are highlighted in this review.

  16. Spirochetal motility and chemotaxis in the natural enzootic cycle and development of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    MOTALEB, MD A.; LIU, JUN; WOOTEN, R. MARK

    2015-01-01

    Two-thirds of all bacterial genomes sequenced to-date possess an organelle for locomotion, referred to as flagella, periplasmic flagella or type IV pili. These genomes may also contain a chemotaxis-signaling system which governs flagellar rotation, thus leading a coordinated function for motility. Motility and chemotaxis are often crucial for infection or disease process caused by pathogenic bacteria. Although motility-associated genes are well-characterized in some organisms, the highly-orchestrated synthesis, regulation, and assembly of periplasmic flagella in spirochetes are just being delineated. Recent advances were fostered by development of unique genetic manipulations in spirochetes coupled with cutting-edge imaging techniques. These contemporary advances in understanding the role of spirochetal motility and chemotaxis in host persistence and disease development are highlighted in this review. PMID:26519910

  17. Viscous Dynamics of Lyme Disease and Syphilis Spirochetes Reveal Flagellar Torque and Drag

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Michael; Vig, Dhruv K.; Radolf, Justin D.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    The spirochetes that cause Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi) and syphilis (Treponema pallidum) swim through viscous fluids, such as blood and interstitial fluid, by undulating their bodies as traveling, planar waves. These undulations are driven by rotation of the flagella within the periplasmic space, the narrow (∼20–40 nm in width) compartment between the inner and outer membranes. We show here that the swimming speeds of B. burgdorferi and T. pallidum decrease with increases in viscosity of the external aqueous milieu, even though the flagella are entirely intracellular. We then use mathematical modeling to show that the measured changes in speed are consistent with the exertion of constant torque by the spirochetal flagellar motors. Comparison of simulations, experiments, and a simple model for power dissipation allows us to estimate the torque and resistive drag that act on the flagella of these major spirochetal pathogens. PMID:24268139

  18. Community ecology and disease risk: lizards, squirrels, and the Lyme disease spirochete in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Salkeld, Daniel J; Lane, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Vector-borne zoonotic diseases are often maintained in complex transmission cycles involving multiple vertebrate hosts and their arthropod vectors. In the state of California, U.S.A., the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which causes Lyme disease, is transmitted between vertebrate hosts by the western black-legged tick, Ixodes pacificus. Several mammalian species serve as reservoir hosts of the spirochete, but levels of tick infestation, reservoir competence, and Borrelia-infection prevalence vary widely among such hosts. Here, we model the host (lizards, Peromyscus mice, Californian meadow voles, dusky-footed wood rats, and western gray squirrels), vector, and pathogen community of oak woodlands in northwestern California to determine the relative importance of different tick hosts. Observed infection prevalence of B. burgdorferi in host-seeking I. pacificus nymphs was 1.8-5.3%, and our host-community model estimated an infection prevalence of 1.6-2.2%. The western gray squirrel (Sciurus griseus) was the only source of infected nymphs. Lizards, which are refractory to Borrelia infection, are important in feeding subadult ticks but reduce disease risk (nymphal infection prevalence). Species identity is therefore critical in understanding and determining the local disease ecology.

  19. Population Bottlenecks during the Infectious Cycle of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Rego, Ryan O. M.; Bestor, Aaron; Štefka, Jan; Rosa, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is a zoonotic pathogen whose maintenance in nature depends upon an infectious cycle that alternates between a tick vector and mammalian hosts. Lyme disease in humans results from transmission of B. burgdorferi by the bite of an infected tick. The population dynamics of B. burgdorferi throughout its natural infectious cycle are not well understood. We addressed this topic by assessing the colonization, dissemination and persistence of B. burgdorferi within and between the disparate mammalian and tick environments. To follow bacterial populations during infection, we generated seven isogenic but distinguishable B. burgdorferi clones, each with a unique sequence tag. These tags resulted in no phenotypic changes relative to wild type organisms, yet permitted highly sensitive and specific detection of individual clones by PCR. We followed the composition of the spirochete population throughout an experimental infectious cycle that was initiated with a mixed inoculum of all clones. We observed heterogeneity in the spirochete population disseminating within mice at very early time points, but all clones displayed the ability to colonize most mouse tissues by 3 weeks of infection. The complexity of clones subsequently declined as murine infection persisted. Larval ticks typically acquired a reduced and variable number of clones relative to what was present in infected mice at the time of tick feeding, and maintained the same spirochete population through the molt to nymphs. However, only a random subset of infectious spirochetes was transmitted to naïve mice when these ticks next fed. Our results clearly demonstrate that the spirochete population experiences stochastic bottlenecks during both acquisition and transmission by the tick vector, as well as during persistent infection of its murine host. The experimental system that we have developed can be used to further explore the forces that shape the population of this vector-borne bacterial pathogen

  20. Genetic characterization of the human relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi in vectors and animal reservoirs of Lyme disease spirochetes in France

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In France as elsewhere in Europe the most prevalent TBD in humans is Lyme borreliosis, caused by different bacterial species belonging to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex and transmitted by the most important tick species in France, Ixodes ricinus. However, the diagnosis of Lyme disease is not always confirmed and unexplained syndromes occurring after tick bites have become an important issue. Recently, B. miyamotoi belonging to the relapsing fever group and transmitted by the same Ixodes species has been involved in human disease in Russia, the USA and the Netherlands. In the present study, we investigate the presence of B. miyamotoi along with other Lyme Borreliosis spirochetes, in ticks and possible animal reservoirs collected in France. Methods We analyzed 268 ticks (Ixodes ricinus) and 72 bank voles (Myodes glareolus) collected and trapped in France for the presence of DNA from B. miyamotoi as well as from Lyme spirochetes using q-PCR and specific primers and probes. We then compared the French genotypes with those found in other European countries. Results We found that 3% of ticks and 5.55% of bank voles were found infected by the same B. miyamotoi genotype, while co-infection with other Lyme spirochetes (B. garinii) was identified in 12% of B. miyamotoi infected ticks. Sequencing showed that ticks and rodents carried the same genotype as those recently characterized in a sick person in the Netherlands. Conclusions The genotype of B. miyamotoi circulating in ticks and bank voles in France is identical to those already described in ticks from Western Europe and to the genotype isolated from a sick person in The Netherlands. This results suggests that even though no human cases have been reported in France, surveillance has to be improved. Moreover, we showed that ticks could simultaneously carry B. miyamotoi and Lyme disease spirochetes, increasing the problem of co-infection in humans. PMID:24886071

  1. Genetic characterization of the human relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi in vectors and animal reservoirs of Lyme disease spirochetes in France.

    PubMed

    Cosson, Jean-François; Michelet, Lorraine; Chotte, Julien; Le Naour, Evelyne; Cote, Martine; Devillers, Elodie; Poulle, Marie-Lazarine; Huet, Dominique; Galan, Maxime; Geller, Julia; Moutailler, Sara; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel

    2014-05-20

    In France as elsewhere in Europe the most prevalent TBD in humans is Lyme borreliosis, caused by different bacterial species belonging to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex and transmitted by the most important tick species in France, Ixodes ricinus. However, the diagnosis of Lyme disease is not always confirmed and unexplained syndromes occurring after tick bites have become an important issue. Recently, B. miyamotoi belonging to the relapsing fever group and transmitted by the same Ixodes species has been involved in human disease in Russia, the USA and the Netherlands. In the present study, we investigate the presence of B. miyamotoi along with other Lyme Borreliosis spirochetes, in ticks and possible animal reservoirs collected in France. We analyzed 268 ticks (Ixodes ricinus) and 72 bank voles (Myodes glareolus) collected and trapped in France for the presence of DNA from B. miyamotoi as well as from Lyme spirochetes using q-PCR and specific primers and probes. We then compared the French genotypes with those found in other European countries. We found that 3% of ticks and 5.55% of bank voles were found infected by the same B. miyamotoi genotype, while co-infection with other Lyme spirochetes (B. garinii) was identified in 12% of B. miyamotoi infected ticks. Sequencing showed that ticks and rodents carried the same genotype as those recently characterized in a sick person in the Netherlands. The genotype of B. miyamotoi circulating in ticks and bank voles in France is identical to those already described in ticks from Western Europe and to the genotype isolated from a sick person in The Netherlands. This results suggests that even though no human cases have been reported in France, surveillance has to be improved. Moreover, we showed that ticks could simultaneously carry B. miyamotoi and Lyme disease spirochetes, increasing the problem of co-infection in humans.

  2. Isolation and transmission of the Lyme disease spirochete from the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J H; Chandler, F W; Luttrell, M P; James, A M; Stallknecht, D E; McGuire, B S; Hutcheson, H J; Cummins, G A; Lane, R S

    1993-08-01

    The isolation of the Lyme disease spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) from the southeastern United States is reported. Three isolates, two from cotton mice (Peromyscus gossypinus) and one from the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis), were recovered from Sapelo Island, Georgia, in July and September 1991. The spirochetes were characterized by indirect fluorescent antibody assay using a battery of five monoclonal antibodies, by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) of whole cell lysates, and by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using primers for three DNA target sequences found in B. burgdorferi reference strain B-31. Transmission experiments indicate that the three Georgia isolates can infect experimentally inoculated hamsters and mice. Tick transmission of one of the isolates has been attempted so far; I. scapularis transmitted isolate SI-1 from hamsters to mice, but the lone-star tick, Amblyomma americanum, did not.

  3. Gut Microbiota of the Tick Vector Ixodes scapularis Modulate Colonization of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Sukanya; Rajeevan, Nallakkandi; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Yang O.; Heisig, Julia; Pan, Jingyi; Eppler-Epstein, Rebecca; DePonte, Kathleen; Fish, Durland; Fikrig, Erol

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Arthopods, such as Ixodes ticks, serve as vectors for many human pathogens. The arthropod gut presents a pivotal microbial entry point and determines pathogen colonization and survival. We show that the gut microbiota of Ixodes scapularis, a major vector of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, influence spirochete colonization of ticks. Perturbing the gut microbiota of larval ticks reduced Borrelia colonization, with dysbiosed larvae displaying decreased expression of the transcription factor STAT. Diminished STAT expression corresponded to lower expression of peritrophin, a key glycoprotein scaffold of the glycan-rich mucus-like peritrophic matrix (PM) that separates the gut lumen from the epithelium. The integrity of the I. scapularis PM was essential for B. burgdorferi to efficiently colonize the gut epithelium. These data elucidate a functional link between the gut microbiota, STAT-signaling, and pathogen colonization in the context of the gut epithelial barrier of an arthropod vector. PMID:24439898

  4. Loss of Lyme disease spirochetes from Ixodes ricinus ticks feeding on European blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Matuschka, F R; Spielman, A

    1992-03-01

    To determine whether blackbirds (Turdus merula), the most abundant and most abundantly tick-infested ecotonal bird of Central Europe, may contribute to the transmission of the Lyme disease spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi), we compared the infectivity to ticks of naturally as well as experimentally infected blackbirds and rodents. European blackbirds experience intense exposure to Ixodes ricinus ticks and to the pathogens that they transmit. In nature, subadult I. ricinus ticks found feeding on these birds generally contain no spirochetes, although infection is universal in those found on black-striped mice (Apodemus agrarius). Those found on yellow-necked mice (A. flavicollis) are less frequently infected. Ticks lose infection in the course of feeding on blackbirds and fail to infect them. Subadult I. ricinus ticks readily feed on blackbirds, black-striped mice, and jirds (Meriones unguiculatus), but engorge less fully on the bird than on the rodents. Although birds may burden human health by establishing new infestations of I. ricinus ticks, our observations indicate that particular birds may benefit health by locally diminishing transmission of the Lyme disease spirochete.

  5. Lyme disease: a selective medium for isolation of the suspected etiological agent, a spirochete.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, S E; Klein, G C; Schmid, G P; Bowen, G S; Feeley, J C; Schulze, T

    1984-01-01

    A simple procedure with a new selective culture medium for the isolation of the suspected etiological agent of Lyme disease from ticks is described. Live ticks (Ixodes dammini) were ground with a mortar and pestle, and the suspensions were inoculated into a selective and nonselective medium. The selective medium, which contained kanamycin and 5-fluorouracil, yielded positive spirochete cultures from 100% of the pooled ticks and from 79% of the single tick specimens. The isolation rate for the nonselective medium was 0% from the tick pools and 58% from the single tick specimens. PMID:6361065

  6. Transformation of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi with heterologous DNA.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, B; Bono, J L; Elias, A; Tilly, K; Rosa, P

    1998-09-01

    Studies of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi have been hindered by the scarcity of genetic tools that can be used in these bacteria. For the first time, a method has been developed by which heterologous DNA (DNA without a naturally occurring B. burgdorferi homolog) can be introduced into and persistently maintained by B. burgdorferi. This technique uses integration of circular DNA into the bacterial genome via a single-crossover event. The ability to transform B. burgdorferi with heterologous DNA will now permit a wide range of experiments on the biology of these bacteria and their involvement in the many facets of Lyme disease.

  7. Transformation of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi with Heterologous DNA

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Brian; Bono, James L.; Elias, Abdallah; Tilly, Kit; Rosa, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi have been hindered by the scarcity of genetic tools that can be used in these bacteria. For the first time, a method has been developed by which heterologous DNA (DNA without a naturally occurring B. burgdorferi homolog) can be introduced into and persistently maintained by B. burgdorferi. This technique uses integration of circular DNA into the bacterial genome via a single-crossover event. The ability to transform B. burgdorferi with heterologous DNA will now permit a wide range of experiments on the biology of these bacteria and their involvement in the many facets of Lyme disease. PMID:9733687

  8. Distribution and molecular analysis of Lyme disease spirochetes, Borrelia burgdorferi, isolated from ticks throughout California.

    PubMed

    Schwan, T G; Schrumpf, M E; Karstens, R H; Clover, J R; Wong, J; Daugherty, M; Struthers, M; Rosa, P A

    1993-12-01

    Previous studies describing the occurrence and molecular characteristics of Lyme disease spirochetes, Borrelia burgdorferi, from California have been restricted primarily to isolates obtained from the north coastal region of this large and ecologically diverse state. Our objective was to look for and examine B. burdorferi organisms isolated from Ixodes pacificus ticks collected from numerous regions spanning most parts of California where this tick is found. Thirty-one isolates of B. burgdorferi were examined from individual or pooled I. pacificus ticks collected from 25 counties throughout the state. One isolate was obtained from ticks collected at Wawona Campground in Yosemite National Park, documenting the occurrence of the Lyme disease spirochete in an area of intensive human recreational use. One isolate from an Ixodes neotomae tick from an additional county was also examined. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblot analysis, agarose gel electrophoresis, Southern blot analysis, and the polymerase chain reaction were used to examine the molecular and genetic determinants of these uncloned, low-passage-number isolates. All of the isolates were identified as B. burgdorferi by their protein profiles and reactivities with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, and all the isolates were typed by the polymerase chain reaction as North American-type spirochetes (B. burgdorferi sensu stricto). Although products of the ospAB locus were identified in protein analyses in all of the isolates, several isolates contained deleted forms of this locus that would result in the expression of chimeric OspA-OspB proteins. The analysis of OspC demonstrated that this protein was widely conserved among the isolates but was also quite variable in its molecular mass and the amount of it that was expressed.

  9. Hypothetical Protein BB0569 Is Essential for Chemotaxis of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Liu, Jun; Charon, Nyles W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has five putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs). In this report, we provide evidence that a hypothetical protein, BB0569, is essential for the chemotaxis of B. burgdorferi. While BB0569 lacks significant homology to the canonical MCPs, it contains a conserved domain (spanning residues 110 to 170) that is often evident in membrane-bound MCPs such as Tar and Tsr of Escherichia coli. Unlike Tar and Tsr, BB0569 lacks transmembrane regions and recognizable HAMP and methylation domains and is similar to TlpC, a cytoplasmic chemoreceptor of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. An isogenic mutant of BB0569 constantly runs in one direction and fails to respond to attractants, indicating that BB0569 is essential for chemotaxis. Immunofluorescence, green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion, and cryo-electron tomography analyses demonstrate that BB0569 localizes at the cell poles and is required for chemoreceptor clustering at the cell poles. Protein cross-linking studies reveal that BB0569 forms large protein complexes with MCP3, indicative of its interactions with other MCPs. Interestingly, analysis of B. burgdorferi mcp mutants shows that inactivation of either mcp2 or mcp3 reduces the level of BB0569 substantially and that such a reduction is caused by protein turnover. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the domain composition and function of BB0569 are similar in some respects to those of TlpC but that these proteins are different in their cellular locations, further highlighting that the chemotaxis of B. burgdorferi is unique and different from the Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica paradigm. IMPORTANCE Spirochete chemotaxis differs substantially from the Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica paradigm, and the basis for controlling the rotation of the bundles of periplasmic flagella at each end of the cell is unknown. In recent years, Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, has

  10. Isolation of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia mayonii From Naturally Infected Rodents in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tammi L; Graham, Christine B; Hojgaard, Andrias; Breuner, Nicole E; Maes, Sarah E; Boegler, Karen A; Replogle, Adam J; Kingry, Luke C; Petersen, Jeannine M; Eisen, Lars; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2017-07-01

    Borrelia mayonii is a newly described member of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex that is vectored by the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis Say) and a cause of Lyme disease in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Vertebrate reservoir hosts involved in the enzootic maintenance of B. mayonii have not yet been identified. Here, we describe the first isolation of B. mayonii from naturally infected white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus Rafinesque) and an American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus Erxleben) from Minnesota, thus implicating these species as potential reservoir hosts for this newly described spirochete. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Reservoir competence of Microtus pennsylvanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markowski, D.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Hyland, K.E.; Hu, R.

    1998-01-01

    The reservoir competence of the meadow vole, Microtus pennsylvanicus Ord, for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Brenner was established on Patience Island, RI. Meadow voles were collected from 5 locations throughout Rhode Island. At 4 of the field sites, M. pennsylvanicus represented only 4.0% (n = 141) of the animals captured. However, on Patience Island, M. pennsylvanicus was the sole small mammal collected (n = 48). Of the larval Ixodes scapularis Say obtained from the meadow voles on Patience Island, 62% (n = 78) was infected with B. burgdorferi. Meadow voles from all 5 locations were successfully infected with B. burgdorferi in the laboratory and were capable of passing the infection to xenodiagnostic I. scapularis larvae for 9 wk. We concluded that M. pennsylvanicus was physiologically capable of maintaining B. burgdorferi infection. However, in locations where Peromyscus leucopus (Rafinesque) is abundant, the role of M. pennsylvanicus as a primary reservoir for B. burgdorferi was reduced.

  12. Susceptibility to Ticks and Lyme Disease Spirochetes Is Not Affected in Mice Coinfected with Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Maaz, Denny; Rausch, Sebastian; Richter, Dania; Krücken, Jürgen; Kühl, Anja A.; Demeler, Janina; Blümke, Julia; Matuschka, Franz-Rainer; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Small rodents serve as reservoir hosts for tick-borne pathogens, such as the spirochetes causing Lyme disease. Whether natural coinfections with other macroparasites alter the success of tick feeding, antitick immunity, and the host's reservoir competence for tick-borne pathogens remains to be determined. In a parasitological survey of wild mice in Berlin, Germany, approximately 40% of Ixodes ricinus-infested animals simultaneously harbored a nematode of the genus Heligmosomoides. We therefore aimed to analyze the immunological impact of the nematode/tick coinfection as well as its effect on the tick-borne pathogen Borrelia afzelii. Hosts experimentally coinfected with Heligmosomoides polygyrus and larval/nymphal I. ricinus ticks developed substantially stronger systemic type 2 T helper cell (Th2) responses, on the basis of the levels of GATA-3 and interleukin-13 expression, than mice infected with a single pathogen. During repeated larval infestations, however, anti-tick Th2 reactivity and an observed partial immunity to tick feeding were unaffected by concurrent nematode infections. Importantly, the strong systemic Th2 immune response in coinfected mice did not affect susceptibility to tick-borne B. afzelii. An observed trend for decreased local and systemic Th1 reactivity against B. afzelii in coinfected mice did not result in a higher spirochete burden, nor did it facilitate bacterial dissemination or induce signs of immunopathology. Hence, this study indicates that strong systemic Th2 responses in nematode/tick-coinfected house mice do not affect the success of tick feeding and the control of the causative agent of Lyme disease. PMID:26883594

  13. Susceptibility to Ticks and Lyme Disease Spirochetes Is Not Affected in Mice Coinfected with Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Maaz, Denny; Rausch, Sebastian; Richter, Dania; Krücken, Jürgen; Kühl, Anja A; Demeler, Janina; Blümke, Julia; Matuschka, Franz-Rainer; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Hartmann, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    Small rodents serve as reservoir hosts for tick-borne pathogens, such as the spirochetes causing Lyme disease. Whether natural coinfections with other macroparasites alter the success of tick feeding, antitick immunity, and the host's reservoir competence for tick-borne pathogens remains to be determined. In a parasitological survey of wild mice in Berlin, Germany, approximately 40% of Ixodes ricinus-infested animals simultaneously harbored a nematode of the genus Heligmosomoides We therefore aimed to analyze the immunological impact of the nematode/tick coinfection as well as its effect on the tick-borne pathogen Borrelia afzelii Hosts experimentally coinfected with Heligmosomoides polygyrus and larval/nymphal I. ricinus ticks developed substantially stronger systemic type 2 T helper cell (Th2) responses, on the basis of the levels of GATA-3 and interleukin-13 expression, than mice infected with a single pathogen. During repeated larval infestations, however, anti-tick Th2 reactivity and an observed partial immunity to tick feeding were unaffected by concurrent nematode infections. Importantly, the strong systemic Th2 immune response in coinfected mice did not affect susceptibility to tick-borne B. afzelii An observed trend for decreased local and systemic Th1 reactivity against B. afzelii in coinfected mice did not result in a higher spirochete burden, nor did it facilitate bacterial dissemination or induce signs of immunopathology. Hence, this study indicates that strong systemic Th2 responses in nematode/tick-coinfected house mice do not affect the success of tick feeding and the control of the causative agent of Lyme disease. Copyright © 2016 Maaz et al.

  14. Filament formation associated with spirochetal infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2011-01-01

    Bovine digital dermatitis is an emerging infectious disease that causes lameness, decreased milk production, and weight loss in livestock. Proliferative stages of bovine digital dermatitis demonstrate keratin filament formation in skin above the hooves in affected animals. The multifactorial etiology of digital dermatitis is not well understood, but spirochetes and other coinfecting microorganisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this veterinary illness. Morgellons disease is an emerging human dermopathy characterized by the presence of filamentous fibers of undetermined composition, both in lesions and subdermally. While the etiology of Morgellons disease is unknown, there is serological and clinical evidence linking this phenomenon to Lyme borreliosis and coinfecting tick-borne agents. Although the microscopy of Morgellons filaments has been described in the medical literature, the structure and pathogenesis of these fibers is poorly understood. In contrast, most microscopy of digital dermatitis has focused on associated pathogens and histology rather than the morphology of late-stage filamentous fibers. Clinical, laboratory, and microscopic characteristics of these two diseases are compared.

  15. Filament formation associated with spirochetal infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons disease

    PubMed Central

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2011-01-01

    Bovine digital dermatitis is an emerging infectious disease that causes lameness, decreased milk production, and weight loss in livestock. Proliferative stages of bovine digital dermatitis demonstrate keratin filament formation in skin above the hooves in affected animals. The multifactorial etiology of digital dermatitis is not well understood, but spirochetes and other coinfecting microorganisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this veterinary illness. Morgellons disease is an emerging human dermopathy characterized by the presence of filamentous fibers of undetermined composition, both in lesions and subdermally. While the etiology of Morgellons disease is unknown, there is serological and clinical evidence linking this phenomenon to Lyme borreliosis and coinfecting tick-borne agents. Although the microscopy of Morgellons filaments has been described in the medical literature, the structure and pathogenesis of these fibers is poorly understood. In contrast, most microscopy of digital dermatitis has focused on associated pathogens and histology rather than the morphology of late-stage filamentous fibers. Clinical, laboratory, and microscopic characteristics of these two diseases are compared. PMID:22253541

  16. There Is a Method to the Madness: Strategies to Study Host Complement Evasion by Lyme Disease and Relapsing Fever Spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Ashley L.; Kraiczy, Peter; Lin, Yi-Pin

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease and relapsing fever are caused by various Borrelia species. Lyme disease borreliae, the most common vector-borne pathogens in both the U.S. and Europe, are transmitted by Ixodes ticks and disseminate from the site of tick bites to tissues leading to erythema migrans skin rash, arthritis, carditis, and neuroborreliosis. Relapsing fever borreliae, carried by ticks and lice, trigger reoccurring fever episodes. Following transmission, spirochetes survive in the blood to induce bacteremia at the early stages of infection, which is thought to promote evasion of the host complement system. The complement system acts as an important innate immune defense mechanism in humans and vertebrates. Upon activation, the cleaved complement components form complexes on the pathogen surface to eventually promote bacteriolysis. The complement system is negatively modulated by a number of functionally diverse regulators to avoid tissue damage. To evade and inhibit the complement system, spirochetes are capable of binding complement components and regulators. Complement inhibition results in bacterial survival in serum (serum resistance) and is thought to promote bloodstream survival, which facilitates spirochete dissemination and disease manifestations. In this review, we discuss current methodologies to elucidate the mechanisms of Borrelia spp. that promote serum resistance and bloodstream survival, as well as novel methods to study factors responsible for bloodstream survival of Lyme disease borreliae that can be applied to relapsing fever borreliae. Understanding the mechanisms these pathogens utilize to evade the complement system will ultimately aid in the development of novel therapeutic strategies and disease prevention to improve human health. PMID:28303129

  17. There Is a Method to the Madness: Strategies to Study Host Complement Evasion by Lyme Disease and Relapsing Fever Spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Ashley L; Kraiczy, Peter; Lin, Yi-Pin

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease and relapsing fever are caused by various Borrelia species. Lyme disease borreliae, the most common vector-borne pathogens in both the U.S. and Europe, are transmitted by Ixodes ticks and disseminate from the site of tick bites to tissues leading to erythema migrans skin rash, arthritis, carditis, and neuroborreliosis. Relapsing fever borreliae, carried by ticks and lice, trigger reoccurring fever episodes. Following transmission, spirochetes survive in the blood to induce bacteremia at the early stages of infection, which is thought to promote evasion of the host complement system. The complement system acts as an important innate immune defense mechanism in humans and vertebrates. Upon activation, the cleaved complement components form complexes on the pathogen surface to eventually promote bacteriolysis. The complement system is negatively modulated by a number of functionally diverse regulators to avoid tissue damage. To evade and inhibit the complement system, spirochetes are capable of binding complement components and regulators. Complement inhibition results in bacterial survival in serum (serum resistance) and is thought to promote bloodstream survival, which facilitates spirochete dissemination and disease manifestations. In this review, we discuss current methodologies to elucidate the mechanisms of Borrelia spp. that promote serum resistance and bloodstream survival, as well as novel methods to study factors responsible for bloodstream survival of Lyme disease borreliae that can be applied to relapsing fever borreliae. Understanding the mechanisms these pathogens utilize to evade the complement system will ultimately aid in the development of novel therapeutic strategies and disease prevention to improve human health.

  18. Intestinal spirochete infections of chickens: a review of disease associations, epidemiology and control.

    PubMed

    Stephens, C P; Hampson, D J

    2001-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of intestinal spirochete infections of chickens. It focuses particularly on studies in Australia, where recent surveys of 136 layer and broiler breeder flocks have revealed a high rate of infection (>40%) with intestinal spirochetes. Infection was not detected in broiler flocks. Approximately 50% of isolates from infected flocks were Brachyspira (Serpulina) intermedia or B. pilosicoli, with the other isolates being B. innocens, B. murdochii or the proposed species 'B. pulli'. No isolates of B. alvinipulli were found. Intestinal spirochetes were significantly associated with wet litter problems and/or reduced egg production. Experimental infection of point-of-lay birds with either B. intermedia or B. pilosicoli caused reduced egg production, and, with B. intermedia, a significant increase in fecal moisture content. Infection with B. innocens caused no significant changes. In-water treatment of a flock with a mixed spirochete infection using lincospectin resulted in a slimy diarrhea lasting for 2-3 weeks, followed by absence of spirochetes for 3 months. Birds treated with tiamulin remained healthy, and had a reduced level of infection with intestinal spirochetes (30%) for 3 months. Trials are under way to test the efficacy of antimicrobials in point-of-lay chickens experimentally infected with either B. intermedia or B. pilosicoli.

  19. Transmission of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia mayonii in Relation to Duration of Attachment by Nymphal Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Dolan, Marc C; Breuner, Nicole E; Hojgaard, Andrias; Boegler, Karen A; Hoxmeier, J Charles; Replogle, Adam J; Eisen, Lars

    2017-09-01

    The recently recognized Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia mayonii, has been detected in host-seeking Ixodes scapularis Say ticks and is associated with human disease in the Upper Midwest. Although experimentally shown to be vector competent, studies have been lacking to determine the duration of time from attachment of a single B. mayonii-infected I. scapularis nymph to transmission of spirochetes to a host. If B. mayonii spirochetes were found to be transmitted within the first 24 h after tick attachment, in contrast to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes (>24 h), then current recommendations for tick checks and prompt tick removal as a way to prevent transmission of Lyme disease spirochetes would need to be amended. We therefore conducted a study to determine the probability of transmission of B. mayonii spirochetes from single infected nymphal I. scapularis ticks to susceptible experimental mouse hosts at three time points postattachment (24, 48, and 72 h) and for a complete feed (>72-96 h). No evidence of infection with or exposure to B. mayonii occurred in mice that were fed upon by a single infected nymph for 24 or 48 h. The probability of transmission by a single infected nymphal tick was 31% after 72 h of attachment and 57% for a complete feed. In addition, due to unintended simultaneous feeding upon some mice by two B. mayonii-infected nymphs, we recorded a single occasion in which feeding for 48 h by two infected nymphs resulted in transmission and viable infection in the mouse. We conclude that the duration of attachment of a single infected nymphal I. scapularis tick required for transmission of B. mayonii appears to be similar to that for B. burgdorferi: transmission is minimal for the first 24 h of attachment, rare up to 48 h, but then increases distinctly by 72 h postattachment. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public

  20. The cyclic-di-GMP signaling pathway in the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Elizabeth A.; Sultan, Syed Z.; Motaleb, Md. A.

    2014-01-01

    In nature, the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi cycles between the unrelated environments of the Ixodes tick vector and mammalian host. In order to survive transmission between hosts, B. burgdorferi must be able to not only detect changes in its environment, but also rapidly and appropriately respond to these changes. One manner in which this obligate parasite regulates and adapts to its changing environment is through cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling. c-di-GMP has been shown to be instrumental in orchestrating the adaptation of B. burgdorferi to the tick environment. B. burgdorferi possesses only one set of c-di-GMP-metabolizing genes (one diguanylate cyclase and two distinct phosphodiesterases) and one c-di-GMP-binding PilZ-domain protein designated as PlzA. While studies in the realm of c-di-GMP signaling in B. burgdorferi have exploded in the last few years, there are still many more questions than answers. Elucidation of the importance of c-di-GMP signaling to B. burgdorferi may lead to the identification of mechanisms that are critical for the survival of B. burgdorferi in the tick phase of the enzootic cycle as well as potentially delineate a role (if any) c-di-GMP may play in the transmission and virulence of B. burgdorferi during the enzootic cycle, thereby enabling the development of effective drugs for the prevention and/or treatment of Lyme disease. PMID:24822172

  1. Integrins αvβ3 and α5β1 Mediate Attachment of Lyme Disease Spirochetes to Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Jenifer; Magoun, Loranne; Bodary, Sarah C.; Leong, John M.

    1998-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato), the agent of Lyme disease, is able to cause chronic, multisystemic infections in human and animal hosts. Attachment of the spirochete to host cells is likely to be important for the colonization of diverse tissues. The platelet-specific integrin αIIbβ3 was previously identified as a receptor for all three species of Lyme disease spirochetes (B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and B. afzelii). Here we show that B. burgdorferi also recognizes the widely expressed integrins αvβ3 and α5β1, known as the vitronectin and fibronectin receptors, respectively. Three representatives of each species of Lyme disease spirochete were tested for the ability to bind to purified αvβ3 and α5β1. All of the strains tested bound to at least one integrin. Binding to one integrin was not always predictive of binding to other integrins, and several different integrin preference profiles were identified. Attachment of the infectious B. burgdorferi strain N40 to purified αvβ3 and α5β1 was inhibited by RGD peptides and the appropriate receptor-specific antibodies. Binding to αvβ3 was also shown by using a transfected cell line that expresses this receptor but not αIIbβ3. Attachment of B. burgdorferi N40 to human erythroleukemia cells and to human saphenous vein endothelial cells was mediated by both α5β1 and αvβ3. Our results show that multiple integrins mediate attachment of Lyme disease spirochetes to host cells. PMID:9573074

  2. Distribution of Twelve Linear Extrachromosomal DNAs in Natural Isolates of Lyme Disease Spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Nanette; Fraser, Claire; Casjens, Sherwood

    2000-01-01

    We have analyzed a panel of independent North American isolates of the Lyme disease agent spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu stricto), for the presence of linear plasmids with sequence similarities to the 12 linear plasmids present in the B. burgdorferi type strain, isolate B31. The frequency of similarities to probes from each of the 12 B31 plasmids varied from 13 to 100% in the strain panel examined, and these similarities usually reside on plasmids similar in size to the cognate B31 plasmid. Sequences similar to 5 of the 12 B31 plasmids were found in all of the isolates examined, and >66% of the panel members hybridized to probes from 4 other plasmids. Sequences similar to most of the B. burgdorferi B31 plasmid-derived DNA probes used were also found on linear plasmids in the related Eurasian Lyme agents Borrelia garinii and Borrelia afzelii; however, some of these plasmids had uniform but substantially different sizes from their B. burgdorferi counterparts. PMID:10762248

  3. Reservoir competence of native North American birds for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, Howard S.; Buckley, P.A.; Balmforth, Maxon G.; Zhioua, Elyes; Mitra, Shaibal; Buckley, Francine G.

    2005-01-01

    Reservoir competence for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, was tested for six species of native North American birds: American robin, gray catbird, brown thrasher, eastern towhee, song sparrow, and northern cardinal. Wild birds collected by mist netting on Fire Island, NY, were held in a field laboratory in cages over water and locally collected larval ticks were placed on the birds, harvested from the water after engorgement, and tested for infection by direct fluorescent-antibody staining after molting to the nymphal stage. American robins were competent reservoirs, infecting 16.1% of larvae applied to wild-caught birds, compared with 0% of control ticks placed on uninfected laboratory mice. Robins that were previously infected in the laboratory by nymphal feeding infected 81.8% of applied larvae. Wild-caught song sparrows infected 4.8% of applied larvae and 21.1% when infected by nymphal feeding. Results suggest moderate levels of reservoir competence for northern cardinals, lower levels for gray catbirds, and little evidence of reservoir competence for eastern towhees or brown thrashers. Lower infection rates in larvae applied to wild-caught birds compared with birds infected in the laboratory suggest that infected birds display temporal variability in infectiousness to larval ticks. Engorged larvae drop from birds abundantly during daylight, so the abundance of these bird species in the peridomestic environment suggests that they might contribute infected ticks to lawns and gardens.

  4. Reservoir competence of native North American birds for the lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorfieri.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Howard S; Buckley, P A; Balmforth, Maxon G; Zhioua, Elyes; Mitra, Shaibal; Buckley, Francine G

    2005-05-01

    Reservoir competence for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, was tested for six species of native North American birds: American robin, gray catbird, brown thrasher, eastern towhee, song sparrow, and northern cardinal. Wild birds collected by mist netting on Fire Island, NY, were held in a field laboratory in cages over water and locally collected larval ticks were placed on the birds, harvested from the water after engorgement, and tested for infection by direct fluorescentantibody staining after molting to the nymphal stage. American robins were competent reservoirs, infecting 16.1% of larvae applied to wild-caught birds, compared with 0% of control ticks placed on uninfected laboratory mice. Robins that were previously infected in the laboratory by nymphal feeding infected 81.8% of applied larvae. Wild-caught song sparrows infected 4.8% of applied larvae and 21.1% when infected by nymphal feeding. Results suggest moderate levels of reservoir competence for northern cardinals, lower levels for gray catbirds, and little evidence of reservoir competence for eastern towhees or brown thrashers. Lower infection rates in larvae applied to wild-caught birds compared with birds infected in the laboratory suggest that infected birds display temporal variability in infectiousness to larval ticks. Engorged larvae drop from birds abundantly during daylight, so the abundance of these bird species in the peridomestic environment suggests that they might contribute infected ticks to lawns and gardens.

  5. Habitat distribution of Ixodes dammini (Acari: Ixodidae) an Lyme disease spirochetes on Fire Island, New York.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, H S; Ewing, C P

    1989-05-01

    The distributions of Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman, and Corwin and Lyme disease spirochetes were studied on Fire Island, N.Y. Adult ticks were more common in high-shrub habitats (shrubby vegetation greater than or equal to 1 m high) than in grassy and lowshrub habitats (vegetation less than 1 m) in spring and fall. In the fall, adults were also common in the woods. Adults were more abundant on narrow trails than in nearby vegetation. During the summer, questing nymphs and larvae were far more common in the woods (primarily in leaf litter) than in open grass-shrub habitats. In contrast, the number of nymphs and larvae per white-footed mouse did not differ among habitats, suggesting that mice play a role in tick dispersal. CO2 trap captures of nymphs on trails were not significantly greater than off trails. Most collections of larvae and nymphs had more than one tick, whereas most samples of adults had only one individual. Borrelia burgdorferi infection rates in free-living ticks were 38% (n = 12) to 50% (n = 32) in adults, 32% in nymphs (n = 184), and 0% in larvae (n = 15). The proportion of ticks infected did not differ significantly among habitats. Therefore, during the spring and fall, activities that take place in high-shrub areas or in the woods (e.g., landscaping, trail or brush clearing) involve a high risk of exposure to adult ticks infected with Lyme disease. In late spring to early summer, any activity involving close contact with leaf litter (e.g., playing in the leaves, gathering leaves for camp bedding) results in a high risk of exposure to infected nymphs.

  6. Rapid clearance of Lyme disease spirochetes lacking OspC from skin.

    PubMed

    Tilly, Kit; Bestor, Aaron; Jewett, Mollie W; Rosa, Patricia

    2007-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that Borrelia burgdorferi requires OspC to colonize a mammalian host. To delineate this requirement, we analyzed the clearance of ospC mutant spirochetes and found that they were eliminated within 48 h. We conclude that B. burgdorferi uses OspC to resist innate host defenses immediately after transmission.

  7. Complete nucleotide sequence of a circular plasmid from the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, J J; Buchstein, S R; Butler, L L; Fisenne, S; Polin, D S; Lade, B N; Luft, B J

    1994-01-01

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of a small circular plasmid from the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi Ip21, the agent of Lyme disease. The plasmid (cp8.3/Ip21) is 8,303 bp long, has a 76.6% A+T content, and is unstable upon passage of cells in vitro. An analysis of the sequence revealed the presence of two nearly perfect copies of a 184-bp inverted repeat sequence separated by 2,675 bp containing three closely spaced, but nonoverlapping, open reading frames (ORFs). Each inverted repeat ends in sequences that may function as signals for the initiation of transcription and translation of flanking plasmid sequences. A unique oligonucleotide probe based on the repeated sequence showed that the DNA between the repeats is present predominantly in a single orientation. Additional copies of the repeat were not detected elsewhere in the Ip21 genome. An analysis for potential ORFs indicates that the plasmid has nine highly probable protein-coding ORFs and one that is less probable; together, they occupy almost 71% of the nucleotide sequence. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of the ORFs revealed one (ORF-9) with features in common with Borrelia lipoproteins and another (ORF-2) having limited homology with a replication protein, RepC, from a gram-positive plasmid that replicates by a rolling circle (RC) mechanism. Known collectively as RC plasmids, such plasmids require a double-stranded origin at which the Rep protein nicks the DNA to generate a single-stranded replication intermediate. cp8.3/Ip21 has three copies of the heptameric motif characteristically found at a nick site of most RC plasmids. These observations suggest that cp8.3/Ip21 may replicate by an RC mechanism. Images PMID:8169221

  8. Antibody Response to Lyme Disease Spirochetes in the Context of VlsE-Mediated Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, David C.; Ionov, Yurij; Gerasimov, Ekaterina; Zelikovsky, Alex

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lyme disease (LD), the most prevalent tick-borne illness in North America, is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. The long-term survival of B. burgdorferi spirochetes in the mammalian host is achieved though VlsE-mediated antigenic variation. It is mathematically predicted that a highly variable surface antigen prolongs bacterial infection sufficiently to exhaust the immune response directed toward invariant surface antigens. If the prediction is correct, it is expected that the antibody response to B. burgdorferi invariant antigens will become nonprotective as B. burgdorferi infection progresses. To test this assumption, changes in the protective efficacy of the immune response to B. burgdorferi surface antigens were monitored via a superinfection model over the course of 70 days. B. burgdorferi-infected mice were subjected to secondary challenge by heterologous B. burgdorferi at different time points postinfection (p.i.). When the infected mice were superinfected with a VlsE-deficient clone (ΔVlsE) at day 28 p.i., the active anti-B. burgdorferi immune response did not prevent ΔVlsE-induced spirochetemia. In contrast, most mice blocked culture-detectable spirochetemia induced by wild-type B. burgdorferi (WT), indicating that VlsE was likely the primary target of the antibody response. As the B. burgdorferi infection further progressed, however, reversed outcomes were observed. At day 70 p.i. the host immune response to non-VlsE antigens became sufficiently potent to clear spirochetemia induced by ΔVlsE and yet failed to prevent WT-induced spirochetemia. To test if any significant changes in the anti-B. burgdorferi antibody repertoire accounted for the observed outcomes, global profiles of antibody specificities were determined. However, comparison of mimotopes revealed no major difference between day 28 and day 70 antibody repertoires. PMID:27799330

  9. Distribution of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in naturally and experimentally infected western gray squirrels (Sciurus griseus).

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Sarah; Jensen, Kelly; Salkeld, Daniel J; Lane, Robert S

    2010-06-01

    The dynamics of Borrelia burgdorferi infections within its natural hosts are poorly understood. We necropsied four wild-caught western gray squirrels (Sciurus griseus) that were acquired during a previous study that evaluated the reservoir competence of this rodent for the Lyme disease spirochete. One animal was infected experimentally, whereas the others were infected in the wild before capture. To investigate dissemination of B. burgdorferi and concurrent histopathologic lesions in different tissues, blood specimens, synovial and cerebrospinal fluid, ear-punch biopsies, and diverse tissue samples from skin and various organs were taken and examined by culture, polymerase chain reaction, and histology. Borrelia-positive cultures were obtained from three of the squirrels, that is, from skin biopsies (7 of 20 samples), ear-punch biopsies (2 of 8), and one (1 of 5) lymph node. Sequencing of amplicons confirmed B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) infection in 9 of 10 culture-positive samples and in DNA extracted from all 10 positive cultures. The experimentally infected squirrel yielded most of the positive samples. In contrast, bodily fluids, all other organ specimens from these animals, and all samples from one naturally infected squirrel were negative for Borrelia for both assays. None of the necropsied squirrels exhibited specific clinical signs associated with B. burgdorferi. Similarly, necropsy and histological examination of tissues indicated the presence of underlying infectious processes, none of which could be ascribed conclusively to B. burgdorferi infection. Based on these results, obtained from a small number of animals investigated at a single time point, we suggest that B. burgdorferi s.s. infection in S. griseus may result in rather localized dissemination of spirochetes, and that mild or nonclinical disease might be more common after several months of infection duration. Since spirochetes could be detected in squirrels 7-21 months postinfection, we

  10. Cyclic di-GMP is Essential for the Survival of the Lyme Disease Spirochete in Ticks

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming; Ouyang, Zhiming; Troxell, Bryan; Xu, Haijun; Moh, Akira; Piesman, Joseph; Norgard, Michael V.; Gomelsky, Mark; Yang, X. Frank

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that modulates many biological processes. Although its role in bacterial pathogenesis during mammalian infection has been documented, the role of c-di-GMP in a pathogen's life cycle within a vector host is less understood. The enzootic cycle of the Lyme disease pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi involves both a mammalian host and an Ixodes tick vector. The B. burgdorferi genome encodes a single copy of the diguanylate cyclase gene (rrp1), which is responsible for c-di-GMP synthesis. To determine the role of c-di-GMP in the life cycle of B. burgdorferi, an Rrp1-deficient B. burgdorferi strain was generated. The rrp1 mutant remains infectious in the mammalian host but cannot survive in the tick vector. Microarray analyses revealed that expression of a four-gene operon involved in glycerol transport and metabolism, bb0240-bb0243, was significantly downregulated by abrogation of Rrp1. In vitro, the rrp1 mutant is impaired in growth in the media containing glycerol as the carbon source (BSK-glycerol). To determine the contribution of the glycerol metabolic pathway to the rrp1 mutant phenotype, a glp mutant, in which the entire bb0240-bb0243 operon is not expressed, was generated. Similar to the rrp1 mutant, the glp mutant has a growth defect in BSK-glycerol medium. In vivo, the glp mutant is also infectious in mice but has reduced survival in ticks. Constitutive expression of the bb0240-bb0243 operon in the rrp1 mutant fully rescues the growth defect in BSK-glycerol medium and partially restores survival of the rrp1 mutant in ticks. Thus, c-di-GMP appears to govern a catabolic switch in B. burgdorferi and plays a vital role in the tick part of the spirochetal enzootic cycle. This work provides the first evidence that c-di-GMP is essential for a pathogen's survival in its vector host. PMID:21738477

  11. Outer membrane proteins of pathogenic spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul A.; Haake, David A.; Adler, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes are the causative agents of several important diseases including syphilis, Lyme disease, leptospirosis, swine dysentery, periodontal disease and some forms of relapsing fever. Spirochetal bacteria possess two membranes and the proteins present in the outer membrane are at the site of interaction with host tissue and the immune system. This review describes the current knowledge in the field of spirochetal outer membrane protein (OMP) biology. What is known concerning biogenesis and structure of OMPs, with particular regard to the atypical signal peptide cleavage sites observed amongst the spirochetes, is discussed. We examine the functions that have been determined for several spirochetal OMPs including those that have been demonstrated to function as adhesins, porins or to have roles in complement resistance. A detailed description of the role of spirochetal OMPs in immunity, including those that stimulate protective immunity or that are involved in antigenic variation, is given. A final section is included which covers experimental considerations in spirochetal outer membrane biology. This section covers contentious issues concerning cellular localization of putative OMPs, including determination of surface exposure. A more detailed knowledge of spirochetal OMP biology will hopefully lead to the design of new vaccines and a better understanding of spirochetal pathogenesis. PMID:15449605

  12. Statins reduce spirochetal burden and modulate immune responses in the C3H/HeN mouse model of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Van Laar, Tricia A; Hole, Camaron; Rajasekhar Karna, S L; Miller, Christine L; Reddick, Robert; Wormley, Floyd L; Seshu, J

    2016-06-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a systemic disorder caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. Lyme spirochetes encode for a functional 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR EC 1.1.1.88) serving as a rate limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that contribute to components critical for cell wall biogenesis. Statins have been shown to inhibit B. burgdorferi in vitro. Using a mouse model of Lyme disease, we found that statins contribute to reducing bacterial burden and altering the murine immune response to favor clearance of spirochetes. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. All rights reserved.

  13. Alzheimer’s Disease: Assessing the Role of Spirochetes, Biofilms, the Immune System, and Amyloid-β with Regard to Potential Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Herbert B.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an infectious disease caused by spirochetes, and these spirochetes form biofilms, which attract the innate immune system. The innate immune system first responder, Toll-like receptor 2, generates both NF-κB and TNF-α which try to kill the spirochetes in the biofilm, but cannot penetrate the “slime”. NF-κB is also responsible for the generation of amyloid-β (Aβ) which itself is anti-microbial. Aβ cannot penetrate the biofilm either, and its accumulation leads to destruction of the cerebral neurocircuitry. Treatment with penicillin (as in tertiary syphilis, the comparator to AD) is outlined; a biofilm dispersing agent may need to be added to the protocol. PMID:27372648

  14. Alzheimer's Disease: Assessing the Role of Spirochetes, Biofilms, the Immune System, and Amyloid-β with Regard to Potential Treatment and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Allen, Herbert B

    2016-06-27

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an infectious disease caused by spirochetes, and these spirochetes form biofilms, which attract the innate immune system. The innate immune system first responder, Toll-like receptor 2, generates both NF-κB and TNF-α which try to kill the spirochetes in the biofilm, but cannot penetrate the "slime". NF-κB is also responsible for the generation of amyloid-β (Aβ) which itself is anti-microbial. Aβ cannot penetrate the biofilm either, and its accumulation leads to destruction of the cerebral neurocircuitry. Treatment with penicillin (as in tertiary syphilis, the comparator to AD) is outlined; a biofilm dispersing agent may need to be added to the protocol.

  15. Strain-specific variation of the decorin-binding adhesin DbpA influences the tissue tropism of the lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Benoit, Vivian; Yang, Xiuli; Martínez-Herranz, Raúl; Pal, Utpal; Leong, John M

    2014-07-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes demonstrate strain- and species-specific differences in tissue tropism. For example, the three major Lyme disease spirochete species, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and B. afzelii, are each most commonly associated with overlapping but distinct spectra of clinical manifestations. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the most common Lyme spirochete in the U.S., is closely associated with arthritis. The attachment of microbial pathogens to cells or to the extracellular matrix of target tissues may promote colonization and disease, and the Lyme disease spirochete encodes several surface proteins, including the decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding adhesin DbpA, which vary among strains and have been postulated to contribute to strain-specific differences in tissue tropism. DbpA variants differ in their ability to bind to its host ligands and to cultured mammalian cells. To directly test whether variation in dbpA influences tissue tropism, we analyzed murine infection by isogenic B. burgdorferi strains that encode different dbpA alleles. Compared to dbpA alleles of B. afzelii strain VS461 or B. burgdorferi strain N40-D10/E9, dbpA of B. garinii strain PBr conferred the greatest decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding activity, promoted the greatest colonization at the inoculation site and heart, and caused the most severe carditis. The dbpA of strain N40-D10/E9 conferred the weakest decorin- and GAG-binding activity, but the most robust joint colonization and was the only dbpA allele capable of conferring significant joint disease. Thus, dbpA mediates colonization and disease by the Lyme disease spirochete in an allele-dependent manner and may contribute to the etiology of distinct clinical manifestations associated with different Lyme disease strains. This study provides important support for the long-postulated model that strain-specific variations of Borrelia surface proteins influence tissue tropism.

  16. Cyclic di-GMP Modulates Gene Expression in Lyme Disease Spirochetes at the Tick-Mammal Interface To Promote Spirochete Survival during the Blood Meal and Tick-to-Mammal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Dunham-Ems, Star; Allard, Anna M.; Cassera, Maria B.; Kenedy, Melisha; Radolf, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete, couples environmental sensing and gene regulation primarily via the Hk1/Rrp1 two-component system (TCS) and Rrp2/RpoN/RpoS pathways. Beginning with acquisition, we reevaluated the contribution of these pathways to spirochete survival and gene regulation throughout the enzootic cycle. Live imaging of B. burgdorferi caught in the act of being acquired revealed that the absence of RpoS and the consequent derepression of tick-phase genes impart a Stay signal required for midgut colonization. In addition to the behavioral changes brought on by the RpoS-off state, acquisition requires activation of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthesis by the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS; B. burgdorferi lacking either component is destroyed during the blood meal. Prior studies attributed this dramatic phenotype to a metabolic lesion stemming from reduced glycerol uptake and utilization. In a head-to-head comparison, however, the B. burgdorferi Δglp mutant had a markedly greater capacity to survive tick feeding than B. burgdorferi Δhk1 or Δrrp1 mutants, establishing unequivocally that glycerol metabolism is only one component of the protection afforded by c-di-GMP. Data presented herein suggest that the protective response mediated by c-di-GMP is multifactorial, involving chemotactic responses, utilization of alternate substrates for energy generation and intermediary metabolism, and remodeling of the cell envelope as a means of defending spirochetes against threats engendered during the blood meal. Expression profiling of c-di-GMP-regulated genes through the enzootic cycle supports our contention that the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS functions primarily, if not exclusively, in ticks. These data also raise the possibility that c-di-GMP enhances the expression of a subset of RpoS-dependent genes during nymphal transmission. PMID:25987708

  17. The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi induces inflammation and apoptosis in cells from dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB), caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, affects both the peripheral and the central nervous systems. Radiculitis or nerve root inflammation, which can cause pain, sensory loss, and weakness, is the most common manifestation of peripheral LNB in humans. We previously reported that rhesus monkeys infected with B. burgdorferi develop radiculitis as well as inflammation in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), with elevated levels of neuronal and satellite glial cell apoptosis in the DRG. We hypothesized that B. burgdorferi induces inflammatory mediators in glial and neuronal cells and that this inflammatory milieu precipitates glial and neuronal apoptosis. Methods To model peripheral neuropathy in LNB we incubated normal rhesus DRG tissue explants with live B. burgdorferi ex vivo and identified immune mediators, producer cells, and verified the presence of B. burgdorferi in tissue sections by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. We also set up primary cultures of DRG cells from normal adult rhesus macaques and incubated the cultures with live B. burgdorferi. Culture supernatants were subjected to multiplex ELISA to detect immune mediators, while the cells were evaluated for apoptosis by the in situ TUNEL assay. A role for inflammation in mediating apoptosis was assessed by evaluating the above phenomena in the presence and absence of various concentrations of the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone. As Schwann cells ensheath the dorsal roots of the DRG, we evaluated the potential of live B. burgdorferi to induce inflammatory mediators in human Schwann cell (HSC) cultures. Results Rhesus DRG tissue explants exposed to live B. burgdorferi showed localization of CCL2 and IL-6 in sensory neurons, satellite glial cells and Schwann cells while IL-8 was seen in satellite glial cells and Schwann cells. Live B. burgdorferi induced elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8 and CCL2 in HSC and DRG cultures and apoptosis of sensory

  18. Nuclear Markers Reveal Predominantly North to South Gene Flow in Ixodes scapularis, the Tick Vector of the Lyme Disease Spirochete.

    PubMed

    Van Zee, Janice; Piesman, Joseph F; Hojgaard, Andrias; Black, William Cormack

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes scapularis, the tick vector of the Lyme disease spirochete, is distributed over most of the eastern United States, but >80% of all Lyme disease cases occur in the northeast. The role that genetic differences between northern and southern tick populations play in explaining this disparate distribution of Lyme disease cases is unclear. The present study was conducted with 1,155 SNP markers in eight nuclear genes; the 16S mitochondrial gene was examined for comparison with earlier studies. We examined 350 I. scapularis from 7 states covering a representative area of the species. A demographic analysis using Bayesian Extended Skyline Analysis suggested that I. scapularis populations in Mississippi and Georgia began expanding 500,000 years ago, those in Florida and North Carolina 200,000 years ago and those from Maryland and New Jersey only during the past 50,000 years with an accompanying bottleneck. Wisconsin populations only began expanding in the last 20,000 years. Analysis of current migration patterns suggests large amounts of gene flow in northern collections and equally high rates of gene flow among southern collections. In contrast there is restricted and unidirectional gene flow between northern and southern collections, mostly occurring from northern into southern populations. Northern populations are characterized by nymphs that quest above the leaf litter, are easy to collect by flagging, frequently feed on mammals such as rodents and shrews, commonly attach to people, and about 25% of which are infected with B. burgdorferi. If there is a genetic basis for these behaviors, then the patterns detected in this study are of concern because they suggest that northern I. scapularis populations with a greater ability to vector B. burgdorferi to humans are expanding south.

  19. Prevalence of the Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, in Blacklegged Ticks, Ixodes scapularis at Hamilton-Wentworth, Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John D.; Anderson, John F.; Durden, Lance A.; Smith, Morgan L.; Manord, Jodi M.; Clark, Kerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease has emerged as a major health concern in Canada, where the etiological agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), a spirochetal bacterium, is typically spread by the bite of certain ticks. This study explores the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. in blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis, collected at Dundas, Ontario (a locality within the region of Hamilton-Wentworth). Using passive surveillance, veterinarians and pet groomers were asked to collect blacklegged ticks from dogs and cats with no history of travel. Additionally, I. scapularis specimens were submitted from local residents and collected by flagging. Overall, 12 (41%) of 29 blacklegged ticks were infected with B. burgdorferi s.l. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing, two borrelial amplicons were characterized as B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), a genospecies pathogenic to humans and certain domestic animals. Notably, three different vertebrate hosts each had two engorged I. scapularis females removed on the same day and, likewise, one cat had three repeat occurrences of this tick species. These multiple infestations suggest that a population of I. scapularis may be established in this area. The local public health unit has been underreporting the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l.-infected I. scapularis in the area encompassing Dundas. Our findings raise concerns about the need to erect tick warning signs in parkland areas. Veterinarians, medical professionals, public health officials, and the general public must be vigilant that Lyme disease-carrying blacklegged ticks pose a public health risk in the Dundas area and the surrounding Hamilton-Wentworth region. PMID:27226771

  20. What Ticks Do Under Your Skin: Two-Photon Intravital Imaging of Ixodes Scapularis Feeding in the Presence of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Bockenstedt, Linda K.; Gonzalez, David; Mao, Jialing; Li, Ming; Belperron, Alexia A.; Haberman, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, due to infection with the Ixodes-tick transmitted spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common tick-transmitted disease in the northern hemisphere. Our understanding of the tick-pathogen-vertebrate host interactions that sustain an enzootic cycle for B. burgdorferi is incomplete. In this article, we describe a method for imaging the feeding of Ixodes scapularis nymphs in real-time using two-photon intravital microscopy and show how this technology can be applied to view the response of Lyme borrelia in the skin of an infected host to tick feeding. PMID:24600332

  1. Spirochete motility and morpholgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, Nyles

    2004-03-01

    Spirochetes have a unique structure, and as a result their motility is different from that of other bacteria. These organisms can swim in a highly viscous, gel-like medium, such as that found in connective tissue, that inhibits the motility of most other bacteria. In spirochetes, the organelles for motility, the periplasmic flagella, reside inside the cell within the periplasmic space. A given periplasmic flagellum is attached only at one end of the cell, and depending on the species, may or may not overlap in the center of the cell. The number of periplasmic flagella varies from species to species. These structures have been shown to be directly involved in motility and function by rotating within the periplasmic space (1). The present talk focuses on the spirochete that causes Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi. In many bacterial species, cell shape is usually dictated by the peptidoyglycan layer of the cell wall. In the first part of the talk, results will be presented that the morphology of B. burgdorferi is the result of a complex interaction between the cell cylinder and the internal periplasmic flagella resulting in a cell with a flat-wave morphology. Backward moving, propagating waves enable these bacteria to swim and translate in a given direction. Using targeted mutagenesis, we inactivated the gene encoding the major periplasmic flagellar filament protein FlaB. The resulting flaB mutants not only were non-motile, but were rod-shaped (2). Western blot analysis indicated that flaB was no longer synthesized, and electron microscopy revealed that the mutants were completely deficient in periplasmic flagella. Our results indicate that the periplasmic flagella of B. burgdorferi have a skeletal function. These organelles dynamically interact with the rod-shaped cell cylinder to enable the cell to swim, and to confer in part its flat-wave morphology The latter part of the talk concerns the basis for asymmetrical rotation of the periplasmic flagella of B

  2. Flagellar motility of the pathogenic spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens are often classified by their toxicity and invasiveness. The invasiveness of a given bacterium is determined by how capable the bacterium is at invading a broad range of tissues in its host. Of mammalian pathogens, some of the most invasive come from a group of bacteria known as the spirochetes, which cause diseases such as syphilis, Lyme disease, relapsing fever and leptospirosis. Most of the spirochetes are characterized by their distinct shapes and unique motility. They are long, thin bacteria that can be shaped like flat-waves, helices, or have more irregular morphologies. Like many other bacteria, the spirochetes use long, helical appendages known as flagella to move; however, the spirochetes enclose their flagella in the periplasm, the narrow space between the inner and outer membranes. Rotation of the flagella in the periplasm causes the entire cell body to rotate and/or undulate. These deformations of the bacterium produce the force that drives the motility of these organisms, and it is this unique motility that likely allows these bacteria to be highly invasive in mammals. This review will describe the current state of knowledge on the motility and biophysics of these organisms and provide evidence on how this knowledge can inform our understanding of spirochetal diseases. PMID:26481969

  3. Evidence of a conjugal erythromycin resistance element in the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Charlene R.; Boylan, Julie; Frye, Jonathan G.; Gherardini, Frank C.

    2007-01-01

    We report the identification of isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi strain B31 that exhibit an unusual macrolide–lincosamide (ML) or macrolide–lincosamide–streptogramin A (MLSA) antibiotic resistance pattern. Low-passage isolates were resistant to high levels (>100 μg/mL) of erythromycin, spiramycin and the lincosamides but were sensitive to dalfopristin, an analogue of streptogramin B. Interestingly, the high-passage erythromycin-resistant strain B31 was resistant to quinupristin, an analogue of streptogramin A (25 μg/mL). Biochemical analysis revealed that resistance was not due to antibiotic inactivation or energy-dependent efflux but was instead due to modification of ribosomes in these isolates. Interestingly, we were able to demonstrate high-frequency transfer of the resistance phenotype via conjugation from B. burgdorferi to Bacillus subtilis (10−2–10−4) or Enterococcus faecalis (10−5). An intergeneric conjugal system in B. burgdorferi suggests that horizontal gene transfer may play a role in its evolution and is a potential tool for developing new genetic systems to study the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. PMID:17905571

  4. Genome Stability of Lyme Disease Spirochetes: Comparative Genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Casjens, Sherwood R.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Qiu, Wei-Gang; Luft, Benjamin J.; Schutzer, Steven E.; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Huang, Wai Mun; Vujadinovic, Marija; Aron, John K.; Vargas, Levy C.; Freeman, Sam; Radune, Diana; Weidman, Janice F.; Dimitrov, George I.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Sosa, Julia E.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Dunn, John J.; Fraser, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33–40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi ∼900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short ≤20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant. PMID:22432010

  5. Genome Stability of Lyme Disease Spirochetes: Comparative Genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmids

    SciTech Connect

    Casjens S. R.; Dunn J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Schutzer, S. E.; Gilcrease, E. B.; Huang, W. M.; Vujadinovic, M.; Aron, J. K.; Vargas, L. C.; Freeman, S.; Radune, D.; Weidman, J. F.; Dimitrov, G. I.; Khouri, H. M.; Sosa, J. E.; Halpin, R. A.; Fraser, C. M.

    2012-03-14

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33-40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi {approx}900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short {le}20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant.

  6. Two Distinct Mechanisms Govern RpoS-Mediated Repression of Tick-Phase Genes during Mammalian Host Adaptation by Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Arianna P.; Liveris, Dionysios; Iyer, Radha; Petzke, Mary; Rudman, Joseph; Caimano, Melissa J.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alternative sigma factor RpoS plays a key role modulating gene expression in Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete, by transcribing mammalian host-phase genes and repressing σ70-dependent genes required within the arthropod vector. To identify cis regulatory elements involved in RpoS-dependent repression, we analyzed green fluorescent protein (GFP) transcriptional reporters containing portions of the upstream regions of the prototypical tick-phase genes ospAB, the glp operon, and bba74. As RpoS-mediated repression occurs only following mammalian host adaptation, strains containing the reporters were grown in dialysis membrane chambers (DMCs) implanted into the peritoneal cavities of rats. Wild-type spirochetes harboring ospAB- and glp-gfp constructs containing only the minimal (−35/−10) σ70 promoter elements had significantly lower expression in DMCs relative to growth in vitro at 37°C; no reduction in expression occurred in a DMC-cultivated RpoS mutant harboring these constructs. In contrast, RpoS-mediated repression of bba74 required a stretch of DNA located between −165 and −82 relative to its transcriptional start site. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays employing extracts of DMC-cultivated B. burgdorferi produced a gel shift, whereas extracts from RpoS mutant spirochetes did not. Collectively, these data demonstrate that RpoS-mediated repression of tick-phase borrelial genes occurs by at least two distinct mechanisms. One (e.g., ospAB and the glp operon) involves primarily sequence elements near the core promoter, while the other (e.g., bba74) involves an RpoS-induced transacting repressor. Our results provide a genetic framework for further dissection of the essential “gatekeeper” role of RpoS throughout the B. burgdorferi enzootic cycle. PMID:28830947

  7. Use of T7 RNA polymerase to direct expression of outer Surface Protein A (OspA) from the Lyme disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, John J.; Lade, Barbara N.

    1991-01-01

    The OspA gene from a North American strain of the Lyme disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, was cloned under the control of transciption and translation signals from bacteriophage T7. Full-length OspA protein, a 273 amino acid (31kD) lipoprotein, is expressed poorly in Escherichia coli and is associated with the insoluble membrane fraction. In contrast, a truncated form of OspA lacking the amino-terminal signal sequence which normally would direct localization of the protein to the outer membrane is expressed at very high levels (less than or equal to 100 mg/liter) and is soluble. The truncated protein was purified to homogeneity and is being tested to see if it will be useful as an immunogen in a vaccine against Lyme disease. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the secondary structure and study conformational changes in the protein. Studies underway with other surface proteins from B burgdorferi and a related spirochete, B. hermsii, which causes relapsing fever, leads us to conclude that a strategy similar to that used to express the truncated OspA can provide a facile method for producing variations of Borrelia lipoproteins which are highly expressed in E. coli and soluble without exposure to detergents.

  8. Comparison of Vector Efficiency of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) From the Northeast and Upper Midwest of the United States for the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia mayonii.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Lars; Breuner, Nicole E; Hojgaard, Andrias; Hoxmeier, J Charles; Pilgard, Mark A; Replogle, Adam J; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Dolan, Marc C

    2017-01-01

    Borrelia mayonii, a recently recognized species within the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex, has been detected in host-seeking Ixodes scapularis Say ticks and found to be associated with Lyme disease in the Upper Midwest. This spirochete has, to date, not been documented from the Northeast, but we previously demonstrated that I. scapularis ticks originating from Connecticut are capable of serving as a vector of B. mayonii In this follow-up study, we compared the vector efficiency for B. mayonii (strain MN14-1420) of I. scapularis ticks originating from Minnesota in the Upper Midwest and Connecticut in the Northeast. CD-1 outbred white mice previously infected with B. mayonii via tick bite were exposed to simultaneous feeding by Minnesota and Connecticut larvae contained within separate feeding capsules. We found no difference in the ability of Minnesota and Connecticut larvae to acquire B. mayonii from infected mice and pass spirochetes to the nymphal stage (overall nymphal infection rates of 11.6 and 13.3%, respectively). Moreover, the efficiency of transmission of B. mayonii by single infected nymphs was similar for the Minnesota and Connecticut ticks (33 and 44%, respectively). We conclude that the examined I. scapularis ticks from the Upper Midwest and Northeast did not differ in their efficiency as vectors for B. mayonii. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2016 This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Comparison of Vector Efficiency of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) From the Northeast and Upper Midwest of the United States for the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia mayonii.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Lars; Breuner, Nicole E; Hojgaard, Andrias; Hoxmeier, J Charles; Pilgard, Mark A; Replogle, Adam J; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Dolan, Marc C

    2016-09-28

    Borrelia mayonii, a recently recognized species within the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex, has been detected in host-seeking Ixodes scapularis Say ticks and found to be associated with Lyme disease in the Upper Midwest. This spirochete has, to date, not been documented from the Northeast, but we previously demonstrated that I. scapularis ticks originating from Connecticut are capable of serving as a vector of B. mayonii In this follow-up study, we compared the vector efficiency for B. mayonii (strain MN14-1420) of I. scapularis ticks originating from Minnesota in the Upper Midwest and Connecticut in the Northeast. CD-1 outbred white mice previously infected with B. mayonii via tick bite were exposed to simultaneous feeding by Minnesota and Connecticut larvae contained within separate feeding capsules. We found no difference in the ability of Minnesota and Connecticut larvae to acquire B. mayonii from infected mice and pass spirochetes to the nymphal stage (overall nymphal infection rates of 11.6 and 13.3%, respectively). Moreover, the efficiency of transmission of B. mayonii by single infected nymphs was similar for the Minnesota and Connecticut ticks (33 and 44%, respectively). We conclude that the examined I. scapularis ticks from the Upper Midwest and Northeast did not differ in their efficiency as vectors for B. mayonii. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2016 This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Response of nymphal Ixodes scapularis, the primary tick vector of Lyme disease spirochetes in North America, to barriers derived from wood products or related home and garden items.

    PubMed

    Piesman, Joseph

    2006-12-01

    Forest products were tested to see if they functioned as a barrier to nymphal Ixodes scapularis. These products could potentially be used to define a border between high density and low density tick zones on residential properties in Lyme disease endemic regions of North America. Common home and garden items were also tested. Three wood products effectively acted as barriers to nymphal I. scapularis: Alaska Yellow Cedar sawdust, Alaska Yellow Cedar woodchips, and cellulose. These three products were then weathered to determine how long they remained active. Cellulose and Alaska Yellow Cedar woodchips lost their activity almost immediately (within three days); in contrast, Alaska Yellow Cedar sawdust impeded crossing by nymphal ticks for up to one month. Creating barriers at the woods-lawn interface may someday play a role in integrated campaigns to prevent Lyme disease but will not serve as a stand-alone measure to block transmission of Lyme disease spirochetes.

  11. Identifying the reservoir hosts of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in California: the role of the western gray squirrel (Sciurus griseus).

    PubMed

    Salkeld, Daniel J; Leonhard, Sarah; Girard, Yvette A; Hahn, Nina; Mun, Jeomhee; Padgett, Kerry A; Lane, Robert S

    2008-10-01

    We investigated the role of the western gray squirrel (Sciurus griseus) as a reservoir host of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. A survey of 222 western gray squirrels in California showed an overall prevalence of B. burgdorferi infection of 30%, although at a county level, prevalence of infection ranged from 0% to 50% by polymerase chain reaction. Laboratory trials with wild-caught western gray squirrels indicated that squirrels were competent reservoir hosts of the Lyme disease bacterium and infected up to 86% of feeding Ixodes pacificus larvae. Infections were long-lasting (up to 14 months), which demonstrated that western gray squirrels can maintain B. burgdorferi trans-seasonally. Non-native eastern gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) and fox squirrels (Sciurus niger) were infrequently infected with B. burgdorferi.

  12. Identifying the Reservoir Hosts of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in California: The Role of the Western Gray Squirrel (Sciurus griseus)

    PubMed Central

    Salkeld, Daniel J.; Leonhard, Sarah; Girard, Yvette A.; Hahn, Nina; Mun, Jeomhee; Padgett, Kerry A.; Lane, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role of the western gray squirrel (Sciurus griseus) as a reservoir host of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. A survey of 222 western gray squirrels in California showed an overall prevalence of B. burgdorferi infection of 30%, although at a county level, prevalence of infection ranged from 0% to 50% by polymerase chain reaction. Laboratory trials with wild-caught western gray squirrels indicated that squirrels were competent reservoir hosts of the Lyme disease bacterium and infected up to 86% of feeding Ixodes pacificus larvae. Infections were long-lasting (up to 14 months), which demonstrated that western gray squirrels can maintain B. burgdorferi trans-seasonally. Non-native eastern gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) and fox squirrels (Sciurus niger) were infrequently infected with B. burgdorferi. PMID:18840740

  13. Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever Spirochetes in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Job E.; Krishnavahjala, Aparna; Garcia, Melissa N.; Bermudez, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Relapsing fever spirochetes are tick- and louse-borne pathogens that primarily afflict those in impoverished countries. Historically the pathogens have had a significant impact on public health, yet currently they are often overlooked because of the nonspecific display of disease. In this review, we discuss aspects of relapsing fever (RF) spirochete pathogenesis including the: (1) clinical manifestation of disease; (2) ability to diagnose pathogen exposure; (3) the pathogen’s life cycle in the tick and mammal; and (4) ecological factors contributing to the maintenance of RF spirochetes in nature. PMID:28959690

  14. Identification of a defined linear epitope in the OspA protein of the Lyme disease spirochetes that elicits bactericidal antibody responses: Implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Izac, Jerilyn R; Oliver, Lee D; Earnhart, Christopher G; Marconi, Richard T

    2017-05-31

    The lipoprotein OspA is produced by the Lyme disease spirochetes primarily in unfed ticks. OspA production is down-regulated by the blood meal and it is not produced in mammals except for possible transient production during late stage infection in patients with Lyme arthritis. Vaccination with OspA elicits antibody (Ab) that can target spirochetes in the tick midgut during feeding and inhibit transmission to mammals. OspA was the primary component of the human LYMErix™ vaccine. LYMErix™ was available from 1998 to 2002 but then pulled from the market due to declining sales as a result of unsubstantiated concerns about vaccination induced adverse events and poor efficacy. It was postulated that a segment of OspA that shares sequence similarity with a region in human LFA-1 and may trigger putative autoimmune events. While evidence supporting such a link has not been demonstrated, most efforts to move forward with OspA as a vaccine component have sought to eliminate this region of concern. Here we identify an OspA linear epitope localized within OspA amino acid residues 221-240 (OspA221-240) that lacks the OspA region suggested to elicit autoimmunity. A peptide consisting of residues 221-240 was immunogenic in mice. Ab raised against OspA221-240 peptide surface labeled B. burgdorferi in IFAs and displayed potent Ab mediated-complement dependent bactericidal activity. BLAST analyses identified several variants of OspA221-240 and a closely related sequence in OspB. It is our hypothesis that integration of the OspA221-240 epitope into a multivalent-OspC based chimeric epitope based vaccine antigen (chimeritope) could result in a subunit vaccine that protects against Lyme disease through synergistic mechanisms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. bptA (bbe16) is essential for the persistence of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, in its natural tick vector

    PubMed Central

    Revel, Andrew T.; Blevins, Jon S.; Almazán, Consuelo; Neil, Lori; Kocan, Katherine M.; de la Fuente, José; Hagman, Kayla E.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2005-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), the agent of Lyme disease, is a zoonotic spirochetal bacterium that depends on arthropod (Ixodes ticks) and mammalian (rodent) hosts for its persistence in nature. The quest to identify borrelial genes responsible for Bb's parasitic dependence on these two diverse hosts has been hampered by limitations in the ability to genetically manipulate virulent strains of Bb. Despite this constraint, we report herein the inactivation and genetic complementation of a linear plasmid-25-encoded gene (bbe16) to assess its role in the virulence, pathogenesis, and survival of Bb during its natural life cycle. bbe16 was found to potentiate the virulence of Bb in the murine model of Lyme borreliosis and was essential for the persistence of Bb in Ixodes scapularis ticks. As such, we have renamed bbe16 a gene encoding borrelial persistence in ticks (bpt)A. Although protease accessibility experiments suggested that BptA as a putative lipoprotein is surface-exposed on the outer membrane of Bb, the molecular mechanism(s) by which BptA promotes Bb persistence within its tick vector remains to be elucidated. BptA also was shown to be highly conserved (>88% similarity and >74% identity at the deduced amino acid levels) in all Bb sensu lato strains tested, suggesting that BptA may be widely used by Lyme borreliosis spirochetes for persistence in nature. Given Bb's absolute dependence on and intimate association with its arthropod and mammalian hosts, BptA should be considered a virulence factor critical for Bb's overall parasitic strategy. PMID:15860579

  16. The diguanylate cyclase, Rrp1, regulates critical steps in the enzootic cycle of the Lyme disease spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    KOSTICK, JESSICA L.; SZKOTNICKI, LEE T.; ROGERS, ELIZABETH A.; BOCCI, PAOLA; RAFFAELLI, NADIA; MARCONI, RICHARD T.

    2011-01-01

    Rrp1 is the sole c-di-GMP producing protein (diguanylate cyclase) of Borrelia burgdorferi. To test the hypothesis that Rrp1 regulates critical processes involved in the transmission of spirochetes between ticks and mammals, an rrp1 deletion mutant (B31-Δrrp1) and a strain that constitutively produces elevated levels of Rrp1 (B31-OV) were constructed. The strains were assessed for progression through the enzootic cycle using an Ixodes tick/C3H-HeJ mouse model and tick immersion feeding methods. B31-Δrrp1 infected mice as efficiently as wild type but had altered motility, decreased chemotactic responses to N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) and attenuated ability to disseminate or colonize distal organs. While this strain infected mice, it was not able to survive in ticks. In contrast, the B31-OV displayed normal motility patterns and chemotactic responses but was non-infectious in mice. Using immersion feeding techniques we demonstrate that B31-OV can establish a population in ticks and survive exposure to a natural bloodmeal. The results presented here indicate Rrp1, and by extension, c-di-GMP, are not required for murine infection, but are required for the successful establishment of a productive population of B. burgdorferi in ticks. These analyses provide significant new insight into the genetic regulatory mechanisms PMID:21542866

  17. Dietary guideline adherence for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common gastrointestinal disease, and the cost of health care and lost productivity due to GERD is extremely high. Recently described side effects of long-term acid suppression have increased the interest in nonpharmacologic methods for alleviating GERD symptoms. We aimed to examine whether GERD patients follow recommended dietary guidelines, and if adherence is associated with the severity and frequency of reflux symptoms. Methods We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study within the Kaiser Permanente Northern California population, comparing 317 GERD patients to 182 asymptomatic population controls. All analyses adjusted for smoking and education. Results GERD patients, even those with moderate to severe symptoms or frequent symptoms, were as likely to consume tomato products and large portion meals as GERD-free controls and were even more likely to consume soft drinks and tea [odds ratio (OR) = 2.01 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-3.61; OR = 2.63 95% CI 1.24-5.59, respectively] and eat fried foods and high fat diet. The only reflux-triggering foods GERD patients were less likely to consume were citrus and alcohol [OR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.35-0.97 for citrus; OR = 0.41 95% CI 0.19-0.87 for 1 + drink/day of alcohol]. The associations were similar when we excluded users of proton pump inhibitors. Conclusions GERD patients consume many putative GERD causing foods as frequently or even more frequently than asymptomatic patients despite reporting symptoms. These findings suggest that, if dietary modification is effective in reducing GERD, substantial opportunities for nonpharmacologic interventions exist for many GERD patients. PMID:25125219

  18. The unique paradigm of spirochete motility and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Charon, Nyles W; Cockburn, Andrew; Li, Chunhao; Liu, Jun; Miller, Kelly A; Miller, Michael R; Motaleb, Md A; Wolgemuth, Charles W

    2012-01-01

    Spirochete motility is enigmatic: It differs from the motility of most other bacteria in that the entire bacterium is involved in translocation in the absence of external appendages. Using the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) as a model system, we explore the current research on spirochete motility and chemotaxis. Bb has periplasmic flagella (PFs) subterminally attached to each end of the protoplasmic cell cylinder, and surrounding the cell is an outer membrane. These internal helix-shaped PFs allow the spirochete to swim by generating backward-moving waves by rotation. Exciting advances using cryoelectron tomography are presented with respect to in situ analysis of cell, PF, and motor structure. In addition, advances in the dynamics of motility, chemotaxis, gene regulation, and the role of motility and chemotaxis in the life cycle of Bb are summarized. The results indicate that the motility paradigms of flagellated bacteria do not apply to these unique bacteria.

  19. Spirochete periplasmic flagella and motility.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Motaleb, A; Sal, M; Goldstein, S F; Charon, N W

    2000-10-01

    Spirochetes have a unique structure, and as a result their motility is different from that of other bacteria. They also have a special attribute: spirochetes can swim in a highly viscous, gel-like medium, such as that found in connective tissue, that inhibits the motility of most other bacteria. In spirochetes, the organelles for motility, the periplasmic flagella, reside inside the cell within the periplasmic space. A given periplasmic flagellum is attached only at one end of the cell, and depending on the species, may or may not overlap in the center of the cell with those attached at the other end. The number of periplasmic flagella varies from species to species. These structures have been shown to be directly involved in spirochete motility, and they function by rotating within the periplasmic space. The mechanics of motility also vary among the spirochetes. In Leptospira, a motility model developed several years ago has been extensively tested, and the evidence supporting this model is convincing. Borrelia burgdorferi swims differently, and a model of its motility has been recently put forward. This model is based on analyzing the motion of swimming cells, high voltage electron microscopy of fixed cells, and mutant analysis. To better understand spirochete motility on a more molecular level, the proteins and genes involved in motility are being analyzed. Spirochete periplasmic flagellar filaments are among the most complex of bacterial flagella. They are composed of the FlaA sheath proteins, and in many species, multiple FlaB core proteins. Allelic exchange mutagenesis of the genes which encode these proteins is beginning to yield important information with respect to periplasmic flagellar structure and function. Although we are at an early stage with respect to analyzing the function, organization, and regulation of many of the genes involved in spirochete motility, unique aspects have already become evident. Future studies on spirochete motility should be

  20. Composite, large spirochetes from microbial mats: spirochete structure review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Ashen, J. B.; Sole, M.; Guerrero, R.

    1993-01-01

    Phenomena previously unknown in free-living spirochetes are reported: large-sized cells with variable diameter (length to 100 microns, width between 0.4 and 3.0 microns), composite structure (smaller spirochetes inside larger ones), and positive phototropic behavior. These bacteria, Spirosymplokos, are compared with all other spirochete genera. The large spirochete, grown in mixed culture, was studied live and by transmission EM. The protoplasmic cylinder was replete with spherical granules 20-32 nm in diameter, and three to six periplasmic 26-nm flagella were inserted subterminally. Comparably granulated and flagellated small spirochetes were located inside the protoplasmic cylinder and in the periplasm of the large ones. When exposed to air, movement became erratic, protoplasmic cylinders retracted to lie folded inside the outer membrane, and refractile membranous structures formed. From one to four structures per still-moving spirochete were seen. Spirosymplokos was enriched from laboratory samples exposed to oxygen-rich and desiccating, but not dry, conditions for at least 4 mo after removal of microbial mat from the field.

  1. Composite, large spirochetes from microbial mats: spirochete structure review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Ashen, J. B.; Sole, M.; Guerrero, R.

    1993-01-01

    Phenomena previously unknown in free-living spirochetes are reported: large-sized cells with variable diameter (length to 100 microns, width between 0.4 and 3.0 microns), composite structure (smaller spirochetes inside larger ones), and positive phototropic behavior. These bacteria, Spirosymplokos, are compared with all other spirochete genera. The large spirochete, grown in mixed culture, was studied live and by transmission EM. The protoplasmic cylinder was replete with spherical granules 20-32 nm in diameter, and three to six periplasmic 26-nm flagella were inserted subterminally. Comparably granulated and flagellated small spirochetes were located inside the protoplasmic cylinder and in the periplasm of the large ones. When exposed to air, movement became erratic, protoplasmic cylinders retracted to lie folded inside the outer membrane, and refractile membranous structures formed. From one to four structures per still-moving spirochete were seen. Spirosymplokos was enriched from laboratory samples exposed to oxygen-rich and desiccating, but not dry, conditions for at least 4 mo after removal of microbial mat from the field.

  2. Pre-exposure Prophylaxis With OspA-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies Protects Mice Against Tick Transmission of Lyme Disease Spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Kern, Aurélie; Boatright, Naomi K; Schiller, Zachary A; Sadowski, Andrew; Ejemel, Monir; Souders, Colby A; Reimann, Keith A; Hu, Linden; Thomas, William D; Klempner, Mark S

    2016-07-15

    Tick transmission of Borrelia spirochetes to humans results in significant morbidity from Lyme disease worldwide. Serum concentrations of antibodies against outer surface protein A (OspA) were shown to correlate with protection from infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the primary cause of Lyme disease in the United States. Mice transgenic for human immunoglobulin genes were immunized with OspA from B. burgdorferi to generate human monoclonal antibodies (HuMabs) against OspA. HuMabs were generated and tested in in vitro borreliacidal assays and animal protection assays. Nearly 100 unique OspA-specific HuMabs were generated, and 4 HuMabs (221-7, 857-2, 319-44, and 212-55) were selected as lead candidates on the basis of borreliacidal activity. HuMabs 319-44, 857-2, and 212-55 were borreliacidal against 1 or 2 Borrelia genospecies, whereas 221-7 was borreliacidal (half maximal inhibitory concentration, < 1 nM) against B. burgdorferi, Borrelia afzelii, and Borrelia garinii, the 3 main genospecies endemic in the United States, Europe, and Asia. All 4 HuMabs completely protected mice from infection at 10 mg/kg in a murine model of tick-mediated transmission of B. burgdorferi  Our study indicates that OspA-specific HuMabs can prevent the transmission of Borrelia and that administration of these antibodies could be employed as preexposure prophylaxis for Lyme disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Medication adherence in Alzheimer's disease: The mediator role of mindfulness.

    PubMed

    Lima, Sara; Gago, Miguel; Garrett, Carolina; Pereira, M Graça

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence is often assessed based on compliance to the dosage and frequency of physician's prescription. Cognitive impairment is one of the biggest barriers in elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), who are usually polymedicated with different oral drugs. Transdermal drug delivery, also requires mobility abilities, reinforcing the role of patients' caregivers. To evaluate the relationship between psychological variables such as social support, family satisfaction, psychological morbidity, awareness of the disease, coping, mindfulness and medication adherence, in patients with AD, taking in consideration the patient's perspective. Cross-sectional and quantitative study including 128 patients with mild AD. Medication adherence showed a positive relationship with social support, mindfulness, family satisfaction and awareness of the disease. Mindfulness was a mediator in the relationship between awareness of the disease and medication adherence. This study reinforces the importance of psychological assessment in medication adherence in mild AD patients, specially the role of mindfulness. Intervention programs to promote mindfulness may have a potential dual benefit, preserving cognitive skills and promoting medication adherence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Geographic uniformity of the Lyme disease spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) and its shared history with tick vector (Ixodes scapularis) in the Northeastern United States.

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei-Gang; Dykhuizen, Daniel E; Acosta, Michael S; Luft, Benjamin J

    2002-01-01

    Over 80% of reported cases of Lyme disease in the United States occur in coastal regions of northeastern and mid-Atlantic states. The genetic structure of the Lyme disease spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) and its main tick vector (Ixodes scapularis) was studied concurrently and comparatively by sampling natural populations of I. scapularis ticks along the East Coast from 1996 to 1998. Borrelia is genetically highly diverse at the outer surface protein ospC. Since Borrelia is highly clonal, the ospC alleles can be used to define clones. A newly designed reverse line blotting (RLB) assay shows that up to 10 Borrelia clones can infect a single tick. The clone frequencies in Borrelia populations are the same across the Northeast. On the other hand, I. scapularis populations show strong regional divergence (among northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and southern states) as well as local differentiation. The high genetic diversity within Borrelia populations and the disparity in the genetic structure between Borrelia and its tick vector are likely consequences of strong balancing selection on local Borrelia clones. Demographically, both Borrelia and I. scapularis populations in the Northeast show the characteristics of a species that has recently expanded from a population bottleneck. Major geological and ecological events, such as the last glacial maximum (18,000 years ago) and the modern-day expansion of tick habitats, are likely causes of the observed "founder effects" for the two organisms in the Northeast. We therefore conclude that the genetic structure of B. burgdorferi has been intimately shaped by the natural history of its main vector, the northern lineage of I. scapularis ticks. PMID:11901105

  5. Adherence of adolescents to multiple sclerosis disease-modifying therapy.

    PubMed

    Thannhauser, Jennifer E; Mah, Jean K; Metz, Luanne M

    2009-08-01

    In this mixed-methods study, utilization data for disease-modifying therapies were reviewed to determine the adherence rate among our pediatric multiple sclerosis cohort. Adolescents were interviewed to explore their experiences with multiple sclerosis and the impact of peer relationships on adherence to treatment. Seventeen adolescents (6 male, 11 female) started interferon beta or glatiramer acetate before age 18. The mean age at first drug start date was 15.8 years. Eight of the adolescents (47%) discontinued treatment after a median duration of 20 months. Many of the adolescents struggled to integrate the injections into their daily lives, with peers either facilitating or impeding this transition. In conclusion, adolescents in this cohort had difficulty adhering to disease-modifying therapies, and peers played an important role in mediating their adjustment to multiple sclerosis. Specific strategies are required to improve adolescents' adherence to treatment, including less intrusive options and enhancing peer support.

  6. Tick-borne bacterial, rickettsial, spirochetal, and protozoal infectious diseases in the United States: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Amsden, Jarrett R; Warmack, Scott; Gubbins, Paul O

    2005-02-01

    Approximately 900 tick species exist worldwide, and they parasitize a variety of mammals, including humans; thus, ticks play a significant role in the transmission of infectious diseases. In the United States, tick-borne diseases are seasonally and geographically distributed; they typically occur during spring and summer but can occur throughout the year. Tick-borne diseases are endemic to a variety of geographic regions of the United States, depending on the species of tick commonly found in a specific locale. Specific tick-borne diseases are difficult to diagnose. Most patients have vague constitutional symptoms and nonspecific laboratory findings. Initially, serologic methods are of little benefit because they lack sensitivity early in the disease course. Therefore, a thorough history and physical examination are necessary for establishing a diagnosis. Antimicrobial regimens for tick-borne infections are poorly studied but well established. Tetracyclines and rifampin form the cornerstones of therapy for most tick-borne infections, but these agents may not be suitable for all patient populations. Therefore, no single agent can be chosen empirically to treat all tick-borne diseases. Because pharmacists are the most accessible health care providers, they are often asked how to treat tick-borne diseases. Thus, practitioners should be familiar with the ticks that inhabit their locale.

  7. Treatment Adherence in Adolescents With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The Collective Impact of Barriers to Adherence and Anxiety/Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Wendy N.; Denson, Lee A.; Baldassano, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Knowledge of factors impacting adolescents’ ability to adhere to their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) regimen is limited. The current study examines the collective impact of barriers to adherence and anxiety/depressive symptoms on adolescent adherence to the IBD regimen. Methods Adolescents (n = 79) completed measures of barriers to adherence, adherence, and anxiety/depressive symptoms at one of two specialty pediatric IBD clinics. Results Most adolescents reported barriers to adherence and 1 in 8 reported borderline or clinically elevated levels of anxiety/depressive symptoms. Anxiety/depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between barriers to adherence and adherence. Post hoc probing revealed a significant, additive effect of higher anxiety/depressive symptoms in the barriers–adherence relationship, with adherence significantly lower among adolescents with higher barriers and higher anxiety/depressive symptoms. Conclusions In order to optimize adherence in adolescents, interventions should target not only barriers to adherence but also any anxiety/depressive symptoms that may negatively impact efforts to adhere to recommended treatment. PMID:22080456

  8. Oral Medication Adherence and Disease Severity in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Kevin A.; Denson, Lee A.; Baldassano, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of oral medication adherence and perceived adherence barriers with disease severity in a sample of adolescents with IBD. Methods Participants included 62 adolescents, aged 13–17 years, diagnosed with IBD and their parents. Measures of parent- and patient-rated oral medication adherence and related barriers, behavioral and emotional functioning per parent- and self-report, and disease severity per physician reported medical chart data were obtained. Results Fifteen percent of the sample reported clinically elevated depressive symptoms and 24% reported clinically elevated internalizing behavioral problems. Number of reported adherence barriers was 2.6 ± 1.5, and no participants reported zero barriers. Parental ratings of medication adherence (t = −2.11, p < .05) and perceived barriers to adherence (t = 2.05, p < .05) significantly predicted disease severity after statistically controlling for the contributions of behavioral and disease parameters to disease severity. Conclusions Results suggest that oral medication adherence and perceived adherence barriers are significantly related to disease severity in adolescents with IBD. These patients also may be at risk for increased behavioral and emotional problems which may impact health outcomes as well. Clinicians should make particular efforts to attend to medication adherence issues with their patients. Working with patients and families to develop solutions for eliminating adherence barriers might result in better disease outcomes. PMID:21304318

  9. Localization of Spirochetes with the Structural Characteristics of Treponema hyodysenteriae in the Lesions of Swine Dysentery

    PubMed Central

    Glock, R. D.; Harris, D. L.; Kluge, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The large intestines of pigs with swine dysentery were examined by phase, light, and electron microscopy at intervals up to 11 days after oral inoculation with mucosal scrapings from infected pigs. Large spirochetes with the structural characteristics of Treponema hyodysenteriae were found only in infected pigs and were first observed in small numbers in the lumen of the large intestine 2 days after inoculation. Numerous large spirochetes were present on the luminal surface and in mucosal crypts as lesions developed. Degenerative changes were first observed in the apical portion of epithelial cells in close contact with large spirochetes. These large spirochetes were found intact in goblet cells and epithelial cells in the early stages of the disease and were numerous within degenerating epithelial cells as lesions became more advanced. Invasion beyond the lamina propria was not detected. These observations demonstrated the relationship between pathogenic large spirochetes and the mucosa of the large intestine in a specific disease, swine dysentery. Images PMID:4587383

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of the spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Paster, B J; Dewhirst, F E; Weisburg, W G; Tordoff, L A; Fraser, G J; Hespell, R B; Stanton, T B; Zablen, L; Mandelco, L; Woese, C R

    1991-10-01

    The 16S rRNA sequences were determined for species of Spirochaeta, Treponema, Borrelia, Leptospira, Leptonema, and Serpula, using a modified Sanger method of direct RNA sequencing. Analysis of aligned 16S rRNA sequences indicated that the spirochetes form a coherent taxon composed of six major clusters or groups. The first group, termed the treponemes, was divided into two subgroups. The first treponeme subgroup consisted of Treponema pallidum, Treponema phagedenis, Treponema denticola, a thermophilic spirochete strain, and two species of Spirochaeta, Spirochaeta zuelzerae and Spirochaeta stenostrepta, with an average interspecies similarity of 89.9%. The second treponeme subgroup contained Treponema bryantii, Treponema pectinovorum, Treponema saccharophilum, Treponema succinifaciens, and rumen strain CA, with an average interspecies similarity of 86.2%. The average interspecies similarity between the two treponeme subgroups was 84.2%. The division of the treponemes into two subgroups was verified by single-base signature analysis. The second spirochete group contained Spirochaeta aurantia, Spirochaeta halophila, Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, Spirochaeta litoralis, and Spirochaeta isovalerica, with an average similarity of 87.4%. The Spirochaeta group was related to the treponeme group, with an average similarity of 81.9%. The third spirochete group contained borrelias, including Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia anserina, Borrelia hermsii, and a rabbit tick strain. The borrelias formed a tight phylogenetic cluster, with average similarity of 97%. THe borrelia group shared a common branch with the Spirochaeta group and was closer to this group than to the treponemes. A single spirochete strain isolated fromt the shew constituted the fourth group. The fifth group was composed of strains of Serpula (Treponema) hyodysenteriae and Serpula (Treponema) innocens. The two species of this group were closely related, with a similarity of greater than 99%. Leptonema illini

  11. Adherence behavior in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nancy Houston

    2012-01-01

    Adherence is critical to the overall management of individuals at risk for and with cardiovascular disease. It forms an interplay between the patient, provider, and health care system and includes barriers that have been encountered within all 3 domains. Improving adherence to exercise, diet, and medication as well as focusing on addictive disorders such as smoking cessation requires patient, provider, and health care system approaches. The use of the cognitive/behavioral elements of health behavior change and communication strategies such as motivational interviewing and coaching serve to enhance overall adherence. Continuous quality improvement initiatives at the system level of change also increase the likelihood that teams will succeed in helping individuals change their behavior. Cardiac rehabilitation programs offer a unique opportunity for health care professionals to play a key role in supporting individuals through the health behavior change process.

  12. Isolation of Borrelia spirochetes from patients in Texas.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, J A; Fournier, P V; Teltow, G J

    1987-01-01

    The Texas Department of Health Laboratory began culturing the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in 1985. This organism was subsequently isolated from blood, cerebrospinal fluid, joint fluid, skin, bone, and autopsy tissues from humans. Fluorescent-antibody tests with murine monoclonal antibodies confirmed that seven of these isolates were B. burgdorferi and that two others belonged to the genus Borrelia. PMID:3611307

  13. Factors associated with Mediterranean diet adherence in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Rivadeneyra, Jéssica; Cubo, Esther; Gil, Cecilia; Calvo, Sara; Mariscal, Natividad; Martínez, Asunción

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the importance of the Mediterranean Diet (MeDi) and dietary intake as environmental neuroprotective factors in Huntington's disease (HD); so, we evaluated and analyzed the prevalence and factors associated with MeDi adherence, and dietary intake in HD. Spanish participants of the European Huntington Disease Network (EHDN) Registry study diagnosed with HD or premanifest HD gene carriers were included from June 2012 to August 2013. Self-reported dietary intake was collected by 3-day dietary record, MeDi adherence was assessed by 0-9 range (proposed by Trichopoulou et al.) and, other contributing factors related to nutrition were collected by telephone. Demographics and clinical variables were obtained from the EHDN Registry study database. Association of HD with MeDi adherence and nutritional characteristics were performed using logistic regression models. Ninety eight participants were included in the study, median age of 48 years (38-60 range), and median total functional capacity (TFC) 9 (5-13 range). HD severity was similar between participants with low vs moderate/high MeDi; however, quality of life (P = 0.009) was significantly higher among participants with moderate/high MeDi adherence. In terms of nutrients, higher MUFA/SFA intake was moderately correlated with better TFC and Unified HD Rating Scale (UHDRS) cognitive. Better TFC was associated with having a caregiver (OR = 11.86, P < 0.001), and non-smoking (OR = 0.21, P = 0.013). Moderate adherence to MeDi, was associated with older participants (OR = 1.19, P = 0.031), lower comorbidity (OR = 0.18, P = 0.018), lower UHDRS motor (OR = 0.90, P = 0.041), and lower risk for abdominal obesity (OR = 0.02, P = 0.011). In HD the moderate MeDi adherence is associated with better quality of life, lower comorbidity, lower motor impairment and lower risk for abdominal obesity compared to those participants with low MeDi adherence. Copyright © 2016 European Society for

  14. The Adherence Estimator: a brief, proximal screener for patient propensity to adhere to prescription medications for chronic disease.

    PubMed

    McHorney, Colleen A

    2009-01-01

    To conceptualize, develop, and provide preliminary psychometric evidence for the Adherence Estimator--a brief, three-item proximal screener for the likelihood of non-adherence to prescription medications (medication non-fulfillment and non-persistence) for chronic disease. Qualitative focus groups with 140 healthcare consumers and two internet-based surveys of adults with chronic disease, comprising a total of 1772 respondents, who were self-reported medication adherers, non-persisters, and non-fulfillers. Psychometric tests were performed on over 150 items assessing 14 patient beliefs and skills hypothesized to be related to medication non-adherence along a proximal-distal continuum. Psychometric tests included, but were not limited to, known-groups discriminant validity at the scale and item level. The psychometric analyses sought to identify: (1) the specific multi-item scales that best differentiated self-reported adherers from self-reported non-adherers (non-fulfillers and non-persisters) and, (2) the single best item within each prioritized multi-item scale that best differentiated self-reported adherers from self-reported non-adherers (non-fulfillers and non-persisters). The two rounds of psychometric testing identified and cross-validated three proximal drivers of self-reported adherence: perceived concerns about medications, perceived need for medications, and perceived affordability of medications. One item from each domain was selected to include in the Adherence Estimator using a synthesis of psychometric results gleaned from classical and modern psychometric test theory. By simple summation of the weights assigned to the category responses of the three items, a total score is obtained that is immediately interpretable and completely transparent. Patients can be placed into one of three segments based on the total score--low, medium, and high risk for non-adherence. Sensitivity was 88%--of the non-adherers, 88% would be accurately classified as medium

  15. Dietary habits in Parkinson's disease: Adherence to Mediterranean diet.

    PubMed

    Cassani, Erica; Barichella, Michela; Ferri, Valentina; Pinelli, Giovanna; Iorio, Laura; Bolliri, Carlotta; Caronni, Serena; Faierman, Samanta A; Mottolese, Antonia; Pusani, Chiara; Monajemi, Fatemeh; Pasqua, Marianna; Lubisco, Alessandro; Cereda, Emanuele; Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Petroni, Maria L; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2017-06-15

    Our objective is to describe the dietary habits, food preferences and adherence to Mediterranean diet (MeDi) of a large sample of Italian Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients compared to a group of controls. Dietary habits of 600 PD patients from throughout Italy and 600 controls matched by gender, age, education, physical activity level and geographical residence, were collected using the ON-GP Food Frequency Questionnaire. Then, we compared patients by disease duration and the presence of swallowing disturbances. Overall, adherence of PD patients (males, 53.8%; mean disease duration, 9.2 ± 7.0 years) to MeDi was similar to controls (score, 4.8 ± 1.7 vs. 4.9 ± 1.6; P = 0.294). Patients consumed less alcohol and fish and drank significantly less water, coffee, and milk which resulted also in lower total fluids intake. On the contrary, they ate more fruit, cooked vegetables, cereals and baked items, more dressings and more sweets in general. Disease duration was associated with increased intake of several food groups but it was not associated with changes in MeDi score (P = 0.721). Patients with swallowing disturbances (n = 72) preferred softer and more viscous food but preferences did not result in differences in dietary pattern. However, patients with dysphagia drank less fluids (P = 0.043). PD patients presented different dietary habits and food preferences compared to the general population and adherence to MeDi was not associated with disease duration. Self-reported dysphagia was associated with reduced intake of fluids. These aspects may be amenable to change in order to improve the management of nutritional issues in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cristispira from oyster styles: complex morphology of large symbiotic spirochetes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Nault, L.; Sieburth, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Crystalline styles (digestive organs) of bivalve mollusks provide the habitat for highly motile bacteria. Styles from freshly-collected oysters, Crassostrea virginica, were studied by electron microscopy; Cristispira spirochetes were abundant in these organs. Detailed study reveals these spirochetes to be among the most complex prokaryotic cells known. More than 600 periplasmic flagella and an adhering outer lipoprotein membrane (e.g., a 270 degrees sillon) form the ultrastructural basis for the "crista," first described by light microscopy. Unique rosette structures corresponding to the "chambers" or "ovoid inclusions" of light microscopy were detected at the periphery of all protoplasmic cylinders. Polar organelles and linearly aligned flagellar insertions are conspicuous. In size and complexity, Cristispira more resembles Pillotina, Diplocalyx, Clevelandina and Hollandina (large spirochetes symbiotic in termites) than it does Treponema. Cristispira pectinis (Gross, 1910), the type species; Spirillum ostrea (Noguchi, 1921); and another, less frequent bacterial symbiont are the predominant inhabitants of the dense style matrix. The ultrastructure of the spirillum and an electron micrograph of the third bacterium are shown.

  17. Cristispira from oyster styles: complex morphology of large symbiotic spirochetes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Nault, L.; Sieburth, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Crystalline styles (digestive organs) of bivalve mollusks provide the habitat for highly motile bacteria. Styles from freshly-collected oysters, Crassostrea virginica, were studied by electron microscopy; Cristispira spirochetes were abundant in these organs. Detailed study reveals these spirochetes to be among the most complex prokaryotic cells known. More than 600 periplasmic flagella and an adhering outer lipoprotein membrane (e.g., a 270 degrees sillon) form the ultrastructural basis for the "crista," first described by light microscopy. Unique rosette structures corresponding to the "chambers" or "ovoid inclusions" of light microscopy were detected at the periphery of all protoplasmic cylinders. Polar organelles and linearly aligned flagellar insertions are conspicuous. In size and complexity, Cristispira more resembles Pillotina, Diplocalyx, Clevelandina and Hollandina (large spirochetes symbiotic in termites) than it does Treponema. Cristispira pectinis (Gross, 1910), the type species; Spirillum ostrea (Noguchi, 1921); and another, less frequent bacterial symbiont are the predominant inhabitants of the dense style matrix. The ultrastructure of the spirillum and an electron micrograph of the third bacterium are shown.

  18. Adherence to Infliximab Treatment in a Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort.

    PubMed

    Vitale, David S; Greenley, Rachel N; Lerner, Diana G; Mavis, Alisha M; Werlin, Steven L

    2015-10-01

    The aims of the study were to describe infliximab adherence in a pediatric inflammatory bowel disease cohort, to identify demographic and disease factors associated with adherence, and to examine differences in acute care use among adherent and nonadherent patients. Charts of patients who received infliximab at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin (CHW) between October 2010 and October 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 151 patients met the inclusion criteria; 91.4% of the patients were adherent. Nonadherent patients had more emergency room visits and hospitalizations than adherent patients. The study is the first to show high adherence rates to infliximab in a pediatric cohort.

  19. Identification and molecular characterization of a cyclic-di-GMP effector protein, PlzA (BB0733): additional evidence for the existence of a functional cyclic-di-GMP regulatory network in the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Rogers, Elizabeth A.; Kostick, Jessica L.; Zhang, Hongming; Iyer, Radha; Schwartz, Ira; Marconi, Richard T.

    2010-01-01

    The Borrelia burgdorferi Rrp1 protein is a diguanylate cyclase that controls a regulon consisting of ~10% of the total genome. Because Rrp1 lacks a DNA-binding domain, its regulatory capability is most likely mediated through the production of bis-(3′–5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP). C-di-GMP binds to and activates the regulatory activity of proteins that harbor a PilZ domain. The occurrence of a PilZ domain within a protein is not in and of itself sufficient to convey c-di-GMP binding, as other structural aspects of the protein are important in the interaction. In this study, we have assessed the expression and c-di-GMP binding ability of the sole PilZ domain-containing protein of B. burgdorferi B31, PlzA. PlzA was determined to be upregulated by tick feeding and to be expressed during mammalian infection. The gene is highly conserved and present in all Borrelia species. Analyses of recombinant PlzA demonstrated its ability to bind c-di-GMP and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that this interaction is highly specific and dependent on Arg residues contained within the PilZ domain. In summary, this study is the first to identify a c-di-GMP effector molecule in a spirochete and provides additional evidence for the existence of a complete c-di-GMP regulatory network in the Lyme disease spirochete, B. burgdorferi. PMID:20030712

  20. Spirochete flagella hook protein self-catalyze a lysinoalanine covalent cross-link for motility

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael R.; Miller, Kelly A.; Bian, Jiang; James, Milinda E.; Zhang, Sheng; Lynch, Michael; Callery, Patrick S.; Hettick, Justin M.; Cockburn, Andrew; Liu, Jun; Li, Chunhao; Crane, Brian R.; Charon, Nyles W.

    2016-01-01

    Spirochetes are bacteria responsible for several serious diseases that include Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi), syphilis (Treponema pallidum), leptospirosis (Leptospira interrogans), and contribute to periodontal diseases (Treponema denticola)1. These spirochetes employ an unusual form of flagella-based motility necessary for pathogenicity; indeed, spirochete flagella (periplasmic flagella, PFs) reside and rotate within the periplasmic space2–11. The universal joint or hook that links the rotary motor to the filament is composed of approximately 120–130 FlgE proteins, which in spirochetes form an unusually stable, high-molecular weight complex (HMWC)9,12–17. In other bacteria, the hook can be readily dissociated by treatments such as heat18. In contrast, spirochete hooks are resistant to these treatments, and several lines of evidence indicate that the HMWC is the consequence of covalent cross-linking12,13,17. Here we show that T. denticola FlgE self-catalyzes an interpeptide cross-linking reaction between conserved lysine and cysteine resulting in the formation of an unusual lysinoalanine adduct that polymerizes the hook subunits. Lysinoalanine cross-links are not needed for flagellar assembly, but they are required for cell motility, and hence infection. The self-catalytic nature of FlgE cross-linking has important implications for protein engineering, and its sensitivity to chemical inhibitors provides a new avenue for the development of antimicrobials targeting spirochetes. PMID:27670115

  1. Use of an early disease-modifying drug adherence measure to predict future adherence in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Chris M; Phillips, Amy L; Meletiche, Dennis M

    2014-08-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who are adherent to their treatment regimens are less likely to experience relapses and the cost associated with relapse. Pharmacists whose practice involves these specialty pharmaceuticals used to treat MS are striving for ways to improve outcomes by achieving treatment adherence in their patients. Specialty pharmacies have reported higher adherence rates than traditional pharmacies, which may translate to improved outcomes. Identifying patients who warrant increased adherence intervention is critical. Models using administrative health care claims to predict adherence have typically included demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and/or previous consumption of health care resources. Addition of a measure of early adherence may improve the ability to predict future adherence outcomes.  To evaluate early adherence with disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) as a predictor of future adherence in patients with MS.  The first DMD claim (i.e., index event) for adult MS patients (aged ≥18 years and aged ≤ 65 years) who received self-injected DMDs between January 1, 2006, and May 31, 2010, was identified in a national U.S. managed care database. Patients were required to have continuous eligibility for 12 months pre- and 24 months post-index. Multiple regression models were used to predict future adherence as measured by the proportion of days covered (PDC). The base model included age, gender, a medication intensity measure, presence of a non-MS-related hospitalization pre-index, and markers for physical difficulty, forgetfulness, or depression/stress. Models adding early DMD adherence as a covariate were analyzed using incrementing 30-day periods predicting the subsequent 360 days.  There were 4,606 patients included with an average age of 46.0 (SD 9.4) years, and 78.7% were female. Average PDC in the first 360 days post-index was 80.0% (SD 26.0). Using the first 60 days of early adherence as the only predictor in the model

  2. Pyruvate protects pathogenic spirochetes from H2O2 killing.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Bryan; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Bourret, Travis J; Zeng, Melody Yue; Blum, Janice; Gherardini, Frank; Hassan, Hosni M; Yang, X Frank

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes cause clinically relevant diseases in humans and animals, such as Lyme disease and leptospirosis. The causative agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, and the causative agent of leptospirosis, Leptospria interrogans, encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS) during their enzootic cycles. This report demonstrated that physiologically relevant concentrations of pyruvate, a potent H2O2 scavenger, and provided passive protection to B. burgdorferi and L. interrogans against H2O2. When extracellular pyruvate was absent, both spirochetes were sensitive to a low dose of H2O2 (≈0.6 µM per h) generated by glucose oxidase (GOX). Despite encoding a functional catalase, L. interrogans was more sensitive than B. burgdorferi to H2O2 generated by GOX, which may be due to the inherent resistance of B. burgdorferi because of the virtual absence of intracellular iron. In B. burgdorferi, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) and the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathways were important for survival during H2O2 challenge since deletion of the uvrB or the mutS genes enhanced its sensitivity to H2O2 killing; however, the presence of pyruvate fully protected ΔuvrB and ΔmutS from H2O2 killing further demonstrating the importance of pyruvate in protection. These findings demonstrated that pyruvate, in addition to its classical role in central carbon metabolism, serves as an important H2O2 scavenger for pathogenic spirochetes. Furthermore, pyruvate reduced ROS generated by human neutrophils in response to the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonist zymosan. In addition, pyruvate reduced neutrophil-derived ROS in response to B. burgdorferi, which also activates host expression through TLR2 signaling. Thus, pathogenic spirochetes may exploit the metabolite pyruvate, present in blood and tissues, to survive H2O2 generated by the host antibacterial response generated during infection.

  3. Pyruvate Protects Pathogenic Spirochetes from H2O2 Killing

    PubMed Central

    Troxell, Bryan; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Bourret, Travis J.; Zeng, Melody Yue; Blum, Janice; Gherardini, Frank; Hassan, Hosni M.; Yang, X. Frank

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes cause clinically relevant diseases in humans and animals, such as Lyme disease and leptospirosis. The causative agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, and the causative agent of leptospirosis, Leptospria interrogans, encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS) during their enzootic cycles. This report demonstrated that physiologically relevant concentrations of pyruvate, a potent H2O2 scavenger, and provided passive protection to B. burgdorferi and L. interrogans against H2O2. When extracellular pyruvate was absent, both spirochetes were sensitive to a low dose of H2O2 (≈0.6 µM per h) generated by glucose oxidase (GOX). Despite encoding a functional catalase, L. interrogans was more sensitive than B. burgdorferi to H2O2 generated by GOX, which may be due to the inherent resistance of B. burgdorferi because of the virtual absence of intracellular iron. In B. burgdorferi, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) and the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathways were important for survival during H2O2 challenge since deletion of the uvrB or the mutS genes enhanced its sensitivity to H2O2 killing; however, the presence of pyruvate fully protected ΔuvrB and ΔmutS from H2O2 killing further demonstrating the importance of pyruvate in protection. These findings demonstrated that pyruvate, in addition to its classical role in central carbon metabolism, serves as an important H2O2 scavenger for pathogenic spirochetes. Furthermore, pyruvate reduced ROS generated by human neutrophils in response to the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonist zymosan. In addition, pyruvate reduced neutrophil-derived ROS in response to B. burgdorferi, which also activates host expression through TLR2 signaling. Thus, pathogenic spirochetes may exploit the metabolite pyruvate, present in blood and tissues, to survive H2O2 generated by the host antibacterial response generated during infection. PMID:24392147

  4. Using communication skills to improve adherence in children with chronic disease: the adherence equation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Paul L P; Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A

    2013-12-01

    Nonadherence to maintenance medication is common in paediatric chronic conditions. Despite the common belief that nonadherence is therapy-resistant, and the apparent lack of evidence for successful interventions to improve adherence, there is, in fact, a considerable body of evidence suggesting that adherence can be improved by applying specific communicative consultation skills. These can be summarized as the adherence equation: adherence=follow-up+dialogue+barriers and beliefs+empathy and education => concordance. Close follow-up of children with a chronic condition is needed to establish a therapeutic partnership with the family. Teaching self management skills is not a unidirectional process of providing information, but requires a constructive and collaborative dialogue between the medical team and the family. Identifying barriers to adherence can be achieved in a non-confrontational manner, by showing a genuine interest what the patient's views and preferences are. In particular, parental illness perceptions and medication beliefs should be identified, because they are strong drivers of nonadherence. Through empathic evidence-based education, such perceptions and beliefs can be modified. By applying these strategies, concordance between the child's family and the medical team can be achieved, resulting in optimal adherence to the jointly created treatment plan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigating self-efficacy, disease knowledge and adherence to treatment in adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Faint, Nicholas R; Staton, Janelle M; Stick, Stephen M; Foster, Juliet M; Schultz, André

    2017-05-01

    Patient adherence is integral to the effectiveness of prescribed treatment, and is associated with beneficial disease outcomes, yet in adolescents with cystic fibrosis, adherence is often sub-optimal. Multiple factors may contribute to treatment adherence, including disease knowledge and self-efficacy. In adolescents with cystic fibrosis: (i) to compare the disease knowledge of adolescents and their parents before transition to adult care; (ii) to determine the relationship between disease knowledge (adolescent, parent) and adherence; and (iii) to evaluate self-efficacy and its association with disease knowledge and adherence. Adolescents with cystic fibrosis and their parents were recruited from a tertiary children's hospital. Disease knowledge and self-efficacy was assessed using the Knowledge of Disease Management-CF and General Self-Efficacy Scales respectively. Using pharmacy records, medication possession ratio was calculated to measure treatment adherence in the preceding year. Thirty-nine adolescent (aged 12-17 (median 14) years) and parent pairs were recruited. Adherence to hypertonic saline, but not other medications, was significantly associated with disease knowledge in adolescents (r (2)  = 0.40, P = 0.029). Mean (SD) adolescent self-efficacy was 30.8 (4.0), and not associated with disease knowledge or adherence. Mean (SD) disease knowledge was less in adolescents than parents (55 (16)% and 72 (14)% respectively, P < 0.001). Disease knowledge is sub-optimal in adolescents with cystic fibrosis, even in the 2 years immediately before transition to adult care. Given that adherence with some treatments has been associated with disease knowledge our results suggest the need for educational interventions in adolescents with cystic fibrosis to optimise self-management and health outcomes. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  6. Adherence to disease management programs in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    George, Johnson; Kong, David C M; Stewart, Kay

    2007-01-01

    The management of COPD is complex and patient adherence to treatment recommendations is known to be poor. In this paper the methods used for evaluating adherence in COPD are compared. Self-reporting has satisfactory reliability and offers a cheap, simple and easy method for assessing adherent behaviors. Unlike the objective measures of adherence such as electronic monitoring, self-reporting helps in identifying the reasons for nonadherence, which in turn would be useful in addressing adherence issues. Patients do not follow their treatment recommendations either intentionally or unintentionally. Intentional deviations are driven by patient beliefs and experiences about illness and treatment, which are in turn influenced by social and cultural factors. Unintentional deviations are often due to cognitive impairment and lack of routines. Factors associated with adherence in COPD have been explained using the Becker-Maiman model. Strategies for overcoming nonadherence have to be formulated based on the nature and reasons for nonadherence. In the event of unintentional nonadherence, the use of adherence aids like Dosette boxes, calendar packs and reminders should be promoted. Understanding patient beliefs and experiences, patient education focusing on the pathology of COPD and the role of treatment, periodic monitoring and reinforcement are critical for overcoming the barriers of intentional nonadherence.

  7. Evaluation of adherence to therapy in patients of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sontakke, Smita; Budania, Ritu; Bajait, Chaitali; Jaiswal, Kavita; Pimpalkhute, Sonali

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate adherence to medication and study factors associated with non-adherence in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. A prospective, cross-sectional, questionnaire based study was conducted in Nephrology department of a super specialty hospital. Patients above 18 years of age, suffering from CKD from six months or more were interviewed using self-designed, semi-structured questionnaire to get information about adherence to medication, diet restriction and lifestyle modification (n = 150). Morisky medication adherence questionnaire was used to calculate overall adherence. In this higher score indicates poor adherence. Main outcome measures included prevalence of non-adherence and factors associated with the same. Average number of medicines taken by each patient was 8.0+1.612 (mean+SD) per day. Non-adherence to medication schedule was reported in 34% patients. Common causes of non-adherence were high cost (21.3%), complex dosing schedule (20%), fear of adverse effects (16%). Sixty-eight% patients were not aware about importance of taking each medicine. Sixteen% stopped taking medicines due to high cost. Forty-two% suggested that government should adopt measures to provide free medicines to poor patients. In Morisky medication adherence questionnaire high, medium and low adherence was reported in 7.3%, 55.3% and 37.3% of patients, respectively. Moderately positive correlation was observed between poor adherence and number of concurrent illnesses and number of medicines taken. Since majority of patients were not aware about importance of taking each medicine, creating awareness about the same is essential for improving adherence to therapy. Measures to provide free medicines to non-affording patients need to be implemented since high cost was other major cause of non-adherence.

  8. Genetic Risk, Adherence to a Healthy Lifestyle, and Coronary Disease.

    PubMed

    Khera, Amit V; Emdin, Connor A; Drake, Isabel; Natarajan, Pradeep; Bick, Alexander G; Cook, Nancy R; Chasman, Daniel I; Baber, Usman; Mehran, Roxana; Rader, Daniel J; Fuster, Valentin; Boerwinkle, Eric; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Ridker, Paul M; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2016-12-15

    Background Both genetic and lifestyle factors contribute to individual-level risk of coronary artery disease. The extent to which increased genetic risk can be offset by a healthy lifestyle is unknown. Methods Using a polygenic score of DNA sequence polymorphisms, we quantified genetic risk for coronary artery disease in three prospective cohorts - 7814 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, 21,222 in the Women's Genome Health Study (WGHS), and 22,389 in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS) - and in 4260 participants in the cross-sectional BioImage Study for whom genotype and covariate data were available. We also determined adherence to a healthy lifestyle among the participants using a scoring system consisting of four factors: no current smoking, no obesity, regular physical activity, and a healthy diet. Results The relative risk of incident coronary events was 91% higher among participants at high genetic risk (top quintile of polygenic scores) than among those at low genetic risk (bottom quintile of polygenic scores) (hazard ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75 to 2.09). A favorable lifestyle (defined as at least three of the four healthy lifestyle factors) was associated with a substantially lower risk of coronary events than an unfavorable lifestyle (defined as no or only one healthy lifestyle factor), regardless of the genetic risk category. Among participants at high genetic risk, a favorable lifestyle was associated with a 46% lower relative risk of coronary events than an unfavorable lifestyle (hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.63). This finding corresponded to a reduction in the standardized 10-year incidence of coronary events from 10.7% for an unfavorable lifestyle to 5.1% for a favorable lifestyle in ARIC, from 4.6% to 2.0% in WGHS, and from 8.2% to 5.3% in MDCS. In the BioImage Study, a favorable lifestyle was associated with significantly less coronary-artery calcification within each genetic risk

  9. Self-reported antenatal adherence to medical treatment among pregnant women with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, M J; Nørgaard, M; Holland-Fisher, P; Christensen, L A

    2010-07-01

    Adherence to medical treatment among women with Crohn's disease (CD) prior to and during pregnancy has never been reported. To examine both the predictors and prevalence rates of non-adherence to maintenance medical treatment among women with CD prior to and during pregnancy. Among a population of 1.6 million inhabitants, we identified a total of 132 women with CD who had given birth during 2000-2005. Questionnaires were used to investigate predictors and extent of adherence. The validity of self-reported use of medication was assessed using data from the Danish Prescription Database. We used logistic regression to estimate prevalence odds ratios for non-adherence according to smoking status and other predictors. Eighty percent of the patients returned the questionnaire. A total of 58 (54%) women reported to have been on medical treatment, 50 of whom had fulfilled a prescription on relevant medication. Adherence to medical treatment was 72%. Fear of a negative effect on fertility/foetus was a reason for non-adherence by 18.8% prior to, and by 45.5% during, pregnancy. Among smokers, 30.8% were non-adherent compared with 11.5% among nonsmokers (prevalence odds ratio 3.41, 95% CI 0.8-14.7). Despite fear of a negative effect on fertility/foetus, adherence to medical treatment is high in women with CD. There is no substantial variation in adherence prior to and during pregnancy. Smoking prior to pregnancy is a predictor of non-adherence.

  10. Suboptimal inhaler medication adherence and incorrect technique are common among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishna B; Percival, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are routinely prescribed one or more inhaled medications. Adherence to inhaler medications and correct inhaler device technique are crucial to successful COPD management. The goals of this study were to estimate adherence and inhaler technique in a cohort of COPD patients. This was an observational study conducted on a sample of 150 COPD patients. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS). Inhaler technique was assessed using standardized checklists. Clinical data were collected using a proforma. Of the 150 patients (mean age 70.3 years, 52% male), 58% reported suboptimal adherence (MARS ≤ 24). High adherence to therapy (MARS = 25) was associated with older age (p = 0.001), but not any of the other studied variables. Medication non-adherence was not associated with COPD exacerbations. Errors (≥ 1) in inhaler technique were common across all of the types of inhaler devices reportedly used by patients, with the highest proportion of errors among Turbuhaler users (83%) and the least proportion of errors among Handihaler users (50%). No clinical variables were associated with errors in inhaler technique. Suboptimal adherence and errors in inhaler technique are common among COPD patients. No clinical variables to assist in the prediction of medication non-adherence and poor inhaler technique were identifiable. Consequently, regular assessment of medication adherence and inhaler technique should be incorporated into routine clinical practice to facilitate improved health outcomes among patients with COPD.

  11. A validated measure of adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Natalie A; Kronenberger, William G; Hampton, Kisha C; Bloom, Ellen M; Rampersad, Angeli G; Roberson, Christopher P; Shapiro, Amy D

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic prophylaxis is a mainstay in sickle cell disease management. However, adherence is estimated at only 66%. This study aimed to develop and validate a Sickle Cell Antibiotic Adherence Level Evaluation (SCAALE) to promote systematic and detailed adherence evaluation. Methods A 28-item questionnaire was created, covering seven adherence areas. General Adherence Ratings from the parent and one health care provider and medication possession ratios were obtained as validation measures. Results Internal consistency was very good to excellent for the total SCAALE (α=0.89) and four of the seven subscales. Correlations between SCAALE scores and validation measures were strong for the total SCAALE and five of the seven subscales. Conclusion The SCAALE provides a detailed, quantitative, multidimensional, and global measurement of adherence and can promote clinical care and research. PMID:27354768

  12. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Illness and Medication Beliefs are Associated with Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Krauskopf, Katherine; Federman, Alex D; Kale, Minal S; Sigel, Keith M; Martynenko, Melissa; O'Conor, Rachel; Wolf, Michael S; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2015-04-01

    Almost half of patients with COPD do not adhere to their medications. Illness and medication beliefs are important determinants of adherence in other chronic diseases. Using the framework of the Common Sense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM), we determined associations between potentially modifiable beliefs and adherence to COPD medications in a cohort of English- and Spanish-speaking adults with COPD from New York and Chicago. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Illness and medication beliefs along CSM domains were evaluated using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and the Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ). Unadjusted analysis (with Cohen's d effect sizes) and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the relationship between illness and medication beliefs with adherence. The study included 188 participants (47% Black, 13% Hispanics); 109 (58%) were non-adherent. Non-adherent participants were younger (p < 0.001), more likely to be Black or Hispanic (p = 0.001), to have reported low income (p = 0.02), and had fewer years of formal education (p = 0.002). In unadjusted comparisons, non-adherent participants reported being more concerned about their COPD (p = 0.011; Cohen's d = 0.43), more emotionally affected by the disease (p = 0.001; Cohen's d = 0.54), and had greater concerns about COPD medications (p < 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.81). In adjusted analyses, concerns about COPD medications independently predicted non-adherence (odds ratio: 0.52, 95% confidence interval: 0.36-0.75). In this cohort of urban minority adults, concerns about medications were associated with non-adherence. Future work should explore interventions to influence patient adherence by addressing concerns about the safety profile and long-term effects of COPD medications.

  13. Suppression of fibroblast proliferation by oral spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Boehringer, H; Taichman, N S; Shenker, B J

    1984-01-01

    Soluble sonic extracts of several strains of Treponema denticola and Treponema vincentii were examined for their abilities to alter proliferation of both murine and human fibroblasts. We found that sonic extracts of all tested strains of T. denticola caused a dose-dependent inhibition of murine and human fibroblast proliferation when assessed by both DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation) and direct cell counts. T. vincentii had only a minimal inhibitory effect at comparable doses. No inhibition was observed when sonic extracts were added simultaneously with [3H]thymidine, indicating that suppression was not due to the presence of excessive amounts of cold thymidine in the extract, nonspecific effects on thymidine utilization by the cells (transport and incorporation), or degradation of label. RNA ([3H]uridine incorporation) and protein ([3H]leucine incorporation) synthesis were similarly altered after exposure to the T. denticola sonic extracts. There was no effect on cell viability as measured by trypan blue exclusion. Inhibition could be reversed by extensive washing of the cells within the first few hours of exposure to sonic extracts. Preliminary characterization and purification indicated that the inhibitory factor(s) is not endotoxin since it is heat labile, and elutes in a single, well-defined peak on a Sephadex G-150 chromatography column corresponding to a molecular weight of approximately 50,000. Since oral spirochetes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontal disorders, it is possible that they contribute to the disease process by inhibition of fibroblast growth and therefore may, at least in part, account for the loss of collagen seen in diseased tissue. PMID:6735466

  14. Adherence to secondary antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with rheumatic heart disease diagnosed through screening in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Engelman, Daniel; Mataika, Reapi L; Kado, Joseph H; Ah Kee, Maureen; Donath, Susan; Parks, Tom; Steer, Andrew C

    2016-12-01

    Echocardiographic screening for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) can detect subclinical cases; however, adequate adherence to secondary antibiotic prophylaxis (SAP) is required to alter disease outcomes. We aimed to investigate the adherence to SAP among young people with RHD diagnosed through echocardiographic screening in Fiji and to investigate factors associated with adherence. Patients diagnosed with RHD through echocardiographic screening in Fiji from 2006 to 2014 were included. Dates of benzathine penicillin G injections were collected from 76 health clinics nationally from December 2011 to December 2014. Adherence was measured using the proportion of days covered (PDC). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify characteristics associated with any adherence (≥1 injection received) and adequate adherence (PDC ≥0.80). Of 494 patients, 268 (54%) were female and the median age was 14 years. Overall, 203 (41%) had no injections recorded and just 33 (7%) had adequate adherence. Multivariate logistic regression showed increasing age (OR 0.93 per year, 95% CI 0.87-0.99) and time since diagnosis ≥1.5 years (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.37-0.79) to be inversely associated with any adherence. Non-iTaukei ethnicity (OR 2.58, 95%CI 1.04-6.33) and urban residence (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.54-7.36) were associated with adequate adherence, whereas time since diagnosis ≥1.5 years (OR 0.38, 95%CI 0.17-0.83) was inversely associated with adequate adherence. Adherence to SAP after screening in Fiji is currently inadequate for individual patient protection or population disease control. Secondary prevention should be strengthened before further screening can be justified. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The impact of medication adherence on coronary artery disease costs and outcomes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Asaf; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Matlin, Olga S; Swanton, Kellie; Shrank, William H

    2013-04-01

    Given the huge burden of coronary artery disease and the effectiveness of medication therapy, understanding and quantifying known impacts of poor medication adherence for primary and secondary prevention is crucial. We sought to systematically review the literature on this topic area with a focus on quantified cost and clinical outcomes related to adherence. We conducted a systematic review of the literature between 1966 and November 2011 using a fixed search strategy, multiple reviewers, and a quality rating scale. We found 2636 articles using this strategy, eventually weaning them down to 25 studies that met our inclusion criteria. Three reviewers independently reviewed the studies and scored them for quality using the Newcastle Ottawa Scoring Scale. We found 5 studies (4 of which focused on statins) that measured the impact of medication adherence on primary prevention of coronary artery disease and 20 articles that focused on the relationship between medication adherence to costs and outcomes related to secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. Most of these latter studies focused on antihypertensive medications and aspirin. All controlled for confounding comorbidities and sociodemographic characteristics, but few controlled for likelihood of adherent patients to have healthier behaviors ("healthy adherer effect"). Three studies found that high adherence significantly improves health outcomes and reduces annual costs for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (between $294 and $868 per patient, equating to 10.1%-17.8% cost reductions between high- and low-adherence groups). The studies were all of generally of high quality on the Newcastle Ottawa Scale (median score 8 of 9). Increased medication adherence is associated with improved outcomes and reduced costs, but most studies do not control for a "healthy adherer" effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bacterial Amyloid and DNA are Important Constituents of Senile Plaques: Further Evidence of the Spirochetal and Biofilm Nature of Senile Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Judith

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that spirochetes form clumps or micro colonies in vitro and in vivo. Cortical spirochetal colonies in syphilitic dementia were considered as reproductive centers for spirochetes. Historic and recent data demonstrate that senile plaques in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are made up by spirochetes. Spirochetes, are able to form biofilm in vitro. Senile plaques are also reported to contain elements of biofilm constituents. We expected that AβPP and Aβ (the main components of senile plaques) also occur in pure spirochetal biofilms, and bacterial DNA (an important component of biofilm) is also present in senile plaques. Histochemical, immunohistochemical, and in situ hybridization techniques and the TUNEL assay were used to answer these questions. The results obtained demonstrate that Aβ and DNA, including spirochete-specific DNA, are key components of both pure spirochetal biofilms and senile plaques in AD and confirm the biofilm nature of senile plaques. These results validate validate previous observations that AβPP and/or an AβPP-like amyloidogenic protein are an integral part of spirochetes, and indicate that bacterial and host derived Aβ are both constituents of senile plaques. DNA fragmentation in senile plaques further confirms their bacterial nature and provides biochemical evidence for spirochetal cell death. Spirochetes evade host defenses, locate intracellularly, form more resistant atypical forms and notably biofilms, which contribute to sustain chronic infection and inflammation and explain the slowly progressive course of dementia in AD. To consider co-infecting microorganisms is equally important, as multi-species biofilms result in a higher resistance to treatments and a more severe dementia. PMID:27314530

  17. Dosing frequency and adherence in chronic psychiatric disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Medic, Goran; Higashi, Kyoko; Littlewood, Kavi J; Diez, Teresa; Granström, Ola; Kahn, René S

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of dosing frequency on adherence in severe chronic psychiatric and neurological diseases. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted for articles in English from medical databases. Diseases were schizophrenia, psychosis, epilepsy, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder. Results: Of 1420 abstracts screened, 12 studies were included. Adherence measures included Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS®), medication possession ratio, medication persistence, and refill adherence. Three schizophrenia and one epilepsy study used MEMS, and all showed a trend towards higher adherence rates with less frequent dosing regimens. Three depression and one schizophrenia study used the medication possession ratio; the pooled odds ratio of being adherent was 89% higher (ie, 1.89, 95% credibility limits 1.71–2.09) on once-daily versus twice-daily dosing. Two studies in depression and one in all bupropion patients assessed medication persistence and refill adherence. The pooled odds ratio for the two depression studies using medication persistence was 2.10 (95% credibility limits 1.86–2.37) for once-daily versus twice-daily dosing. For refill adherence after 9 months, 65%–75% of patients on once-daily versus 56% on twice-daily dosing had at least one refill. In all but one of the studies using other measures of adherence, adherence rates were higher with once-daily dosing compared with more frequent dosing regimens. No relevant studies were identified for bipolar disorder or psychosis. Conclusion: Differences in study design and adherence measures used across the studies were too large to allow pooling of all results. Despite these differences, there was a consistent trend of better adherence with less frequent dosing. PMID:23355782

  18. Imaging of rickettsial, spirochetal, and parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Akgoz, Ayca; Mukundan, Srini; Lee, Thomas C

    2012-11-01

    This article is an update and literature review of the clinical and neuroimaging findings of the commonly known rickettsial, spirochetal, and eukaryotic parasitic infections. Being familiar with clinical presentation and imaging findings of these infections is crucial for early diagnosis and treatment especially in patients who live in or have a travel history to endemic regions or are immunocompromised.

  19. Sticker charts: a method for improving adherence to treatment of chronic diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Luersen, Kara; Davis, Scott A; Kaplan, Sebastian G; Abel, Troy D; Winchester, Woodrow W; Feldman, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Poor adherence is a common problem and may be an underlying cause of poor clinical outcomes. In pediatric populations, positive reinforcement techniques such as sticker charts may increase motivation to adhere to treatment regimens. To review the use of sticker charts to improve adherence in children with chronic disease, Medline and PsycINFO searches were conducted using the key words "positive reinforcement OR behavior therapy" and "adherence OR patient compliance" and "child." Randomized controlled retrospective cohort or single-subject-design studies were selected. Studies reporting adherence to the medical treatment of chronic disease in children using positive reinforcement techniques were included in the analysis. The systematic search was supplemented by identifying additional studies identified through the reference lists and authors of the initial articles found. Positive reinforcement techniques such as sticker charts increase adherence to medical treatment regimens. In several studies, this effect was maintained for months after the initial intervention. Better adherence correlated with better clinical outcomes in some, but not all, studies. Few studies examining the use of sticker charts were identified. Although single-subject-design studies are useful in establishing the effect of a behavioral intervention, larger randomized controlled trials would help determine the precise efficacy of sticker chart interventions. Adherence to medical treatments in children can be increased using sticker charts or other positive reinforcement techniques. This may be an effective means to encourage children with atopic dermatitis to apply their medications and improve clinical outcomes.

  20. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    SciTech Connect

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  1. Antibody profiling of canine IgG responses to the OspC protein of the Lyme disease spirochetes supports a multivalent approach in vaccine and diagnostic assay development.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Lee D; Earnhart, Christopher G; Virginia-Rhodes, DeLacy; Theisen, Michael; Marconi, Richard T

    2016-12-01

    OspC performs essential functions during the enzootic cycle of the Lyme disease (LD) spirochetes. In this study, the specificity of antibody (Ab) responses to OspC was profiled to define the antigenic determinants during infection and after vaccination. Several OspC variants or 'types' were screened with serum from SNAP4Dx C6 positive dogs and with serum from rabbits hyperimmunized with OspC proteins. The OspC type-specific nature of the Ab response revealed that variable domains of OspC are immunodominant during infection and upon vaccination. To assess the potential of OspC to elicit Ab in the context of a bacterin vaccine, OspC production in strains cultivated in vitro was assessed. Immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescent antibody analyses demonstrated that production is low and that only a subset of cells actively produces OspC in vitro, raising questions about the potential of bacterin vaccines to stimulate significant anti-OspC Ab responses. The specificity of the OspC Ab response in experimentally infected mice over time was assessed to determine if domains shielded in the OspC homodimer become accessible and stimulate Ab production as infection progresses. The results demonstrate that the OspC Ab response remains focused on surface exposed variable regions of the protein throughout infection. In contrast to some earlier studies, it is concluded that conserved domains of OspC, including the C7 or C10 domain, do not elicit significant Ab responses during infection or upon vaccination. Collectively, the results indicate that OspC diversity must be considered in vaccine design and in the interpretation of diagnostic assays that employ OspC as a diagnostic antigen. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of medication adherence on absenteeism and short-term disability for five chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Carls, Ginger S; Roebuck, M Christopher; Brennan, Troyen A; Slezak, Julie A; Matlin, Olga S; Gibson, Teresa B

    2012-07-01

    To estimate the impact of medication adherence on absenteeism and short-term disability among employees with chronic disease. Cross-sectional analysis of administrative health care claims, absenteeism, and short-term disability data using multivariate regression and instrumental variable models for five cohorts of employees: diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, dyslipidemia, and asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Adherence was defined as possessing medication on at least 80% of days during follow-up. Adherent employees with diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease realized between 1.7 and 7.1 fewer days absent from work and between 1.1 and 5.0 fewer days on short-term disability. Absenteeism and short-term disability days by adherent employees with congestive heart failure were not significantly different from nonadherent employees with the condition in most specifications. Appropriate management of chronic conditions can help employers minimize losses due to missed work.

  3. Illness perception, coping and adherence to treatment among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Vélez, Esperanza; Bosch, Ricardo J

    2016-04-01

    To analyse the predictive value of illness representations on treatment adherence and coping strategies in a group of patients on haemodialysis. Understanding the cognitive and emotional factors that influence adherence behaviour and coping strategies and determining their relationship to sociodemographic factors remain a challenge; meeting this challenge would encourage comprehensive patient care, thereby improving their quality of life Cross-sectional study with predictive means in a sample of 135 patients on haemodialysis. Data collection occurred from September 2010-January 2012 and tools included the following: sociodemographic data, Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised, the Cuestionario de Afrontamiento del Estrés and the Morisky-Green test to study adherence to treatment. Being a woman, having a greater knowledge of the disease and having a poorer sense of personal control affected adherence to treatment on controlling for each factor. 'Identity', 'personal control' and 'adherence' were associated with a proactive coping strategy, whereas 'evolution' and 'gender' were related independently to avoidance coping strategies; those who believed that their illness had a chronic course were more likely to cope by avoiding the problem and this tendency was stronger among women. This study provides evidence supporting the role of gender, knowledge about the disease and sense of personal control in adherence to therapeutic regimens of patients in chronic haemodialysis. The identification and characterization of patients' perception of chronic illness may represent a useful framework to influence disease outcomes such as adherence. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Modifying habits and treatment adherence, essential for controlling the chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Pisano González, Marta M; González Pisano, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic adherence is defined as the extent to which a person's behavior (taking medications, following a diet and changes in lifestyle) coincides with health recommendations (WHO, 2004). We can deduce that is a multiple, complex and changing phenomenon, that there can be total or partial adherence to a treatment, and depending on timing and circumstances. Lack of adherence is a worrying problem; due to its great magnitude and complexity (over two hundred factors) it is responsible for the increased morbid-mortality, complications, hospital admissions, health costs, and dissatisfaction of the user and health professionals. In this paper we develop effective interventions in changing habits and improving adherence: cognitive (education and improved communication), behavior and motivation. Interventions areas include pharmacological treatments, habits and life style, as well as social and family support. The most effective model emphasizes self-care and self-responsibility of the user to manage their disease and increase adherence.

  5. Association Between Patient-Centered Medical Homes and Adherence to Chronic Disease Medications: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lauffenburger, Julie C; Shrank, William H; Bitton, Asaf; Franklin, Jessica M; Glynn, Robert J; Krumme, Alexis A; Matlin, Olga S; Pezalla, Edmund J; Spettell, Claire M; Brill, Gregory; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2017-01-17

    Despite the widespread adoption of patient-centered medical homes into primary care practice, the evidence supporting their effect on health care outcomes has come primarily from geographically localized and well-integrated health systems. To assess the association between medication adherence and medical homes in a national patient and provider population, given the strong ties between adherence to chronic disease medications and health care quality and spending. Retrospective cohort study. Claims from a large national health insurer. Patients initiating therapy with common medications for chronic diseases (diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia) between 2011 and 2013. Medication adherence in the 12 months after treatment initiation was compared among patients cared for by providers practicing in National Committee for Quality Assurance-recognized patient-centered medical homes and propensity score-matched control practices in the same Primary Care Service Areas. Linear mixed models were used to examine the association between medical homes and adherence. Of 313 765 patients meeting study criteria, 18 611 (5.9%) received care in patient-centered medical homes. Mean rates of adherence were 64% among medical home patients and 59% among control patients. Among 4660 matched control and medical home practices, medication adherence was significantly higher in medical homes (2.2% [95% CI, 1.5% to 2.9%]). The association between medical homes and better adherence did not differ significantly by disease state (diabetes, 3.0% [CI, 1.5% to 4.6%]; hypertension, 3.2% [CI, 2.2% to 4.2%]; hyperlipidemia, 1.5% [CI, 0.6% to 2.5%]). Clinical outcomes related to medication adherence were not assessed. Receipt of care in a patient-centered medical home is associated with better adherence, a vital measure of health care quality, among patients initiating treatment with medications for common high-cost chronic diseases. CVS Health.

  6. Adherence to antihypertensive agents improves risk reduction of end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Roy, Louise; White-Guay, Brian; Dorais, Marc; Dragomir, Alice; Lessard, Myriam; Perreault, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    Uncontrolled hypertension is associated with an increased risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Intensified blood pressure control may slow progression of chronic kidney disease; however, the impact of antihypertensive agent adherence on the prevention of ESRD has never been evaluated. Here we assessed the impact of antihypertensive agent adherence on the risk of ESRD in 185,476 patients in the RAMQ databases age 45 to 85 and newly diagnosed/treated for hypertension between 1999 and 2007. A case cohort study design was used to assess the risk of and multivariate Cox proportional models were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio of ESRD. Adherence level was reported as a medication possession ratio. Mean patient age was 63 years, 42.2% male, 14.0% diabetic, 30.3% dyslipidemic, and mean follow-up was 5.1 years. A high adherence level of 80% or more to antihypertensive agent(s) compared to a lower one was related to a risk reduction of ESRD (hazard ratio 0.67; 95% confidence intervals 0.54-0.83). Sensitivity analysis revealed that the effect is mainly in those without chronic kidney disease. Risk factors for ESRD were male, diabetes, peripheral artery disease, chronic heart failure, gout, previous chronic kidney disease, and use of more than one agent. Thus, our study suggests that a better adherence to antihypertensive agents is related to a risk reduction of ESRD and this adherence needs to be improved to optimize benefits.

  7. The role of irrational thought in medicine adherence: people with diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Allison F; Manias, Elizabeth; Walker, Rowan

    2009-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to examine how irrational thinking affects people's adherence to multiple medicines prescribed to manage their diabetic kidney disease. Approximately 50% of people are non-adherent to their prescribed medicines and the risk of non-adherence escalates as the number of prescribed medicines increases. Adherence to prescribed medicines can slow disease progression in diabetic kidney disease. A descriptive exploratory design was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with 23 participants recruited from a nephrology outpatient clinic in Australia in 2007. Data were analysed using a 'framework' method. Participants' mean age was 59 years, they had approximately six chronic conditions in addition to their diabetic kidney disease and were prescribed a median of ten medicines daily. Two major themes of irrational thinking--heuristics and denial--and subthemes were identified. Heuristics contributed to inaccurate risk assessment and biases affecting rational judgement concerning medicines, whereas denial was used to enhance coping necessary to manage this complex health condition. Participants underestimated their health risks because they had been taking medicines for many years and preferred not to dwell on their ill health. A large amount of irrational thinking was related to maintaining the emotional strength necessary to manage their comorbid conditions as best they could. Regular assessment and support of medicine adherence throughout the disease course is necessary to avert the development of counterproductive heuristics and denial affecting medicine adherence.

  8. A relapsing fever group spirochete transmitted by Ixodes scapularis ticks.

    PubMed

    Scoles, G A; Papero, M; Beati, L; Fish, D

    2001-01-01

    A species of Borrelia spirochetes previously unknown from North America has been found to be transmitted by Ixodes scapularis ticks. Infected ticks are positive for Borrelia spp. by DFA test but negative for Borrelia burgdorferi by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using species-specific primers for 16S rDNA, outer surface protein A, outer surface protein C, and flagellin genes. A 1,347-bp portion of 16S rDNA was amplified from a pool of infected nymphs, sequenced, and compared with the homologous fragment from 26 other species of Borrelia. The analysis showed 4.6% pairwise difference from B. burgdorferi, with the closest relative being Borrelia miyamotoi (99.3% similarity) reported from Ixodes persulcatus in Japan. Phylogenetic analysis showed the unknown Borrelia to cluster with relapsing fever group spirochetes rather than with Lyme disease spirochetes. A 764-bp fragment of the flagellin gene was also compared with the homologous fragment from 24 other Borrelia species. The flagellin sequence of B. burgdorferi was 19.5% different from the unknown Borrelia and showed 98.6% similarity with B. miyamotoi. A pair of PCR primers specifically designed to amplify a 219-bp fragment of the flagellin gene from this spirochete was used to survey field-collected I. scapularis nymphs from five northeastern states (Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, and Maryland). Positive results were obtained in 1.9-2.5% of 712 nymphs sampled from four states but in none of 162 ticks collected from Maryland. Transovarial transmission was demonstrated by PCR of larval progeny from infected females with filial infection rates ranging from 6% to 73%. Transstadial passage occurred from larvae through adults. Vertebrate infection was demonstrated by feeding infected nymphs on Peromyscus leucopus mice and recovering the organism from uninfected xenodiagnostic larvae fed 7-21 days later. Considering the frequency of contact between I. scapularis and humans, further work is needed to

  9. [Treatment adherence and use of complementary and alternative medicine in patients with inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Czeglédi, Zsófia; Dávid, Gyula; Kispál, Zsófi; Kiss, Lajos S; Palatka, Károly; Kristóf, Tünde; Molnár, Tamás; Salamon, Agnes; Demeter, Pál; Miheller, Pál; Szamosi, Tamás; Banai, János; Papp, Mária; Bene, László; Kovács, Agota; Rácz, István; Lakatos, Péter László

    2010-02-14

    Previous studies have suggested an increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Furthermore, a significant number of IBD patients fail to comply with treatment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of non-adherence the use of CAM in Hungarian patients with IBD. A total of 655 consecutive IBD patients (Crohn's disease [CD]: 344, age: 38.2 + or - 12.9 years; ulcerative colitis [UC]: 311, age: 44.9 + or - 15.3 years) were interviewed during the visit at specialists by self-administered questionnaire including demographic and disease-related data, as well as items analyzing the extent of non-adherence and CAM use. Patients taking more then 80% of each prescribed medicine were classified as adherent. The overall rate of self reported non-adherence (CD: 20.9%, UC: 20.6%) and CAM (CD: 31.7%, UC: 30.9%) use was not different between CD and UC. The most common causes of non-adherence were: forgetfulness (47.8%), too many/unnecessary pills (39.7%), being afraid of side effects (27.9%) and too frequent dosing. Most common forms of CAM were herbal tee (47.3%), homeopathy (14.6%), special diet (12.2%), and acupuncture (5.8%). In CD, disease duration, date of last follow-up visit, educational level and previous surgeries were predicting factors for non-adherence. Alternative medicine use was associated in both diseases with younger age, higher educational level and immunosuppressant use. In addition, CAM use in UC was more common in females and in patients with supportive psychiatric/psychological therapy. Non-adherence and CAM use is common in patients with IBD. Special attention should be paid to explore the identified predictive factors during follow-up visits to improve adherence to therapy and improving patient-doctor relationship.

  10. Factors associated with dietary adherence in celiac disease: a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Kurppa, Kalle; Lauronen, Olli; Collin, Pekka; Ukkola, Anniina; Laurila, Kaija; Huhtala, Heini; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostics and follow-up of celiac disease have gradually shifted from tertiary centers to secondary and primary health care. In order to establish whether this has affected the success of treatment, and to identify predictors for dietary non-adherence, we carried out a study in a nationwide cohort of treated celiac patients. 843 biopsy-proven patients, 94 children and 749 adults, were enrolled and interviewed. Adherence to a gluten-free diet was determined by means of an interview and serological testing. Altogether, 88% were on a strict gluten-free diet; the rest had occasional dietary transgressions. Younger age at diagnosis, being currently a teenager, and current symptoms were associated with non-adherence. There was no association between non-adherence and place of diagnosis, gender, disease phenotype or severity of symptoms before diagnosis, presence of comorbidities, family history of celiac disease, smoking, duration of diet, use of oats, self-efficacy for the diet or lack of follow-up. Good dietary adherence can be achieved also in patients diagnosed and followed in primary health care. In a country with a high prevalence and good general knowledge of celiac disease, only age at diagnosis and age at present would appear to be major determinants for adherence. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Impact of decreasing copayments on medication adherence within a disease management environment.

    PubMed

    Chernew, Michael E; Shah, Mayur R; Wegh, Arnold; Rosenberg, Stephen N; Juster, Iver A; Rosen, Allison B; Sokol, Michael C; Yu-Isenberg, Kristina; Fendrick, A Mark

    2008-01-01

    This paper estimates the effects of a large employer's value-based insurance initiative designed to improve adherence to recommended treatment regimens. The intervention reduced copayments for five chronic medication classes in the context of a disease management (DM) program. Compared to a control employer that used the same DM program, adherence to medications in the value-based intervention increased for four of five medication classes, reducing nonadherence by 7-14 percent. The results demonstrate the potential for copayment reductions for highly valued services to increase medication adherence above the effects of existing DM programs.

  12. Interventions to enhance adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults

    PubMed Central

    Desroches, Sophie; Lapointe, Annie; Ratté, Stéphane; Gravel, Karine; Légaré, France; Turcotte, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been recognized that poor adherence can be a serious risk to the health and wellbeing of patients, and greater adherence to dietary advice is a critical component in preventing and managing chronic diseases. Objectives To assess the effects of interventions for enhancing adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults. Search methods We searched the following electronic databases up to 29 September 2010: The Cochrane Library (issue 9 2010), PubMed, EMBASE (Embase.com), CINAHL (Ebsco) and PsycINFO (PsycNET) with no language restrictions. We also reviewed: a) recent years of relevant conferences, symposium and colloquium proceedings and abstracts; b) web-based registries of clinical trials; and c) the bibliographies of included studies. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated interventions enhancing adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults. Studies were eligible if the primary outcome was the client’s adherence to dietary advice. We defined ‘client’ as an adult participating in a chronic disease prevention or chronic disease management study involving dietary advice. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of the studies. They also assessed the risk of bias and extracted data using a modified version of the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group data extraction template. Any discrepancies in judgement were resolved by discussion and consensus, or with a third review author. Because the studies differed widely with respect to interventions, measures of diet adherence, dietary advice, nature of the chronic diseases and duration of interventions and follow-up, we conducted a qualitative analysis. We classified included studies according to the function of the intervention and present results in a narrative table using vote counting for each category of intervention. Main results

  13. Development and Reliability of a Correction Factor for Family-Reported Medication Adherence: Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease as an Exemplar

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yelena P.; Pai, Ahna L. H.; Gray, Wendy N.; Denson, Lee A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the issue of accurate adherence assessment and illustrate methodologies for correcting parent-reported medication adherence. Methods 40 children with inflammatory bowel disease provided medication adherence data using electronic monitoring. Parents provided subjective reports of medication adherence. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were used to examine the detection of non-adherence at several adherence cut-points. 2 methods for empirically deriving a correction factor for subjectively reported adherence were applied. Results Although parent-report and EM adherence were significantly correlated, parent-reported adherence was significantly higher than EM adherence. A 90% cut-point provided the highest sensitivity and specificity. Both correction factors reliably adjusted parent-reported adherence based on EM adherence. Conclusions Application of an empirically derived correction factor for parent-reported adherence using methodologies, such as those illustrated in the current study, could yield more accurate adherence assessment. Obtaining more accurate adherence assessments based on parent-report will have implications for self-management interventions, clinician prescribing behavior, and medication safety. PMID:23804406

  14. Systemic Arterial Hypertension in the Emergency Service: medication adherence and understanding of this disease

    PubMed Central

    Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Oliveira, Gabriella Novelli; Andrade, Thaisa Fernanda Landim; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to identify the epidemiological profile of hypertension patients, how much they understand about the disease and the rate of adherence to treatment by these patients who had been hospitalized in the Brazilian emergency service. Methods: this cross-sectional study was performed with 116 patients, both male and female and aged over 18 years, who had been hospitalized in the Emergency Service of a University Hospital between March and June, 2013. The studied variables were data referring to socio-demographics, comorbidities, physical activity and knowledge regarding the disease. Patient adherence to treatment and the identification of the barriers were respectively evaluated using the Morisky test and the Brief Medication Questionnaire. Results: most of the patients involved in this study were women (55%), with white skin color (55%), married (51%), retirees or pensioners (64%) and with a low educational level (58%). Adherence to treatment, in most cases (55%), was moderate and the most prevalent adherence barrier was recall (67%). When medication was acquired at no cost to the patient, there was greater adherence to treatment. Conclusion: this study's patients had a moderate understanding about the disease. The high correlation between the number of drugs used and the recall barrier suggests that monotherapy is an option that can facilitate treatment adherence and reduce how often the patients forget to take their medication. PMID:26626007

  15. Exposure of black-legged kittiwakes to Lyme disease spirochetes: dynamics of the immune status of adult hosts and effects on their survival.

    PubMed

    Chambert, Thierry; Staszewski, Vincent; Lobato, Elisa; Choquet, Rémi; Carrie, Cécile; McCoy, Karen D; Tveraa, Torkild; Boulinier, Thierry

    2012-09-01

    1. Despite a growing interest in wildlife disease ecology, there is a surprising lack of knowledge about the exposure dynamics of individual animals to naturally circulating infectious agents and the impact of such agents on host life-history traits. 2. The exploration of these questions requires detailed longitudinal data on individual animals that can be captured multiple times during their life but also requires being able to account for several sources of uncertainty, notably the partial observation or recapture of individuals at each sampling occasion. 3. We use a multi-year dataset to (i) assess the potential effect of exposure to the tick-borne agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Bbsl), on adult apparent survival for one of its natural long-lived hosts, the Black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla), and (ii) investigate the temporal dynamics of individual immunological status in kittiwakes to infer the rate of new exposure and the persistence of the immune response. Using a multi-event modelling approach, potential uncertainties arising from partial observations were explicitly taken into account. 4. The potential impact of Bbsl on kittiwake survival was also evaluated via an experimental approach: the apparent survival of a group of breeding birds treated with an antibiotic was compared with that of a control group. 5. No impact of exposure to Bbsl was detected on adult survival in kittiwakes, in either observational or experimental data. 6. An annual seroconversion rate (from negative to positive) of 1·5% was estimated, but once an individual became seropositive, it remained so with a probability of 1, suggesting that detectable levels of anti-Bbsl antibodies persist for multiple years. 7. These results, in combination with knowledge on patterns of exposure to the tick vector of Bbsl, provide important information for understanding the spatio-temporal nature of the interaction between this host and several of its parasites. Furthermore

  16. BpaB and EbfC DNA-Binding Proteins Regulate Production of the Lyme Disease Spirochete's Infection-Associated Erp Surface Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jutras, Brandon L.; Verma, Ashutosh; Adams, Claire A.; Brissette, Catherine A.; Burns, Logan H.; Whetstine, Christine R.; Bowman, Amy; Chenail, Alicia M.; Zückert, Wolfram R.

    2012-01-01

    Vector-borne pathogens regulate their protein expression profiles, producing factors during host infection that differ from those produced during vector colonization. The Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, produces Erp surface proteins throughout mammalian infection and represses their synthesis during colonization of vector ticks. Known functions of Erp proteins include binding of host laminin, plasmin(ogen), and regulators of complement activation. A DNA region immediately 5′ of erp operons, the erp operator, is required for transcriptional regulation. The B. burgdorferi BpaB and EbfC proteins exhibit high in vitro affinities for erp operator DNA. In the present studies, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated that both proteins bind erp operator DNA in vivo. Additionally, a combination of in vivo and in vitro methods demonstrated that BpaB functions as a repressor of erp transcription, while EbfC functions as an antirepressor. PMID:22155777

  17. Identification and characterization of the factor H and FHL-1 binding complement regulator-acquiring surface protein 1 of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Herzberger, Pia; Siegel, Corinna; Skerka, Christine; Fingerle, Volker; Schulte-Spechtel, Ulrike; Wilske, Bettina; Brade, Volker; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Borrelia spielmanii, one of the etiological agents of Lyme disease found in Europe, evades host complement-mediated killing by recruitment of the immune regulators factor H and FHL-1 from human serum. Serum-resistant and intermediate serum-resistant isolates express up to 3 distinct complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs) that bind factor H and/or FHL-1. The present study describes identification and functional characterization of BsCRASP-1 as the dominant factor H and FHL-1 binding protein of B. spielmanii. BsCRASP-1 is a 27.7kDa outer surface lipoprotein, which after processing has a predicted mass of 24.9kDa. BsCRASP-1 is encoded by a single copy gene, cspA, that maps to a linear plasmid of approximately 55kb. Ligand affinity blot techniques revealed that both native and recombinant BsCRASP-1 from different isolates can strongly bind FHL-1, but only weakly factor H. Deletion mutants of recombinant BsCRASP-1 were generated and a high-affinity binding site for factor H and FHL-1 was mapped to its carboxy-terminal 10-amino-acid residue domain. Similarly, the dominant binding site of factor H and FHL-1 was localized to short consensus repeats (SCRs) 5-7. Factor H and FHL-1 maintained cofactor activity for factor I-mediated C3b inactivation when bound to full-length BsCRASP-1 but not to a deletion mutant lacking the carboxy-terminal 10-amino-acid residue domain. In conclusion, BsCRASP-1 binds the host immune regulators factor H and FHL-1, and is suggested to represent a key molecule of B. spielmanii for complement resistance. Thus, BsCRASP-1 most likely contributes to persistence of B. spielmanii and to pathogenesis of Lyme disease.

  18. Factors associated with low adherence to medicine treatment for chronic diseases in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Mengue, Sotero Serrate; Arrais, Paulo Sergio Dourado; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Farias, Mareni Rocha; Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva Dal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze factors associated with low adherence to drug treatment for chronic diseases in Brazil. METHODS Analysis of data from Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos (PNAUM - Brazilian Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines), a population-based cross-sectional household survey, based on a probabilistic sample of the Brazilian population. We analyzed the association between low adherence to drug treatment measured by the Brief Medication Questionnaire and demographic, socioeconomic, health, care and prescription factors. We used Poisson regression model to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios, their respective 95% confidence interval (95%CI) and p-value (Wald test). RESULTS The prevalence of low adherence to drug treatment for chronic diseases was 30.8% (95%CI 28.8-33.0). The highest prevalence of low adherence was associated with individuals: young adults; no education; resident in the Northeast and Midwest Regions of Brazil; paying part of the treatment; poor self-perceived health; three or more diseases; reported limitations caused by a chronic disease; using five drugs or more. CONCLUSIONS Low adherence to drug treatment for chronic diseases in Brazil is relevant, and regional and demographic differences and those related to patients’ health care and therapy regime require coordinated action between health professionals, researchers, managers and policy makers. PMID:27982378

  19. Practical Strategies for Enhancing Adherence to Treatment Regimen in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenley, Rachel N.; Kunz, Jennifer H.; Walter, Jennifer; Hommel, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    Promoting adherence to treatment among pediatric and adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a critical yet challenging task for health care providers. Several existing interventions to enhance adherence among individuals with IBD offer useful information about practical strategies to enhance adherence. The current review article has 3 goals. First, the review provides a context for understanding treatment regimen adherence in IBD by reviewing key definitional, measurement, and conceptual challenges in this area. Next, published studies focused on interventions to enhance adherence in IBD are briefly summarized, followed by a synthesis of practical adherence promotion strategies for use in IBD by health care providers. Strategies are distinguished by the level of evidence supporting their utility as well as by age group. Finally, recommendations for future research to facilitate the development and implementation of practical, evidence-based strategies for adherence promotion in IBD are provided. Findings from the literature review suggest that strategies including education, regimen simplification, and use of reminder systems and organizational strategies (e.g., pill boxes) are likely to be best suited for addressing accidental nonadherence. In contrast, addressing motivational issues, teaching problem-solving skills, and addressing problematic patterns of family functioning are more likely to benefit individuals displaying intentional nonadherence. PMID:23635715

  20. Practical strategies for enhancing adherence to treatment regimen in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Greenley, Rachel N; Kunz, Jennifer H; Walter, Jennifer; Hommel, Kevin A

    2013-06-01

    Promoting adherence to treatment among pediatric and adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a critical yet challenging task for health care providers. Several existing interventions to enhance adherence among individuals with IBD offer useful information about practical strategies to enhance adherence. The current review article has 3 goals. First, the review provides a context for understanding treatment regimen adherence in IBD by reviewing key definitional, measurement, and conceptual challenges in this area. Next, published studies focused on interventions to enhance adherence in IBD are briefly summarized, followed by a synthesis of practical adherence promotion strategies for use in IBD by health care providers. Strategies are distinguished by the level of evidence supporting their utility as well as by age group. Finally, recommendations for future research to facilitate the development and implementation of practical, evidence-based strategies for adherence promotion in IBD are provided. Findings from the literature review suggest that strategies including education, regimen simplification, and use of reminder systems and organizational strategies (e.g., pill boxes) are likely to be best suited for addressing accidental nonadherence. In contrast, addressing motivational issues, teaching problem-solving skills, and addressing problematic patterns of family functioning are more likely to benefit individuals displaying intentional nonadherence.

  1. Systematic and Meta-Analytic Review: Medication Adherence Among Pediatric Patients With Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Loiselle, Kristin; Lee, Jennifer L; Szulczewski, Lauren; Drake, Sarah; Crosby, Lori E; Pai, Ahna L H

    2016-05-01

    To provide a comprehensive summary (systematic review) of medication adherence rates by assessment method and medication type for pediatric patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), as well as identify important correlates for future research. Articles assessing medication adherence and published between 1982 and February 2015 (n = 49) were identified using electronic databases. A meta-analysis of 14 studies examining demographic, medical, and psychosocial factors and medication adherence was conducted. Adherence rates ranged from 12% to 100% across all medications. Approximately 30% of studies reported associations between adherence and key demographic, medical, and psychosocial correlates. Mean effect sizes were small to moderate (r = .02-.53). The wide range of adherence rates reported in the literature may be because of, in part, the use of variable assessment strategies. Future studies examining pediatric SCD adherence should incorporate key correlates with the goal of replication. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Mobile Telephone Text Messaging for Medication Adherence in Chronic Disease: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Jay; Kurup, Rahul; Laba, Tracey-Lea; Santo, Karla; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Rodgers, Anthony; Woodward, Mark; Redfern, Julie; Chow, Clara K

    2016-03-01

    Adherence to long-term therapies in chronic disease is poor. Traditional interventions to improve adherence are complex and not widely effective. Mobile telephone text messaging may be a scalable means to support medication adherence. To conduct a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials to assess the effect of mobile telephone text messaging on medication adherence in chronic disease. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO, and CINAHL (from database inception to January 15, 2015), as well as reference lists of the articles identified. The data were analyzed in March 2015. Randomized clinical trials evaluating a mobile telephone text message intervention to promote medication adherence in adults with chronic disease. Two authors independently extracted information on study characteristics, text message characteristics, and outcome measures as per the predefined protocol. Odds ratios and pooled data were calculated using random-effects models. Risk of bias and study quality were assessed as per Cochrane guidelines. Disagreement was resolved by consensus. Sixteen randomized clinical trials were included, with 5 of 16 using personalization, 8 of 16 using 2-way communication, and 8 of 16 using a daily text message frequency. The median intervention duration was 12 weeks, and self-report was the most commonly used method to assess medication adherence. In the pooled analysis of 2742 patients (median age, 39 years and 50.3% [1380 of 2742] female), text messaging significantly improved medication adherence (odds ratio, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.52-2.93; P < .001). The effect was not sensitive to study characteristics (intervention duration or type of disease) or text message characteristics (personalization, 2-way communication, or daily text message frequency). In a sensitivity analysis, our findings remained robust to change in inclusion criteria based on study quality (odds ratio, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.21-2.29; P = .002). There was moderate

  3. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and Alzheimer's disease risk in an Australian population

    PubMed Central

    Gardener, S; Gu, Y; Rainey-Smith, S R; Keogh, J B; Clifton, P M; Mathieson, S L; Taddei, K; Mondal, A; Ward, V K; Scarmeas, N; Barnes, M; Ellis, K A; Head, R; Masters, C L; Ames, D; Macaulay, S L; Rowe, C C; Szoeke, C; Martins, R N

    2012-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet (MeDi), due to its correlation with a low morbidity and mortality for many chronic diseases, has been widely recognised as a healthy eating model. We aimed to investigate, in a cross-sectional study, the association between adherence to a MeDi and risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in a large, elderly, Australian cohort. Subjects in the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Study of Ageing cohort (723 healthy controls (HC), 98 MCI and 149 AD participants) completed the Cancer Council of Victoria Food Frequency Questionnaire. Adherence to the MeDi (0- to 9-point scale with higher scores indicating higher adherence) was the main predictor of AD and MCI status in multinominal logistic regression models that were adjusted for cohort age, sex, country of birth, education, apolipoprotein E genotype, total caloric intake, current smoking status, body mass index, history of diabetes, hypertension, angina, heart attack and stroke. There was a significant difference in adherence to the MeDi between HC and AD subjects (P<0.001), and in adherence between HC and MCI subjects (P<0.05). MeDi is associated with change in Mini-Mental State Examination score over an 18-month time period (P<0.05) in HCs. We conclude that in this Australian cohort, AD and MCI participants had a lower adherence to the MeDi than HC participants. PMID:23032941

  4. Evidence for Personal Protective Measures to Reduce Human Contact With Blacklegged Ticks and for Environmentally Based Control Methods to Suppress Host-Seeking Blacklegged Ticks and Reduce Infection with Lyme Disease Spirochetes in Tick Vectors and Rodent Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Lars; Dolan, Marc C

    2016-07-20

    In the 1980s, the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say, and rodents were recognized as the principal vector and reservoir hosts of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in the eastern United States, and deer were incriminated as principal hosts for I. scapularis adults. These realizations led to pioneering studies aiming to reduce the risk for transmission of B. burgdorferi to humans by attacking host-seeking ticks with acaricides, interrupting the enzootic transmission cycle by killing immatures infesting rodent reservoirs by means of acaricide-treated nesting material, or reducing deer abundance to suppress tick numbers. We review the progress over the past three decades in the fields of: 1) prevention of human-tick contact with repellents and permethrin-treated clothing, and 2) suppression of I. scapularis and disruption of enzootic B. burgdorferi transmission with environmentally based control methods. Personal protective measures include synthetic and natural product-based repellents that can be applied to skin and clothing, permethrin sprays for clothing and gear, and permethrin-treated clothing. A wide variety of approaches and products to suppress I. scapularis or disrupt enzootic B. burgdorferi transmission have emerged and been evaluated in field trials. Application of synthetic chemical acaricides is a robust method to suppress host-seeking I. scapularis ticks within a treated area for at least 6-8 wk. Natural product-based acaricides or entomopathogenic fungi have emerged as alternatives to kill host-seeking ticks for homeowners who are unwilling to use synthetic chemical acaricides. However, as compared with synthetic chemical acaricides, these approaches appear less robust in terms of both their killing efficacy and persistence. Use of rodent-targeted topical acaricides represents an alternative for homeowners opposed to open distribution of acaricides to the ground and vegetation on their properties. This host-targeted approach also

  5. Impact of statin adherence on cardiovascular disease and mortality outcomes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    De Vera, Mary A; Bhole, Vidula; Burns, Lindsay C; Lacaille, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Aims While suboptimal adherence to statin medication has been quantified in real-world patient settings, a better understanding of its impact is needed, particularly with respect to distinct problems of medication taking. Our aim was to synthesize current evidence on the impacts of statin adherence, discontinuation and persistence on cardiovascular disease and mortality outcomes. Methods We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed studies using a mapped search of Medline, Embase and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts databases. Observational studies that met the following criteria were included: defined patient population; statin adherence exposure; defined study outcome [i.e. cardiovascular disease (CVD), mortality]; and reporting of statin-specific results. Results Overall, 28 studies were included, with 19 studies evaluating outcomes associated with statin adherence, six with statin discontinuation and three with statin persistence. Among adherence studies, the proportion of days covered was the most widely used measure, with the majority of studies reporting increased risk of CVD (statistically significant risk estimates ranging from 1.22 to 5.26) and mortality (statistically significant risk estimates ranging from 1.25 to 2.54) among non-adherent individuals. There was greater methodological variability in discontinuation and persistence studies. However, findings of increased CVD (statistically significant risk estimates ranging from 1.22 to 1.67) and mortality (statistically significant risk estimates ranging from 1.79 to 5.00) among nonpersistent individuals were also consistently reported. Conclusions Observational studies consistently report an increased risk of adverse outcomes associated with poor statin adherence. These findings have important implications for patients and physicians and emphasize the importance of monitoring and encouraging adherence to statin therapy. PMID:25364801

  6. Treatment adherence is always worse than we think: an unresolved problem in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gomollón, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    New diagnostic and treatment tools are the "stars" of scientific meetings but other aspects may have an even greater impact on patients' lives. Several new studies presented at DDW (Digestive Disease Week) 2016 demonstrated that: a) treatment adherence continues to be suboptimal even in the most advanced health systems; b) lack of adherence correlates with low treatment effectiveness, with higher levels of intestinal damage and higher costs; and c) the factor most consistently associated with poor adherence is age (the younger the patient, the poorer the adherence). In any new programme aiming to enhance the quality of inflammatory bowel disease management, a key element should be the inclusion of new patient information and communication systems to increase treatment adherence. The new tools available in the telemedicine era provide an opportunity to improve the care of inflammatory bowel disease, but their success is limited by multiple problems. Overcoming these barriers should be our key goal in the next few years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of the genome of the oral pathogen Treponema denticola with other spirochete genomes

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Rekha; Myers, Garry S. A.; Tettelin, Hervé; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, John F.; Dodson, Robert J.; Davidsen, Tanja M.; DeBoy, Robert T.; Fouts, Derrick E.; Haft, Dan H.; Selengut, Jeremy; Ren, Qinghu; Brinkac, Lauren M.; Madupu, Ramana; Kolonay, Jamie; Durkin, Scott A.; Daugherty, Sean C.; Shetty, Jyoti; Shvartsbeyn, Alla; Gebregeorgis, Elizabeth; Geer, Keita; Tsegaye, Getahun; Malek, Joel; Ayodeji, Bola; Shatsman, Sofiya; McLeod, Michael P.; Šmajs, David; Howell, Jerrilyn K.; Pal, Sangita; Amin, Anita; Vashisth, Pankaj; McNeill, Thomas Z.; Xiang, Qin; Sodergren, Erica; Baca, Ernesto; Weinstock, George M.; Norris, Steven J.; Fraser, Claire M.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2004-01-01

    We present the complete 2,843,201-bp genome sequence of Treponema denticola (ATCC 35405) an oral spirochete associated with periodontal disease. Analysis of the T. denticola genome reveals factors mediating coaggregation, cell signaling, stress protection, and other competitive and cooperative measures, consistent with its pathogenic nature and lifestyle within the mixed-species environment of subgingival dental plaque. Comparisons with previously sequenced spirochete genomes revealed specific factors contributing to differences and similarities in spirochete physiology as well as pathogenic potential. The T. denticola genome is considerably larger in size than the genome of the related syphilis-causing spirochete Treponema pallidum. The differences in gene content appear to be attributable to a combination of three phenomena: genome reduction, lineage-specific expansions, and horizontal gene transfer. Genes lost due to reductive evolution appear to be largely involved in metabolism and transport, whereas some of the genes that have arisen due to lineage-specific expansions are implicated in various pathogenic interactions, and genes acquired via horizontal gene transfer are largely phage-related or of unknown function. PMID:15064399

  8. Factors affecting adherence of end-stage renal disease patients to an exercise programme.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A; Stephens, R; McKnight, T; Dodd, S

    1991-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that regular exercise is both physiologically and psychologically beneficial to patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, ESRD patients traditionally have a high non-adherence level to their self-care and medical regimens. To date, their adherence to exercise programmes has not been studied. Background information about employment, medical history, previous exercise habits and locus of control was obtained from 40 volunteer ESRD patients who started exercise at home. Twenty-eight participants maintained the exercise programme, consisting of aerobic activity lasting an average of 25 min, four times per week, for 12 weeks. The adherent patients were found to have encouraging support groups (75 versus 25%), to be between 41 and 60 years of age (64 versus 33%), to have been on dialysis for between 2 and 5 years, and to have loci of control (feeling of control over life events) classed as 'internal' (68 versus 25%). Factors such as sex, race, employment status and depression were found to have little influence on adherence. The major finding of this study was that patients adherent to exercise could be distinguished by unique psychological and psychosocial factors, and that adherence in this population was higher (70 compared with 50%) than some estimates for the general population. PMID:1751896

  9. Caregiver's Health Locus of Control and Medication Adherence in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Kusum; Swaminathan, Neeraja; Viswanathan, Ramaswamy; Lakkaraja, Madhavi

    2015-03-01

    The authors would like to thank Dr. Morisky for giving us permission to use the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale To explore caregivers' Health Locus of Control's relationship to self-reported adherence to penicillin prophylaxis or hydroxyurea in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). A questionnaire-based study was conducted of caregivers of children with SCD who visited a comprehensive sickle cell center in an inner city hospital, who were either on penicillin prophylaxis or hydroxyurea or both. Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC) and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) questionnaires were used for the study. Caregivers of 43 children (27 on penicillin prophylaxis, 13 on hydroxyurea, and 3 on both) completed the MHLC and the MMAS-8. There was no significant difference in adherence between the penicillin and the hydroxyurea groups. The mean Powerful Others score of caregivers of the hydroxyurea only group (25.5+5.6) was higher than that of the penicillin only group (21.2+6.1, p=0.043). Regression analysis revealed an inverse relationship of Chance Locus of Control to adherence in the entire group (Beta = -0.306, R2=0.093, F[1,40]=4.12, p=0.049). Chance Locus of control may identify caregivers of children with SCD at risk for non-adherence to treatment. © 2015 National Medical Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quality of life in Coeliac Disease is determined by perceived degree of difficulty adhering to a gluten-free diet, not the level of dietary adherence ultimately achieved.

    PubMed

    Barratt, Stephen M; Leeds, John S; Sanders, David S

    2011-09-01

    Coeliac Disease (CD) is an increasingly common autoimmune condition, the treatment of which is a gluten-free diet (GFD). Previous studies fail to reach consensus of the impact this restrictive diet has on an individual's quality of life (QoL). Furthermore, how patient characteristics, such as demographic and educational background, may predict GFD adherence is poorly understood. We aimed to assess which factors had an impact on Qol in patients with CD. Case-control postal survey (n=573). Biopsy-proven CD patients (n=225; mean disease duration 8yrs; range 0.5-52yrs; male 26%) and age and sex matched controls (n=348; male 36%) completed The Short-Form 36-Item (SF-36) QoL measure, The Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale (HADS), GFD assessment, and demographic questionnaire. We found a high proportion of GFD adherence: 'Full Adherence' 65%, 'Partial Adherence' 31%, 'None Adherence' 4%, accompanied however, by 80% of patients reporting difficulty adhering to the GFD: 'Impossible' 5%, 'Mostly difficult' 14%, 'Sometimes difficult' 61%, 'No difficulty' 20%. Negligible differences in QoL scores were observed when comparing full versus partial/none GFD patients (P=>0.05), however, stepwise reductions in QoL and increasing likelihood of anxiety/depression were found in association with increasing degree of difficulty adhering to the GFD (P=<0.0001). Demographic assessment suggests that an affluent background and a university education promote greater GFD adherence. Most coeliac patients adhere to a GFD but encounter difficulty doing so (potentially influenced by social and educational background). The degree of GFD difficulty is associated with reductions in patient wellbeing and psychological distress that the dietician is critically placed to address.

  11. Strategies to improve adherence to medications for cardiovascular diseases in socioeconomically disadvantaged populations: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Laba, Tracey-Lea; Bleasel, Jonathan; Brien, Jo-Anne; Cass, Alan; Howard, Kirsten; Peiris, David; Redfern, Julie; Salam, Abdul; Usherwood, Tim; Jan, Stephen

    2013-09-10

    Medication non-adherence poses a major barrier to reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden globally, and is increasingly recognised as a socioeconomically determined problem. Strategies promoting CVD medication adherence appear of moderate effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Potentially, 'one-size-fits-all' measures are ill-equipped to address heterogeneous adherence behaviour between social groups. This review aims to determine the effects of strategies to improve adherence to CVD-related medications in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. Randomised/quasi-randomised controlled trials (1996-June 2012, English), testing strategies to increase adherence to CVD-related medications prescribed to adult patients who may experience health inequity (place of residence, occupation, education, or socioeconomic position) were reviewed. 772 abstracts were screened, 111 full-text articles retrieved, and 16 full-text articles reporting on 14 studies, involving 7739 patients (age range 41-66 years), were included. Methodological and clinical heterogeneity precluded quantitative data synthesis. Studies were thematically grouped by targeted outcomes; underlying interventions and policies were classified using Michie et al.'s Behaviour Change Wheel. Contrasting with patient or physician/practice strategies, those simultaneously directed at patients and physicians/practices resulted in statistically significant improvements in relative adherence (16-169%). Comparative cost and cost-effectiveness analyses from three studies did not find cost-saving or cost-effective strategies. Unlike much current evidence in general populations, promising evidence exists about what strategies improve adherence in disadvantaged groups. These strategies were generally complex: simultaneously targeting patients and physicians; addressing social, financial, and treatment-related adherence barriers; and supported by broader guidelines, regulatory and communication-based policies. Given their

  12. Educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, treatment adherence and control of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Ana Laura Galhardo; Boas, Lilian Cristiane Gomes Villas; Coelho, Anna Claudia Martins; Freitas, Maria Cristina Foss de; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-04-20

    to assess the effect of educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, medication treatment adherence and glycemic control of diabetes mellitus patients. evaluation research with "before and after" design, developed in a sample of 82 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. To collect the data, the Brazilian version of the Diabetes Knowledge Scale (DKN-A), the Measure of Adherence to Treatments and the electronic system at the place of study were used. The data were collected before and after the end of the educational interventions. The educational activities were developed within 12 months, mediated by the Diabetes Conversation Maps, using the Cognitive Social Theory to conduct the interventions. the knowledge on the disease (p<0.001), the medication treatment (oral antidiabetics) (p=0.0318) and the glycated hemoglobin rates (p=0.0321) improved significantly. the educational interventions seem to have positively contributed to the participants' knowledge about diabetes mellitus, the medication treatment adherence and the glycated hemoglobin rates.

  13. Exercise adherence in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an exploration of motivation and goals.

    PubMed

    Davis, Amy H T

    2007-01-01

    Adherence to an exercise regimen is challenging. Motivation is an important factor that can enhance exercise adherence. A key component of motivation is the setting and accomplishment of specified goals. Therefore, it is important to understand the relationship between patients' motivation and goals. Motivation and goal orientation in 14 participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were assessed. Participants were also interviewed to explore their exercise and activity goals. Motivation was significantly associated with goal orientation. In addition, participants reported many explicit activity goals, but few participants had set specific exercise goals. The inconsistency between activity and exercise goals has not been reported previously. Findings from this preliminary study provide novel and relevant information that may help care providers understand factors that may influence exercise adherence in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  14. Low adherence to antidepressants is associated with increased mortality in Parkinson disease patients.

    PubMed

    Shoval, Gal; Stubbs, Brendon; Balicer, Ran D; Feldman, Becca; Hoshen, Moshe; Zalsman, Gil; Sagy, Roi; Hochman, Eldar; Weizman, Abraham; Krivoy, Amir

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between adherence to antidepressants (AD) and all-cause mortality in a population-based cohort of patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD). From a database of more than 4 million people, 8553 patients with PD who purchased an AD at least once between the years 2008-2011 were retrospectively followed for all-cause mortality over 4-years. Adherence was measured as a ratio between dispensed and prescribed durations and was modeled as: non-adherence (<20%, n = 1566), poor (20%-50%, n = 1184), moderate (50%-80%, n = 1584), and good (>80%, n = 4219) adherence. Multivariable survival analyses adjusted for demographic and clinical variables including physical comorbidities known to influence mortality were conducted, however there was no adjustment for other psychiatric disorders and medications. Unadjusted mortality rates were 20.4%, 25.1%, 23.4% and 25.6% in those classified as non-adherent, poor, moderate and good adherence respectively (χ2 = 18.45, p < 0.0001). The non-adherent and poor adherence groups had significantly increased adjusted mortality hazard ratios (HR) of 1.43 (CI: 1.26-1.62) and 1.26 (CI: 1.1-1.44) respectively compared to the good adherence group. Using the same model, the adjusted HR for death among males was 1.49 [95% CI: 1.36-1.62] compared to females. People with PD and Charslon's Comorbidity Index score of 3-4 (HR 1.3, P < 0.001) and 5+ (HR 1.78, P < 0.001) were more likely to die than those with 0-2 comorbidities. Our findings suggest that poor adherence to AD is associated with increased all-cause mortality in people with PD. Given the high prevalence of depression and AD effectiveness, efforts to promote adherence should be prioritized in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Patients' Adherence to Healthy Behavior in Coronary Heart Disease: Risk Factor Management Among Jordanian Patients.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Sultan M; Darawad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Poor adherence to risk factor management behaviors for coronary heart disease (CHD) patients increases the risk for a further cardiac event. There is a scarcity of literature about the level of adherence to risk factor management behaviors after CHD diagnosis in Jordan. The aim of this study was to explore which demographic, psychosocial, and clinical factors predict better adherence to risk factor management behaviors, particularly smoking cessation, physical activity, healthy diet, and medication adherence. In addition, we sought to explore the association of poor adherence to hospital readmission. A cross-sectional survey was performed using a sample of 350 patients who visited the outpatient clinics in 4 hospitals in Jordan. Data were obtained from 254 patients (response rate, 73%). Most were overweight (47.8%) or obese (28.5%), and 30% remained smokers after CHD diagnosis; 53 (21.5%) described themselves as ex-smokers. One-third of participants (88, 34.8%) performed regular walking exercise. Only 16% of participants reported that they had been instructed to perform regular activity. Stepwise multiple regressions revealed younger age and lower body mass index as independent predictors for more physical activity. Only 51 (20.9%) reported always following a low-fat dietary regimen, and participants who received dietary recommendation advice were significantly more likely to be on a healthy diet (odds ratio, 10.3; 95% confidence interval, 3.79-30.80; P < .001). Most of the participants (183, 72%) reported low medication adherence (score ≤6), based on the Morisky scale, and only 5 (2%) reported a high adherence score (score = 8). Male gender and having chronic back pain were independent predictors for better medication adherence. About one-third of participants had been hospitalized for cardiac reason at last 2 times in the past 12 months. Rehospitalization was significantly more common among patients who were not following a dietary regimen (Mann-Whitney Z = -2

  16. Reviewing molecular adaptations of Lyme borreliosis spirochetes in the context of reproductive fitness in natural transmission cycles

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jean I.

    2009-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is caused by a group of pathogenic spirochetes – most often Borrelia burgdorferi, B. afzelii, and B. garinii – that are vectored by hard ticks in the Ixodes ricinus-persulcatus complex, which feed on a variety of mammals, birds, and lizards. Although LB is one of the best-studied vector-borne zoonoses, the annual incidence in North America and Europe leads other vector-borne diseases and continues to increase. What factors make the LB system so successful, and how can researchers hope to reduce disease risk – either through vaccinating humans or reducing the risk of contacting infected ticks in nature? Discoveries of molecular interactions involved in the transmission of LB spirochetes have accelerated recently, revealing complex interactions among the spirochete-tick-vertebrate triad. These interactions involve multiple, and often redundant, pathways that reflect the evolution of general and specific mechanisms by which the spirochetes survive and reproduce. Previous reviews have focused on the molecular interactions or population biology of the system. Here molecular interactions among the LB spirochete, its vector, and vertebrate hosts are reviewed in the context of natural maintenance cycles, which represent the ecological and evolutionary contexts that shape these interactions. This holistic system approach may help researchers develop additional testable hypotheses about transmission processes, interpret laboratory results, and guide development of future LB control measures and management. PMID:19368764

  17. Periplasmal Physics: The Rotational Dynamics of Spirochetal Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Greg

    2012-02-01

    Spirochetes are distinguished by the location of their flagella, which reside within the periplasm: the tiny space between the bacterial cell wall and the outer membrane. In Borrelia burgdorferi/ (the causative agent of Lyme Disease), rotation of the flagella leads to cellular undulations that drive swimming. Exactly how these shape changes arise due to the forces and torques acting between the flagella and the cell body is unknown. By applying low-Reynolds number hydrodynamic theory to the motion of an elastic flagellum rotating in the periplasm, we show that the flagella are most likely separated from the bacterial cell wall by a lubricating layer of fluid. We obtain analytical solutions for the force and torque on the rotating flagellum through lubrication analysis, as well as through scaling analysis, and find results are in close agreement numerical simulations. (Joint work with J. Yang and C.W. Wolgemuth.)

  18. Alexithymia, Assertiveness and Psychosocial Functioning in HIV: Implications for Medication Adherence and Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Roger C; Ironson, Gail; Antoni, Michael; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Schneiderman, Neil

    2016-02-01

    Psychosocial function and adherence to antiretroviral regimen are key factors in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease management. Alexithymia (AL) is a trait deficit in the ability to identify and describe feelings, emotions and bodily sensations. A structural equation model was used to test whether high levels of AL indirectly relate to greater non-adherent behavior and HIV disease severity via psychosocial dysfunction. Blood draws for HIV-1 viral load and CD4 T-lymphocyte, along with psychosocial surveys were collected from 439 HIV positive adults aged 18-73 years. The structural model supports significant paths from: (1) AL to non-active patient involvement, psychological distress, and lower social support, (2) psychological distress and non-active involvement to non-adherent behavior, and (3) non-adherence to greater HIV disease severity (CFI = .97, RMSEA = .04, SRMR = .05). A second model confirmed the intermediary effect of greater patient assertiveness on the path from AL to social support and non-active patient involvement (CFI = .94, RMSEA = .04, SRMR = .05). Altogether, AL is indirectly linked with HIV disease management through it's association with poor psychosocial function, however greater patient assertiveness buffers the negative impact of AL on relationship quality with healthcare providers and members of one's social support network.

  19. Adherence to Maintenance Medications among Older Adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. The Role of Depression.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Park, Yujin; Hur, Peter; Huang, Ting-Ying; Harris, Ilene; Netzer, Giora; Lehmann, Susan W; Langenberg, Patricia; Khokhar, Bilal; Wei, Yu-Jung; Moyo, Patience; Simoni-Wastila, Linda

    2016-09-01

    Among individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), depression is one of the most common yet underrecognized and undertreated comorbidities. Although depression has been associated with reduced adherence to maintenance medications used in other conditions, such as diabetes, little research has assessed the role of depression in COPD medication use and adherence. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of depression on COPD maintenance medication adherence among a nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries newly diagnosed with COPD. We used a 5% random sample of Medicare administrative claims data to identify beneficiaries diagnosed with COPD between 2006 and 2010. We included beneficiaries with 2 years of continuous Medicare Parts A, B, and D coverage and at least two prescription fills for COPD maintenance medications after COPD diagnosis. We searched for prescription fills for inhaled corticosteroids, long-acting β-agonists, and long-acting anticholinergics and calculated adherence starting at the first fill. We modeled adherence to COPD maintenance medications as a function of new episodes of depression, using generalized estimated equations. Our primary outcome was adherence to COPD maintenance medications, measured as proportion of days covered. The exposure measure was depression. Both COPD and depression were assessed using diagnostic codes in Part A and B data. Covariates included sociodemographics, as well as clinical markers, including comorbidities, COPD severity, and depression severity. Of 31,033 beneficiaries meeting inclusion criteria, 6,227 (20%) were diagnosed with depression after COPD diagnosis. Average monthly adherence to COPD maintenance medications was low, peaking at 57% in the month after first fill and decreasing to 35% within 6 months. In our adjusted regression model, depression was associated with decreased adherence to COPD maintenance medications (odds ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval

  20. Adherence to Maintenance Medications among Older Adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. The Role of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jennifer S.; Park, Yujin; Hur, Peter; Huang, Ting-Ying; Harris, Ilene; Netzer, Giora; Lehmann, Susan W.; Langenberg, Patricia; Khokhar, Bilal; Wei, Yu-Jung; Moyo, Patience

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Among individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), depression is one of the most common yet underrecognized and undertreated comorbidities. Although depression has been associated with reduced adherence to maintenance medications used in other conditions, such as diabetes, little research has assessed the role of depression in COPD medication use and adherence. Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the impact of depression on COPD maintenance medication adherence among a nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries newly diagnosed with COPD. Methods: We used a 5% random sample of Medicare administrative claims data to identify beneficiaries diagnosed with COPD between 2006 and 2010. We included beneficiaries with 2 years of continuous Medicare Parts A, B, and D coverage and at least two prescription fills for COPD maintenance medications after COPD diagnosis. We searched for prescription fills for inhaled corticosteroids, long-acting β-agonists, and long-acting anticholinergics and calculated adherence starting at the first fill. We modeled adherence to COPD maintenance medications as a function of new episodes of depression, using generalized estimated equations. Measurements and Main Results: Our primary outcome was adherence to COPD maintenance medications, measured as proportion of days covered. The exposure measure was depression. Both COPD and depression were assessed using diagnostic codes in Part A and B data. Covariates included sociodemographics, as well as clinical markers, including comorbidities, COPD severity, and depression severity. Of 31,033 beneficiaries meeting inclusion criteria, 6,227 (20%) were diagnosed with depression after COPD diagnosis. Average monthly adherence to COPD maintenance medications was low, peaking at 57% in the month after first fill and decreasing to 35% within 6 months. In our adjusted regression model, depression was associated with decreased adherence to COPD

  1. Factors that affect adherence to surveillance colonoscopy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Sonia; Cheifetz, Adam S; Farraye, Francis A; Banks, Peter A; Makrauer, Frederick L; Burakoff, Robert; Farmer, Barbara; Torgersen, Leanne N; Wahl, Kelly E

    2013-03-01

    Patients with extensive ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease of the colon have an increased risk of colon cancer and require colonoscopic surveillance. This study explores factors that affect adherence to surveillance colonoscopy. Three hundred and seventy-eight patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease of the colon for at least 7 years and at least one-third of the colon involved participated in this cross-sectional questionnaire study performed at 3 tertiary referral inflammatory bowel disease clinics. Two hundred and eight patients were female and 189 had ulcerative colitis. The mean age was 49.9 years and mean disease duration 22.9 years. The total number of surveillance colonoscopies performed was 1529, and the mean number per patient was 4.01. The mean interval between surveillance colonoscopies was 2.71 years; 282 patients had a mean interval of <3 years. Self-reported adherence was consistently higher than chart-documented adherence. Significant categories of reasons for nonadherence were logistics (P = 0.012), health perceptions (P = 0.0001); stress regarding procedure, job, or personal life (P = 0.0002); and procedure problems (P = 0.001). The most frequently cited most important reason was difficulty with the bowel preparation (18 patients; 4.8%). Of the 26 patients with inflammatory bowel disease-related dysplasia, 3 had cancer, 4 high-grade dysplasia, 15 low-grade dysplasia, and 4 indefinite dysplasia. Detection of dysplasia was not related to adherence or to lack of adherence. In this study, 25.5% of our patients underwent surveillance colonoscopies at >3-year intervals on average. Significant categories of reasons for nonadherence included logistics, health perceptions, stress, and procedure problems.

  2. Increased adherence to cardiac standards of care during participation in cardiac disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Coberley, Carter; Morrow, Greg; McGinnis, Matthew; Wells, Aaron; Coberley, Sadie; Orr, Patty; Shurney, Dexter

    2008-04-01

    Adherence to cardiovascular disease standards of care is critically important for minimizing the risk of mortality and morbidity for individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) and heart failure (HF). The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of cardiac disease management (DM) programs to assist members with their adherence to evidence-based medicine for cardiovascular diseases. A total of 20,202 members with CHD and/or HF were evaluated 12 months prior to the start of DM programs and during their first 12 months of participation in the programs. Members were assessed for their adherence to appropriate cardiac medications. In addition, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) testing rates and clinical control of LDL values (defined as <100 mg/dL) were measured. The association between LDL control and use of lipid-lowering statins also was assessed. During participation in the cardiac programs, members achieved significant improvement in their adherence to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, and beta-blockers (P < 0.0001). The cardiac population also achieved a significant increase in LDL testing rates and statin use (P < 0.0001). More members attained appropriate LDL control in year 1 compared to baseline (36% relative increase), and this improvement was associated with a 40% relative increase in statin use. In summary, participation in these cardiac DM programs assisted members to improve their adherence to cardiac medications and standards of care guidelines. Such improvements in cardiovascular disease care are likely associated with improved quality of life and reduced risk for mortality.

  3. Illness perception and adherence to healthy behaviour in Jordanian coronary heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Sultan M; Almalik, Mona Ma

    2016-06-01

    Patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease are strongly recommended to adopt healthier behaviours and adhere to prescribed medication. Previous research on patients with a wide range of health conditions has explored the role of patients' illness perceptions in explaining coping and health outcomes. However, among coronary heart disease patients, this has not been well examined. The purpose of this study was to explore coronary heart disease patients' illness perception beliefs and investigate whether these beliefs could predict adherence to healthy behaviours. A multi-centre cross-sectional study was conducted at four tertiary hospitals in Jordan. A convenience sample of 254 patients (73% response rate), who visited the cardiac clinic for routine review, participated in the study. Participants completed a self-reported questionnaire, which included the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, the Godin Leisure Time Activity questionnaire and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Patients reported high levels of disease understanding (coherence) and they were convinced that they were able to control their condition by themselves and/or with appropriate treatment. Male patients perceived lower consequences (p<0.05) and had a better understanding of their illness than female patients (p<0.001). There were significant associations between increasing age and each of timeline (r=0.326, p<0.001), (r=0.146, p<0.024) and coherence (r=-0.166, p<0.010). Adjusted regression analysis showed that exercise adherence was predicted by both a strong perception in personal control (β 2.66, 95% confidence interval 1.28-4.04), timeline (β -1.85, 95% confidence interval 0. 8-2.88) and illness coherence (β 2.12, 95% confidence interval 0.35-3.90). Medication adherence was predicted by perception of personal control and treatment control. Adherence to a low-fat diet regimen was predicted by perception of illness coherence only (odds ratio 12, 95% confidence interval 1

  4. Diversity of Spirochetes in Endodontic Infections ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Siqueira, José F.; Rôças, Isabela N.; Benno, Yoshimi

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of spirochetes in primary endodontic infections of teeth with chronic apical periodontitis or acute apical abscesses was investigated using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. The prevalences of three common cultivable oral Treponema species were also determined using species-specific nested PCR. All detected spirochetes belonged to the genus Treponema. Overall, 28 different taxa were identified from the 431 clones sequenced: 9 cultivable and validly named species, 1 cultivable as-yet-uncharacterized strain, and 18 as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes, 17 of which were novel. The large majority of clones (94%) were from cultivable named species. The numbers of Treponema species/phylotypes per selected positive sample ranged from 2 to 12. Species-specific nested PCR detected T. denticola, T. socranskii, and T. maltophilum in 59 (66%), 33 (37%), and 26 (29%) of the 90 cases of primary endodontic infections, respectively. Clone library analysis revealed diverse Treponema species/phylotypes as part of the microbiota associated with asymptomatic and symptomatic (abscess) endodontic infections. Although several as-yet-uncultivated Treponema phylotypes were disclosed, including novel taxa, cultivable named species were more abundant and frequently detected. PMID:19261792

  5. End-stage renal disease adherence questionnaire: translation and validation to the portuguese language.

    PubMed

    Poveda, Verónica; Amado, Leonilde; Filgueiras, Madalena; Teixeira, Laetitia; Miranda, Vasco; Santos-Silva, Alice; Paúl, Constança; Costa, Elísio

    2016-11-01

    Non-adherence to medical plans is recognized as an important problem in dialysis patients, since it has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality, resulting in disproportionately high costs of care. The success of renal replacement therapy depends on the adherence of patients to the different aspects of the therapeutic strategy, which includes a complex drug regimen involving a wide variety of drugs and doses, several prescribed dialysis sessions with different durations, dietetic recommendations and restriction of fluid intake. In this work, we aimed to translate and validate a previously described self-reported end-stage renal disease questionnaire (ESRD-AQ) to the Portuguese language (PESRD-AQ). After ESRD-AQ translation, a validation was performed by experts and by using a cohort of 185 Portuguese dialysis patients. PESRD-AQ reliability analysis showed strong test-retest stability across all items, with an intra-class correlation of 0.931. The average of the item-level content validity index by experts for the 46 items was 0.98, ranging from 0.94 to 1. Moreover, we found that PESRD-AQ scores indicative of non-adherence were associated with alterations in some biological and biochemical markers of non-adherence, including interdialytic weight gain. In conclusion, our results showed that PESRD-AQ, which presented an acceptable reliability and validity, is a valid tool to be used for adherence evaluation by Portuguese-speaking dialysis patients.

  6. Psychosocial predictors of patient adherence to disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alosaimi, Fahad D; AlMulhem, Alaa; AlShalan, Hanan; Alqazlan, Mohammad; Aldaif, Abdulgader; Kowgier, Matthew; Balasundaram, Janooshsheya; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to identify the impact of psychosocial predictors, specifically relationship style, depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, cognitive impairment, and culture-specific disease beliefs, on treatment adherence for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods In this cross-sectional observational study, patients from two MS clinics in Saudi Arabia completed self-reported questionnaires focused on MS treatment adherence, physical symptom burden, relationship style, cultural beliefs, depressive symptoms, anxiety, and cognitive impairment. Results A total of 163 MS patients participated, 81.6% of them were female, and the mean age of the patients was 31.6 years. Mean patient-reported adherence to their MS treatment regimen was 79.47%±25.26%. Multivariate linear regression analysis only identified patients’ belief that their MS was due to “supernatural” forces as being significantly negatively associated with MS medication adherence. Conclusion This study demonstrates the importance of cultural interpretations to MS medication adherence in comparison to psychosocial factors. Education and family involvement in the treatment planning may address this issue and warrant further research. PMID:28331298

  7. Impact of mHealth chronic disease management on treatment adherence and patient outcomes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hamine, Saee; Gerth-Guyette, Emily; Faulx, Dunia; Green, Beverly B; Ginsburg, Amy Sarah

    2015-02-24

    Adherence to chronic disease management is critical to achieving improved health outcomes, quality of life, and cost-effective health care. As the burden of chronic diseases continues to grow globally, so does the impact of non-adherence. Mobile technologies are increasingly being used in health care and public health practice (mHealth) for patient communication, monitoring, and education, and to facilitate adherence to chronic diseases management. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the effectiveness of mHealth in supporting the adherence of patients to chronic diseases management ("mAdherence"), and the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of mAdherence tools and platforms in chronic disease management among patients and health care providers. We searched PubMed, Embase, and EBSCO databases for studies that assessed the role of mAdherence in chronic disease management of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and chronic lung diseases from 1980 through May 2014. Outcomes of interest included effect of mHealth on patient adherence to chronic diseases management, disease-specific clinical outcomes after intervention, and the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of mAdherence tools and platforms in chronic disease management among target end-users. In all, 107 articles met all inclusion criteria. Short message service was the most commonly used mAdherence tool in 40.2% (43/107) of studies. Usability, feasibility, and acceptability or patient preferences for mAdherence interventions were assessed in 57.9% (62/107) of studies and found to be generally high. A total of 27 studies employed randomized controlled trial (RCT) methods to assess impact on adherence behaviors, and significant improvements were observed in 15 of those studies (56%). Of the 41 RCTs that measured effects on disease-specific clinical outcomes, significant improvements between groups were reported in 16 studies (39%). There is potential for mHealth tools to

  8. Impact of Disease Management on Utilization and Adherence With Drugs and Tests

    PubMed Central

    Thiebaud, Patrick; Demand, Michael; Wolf, Scott A.; Alipuria, Linda L.; Ye, Qin; Gutierrez, Peter R.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of telephonic care management within a diabetes disease management program on adherence to treatment with hypoglycemic agents, ACE inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), statins, and recommended laboratory tests in a Medicaid population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 2,598 patients with diabetes enrolled for at least 2 years in Florida: A Healthy State (FAHS), a large Medicaid disease management program, who received individualized telephonic care management were selected if they were eligible for at least 12 months before and 12 months after beginning care management. Patients were matched one-to-one on all baseline characteristics to 2,598 control patients. The impact of care management on utilization and adherence rates for diabetes-related medications and tests was analyzed with the difference-in-difference estimator. RESULTS—Changes in utilization were evaluated separately for those who were characterized as adherent to treatment at baseline (“users”) and those who were not (“nonusers”). Both groups achieved significant improvement in adherence between baseline and follow-up. Nonusers increased their overall hypoglycemic use by 0.7 script (P < 0.001), by 0.7 script for ACEIs and statins (both P < 0.001), by 0.8 test for A1C (P < 0.001), and by 0.7 test for lipids (P < 0.001). Users increased hypoglycemic use by 1.5 scripts (P < 0.001) and insulin use by 0.9 script (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS—The FAHS telephonic care management intervention effectively induced Medicaid patients with diabetes to begin treatment and improved adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents and recommended tests. It also substantially improved adherence among baseline insulin users. PMID:18523144

  9. Relationship of emotional intelligence and adherence to combination antiretroviral medications by individuals living with HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Willard, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Medications are an intentional and purposeful means to the successful management of many chronic diseases. In the treatment of disease caused by HIV, adherence to medication is of particular concern because any level of nonadherence, often a few missed doses, will lead eventually to the development of drug resistance. Many predictors of poor adherence to HIV medications have been identified as significant factors in adherence. Among these is the emotional aspect. The purpose of this study was to examine emotional intelligence (EI) and adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy in individuals who are infected with HIV. EI is defined as the ability to perceive and express emotions, facilitate emotions, understand and reason with emotion, and manage emotions. EI has been correlated with various aspects of success in life. In this study, EI was measured by the Mayer, Salovey, Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test. Adherence to medications was measured by self-report and defined as less than 10% missed doses of medications. Eighty-two participants were recruited from an urban hospital-based HIV clinic. Pearson's r was used to analyze the data for significance, and no correlation was reported. This data set was not large enough to prove significance, statistically, of the research question. However, an unexpected result of this study was that the overall EI scores for this particular population were markedly lower than the test norms. Further study would be warranted and recommended to explore El measurement in people at risk for HIV disease or in those who have the disease to further understand the impact of emotions and EI in this specific population.

  10. Chronic kidney disease progression: a retrospective analysis of 3-year adherence to a low protein diet.

    PubMed

    Rizzetto, Felipe; Leal, Viviane de Oliveira; Bastos, Leonardo Soares; Fouque, Denis; Mafra, Denise

    2017-11-01

    The potential benefits and dangers of dietary protein restriction in chronic kidney disease (CKD) are still controversial. Thus, the aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of low protein diet (LPD) on the renal function in nondialysis CKD patients. A retrospective study was conducted from 321 nondialysis CKD patient's medical files (65.1 ± 12.7 yrs, 58.2% men). These patients received individualized dietary protein prescription (0.6-0.8 g protein/kg/day). Protein intake was evaluated by food diary and 24 h-food recall. Adherence to the LPD was considered when patients intake from 90 to 110% of the prescribed amount of protein. The patients were divided into 4 groups: (G1) adherent diabetes mellitus (DM) patients (n = 83); (G2) non-adherent DM patients (n = 106); (G3) adherent non-DM patients (n = 75); (G4) non-adherent non-DM patients (n = 57). Renal function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Both groups of patients (DM and non-DM) that adhered to the LPD showed significant improvement in eGFR (G1: 38.7 ± 13.2 mL/min to 51.1 ± 17.0 mL/min (p < 0.001); G3: 35.1 ± 16.8 mL/min to 46.8 ± 21.4 mL/min (p < 0.001)). In adherent patients, no differences in albumin and BMI were observed at the end of follow up. In non-adherent patients, eGFR significantly decreased in DM group (G2: 44.2 ± 18.5 mL/min to 38.2 ± 15.8 mL/min (p = 0.003)). According to multivariate analysis, annual changes in eGFR were not independent associated with age, gender, BMI, lipid profile, bicarbonate or smoking status. In summary, adherence to low protein diet could be able to improve serum creatinine and eGFR, well-known markers of renal function. However, prospective studies are needed to control confounders which affect renal function and CKD progression.

  11. Improving medication adherence with a targeted, technology-driven disease management intervention.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David B; Allison, Wanda; Chen, Joyce C; Demand, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Treatment adherence is critical in managing chronic disease, but achieving it remains an elusive goal across many prevalent conditions. As part of its care management strategy, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina (BCBSSC) implemented the Longitudinal Adherence Treatment Evaluation program, a behavioral intervention to improve medication adherence among members with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes. The objectives of this study were to 1) assess the effectiveness of telephonic intervention in influencing reinitiation of medication therapy, and 2) evaluate the rate and timing of medication reinitiation. BCBSSC applied algorithms against pharmacy claims data to identify patients prescribed targeted medications who were 60 or more days overdue for refills. This information was provided to care managers to address during their next patient contact. Care managers received focused training on techniques for medication behavior change, readiness to change, motivational interviewing, and active listening. Training also addressed common barriers to adherence and available resources, including side effect management, mail order benefits, drug assistance programs, medication organizers, and reminder systems. Overdue refills were tracked for 12 months, with medication reinitiation followed for an additional 3 months. In the intervention group, 94 patients were identified with 123 instances of late medication refills. In the age- and gender-matched comparison group, 61 patients were identified with 76 late refills. The intervention group had a significantly higher rate of medication reinitiation (59.3%) than the control group (42.1%; P < 0.05). Time to reinitiation was significantly shorter in the intervention group, 59.5 (+/- 69.0) days vs. 107.4 (+/- 109) days for the control group (P < 0.05). This initiative demonstrated that a targeted disease management intervention promoting patient behavior change increased the number of patients who reinitiated therapy after a

  12. Mobilifilum chasei: morphology and ecology of a spirochete from an intertidal stratified microbial mat community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.; Stolz, J.; Craft, F.; Esteve, I.; Guerrero, R.

    1990-01-01

    Spirochetes were found in the lower anoxiphototrophic layer of a stratified microbial mat (North Pond, Laguna Figueroa, Baja California, Mexico). Ultra-structural analysis of thin sections of field samples revealed spirochetes approximately 0.25 micrometer in diameter with 10 or more periplasmic flagella, leading to the interpretation that these spirochetes bear 10 flagellar insertions on each end. Morphometric study showed these free-living spirochetes greatly resemble certain symbiotic ones, i.e., Borrelia and certain termite spirochetes, the transverse sections of which are presented here. The ultrastructure of this spirochete also resembles Hollandina and Diplocalyx (spirochetes symbiotic in arthropods) more than it does Spirochaeta, the well known genus of mud-dwelling spirochetes. The new spirochete was detected in mat material collected both in 1985 and in 1987. Unique morphology (i.e., conspicuous outer coat of inner membrane, large number of periplasmic flagella) and ecology prompt us to name a new free-living spirochete.

  13. Mobilifilum chasei: morphology and ecology of a spirochete from an intertidal stratified microbial mat community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.; Stolz, J.; Craft, F.; Esteve, I.; Guerrero, R.

    1990-01-01

    Spirochetes were found in the lower anoxiphototrophic layer of a stratified microbial mat (North Pond, Laguna Figueroa, Baja California, Mexico). Ultra-structural analysis of thin sections of field samples revealed spirochetes approximately 0.25 micrometer in diameter with 10 or more periplasmic flagella, leading to the interpretation that these spirochetes bear 10 flagellar insertions on each end. Morphometric study showed these free-living spirochetes greatly resemble certain symbiotic ones, i.e., Borrelia and certain termite spirochetes, the transverse sections of which are presented here. The ultrastructure of this spirochete also resembles Hollandina and Diplocalyx (spirochetes symbiotic in arthropods) more than it does Spirochaeta, the well known genus of mud-dwelling spirochetes. The new spirochete was detected in mat material collected both in 1985 and in 1987. Unique morphology (i.e., conspicuous outer coat of inner membrane, large number of periplasmic flagella) and ecology prompt us to name a new free-living spirochete.

  14. Adherence to secondary prophylaxis and disease recurrence in 536 Brazilian children with rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background More than 15 million people worldwide have rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease due to RF. Secondary prophylaxis is a critical cost-effective intervention for preventing morbidity and mortality related to RF. Ensuring adequate adherence to secondary prophylaxis for RF is a challenging task. This study aimed to describe the rates of recurrent episodes of RF, quantify adherence to secondary prophylaxis, and examine the effects of medication adherence to the rates of RF in a cohort of Brazilian children and adolescents with RF. Methods This retrospective study took place in the Pediatric Rheumatology outpatient clinic at a tertiary care hospital (Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagão Gesteira) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and included patients with a diagnosis of RF from 1985 to 2005. Results 536 patients with RF comprised the study sample. Recurrent episodes of RF occurred in 88 of 536 patients (16.5%). Patients with a recurrent episode of RF were younger (p < 0.0001), more frequently males (p = 0.003), and less adherent (p < 0.0001) to secondary prophylaxis than patients without RF recurrence. Non-adherence to medication at any time during follow-up was detected in 35% of patients. Rates of non-adherence were higher in the group of patients that were lost to follow-up (42%) than in the group of patients still in follow-up (32%) (p = 0.027). Appointment frequency was inadequate in 10% of patients. Higher rates of inadequate appointment frequency were observed among patients who were eventually lost to follow-up (14.5%) than in patients who were successfully followed-up (8%) (p = 0.022). 180 patients (33.5%) were lost to follow up at some point in time. Conclusions We recommend implementation of a registry, and a system of active search of missing patients in every service responsible for the follow-up of RF patients. Measures to increase adherence to secondary prophylaxis need to be implemented formally, once non-adherence to secondary

  15. Forces and Torques on Rotating Spirochete Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Huber, Greg; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2011-12-01

    Spirochetes are a unique group of motile bacteria that are distinguished by their helical or flat-wave shapes and the location of their flagella, which reside within the tiny space between the bacterial cell wall and the outer membrane (the periplasm). In Borrelia burgdorferi, rotation of the flagella produces cellular undulations that drive swimming. How these shape changes arise due to the forces and torques that act between the flagella and the cell body is unknown. It is possible that resistive forces come from friction or from fluid drag, depending on whether or not the flagella are in contact with the cell wall. Here, we consider both of these cases. By analyzing the motion of an elastic flagellum rotating in the periplasmic space, we show that the flagella are most likely separated from the bacterial cell wall by a lubricating layer of fluid. This analysis then provides drag coefficients for rotation and sliding of a flagellum within the periplasm.

  16. Forces and torques on rotating spirochete flagella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Huber, Greg; Wolgemuth, Charles W

    2011-12-23

    Spirochetes are a unique group of motile bacteria that are distinguished by their helical or flat-wave shapes and the location of their flagella, which reside within the tiny space between the bacterial cell wall and the outer membrane (the periplasm). In Borrelia burgdorferi, rotation of the flagella produces cellular undulations that drive swimming. How these shape changes arise due to the forces and torques that act between the flagella and the cell body is unknown. It is possible that resistive forces come from friction or from fluid drag, depending on whether or not the flagella are in contact with the cell wall. Here, we consider both of these cases. By analyzing the motion of an elastic flagellum rotating in the periplasmic space, we show that the flagella are most likely separated from the bacterial cell wall by a lubricating layer of fluid. This analysis then provides drag coefficients for rotation and sliding of a flagellum within the periplasm.

  17. STUDIES ON THE LIFE CYCLE OF SPIROCHETES

    PubMed Central

    DeLamater, Edward D.; Wiggall, Richter H.; Haanes, Merle

    1950-01-01

    A series of observations with the phase contrast microscope on the occurrence of a complex life cycle in the pathogenic Treponema pallidum as it occurs in the syphilitic rabbit testis has been presented and it seems likely from these observations that there are two means of vegetative reproduction, consisting of (1) transverse division (the most important under usual conditions); and (2) the production of gemmae or buds which eventuate into unispirochetal cysts comparable to those described for saprophytic forms, within each of which single spirochetes develop and differentiate, and from which they subsequently emerge. In addition preliminary evidence is presented which suggests that a more complex process is involved in which multispirochetal cysts develop following aggregation of two or more organisms. Within each of these larger cysts numerous organisms develop and subsequently emerge as tangled ropes. Following emergence, they subsequently undergo transverse division and gemmae formation, and so reproduce vegetatively. Subsequent papers will elaborate upon these processes. PMID:15436933

  18. European hospital adherence to GOLD recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation admissions.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C Michael; Lopez-Campos, Jose Luis; Pozo-Rodriguez, Francisco; Hartl, Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Understanding how European care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) admissions vary against guideline standards provides an opportunity to target appropriate quality improvement interventions. In 2010-2011 an audit of care against the 2010 'Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease' (GOLD) standards was performed in 16 018 patients from 384 hospitals in 13 countries. Clinicians prospectively identified consecutive COPD admissions over a period of 8 weeks, recording clinical care measures on a web-based data tool. Data were analysed comparing adherence to 10 key management recommendations. Adherence varied between hospitals and across countries. The lack of available spirometry results and variable use of oxygen and non-invasive ventilation (NIV) are high impact areas identified for improvement.

  19. Barriers to hydroxyurea adherence and health-related quality of life in adolescents and young adults with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Sherif M; Thompson, Alexis A; Penedo, Frank J; Lai, Jin-Shei; Rychlik, Karen; Liem, Robert I

    2017-06-01

    To identify barriers to hydroxyurea adherence (negative beliefs, access, and/or recall barriers), and their relationship to adherence rates and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among adolescents and young adults (AYA) with sickle cell disease (SCD). A cross-sectional survey was administered to 34 AYAs (12-22 years old) in SCD clinics from January to December 2015. Study measures included Brief Medication Questionnaire, Modified Morisky Adherence Scale 8-items, visual analog scale, and Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System. Participants (59% male; 91% Black) had a median age of 13.5 years (IQR 12-18). Participants reported negative beliefs (32%), recall barriers (44%), and access barriers (32%). Participants with recall barriers reported worse pain (P=.02), fatigue (P=.05), and depression (P=.05). The number of adherence barriers inversely correlated with adherence level using ©MMAS-8 (rs =-.38, P=.02) and VASdose (rs =-.25, P=.14) as well as MCV (rs =-.45, P=.01) and HbF% (rs =-.36, P=.05), suggesting higher hydroxyurea adherence in patients with fewer barriers. Patients with fewer barriers to hydroxyurea adherence were more likely to have higher adherence rates and better HRQOL scores. Routine assessment of hydroxyurea adherence and its related barriers could provide actionable information to improve adherence rates, HRQOL, and other clinical outcomes. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Haematology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Mobile phone text messaging to improve medication adherence in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Adler, Alma J; Martin, Nicole; Mariani, Javier; Tajer, Carlos D; Owolabi, Onikepe O; Free, Caroline; Serrano, Norma C; Casas, Juan P; Perel, Pablo

    2017-04-29

    Worldwide at least 100 million people are thought to have prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD). This population has a five times greater chance of suffering a recurrent cardiovascular event than people without known CVD. Secondary CVD prevention is defined as action aimed to reduce the probability of recurrence of such events. Drug interventions have been shown to be cost-effective in reducing this risk and are recommended in international guidelines. However, adherence to recommended treatments remains sub-optimal. In order to influence non-adherence, there is a need to develop scalable and cost-effective behaviour-change interventions. To assess the effects of mobile phone text messaging in patients with established arterial occlusive events on adherence to treatment, fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events, and adverse effects. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, the Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science on Web of Science on 7 November 2016, and two clinical trial registers on 12 November 2016. We contacted authors of included studies for missing information and searched reference lists of relevant papers. We applied no language or date restrictions. We included randomised trials with at least 50% of the participants with established arterial occlusive events. We included trials investigating interventions using short message service (SMS) or multimedia messaging service (MMS) with the aim to improve adherence to medication for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Eligible comparators were no intervention or other modes of communication. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. In addition, we attempted to contact all authors on how the SMS were developed. We included seven trials (reported in 13 reports) with 1310 participants randomised. Follow-up ranged from one month to 12 months. Due to heterogeneity in the methods, population and outcome measures, we were unable to conduct meta-analysis on these studies

  1. Improving medication adherence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Jamie; McDonald, Vanessa M; Boyes, Allison; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Paul, Christine; Melville, Jessica

    2013-10-20

    Adherence to medication among individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is suboptimal and has negative impacts on survival and health care costs. No systematic review has examined the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve medication adherence. Electronic databases Medline and Cochrane were searched using a combination of MeSH and keywords. Eligible studies were interventions with a primary or secondary aim to improve medication adherence among individuals with COPD published in English. Included studies were assessed for methodological quality using the Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) criteria. Of the 1,186 papers identified, seven studies met inclusion criteria. Methodological quality of the studies was variable. Five studies identified effective interventions. Strategies included: brief counselling; monitoring and feedback about inhaler use through electronic medication delivery devices; and multi-component interventions consisting of self-management and care co-ordination delivered by pharmacists and primary care teams. Further research is needed to establish the most effective and cost effective interventions. Special attention should be given to increasing patient sample size and using a common measure of adherence to overcome methodological limitations. Interventions that involve caregivers and target the healthcare provider as well as the patient should be further explored.

  2. Adherence to recommendations for fruit and vegetable intake, ethnicity and ischemic heart disease mortality.

    PubMed

    Sangita, S; Vik, S A; Pakseresht, M; Kolonel, L N

    2013-12-01

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) accounts for one-third of annual deaths in the U.S. and mortality rates vary by ethnicity. The association between adherence to dietary guidelines for fruit and vegetable intake with IHD mortality among different ethnic groups has not previously been examined. A prospective cohort design was used to examine the incidence of fatal IHD among participants in the Multiethnic Cohort Study. Participants included 164,617 men and women from five ethnic groups: African American, Native Hawaiian, Japanese American, Latino, and Caucasian. Cox proportional hazards models, stratified by ethnicity and sex, were used to examine associations between adherence with recommended dietary guidelines for fruit and vegetable intake and risk for fatal IHD. The results did not provide evidence that the association between adherence with dietary recommendations for fruit or vegetable intake and IHD mortality varies by ethnicity. Pooled data did provide evidence that adhering to the recommendations for vegetables lowered risk among men (RR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.74-0.96) and women (RR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.69-0.94). No significant effects were observed for fruit intake. The effect of dietary intake of fruit and vegetables did not vary by ethnicity, providing evidence that recommendations do not need to be individualized for these special populations. The protective effect observed for vegetable intake among both sexes confirms previous findings and supports the evidence base for promoting diet modification in this direction. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Disparities in hypertension and cardiovascular disease in blacks: The critical role of medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Keith C; Yadav, Kapil; Nasser, Samar A; Clayton-Jeter, Helene D; Lewin, John; Cryer, Dennis R; Senatore, Fortunato Fred

    2017-08-30

    Blacks are two to three times as likely as whites to die of preventable heart disease and stroke. Declines in mortality from heart disease have not eliminated racial disparities. Control and effective treatment of hypertension, a leading cause of cardiovascular disease, among blacks is less than in whites and remains a challenge. One of the driving forces behind this racial/ethnic disparity is medication nonadherence whose cause is embedded in social determinants. Eight practical approaches to addressing medication adherence with the potential to attenuate disparities were identified and include: (1) patient engagement strategies, (2) consumer-directed health care, (3) patient portals, (4) smart apps and text messages, (5) digital pillboxes, (6) pharmacist-led engagement, (7) cardiac rehabilitation, and (8) cognitive-based behavior. However, while data suggest that these strategies may improve medication adherence, the effect on ameliorating racial/ethnic disparities is not certain. This review describes the relationship between disparities and medication adherence, which likely plays a role in persistent disparities in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Clinicians' adherence to international guidelines in the clinical care of adults with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Belinda D; Con, Danny; Liew, Danny; De Cruz, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Although evidence-based guidelines have been developed for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the extent to which they are followed is unclear. The objective of this study was to review clinicians' adherence to international IBD guidelines. Retrospective data collection of patients attending a tertiary Australian hospital IBD clinic over a 12-month period. Management practices were audited and compared to ECCO (European Crohn's and Colitis Organization) guidelines. Data from 288 patients were collected: 47% (136/288) male; mean age 43; 140/288 (49%) patients had ulcerative colitis (UC); 145/288 (50%) patients had Crohn's disease (CD); 3/288 (1%) patients had IBD-unclassified (IBD-U). Patient care was undertaken by gastroenterologists, trainees and general practitioners. Overall adherence to disease management guidelines occurred in 204/288 (71%) of patient encounters. Discrepancies between guidelines and management were found in: 25/80 (31%) of patients with UC in remission receiving oral 5-aminosalicyclates (5-ASAs) as maintenance therapy, and; 46/110 (42%) of patients with small bowel and/or ileo-cecal CD receiving 5-ASA. Preventive Care: Adherence to ≥1 additional component of preventive care was observed in 73/288 (25%) of patient encounters: 12/133 (9%) on thiopurines underwent annual skin checks; 61/288 (21%) of patients with IBD underwent a bone scan; 46/288 (16%) patients were reminded to have their influenza vaccine. Psychological care: Assessment of psychological wellbeing was undertaken in only 16/288 (6%) of patients. There remains a gap between adherence to international guidelines and clinical practice. Standardizing practice using evidence-based clinical pathways may be a strategy towards improving the quality of IBD outpatient management.

  5. Assessing medication adherence in inflammatory bowel diseases. A comparison between a self-administered scale and a pharmacy refill index.

    PubMed

    de Castro, María Luisa; Sanromán, Luciano; Martín, Alicia; Figueira, Montserrat; Martínez, Noemi; Hernández, Vicent; Del Campo, Victor; Pineda, Juan R; Martínez-Cadilla, Jesús; Pereira, Santos; Rodríguez Prada, José Ignacio

    2017-08-01

    Medication non-adherence in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has a negative impact on disease outcome. Different tools have been proposed to assess non-adherence. We aimed to compare a self-administered scale and a pharmacy refill index as a reliable measure of medication adherence and to determine what factors are related to adherence. Consecutive non-active IBD outpatients were asked to fill in the self-reported Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) and the Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire (BMQ). Pharmacy refill data were reviewed from the previous three or six months and the medication possession ratio (MPR) was calculated. Non-adherence was defined as MMAS-8 scores < 6 or MPR < 0.8. Two-hundred and three patients were enrolled (60% ulcerative colitis, 40% Crohn's disease); 51% were men, and the mean age was 46.3 (14) years. Seventy-four per cent of patients were on monotherapy and 26% on combination therapy; altogether, 65% received mesalazine, 46% thiopurines and 16% anti-tumor necrosis factor alfa. Non-adherence rate assessed by MPR was 37% and 22.4% by MMAS-8. Receiver operator curve analysis using a MMAS-8 cut-off of six gave an area under the curve of 0.6 (95% CI 0.5-0.7), p = 0.001. This score had an 85% sensitivity and 34% specificity to predict medication non-adherence, with negative and positive predictive values of 57% and 70% respectively. High scores in the BMQ potential for harm of medication were significantly associated with MPR non-adherence (p = 0.01). The accuracy of MMAS-8 to identify medication non-adherence in inactive IBD outpatients in our setting is poor due to a low specificity and a negative predictive value. Psychosocial factors such as beliefs about medication seem to be related to IBD non-adherence.

  6. Effects of breast cancer on chronic disease medication adherence among older women.

    PubMed

    Santorelli, Melissa L; Steinberg, Michael B; Hirshfield, Kim M; Rhoads, George G; Bandera, Elisa V; Lin, Yong; Demissie, Kitaw

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of breast cancer on chronic disease medication adherence among older women. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare-linked data and a 5% random sample of Medicare enrollees were used. Stage I-III breast cancer patients diagnosed in 2008 and women without cancer were eligible. Three cohorts of medication users 66+ years were identified using diagnosis codes and prescription fill records: diabetes, hypertension, and lipid disorders. For each cohort, breast cancer patients were frequency matched to comparison women by age and geographic area. Medication adherence was measured by the proportion of days covered and medication persistence. During the post-baseline period, the percentage of breast cancer patients who were non-adherent was 26.2% for diabetes medication, 28.9% for lipid-lowering medication, and 14.2% for hypertension medication. Breast cancer patients experienced an increased odds of diabetes medication non-adherence [odds ratio (OR) = 1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.07 to 1.95] and were more likely to be non-persistent with diabetes medication (hazard ratio = 1.31; 95%CI: 1.04 to 1.66) relative to women without cancer. The study failed to show a difference between breast cancer and comparison women in the odds of non-adherence to hypertensive (OR = 0.87; 95%CI: 0.71 to 1.05) or lipid-lowering medication (OR = 0. 91; 95%CI: 0.73 to 1.13) with a proportion of days covered threshold of 80%. Special attention should be given to the coordination of primary care for older breast cancer patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Acute responses to exercise training and relationship with exercise adherence in moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Amanda K; Wardini, Rima; Chan-Thim, Emilie; Bacon, Simon L; Lavoie, Kim L; Pepin, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of our study were to (i) compare, in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, acute responses to continuous training at high intensity (CTHI), continuous training at ventilatory threshold (CTVT) and interval training (IT); (ii) examine associations between acute responses and 12-week adherence; and (iii) investigate whether the relationship between acute responses and adherence is mediated/moderated by affect/vigour. Thirty-five COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second = 60.2 ± 15.8% predicted), underwent baseline assessments, were randomly assigned to CTHI, CTVT or IT, were monitored throughout about before training, and underwent 12 weeks of exercise training during which adherence was tracked. Compared with CTHI, CTVT was associated with lower respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate and respiratory rate (RR), while IT induced higher [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]maximal voluntary ventilation, RR and lower pulse oxygen saturation. From pre- to post-exercise, positive affect increased (F = 9.74, p < 0.001) and negative affect decreased (F = 6.43, p = 0.005) across groups. CTVT reported greater end-exercise vigour compared to CTHI (p = 0.01) and IT (p = 0.02). IT exhibited lowest post-exercise vigour (p = 0.04 versus CTHI, p = 0.02 versus CTVT) and adherence rate (F = 6.69, p = 0.004). Mean [Formula: see text] (r = -0.466, p = 0.007) and end-exercise vigour (r = 0.420, p = 0.017) were most strongly correlated with adherence. End-exercise vigour moderated the relationship between [Formula: see text] and adherence (β = 2.74, t(32) = 2.32, p = 0.03). In summary, CTHI, CTVT and IT improved affective valence from rest to post-exercise and induced a significant 12-week exercise training effect. However, they elicited different acute physiological responses, which in turn were associated with differences in 12-week adherence to the target training intensity. This association was moderated by acute end-exercise vigour.

  8. Phylogeny of not-yet-cultured spirochetes from termite guts.

    PubMed Central

    Paster, B J; Dewhirst, F E; Cooke, S M; Fussing, V; Poulsen, L K; Breznak, J A

    1996-01-01

    Comparisons of 16S rDNA sequences were used to determine the phylogeny of not-yet-cultured spirochetes from hindguts of the African higher termite, Nasutitermes lujae (Wasmann). The 16S rRNA genes were amplified directly from spirochete-rich hindguts by using universal primers, and the amplified products were cloned into Escherichia coli. Clones were screened with a spirochete-specific DNA probe. Analysis of 1,410 base positions of the 16S rDNA insert from one spirochete clone, designated NL1, supported its assignment to the genus Treponema, with average interspecies similarities of ca. 85%. The sequence of NL1 was most closely related (ca. 87 to 88% similarity) to sequences of Spirochaeta stenostrepta and Spirochaeta caldaria and to a previously published sequence (ca. 87% similarity) of spirochetal clone MDS1 from the Australian lower termite, Mastotermes darwiniensis (Froggatt). On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence comparisons and individual base signatures, clones NL1 and MDS1 clearly represent two novel species of Treponema, although specific epithets have not yet been proposed. The gross morphology of NL1 was determined from in situ hybridization experiments with an NL1-specific, fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probe. Cells were approximately 0.3 to 0.4 by 30 microns in size, with a wavelength and amplitude of about 10 microns and 0.8 to 1.6 micron, respectively. Moreover, electron microscopy of various undulate cells present in gut contents confirmed that they possessed ultrastructural features typical of spirochetes, i.e., a wavy protoplasmic cylinder, periplasmic flagella, and an outer sheath. The sequence data suggest that termite gut spirochetes may represent a separate line of descent from other treponemes and that they constitute a significant reservoir of previously unrecognized spirochetal biodiversity. PMID:8593040

  9. Educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, treatment adherence and control of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, Ana Laura Galhardo; Boas, Lilian Cristiane Gomes Villas; Coelho, Anna Claudia Martins; de Freitas, Maria Cristina Foss; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to assess the effect of educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, medication treatment adherence and glycemic control of diabetes mellitus patients. Method: evaluation research with "before and after" design, developed in a sample of 82 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. To collect the data, the Brazilian version of the Diabetes Knowledge Scale (DKN-A), the Measure of Adherence to Treatments and the electronic system at the place of study were used. The data were collected before and after the end of the educational interventions. The educational activities were developed within 12 months, mediated by the Diabetes Conversation Maps, using the Cognitive Social Theory to conduct the interventions. Results: the knowledge on the disease (p<0.001), the medication treatment (oral antidiabetics) (p=0.0318) and the glycated hemoglobin rates (p=0.0321) improved significantly. Conclusion: the educational interventions seem to have positively contributed to the participants' knowledge about diabetes mellitus, the medication treatment adherence and the glycated hemoglobin rates. PMID:28443992

  10. Adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) and risk of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Hekmatdoost, Azita; Shamsipour, Ali; Meibodi, Mohammad; Gheibizadeh, Newsha; Eslamparast, Tannaz; Poustchi, Hossein

    2016-12-01

    This case-control study was conducted to examine the association between adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and risk of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) development in 102 patients with newly diagnosed NAFLD and 204 controls. Adherence to DASH-style diet was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire, and a DASH diet score based on food and nutrients emphasized or minimized in the DASH diet. Participants in the top quartile of DASH diet score were 30% less likely to have NAFLD (OR: 0.0.70; 95% CI: 0.61, 0.80); however, more adjustment for dyslipidemia and body mass index changed the association to non-significant (OR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.73, 1.12). In conclusion, we found an inverse relationship between the DASH-style diet and risk of NAFLD. Prospective studies are needed to confirm this association.

  11. A randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of planning strategies in the adherence to medication for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Laura Bacelar de Araujo; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus; Ciol, Marcia Aparecida; São-João, Thaís Moreira; Cornélio, Marilia Estevam; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadoti; Gallani, Maria-Cecília

    2014-07-01

    To examine the effect of action and coping planning strategies in the adherence to medication among outpatients with coronary artery disease. Action and coping planning strategies are based on implementation intention, which requires self-regulation by the individual, to prioritize intentionally planned responses over learned or habitual ones, from daily routines to stressful situations. Randomized controlled trial. Participants (n = 115) were randomized into intervention (use of action and coping planning strategies, n = 59) or control (usual care, n = 56) groups. The study was conducted between June 2010-May 2011 in two in-person visits: baseline and 2-month follow-up. Participants in the intervention group received telephone reinforcement between baseline and 2-month follow-up. Adherence to medication for cardioprotection and symptoms relief was evaluated by proportion of adherence, global measure of adherence evaluation and Morisky Self-Reported Measure of Medication Adherence Scale at both baseline and 2-month follow-up. When using the measure of global measure of adherence, participants in the intervention group reported adherence to therapy more often than controls (odds ratio = 5.3), but no statistically significant change was observed in the other two outcome measures. This study has shown that individuals who use action and coping planning report higher adherence to drug treatment, when measured by the global adherence evaluation. Further studies with longer follow-ups are needed to assess if the effect of planning strategies has long-term duration. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Impact of adherence to statins on cardiovascular adverse events in patients with coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, S T; Xu, J Y; Huang, R C

    2016-08-24

    To evaluate the impact of different adherence mode to statins on cardiovascular adverse events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Electronic searches, including PubMed, Scopus, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Ovid EBM Reviews CENTRAL, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, Ovid PsycInfo, Wanfang data, CNKI and Science & Technology Magazine Online, were performed and all related literatures of all languages were retrieval till to March 1, 2015. The full text was obtained through manual retrieval, inter-library loan and document delivery service, or by contacting the author directly. According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, data was extracted dependently by two raters. The high adherence to statin was use defined by the ratio of statins cover time and the total time (proportion of days covered, PDC≥80%). Data were analyzed quantitatively using RevMan 5.1. Then implement subgroup analysis was made according to different statin adherence and classification of clinical outcomes. The impact of adherence to statin on cardiovascular events (all-cause mortality, non-fatal myocardial infarction, hospitalization due to unstable angina pectoris, heart insufficiency attack) in CAD patients was evaluated. Present analysis enrolled eight relevant retrospective and observational studies. Because there were only few literatures describing the impact of statin adherence on clinical outcomes, we also included literatures with low adherence group (4 studies in PDC<80%, 2 studies in PDC<40% and 2 studies in PDC<20%). High adherence group includes 189 556 cases; low adherence group includes 11 384 cases. Compare with low adherence group, cardiovascular events rate reduced by 32% in high adherence group (OR=0.68, 95%CI 0.58-0.80, P<0.001). Subgroup analysis with 4 literatures with PDC≥80% or<80% showed that the cardiovascular events prominently decreased in high adherence group compared to low adherence group (OR=0.63, 95%CI 0.53-0.76, P<0.001). According to 5 literatures with

  13. Examination of the Link Between Medication Adherence and Use of Mail-Order Pharmacies in Chronic Disease States.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Elena V; McDaniel, Jennifer A; Carroll, Norman V

    2016-11-01

    Higher medication adherence is associated with positive health outcomes, including reduction in hospitalizations and costs, and many interventions have been implemented to increase patient adherence. To determine whether patients experience higher medication adherence by using mail-order or retail pharmacies. Articles pertaining to retail and mail-order pharmacies and medication adherence were collected from 3 literature databases: MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA). Searches were created for each database and articles were compiled. Articles were screened for exclusion factors, and final articles (n=15) comparing medication adherence in patients utilizing mail and retail pharmacies were analyzed. For each study, various factors were identified including days supply, patients' out-of-pocket costs, prior adherence behavior, therapeutic class, measure of adherence, limitations, and results. Studies were then categorized by disease state, and relevant information from each study was compared and contrasted. The majority of studies-14 out of the 15 reviewed-supported higher adherence through the mail-order dispensing channel rather than through retail pharmacies. There are a number of reasons for the differences in adherence between the channels. Study patients who used mail-order pharmacies were more likely to have substantially higher prior adherence behavior, socioeconomic status, and days supply of medicines received and were likely to be offered financial incentives to use mail-order. The few studies that attempted to statistically control for these factors also found that patients using mail-order services were more adherent but the size of the differences was smaller. The extent to which these results indicate an inherent adherence advantage of mail-order pharmacy (as distinct from adherence benefits due to greater days supply, lower copays, or more adherent patients

  14. Changing illness perceptions and adherence to dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with stable coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Fennessy, Michelle M; Devon, Holli A; Ryan, Catherine; Lopez, John J; Zerwic, Julie J

    2013-01-01

    Platelet inhibition with dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is an important component of medical management in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Dual antiplatelet therapy nonadherence is associated with increased mortality. Little is known about illness perceptions (IPs) surrounding the use of antiplatelet medications and whether they differ in stable CAD patients treated with medical and/or interventional approaches. The aim of this study was to examine temporal changes in IP scores for patients with stable CAD and examine the influence of clinical and demographic variables, IP, and depressive symptoms on adherence to DAPT. Patients (n = 180, 71.7% men; mean [SD] age, 65.1 [8.3] years) were recruited after coronary angiography and optimal medical therapy (OMT) (n = 90) or after percutaneous coronary intervention with initiation of OMT (n = 90). The Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 were administered at baseline and 30 days after treatment, with a response rate of 52.8% (n = 95) at 30 days. Adherence to DAPT (aspirin and thienopyridine) at 30 days was collected using a health history update. Patients with stable CAD experienced shifts in IP within the first 30 days after treatment. Patients treated with OMT demonstrated increased symptoms after treatment (timeline cyclical) and reduced beliefs in the level of control provided by their prescribed regimen (treatment control, t = 3.26, P = .002). Both groups demonstrated an increase in perceived understanding of illness (illness coherence subscale) from baseline to 30 days (percutaneous coronary intervention/OMT, t = -4.43, P < .001; OMT, t = -3.74, P = .001). Chronic IPs were associated with 5.7% increased odds for improved adherence to thienopyridine agents (B = 0.509, P = .009, Exp(B) = 1.66) and 5.6% increased odds for aspirin use (B = 0.265, P = .031, Exp(B) = 1.30). Depressive symptoms were predictive of adherence for thienopyridine medications (B = 0

  15. Adherence to Healthy Lifestyle and Cardiovascular Diseases in the Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jun; Yu, Canqing; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Yang, Ling; Chen, Yiping; Tang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Weiyuan; Qian, Yijian; Huang, Yuelong; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Qi, Lu; Li, Liming

    2017-03-07

    Adherence to a combination of healthy lifestyle factors has been related to a considerable reduction of cardiovascular risk in white populations; however, little is known whether such associations persist in nonwhite populations like the Asian population. This study aimed to examine the associations of a combination of modifiable, healthy lifestyle factors with the risks of ischemic cardiovascular diseases and estimate the proportion of diseases that could potentially be prevented by adherence to these healthy lifestyle patterns. This study examined the associations of 6 lifestyle factors with ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke (IS) in the China Kadoorie Biobank of 461,211 participants 30 to 79 years of age who did not have cardiovascular diseases, cancer, or diabetes at baseline. Low-risk lifestyle factors were defined as nonsmoking status or having stopped smoking for reasons other than illness, alcohol consumption of <30 g/day, a median or higher level of physical activity, a diet rich in vegetables and fruits and limited in red meat, a body mass index of 18.5 to 23.9 kg/m(2), and a waist-to-hip ratio <0.90 for men and <0.85 for women. During a median of 7.2 years (3.3 million person-years) of follow-up, this study documented 3,331 incident major coronary events (MCE) and 19,348 incident ISs. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, current nonsmoking status, light to moderate alcohol consumption, high physical activity, a diet rich in vegetables and fruits and limited in red meat, and low adiposity were independently associated with reduced risks of MCE and IS. Compared with participants without any low-risk factors, the hazard ratio for participants with ≥4 low-risk factors was 0.42 (95% confidence interval: 0.34 to 0.52) for MCE and 0.61 (95% confidence interval: 0.56 to 0.66) for IS. Approximately 67.9% (95% confidence interval: 46.5% to 81.9%) of the MCE and 39.1% (95% confidence interval: 26.4% to 50.4%) of the IS cases were attributable to

  16. Health care providers' support of patients' autonomy, phosphate medication adherence, race and gender in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Umeukeje, Ebele M; Merighi, Joseph R; Browne, Teri; Wild, Marcus; Alsmaan, Hafez; Umanath, Kausik; Lewis, Julia B; Wallston, Kenneth A; Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to assess dialysis subjects' perceived autonomy support association with phosphate binder medication adherence, race and gender. A multi-site cross-sectional study was conducted among 377 dialysis subjects. The Health Care Climate (HCC) Questionnaire assessed subjects' perception of their providers' autonomy support for phosphate binder use, and adherence was assessed by the self-reported Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Serum phosphorus was obtained from the medical record. Regression models were used to examine independent factors of medication adherence, serum phosphorus, and differences by race and gender. Non-white HCC scores were consistently lower compared with white subjects' scores. No differences were observed by gender. Reported phosphate binder adherence was associated with HCC score, and also with phosphorus control. No significant association was found between HCC score and serum phosphorus. Autonomy support, especially in non-white end stage renal disease subjects, may be an appropriate target for culturally informed strategies to optimize mineral bone health.

  17. Facilitators and Barriers to Noninvasive Ventilation Adherence in Youth with Nocturnal Hypoventilation Secondary to Obesity or Neuromuscular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ennis, Jonathan; Rohde, Kristina; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Buchholz, Annick; Katz, Sherri Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Many youth struggle with adherence to bilevel noninvasive ventilation (NIV), often shortly after initiation of treatment. Anecdotal evidence suggests youths with comorbid obesity struggle with adherence while youths with comorbid neuromuscular disease demonstrate better adherence rates. The objective of this study was to explore factors relating to bilevel NIV adherence, and to compare these between youths with underlying obesity or neuromuscular disease. Methods: An exploratory qualitative approach was used to examine youth and caregivers' experiences with and perceptions of bilevel NIV. Semi-structured interviews (n = 16) of caregivers and youths were conducted. Youths 12 years and older with nocturnal hypoventilation diagnosed on polysomnography and managed with bilevel NIV, with either concurrent obesity or neuromuscular disease were included. Thematic analysis of interview data was conducted using qualitative analysis software. Results: Factors associated with positive bilevel NIV adherence included previous encouraging experiences with therapy; subjective symptom improvement; familiarity with medical treatments; understanding of nocturnal hypoventilation and its consequences; family and health-care team support; and early adaptation to treatments. Factors associated with poor bilevel NIV adherence included previous negative experiences with therapy, negative attitude towards therapy; difficulty adapting; perceived lack of support from family or health-care team; fear/embarrassment regarding treatment; caregivers not being health-minded; technical issues; side effects; and a lack of subjective symptom improvement. Conclusions: The dimensions which most affect adherence to bilevel NIV are those which contribute to youths' conception of feeling “well” or “unwell.” Adherence to treatment may hinge largely on the way in which NIV is initially experienced and framed. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1355

  18. Adherence and Tolerability of Alzheimer's Disease Medications: A Pragmatic Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Noll L; Perkins, Anthony J; Gao, Sujuan; Skaar, Todd C; Li, Lang; Hendrie, Hugh C; Fowler, Nicole; Callahan, Christopher M; Boustani, Malaz A

    2017-07-01

    Post-marketing comparative trials describe medication use patterns in diverse, real-world populations. Our objective was to determine if differences in rates of adherence and tolerability exist among new users to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI's). Pragmatic randomized, open label comparative trial of AChEI's currently available in the United States. Four memory care practices within four healthcare systems in the greater Indianapolis area. Eligibility criteria included older adults with a diagnosis of possible or probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) who were initiating treatment with an AChEI. Participants were required to have a caregiver to complete assessments, access to a telephone, and be able to understand English. Exclusion criteria consisted of a prior severe adverse event from AChEIs. Participants were randomized to one of three AChEIs in a 1:1:1 ratio and followed for 18 weeks. Caregiver-reported adherence, defined as taking or not taking study medication, and caregiver-reported adverse events, defined as the presence of an adverse event. 196 participants were included with 74.0% female, 30.6% African Americans, and 72.9% who completed at least twelfth grade. Discontinuation rates after 18 weeks were 38.8% for donepezil, 53.0% for galantamine, and 58.7% for rivastigmine (P = .063) in the intent to treat analysis. Adverse events and cost explained 73.1% and 25.4% of discontinuation. No participants discontinued donepezil due to cost. Adverse events were reported by 81.2% of all participants; no between-group differences in total adverse events were statistically significant. This pragmatic comparative trial showed high rates of adverse events and cost-related non-adherence with AChEIs. Interventions improving adherence and persistence to AChEIs may improve AD management. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01362686 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01362686). © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. [Treating coeliac disease. How do we measure adherence to the gluten-free diet?

    PubMed

    Aranda, Elisa A; Araya, Magdalena

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a systemic autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten consumption in genetically susceptible individuals. It exhibits several clinical features, such as blood auto-antibodies (anti-endomysial antibodies EMA, anti-transglutaminase antibodies tTG, anti-deamidated gliadin peptides PGD), plus variable degrees of damage in the small intestinal mucosa. In Chile, tTG is positive in 0.76% in individuals >15 years, with the prevalence of CD being estimated at 0.6%. Approximately17% of first-degree relatives of coeliac patients have been reported tTG positive. To date, the gluten free diet (GFD) is the only known treatment for CD. To be effective, this must be lifelong, permanent, and strict. Gluten content in the GFD is not zero, but is limited to a cut-off of 3ppm (ormg/kg of product) in Chile. Mortality higher than that of the general population has been reported among coeliac patients, and poor adherence to GFD is associated with complications (mainly autoimmune processes and cancer). GFD is difficult to maintain strictly and poor adherence is by far the main cause of lack of response to treatment. Follow-up of adherence is also difficult because there are no objective measurements to assess it. In clinical practice determination of serum EMA, tTG and PGD is routinely used for these purposes, although more recently, the interview by an expert dietitian, validated questionnaires and measurement of faecal 33-mer peptide are being assessed as alternatives or complements to measure adherence to GFD. A review is presented with the current concepts on the available tools to follow up patients on GFD, emphasising those available in Chilel.

  20. MERGING VETERANS AFFAIRS RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS REGISTRY AND PHARMACY DATA TO ASSESS METHOTREXATE ADHERENCE AND DISEASE ACTIVITY IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Grant W; Sauer, Brian C; Hayden, Candace L; Ying, Jian; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Reimold, Andreas M; Caplan, Liron; Kerr, Gail S; Richards, J Steuart; Johnson, Dannette S; Mikuls, Ted R

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Veterans Affairs Rheumatoid Arthritis (VARA) registry and the VA Pharmacy Benefits Management (PBM) database were linked to determine the association of methotrexate (MTX) adherence with RA disease activity. Methods For each patient, the medication possession ratio (MPR) was calculated for the first episode of MTX exposure of ≥12 weeks duration for both new and established MTX users. High MTX adherence was defined as an MPR ≥0.80 and low MTX adherence <0.80. For each patient, the mean DAS28, ESR, and CRP observed during registry follow-up were compared in high versus low adherence groups. Results In 455 RA patients, the prescribed doses of MTX (16±4mg versus 16±4mg, p=0.6) were similar in high adherence patients (n=370) in comparison to low adherence patients (n=85). However, the actual observed MTX doses taken by patients were significantly higher in the high adherence group (16±5mg versus 11±3mg, p<0.001). DAS28 (3.6±1.2 versus 3.9±1.5, p<0.02), ESR (24±18 versus 29±24, p= 0.05) and CRP (1.2±1.3 versus 1.6±1.5, p<0.03) were lower in the high adherence group compared to those with low MTX adherence. These variances were not explained by differences in baseline demographic features, concurrent treatments, or whether MTX was initiated before or after VARA enrollment. Conclusion High MTX adherence was associated with improved clinical outcomes in RA patients treated with MTX. Adjustment for potential confounders did not alter the estimated effect of adherence. These results demonstrate the advantages of being able to merge clinical observations with pharmacy databases to evaluate anti-rheumatic drugs in clinical practice. PMID:21905260

  1. Religious coping and its influence on psychological distress, medication adherence, and quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Thiago H; Hyphantis, Thomas N; Andreoulakis, Elias; Quevedo, João; Miranda, Hesley L; Alves, Gilberto S; Souza, Marcellus H; Braga, Lúcia L; Pargament, Kenneth I; Soczynska, Joanna K; McIntyre, Roger S; Carvalho, André F

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with elevated levels of anxiety and depression and a reduction in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Nonadherence to treatment is also frequent in IBD and compromises outcomes. Religious coping plays a role in the adaptation to several chronic diseases. However, the influence of religious coping on IBD-related psychological distress, HRQoL, and treatment adherence remains unknown. This cross-sectional study recruited 147 consecutive patients with either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Sociodemographic data, disease-related variables, psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), religious coping (Brief RCOPE Scale), HRQoL (WHOQOL-Bref), and adherence (8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale) were assessed. Hierarchical multiple regression models were used to evaluate the effects of religious coping on IBD-related psychological distress, treatment adherence, and HRQoL. Positive RCOPE was negatively associated with anxiety (b = 0.256; p = 0.007) as well as with overall, physical, and mental health HRQoL. Religious struggle was significantly associated with depression (b = 0.307; p < 0.001) and self-reported adherence (b = 0.258; p = 0.009). Finally, anxiety symptoms fully mediated the effect of positive religious coping on overall HRQoL. Religious coping is significantly associated with psychological distress, HRQoL, and adherence in IBD.

  2. The Effectiveness of Mobile Phone Text Messaging in Improving Medication Adherence for Patients with Chronic Diseases: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ershad Sarabi, Roghayeh; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Jamshidi Orak, Roohangiz; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz

    2016-01-01

    Context Medication non-adherence is a commonly observed problem in the self-administration of treatment, regardless of the disease type. Text messaging reminders, as electronic reminders, provide an opportunity to improve medication adherence. In this study, we aimed to provide evidence addressing the question of whether text message reminders were effective in improving patients’ adherence to medication. Evidence Acquisition We carried out a systematic literature search, using the five electronic bibliographic databases: PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane central register of controlled trials. Studies were included on the basis of whether they examined the benefits and effects of short-message service (SMS) interventions on medication adherence. Results The results of this systematic review indicated that text messaging interventions have improved patients’ medication adherence rate (85%, 29.34). Included in the review, those who had problems with adherence, or those whom text messaging was most helpful had HIV, asthma, diabetes, schizophrenia and heart disease (73.5%). The period of intervention varied from 1 week to 14 months. The most common study design was randomized controlled trials (RCTs) (66%) carried out in the developed countries. Conclusions This study demonstrated the potential of mobile phone text messaging for medication non-adherence problem solving. PMID:27437126

  3. The Effectiveness of Mobile Phone Text Messaging in Improving Medication Adherence for Patients with Chronic Diseases: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ershad Sarabi, Roghayeh; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Jamshidi Orak, Roohangiz; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz

    2016-05-01

    Medication non-adherence is a commonly observed problem in the self-administration of treatment, regardless of the disease type. Text messaging reminders, as electronic reminders, provide an opportunity to improve medication adherence. In this study, we aimed to provide evidence addressing the question of whether text message reminders were effective in improving patients' adherence to medication. We carried out a systematic literature search, using the five electronic bibliographic databases: PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane central register of controlled trials. Studies were included on the basis of whether they examined the benefits and effects of short-message service (SMS) interventions on medication adherence. The results of this systematic review indicated that text messaging interventions have improved patients' medication adherence rate (85%, 29.34). Included in the review, those who had problems with adherence, or those whom text messaging was most helpful had HIV, asthma, diabetes, schizophrenia and heart disease (73.5%). The period of intervention varied from 1 week to 14 months. The most common study design was randomized controlled trials (RCTs) (66%) carried out in the developed countries. This study demonstrated the potential of mobile phone text messaging for medication non-adherence problem solving.

  4. Quality of life of coronary artery disease patients after the implementation of planning strategies for medication adherence 1

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Laura Bacelar de Araujo; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus; São-João, Thaís Moreira; Gallani, Maria Cecilia; Cornélio, Marilia Estevam

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to compare the general and specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) between the Intervention (IG) and Control (CG) groups of coronary artery disease patients after the implementation of Action Planning and Coping Planning strategies for medication adherence and to verify the relationship between adherence and HRQoL. METHOD: this was a controlled and randomized study. RESULTS: the sample (n=115) was randomized into two groups, IG (n=59) and CG (n=56). Measures of medication adherence and general and specific HRQoL were obtained in the baseline and after two months of monitoring. CONCLUSION: the findings showed that the combination of intervention strategies - Action Planning and Coping Planning for medication adherence did not affect the HRQoL of coronary artery disease patients in outpatient monitoring. PMID:25806626

  5. [Role of adherence to long-term drug therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease: an Italian intersocietary consensus document].

    PubMed

    Volpe, Massimo; Degli Esposti, Luca; Romeo, Francesco; Trimarco, Bruno; Bovenzi, Francesco Maria; Mastromarino, Vittoria; Battistoni, Allegra

    2014-10-01

    Chronic therapy with statins, antihypertensive and antiplatelet drugs is one of the most important interventions for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Adherence to drug treatment is key to successful therapeutic intervention, especially in chronic conditions. This holds particularly true in the setting of cardiovascular diseases, because poor adherence may have serious adverse effects in terms of morbidity and mortality. Many factors may contribute to poor adherence, which can be either patient-related or dependent on the healthcare system, the physician and the environment. The identification and appropriate correction of these factors may result in both clinical and economic benefits. In this setting it is also important to assess the implications of the increasing use of generic or equivalent drugs on adherence to pharmacological therapy.

  6. Quality of life of coronary artery disease patients after the implementation of planning strategies for medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Laura Bacelar de Araujo; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus; São-João, Thaís Moreira; Gallani, Maria Cecilia; Cornélio, Marilia Estevam

    2015-01-01

    to compare the general and specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) between the Intervention (IG) and Control (CG) groups of coronary artery disease patients after the implementation of Action Planning and Coping Planning strategies for medication adherence and to verify the relationship between adherence and HRQoL. this was a controlled and randomized study. the sample (n=115) was randomized into two groups, IG (n=59) and CG (n=56). Measures of medication adherence and general and specific HRQoL were obtained in the baseline and after two months of monitoring. the findings showed that the combination of intervention strategies - Action Planning and Coping Planning for medication adherence did not affect the HRQoL of coronary artery disease patients in outpatient monitoring.

  7. [Impact on non-adherence to farmacologic treatment on quality and sustainability of healthcare. Focus on cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Romeo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to drug treatment is key to successful therapeutic intervention, especially in chronic conditions. This holds particularly true in the setting of cardiovascular diseases, because poor adherence may have serious adverse effects in terms of morbidity and mortality. Many factors may contribute to poor adherence, which can be either patient-related or dependent on the healthcare system, the physician and the environment. The identification and appropriate correction of these factors may result in both clinical and economic benefits. In this setting it is also important to assess the implications of the increasing use of generic or equivalent drugs on adherence to pharmacological therapy. This topic has recently been addressed by an important Expert Consensus Document, endorsed by the Italian Societies of Cardiovascular Disease and Prevention, which was published in the Giornale Italiano di Cardiologia. The document addressed the relevance of the problem, potential determinants and possible solutions.

  8. Clinical usefulness of adherence to gastro-esophageal reflux disease guideline by Spanish gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Mearin, Fermín; Ponce, Julio; Ponce, Marta; Balboa, Agustín; González, Miguel A; Zapardiel, Javier

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate usefulness of adherence to gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) guideline established by the Spanish Association of Gastroenterology. METHODS: Prospective, observational and multicentre study of 301 patients with typical symptoms of GERD who should be managed in accordance with guidelines and were attended by gastroenterologists in daily practice. Patients (aged > 18 years) were eligible for inclusion if they had typical symptoms of GERD (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation) as the major complaint in the presence or absence of accompanying atypical symptoms, such as dyspeptic symptoms and/or supraesophageal symptoms. Diagnostic and therapeutic decisions should be made based on specific recommendations of the Spanish clinical practice guideline for GERD which is a widely disseminated and well known instrument among Spanish in digestive disease specialists. RESULTS: Endoscopy was indicated in 123 (41%) patients: 50 with alarm symptoms, 32 with age > 50 years without alarm symptom. Seventy-two patients (58.5%) had esophagitis (grade A, 23, grade B, 28, grade C, 18, grade D, 3). In the presence of alarm symptoms, endoscopy was indicated consistently with recommendations in 98% of cases. However, in the absence of alarm symptoms, endoscopy was indicated in 33% of patients > 50 years (not recommended by the guideline). Adherence for proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) therapy was 80%, but doses prescribed were lower (half) in 5% of cases and higher (double) in 15%. Adherence regarding duration of PPI therapy was 69%; duration was shorter than recommended in 1% (4 wk in esophagitis grades C-D) or longer in 30% (8 wk in esophagitis grades A-B or in patients without endoscopy). Treatment response was higher when PPI doses were consistent with guidelines, although differences were not significant (95% vs 85%). CONCLUSION: GERD guideline compliance was quite good although endoscopy was over indicated in patients > 50 years without alarm symptoms; PPIs were

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Crohn's Disease-Associated Adherent-Invasive E. coli Strain LF82

    PubMed Central

    de Vallée, Amélie; Dossat, Carole; Vacherie, Benoit; Zineb, El Hajji; Segurens, Beatrice; Barbe, Valerie; Sauvanet, Pierre; Neut, Christel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Medigue, Claudine; Mojica, Francisco J. M.; Peyret, Pierre; Bonnet, Richard; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2010-01-01

    Background Ileal lesions of Crohn's disease (CD) patients are abnormally colonized by pathogenic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) able to invade and to replicate within intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Principal Findings We report here the complete genome sequence of E. coli LF82, the reference strain of adherent-invasive E. coli associated with ileal Crohn's disease. The LF82 genome of 4,881,487 bp total size contains a circular chromosome with a size of 4,773,108 bp and a plasmid of 108,379 bp. The analysis of predicted coding sequences (CDSs) within the LF82 flexible genome indicated that this genome is close to the avian pathogenic strain APEC_01, meningitis-associated strain S88 and urinary-isolated strain UTI89 with regards to flexible genome and single nucleotide polymorphisms in various virulence factors. Interestingly, we observed that strains LF82 and UTI89 adhered at a similar level to Intestine-407 cells and that like LF82, APEC_01 and UTI89 were highly invasive. However, A1EC strain LF82 had an intermediate killer phenotype compared to APEC-01 and UTI89 and the LF82 genome does not harbour most of specific virulence genes from ExPEC. LF82 genome has evolved from those of ExPEC B2 strains by the acquisition of Salmonella and Yersinia isolated or clustered genes or CDSs located on pLF82 plasmid and at various loci on the chromosome. Conclusion LF82 genome analysis indicated that a number of genes, gene clusters and pathoadaptative mutations which have been acquired may play a role in virulence of AIEC strain LF82. PMID:20862302

  10. Perceptions and Attitudes Towards Medication Adherence during Pregnancy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Gallinger, Zane R; Rumman, Amir; Nguyen, Geoffrey C

    2016-08-01

    Women with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] report concerns about medication safety during pregnancy. Adherence to IBD medications may be lower in pregnant patients as a result. The aim of this study was to assess medication adherence during pregnancy in women with inflammatory bowel disease. Female patients of childbearing age completed a self-administered, structured survey. We collected demographic data, medication history, and self-reported adherence to IBD medications during pregnancy. We also assessed knowledge and perceptions of IBD medication safety in pregnancy. A time trade-off [TTO] analysis was done to assess health utilities for continuing or discontinuing IBD medications during pregnancy. A total of 204 women completed the survey [mean age was 32.8 years]. Current or previous pregnancy was reported by 101 patients [median parity 2, median gravity 1]. While pregnant or attempting to conceive, 47 [46.5%] participants reported stopping a prescribed IBD medication. Of those, 20 participants reported stopping medications without the advice of a physician. TTO analysis was completed by 31 patients. When presented with the option of continuing a potentially teratogenic medication, switching to less effective medication that is non-teratogenic, or stopping medication all together, participants consistently preferred to not remain on the most effective IBD therapy. Women with IBD report preference to not remain on IBD medications during pregnancy. This is driven by concerns about safety and uncertainty about teratogenic effects. Women with IBD may benefit from increased education about medication safety in pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Statin adherence and the risk of Parkinson's disease: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rozani, Violetta; Giladi, Nir; El-Ad, Baruch; Gurevich, Tanya; Tsamir, Judith; Hemo, Beatriz; Peretz, Chava

    2017-01-01

    While experimental data provided some compelling evidence on the benefits of statins on dopaminergic neurons, observational studies reported conflicting results regarding the potential of statins to effect the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). To evaluate the association between changes in statin adherence over time and PD risk. A population-based cohort of new statin users (ages 40-79, years 1999-2012) was derived from a large Israeli healthcare services organization. Data included history of statin purchases and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Personal statin adherence was measured annually by the proportion of days covered (PDC). PD was detected employing a drug-tracer approach. Stratified (by sex, LDL-C levels at baseline and age) Cox proportional hazards models with time-dependent covariates were used to compute adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) with 95%CI. The cohort included 232,877 individuals, 49.3% men. Mean age at first statin purchase was 56.5 (±9.8) years for men and 58.7 (±9.2) years for women. PDC distribution for the whole follow up period differed between men and women: medians 58.3% and 54.1% respectively. During a mean follow up of 7.6 (±3.4) years, 2,550 (1.1%) PD cases were identified. In a 1-year lagged analysis, we found no association between annual statin adherence and PD risk in all age-groups regardless of statin type and potency. Age-pooled HR (95%CI) for men and women with LDL-C levels at baseline ≤160mg/dL were: 0.99 (0.99-1.01), 1.01 (1.00-1.02); and for men and women with LDL-C >160mg/dL levels: 0.99 (0.98-1.01), 0.97 (0.98-1.01). Our findings suggest that statin adherence over time does not affect PD risk. Future studies should use large-scale cohorts and refining assessments of long-term profiles in statin adherence.

  12. Health system barriers and facilitators to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Amitava; Khandelwal, Shweta; Nambiar, Lavanya; Saxena, Malvika; Peck, Victoria; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Faria Neto, Jose Rocha; Quinto, Katherine Curi; Smyth, Andrew; Leong, Darryl; Werba, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Secondary prevention is cost-effective for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but uptake is suboptimal. Understanding barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary prevention for CVD at multiple health system levels may inform policy. Objectives To conduct a systematic review of barriers and facilitators to adherence/persistence to secondary CVD prevention medications at health system level. Methods Included studies reported effects of health system level factors on adherence/persistence to secondary prevention medications for CVD (coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease). Studies considered at least one of β blockers, statins, angiotensin–renin system blockers and aspirin. Relevant databases were searched from 1 January 1966 until 1 October 2015. Full texts were screened for inclusion by 2 independent reviewers. Results Of 2246 screened articles, 25 studies were included (12 trials, 11 cohort studies, 1 cross-sectional study and 1 case–control study) with 132 140 individuals overall (smallest n=30, largest n=63 301). 3 studies included upper middle-income countries, 1 included a low middle-income country and 21 (84%) included high-income countries (9 in the USA). Studies concerned established CVD (n=4), cerebrovascular disease (n=7) and coronary heart disease (n=14). Three studies considered persistence and adherence. Quantity and quality of evidence was limited for adherence, persistence and across drug classes. Studies were concerned with governance and delivery (n=19, including 4 trials of fixed-dose combination therapy, FDC), intellectual resources (n=1), human resources (n=1) and health system financing (n=4). Full prescription coverage, reduced copayments, FDC and counselling were facilitators associated with higher adherence. Conclusions High-quality evidence on health system barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary prevention medications for CVD is lacking, especially for low-income settings. Full prescription coverage

  13. Diet adherence and gluten exposure in coeliac disease and self-reported non-coeliac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Løvik, A; Skodje, G; Bratlie, J; Brottveit, M; Lundin, K E A

    2017-02-01

    Adherence to gluten-free diet in self reported non-coeliac gluten sensitive subjects is scarcely researched. Objectives of the study were to compare dietary adherence in coeliac disease (CD) subjects and in non-coeliac gluten sensitive (NCGS) subjects, and to estimate gluten exposure based on weighed food records and analysis of gluten content in selected food items. Twenty-three subjects with biopsy verified CD on a gluten-free diet and 34 HLA-DQ2(+) NCGS subjects on a self-instituted gluten-free diet were enrolled. The latter group was under investigation of CD. Dietary adherence was assessed by frequency questionnaire and structured forms supplied by weighed food records. For the analyses of food samples, the sandwich R5-ELISA, Ridascreen(®) Gliadin competitive method was used. There was no difference in dietary adherence between CD and NCGS subjects (83% vs 68%, p = 0.21). NCGS subjects were mainly self-educated in gluten-free diet compared to CD subjects (91% and 39%, respectively, p < 0.001). In non-adherent subjects, there was no difference in gluten exposure between CD and NCGS (10 vs 138 mg/day, p = 0.83). There was no difference in BMR-factor between CD and NCGS subjects, or between adherent and non-adherent subjects. Both CD and NCGS subjects were largely adherent, and adherence did not differ between the groups. Gluten exposure varied greatly, and some CD and NCGS subjects reached gluten intake above 500 mg/day, which might have considerable health effects on the individual, especially in case of coeliac disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. Patterns of Adherence of Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates to Epithelial Cells, and its Association with Disease and with Virulence Factors.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Jiménez, Flor Elizabeth; Torres, Javier; Flores-Luna, Lourdes; Cerezo, Silvia Giono; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita

    2016-02-01

    Adherence to the gastric epithelium is one of the most important steps of Helicobacter pylori to remain and cause disease. The aim of this study was to analyze whether H. pylori isolates from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases present differences in the pattern of adherence to gastric epithelial cells (AGS), in the ability to induce IL-8, and in the presence of virulence genes. We tested 75 H. pylori strains isolated from nonatrophic gastritis, gastric cancer, and duodenal ulcer patients. The adhesion pattern and IL-8 induction were determined in AGS cells, and invasion of AGS cells was studied using a gentamicin protection assay. The IL-8 levels induced were determined by ELISA. Helicobacter pylori strains presented diffuse adherence (DA) and localized (LA) adherence patterns, similar to those described for enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), were observed in AGS cells. A DA pattern was observed in 57% and LA in 43% of the strains, and DA was more frequent in isolates from patients with gastric cancer (p = 0.044). Strains with a LA pattern induced higher levels of IL-8 (p = 0.042) in AGS cells. The adherence pattern was not associated with neither invasiveness nor with the presence of virulence genes. Our study shows that H. pylori strains present adherence patterns to AGS cells resembling those observed in EPEC and that these patterns may be associated with disease and with activity on AGS cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Socio-demographic and clinical factors influencing the adherence to treatment in Parkinson's disease: the ADHESON study.

    PubMed

    Valldeoriola, F; Coronell, C; Pont, C; Buongiorno, M T; Cámara, A; Gaig, C; Compta, Y

    2011-07-01

    Symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are usually controlled by a continuous titration of medication and addition of multiple therapies over the course of the disease. Therapeutic complex schemes, polymedication, comorbidities and the number of medications required contribute to non-adherence. This cross-sectional survey was performed in 418 patients with PD on treatment with any antiparkinsonian medication. Patient adherence was assessed through physicians' subjective perception and the Morisky-Green test (MGT). Several social, demographic and clinical features were correlated through bivariate and multivariate analyses. According to the physician's opinion 93.7%, and according to the MGT 60.4% of patients were adherent to parkinsonian therapy. The bivariate analysis showed greater adherence in patients with a high level of knowledge about the disease (62.8%), good clinical control (63.6%), a spouse or life partner (63%) and higher incomes (66%). Negative correlation with psychiatric symptoms was found. In relation to the MGT, the logistic regression model showed a negative correlation between cognitive deterioration and psychiatric pathology and adherence to therapy. The physician's impression overestimated the compliance of patients when compared with an objective evaluation such as the MGT. Cognitive impairment and psychiatric symptoms are the clinical variables associated with a lower level of adherence. © 2010 The Author(s). European Journal of Neurology © 2010 EFNS.

  16. Factors associated with low adherence to medicine treatment for chronic diseases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Mengue, Sotero Serrate; Arrais, Paulo Sergio Dourado; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Farias, Mareni Rocha; Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva Dal

    2016-12-01

    To analyze factors associated with low adherence to drug treatment for chronic diseases in Brazil. Analysis of data from Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos (PNAUM - Brazilian Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines), a population-based cross-sectional household survey, based on a probabilistic sample of the Brazilian population. We analyzed the association between low adherence to drug treatment measured by the Brief Medication Questionnaire and demographic, socioeconomic, health, care and prescription factors. We used Poisson regression model to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios, their respective 95% confidence interval (95%CI) and p-value (Wald test). The prevalence of low adherence to drug treatment for chronic diseases was 30.8% (95%CI 28.8-33.0). The highest prevalence of low adherence was associated with individuals: young adults; no education; resident in the Northeast and Midwest Regions of Brazil; paying part of the treatment; poor self-perceived health; three or more diseases; reported limitations caused by a chronic disease; using five drugs or more. Low adherence to drug treatment for chronic diseases in Brazil is relevant, and regional and demographic differences and those related to patients' health care and therapy regime require coordinated action between health professionals, researchers, managers and policy makers. Analisar fatores associados à baixa adesão ao tratamento farmacológico de doenças crônicas no Brasil. Análise de dados oriundos da Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos (PNAUM), inquérito domiciliar de base populacional, de delineamento transversal, baseado em amostra probabilística da população brasileira. Analisou-se a associação entre baixa adesão ao tratamento medicamentoso mensurado pelo Brief Medication Questionnaire e fatores demográficos, socioeconômicos, de saúde, assist

  17. Maintaining Control of Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease: Adherence to Inhaled Therapy and Risks and Benefits of Switching Devices.

    PubMed

    Melani, Andrea S; Paleari, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major obstructive airway diseases that involve underlying airway inflammation. The most widely used pharmacotherapies for asthma and COPD are inhaled agents that have been shown to be effective and safe in these patients. However, despite the availability of effective pharmacologic treatment and comprehensive treatment guidelines, the prevalence of inadequately controlled asthma and COPD is high. A main reason for this is poor adherence. Adherence is a big problem for all chronic diseases, but in asthma and COPD patients there are some additional difficulties because of poor inhalation technique and inhaler choice. Easier-to-use devices and educational strategies on proper inhaler use from health caregivers can improve inhaler technique. The type of device used and the concordance between patient and physician in the choice of inhaler can also improve adherence and are as important as the drug. Adherence to inhaled therapy is absolutely necessary for optimizing patient control. If disease control is not adequate despite good adherence, switching to a more appropriate inhaled therapy is recommended. By contrast, uninformed switching or switching to less user-friendly inhaler may impact disease control negatively. This critical review of the available literature is aimed to provide a guidance protocol on when a switch may be recommended in individual patients.

  18. Facilitators and Barriers to Noninvasive Ventilation Adherence in Youth with Nocturnal Hypoventilation Secondary to Obesity or Neuromuscular Disease.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Jonathan; Rohde, Kristina; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Buchholz, Annick; Katz, Sherri Lynne

    2015-12-15

    Many youth struggle with adherence to bilevel noninvasive ventilation (NIV), often shortly after initiation of treatment. Anecdotal evidence suggests youths with comorbid obesity struggle with adherence while youths with comorbid neuromuscular disease demonstrate better adherence rates. The objective of this study was to explore factors relating to bilevel NIV adherence, and to compare these between youths with underlying obesity or neuromuscular disease. An exploratory qualitative approach was used to examine youth and caregivers' experiences with and perceptions of bilevel NIV. Semi-structured interviews (n = 16) of caregivers and youths were conducted. Youths 12 years and older with nocturnal hypoventilation diagnosed on polysomnography and managed with bilevel NIV, with either concurrent obesity or neuromuscular disease were included. Thematic analysis of interview data was conducted using qualitative analysis software. Factors associated with positive bilevel NIV adherence included previous encouraging experiences with therapy; subjective symptom improvement; familiarity with medical treatments; understanding of nocturnal hypoventilation and its consequences; family and health-care team support; and early adaptation to treatments. Factors associated with poor bilevel NIV adherence included previous negative experiences with therapy, negative attitude towards therapy; difficulty adapting; perceived lack of support from family or health-care team; fear/embarrassment regarding treatment; caregivers not being health-minded; technical issues; side effects; and a lack of subjective symptom improvement. The dimensions which most affect adherence to bilevel NIV are those which contribute to youths' conception of feeling "well" or "unwell." Adherence to treatment may hinge largely on the way in which NIV is initially experienced and framed. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1355. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  19. Coevolution of symbiotic spirochete diversity in lower termites.

    PubMed

    Berlanga, Mercedes; Paster, Bruce J; Guerrero, Ricardo

    2007-06-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of symbiotic spirochetes from five dry-wood feeding lower termites (Cryptotermes cavifrons, Heterotermes tenuis, Kalotermes flavicollis, Neotermes mona, and Reticulitermes grassei) was compared to those described in previous reports. The 16S rDNA bacterial genes were PCR-amplified from DNA isolated from intestinal samples using a spirochete-selective primer, and the 16S amplicons were cloned into Escherichia coli. Sequences of the cloned inserts were then used to determine closest relatives by comparison with published sequences. Clones sharing more than 97% sequence identity were grouped into the same phylotype. Forty-three new phylotypes were identified. These termite whole-gut-spirochetes fell into two previous defined clusters, designated as Treponema Clusters I and II, and one new Cluster III. Thirty-seven phylotypes were grouped in Cluster I. Cluster II comprised three phylotypes, two from Reticulitermes grassei (LJ029 and LJ012) and one from Heterotermes tenuis (LQ016). Three phylotypes, LK057, LK050 and LK028, were affiliated to Cluster III. Members of Cluster I showed the following characteristics: (i) spirochete phylotypes from a particular species of termite were more closely related to each other than to phylotypes of other termite species; (ii) spirochetes obtained from different genera of the same family, such as Cryptotermes sp., Kalotermes sp., and Neotermes sp., all from the family Kalotermitidae, were also related to each other. It was therefore concluded that spirochetes are specific symbionts that have coevolved with their respective species of termites, are stably harbored, and are closely related to members of the same termite family.

  20. Metabolic syndrome, adherence to the Mediterranean diet and 10-year cardiovascular disease incidence: The ATTICA study.

    PubMed

    Kastorini, Christina-Maria; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Chrysohoou, Christina; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi; Pitaraki, Evangelia; Puddu, Paolo Emilio; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Pitsavos, Christos

    2016-03-01

    To better understand the metabolic syndrome (MS) spectrum through principal components analysis and further evaluate the role of the Mediterranean diet on MS presence. During 2001-2002, 1514 men and 1528 women (>18 y) without any clinical evidence of CVD or any other chronic disease, at baseline, living in greater Athens area, Greece, were enrolled. In 2011-2012, the 10-year follow-up was performed in 2583 participants (15% of the participants were lost to follow-up). Incidence of fatal or non-fatal CVD was defined according to WHO-ICD-10 criteria. MS was defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment panel III (revised NCEP ATP III) definition. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using the MedDietScore (range 0-55). Five principal components were derived, explaining 73.8% of the total variation, characterized by the: a) body weight and lipid profile, b) blood pressure, c) lipid profile, d) glucose profile, e) inflammatory factors. All components were associated with higher likelihood of CVD incidence. After adjusting for various potential confounding factors, adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern for each 10% increase in the MedDietScore, was associated with 15% lower odds of CVD incidence (95%CI: 0.71-1.06). For the participants with low adherence to the Mediterranean diet all five components were significantly associated with increased likelihood of CVD incidence. However, for the ones following closely the Mediterranean pattern positive, yet not significant associations were observed. Results of the present work propose a wider MS definition, while highlighting the beneficial role of the Mediterranean dietary pattern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gluten free diet adherence in coeliac disease. The role of psychological symptoms in bridging the intention-behaviour gap.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Kirby; Mullan, Barbara; Sharpe, Louise

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the potential role of psychological symptoms in limiting the translation of positive intention into strict gluten free diet (GFD) adherence in coeliac disease (CD) within a theory of planned behaviour (TPB) framework. It was hypothesised that participants with more symptomatic psychological profiles would exhibit poorer adherence, primarily in the context of positive intentions. Coeliac disease participants (N=390) completed online measures of gluten free diet adherence, psychological symptoms, coping behaviour, and TPB items. Intention and behaviour were moderately correlated, confirming the existence of the intention-behaviour gap. Psychological symptoms accounted for additional variance over and above TPB variables in GFD adherence but not intention. Participants who failed to act on their positive intentions displayed more psychological symptoms and greater reliance on maladaptive coping strategies than those with consistent intention-behaviour relationships (p<.01). The heightened incidence of psychological symptoms in CD has a small but significant negative impact on the ability to translate positive intentions into strict adherence. Directions for future research including interventions to improve GFD adherence are discussed.

  2. A Randomised Controlled Trial to Test the Effectiveness of Planning Strategies to Improve Medication Adherence in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Meslot, Carine; Gauchet, Aurélie; Hagger, Martin S; Chatzisarantis, Nikos; Lehmann, Audrey; Allenet, Benoît

    2017-03-01

    Low levels of adherence to medication prescribed to treat and manage chronic disease may lead to maladaptive health outcomes. Theory-based, easy-to-administer interventions that promote patients' effective self-regulation of their medication-taking behaviour are needed if adherence is to be maximised. We tested the effectiveness of an intervention adopting planning techniques to promote medication adherence. Outpatients with cardiovascular disease (N = 71) were allocated to either an experimental condition, in which participants were asked to form implementation intentions and coping plans related to their treatment, or to a no-planning control condition, in which participants received no treatment. Patients also completed self-report measures of medication adherence, self-efficacy, and beliefs in medication necessity and concerns. Measures were administered at baseline and at 6-week follow-up. Results revealed no overall main effect for the intervention on medication adherence. Post-hoc moderator analyses revealed that the intervention was effective in patients with lower necessity beliefs compared to those with higher necessity beliefs. While current findings have promise in demonstrating the conditional effects of planning interventions, there is a need to replicate these findings by manipulating planning and beliefs independently and testing their direct and interactive effects on medication adherence. © 2016 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  3. Relationship between depression and medication adherence in cardiovascular disease: the perfect challenge for the integrated care team

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Carly M; Gathright, Emily C; Garcia, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Many individuals with cardiovascular disease (CVD) experience depression that is associated with poor health outcomes, which may be because of medication nonadherence. Several factors influence medication adherence and likely influence the relationship between depression and medication adherence in CVD patients. This comprehensive study reviews the existing literature on depression and medication adherence in CVD patients, addresses the methods of and problems with measuring medication adherence, and explains why the integrated care team is uniquely situated to improve the outcomes in depressed CVD patients. This paper also explores how the team can collaboratively target depressive symptoms and medication-taking behavior in routine clinical care. Finally, it suggests the limitations to the integrated care approach, identifies targets for future research, and discusses the implications for CVD patients and their families. PMID:28352161

  4. Relationship between depression and medication adherence in cardiovascular disease: the perfect challenge for the integrated care team.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Carly M; Gathright, Emily C; Garcia, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Many individuals with cardiovascular disease (CVD) experience depression that is associated with poor health outcomes, which may be because of medication nonadherence. Several factors influence medication adherence and likely influence the relationship between depression and medication adherence in CVD patients. This comprehensive study reviews the existing literature on depression and medication adherence in CVD patients, addresses the methods of and problems with measuring medication adherence, and explains why the integrated care team is uniquely situated to improve the outcomes in depressed CVD patients. This paper also explores how the team can collaboratively target depressive symptoms and medication-taking behavior in routine clinical care. Finally, it suggests the limitations to the integrated care approach, identifies targets for future research, and discusses the implications for CVD patients and their families.

  5. Motivation is a crucial factor for adherence to a healthy lifestyle among people with coronary heart disease after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Kähkönen, Outi; Kankkunen, Päivi; Saaranen, Terhi; Miettinen, Heikki; Kyngäs, Helvi; Lamidi, Marja-Leena

    2015-10-01

    To test the Theory of Adherence of People with Chronic Disease with regard to adherence to treatment among patients with coronary heart disease after a percutaneous coronary intervention. Increased knowledge of the concept of adherence is needed for the development of nursing interventions and nursing guidelines for patients with coronary heart disease. A cross-sectional, multi-centre study. This study was conducted from February-December 2013 with 416 patients with coronary heart disease 4 months after undergoing a percutaneous coronary intervention. A self-reported questionnaire was used to assess their adherence to treatment. Data were analysed using structural equation modelling. The theory explained 45% of the adherence to a healthy lifestyle and 7% of the adherence to medication. Structural equation modelling confirmed that motivation and results of care had the highest association with adherence to a healthy lifestyle. Responsibility was associated with adherence to medication. Support from next of kin, support from nurses and physicians, and motivation, co-operation, fear of complications and a sense of normality were associated with adherence. Patients who are motivated to perform self-care and consider the results of care to be important were more likely to adhere to a healthy lifestyle. Responsible patients were more likely to adhere to their medication. It is important to account for these elements as a part of secondary prevention strategies among patients with coronary heart disease after a percutaneous coronary intervention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Better knowledge improves adherence to lifestyle changes and medication in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Alm-Roijer, Carin; Stagmo, Martin; Udén, Giggi; Erhardt, Leif

    2004-12-01

    Many patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) are not managed adequately, and we often fail to reach treatment targets. To investigate if knowledge of risk factors for CHD, measured by a questionnaire, would show any relation to advice to compliance to lifestyle changes to attain treatment goals and adherence to drug therapy. Men and women <71 years who had had a cardiac event were screened consecutively (509) from the medical records. Responders (392) were interviewed, examined and received a questionnaire. Three hundred and forty-seven patients answered the questionnaire regarding their general knowledge of risk factors for CHD, compliance to lifestyle changes to attain treatment goals and adherence to drug therapy. There were statistically significant correlations between general knowledge about risk factors for CHD and compliance to certain lifestyle changes: weight, physical activity, stress management, diet, attainment of lipid level goals and the likelihood of taking prescribed blood pressure-lowering drugs. General knowledge of risk factors had no correlation to blood glucose or blood pressure levels nor on smoking habits or treatment patterns for prescribed lipid- and blood glucose-lowering drugs. Knowledge correlates to patient behaviour with respect to some risk factors, which should be recognised in preventive programs.

  7. Adherence of Myxobolus cerebralis myxospores to waders: Implications for disease dissemination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gates, K.K.; Guy, C.S.; Zale, A.V.; Horton, T.B.

    2008-01-01

    The vectors involved in the spread of whirling disease, which is caused by Myxobolus cerebralis, are only partly understood. However, the parasite has rapidly become established in many regions, suggesting that it is easily disseminated. We gained insight into transport vectors by examining the surface porosity of common wading equipment materials and the adherence of M. cerebralis myxospores to them. Interstitial spaces within rubber, felt, lightweight nylon, and neoprene were measured on scanning electron microscope images. Myxospores were applied to each material, the material was rinsed, and the myxospores recovered to assess adherence. The mean interstitial space size of rubber was the smallest (2.0 ??m), whereas that of felt was the largest (31.3 ??m). The highest recovery rates were from rubber and the glass control. Percent myxospore recovery varied by material, the recovery from felt being lower than that from all other materials. The potential for felt to carry even small numbers of myxospores suggests that the introduction of M. cerebralis by felt-soled wading boots is possible. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  8. Physicians Infrequently Adhere to Hepatitis Vaccination Guidelines for Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thudi, Kavitha; Yadav, Dhiraj; Sweeney, Kaitlyn; Behari, Jaideep

    2013-01-01

    Background and Goals Hepatitis A (HAV) and hepatitis B (HBV) vaccination in patients with chronic liver disease is an accepted standard of care. We determined HAV and HBV vaccination rates in a tertiary care referral hepatology clinic and the impact of electronic health record (EHR)-based reminders on adherence to vaccination guidelines. Methods We reviewed the records of 705 patients with chronic liver disease referred to our liver clinic in 2008 with at least two follow-up visits during the subsequent year. Demographics, referral source, etiology, and hepatitis serology were recorded. We determined whether eligible patients were offered vaccination and whether patients received vaccination. Barriers to vaccination were determined by a follow-up telephone interview. Results HAV and HBV serologic testing prior to referral and at the liver clinic were performed in 14.5% and 17.7%; and 76.7% and 74% patients, respectively. Hepatologists recommended vaccination for HAV in 63% and for HBV in 59.7% of eligible patients. Patient demographics or disease etiology did not influence recommendation rates. Significant variability was observed in vaccination recommendation amongst individual providers (30–98.6%), which did not correlate with the number of patients seen by each physician. Vaccination recommendation rates were not different for Medicare patients with hepatitis C infection for whom a vaccination reminder was automatically generated by the EHR. Most patients who failed to get vaccination after recommendation offered no specific reason for noncompliance; insurance was a barrier in a minority. Conclusions Hepatitis vaccination rates were suboptimal even in an academic, sub-speciality setting, with wide-variability in provider adherence to vaccination guidelines. PMID:23923056

  9. Self-reported adherence to medical treatment, breastfeeding behaviour, and disease activity during the postpartum period in women with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Julsgaard, Mette; Nørgaard, Mette; Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Grosen, Anne; Hasseriis, Sara; Christensen, Lisbet Ambrosius

    2014-08-01

    Adherence to medical treatment among women with Crohn's disease (CD) in the postpartum period has never been examined. The impact of breast-feeding on disease activity remains controversial. We aimed to assess rates of non-adherence to medical treatment among women with CD in the postpartum period. Further, to assess breast-feeding rates and the impact of breast-feeding on the risk of relapse. Within a population of 1.6 million, we identified 154 women with CD who had given birth within a 6-year period. We combined questionnaire data, data from medical records and public register data. We used logistic regression to estimate prevalence odds ratios (POR) for non-adherence, relapse and breast-feeding according to different predictors. Among 105 (80%) respondents, 59 (56%) reported taking medication. Of these, 66.1% reported to be adherent to medical treatment. Fear of medication transmission to the breast milk was stated as the reason for non-adherence in 60%. Those who received counselling regarding medical treatment were less likely to be non-adherent (POR 0.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.1-2.5). In total, 87.6% were breast-feeding. Breast-feeding rates did not vary by medical treatment. Predictors for relapse in CD were smoking (POR 1.85, 95% CI 0.62-5.54) and non-adherence among medical treated (POR 1.25, 95% CI 0.26-6.00). Breast-feeding seemed protective against relapse (POR 0.33, 95% CI 0.10-1.26). Adherence to medical treatment in the postpartum period was high, and counselling seemed to increase adherence. Relapse may be explained by non-adherence or smoking while breast-feeding seemed protective.

  10. Evaluation of a group-based behavioral intervention to promote adherence in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Kevin A; Hente, Elizabeth A; Odell, Shannon; Herzer, Michele; Ingerski, Lisa M; Guilfoyle, Shanna M; Denson, Lee A

    2012-01-01

    To pilot test the feasibility and acceptability of a family-based group behavioral intervention and to improve medication adherence in adolescents diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease. Participants were 40 adolescents aged 11-18 years diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease and their primary caregivers, who were randomized to either a four-session Family-Based Group Behavioral Treatment or Usual Care over a 6-week period. Adherence was measured using a multi-method, multi-informant assessment involving caregiver-report and patient-report, pill count data, and electronic monitoring. Adherence rates ranged from 66 to 89% for 6-mercaptopurine/azathioprine and 51 to 93% for mesalamine across assessment methods. The intervention was feasible, as evidenced by the 99% treatment session attendance rate, and acceptable based on patient and caregiver report. Repeated measures analysis of variance tests revealed nonsignificant differences between the conditions from baseline to post-treatment assessments for pill count, electronic monitor, and primary caregiver-reported adherence (P's>0.05). There was a statistically significant improvement in patient-reported mesalamine adherence represented by a significant main effect for Condition (F=22.24, P<0.01; δ=0.79) and Condition×Time interaction (F=13.32, P<0.05; δ=0.69). Findings suggest potential for use of behavioral intervention to improve medication adherence in this population. This intervention may be more effective with more complex regimens (e.g. multiple doses per day) such as those prescribed with mesalamine. Further research is needed to examine this type of intervention in more diverse samples with more active disease. Use of alternative adherence measurement approaches, including electronic pill boxes and/or real-time self-report (e.g. by text messaging, electronic diaries, etc.) is also recommended.

  11. Tick Surveillance for Relapsing Fever Spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi in Hokkaido, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; Nakao, Minoru; Ito, Takuya; Andoh, Masako; Maeda, Ken; Watarai, Masahisa; Sato, Kozue; Kawabata, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    During 2012–2013, a total of 4325 host-seeking adult ticks belonging to the genus Ixodes were collected from various localities of Hokkaido, the northernmost island of Japan. Tick lysates were subjected to real-time PCR assay to detect borrelial infection. The assay was designed for specific detection of the Relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi and for unspecific detection of Lyme disease-related spirochetes. Overall prevalence of B. miyamotoi was 2% (71/3532) in Ixodes persulcatus, 4.3% (5/117) in Ixodes pavlovskyi and 0.1% (1/676) in Ixodes ovatus. The prevalence in I. persulcatus and I. pavlovskyi ticks were significantly higher than in I. ovatus. Co-infections with Lyme disease-related spirochetes were found in all of the tick species. During this investigation, we obtained 6 isolates of B. miyamotoi from I. persulcatus and I. pavlovskyi by culture in BSK-M medium. Phylogenetic trees of B. miyamotoi inferred from each of 3 housekeeping genes (glpQ, 16S rDNA, and flaB) demonstrated that the Hokkaido isolates were clustered with Russian B. miyamotoi, but were distinguishable from North American and European B. miyamotoi. A multilocus sequence analysis using 8 genes (clpA, clpX, nifS, pepX, pyrG, recG, rplB, and uvrA) suggested that all Japanese B. miyamotoi isolates, including past isolates, were genetically clonal, although these were isolated from different tick and vertebrate sources. From these results, B. miyamotoi-infected ticks are widely distributed throughout Hokkaido. Female I. persulcatus are responsible for most human tick-bites, thereby I. persulcatus is likely the most important vector of indigenous relapsing fever from tick bites in Hokkaido. PMID:25111141

  12. Tick surveillance for relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Takano, Ai; Toyomane, Kochi; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; Nakao, Minoru; Ito, Takuya; Andoh, Masako; Maeda, Ken; Watarai, Masahisa; Sato, Kozue; Kawabata, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    During 2012-2013, a total of 4325 host-seeking adult ticks belonging to the genus Ixodes were collected from various localities of Hokkaido, the northernmost island of Japan. Tick lysates were subjected to real-time PCR assay to detect borrelial infection. The assay was designed for specific detection of the Relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi and for unspecific detection of Lyme disease-related spirochetes. Overall prevalence of B. miyamotoi was 2% (71/3532) in Ixodes persulcatus, 4.3% (5/117) in Ixodes pavlovskyi and 0.1% (1/676) in Ixodes ovatus. The prevalence in I. persulcatus and I. pavlovskyi ticks were significantly higher than in I. ovatus. Co-infections with Lyme disease-related spirochetes were found in all of the tick species. During this investigation, we obtained 6 isolates of B. miyamotoi from I. persulcatus and I. pavlovskyi by culture in BSK-M medium. Phylogenetic trees of B. miyamotoi inferred from each of 3 housekeeping genes (glpQ, 16S rDNA, and flaB) demonstrated that the Hokkaido isolates were clustered with Russian B. miyamotoi, but were distinguishable from North American and European B. miyamotoi. A multilocus sequence analysis using 8 genes (clpA, clpX, nifS, pepX, pyrG, recG, rplB, and uvrA) suggested that all Japanese B. miyamotoi isolates, including past isolates, were genetically clonal, although these were isolated from different tick and vertebrate sources. From these results, B. miyamotoi-infected ticks are widely distributed throughout Hokkaido. Female I. persulcatus are responsible for most human tick-bites, thereby I. persulcatus is likely the most important vector of indigenous relapsing fever from tick bites in Hokkaido.

  13. Integrating Interactive Web-Based Technology to Assess Adherence and Clinical Outcomes in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Lori E.; Barach, Ilana; McGrady, Meghan E.; Kalinyak, Karen A.; Eastin, Adryan R.; Mitchell, Monica J.

    2012-01-01

    Research indicates that the quality of the adherence assessment is one of the best predictors for improving clinical outcomes. Newer technologies represent an opportunity for developing high quality standardized assessments to assess clinical outcomes such as patient experience of care but have not been tested systematically in pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD). The goal of the current study was to pilot an interactive web-based tool, the Take-Charge Program, to assess adherence to clinic visits and hydroxyurea (HU), barriers to adherence, solutions to overcome these barriers, and clinical outcomes in 43 patients with SCD age 6–21 years. Results indicate that the web-based tool was successfully integrated into the clinical setting while maintaining high patient satisfaction (>90%). The tool provided data consistent with the medical record, staff report, and/or clinical lab data. Participants reported that forgetting and transportation were major barriers for adherence to both clinic attendance and HU. A greater number of self-reported barriers (P < .01) and older age (P < .05) were associated with poorer clinic attendance and HU adherence. In summary, the tool represents an innovative approach to integrate newer technology to assess adherence and clinical outcomes for pediatric patients with SCD. PMID:22701785

  14. Adherence and Persistence to Long-Acting Anticholinergics Treatment Episodes in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Savaria, François; Beauchesne, Marie-France; Forget, Amélie; Blais, Lucie

    2017-07-01

    No studies have examined adherence or persistence to long-acting anticholinergics (LAAC) treatment episodes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To estimate 1-year adherence and 5-year persistence to LAAC during treatment episodes, and the likelihood of initiating a subsequent treatment episode. A retrospective cohort of LAAC-treated COPD patients was reconstructed from Quebec databases. A treatment episode was initiated at cohort entry, defined as the first LAAC prescription date on/after the first COPD diagnosis date recorded between October 1, 2003, and March 31, 2014. We identified a subsequent treatment episode up to 5 years after the end of the episode initiated at cohort entry. We measured adherence as the proportion of days covered over 1 year. Persistence was defined as prescription renewal within 90 days of the previous prescription and was plotted using Kaplan-Meier curves over 5 years. The 5-year hazard and cumulative incidence of initiating a subsequent episode were estimated with survival analyses. We compared adherence and persistence between the treatment episodes using t and log-rank tests. The cohort included 113 435 COPD patients. Adherence and persistence to LAAC were significantly lower in the subsequent treatment episode (55% vs 63%; P < 0.0001). The likelihood of initiating a subsequent episode was greatest immediately after the cessation of the initial episode, with 59% of patients starting a subsequent episode within 1 year. Adherence and persistence to LAAC were lower in the subsequent treatment episode. Interventions should be offered quickly after LAAC cessation.

  15. Enhancement of adherence of Helicobacter pylori to host cells by virus: possible mechanism of development of symptoms of gastric disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Nakano, Takashi; Suzuki, Youichi; Ooi, Yukimasa; Sano, Kouichi

    2017-06-01

    It remains unclear why gastric disease does not develop in all cases of Helicobacter pylori infection. In this study, we analyzed whether simian virus 5 (SV5) enhanced adherence of H. pylori to adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (AGS). H. pylori in AGS (harboring SV5) and SV5-infected Vero cells, and an agglutination of H. pylori mixed with SV5 were observed by light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The adherent rate of H. pylori to SV5-infected Vero cells and treated with an anti-SV5 antibody was determined. H. pylori adhered to the surface of AGS cells near SV5 particles, as shown by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The adherence of H. pylori to SV5-infected Vero cells was significantly enhanced compared with that to Vero cells. In contrast, the adherence of H. pylori to Vero cells was decreased by treatment with the anti-SV5 antibody. Agglutination of H. pylori mixed with SV5 was observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Agglutination did not occur when SV5 was treated with the anti-SV5 antibody before mixing. These findings demonstrated that SV5 enhanced the adherence of H. pylori to host cells, suggesting that a persistently infected virus may be a factor enhancing the pathogenicity of H. pylori in humans.

  16. Lyme disease associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Meer-Scherrer, Laurence; Chang Loa, Chien; Adelson, Martin E; Mordechai, Eli; Lobrinus, Johannes Alexander; Fallon, Brian A; Tilton, Richard C

    2006-04-01

    This case report discusses a patient with co-occurring neuroborreliosis and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although no claim is made for causality nor is there objective evidence that spirochetes are involved in AD, co-infection may exacerbate the symptoms of either neuroborreliosis or AD. Much is to be learned about the role of spirochetes in degenerative central nervous system disease.

  17. Efficacy of a multifactorial intervention on therapeutic adherence in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic adherence of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is poor. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a multifactorial intervention on improving the therapeutic adherence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with scheduled inhalation therapy. Methods The study design consisted of a randomised controlled trial in a primary care setting. 146 patients diagnosed with COPD were randomly allocated into two groups using the block randomisation technique. One-year follow-ups with three visits were performed. The intervention consisted of motivational aspects related to adherence (beliefs and behaviour) in the form of group and individual interviews, cognitive aspects in the form of information about the illness and skills in the form of training in inhalation techniques. Cognitive-emotional aspects and training in inhalation techniques were reinforced during all visits of the intervention group. The main outcome measure was adherence to the medication regimen. Therapeutic adherence was determined by the percentage of patients classified as good adherent as evaluated by dose or pill count. Results Of the 146 participants (mean age 69.8 years, 91.8% males), 41.1% reported adherence (41.9% of the control group and 40.3% of the intervention group). When multifactorial intervention was applied, the reported adherence was 32.4% for the control group and 48.6% for the intervention group, which showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.046). Number needed to treat is 6.37. In the intervention group, cognitive aspects increased by 23.7% and skilled performance of inhalation techniques increased by 66.4%. The factors related to adherence when multifactorial intervention was applied were the number of exacerbations (OR = 0.66), visits to health centre (OR = 0.93) and devices (OR = 2.4); illness severity (OR = 0.67), beta-2-adrenergic (OR = 0.16) and xantine (OR = 0.19) treatment

  18. Targeting Medication Non-Adherence Behavior in Selected Autoimmune Diseases: A Systematic Approach to Digital Health Program Development.

    PubMed

    van Mierlo, Trevor; Fournier, Rachel; Ingham, Michael

    2015-01-01

    29 autoimmune diseases, including Rheumatoid Arthritis, gout, Crohn's Disease, and Systematic Lupus Erythematosus affect 7.6-9.4% of the population. While effective therapy is available, many patients do not follow treatment or use medications as directed. Digital health and Web 2.0 interventions have demonstrated much promise in increasing medication and treatment adherence, but to date many Internet tools have proven disappointing. In fact, most digital interventions continue to suffer from high attrition in patient populations, are burdensome for healthcare professionals, and have relatively short life spans. Digital health tools have traditionally centered on the transformation of existing interventions (such as diaries, trackers, stage-based or cognitive behavioral therapy programs, coupons, or symptom checklists) to electronic format. Advanced digital interventions have also incorporated attributes of Web 2.0 such as social networking, text messaging, and the use of video. Despite these efforts, there has not been little measurable impact in non-adherence for illnesses that require medical interventions, and research must look to other strategies or development methodologies. As a first step in investigating the feasibility of developing such a tool, the objective of the current study is to systematically rate factors of non-adherence that have been reported in past research studies. Grounded Theory, recognized as a rigorous method that facilitates the emergence of new themes through systematic analysis, data collection and coding, was used to analyze quantitative, qualitative and mixed method studies addressing the following autoimmune diseases: Rheumatoid Arthritis, gout, Crohn's Disease, Systematic Lupus Erythematosus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Studies were only included if they contained primary data addressing the relationship with non-adherence. Out of the 27 studies, four non-modifiable and 11 modifiable risk factors were discovered. Over one

  19. Diet and Exercise Adherence and Practices among Medically Underserved Patients with Chronic Disease: Variation across Four Ethnic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orzech, Kathryn M.; Vivian, James; Huebner Torres, Cristina; Armin, Julie; Shaw, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors interact to create barriers to dietary and exercise plan adherence among medically underserved patients with chronic disease, but aspects related to culture and ethnicity are underexamined in the literature. Using both qualitative ("n" = 71) and quantitative ("n" = 297) data collected in a 4-year, multimethod study…

  20. Diet and Exercise Adherence and Practices among Medically Underserved Patients with Chronic Disease: Variation across Four Ethnic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orzech, Kathryn M.; Vivian, James; Huebner Torres, Cristina; Armin, Julie; Shaw, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors interact to create barriers to dietary and exercise plan adherence among medically underserved patients with chronic disease, but aspects related to culture and ethnicity are underexamined in the literature. Using both qualitative ("n" = 71) and quantitative ("n" = 297) data collected in a 4-year, multimethod study…

  1. [Detection of co-infection with Lyme spirochetes and Spotted fever group rickettsiae in a group of Haemaphysalis longicornis].

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhen; Jiang, Li-ping; Lu, Qun-ying; Cheng, Su-yun; Ye, Ju-lian; Zhan, Li

    2008-12-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the infection of Lyme disease, Spotted fever, Ehrlichiosis (anaplasmosisin) in wild animals and ticks in the mountain areas of Zhejiang province. Nested polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify specific DNA sequences of Lyme spirochetes, Spotted fever group rickettsiae, Ehrlichia(anaplasma) from samples of mice and ticks. 14 positive samples were identified from 121 mice and 105 groups of ticks. Among mice samples, one positive 5S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer of Borrelia burgdorferi and two 5' fragments of Ehrlichia (anaplasma) 16S rDNA were obtained. 11 positive results were detected from tick samples including three 5S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer regions of Borrelia burgdorferi and eight 5' fragments of Spotted fever group rickettsiae outer member protein A gene. One group of adult ticks, Haemaphysalis longicornis, which had been collected from eastern mountain area were detected to have co-infected with Lyme spirochetes and Spotted fever group rickettsiae. The positive sequences of 5S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer and ompA gene were tested and analyzed as Lyme spirochetes while rickettsia which was closely related to Borrelia valaisiana and R. massiliae. This was the first report about co-infection of Lyme spirochetes and Spotted fever group rickettsiae found in the same group of adult Haemaphysalis longicornis. It is very important to strengthen the surveillance program on tick-borne infectious disease and their pathogenic in vectors, wild animals and targeted high risk groups and to differentiate the clinical manifestation and diagnosis to extend the knowledge of tick-borne infectious diseases in Zhejiang.

  2. Knowledge and Adherence to Medications among Palestinian Geriatrics Living with Chronic Diseases in the West Bank and East Jerusalem.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Anas; Amro, Yazan; Kitaneh, Islam; Abu-Sharar, Salam; Sawalha, Maryam; Jamous, Abrar; Qiq, Muhannad; Makharzeh, Enas; Subb Laban, Bayan; Amro, Wafa; Amro, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Adequate patient knowledge about medications is essential for appropriate drug taking behavior and patient adherence. This study aims to assess and quantify the level of knowledge and adherence to medications among Palestinian geriatrics living with chronic diseases and to investigate possible associated socio-demographic characteristics. We conducted a cross-sectional study during June 2013 and January 2014 among Palestinian geriatrics ≥ 60 years old living with chronic disease in the West Bank and East Jerusalem. A stratified random sample was selected and a questionnaire-assisted interview was applied for data collection. T-test was applied for bivariate analyzing and one-way ANOVA test was applied for multivariate analyses. A total of 1192 Palestinian geriatrics were studied. The average age was 70.3 (SD = 8.58) years and ranged from 60-110 years. The sample comprised 659 (55.3%) females and 533 (44.7%) males. The global knowledge and global adherence scores were (67.57%) and (89.29%), respectively. Adequate levels of knowledge were 71.4%, and of adherence 75%, which were recorded for 705 (59.1%) and 1088 (91.3%) participants, respectively. Significant higher levels of global knowledge and global adherence were recorded for males, and for participants who hold a Bachelor's degree, those who live on their own, and did physical activity for more than 40 hours/week (p-value < 0.05). Furthermore, workers, participants with a higher monthly income, and non-smokers have a higher knowledge level with (p-value < 0.05). We found positive correlation between participants' global adherence and global knowledge (r = 0.487 and p-value < 0.001). Negative correlation was found between participants' global knowledge and adherence with age (r = -0.236, p-value < 0.001 and r = -0.211 and p-value < 0.001, respectively. Negative correlation between global knowledge and the number of drugs taken (r = -0.130, p-value < 0.001) was predicted. We concluded that patients with a higher

  3. Knowledge and Adherence to Medications among Palestinian Geriatrics Living with Chronic Diseases in the West Bank and East Jerusalem

    PubMed Central

    Najjar, Anas; Amro, Yazan; Kitaneh, Islam; Abu-Sharar, Salam; Sawalha, Maryam; Jamous, Abrar; Qiq, Muhannad; Makharzeh, Enas; Subb Laban, Bayan; Amro, Wafa; Amro, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background Adequate patient knowledge about medications is essential for appropriate drug taking behavior and patient adherence. This study aims to assess and quantify the level of knowledge and adherence to medications among Palestinian geriatrics living with chronic diseases and to investigate possible associated socio-demographic characteristics. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional study during June 2013 and January 2014 among Palestinian geriatrics ≥60 years old living with chronic disease in the West Bank and East Jerusalem. A stratified random sample was selected and a questionnaire-assisted interview was applied for data collection. T-test was applied for bivariate analyzing and one-way ANOVA test was applied for multivariate analyses. Results A total of 1192 Palestinian geriatrics were studied. The average age was 70.3 (SD=8.58) years and ranged from 60-110 years. The sample comprised 659 (55.3%) females and 533 (44.7%) males. The global knowledge and global adherence scores were (67.57%) and (89.29%), respectively. Adequate levels of knowledge were 71.4%, and of adherence 75%, which were recorded for 705 (59.1%) and 1088 (91.3%) participants, respectively. Significant higher levels of global knowledge and global adherence were recorded for males, and for participants who hold a Bachelor’s degree, those who live on their own, and did physical activity for more than 40 hours/week (p-value <0.05). Furthermore, workers, participants with a higher monthly income, and non-smokers have a higher knowledge level with (p-value <0.05). We found positive correlation between participants’ global adherence and global knowledge (r=0.487 and p-value <0.001). Negative correlation was found between participants’ global knowledge and adherence with age (r= -0.236, p-value <0.001 and r= -0.211 and p-value <0.001, respectively. Negative correlation between global knowledge and the number of drugs taken (r= -0.130, p-value <0.001) was predicted

  4. [Adherence to HEp-2 cells of enterotoxemic Escherichia coli O-group 139 from pigs with edema disease].

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, M; Kataoka, Y; Ohya, T

    1995-01-01

    One hundred and one strains of enterotoxemic Escherichia coli (ETEEC) O-group 139 isolated from swine with edema disease were investigated for their adherence to HEp-2 cells in the presence of D-mannose. All strains adhered in large numbers to the cells (21 to 60 bacteria/cell). No correlation was found between the presence of F107 fimbria on the organisms and the adherence to the cells. Adhesion-inhibition tests showed that anti-K12 serum inhibited the adhesion ETEEC O-group 139 (an inhibition rate of 63 to 65%), but anti-F107 or anti-O139 sera did not. These results indicate that the capsular K12 antigen may be one of the pathogenic factors of ETEEC O-group 139.

  5. Patients' perspective of disease and medication adherence for type 2 diabetes in an urban area in Bangladesh: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful; Biswas, Tuhin; Bhuiyan, Faiz A; Mustafa, Kamrun; Islam, Anwar

    2017-03-21

    Patients' perspective of diabetes and adherence to its prescribed medications is a significant predictor of glycemic control and overall management of the disease. However, there is a paucity of such information in Bangladesh. This study aimed to explore patients' perspective of diabetes, their experience of taking oral hypoglycemic medications and explore factors that contribute to medication adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes in Bangladesh. We conducted in-depth face-to-face interviews with 12 type 2 diabetes patients attending a tertiary hospital in Dhaka city between February and March, 2014. Participants were purposively sampled representing different age groups, education levels, years since diagnosis with diabetes, and glycemic status, to achieve maximum variation sampling. All interviews were conducted using a topic guide and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, checked for errors, coded and analyzed by means of a qualitative content analysis framework. The data analysis generated rich information on the participants' knowledge and perception on diabetes, its causes, self-management, medication use, adverse effects of medication use, medication adherence, and impact of diabetes, Although most of the participants demonstrated substantive knowledge on diabetes and its consequences, they also reported numerous misconceptions about the disease. Knowledge on diabetes medication, their appropriate use and side effects was rather poor. Respondents also reported non-compliance to dietary and physical activity advice by their physicians and concerns on diabetes diabetes-induced psychological stress. High cost of medications, concerns over medication side effects and forgetfulness was noted as factors for non-adherence to medication. Participants' knowledge and perception on diabetes are key factors determining their adherence to medications and, thereby, diabetes management. Healthcare providers should explore to better understand patients' perspective

  6. Prediction of adherence to a gluten-free diet using protection motivation theory among adults with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Dowd, A J; Jung, M E; Chen, M Y; Beauchamp, M R

    2016-06-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic autoimmune disease that requires strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. However, strict adherence to a gluten-free diet is difficult, with findings from a recent review suggesting that up to 42% of individuals with coeliac disease do not eat a strict gluten-free diet. The present study aimed to examine psychosocial predictors of adherence (purposeful and accidental) to a gluten-free diet among adults with coeliac disease over a 1-month period. In this longitudinal study, 212 North American adults with coeliac disease completed online questionnaires at two time points, baseline and 1 month later. The results revealed that intentions partially mediated the effects of symptom severity, self-regulatory efficacy, planning and knowledge on purposeful gluten consumption. Intentions did not mediate the effects of severity, response cost, self-regulatory efficacy, planning and knowledge for accidental gluten consumption but, interestingly, self-regulatory efficacy directly predicted fewer accidental incidents of gluten-consumption. These findings delineate the differential psychological processes in understanding accidental and purposeful gluten consumption among adults with coeliac disease and emphasise the importance of bolstering self-regulatory efficacy beliefs to prevent accidental and purposeful consumption of gluten. © 2015 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  7. Adherence to iron chelation therapy and associated healthcare resource utilization and costs in Medicaid patients with sickle cell disease and thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Vekeman, Francis; Sasane, Medha; Cheng, Wendy Y; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; Fortier, Jonathan; Qiu, Ying; Duh, Mei Sheng; Paley, Carole; Adams-Graves, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Sub-optimal patient adherence to iron chelation therapy (ICT) may impact patient outcomes and increase cost of care. This study evaluated the economic burden of ICT non-adherence in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) or thalassemia. Patients with SCD or thalassemia were identified from six state Medicaid programs (1997-2013). Adherence was estimated using the medication possession ratio (MPR) of ≥0.80. All-cause and disease-specific resource utilization per-patient-per-month (PPPM) was assessed and compared between adherent and non-adherent patients using adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR). All-cause and disease-specific healthcare costs were computed using mean cost PPPM. Regression models adjusting for baseline characteristics were used to compare adherent and non-adherent patients. A total of 728 eligible patients treated with ICT in the SCD cohort, 461 (63%) adherent, and 218 in the thalassemia cohort, 137 (63%) adherent, were included in this study. In SCD patients, the adjusted rate of all-cause outpatient visits PPPM was higher in adherent patients vs non-adherent patients (aIRR [95% CI]: 1.05 [1.01-1.08], p < 0.0001). Conversely, adherent patients incurred fewer all-cause inpatients visits (0.87 [0.81-0.94], p < 0.001) and ER visits (0.86 [0.78-0.93], p < 0.001). Similar trends were observed in SCD-related resource utilization rates and in thalassemia patients. Total all-cause costs were similar between adherent and non-adherent patients, but inpatient costs (adjusted cost difference = -$1530 PPPM, p = 0.0360) were lower in adherent patients. Patients adherent to ICT had less acute care need and lower inpatient costs than non-adherent patients, although they had more outpatient visits. Improved adherence may be linked to better disease monitoring and has the potential to avoid important downstream costs associated with acute care visits and reduce the financial burden on health programs and managed care plans treating SCD and

  8. Sexual transmission of Lyme disease: challenging the tickborne disease paradigm.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Raphael B; Middelveen, Marianne J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has become a major worldwide epidemic. In this article, we explore the clinical, epidemiological and experimental evidence for sexual transmission of Lyme disease in animal models and humans. Although the likelihood of sexual transmission of the Lyme spirochete remains speculative, the possibility of Lyme disease transmission via intimate human contact merits further study.

  9. Self-compassion directly and indirectly predicts dietary adherence and quality of life among adults with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Dowd, A Justine; Jung, Mary E

    2017-06-01

    Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only treatment for preventing both short- and long-term consequences of celiac disease. Given that following a strict GFD can be difficult, evidence-based strategies are needed to improve the psychological experience of living with celiac disease and following the GFD. Self-compassion appears to be an important component of effectively self-regulating one's behavior to cope with a chronic disease. The main goal of this study was to examine the relationships between self-compassion and management of celiac disease as assessed by (a) adherence to a strict GFD and (b) celiac-specific quality of life (CQoL). The secondary goal of this study was to explore self-regulatory efficacy (i.e., confidence in one's ability to self-manage behavior to follow a strict GFD) and concurrent self-regulatory efficacy (i.e., one's confidence to self-manage other valued life goals while following a strict GFD) as mediators of the relationship between self-compassion and the primary outcomes (adherence and CQoL). In this prospective study, 200 North American adults diagnosed with celiac disease completed online questionnaires at two time points (baseline and 1 month later). Self-compassion at baseline directly predicted stricter adherence (at Time 2; b = -0.63, p = 0.006) and enhanced CQoL (at Time 2; b = -0.50, p = 0.001). Further, self-compassion (at Time 1) also indirectly predicted stricter Time 2 adherence through self-regulatory efficacy (at Time 1; b = -0.26, 95% CI [-0.58, -0.04], R(2) = 0.29) and enhanced Time 2 CQoL through concurrent self-regulatory efficacy (at Time 1; b = -0.07, 95% CI [-0.14, -0.03], R(2) = 0.33). This was the first study to assess the effects of self-compassion in relation to the psychological experience of coping with celiac disease and following a GFD. The findings indicate that self-compassion, self-regulatory efficacy and concurrent self-regulatory efficacy are important cognitions in

  10. Lanthanum carbonate oral powder: satisfaction, preference and adherence in French and Spanish patients with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Michael; de Sequera, Patricia; Clair, François; Pedersini, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Phosphate binders, such as lanthanum carbonate, control elevated serum-phosphate levels in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Lanthanum carbonate is available in oral powder and tablet form. The aim of this survey was to investigate satisfaction with, preference for, and adherence to lanthanum carbonate oral powder in patients with ESRD. Scope Patients from France and Spain who had been taking lanthanum carbonate powder for at least 4 weeks, and who had experience of other phosphate binders of any formulation, were asked to complete an online or telephone survey. Treatment satisfaction was measured using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication-9; preference was measured using 5-point Likert scale agreement ratings; and adherence was measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4. Data were evaluated using bivariate analyses. Findings Overall, 160 patients participated (80 per country). Lanthanum carbonate powder was reported to have a higher effectiveness rating (p<0.05), be more convenient (p<0.05), and provide a higher level of satisfaction (p<0.01) than previous binders. There was an overall preference for lanthanum carbonate powder over previous binders of any formulation (p<0.001). Adherence to medication was similar for all binders analysed: 66.3% of French patients adhered to lanthanum carbonate powder, and 65.0% adhered to previous binder treatment (p=not significant); 52.5% of Spanish patients adhered to lanthanum carbonate powder, and 56.3% adhered to previous binder treatment (p=not significant). Limitations The survey enrolled patients who had already experienced phosphate binders before the study began. Information on patient preferences for and adherence to previous phosphate binders was therefore based on the patients’ memories of these experiences, which may have been subject to change over time. Although most participants completed the online survey in this study, a telephone survey was used for

  11. Does co-payment for inhaler devices affect therapy adherence and disease outcomes? A historical, matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Voorham, Jaco; Vrijens, Bernard; van Boven, Job Fm; Ryan, Dermot; Miravitlles, Marc; Law, Lisa M; Price, David B

    2017-01-01

    Adherence to asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treatment has been shown to depend on patient-level factors, such as disease severity, and medication-level factors, such as complexity. However, little is known about the impact of prescription charges - a factor at the health care system level. This study used real-life data to investigate whether co-payment affects adherence (implementation and persistence) and disease outcomes in patients with asthma or COPD. A matched, historical cohort study was carried out using two UK primary care databases. The exposure was co-payment for prescriptions, which is required for most patients in England but not in Scotland. Two comparison cohorts were formed: one comprising patients registered at general practices in England and the other comprising patients registered in Scotland. Patients aged 20-59 years with asthma, or 40-59 years with COPD, who were initiated on fluticasone propionate/salmeterol xinafoate, were included, matched to patients in the opposite cohort, and followed up for 1 year following fluticasone propionate/salmeterol xinafoate initiation. The primary outcome was good adherence, defined as medication possession ratio ≥80%, and was analyzed using conditional logistic regression. Secondary outcomes included exacerbation rate. There were 1,640 patients in the payment cohort, ie, England (1,378 patients with asthma and 262 patients with COPD) and 619 patients in the no-payment cohort, ie, Scotland (512 patients with asthma and 107 patients with COPD). The proportion of patients with good adherence was 34.3% and 34.9% in the payment and no-payment cohorts, respectively, across both disease groups. In a multivariable model, no difference in odds of good adherence was found between the cohorts (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.85-1.27). There was also no difference in exacerbation rate. There was no difference in adherence between matched patients registered in England and Scotland

  12. Diet and exercise adherence and practices among medically underserved patients with chronic disease: variation across four ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Orzech, Kathryn M; Vivian, James; Huebner Torres, Cristina; Armin, Julie; Shaw, Susan J

    2013-02-01

    Many factors interact to create barriers to dietary and exercise plan adherence among medically underserved patients with chronic disease, but aspects related to culture and ethnicity are underexamined in the literature. Using both qualitative (n = 71) and quantitative (n = 297) data collected in a 4-year, multimethod study among patients with hypertension and/or diabetes, the authors explored differences in self-reported adherence to diet and exercise plans and self-reported daily diet and exercise practices across four ethnic groups-Whites, Blacks, Vietnamese, and Latinos-at a primary health care center in Massachusetts. Adherence to diet and exercise plans differed across ethnic groups even after controlling for key sociodemographic variables, with Vietnamese participants reporting the highest adherence. Food and exercise options were shaped by economic constraints as well as ethnic and cultural familiarity with certain foods and types of activity. These findings indicate that health care providers should consider ethnicity and economic status together to increase effectiveness in encouraging diverse populations with chronic disease to make healthy lifestyle changes.

  13. Different approaches to the assessment of adherence and persistence with cardiovascular-disease preventive medications.

    PubMed

    Malo, Sara; Aguilar-Palacio, Isabel; Feja, Cristina; Lallana, María Jesús; Rabanaque, María José; Armesto, Javier; Menditto, Enrica

    2017-07-01

    To assess suitability and comparability of the most common methods of treatment adherence and persistence assessment, as applied to the same pharmacy dataset. Data on drugs prescribed for cardiovascular primary prevention to participants in the Aragon Workers' Health Study (AWHS) were collected from a regional electronic drug prescription database. Several different approaches were used to measure treatment adherence (with the medication possession ratio [MPR]) and proportion of days covered [PDC]) and persistence in new users by therapeutic subgroup. Defined daily dose (DDD) was used as a proxy of the number of days' supply, or substituted with surrogate daily dose values. Higher mean adherence values and proportions of adherent patients were obtained using MPR versus PDC, with additional differences depending on the approach used. The proportion of adherent patients was lowest for oral antidiabetics (14.4%-30.6%) and highest for antihypertensives (70.2%-82.1%). The use of surrogate daily dose values increased adherence for antidiabetics and statins and decreased adherence for antihypertensives. After a 1 year follow-up, treatment persistence was observed for 21.1%, 58.7%, and 29.5% of antidiabetic, antihypertensive and statin users, respectively. Our findings indicate that use of multiple measures of treatment adherence and persistence provides a more complete overview of medication use patterns, and certain limitations associated with DDD for some drug groups can be overcome with replacement by surrogate doses. The PDC indicator seems to provide a more accurate reflection of patient behavior and treatment continuity than the MPR. Any comparison of adherence/persistence should always consider the method used, variables analyzed, and corresponding data collection process.

  14. Genetic heterogeneity among strains of Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes isolated from dairy cattle with papillomatous digital dermatitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yano, Takahisa; Yamagami, Ryoko; Misumi, Kazuhiro; Kubota, Chikara; Moe, Kyaw Kyaw; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Yoshitani, Kazunori; Ohtake, Osamu; Misawa, Naoaki

    2009-03-01

    Papillomatous digital dermatitis (PDD) is an infectious foot disease of cattle that is prevalent throughout the world. Although it has been prevalent in Japan since the first case was reported in 1992, full epidemiological and bacteriological examinations have not been conducted. We collected 91 lesions of PDD from 80 dairy cattle on 12 farms in eight regions of Japan to isolate the spirochetes that are frequently detected in lesions. We isolated 40 strains of spirochetes from 24 cattle (30.0%) by a simple two-step culture technique, in which the biopsy samples were incubated at 4 degrees C for 48 to 72 h in an enrichment broth supplemented with antibiotics, which improved the rate of isolation, and then inoculated on selective agar plates. All spirochetes examined were catalase positive and oxidase negative and showed weak beta-hemolytic activity. Enzyme activities were identical to those of Treponema phagedenis ATCC 27087. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene showed that all strains isolated had >99% identity to those of the T. phagedenis type strain and of T. phagedenis-like strains isolated from PDD lesions in the United States and Europe. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and PCR-based random amplified polymorphism DNA methods revealed considerable diversity among strains isolated not only from different cattle but also from the same individuals. These findings may provide further evidence for the role of these treponemes in the pathogenesis of persistent PDD.

  15. Factors associated with early adherence to tiotropium in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Laforest, Laurent; Licaj, Idlir; Devouassoux, Gilles; Hartwig, Susanne; Marvalin, Serge; Van Ganse, Eric

    2013-02-01

    Tiotropium is an innovative intervention in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Early adherence to tiotropium remains inadequately explored, notably time from initiation to discontinuation (persistence). In patients with COPD, the factors associated with the risk of discontinuing the treatment with tiotropium within 12 months following initiation were identified (12-month persistence). Claim databases from the French Social Security were used. A random sample of patients (aged 50-80 years) who initiated tiotropium soon after launch was selected. Factors associated with the persistence were investigated (Log-rank test and multivariate Cox model). Of the 1147 newly treated patients (mean age 68 years, 33% women), 64% remained in the treatment of tiotropium for over a period of 12 months following initiation. More than 10% of the patients interrupted therapy after a single dispensing, most often those with mild COPD. Lower risks of discontinuing tiotropium within 12 months following initiation were observed when it was initiated by a private sector specialist (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) = (0.52-0.82)), by hospital-based physician (HR = 0.58, 95% CI = (0.42-0.78)), when ≥ 2 other respiratory drugs were associated (HR = 0.74, 95% CI = (0.58-0.95)) and in case of long-term disease status (HR = 0.78, 95% CI = (0.63-0.97)). Conversely, no clear effect appeared according to age or gender. In this population of patients with COPD, fewer early discontinuations of tiotropium were observed in patients having a severe condition.

  16. A direct fluorescent antibody test for large spirochetes in swine dysentery using hyperimmunized swine serum.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C H; Olson, L D

    1976-01-01

    A direct fluorescent antibody test was developed for the identification of large spirochetes which are considered to be the cause of swine dysentery. Sera from swine which had recovered from swine dysentery and had been hyperimmunized by the intravenous and intraperitoneal injection of filtered spirochetes were used for conjugation with fluorescein isothiocyanate. A bright greenish fluorescence of large spirochetes was observed with the conjugated serum from hyperimmunized pig No. 1 when diluted 1:8 and hyperimmunized pig No. 2 when diluted 1:2. Pig No. 1 had developed a serum titer of 1:64 using the indirect fluorescent antibody test for large spirochetes. The conjugated serum from the three swine which had recovered from swine dysentery fluoresced spirochetes only when undiluted. The conjugated serum from the two swine treated while having a hemorrhagic diarrhea did not fluoresce spirochetes. No immunofluorescence of Vibrio spp. was observed. Images Fig. 1. PMID:793697

  17. Comparing medication adherence tools scores and number of controlled diseases among low literacy patients discharged from a Brazilian cardiology ward.

    PubMed

    Baruel Okumura, Patrícia Carvalho; Okumura, Lucas Miyake; Reis, Wálleri Christini Torelli; Godoy, Rangel Ray; Cata-Preta, Bianca de Oliveira; de Souza, Thais Teles; Fávero, Maria Luiza Drechsel; Correr, Cassyano Januário

    2016-12-01

    Background Adherence to prescribed drug therapy is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular causes of death. In view of the relevance for public health, it is important to understand the relation between medication adherence tools' scores, especially in low literacy patients discharged from a cardiology ward. Objectives We aimed to assess: (a) the association between number of controlled clinical conditions and adherence tools scores, and (b) the correlation between the scores of three instruments to assess adherence. Methods We conducted a prospective study and included patients discharged from a specialized cardiovascular ward in Brazil. The results of the Beliefs about Medicines questionnaire (BMQ), the Adherence to Refills and Medication Scale (ARMS) and the MedTake test were compared. Results Of 53 included patients, most of them were elderly, and did not complete primary school. On average, there were six health conditions per patient, where two of them were not controlled. ARMS was the only tool that was associated with number of controlled health conditions (r = -0.312, p < 0.05). Moreover, ARMS (average score 15.6 ± 3.4) had significant correlation with MEDTAKE (r = 0.535, p < 0.01) and BMQ (r = 0.38, p < 0.01). BMQ and MEDTAKE were also positively correlated (r = 0.311, p < 0.05). Conclusions Clinically, higher ARMS scores (>12) suggest assumed non-adherence. It is also negatively correlated with the number of controlled clinical conditions in low literacy elderlies with cardiovascular diseases.

  18. The effect of medical device dose-memory functions on patients' adherence to treatment, confidence, and disease self-management.

    PubMed

    Hall, Rebecca L; Willgoss, Thomas; Humphrey, Louise J; Kongsø, Jens Harald

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to treatment is an important issue in chronic disease management and an indicator of patients' ability to self-manage their condition and treatment. Some drug-dispensing and drug-delivery devices have been designed to support patients' medication-taking behavior by including dose-memory and combined dose-memory and dose-reminder functions, which electronically store, and visually display dose-history information, enabling the patient to review, monitor, and/or be actively reminded about their medication doses. This literature review explored the role and impact of these devices on patients' treatment adherence, confidence with, and self-management of their condition and treatment. A search of MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO was performed to identify articles published in English from 2003-2013 that studied the effect of devices with dose-memory and combined dose-memory and dose-reminder functions on treatment adherence and users' (patients, health care professionals [HCPs], and caregivers) confidence, self-management behavior, and attitudes. The database searches yielded 940 abstracts from which 13 articles met the inclusion criteria and were retained. Devices with dose-memory and combined dose-memory and dose-reminder functions were found to improve self-reported and electronically monitored treatment adherence in chronic conditions such as asthma, diabetes, and HIV. The ability of the devices to provide dose-history information and active medication reminders was considered valuable in disease management by patients, caregivers, and HCPs. The devices were found to enhance patients' confidence in, and motivation to manage their medication and condition, and help reduce forgotten or incorrect medication dosing. The incorporation of dose-memory and combined dose-memory and dose-reminder functions in drug-delivery devices can improve patients' adherence, confidence, and self-management behavior. They can target non-intentional barriers to adherence and can

  19. The effect of short message system (SMS) reminder on adherence to a healthy diet, medication, and cessation of smoking among adult patients with cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Akhu-Zaheya, Laila M; Shiyab, Wa'ed Y

    2017-02-01

    Cardiovascular Disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Non-adherence to a recommended regimen among patients with Cardiovascular Diseases represents a significant problem which could lead to an increase in Cardiovascular Diseases. This study aimed to assess the effects of Short Message System (SMS) reminders on adherence to a healthy diet, medication, and cessation of smoking among adult patients with Cardiovascular Diseases. Randomized controlled trial design with three groups was used for this study. A non-probability convenient sample of 160 patients was recruited in this study. The participants were assigned randomly to an experimental group (received SMS regarding adherence to a healthy diet, medication, and smoking cessation), placebo group (received general messages) and control group (routine care). Morisky 8-Item Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS), Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS), and Readiness to Quit Ladder, were used to assess patients' adherence to medication, adherence to Mediterranean diet, and smoking cessation, respectively. The outcomes were assessed at the beginning of the study and three months later, following completion of the intervention. One way ANONVA was used to assess the study hypothesis. Significant differences between study groups found in terms of adherence to medication (p=.001) and adherence to a healthy diet (p=.000); however, no significant difference was found between groups, in terms of intention to quit smoking, and/or the number of cigarettes smoked (p= .327), (p=.34), respectively. It is documented that SMS is effective in improving adherence to a healthy diet and medication. SMS could be a promising solution for management of different chronic diseases. It is recommended to apply Short Message System (SMS) via cellphone services to improve patient's adherence to a healthy diet and medication. However, further research is needed to support the effectiveness of SMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland

  20. [New records of bacteria-spirochetes in crystalline style of fresh water gastropods].

    PubMed

    Sitnikova, T Ia; Tulupopva, Iu R; Khanaeva, I V; Prozorova, L A

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater mollusks belonging to 17 species, in 7 families are examined purposely to search for spirochete bacteria in their crystalline style of the digestive system. As result of this study spirochetes are recorded in gastropod families Amnicolidae, Bithyniidae, Baicaliidae and Benedictiidae, represented by 12 species, occupying different habitats. Gastropods belonging to Valvatidae, Lymnaeidae and Planorbidae, characterized by lack of crystalline style did not include spirochetes in their stomachs. Studied gastropods having spirochetes or free of them are grazers or filter-feeders and mainly phyto-detrito-bacteriaphagous.

  1. Effect of an Educational Program on Adherence to Therapeutic Regimen among Chronic Kidney Disease Stage5 (CKD5) Patients under Maintenance Hemodialysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deif, Hala I. Abo; Elsawi, Khiria; Selim, Mohga; NasrAllah, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease on health care services worldwide is growing and the increased development of educational interventions which help patients to better manage their conditions is evident internationally. It has been recognized that poor adherence can be a serious risk to the health and wellbeing of patients. Adherence to fluid…

  2. An exploration of the relationship between adherence with dietary sodium restrictions and health beliefs regarding these restrictions in Irish patients receiving haemodialysis for end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Ella; Lehane, Elaine

    2011-02-01

    To measure adherence levels with dietary restrictions in Irish patients with end-stage renal disease receiving haemodialysis and to explore the relationships between adherence with dietary sodium restrictions and health beliefs in relation to following these restrictions in this group. Non-adherence to medical regimes is an important healthcare issue and an ever-present problem, particularly in patients with a chronic illness. The literature revealed a lack of studies measuring adherence with the sodium component of the renal dietary restrictions and associated factors; despite the fact that adherence with sodium restrictions is essential to the optimal management of end-stage renal disease. Furthermore, despite increased emphasis on 'the patients' view' in healthcare no study to date has contextualised health beliefs and adherence in end-stage renal disease from an Irish perspective. A quantitative, descriptive, correlational design was employed using the Health Belief Model as a theoretical framework. A convenience sample (n = 79) was recruited from the haemodialysis units of a large hospital. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires. Data were analysed using descriptive and correlational statistics. Non-adherence with dietary restrictions was a problem among a proportion of the sample. Greater adherence levels with dietary sodium restrictions were associated with greater 'perceived benefits' and fewer 'perceived barriers.' For the Irish patient, beliefs in relation to following a low sodium diet significantly affected adherence levels with this diet. This is an important finding as delineating key beliefs, particularly key barriers, facilitates an increased understanding of non-adherence for nurses. These findings have implications for the care of patients with end-stage renal disease in that they can provide guidance in terms of developing interventions designed to improve adherence. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Health and Nutrition Literacy and Adherence to Treatment in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Chronic Kidney Disease and Hypertension, North Carolina, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Maria; Rak, Eniko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to treatment and dietary restrictions is important for health outcomes of patients with chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension. The relationship of adherence with nutritional and health literacy in children, adolescents, and young adults is not well understood. The current study examined the relationship of health literacy, nutrition knowledge, nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance, and medication adherence in a sample of children and young people with chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension. Methods We enrolled 74 patients (aged 7–29 y) with a diagnosis of chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension from the University of North Carolina Kidney Center. Participants completed instruments of nutrition literacy (Disease-Specific Nutrition Knowledge Test), health literacy (Newest Vital Sign), nutrition behavior (Nutrition Knowledge–Behavior Concordance Scale), and medication adherence (Morisky Medication Adherence Scale). Linear and binary logistic regressions were used to test the associations. Results In univariate comparisons, nutrition knowledge was significantly higher in people with adequate health literacy. Medication adherence was related to nutrition knowledge and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance. Multivariate regression models demonstrated that knowledge of disease-specific nutrition restrictions did not significantly predict nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance scores. In logistic regression, knowledge of nutrition restrictions did not significantly predict medication adherence. Lastly, health literacy and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance were significant predictors of medication adherence. Conclusion Nutrition knowledge and health literacy skills are positively associated. Nutrition knowledge, health literacy, and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance are positively related to medication adherence. Future research should focus on additional factors that may predict

  4. Strategies to promote adherence to nutritional advice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a narrative review and commentary

    PubMed Central

    Beto, Judith A; Schury, Katherine A; Bansal, Vinod K

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) requires extensive changes to food and lifestyle. Poor adherence to diet, medications, and treatments has been estimated to vary between 20% and 70%, which in turn can contribute to increased mortality and morbidity. Delivering effective nutritional advice in patients with CKD coordinates multiple diet components including calories, protein, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and fluid. Dietary intake studies have shown difficulty in adhering to the scope and complexity of the CKD diet parameters. No single educational or clinical strategy has been shown to be consistently effective across CKD populations. Highest adherence has been observed when both diet and education efforts are individualized to each patient and adapted over time to changing lifestyle and CKD variables. This narrative review and commentary summarizes nutrition education literature and published strategies for providing nutritional advice in CKD. A cohort of practical and effective strategies for increasing dietary adherence to nutritional advice are provided that include communicating with “talking control” principles, integrating patient-owned technology, acknowledging the typical food pattern may be snacking rather than formal meals, focusing on a single goal rather than multiple goals, creating active learning and coping strategies (frozen sandwiches, visual hands-on activities, planting herb gardens), and involving the total patient food environment. PMID:26893578

  5. Adherence to a home-based exercise program and incidence of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Shinji, S; Shigeru, M; Ryusei, U; Mitsuru, M; Shigehiro, K

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between adherence to a home-based exercise program and the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated 102 patients with type 2 diabetes aged 35 to 75 years, and followed them prospectively for 17.2 months. Before enrollment, all patients received a traditional exercise prescription. The exercise program consisted of a daily walking exercise at home for 20 - 30 minutes. Self-reported adherence to the exercise program and the incidence of CVD were confirmed by information obtained from telephone interviews. There were 38 dropouts among the patients in the exercise program. Dropouts were significantly younger than completers. The rate of obesity was significantly higher among the dropouts than among the completers. No differences were observed between the two groups for gender, history of CVD and other clinical characteristics. During the follow-up, we documented 8 new cases of CVD. The incidence of CVD during the follow-up was 1.56 percent among the program completers and 18.4 percent among the dropouts. Adherence to the home-based exercise was inversely related to the incidence of CVD (p < 0.01). These associations persisted after adjustment for age and other covariates. In conclusion, adherence to an exercise program is associated with a reduced incidence of CVD among patients with type 2 diabetes.

  6. Pathogenic Role of Associated Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Perna, Angelica; Marano, Angela; Lucariello, Angela; Rotondi Aufiero, Vera; Sorrentino, Alida; Melina, Raffaele; Guerra, Germano; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Iaquinto, Gaetano; De Luca, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) strains play an important role in Crohn's disease (CD). The objective of this study was to investigate the pathogenic role of two AIEC strains, LF82 and O83:H1, in CD patients. Organ cultures of colonic biopsies from patients were set up to assess the effects of LF82 and O83:H1 on the expression of CEACAM6, LAMP1, HLA-DR, ICAM1 by immunohistochemistry and of IL-8, IFNʏ, and TNF-α genes by RT-PCR. Moreover, on Caco2 cells, we analyzed the cell cycle, the expression of MGMT and DNMT1 genes, and DNA damage induced by LF82 and O83:H1, by FACS, RT-PCR, and DAPI staining, respectively. Epithelial and lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMNC) expression of CEACAM6 and LAMP1 were higher in biopsies cultured in the presence of both O83:H1 and LF82 than in biopsies cultured with non-pathogenic E. coli. Both AIEC strains induced increased expression of ICAM-1 on blood vessels and HLA-DR on LPMNC. We observed higher levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-8 transcripts in biopsies cultured with both AIEC strains than in those cultured with NP. Both LF82 and O83:H1, block the cell cycle into S phase, inducing DNA damage, and modulate the expression of DNMT1 and MGMT genes. Our data suggest that LF82 and 083:H1 strains of E. coli are able to increase in CD colonic biopsies the expression of all the pro-inflammatory cytokines and all the mucosal immune markers investigated. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2860-2868, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Current practice and clinicians’ perception of medication non-adherence in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: A survey of 98 clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Soobraty, Anisah; Boughdady, Sarah; Selinger, Christian P

    2017-01-01

    AIM The survey ascertains perceptions and describes current practice of clinicians regarding medication non-adherence in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. METHODS Gastroenterologists, trainees and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) specialist nurses from the United Kingdom were invited to a web based survey collecting data on clinician demographics, patient volume and level of interest in IBD. Respondents were asked to estimate non-adherence levels and report use of screening tools and interventions to improve adherence. RESULTS Non-adherence was seen as an infrequent problem by 57% of 98 respondents. Levels of non-adherence were estimated lower than evidence suggests by 29% for mesalazine (5ASA), 26% for immunomodulators (IMM) and 21% for biologics (BIOL). Respondents reporting non-adherence as a frequent problem were more likely to report adherence levels in line with evidence (5ASA P < 0.001; IMM P = 0.012; BIOL P = 0.015). While 80% regarded screening as important only 25% screen regularly (40% of these with validated assessment tools). Respondents stated forgetfulness, beliefs about necessity of medication and not immediately apparent benefits as the main reasons for non-adherence. Patient counselling on benefits and risks of medication was a commonly used intervention. CONCLUSION Clinicians treating IBD patients frequently underestimate non-adherence and use of validated screening tools is infrequent. Most respondents identified the main factors associated with non-adherence in line with evidence and often counselled patients accordingly. Professional education should focus more on non-adherence practice to avoid adverse treatment outcomes associated with non-adherence. PMID:28217376

  8. Current practice and clinicians' perception of medication non-adherence in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: A survey of 98 clinicians.

    PubMed

    Soobraty, Anisah; Boughdady, Sarah; Selinger, Christian P

    2017-02-06

    The survey ascertains perceptions and describes current practice of clinicians regarding medication non-adherence in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Gastroenterologists, trainees and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) specialist nurses from the United Kingdom were invited to a web based survey collecting data on clinician demographics, patient volume and level of interest in IBD. Respondents were asked to estimate non-adherence levels and report use of screening tools and interventions to improve adherence. Non-adherence was seen as an infrequent problem by 57% of 98 respondents. Levels of non-adherence were estimated lower than evidence suggests by 29% for mesalazine (5ASA), 26% for immunomodulators (IMM) and 21% for biologics (BIOL). Respondents reporting non-adherence as a frequent problem were more likely to report adherence levels in line with evidence (5ASA P < 0.001; IMM P = 0.012; BIOL P = 0.015). While 80% regarded screening as important only 25% screen regularly (40% of these with validated assessment tools). Respondents stated forgetfulness, beliefs about necessity of medication and not immediately apparent benefits as the main reasons for non-adherence. Patient counselling on benefits and risks of medication was a commonly used intervention. Clinicians treating IBD patients frequently underestimate non-adherence and use of validated screening tools is infrequent. Most respondents identified the main factors associated with non-adherence in line with evidence and often counselled patients accordingly. Professional education should focus more on non-adherence practice to avoid adverse treatment outcomes associated with non-adherence.

  9. Medication non-adherence in adult patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease: a critical review and update of the determining factors, consequences and possible interventions.

    PubMed

    Lenti, Marco Vincenzo; Selinger, Christian P

    2017-03-01

    Achieving adherence to medications can be a serious challenge for patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Medical treatment is fundamental for inducing and maintaining remission, preventing flares and reducing the risk of colorectal cancer. Non-adherence may affect patients' quality of life resulting in unfavourable treatment outcomes, more hospitalizations and higher healthcare-related costs. Recognising and improving adherence is therefore a primary aim for the treatment of IBD. Areas covered: We critically discuss the current knowledge on medication non-adherence in adult patients affected by IBD, also mentioning a few issues concerning the paediatric and adolescent populations. In particular, we reviewed the literature focusing on the definition and detection of non-adherence, on its extent and on the possible non-modifiable and modifiable factors involved (patient-centred, therapy-related, disease-related and physician-related). Furthermore, we analysed the interventional studies performed so far. The literature review was conducted through PubMed addressing medication non-adherence in IBD, using the keywords 'adherence' and related terms and 'IBD, ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease'. Expert commentary: Adherence to therapy for IBD is a complex yet fundamental issue that cannot be solved by addressing a single aspect only. Future studies should focus on patient-tailored and multidimensional interventions.

  10. [Deficits in adherence on all levels. Current need of interventions in primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Huy, C; Thiel, A; Diehm, C; Schneider, S

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies often lack any differentiation between target groups for primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to investigate the target group-specific adherence with lifestyle recommendations in different risk groups. This information may be useful in identifying better starting points for future CVD interventions. 2,002 men and women aged 50 to 70 years were selected by random and interviewed about their health status, health behavior and health locus of control. Adherence was defined as regular physical activity, healthy diet, non-smoking, and moderate alcohol consumption. Differences between risk groups were determined using Chi-square tests and stratified logistic regression. Health behavior only varied to a limited extent between the risk groups: physical activity (77.8%), healthy diet (62.2%), moderate alcohol consumption (74.4%), non-smoking (total: 75.7%; healthy respondents 70.9%; risk group 79.1%; CVD patients 74.7%). 29.6% were adherent to lifestyle recommendations. Women were more likely to be adherent than men (35.4% vs. 23.5%). In CVD patients, those living together with a partner were also more likely to have a healthy lifestyle (32.2% vs. 20.0%). Furthermore, health locus of control seems to be an important factor. In the age group 50-70 adherence with lifestyle recommendations of almost 30% is rather low and not optimal. Health locus of control as motivational barrier should be taken into account particularly in secondary prevention. There is a need of health behavior interventions not only for persons at increased risk and CVD patients, but also for the (still) healthy. Men, singles and persons with external health locus of control should be particularly addressed by these interventions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Technology Access and Smartphone App Preferences for Medication Adherence in Adolescents and Young Adults With Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Sherif M; Thompson, Alexis A; Liem, Robert I

    2016-05-01

    Hydroxyurea is the only Food and Drug Administration approved medication for sickle cell disease (SCD) with short- and long-term benefits for both morbidity and mortality. However, hydroxyurea underutilization and adherence remain challenges for patients with SCD. The objectives of this study were to determine access to technology among adolescents and young adults (AYA) with SCD and to identify their preferred technology-based strategies for improving medication adherence. A cross-sectional survey was administered in a variety of clinical settings from October 2014 through May 2015 to AYA (12-22 years) with SCD (all genotypes) followed in a Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program. Eighty of 107 eligible participants completed the survey for a 75% response rate. Participants (51% female, 94% Black) had a mean age of 15.3 ± 2.8 years. Most participants (75%) were on a daily medication with about half on hydroxyurea. Forgetfulness (67%) was the most common barrier to medication adherence. The majority of participants (85%) owned smartphones and either owned or had access to electronic tablets (83%), laptops (72%), or desktops (70%). Of the proposed smartphone app features, daily medication reminders were ranked first most frequently, followed by education about SCD, adherence text prompts, education about SCD medications, and medication log. The majority of our AYA with SCD owned smartphones and had access to other electronic devices. Our survey results provided valuable insight into the preferred app features and optimal strategies for developing technology-based interventions, such as a multicomponent app, to increase medication adherence for AYA with SCD or other chronic conditions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effectiveness of involving pharmacists in the process of ambulatory health care to improve drug treatment adherence and disease control.

    PubMed

    Mino-León, Dolores; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Flores-Hernández, Sergio

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating the pharmacist into the ambulatory health care team to increase the proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and/or hypertension who adhere to their drug regimen and to improve disease control. A non-randomized clinical trial was carried out in patients with T2DM and/or hypertension from two primary care clinics. Patients from one of the clinics comprised the intervention group (IG) who received 'counselling' from the pharmacist. The control group (CG) was comprised of patients who attended another clinic and received the usual care. Adherence was measured by counting pills; hypertension control was evaluated by blood pressure and diabetes control by blood glucose. Statistical analysis was carried out by intention to treat using generalized linear models. There were 440 patients included. There was no difference in the proportion of IG and CG patients who adhered to treatment according to baseline measurements. An increase in the proportion of adherence at baseline and final determination was observed in both groups (IG 71-80%, P=0.006 and CG 72-87%, P=0.000). Generalized linear models showed a 55% or higher probability of IG patients achieving control of hypertension in comparison with the CG. Patients from the IG with T2DM have 13% more possibility of achieving glycaemic control than those of the CG. Counselling offered by the pharmacist proved to be effective for improving drug adherence of diabetic and hypertensive patients in ambulatory health care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Targeting Medication Non-Adherence Behavior in Selected Autoimmune Diseases: A Systematic Approach to Digital Health Program Development

    PubMed Central

    van Mierlo, Trevor; Fournier, Rachel; Ingham, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background 29 autoimmune diseases, including Rheumatoid Arthritis, gout, Crohn’s Disease, and Systematic Lupus Erythematosus affect 7.6-9.4% of the population. While effective therapy is available, many patients do not follow treatment or use medications as directed. Digital health and Web 2.0 interventions have demonstrated much promise in increasing medication and treatment adherence, but to date many Internet tools have proven disappointing. In fact, most digital interventions continue to suffer from high attrition in patient populations, are burdensome for healthcare professionals, and have relatively short life spans. Objective Digital health tools have traditionally centered on the transformation of existing interventions (such as diaries, trackers, stage-based or cognitive behavioral therapy programs, coupons, or symptom checklists) to electronic format. Advanced digital interventions have also incorporated attributes of Web 2.0 such as social networking, text messaging, and the use of video. Despite these efforts, there has not been little measurable impact in non-adherence for illnesses that require medical interventions, and research must look to other strategies or development methodologies. As a first step in investigating the feasibility of developing such a tool, the objective of the current study is to systematically rate factors of non-adherence that have been reported in past research studies. Methods Grounded Theory, recognized as a rigorous method that facilitates the emergence of new themes through systematic analysis, data collection and coding, was used to analyze quantitative, qualitative and mixed method studies addressing the following autoimmune diseases: Rheumatoid Arthritis, gout, Crohn’s Disease, Systematic Lupus Erythematosus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Studies were only included if they contained primary data addressing the relationship with non-adherence. Results Out of the 27 studies, four non-modifiable and 11 modifiable

  14. Effect of gluten-free diet and adherence on growth and diabetic control in diabetics with coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Saadah, O; Zacharin, M; O'Callaghan, A; Oliver, M; Catto-Smith, A

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To study the effect of gluten-free diet on growth and diabetic control of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and coeliac disease. Methods: Twenty one children (mean age 7.5 years, range 1.6–12.9) with type 1 diabetes, primarily initially identified on the basis of symptoms and consecutively diagnosed with coeliac disease by biopsy over a 10 year period, were matched by sex, age at onset, and duration of diabetes with two diabetic controls without coeliac disease. Weight, height, haemoglobin A1c, and insulin requirements were measured before and for 12 months after the diagnosis and treatment of coeliac disease. Dietary awareness and adherence were assessed by structured questionnaire. Results: A gluten-free diet resulted in a significant increase in weight-for-age z scores at 12 months after diagnosis (mean increase in z score 0.33) and in BMI (mean increase in z score 0.32). Increases in height did not achieve statistical significance. Controls showed no significant changes in weight, height, or BMI over the same period. Insulin dosage at diagnosis was less in coeliacs than in controls (mean difference 0.16 units/kg/day), but was similar to controls once a gluten-free diet had been established. Questionnaires were obtained in 20 patients. There appeared to be a relation between dietary awareness/adherence and growth parameters, but the small number of patients with "poor/fair" dietary adherence prevented meaningful analysis of this group. Conclusion: Identification and dietary treatment of coeliac disease in children with diabetes improved growth and influenced diabetic control. Evaluation of the outcome of treatment of coeliac disease in diabetics should include assessments of gluten intake. PMID:15321869

  15. Adherence to Antihypertensive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Erin; Krousel-Wood, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Adherence to antihypertensive medication remains a key modifiable factor in the management of hypertension. The multidimensional nature of adherence and blood pressure (BP) control call for multicomponent, patient-centered interventions to improve adherence. Promising strategies to improve antihypertensive medication adherence and BP control include regimen simplification, reduction of out-of-pocket costs, use of allied health professionals for intervention delivery, and self-monitoring of BP. Research to understand the effects of technology-mediated interventions, mechanisms underlying adherence behavior, and sex-race differences in determinants of low adherence and intervention effectiveness may enhance patient-specific approaches to improve adherence and disease control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Interactive Effects of Neurocognitive Impairment and Substance Use on Antiretroviral Non-adherence in HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Nicholas S.; Sayegh, Philip; Kim, Michelle S.; Castellon, Steven A.; Hinkin, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    While numerous studies have established the adverse independent effects of clinical conditions including neurocognitive dysfunction, psychiatric illness, and substance abuse/dependence on medication adherence among HIV-infected adults, fewer have studied their interactive effects. The current study examined this issue among 204 HIV-infected participants based upon current neurocognitive functioning and DSM-IV-diagnosed psychiatric illness and current substance abuse or dependence. Results confirmed that participants with any of these risk factors demonstrated poorer adherence than individuals with no risk factors. A neurocognitive status × substance abuse/dependence interaction was also identified such that participants with impaired neurocognition and a co-occurring substance abuse/dependence diagnosis demonstrated the poorest adherence. Results confirm the deleterious impact of these risk factors in isolation and also identify a specific interactive effect for individuals with comorbid neurocognitive impairment and a substance abuse/dependence disorder. Findings highlight the need for interventions that simultaneously address these problems. PMID:25589442

  17. Rationale and design of the Study of a Tele-pharmacy Intervention for Chronic diseases to Improve Treatment adherence (STIC2IT): A cluster randomized pragmatic trial

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Niteesh K.; Isaac, Thomas; Lauffenburger, Julie C.; Gopalakrishnan, Chandrasekar; Khan, Nazleen F.; Lee, Marianne; Vachon, Amy; Iliadis, Tanya L.; Hollands, Whitney; Doheny, Scott; Elman, Sandra; Kraft, Jacqueline M.; Naseem, Samrah; Gagne, Joshua J.; Jackevicius, Cynthia A.; Fischer, Michael A.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Sequist, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately half of patients with chronic cardiometabolic conditions are non-adherent with their prescribed medications. Interventions to improve adherence have been only modestly effective because they often address single barriers to adherence, intervene at single points in time, or are imprecisely targeted to patients who may or may not need adherence assistance. Objective To evaluate the effect of a multi-component, behaviorally-tailored pharmacist-based intervention to improve adherence to medications for diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Trial design The STIC2IT (Study of a Tele-pharmacy Intervention for Chronic diseases To Improve Treatment adherence) trial is a cluster-randomized pragmatic trial testing the impact of a pharmacist-led multi-component intervention that uses behavioral interviewing, text messaging, mailed progress reports and video visits. Targeted patients are those who are non-adherent to glucose-lowering, anti-hypertensive, or statin medications and who also have evidence of poor disease control. The intervention is tailored to patients’ individual health barriers and their level of health activation. We cluster randomized 14 practice sites of a large multi-specialty group practice to receive either the pharmacist-based intervention or usual care. STIC2IT has enrolled 4,076 patients to be followed for 12 months after randomization. The trial’s primary outcome is medication adherence, assessed using pharmacy claims data. Secondary outcomes are disease control and healthcare resource utilization. Conclusion This trial will determine whether a technologically-enabled, behaviorally-targeted pharmacist-based intervention results in improved adherence and disease control. If effective, this strategy could be a scalable method of offering tailored adherence support to those with the greatest clinical need. PMID:27659887

  18. Electronic messaging support service programs improve adherence to lipid-lowering therapy among outpatients with coronary artery disease: an exploratory randomised control study.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ronghua; Li, Xia

    2016-03-01

    To compare drug adherence to lipid-lowering therapy among outpatients with coronary artery disease who received information via short message service, via short message service and Micro Letter, or via phone only. Messaging applications and short message service are commonly used internationally. However, little is known about how coronary artery disease outpatients in China may benefit from receiving health education through these technologies. Random sampling method. Data were collected from March-December 2013. Subjects from Chengdu City, China, were randomised to three groups: short message service, short message service + Micro Letter, and phone (control). Appointment reminders and health information were delivered to patients in accordance with designations. After six months, adherence to statin prescriptions was compared among the groups by using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Logistic regression analysis was applied to determine those independent variables that were related to adherence. The short message service and short message service + Micro Letter groups had better cumulative adherence (lower Morisky Medication Adherence Scale scores) after six months than phone group, and the short message service + Micro Letter group had better cumulative adherence (lower Morisky Medication Adherence Scale scores) than the short message service group. Female sex, older age and marriage show positive associations with adherence. Short message service and messaging applications, such as Micro Letter, are effective means of providing discharged patients with reminders and coronary artery disease-related health information. Implementation of a short message service + Micro Letter program can improve outpatient adherence to medication. This research offers useful information to help medical staff design effective interventions to improve medication compliance among coronary artery disease patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Disease related knowledge, medication adherence and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Saeed Ur Rashid; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Saleem, Fahad; Bashir, Sajid; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of diabetes-related knowledge and treatment adherence with glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Pakistan. The study was designed as a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional analysis. T2DM patients attending a public outpatient clinic in Sargodha, Pakistan, were targeted for the study. In addition to the demographic information, the Urdu version of Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test and Morisky Medication Adherence Scale was used for data collection. Patients' medical records were reviewed for glycated haemoglobin levels (HbA1c). Descriptive statistics were used to elaborate sociodemographic characteristics. The Spearman's Rho correlation was used to measure association of disease-related knowledge and treatment adherence with glycaemic control. SPSS V 20.0 was used for data analysis and p<0.05 was taken as significant. In total, 392 T2DM patients were included in the study. The mean age (SD) of these patients was 50.77±9.671 years, 56.6% were males and 90% (n=353) of respondents were married. The mean (SD) duration of disease was 5.58 (4.09) years with median HbA1c of 9.00 (IQR=8.20-10.40). The median knowledge score was 8.0 (IQR=6.0-10.0), while the median adherence score was 4.7 (IQR=3.0-6.0). HbA1c had non-significant and weak negative association with diabetes-related knowledge (r=-0.036, p=0.404) and treatment adherence (r=-0.071, p=0.238). There was negative association reported between HbA1c, treatment adherence and diabetes-related knowledge. Greater efforts are clearly required to investigate other factors affecting glycaemic control among T2DM patients in Pakistan. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. What's in a name? Concordance is better than adherence for promoting partnership and self-management of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Randall, Sue; Neubeck, Lis

    2016-01-01

    The choice of language health professionals use to discuss self-management of chronic disease is important and influences patients' self-management. The words compliance, adherence and concordance are used to discuss patients' agreement with prescribed treatment plans, but have different tone and meanings. Models of care linked to the words compliance and adherence are underpinned by interactions between patients and healthcare providers that merely reinforce instructions about treatments. The 'patient-professional partnership' is introduced as a model by Bodenheimer et al. (2002, p. 2469) whereby true partnership working should be an opportunity to pool the expertise of both parties to arrive at mutually agreed goals in concordance. The impact these words might have on partnership working is important in defining the patient-health professional relationship, and for the patients' healthcare outcomes and the potential effect on healthcare utilisation.

  1. Multiple-exposure photographic analysis of a motile spirochete.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, S F; Charon, N W

    1990-01-01

    The Leptospiraceae are thin spirochetes with a unique mode of motility. These spiral-shaped bacteria have internal periplasmic flagella that propel the cells in low-viscosity and gel-like high-viscosity media. A model of Leptospiraceae motility has been previously proposed that states that the subterminally attached periplasmic flagella rotate between the outer sheath and the helical protoplasmic cylinder. The shape of the cell ends and the direction of gyration of these ends are determined by the direction of rotation of the internal periplasmic flagella. Rotation of the periplasmic flagella in one direction causes that end to be spiral-shaped, and rotation in the other direction causes that end to be hook-shaped. One prediction of the model is that these right-handed spirochetes roll clockwise when swimming away from an observer. For maximum swimming efficiency, the model predicts that the sense of the spiral-shaped end is left-handed and gyrates counterclockwise. The present study presents direct evidence that the cell rolls clockwise (protoplasmic cylinder helix diameter = 0.24 micron; pitch = 0.69 micron), the ends gyrate counterclockwise, and the spiral-shaped end is left-handed (helix diameter = 0.6 micron; pitch = 2.7 microns)--as predicted by the model. The hook-shaped end appears approximately planar. The approach used was to illuminate stroboscopically cells slowed by Ficoll and analyze the resultant multiple-exposure photographs focused above and below the axis of the cell. The methodology used should be helpful in analyzing the motility of the larger and more complex spirochetes. Images PMID:2367518

  2. Medication adherence and visit-to-visit variability of systolic blood pressure in African Americans with chronic kidney disease in the AASK trial.

    PubMed

    Hong, K; Muntner, P; Kronish, I; Shilane, D; Chang, T I

    2016-01-01

    Lower adherence to antihypertensive medications may increase visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure (VVV of BP), a risk factor for cardiovascular events and death. We used data from the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) trial to examine whether lower medication adherence is associated with higher systolic VVV of BP in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease (CKD). Determinants of VVV of BP were also explored. AASK participants (n=988) were categorized by self-report or pill count as having perfect (100%), moderately high (75-99%), moderately low (50-74%) or low (<50%) proportion of study visits with high medication adherence over a 1-year follow-up period. We used multinomial logistic regression to examine determinants of medication adherence, and multivariable-adjusted linear regression to examine the association between medication adherence and systolic VVV of BP, defined as the coefficient of variation or the average real variability (ARV). Participants with lower self-reported adherence were generally younger and had a higher prevalence of comorbid conditions. Compared with perfect adherence, moderately high, moderately low and low adherence was associated with 0.65% (±0.31%), 0.99% (±0.31%) and 1.29% (±0.32%) higher systolic VVV of BP (defined as the coefficient of variation) in fully adjusted models. Results were qualitatively similar when using ARV or when using pill counts as the measure of adherence. Lower medication adherence is associated with higher systolic VVV of BP in African Americans with hypertensive CKD; efforts to improve medication adherence in this population may reduce systolic VVV of BP.

  3. Borrelia miyamotoi: a widespread tick-borne relapsing fever spirochete.

    PubMed

    Wagemakers, Alex; Staarink, Pieter J; Sprong, Hein; Hovius, Joppe W R

    2015-06-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi is a relapsing fever spirochete that has only recently been identified as a human pathogen. Borrelia miyamotoi is genetically and ecologically distinct from Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, while both are present in Ixodes ticks. Over 50 patients with an acute febrile illness have been described with a B. miyamotoi infection, and two infected immunocompromised patients developed a meningoencephalitis. Seroprevalence studies indicate exposure in the general population and in specific risk groups, such as patients initially suspected of having human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Here, we review the available literature on B. miyamotoi, describing its presence in ticks, reservoir hosts, and humans, and discussing its potential impact on public health.

  4. Genome-based Definition of an Inflammatory Bowel Disease-associated Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli Pathovar.

    PubMed

    Desilets, Michael; Deng, Xianding; Deng, Xiangding; Rao, Chitong; Ensminger, Alexander W; Krause, Denis O; Sherman, Philip M; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated Escherichia coli are commonly found in inflamed tissues during inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These bacteria often possess an adherent and invasive phenotype but lack virulence-associated features of well-described intestinal E. coli pathogens, and are of diverse serology and phylotypes, making it difficult to correlate strain characteristics with exacerbations of disease. The genome sequences of 14 phenotypically assigned adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) isolates obtained from intestinal biopsies of patients with IBD were compared with the genome sequences of 37 other pathogenic and commensal E. coli available from public databases. Core genome-based phylogenetic analyses and genome-wide comparison of genetic content established the existence of a closely related cluster of AIEC strains with 3 distinct genetic insertions differentiating them from commensal E. coli. These strains are of the B2 phylotype have a variant type VI secretion system (T6SS-1), and are highly related to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, suggesting that these 2 clinically distinct pathovars have common virulence strategies. Four other mucosally adherent E. coli strains from patients with IBD were of diverse phylogenetic origins and lacked the 3 genetic features, suggesting that they are not related to the B2 AIEC cluster. Although AIEC are often considered as having a unique association with Crohn's disease, isolates from Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis were genetically indistinguishable. B2 AIEC thus represent a closely related cluster of IBD-associated E. coli strains that are distinct from normal commensal isolates, and which should be considered separately from the phenotypically similar but genetically distinct non-B2 AIEC strains when considering their association with intestinal pathogenesis.

  5. Cyclic-di-GMP binding induces structural rearrangements in the PlzA and PlzC proteins of the Lyme disease and relapsing fever spirochetes: a possible switch mechanism for c-di-GMP-mediated effector functions.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Katherine L; Miller, Daniel P; Oliver, Lee D; Freedman, John C; Kostick-Dunn, Jessica L; Carlyon, Jason A; Marion, James D; Bell, Jessica K; Marconi, Richard T

    2016-11-01

    The c-di-GMP network of Borrelia burgdorferi, a causative agent of Lyme disease, consists of Rrp1, a diguanylate cyclase/response regulator; Hpk1, a histidine kinase; PdeA and PdeB, c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases; and PlzA, a PilZ domain c-di-GMP receptor. Borrelia hermsii, a causative agent of tick-borne relapsing fever, possesses a putative c-di-GMP regulatory network that is uncharacterized. While B. burgdorferi requires c-di-GMP to survive within ticks, the associated effector mechanisms are poorly defined. Using site-directed mutagenesis, size exclusion chromatography, isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we investigate the interaction of c-di-GMP with the Borrelia PilZ domain-containing Plz proteins: B. burgdorferi PlzA and B. hermsii PlzC. The Plz proteins were determined to be monomeric in their apo and holo forms and to bind c-di-GMP with high affinity with a 1:1 stoichiometry. C-di-GMP binding induced structural rearrangements in PlzA and PlzC. C-di-GMP binding proved to be dependent on positive charge at R145 of the PilZ domain motif, R145xxxR. Comparative sequence analyses led to the identification of Borrelia consensus sequences for the PilZ domain signature motifs. This study provides insight into c-di-GMP:Plz receptor interaction and identifies a possible switch mechanism that may regulate Plz protein effector functions. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Development and Cultural Adaptation Of the Spanish Version of the End Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (SESRD-AQ)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngmee; Evangelista, Lorraine S.

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed and validated the End-Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (ESRD-AQ) to measure adherence behaviors (e.g., hemodialysis attendance, medication use, fluid restrictions, and diet) of patients on maintenance hemodialysis. To determine whether the ESRD-AQ can be used to measure adherence behaviors in non- English-speaking patients, we translated and adapted the ESRD-AQ into Spanish (SESRD-AQ) using forward and backward translation and cultural adaptation of the content. Validity and reliability were measured using item-level content validity indexes, intraclass correlation coefficients, and known-group analysis. All validity indices were within an acceptable range; strong test-retest stability existed across all items, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.82 to 1.00. The developed SESRD-AQ is a valid assessment tool for use among Spanish-speaking patients on maintenance hemodialysis. This instrument refinement and validation process can be replicated with other maintenance hemodialysis population groups. PMID:24579396

  7. Better Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Could Mitigate the Adverse Consequences of Obesity on Cardiovascular Disease: The SUN Prospective Cohort.

    PubMed

    Eguaras, Sonia; Toledo, Estefanía; Hernández-Hernández, Aitor; Cervantes, Sebastián; Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2015-11-05

    Strong observational evidence supports the association between obesity and cardiovascular events. In elderly high-risk subjects, the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) was reported to counteract the adverse cardiovascular effects of adiposity. Whether this same attenuation is also present in younger subjects is not known. We prospectively examined the association between obesity and cardiovascular clinical events (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death) after 10.9 years follow-up in 19,065 middle-aged men and women (average age 38 year) according to their adherence to the MedDiet (<6 points or ≥6 points in the Trichopoulou's Mediterranean Diet Score). We observed 152 incident cases of cardiovascular disease (CVD). An increased risk of CVD across categories of body mass index (BMI) was apparent if adherence to the MedDiet was low, with multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs): 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 0.93-2.25) for ≥25 - <30 kg/m² of BMI and 2.00 (1.04-3.83) for ≥30 kg/m² of BMI, compared to a BMI < 25 kg/m². In contrast, these estimates were 0.77 (0.35-1.67) and 1.15 (0.39-3.43) with good adherence to MedDiet. Better adherence to the MedDiet was associated with reduced CVD events (p for trend = 0.029). Our results suggest that the MedDiet could mitigate the harmful cardiovascular effect of overweight/obesity.

  8. Better Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Could Mitigate the Adverse Consequences of Obesity on Cardiovascular Disease: The SUN Prospective Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Eguaras, Sonia; Toledo, Estefanía; Hernández-Hernández, Aitor; Cervantes, Sebastián; Martínez-González, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Strong observational evidence supports the association between obesity and cardiovascular events. In elderly high-risk subjects, the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) was reported to counteract the adverse cardiovascular effects of adiposity. Whether this same attenuation is also present in younger subjects is not known. We prospectively examined the association between obesity and cardiovascular clinical events (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death) after 10.9 years follow-up in 19,065 middle-aged men and women (average age 38 year) according to their adherence to the MedDiet (<6 points or ≥6 points in the Trichopoulou’s Mediterranean Diet Score). We observed 152 incident cases of cardiovascular disease (CVD). An increased risk of CVD across categories of body mass index (BMI) was apparent if adherence to the MedDiet was low, with multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs): 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 0.93–2.25) for ≥25 – <30 kg/m2 of BMI and 2.00 (1.04–3.83) for ≥30 kg/m2 of BMI, compared to a BMI < 25 kg/m2. In contrast, these estimates were 0.77 (0.35–1.67) and 1.15 (0.39–3.43) with good adherence to MedDiet. Better adherence to the MedDiet was associated with reduced CVD events (p for trend = 0.029). Our results suggest that the MedDiet could mitigate the harmful cardiovascular effect of overweight/obesity. PMID:26556370

  9. Medication Adherence Patterns after Hospitalization for Coronary Heart Disease. A Population-Based Study Using Electronic Records and Group-Based Trajectory Models

    PubMed Central

    Librero, Julián; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel; Peiró, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify adherence patterns over time and their predictors for evidence-based medications used after hospitalization for coronary heart disease (CHD). Patients and Methods We built a population-based retrospective cohort of all patients discharged after hospitalization for CHD from public hospitals in the Valencia region (Spain) during 2008 (n = 7462). From this initial cohort, we created 4 subcohorts with at least one prescription (filled or not) from each therapeutic group (antiplatelet, beta-blockers, ACEI/ARB, statins) within the first 3 months after discharge. Monthly adherence was defined as having ≥24 days covered out of 30, leading to a repeated binary outcome measure. We assessed the membership to trajectory groups of adherence using group-based trajectory models. We also analyzed predictors of the different adherence patterns using multinomial logistic regression. Results We identified a maximum of 5 different adherence patterns: 1) Nearly-always adherent patients; 2) An early gap in adherence with a later recovery; 3) Brief gaps in medication use or occasional users; 4) A slow decline in adherence; and 5) A fast decline. These patterns represented variable proportions of patients, the descending trajectories being more frequent for the beta-blocker and ACEI/ARB cohorts (16% and 17%, respectively) than the antiplatelet and statin cohorts (10% and 8%, respectively). Predictors of poor or intermediate adherence patterns were having a main diagnosis of unstable angina or other forms of CHD vs. AMI in the index hospitalization, being born outside Spain, requiring copayment or being older. Conclusion Distinct adherence patterns over time and their predictors were identified. This may be a useful approach for targeting improvement interventions in patients with poor adherence patterns. PMID:27551748

  10. Efficacy and safety of a multifactor intervention to improve therapeutic adherence in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): protocol for the ICEPOC study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low therapeutic adherence to medication is very common. Clinical effectiveness is related to dose rate and route of administration and so poor therapeutic adherence can reduce the clinical benefit of treatment. The therapeutic adherence of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is extremely poor according to most studies. The research about COPD adherence has mainly focussed on quantifying its effect, and few studies have researched factors that affect non-adherence. Our study will evaluate the effectiveness of a multifactor intervention to improve the therapeutic adherence of COPD patients. Methods/Design A randomized controlled clinical trial with 140 COPD diagnosed patients selected by a non-probabilistic method of sampling. Subjects will be randomly allocated into two groups, using the block randomization technique. Every patient in each group will be visited four times during the year of the study. Intervention: Motivational aspects related to adherence (beliefs and behaviour): group and individual interviews; cognitive aspects: information about illness; skills: inhaled technique training. Reinforcement of the cognitive-emotional aspects and inhaled technique training will be carried out in all visits of the intervention group. Discussion Adherence to a prescribed treatment involves a behavioural change. Cognitive, emotional and motivational aspects influence this change and so we consider the best intervention procedure to improve adherence would be a cognitive and emotional strategy which could be applied in daily clinical practice. Our hypothesis is that the application of a multifactor intervention (COPD information, dose reminders and reinforcing audiovisual material, motivational aspects and inhalation technique training) to COPD patients taking inhaled treatment will give a 25% increase in the number of patients showing therapeutic adherence in this group compared to the control group. We will evaluate the effectiveness

  11. Rheumatologists' adherence to a disease activity score steered treatment protocol in early arthritis patients is less if the target is remission.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, G; Markusse, I M; Goekoop-Ruiterman, Y P M; Steup-Beekman, G M; Grillet, B A M; Kerstens, P J S M; Lems, W F; Huizinga, T W J; Allaart, C F

    2017-02-01

    To compare rheumatologists' adherence to treatment protocols for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) targeted at Disease Activity Score (DAS) ≤2.4 or <1.6. The BeSt-study enrolled 508 early RA (1987) patients targeted at DAS ≤2.4. The IMPROVED-study included 479 early RA (2010) and 122 undifferentiated arthritis patients targeted at DAS <1.6. We evaluated rheumatologists' adherence to the protocols and assessed associated opinions and conditions during 5 years. Protocol adherence was higher in BeSt than in IMPROVED (86 and 70 %), with a greater decrease in IMPROVED (from 100 to 48 %) than in BeSt (100 to 72 %). In BeSt, 50 % of non-adherence was against treatment intensification/restart, compared to 63 % in IMPROVED and 50 vs. 37 % were against tapering/discontinuation. In both studies, non-adherence was associated with physicians' disagreement with DAS or with next treatment step and if patient's visual analogue scale (VAS) for general health was ≥20 mm higher than the physician's VAS. In IMPROVED, also discrepancies between swelling, pain, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and VASgh were associated with non-adherence. Adherence to DAS steered treatment protocols was high but decreased over 5 years, more in a DAS <1.6 steered protocol. Non-adherence was more likely if physicians disagreed with DAS or next treatment step. In the DAS <1.6 steered protocol, non-adherence was also associated with discrepancies between subjective and (semi)objective disease outcomes, and often against required treatment intensification. These results may indicate that adherence to DAS-steered protocols appears to depend in part on the height of the target and on how physicians perceive the DAS reflects RA activity.

  12. Guideline Adherence in Outpatient Clinics for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Results from a Clinical Audit

    PubMed Central

    López-Campos, Jose L.; Abad Arranz, Maria; Calero-Acuña, Carmen; Romero-Valero, Fernando; Ayerbe-García, Ruth; Hidalgo-Molina, Antonio; Aguilar-Pérez-Grovas, Ricardo I.; García-Gil, Francisco; Casas-Maldonado, Francisco; Caballero-Ballesteros, Laura; Sánchez-Palop, María; Pérez-Tejero, Dolores; Segado, Alejandro; Calvo-Bonachera, Jose; Hernández-Sierra, Bárbara; Doménech, Adolfo; Arroyo-Varela, Macarena; González-Vargas, Francisco; Cruz-Rueda, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Previous clinical audits of COPD have provided relevant information about medical intervention in exacerbation admissions. The present study aims to evaluate adherence to current guidelines in COPD through a clinical audit. Methods This is a pilot clinical audit performed in hospital outpatient respiratory clinics in Andalusia, Spain (eight provinces with more than 8 million inhabitants), including 9 centers (20% of the public centers in the area) between 2013 and 2014. Cases with an established diagnosis of COPD based on risk factors, clinical symptoms, and a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.70 were deemed eligible. The performance of the outpatient clinics was benchmarked against three guidance documents available at the time of the audit. The appropriateness of the performance was categorized as excellent (>80%), good (60−80%), adequate (40−59%), inadequate (20−39%), and highly inadequate (<20%). Results During the audit, 621 clinical records were audited. Adherence to the different guidelines presented a considerable variability among the different participating hospitals, with an excellent or good adherence for symptom recording, MRC or CAT use, smoking status evaluation, spirometry, or bronchodilation therapy. The most outstanding areas for improvement were the use of the BODE index, the monitoring of treatments, the determination of alpha1-antitrypsin, the performance of exercise testing, and vaccination recommendations. Conclusions The present study reflects the situation of clinical care for COPD patients in specialized secondary care outpatient clinics. Adherence to clinical guidelines shows considerable variability in outpatient clinics managing COPD patients, and some aspects of the clinical care can clearly be improved. PMID:26985822

  13. Interventions for improving adherence to iron chelation therapy in people with sickle cell disease or thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Patricia M; Madgwick, Karen V; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Doree, Carolyn; Estcourt, Lise J

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To identify and assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve adherence to iron chelation therapy compared to standard care in people with SCD or thalassaemia including: identifying and assessing the effectiveness of different types of interventions (psychological and psychosocial, educational, medication interventions, or multi-component interventions);identifying and assessing the effectiveness of interventions specific to different age groups (children, adolescents, adults). PMID:27713668

  14. Predicting intention and behaviour following participation in a theory-based intervention to improve gluten free diet adherence in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Kirby; Mullan, Barbara; Sharpe, Louise

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether changes in theory of planned behaviour (TPB) constructs could predict intention and gluten-free diet (GFD) adherence following participation in an online theory-based intervention designed to improve adherence in coeliac disease. Theory-based process evaluation of the mechanisms of change over the course of a six-week online intervention. Measures of GFD adherence and TPB variables were administered at baseline and follow-up (immediate post-intervention: n = 74; three-month: n = 68; six-month: n = 65). Hierarchical regression analyses using residualised change scores were conducted at each time point (dependent variables: intention and adherence). Baseline intention and GFD adherence were the strongest predictors of follow-up intention and adherence, respectively. Change in attitude accounted for significant variance in intention. Change in intention accounted for significant variance in GFD adherence immediately post-intervention; by the six-month follow-up change in perceived behavioural control was the stronger predictor. Partial support for the hypotheses suggests that, for certain behaviours, the TPB may be relevant in explaining the mechanism of action responsible for changes in intention and behaviour following participation in a behaviour change intervention. Additional predictive pathways are also likely to exist and, in the area of GFD adherence, may include habit strength and actual behavioural control.

  15. The use of carer assisted adherence therapy for people with Parkinson's disease and their carers (CAAT-PARK): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pharmacological intervention is essential for managing the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Adherence to medication regimens however is a major problem. Poor adherence leads to significant motor deterioration and inadequate symptom control. This results in poor quality of life. Whilst interventions to improve medication adherence have shown considerable benefit in other chronic conditions, the efficacy of such treatments in Parkinson's disease is less well researched. Many people with Parkinson's disease require substantial support from spouse/caregivers. This often extends to medication taking. Consequently, spouse/caregiver's support for timely medication management is paramount. We aim to investigate the benefit of a novel intervention, Carer Assisted Adherence Therapy, for improving medication adherence and quality of life in people with Parkinson's disease. Adherence therapy may help to optimise the efficacy of anti-parkinsonian agents, subsequently improving clinical outcomes. Methods/Design A parallel, randomised controlled trial will be conducted to investigate whether carer assisted adherence therapy is effective for improving medication adherence and quality of life. We aim to recruit 40 patient/carer pairs into each group. Participants will be randomly assigned by the Clinical Research Trials Unit at the University of East Anglia. Adherence therapy is a brief cognitive-behavioural approach aimed at facilitating a process of shared decision making. The central theory is that when patients make shared choices with a professional they are more likely to continue with those choices because they are personally owned and meaningful. Outcomes will be rates of adherence and quality of life, determined by the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4 and the Parkinson's disease Questionnaire-39 respectively. Assessments will take place post randomisation, immediately post intervention and 12-weeks post randomisation. Primary outcomes are adherence and

  16. Determinants of adherence to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in White British and South Asian patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kanta; Raza, Karim; Nightingale, Peter; Horne, Robert; Chapman, Sarah; Greenfield, Sheila; Gill, Paramjit

    2015-12-29

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic inflammatory disease causing joint damage, disability, and reduced life expectancy. Highly effective drugs are now available for the treatment of RA. However, poor adherence to drug regimens remains a significant barrier to improving clinical outcomes in RA. Poor adherence has been shown to be linked to patients' beliefs about medicines with a potential impact on adherence. These beliefs are reported to be different between ethnic groups. The purpose of this study was to identify potential determinants of adherence to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) including an assessment of the influence of beliefs about medicines and satisfaction with information provided about DMARDs and compare determinants of adherence between RA patients of White British and South Asian. RA patients of either White British (n = 91) or South Asian (n = 89) origin were recruited from secondary care. Data were collected via questionnaires on patients': (1) self-reported adherence (Medication Adherence Report Scale-MARS); (2) beliefs about medicines (Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-BMQ); (3) illness perceptions (Illness Perceptions Questionnaire-IPQ) and (4) satisfaction with information about DMARDs (Satisfaction with Information about Medicines questionnaire-SIMS). In addition, clinical and demographic data were collected. The results revealed that socio-demographic factors only explained a small amount of variance in adherence whereas illness representations and treatment beliefs were more substantial in explaining non-adherence to DMARDs. Patients' self-reported adherence was higher in White British than South Asian patients (median 28 (interquartile range 26-30) vs median 26 (interquartile range 23-30) respectively; P = 0.013, Mann-Whitney test). Patients who reported lower adherence were more dissatisfied with the information they had received about their DMARDs (P < 0.001, Spearman correlation, SIMS action and usage

  17. Real-World Adherence and Persistence to Oral Disease-Modifying Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis Patients Over 1 Year.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kristen M; Zhou, Huanxue; Lin, Feng; Ko, John J; Herrera, Vivian

    2017-08-01

    Disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) are indicated to reduce relapse rates and slow disease progression for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) patients when taken as prescribed. Nonadherence or non-persistence in the real-world setting can lead to greater risk for negative clinical outcomes. Although previous research has demonstrated greater adherence and persistence to oral DMTs compared with injectable DMTs, comparisons among oral DMTs are lacking. To compare adherence, persistence, and time to discontinuation among MS patients newly prescribed the oral DMTs fingolimod, dimethyl fumarate, or teriflunomide. This retrospective study used MarketScan Commercial and Medicare Supplemental claims databases. MS patients with ≥ 1 claim for specified DMTs from April 1, 2013, to June 30, 2013, were identified. The index drug was defined as the first oral DMT within this period. To capture patients newly initiating index DMTs, patients could not have a claim for their index drugs in the previous 12 months. Baseline characteristics were described for patients in each treatment cohort. Adherence, as measured by medication possession ratio (MPR) and proportion of days covered (PDC); persistence (30-day gap allowed); and time to discontinuation over a 12-month follow-up period were compared across treatment cohorts. Adjusted logistic regression models were used to examine adherence, and Cox regression models estimated risk of discontinuation. 1,498 patients newly initiated oral DMTs and met study inclusion criteria: fingolimod (n = 185), dimethyl fumarate (n = 1,160), and teriflunomide (n = 143). Patients were similar across most baseline characteristics, including region, relapse history, and health care resource utilization. Statistically significant differences were observed across the treatment cohorts for age, gender, previous injectable/infused DMT use, and comorbidities. Adherence and time to discontinuation were adjusted for age, gender, region, previous oral

  18. Impact of adherence to WHO infant feeding recommendations on later risk of obesity and non-communicable diseases: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Martin, Anne; Bland, Ruth M; Connelly, Andrew; Reilly, John J

    2016-07-01

    Adherence to WHO infant feeding recommendations has short-term benefits and may also help in the prevention of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). This study reviewed the evidence on whether adherence to all elements of the WHO infant feeding recommendations (comparison group those exclusively breastfed to 6 months, introduced to appropriate complementary feeding from 6 months, with continued breastfeeding to at least 24 months; exposure group characterised by non-adherence to any of the three recommendations) is associated with reduced risk of later obesity or cardiometabolic disease. The population of interest was children not classified as very low weight (weight-for-age z-score >-3.0). MEDLINE, EMBASE, Global Health, CINAHL plus, ProQuest Dissertations and Thesis were systematically searched from 2001 to July 2014, manual reference searching of a birth cohort register (http://www.birthcohorts.net/) as well as papers identified in the search and selected journals was carried out. The database search yielded 9050 records, 275 English-language full-text articles were screened, but no studies were eligible, failing to meet the following criteria: comparison (213); exposure (14); population (3); relevant outcome (5); outcome before 24 months (9); insufficient information provided (30); plus one study was qualitative. Eight studies met the inclusion criterion of exclusive breastfeeding to 6 months, but did not meet the other inclusion criteria. The present study has revealed an important gap in the evidence on NCD prevention, and suggestions for addressing this evidence gap are provided. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effect of Adherence to Protocolized Targeted Intensifications of Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs on Treatment Outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from an Australian Early Arthritis Cohort.

    PubMed

    Wabe, Nasir T; Sorich, Michael J; Wechalekar, Mihir D; Cleland, Leslie G; McWilliams, Leah; Lee, Anita T Y; Spargo, Llewellyn D; Metcalf, Robert G; Hall, Cindy; Proudman, Susanna M; Wiese, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the association between adherence to treat-to-target (T2T) protocol and disease activity, functional outcomes, and radiographic outcomes in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Data from a longitudinal cohort of patients with early RA were used. Adherence was determined at each followup visit over 3 years according to predefined criteria. The primary endpoint was remission according to Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) and Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) criteria. Functional and radiographic outcomes measured by modified Health Assessment Questionnaire and modified total Sharp score, respectively, were secondary endpoints. A total of 198 patients with 3078 clinic visits over 3 years were included in this analysis. After adjusting for relevant variables, although there was no significant association between adherence to T2T and remission rate after 1 year, the associations reached significance after 3 years for both DAS28 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.16-2.50; p = 0.006) and SDAI criteria (OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.06-3.56; p = 0.033). After 3 years, adherence was also associated with improvement in physical function (β=0.12, 95% CI 0.06-0.18; p < 0.0001). None of the radiographic outcomes were associated with adherence after either 1 or 3 years, although there was a trend for higher adherence to be associated with less radiographic progression at the end of the study (p = 0.061). Increased adherence to T2T was associated with better longterm disease activity and functional outcomes, which suggests that the benefit of a T2T protocol may be enhanced by ensuring adequate adherence.

  20. Evaluation of the chronic disease management program for appropriateness of medication adherence and persistence in hypertension and type-2 diabetes patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Ae; Kim, Eun-Sook; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2017-04-01

    The chronic disease management program (CDMP), a multilevel intervention including copayment reduction and physician incentives, was introduced in 2012 in Korea to improve blood pressure and glycemic control by strengthening the function of clinic as primary care institutions in managing hypertension and diabetes. This study, therefore, aimed to evaluate the effect of CDMP on the appropriateness of medication adherence and persistence in hypertension or type-2 diabetes patients.A pre-post retrospective study was conducted using claims cohort data from 2010 to 2013. Hypertension or type-2 diabetes patients were selected as the CDMP group, while dyslipidemia patients were the control group. Study groups were further categorized as clinic shifters or non-shifters on the basis of whether hospital use changed to clinic use during the study period. Pre-post changes in adherence and persistence were assessed. Adherence was measured by medication possession ratio (MPR) and categorized as under (<0.8), appropriate (0.8-1.1), and over-adherence (>1.1). Persistence was measured by 12-month cumulative persistence rate.The pre-post change was significantly improved for appropriate-adherence (hypertension, +6.0%p; diabetes, +6.1%p), 12-month cumulative persistence (hypertension, +6.5%p; diabetes, +10.8%p), and over-adherence (hypertension, -5.3%p; diabetes, -2.8%p) only among the shifters in the CDMP group. Among these, patients visiting the same, single clinic showed a significant increase in appropriate-adherence, whereas those who changed their clinics showed a nonsignificant increase. No significant improvement was verified among the non-shifters in the CDMP group.CDMP improved medication adherence and persistence by significantly increasing appropriate-adherence and 12-month cumulative persistence rate in hypertension and type-2 diabetes patients. Particularly, CDMP significantly improved over-adherence, which was associated with increasing healthcare costs and

  1. Comparing Mobile Health Strategies to Improve Medication Adherence for Veterans With Coronary Heart Disease (Mobile4Meds): Protocol for a Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Eileen G; Shim, Janet K; Whooley, Mary A

    2017-01-01

    Background Adherence to antiplatelet medications is critical to prevent life threatening complications (ie, stent thrombosis) after percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs), yet rates of nonadherence range from 21-57% by 12 months. Mobile interventions delivered via text messaging or mobile apps represent a practical and inexpensive strategy to promote behavior change and enhance medication adherence. Objective The Mobile4Meds study seeks to determine whether text messaging or a mobile app, compared with an educational website control provided to all Veterans, can improve adherence to antiplatelet therapy among patients following acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or PCI. The three aims of the study are to: (1) determine preferences for content and frequency of text messaging to promote medication adherence through focus groups; (2) identify the most patient-centered app that promotes adherence, through a content analysis of all commercially available apps for medication adherence and focus groups centered on usability; and (3) compare adherence to antiplatelet medications in Veterans after ACS/PCI via a randomized clinical trial (RCT). Methods We will utilize a mixed-methods design that uses focus groups to achieve the first and second aims (N=32). Patients will be followed for 12 months after being randomly assigned to one of three arms: (1) customized text messaging, (2) mobile app, or (3) website-control groups (N=225). Medication adherence will be measured with electronic monitoring devices, pharmacy records, and self-reports. Results Enrollment for the focus groups is currently in progress. We expect to enroll patients for the RCT in the beginning of 2018. Conclusions Determining the efficacy of mobile technology using a Veteran-designed protocol to promote medication adherence will have a significant impact on Veteran health and public health, particularly for individuals with chronic diseases that require strict medication adherence. Trial Registration

  2. Comparing Mobile Health Strategies to Improve Medication Adherence for Veterans With Coronary Heart Disease (Mobile4Meds): Protocol for a Mixed-Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Linda G; Collins, Eileen G; Shim, Janet K; Whooley, Mary A

    2017-07-18

    Adherence to antiplatelet medications is critical to prevent life threatening complications (ie, stent thrombosis) after percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs), yet rates of nonadherence range from 21-57% by 12 months. Mobile interventions delivered via text messaging or mobile apps represent a practical and inexpensive strategy to promote behavior change and enhance medication adherence. The Mobile4Meds study seeks to determine whether text messaging or a mobile app, compared with an educational website control provided to all Veterans, can improve adherence to antiplatelet therapy among patients following acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or PCI. The three aims of the study are to: (1) determine preferences for content and frequency of text messaging to promote medication adherence through focus groups; (2) identify the most patient-centered app that promotes adherence, through a content analysis of all commercially available apps for medication adherence and focus groups centered on usability; and (3) compare adherence to antiplatelet medications in Veterans after ACS/PCI via a randomized clinical trial (RCT). We will utilize a mixed-methods design that uses focus groups to achieve the first and second aims (N=32). Patients will be followed for 12 months after being randomly assigned to one of three arms: (1) customized text messaging, (2) mobile app, or (3) website-control groups (N=225). Medication adherence will be measured with electronic monitoring devices, pharmacy records, and self-reports. Enrollment for the focus groups is currently in progress. We expect to enroll patients for the RCT in the beginning of 2018. Determining the efficacy of mobile technology using a Veteran-designed protocol to promote medication adherence will have a significant impact on Veteran health and public health, particularly for individuals with chronic diseases that require strict medication adherence. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03022669.

  3. Early elevation of albumin excretion rate is associated with poor gluten-free diet adherence in young people with coeliac disease and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pham-Short, A; C Donaghue, K; Ambler, G; K Chan, A; Hing, S; Cusumano, J; E Craig, M

    2014-02-01

    There are conflicting data on microvascular complications in coexisting Type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease. We compared complications rates in youth with or without coeliac disease and examined the association between gluten-free diet adherence and complications. This was a comparative study of adolescents (2510 without coeliac disease, 129 with coeliac disease); 60 (47%) did not adhere to a gluten-free diet--defined as elevated anti-tissue transglutaminase or endomysial immunoglobulin A titres. Retinopathy was detected using 7-field fundal photography and albumin excretion rate by timed overnight urine collections, with early elevation defined as albumin excretion rate ≥ 7.5 μg/min. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between complications and explanatory variables, including coeliac disease vs. no coeliac disease, gluten-free diet adherence vs. non-adherence, diabetes duration and HbA1c . Median age at last assessment was 16.5 years. Those with coeliac disease vs. those without were younger at diabetes diagnosis (7.1 vs. 8.6 years, P < 0.001) and had longer diabetes duration (9.3 vs. 7.2 years, P < 0.001). HbA1c was lower in those with coeliac disease vs. those without (67 vs. 70 mmol/mol, 8.3 vs. 8.6%, P = 0.04) and adherence to a gluten-free diet vs. non-adherence (66 vs. 72 mmol/mol, 8.2 vs. 8.7%, P = 0.003). There were no differences in complication rates between those with coeliac disease vs. those without (retinopathy 22 vs. 23%, elevated albumin excretion rate 31 vs. 28%). Non-adherence to a gluten-free diet was associated with elevated albumin excretion rate (40 vs. 23%, P = 0.04). In multivariable logistic regression, elevated albumin excretion rate was associated with non-adherence to a gluten-free diet (odds ratio 2.37, 95% CI 1.04-5.40, P = 0.04) and diabetes duration (odds ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.02-1.25, P = 0.03), but not HbA1c . While glycaemic control is better in patients with coeliac disease, non-adherence to a gluten

  4. Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi nov. gen., nov. sp.: variable-diameter composite spirochete from microbial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.; Ashen, J.; Sole, M.; Margulis, L.

    1993-01-01

    Large (up to 100 micrometers long), loosely coiled, free-living spirochetes with variable diameters (from 0.4 to 3 micrometers in the same cell) were seen at least 40 times between August 1990 and January 1993. These spirochetes were observed in mud water and enrichment media from highly specific habitats in intertidal evaporite flats at three disjunct localities, one in Spain and two in Mexico. All three are sites of commercial saltworks. Associated with Microcoleus chthonoplastes the large spirochetes from Spain display phototaxis and a composite organization. Shorter and smaller-diameter spirochetes are seen inside both healthy and spent periplasm of larger ones. Small spirochetes attached to large ones have been observed live. From two to twelve spirochete protoplasmic cylinders were seen inside a single common outer membrane. A distinctive granulated cytoplasm in which the granules are of similar diameter (20-32 nanometers) to that of the flagella (26 nanometers) was present. Granule diameters were measured in thin section and in negatively-stained whole-mount preparations. Based on their ultrastructure, large size, variable diameter, number of flagella (3 to 6), and phototactic behavior these unique spirochetes are formally named Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi. Under anoxic (or low oxygen) conditions they formed blooms in mixed culture in media selective for spirochetes. Cellobiose was the major carbon source in 80% seawater, the antibiotic rifampicin was added, mat from the original field site was present and tubes were incubated in the light at from 18-31 degrees C. Within 1-2 weeks populations of the large spirochete developed at 25 degrees C but they could not be transferred to fresh medium.

  5. Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi nov. gen., nov. sp.: variable-diameter composite spirochete from microbial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.; Ashen, J.; Sole, M.; Margulis, L.

    1993-01-01

    Large (up to 100 micrometers long), loosely coiled, free-living spirochetes with variable diameters (from 0.4 to 3 micrometers in the same cell) were seen at least 40 times between August 1990 and January 1993. These spirochetes were observed in mud water and enrichment media from highly specific habitats in intertidal evaporite flats at three disjunct localities, one in Spain and two in Mexico. All three are sites of commercial saltworks. Associated with Microcoleus chthonoplastes the large spirochetes from Spain display phototaxis and a composite organization. Shorter and smaller-diameter spirochetes are seen inside both healthy and spent periplasm of larger ones. Small spirochetes attached to large ones have been observed live. From two to twelve spirochete protoplasmic cylinders were seen inside a single common outer membrane. A distinctive granulated cytoplasm in which the granules are of similar diameter (20-32 nanometers) to that of the flagella (26 nanometers) was present. Granule diameters were measured in thin section and in negatively-stained whole-mount preparations. Based on their ultrastructure, large size, variable diameter, number of flagella (3 to 6), and phototactic behavior these unique spirochetes are formally named Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi. Under anoxic (or low oxygen) conditions they formed blooms in mixed culture in media selective for spirochetes. Cellobiose was the major carbon source in 80% seawater, the antibiotic rifampicin was added, mat from the original field site was present and tubes were incubated in the light at from 18-31 degrees C. Within 1-2 weeks populations of the large spirochete developed at 25 degrees C but they could not be transferred to fresh medium.

  6. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Dietary adherence influences normalization of health-related quality of life in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Burger, Jordy P W; de Brouwer, Bart; IntHout, Joanna; Wahab, Peter J; Tummers, Marcia; Drenth, Joost P H

    2017-04-01

    Gluten-free diet is the keystone of coeliac disease treatment. Despite adherence, some patients continue to suffer from symptoms that negatively influence health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Therefore we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effect of gluten-free diet on HRQoL in coeliac disease. We specifically sought for determinants that negatively influenced HRQoL. We systematically searched PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Cochrane Library for studies assessing HRQoL in untreated or treated adults using validated HRQoL-questionnaires from 1960 to September 2015, comparing HRQoL: (1) before and after gluten-free diet initiation or (2) in patients and non-coeliac controls. We included eighteen studies and sixteen were suitable for meta-analysis. Gluten-free diet significantly improves HRQoL, for psychological general well-being (PGWB)-Total (mean difference (MD) 7.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.96; 12.72]; p = 0.008), SF-36 Mental Component Score (MCS) (MD 7.37, 95% CI [1.84; 12.90]; p = 0.009) and SF-36 Physical Component Score (PCS) (MD 5.72, 95% CI [1.50; 9.95]; p = 0.008). Treated patients had similar HRQoL compared with controls for PGWB-Total (MD -0.72, 95% CI [-2.71; 1.27]; p = 0.48), but significantly lower levels for SF-36 MCS (MD -4.09, 95% CI [-6.17; -2.01]; p = 0.0001) and PCS (MD -4.57, 95% CI [-6.97; -2.17]; p = 0.0002). Symptom-detected gluten-free diet adhering patients have lower HRQoL compared with screening-detected patients (MD -3.73, 95% CI [-6.77;-0.69]; p = 0.02) Strict adhering patients have better HRQoL compared with non-strict adhering patients for SF-36 MCS (MD 7.70, 95% CI [4.61; 10.79]; p < 0.00001) and for SF-36 PCS (MD 3.23, 95% CI [1.33; 5.14]; p = 0.0009). Gluten-free diet significantly improves but does not normalize HRQoL in adults with coeliac disease. Dietary adherence improves HRQoL. Better (self-reported) dietary adherence results in higher HRQoL. Copyright

  7. Crohn disease--associated adherent-invasive E. coli bacteria target mouse and human Peyer's patches via long polar fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Chassaing, Benoit; Rolhion, Nathalie; de Vallée, Amélie; Salim, Sa'ad Y; Prorok-Hamon, Maelle; Neut, Christel; Campbell, Barry J; Söderholm, Johan D; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2011-03-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a multifactorial disease in which an abnormal immune response in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract leads to chronic inflammation. The small intestine, particularly the ileum, of patients with CD is colonized by adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC)--a pathogenic group of E. coli able to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells. As the earliest inflammatory lesions are microscopic erosions of the epithelium lining the Peyer's patches (PPs), we investigated the ability of AIEC bacteria to interact with PPs and the virulence factors involved. We found that AIEC bacteria could interact with mouse and human PPs via long polar fimbriae (LPF). An LPF-negative AIEC mutant was highly impaired in its ability to interact with mouse and human PPs and to translocate across monolayers of M cells, specialized epithelial cells at the surface of PPs. The prevalence of AIEC strains harboring the lpf operon was markedly higher in CD patients compared with controls. In addition, increased numbers of AIEC, but not LPF-deficient AIEC, bacteria were found interacting with PPs from Nod2(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. In conclusion, we have identified LPF as a key factor for AIEC to target PPs. This could be the missing link between AIEC colonization and the presence of early lesions in the PPs of CD patients.

  8. Isolation and characterization of Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes from digital dermatitis lesions in Swedish dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Märit; Bergsten, Christer; Fernström, Lise-Lotte; Höök, Helena; Johansson, Karl-Erik

    2008-10-20

    Digital dermatitis in cattle is an emerging infectious disease. Ulcerative lesions are typically located on the plantar skin between the heel bulbs and adjacent to the coronet. Spirochetes of the genus Treponema are found in high numbers in the lesions and are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to obtain pure cultures of spirochetes from cattle with digital dermatitis and to describe them further. Tissue samples and swabs from active digital dermatitis lesions were used for culturing. Pure isolates were subjected to, molecular typing through 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and an intergenic spacer PCR developed for Treponema spp. as well as API-ZYM and antimicrobial susceptibility tests. The antimicrobial agents used were tiamulin, valnemulin, tylosin, aivlosin, lincomycin and doxycycline. Seven spirochete isolates from five herds were obtained. Both 16S rRNA gene sequences, which were identical except for three polymorphic nucleotide positions, and the intergenic spacer PCR indicated that all isolates were of one yet unnamed species, most closely related to Treponema phagedenis. The enzymatic profile and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern were also similar for all isolates. However it was possible to separate the isolates through their PFGE and RAPD banding pattern. This is the first report on isolation of a Treponema sp. from cattle with digital dermatitis in Scandinavia. The phylotype isolated has previously been cultured from samples from cattle in the USA and the UK and is closely related to T. phagedenis. While very similar, the isolates in this study were possible to differentiate through PFGE and RAPD indicating that these methods are suitable for subtyping of this phylotype. No antimicrobial resistance could be detected among the tested isolates.

  9. Isolation and characterization of Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes from digital dermatitis lesions in Swedish dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Märit; Bergsten, Christer; Fernström, Lise-Lotte; Höök, Helena; Johansson, Karl-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Background Digital dermatitis in cattle is an emerging infectious disease. Ulcerative lesions are typically located on the plantar skin between the heel bulbs and adjacent to the coronet. Spirochetes of the genus Treponema are found in high numbers in the lesions and are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to obtain pure cultures of spirochetes from cattle with digital dermatitis and to describe them further. Methods Tissue samples and swabs from active digital dermatitis lesions were used for culturing. Pure isolates were subjected to, molecular typing through 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and an intergenic spacer PCR developed for Treponema spp. as well as API-ZYM and antimicrobial susceptibility tests. The antimicrobial agents used were tiamulin, valnemulin, tylosin, aivlosin, lincomycin and doxycycline. Results Seven spirochete isolates from five herds were obtained. Both 16S rRNA gene sequences, which were identical except for three polymorphic nucleotide positions, and the intergenic spacer PCR indicated that all isolates were of one yet unnamed species, most closely related to Treponema phagedenis. The enzymatic profile and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern were also similar for all isolates. However it was possible to separate the isolates through their PFGE and RAPD banding pattern. Conclusion This is the first report on isolation of a Treponema sp. from cattle with digital dermatitis in Scandinavia. The phylotype isolated has previously been cultured from samples from cattle in the USA and the UK and is closely related to T. phagedenis. While very similar, the isolates in this study were possible to differentiate through PFGE and RAPD indicating that these methods are suitable for subtyping of this phylotype. No antimicrobial resistance could be detected among the tested isolates. PMID:18937826

  10. Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Spirochetes in Wild Birds in Northwestern California: Associations with Ecological Factors, Bird Behavior and Tick Infestation

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Erica A.; Eisen, Lars; Eisen, Rebecca J.; Fedorova, Natalia; Hasty, Jeomhee M.; Vaughn, Charles; Lane, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Although Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) are found in a great diversity of vertebrates, most studies in North America have focused on the role of mammals as spirochete reservoir hosts. We investigated the roles of birds as hosts for subadult Ixodes pacificus ticks and potential reservoirs of the Lyme disease spirochete B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) in northwestern California. Overall, 623 birds representing 53 species yielded 284 I. pacificus larvae and nymphs. We used generalized linear models and zero-inflated negative binomial models to determine associations of bird behaviors, taxonomic relationships and infestation by I. pacificus with borrelial infection in the birds. Infection status in birds was best explained by taxonomic order, number of infesting nymphs, sampling year, and log-transformed average body weight. Presence and counts of larvae and nymphs could be predicted by ground- or bark-foraging behavior and contact with dense oak woodland. Molecular analysis yielded the first reported detection of Borrelia bissettii in birds. Moreover, our data suggest that the Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla), a non-resident species, could be an important reservoir for B. burgdorferi s.s. Of 12 individual birds (9 species) that carried B. burgdorferi s.l.-infected larvae, no birds carried the same genospecies of B. burgdorferi s.l. in their blood as were present in the infected larvae removed from them. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Our study is the first to explicitly incorporate both taxonomic relationships and behaviors as predictor variables to identify putative avian reservoirs of B. burgdorferi s.l. Our findings underscore the importance of bird behavior to explain local tick infestation and Borrelia infection in these animals, and suggest the potential for bird-mediated geographic spread of vector ticks and spirochetes in the far-western United States. PMID:25714376

  11. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato spirochetes in wild birds in northwestern California: associations with ecological factors, bird behavior and tick infestation.

    PubMed

    Newman, Erica A; Eisen, Lars; Eisen, Rebecca J; Fedorova, Natalia; Hasty, Jeomhee M; Vaughn, Charles; Lane, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Although Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) are found in a great diversity of vertebrates, most studies in North America have focused on the role of mammals as spirochete reservoir hosts. We investigated the roles of birds as hosts for subadult Ixodes pacificus ticks and potential reservoirs of the Lyme disease spirochete B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) in northwestern California. Overall, 623 birds representing 53 species yielded 284 I. pacificus larvae and nymphs. We used generalized linear models and zero-inflated negative binomial models to determine associations of bird behaviors, taxonomic relationships and infestation by I. pacificus with borrelial infection in the birds. Infection status in birds was best explained by taxonomic order, number of infesting nymphs, sampling year, and log-transformed average body weight. Presence and counts of larvae and nymphs could be predicted by ground- or bark-foraging behavior and contact with dense oak woodland. Molecular analysis yielded the first reported detection of Borrelia bissettii in birds. Moreover, our data suggest that the Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla), a non-resident species, could be an important reservoir for B. burgdorferi s.s. Of 12 individual birds (9 species) that carried B. burgdorferi s.l.-infected larvae, no birds carried the same genospecies of B. burgdorferi s.l. in their blood as were present in the infected larvae removed from them. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Our study is the first to explicitly incorporate both taxonomic relationships and behaviors as predictor variables to identify putative avian reservoirs of B. burgdorferi s.l. Our findings underscore the importance of bird behavior to explain local tick infestation and Borrelia infection in these animals, and suggest the potential for bird-mediated geographic spread of vector ticks and spirochetes in the far-western United States.

  12. Systematic Information to Health-Care Professionals about Vaccination Guidelines Improves Adherence in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Anti-TNFα Therapy.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Katrine R; Steenholdt, Casper; Buhl, Sine S; Ainsworth, Mark A; Thomsen, Ole Ø; Brynskov, Jørn

    2015-11-01

    Implementation of guidelines for prevention of infectious diseases during anti-TNFα therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is important but difficult. We investigated whether systematic information to health-care professionals about these guidelines improves patients' adherence. The study comprised three parts: (1) cross-sectional evaluation of baseline vaccination status in all IBD patients in anti-TNFα therapy (reference group; n=130); (2) prospective interventional study, where health-care professionals received systematic oral and written information about vaccination guidelines at baseline and at 2-month intervals for 6 months, followed by reassessment of vaccination status (intervention group; n=99); (3) cross-sectional evaluation of representative gastroenterologists' knowledge of guidelines (n=53). Outcomes were assessed by validated questionnaires. Patients' adherence to vaccination guidelines increased significantly after a period of systematic information to health-care professionals. Hence, complete adherence increased from 5 to 26%, partial adherence from 38 to 56%, and complete non-adherence decreased from 57 to 18% (P<0.0001). Adherence to all individual vaccinations except human papilloma virus increased significantly (P≤0.0021). Improvement was independent of disease type and anti-TNFα agent. At baseline, only 8% of physicians could identify all elements in the reference guideline. Additional barriers reported by physicians were forgetfulness (32%) and insufficient consultation time (26%). Patient-perceived barriers were costs of vaccinations (35%) and forgetfulness (25%). Gastroenterologists' limited knowledge of vaccination guidelines during anti-TNFα therapy can be overcome by systematic education of health-care professionals. This inexpensive and easily accessible intervention immediately results in markedly improved patient adherence. Remaining obstacles for adherence comprise high vaccination costs and forgetfulness.

  13. Using a virtual game system to innovate pulmonary rehabilitation: Safety, adherence and enjoyment in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wardini, Rima; Dajczman, Esther; Yang, Nathan; Baltzan, Marcel; Préfontaine, David; Stathatos, Maria; Marciano, Haguit; Watson, Shawn; Wolkove, Norman

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present pilot study tested the use of a virtual game system (VGS) for exercise training in patients with moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Safety, feasibility, enjoyment and adherence were assessed. METHODS: VGS (Wii [2006], Nintendo, USA) games were prescreened and categorized into lower- and upper-body workouts. Patients admitted for a three- to four-week inpatient PR program exercised daily. They were provided an opportunity to individually engage in VGS sessions three times weekly, varying with length of stay. Dyspnea, oxygen saturation and heart rate were measured before, during and after game sessions. Patients were considered to be adherent if they attended at least 50% of VGS sessions. Adverse events and enjoyment were evaluated. RESULTS: Thirty-two patients with a mean (± SD) age of 66±9 years and a mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 0.72±0.40 L participated. Among the 25 patients completing the program, adherence was 76%, with a mean attendance rate of 64±35%. Mean dyspnea score was 1.5±1.1 before and 3.2±1.2 after exercise. Mean oxygen saturation changed from 94±3% to 91±5% (P<0.001), while heart rate increased from 88±15 beats/min to 102±18 beats/min (P<0.001). One patient reported chest pain requiring nitroglycerin spray and five experienced transient desaturation below 85% with play. Patients enjoyed the program (visual analogue score 8±2.6/10) and most would highly recommend it to others. CONCLUSIONS: Moderate exercise using a VGS was safe, feasible and enjoyed as an adjunct to inpatient PR. This modality may encourage patients to maintain physical activity after PR. PMID:24093115

  14. Adherence to disease-modifying therapies and its impact on relapse, health resource utilization, and costs among patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Burks, Jack; Marshall, Thomas S; Ye, Xiaolan

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate adherence to disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) initiating oral and injectable DMTs, and to estimate the impact of adherence on relapse, health resource utilization, and medical costs. Commercially insured MS patients (aged 18-65 years, two or more MS diagnoses, one or more DMT claims) with continuous eligibility 12 months before and after the first DMT claim date (index date) and no DMT claim during the pre-index period were identified from a large commerical claims database for the period from January 1, 2008, to September 30, 2015. Adherence to the index DMT was measured by the 12-month post-index proportion of days covered (PDC) and compared between oral and injectable DMT initiators. After adjustment for sex, age at index DMT, and comorbidities, regression models examined the relationship between adherence and relapse risk, MS-related health resource utilization, and non-drug medical costs (2015 US$). The study covered 12,431 patients and nine DMTs. Adherence to the index DMT did not differ significantly between oral (n=1,018) and injectable (n=11,413) DMTs when assessed by mean PDC (0.7257±0.2934 vs 0.7259±0.2869, respectively; P=0.0787), or percentages achieving PDC ≥0.8 (61.4% vs 58.6%, respectively; P=0.0806). Compared to non-adherence, adherence to DMT significantly reduced the likelihood of relapse in the post-index 12 months by 42%, hospitalization by 52%, and emergency visits by 38% (all, P<0.0001). Adherent patients would be expected to have on average 0.7 fewer outpatient visits annually versus non-adherent patients (P<0.0001). Based on the differences in predicted mean costs, adherence (vs non-adherence) would decrease the total annual medical care costs by $5,816 per patient, including hospitalization costs by $1,953, emergency visits by $171, and outpatient visits by $2,802. Adherence remains suboptimal but comparable between oral and injectable DMTs. Potential health and economic

  15. Adherence to disease-modifying therapies and its impact on relapse, health resource utilization, and costs among patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Jack; Marshall, Thomas S; Ye, Xiaolan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate adherence to disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) initiating oral and injectable DMTs, and to estimate the impact of adherence on relapse, health resource utilization, and medical costs. Patients and methods Commercially insured MS patients (aged 18–65 years, two or more MS diagnoses, one or more DMT claims) with continuous eligibility 12 months before and after the first DMT claim date (index date) and no DMT claim during the pre-index period were identified from a large commerical claims database for the period from January 1, 2008, to September 30, 2015. Adherence to the index DMT was measured by the 12-month post-index proportion of days covered (PDC) and compared between oral and injectable DMT initiators. After adjustment for sex, age at index DMT, and comorbidities, regression models examined the relationship between adherence and relapse risk, MS-related health resource utilization, and non-drug medical costs (2015 US$). Results The study covered 12,431 patients and nine DMTs. Adherence to the index DMT did not differ significantly between oral (n=1,018) and injectable (n=11,413) DMTs when assessed by mean PDC (0.7257±0.2934 vs 0.7259±0.2869, respectively; P=0.0787), or percentages achieving PDC ≥0.8 (61.4% vs 58.6%, respectively; P=0.0806). Compared to non-adherence, adherence to DMT significantly reduced the likelihood of relapse in the post-index 12 months by 42%, hospitalization by 52%, and emergency visits by 38% (all, P<0.0001). Adherent patients would be expected to have on average 0.7 fewer outpatient visits annually versus non-adherent patients (P<0.0001). Based on the differences in predicted mean costs, adherence (vs non-adherence) would decrease the total annual medical care costs by $5,816 per patient, including hospitalization costs by $1,953, emergency visits by $171, and outpatient visits by $2,802. Conclusion Adherence remains suboptimal but comparable between oral and

  16. Non-adherence to Anti-TNF Therapy is Associated with Illness Perceptions and Clinical Outcomes in Outpatients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results from a Prospective Multicentre Study.

    PubMed

    van der Have, Mike; Oldenburg, Bas; Kaptein, Ad A; Jansen, Jeroen M; Scheffer, Robert C H; van Tuyl, Bas A; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Pierik, Marieke; Siersema, Peter D; van Oijen, Martijn G H; Fidder, Herma H

    2016-05-01

    Non-adherence to anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] agents in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] is a serious problem. In this study, we assessed risk factors for non-adherence and examined the association between adherence to anti-TNF agents and loss of response [LOR]. In this multicentre, 12-month observational study, outpatients with IBD were included. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded. Adherence was measured with the Modified Morisky Adherence Scale-8 [MMAS-8] and 12-month pharmacy refills [medication possession ratio, MPR]. Risk factors included demographic and clinical characteristics, medication beliefs, and illness perceptions. Cox regression analysis was performed to determine the association between MPR and LOR to anti-TNF, IBD-related surgery or hospitalisation, dose intensification, or discontinuation of anti-TNF. In total, 128 patients were included [67 infliximab, 61 adalimumab], mean age 37 ( ± standard deviation [SD] 14) years, 71 [56%] female. Median disease duration was 8 (interquartile range [IQR] 4-14) years. Clinical disease activity was present in 41/128 [32%] patients, 36/127 [28%] patients had an MMAS-8 < 6 ['low adherence'], and 25/99 [25%] patients had an MPR < 80% [non-adherence]. Risk factors for non-adherence included adalimumab use (odds ratio [OR] 10.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.62-40.00), stronger emotional response [OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.02-1.31], and shorter timeline perception, i.e. short perceived illness duration [OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.38-0.96]. Adherence is linearly and negatively [OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.03-0.63] associated with LOR. Non-adherence to anti-TNF agents is strongly associated with LOR to anti-TNF agents, adalimumab use, and illness perceptions. The latter may provide an important target for interventions aimed at improving adherence and health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  17. The End-Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (ESRD-AQ): Testing The Psychometric Properties in Patients Receiving In-Center Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Phillips, Linda R.; Pavlish, Carol; Kopple, Joel D.

    2010-01-01

    Reported treatment adherence rates of patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) have been extremely varied due to lack of reliable and valid measurement tools. This study was conducted to develop and test an instrument to measure treatment adherence to hemodialysis (HD) attendance, medications, fluid restrictions, and diet prescription among patients with ESRD. This article describes the methodological approach used to develop and test the psychometric properties (such as reliability and validity) of the 46-item ESRD-Adherence Questionnaire (ESRD-AQ) in a cohort of patients receiving maintenance HD at dialysis centers in Los Angeles County. The ESRD-AQ is the first self-report instrument to address all components of adherence behaviors of patients with ESRD. The findings support that the instrument is reliable and valid, and is easy to administer. Future studies are needed in a larger sample to determine whether additional modifications are needed. PMID:20830945

  18. Direct Adherence Measurement Using an Ingestible Sensor Compared With Self-Reporting in High-Risk Cardiovascular Disease Patients Who Knew They Were Being Measured: A Prospective Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, David; Mackay, Teresa; Matthews, Maria; Edwards, Judith; Connolly, Susan B

    2017-01-01

    Background Use of appropriate cardioprotective medication is a cornerstone of cardiovascular disease prevention, but less-than-optimal patient adherence is common. Thus, strategies for improving adherence are recommended to adopt a multifaceted approach. Objective The objective of our study was to test a system comprising a biodegradable, ingestible sensor for direct measurement of medication ingestion in a group of patients at elevated cardiovascular risk attending a cardiac prevention and rehabilitation program. Methods In this prospective intervention trial in a single group of 21 patients running from April 2014 to June 2015, we measured adherence by self-report and adherence determined objectively by the system. The sensor emits a signal when it encounters the acidic environment of the stomach, detectable by an externally worn patch and linked software app. Longitudinal adherence data in the form of daily progress charts for sensed dosing events as compared with scheduled dosing are visible to patients on their tablet computer’s medication dosing app, thus providing patients with continuous medication adherence feedback. We sought feedback on patient acceptability by questionnaire assessment. Participants used the system for the 12-week period of their cardiac prevention and rehabilitation program. Results Only 1 patient at initial assessment and 1 patient at end-of-program assessment reported often missing medication. The remaining patients reported never missing medication or had missing data. Only 12 (57%) of patients overall achieved system-determined adherence of 80% or more, and 3 patients had scores below 40%. Participants reported high levels of acceptability. Conclusions This integrated system was well tolerated in a group of 21 patients over an appreciable time frame. Its ability to measure adherence reveals the sizeable disconnect between patient self-reported adherence and actual medication taking and has promising potential for clinical use as a

  19. Direct Adherence Measurement Using an Ingestible Sensor Compared With Self-Reporting in High-Risk Cardiovascular Disease Patients Who Knew They Were Being Measured: A Prospective Intervention.

    PubMed

    Thompson, David; Mackay, Teresa; Matthews, Maria; Edwards, Judith; Peters, Nicholas; Connolly, Susan B

    2017-06-12

    Use of appropriate cardioprotective medication is a cornerstone of cardiovascular disease prevention, but less-than-optimal patient adherence is common. Thus, strategies for improving adherence are recommended to adopt a multifaceted approach. The objective of our study was to test a system comprising a biodegradable, ingestible sensor for direct measurement of medication ingestion in a group of patients at elevated cardiovascular risk attending a cardiac prevention and rehabilitation program. In this prospective intervention trial in a single group of 21 patients running from April 2014 to June 2015, we measured adherence by self-report and adherence determined objectively by the system. The sensor emits a signal when it encounters the acidic environment of the stomach, detectable by an externally worn patch and linked software app. Longitudinal adherence data in the form of daily progress charts for sensed dosing events as compared with scheduled dosing are visible to patients on their tablet computer's medication dosing app, thus providing patients with continuous medication adherence feedback. We sought feedback on patient acceptability by questionnaire assessment. Participants used the system for the 12-week period of their cardiac prevention and rehabilitation program. Only 1 patient at initial assessment and 1 patient at end-of-program assessment reported often missing medication. The remaining patients reported never missing medication or had missing data. Only 12 (57%) of patients overall achieved system-determined adherence of 80% or more, and 3 patients had scores below 40%. Participants reported high levels of acceptability. This integrated system was well tolerated in a group of 21 patients over an appreciable time frame. Its ability to measure adherence reveals the sizeable disconnect between patient self-reported adherence and actual medication taking and has promising potential for clinical use as a tool to encourage better medication

  20. Patterns of medication adherence and health care utilization among patients with chronic disease who were enrolled in a pharmacy assistance program.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Andrew W; Crisp, Ginny D; Esserman, Denise A; Roth, Mary T; Weinberger, Morris; Farley, Joel F

    2014-01-01

    Poor medication adherence due to high drug costs is a barrier to optimal health outcomes among low-income uninsured patients with chronic conditions. Charitable pharmacy assistance programs provide medications to such patients, but little is known about the utilization patterns of program participants. We used a retrospective cohort design to investigate 6-month outcomes for participants in the University of North Carolina (UNC) Health Care Pharmacy Assistance Program (PAP) who received medications indicated for hypertension, diabetes, and/or hyperlipidemia from 2009 through 2011. Logistic regression was used to analyze predictors of medication adherence and to evaluate the association between adherence and use of emergency and inpatient care. The 3 study cohorts included 866 patients receiving antihypertensive agents, 265 patients receiving oral glucose-lowering agents, and 455 patients receiving statins. When assessed 6 months after program enrollment, 52%, 45%, and 38% of patients in these 3 groups, respectively, were at least 80% adherent to treatment. Adherent patients in all cohorts had lower odds of requiring inpatient or emergency department care, but the decrease was only statistically significant among those taking antihypertensive agents (odds ratio for hospitalization = 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.87). Selection bias and inability to capture utilization data from sources other than UNC Health Care may have biased results. Approximately 50% of PAP participants were adherent to chronic disease medications. Adherence to such therapies among patients who are receiving financial assistance with medications may reduce their need for costly health care services. Future research should assess the long-term ability of pharmacy assistance programs to promote medication adherence and should examine alternative strategies for improving adherence and health outcomes among low-income uninsured patients.

  1. Mealtime-related dosing directions for proton-pump inhibitors in gastroesophageal reflux disease: physician knowledge, patient adherence.

    PubMed

    Solem, Caitlyn; Mody, Reema; Stephens, Jennifer; Macahilig, Cynthia; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe physicians' knowledge, patients' adherence, and perceptions of both regarding mealtime-related dosing directions for proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). DESIGN Chart review and survey of patients and physicians. SETTING United States, with data collected between January and July 2011. PARTICIPANTS Patients being treated for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with PPIs and their prescribing physicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient- and physician-reported perception of PPI mealtime-related directions as important/inconvenient (seven-point Likert scale; 7 = very important/very inconvenient); physician-reported knowledge of PPI mealtime-related dosing directions based on whether the agent is labeled to be taken 30-60 minutes before eating (DIR-esomeprazole magnesium [Nexium-AstraZeneca], lansoprazole, and omeprazole) or labeled to be taken regardless of meals (NoDIR-dexlansoprazole [Dexilant-Takeda], rabeprazole, and pantoprazole); and patient-reported PPI mealtime-related directions received and adherence to directions. RESULTS Physicians (n = 262) recruited 501 patients who had been prescribed PPIs (262 DIR/239 NoDIR; mean age 51 years, 37% men, 56% nonerosive GERD [29% undocumented]). Across PPIs, physicians frequently reported incorrect directions or "did not know directions" (29% for esomeprazole to 69% for pantoprazole). While 98% of patients reported receiving directions from their physicians and 55% from their pharmacists, only 65% of DIR patients and 18% of NoDIR received directions consistent with product labeling. Physicians perceived greater inconvenience than patients (4.4 vs. 1.6, P < 0.001) and greater importance (5.2 vs. 4.5, P < 0.001) of mealtime-related directions. Overall, 81% of patients reported taking their PPI as directed. CONCLUSION While this patient cohort was adherent to directions given, physicians' directions were often inconsistent with product labeling. Understanding physician and patient knowledge gaps may

  2. First isolation of the relapsing fever spirochete, Borrelia hermsii, from a domestic dog.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ashley L; Raffel, Sandra J; Fischer, Robert J; Bellinghausen, Michael; Stevenson, Connie; Schwan, Tom G

    2014-03-01

    In North America, tick-borne relapsing fever of humans is most frequently caused by infection with the spirochete Borrelia hermsii. Prior to our investigation, this spirochete was not known to infect dogs although another species, Borrelia turicatae, has been isolated from domestic canids in Florida and Texas. A clinically ill dog in Washington, USA, was spirochetemic upon examination. Spirochetes were isolated from the dog's serum and examined by PCR and multi-locus sequence typing. DNA sequences for 7 loci all typed the spirochete as B. hermsii and a member of genomic group II of this species. Therefore, companion dogs that reside in rustic cabins in higher elevation forests are at risk of infection with B. hermsii.

  3. Influence of patients' disease knowledge and beliefs about medicines on medication adherence: findings from a cross-sectional survey among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Sweileh, Waleed M; Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Abu Nab'a, Rawan J; Deleq, Mohammed I; Enaia, Mohammed I; Nassar, Sana'a M; Al-Jabi, Samah W

    2014-01-30

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common serious health problem. Medication adherence is a key determinant of therapeutic success in patients with diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to assess medication adherence and its potential association with beliefs and diabetes - related knowledge in patients with type II DM. This study was carried out at Al-Makhfia governmental diabetes primary healthcare clinic in Nablus, Palestine. Main outcome of interest in the study was medication adherence. The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ) was used to assess beliefs. Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMSA-8©) was used to assess medication adherence. The Michigan diabetes knowledge test (MDKT) was used to assess diabetes - related knowledge. Univariate and multivariate analysis were carried out using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 20). Four hundred and five patients were interviewed. The mean ± SD age of the participants was 58.3 ± 10.4 (range = 28 - 90) years. More than half (53.3%) of the participants were females. Approximately 42.7% of the study sample were considered non-adherent (MMAS-8© score of < 6). Multivariate analysis showed that the following variables were significantly associated with non-adherence: disease-related knowledge, beliefs about necessity of anti-diabetic medications, concerns about adverse consequences of anti-diabetic medications and beliefs that medicines in general are essentially harmful. Diabetic patients with high knowledge score and those with strong beliefs in the necessity of their anti-diabetic medications were less likely to be non-adherent ([O.R = 0.87, 95% CI of 0.78 - 0.97] and [O.R = 0.93, 95% of 0.88 - 0.99] respectively). However, diabetic patients with high concerns about adverse consequences of anti-diabetic medications and those with high belief that all medicines are harmful were more likely to be non-adherent ([O.R = 1.09; 95% C.I of 1.04 - 1.16] and [O.R = 1

  4. An evaluation of adherence in patients with multiple sclerosis newly initiating treatment with a self-injectable or an oral disease-modifying drug

    PubMed Central

    Munsell, Michael; Frean, Molly; Menzin, Joseph; Phillips, Amy L

    2017-01-01

    Objective As the multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying drug (DMD) treatment options have expanded to include oral therapies, it is important to understand whether route of administration is associated with DMD adherence. The objective of this study was to compare adherence to DMDs in patients with MS newly initiating treatment with a self-injectable versus an oral DMD. Methods This retrospective database study used IMS Health Real World Data Adjudicated Claims – US data between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2014. Adherence was measured by medication possession ratio (MPR), calculated as the total number of treated days divided by the total number of days from the first treated day until the end of 12-month follow-up. A binary measure representing adherence (MPR ≥0.8) versus nonadherence (MPR <0.8) to therapy was used. Logistic regression evaluated the likelihood of adherence to index DMD type (self-injectable vs oral). Covariates included patient baseline characteristics (ie, age, sex, comorbidities) and index DMD type. Results The analysis included 7,207 self-injectable and 1,175 oral DMD-treated patients with MS. In unadjusted analyses, the proportion of patients adherent to therapy (MPR ≥0.8) did not differ significantly between the self-injectable (54.1%) and the oral DMD cohorts (53.0%; P=0.5075). After controlling for covariates, index DMD type was not a significant predictor of adherence (odds ratio [OR] 1.062; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.937–1.202; P=0.3473). Higher likelihood of adherence was associated with male sex (OR 1.20; 95% CI: 1.085–1.335; P=0.0005) and age groups older than 18–34 years (ORs 1.220–1.331; P<0.01). Depression was associated with a lower likelihood of adherence (OR 0.618; 95% CI: 0.511–0.747; P<0.0001). Conclusion Male sex and age older than 18–34 years were significantly associated with a higher likelihood of adherence, while depression was associated with a lower likelihood of adherence. Index DMD type

  5. Cosmopolitan distribution of the large composite microbial mat spirochete, Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Navarrete, A.; Sole, M.

    1998-01-01

    Inocula from organic-rich black muds immediately underlying intertidal laminated microbial mats dominated by Microcoleus chthonoplastes yielded large, variable diameter spirochetes. These unusual spirochetes, previously reported only from the Alfacs Peninsula at the delta of the Ebro river in northeast Spain, contain striking arrays of cytoplasmic granules packed into their protoplasmic cylinders. On several occasions, both in summer and winter, the huge spirochetes were recognized in samples from mats growing in the Sippewissett salt marsh at Woods Hole Massachusetts. They were also seen in similar samples from microbial mats at North Pond, Laguna Figueroa, Baja California Norte, Mexico. The identity of these spirochetes was confirmed by electron microscopy: number and disposition of flagella, composite structure, measurements of their distinctive cytoplasmic granules. The granules, larger, more conspicuous and present in addition to ribosomes, are hypothesized to contain ATPases. As culture conditions worsen, these spirochetes retract into membrane-bounded round bodies in which they form refractile inclusions. From morphology and behavior we conclude the North American spirochetes from both Atlantic and Pacific intertidal microbial mats are indistinguishable from those at the delta of the Ebro river. We conclude a cosmopolitan distribution for Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi.

  6. Beliefs about HIV disease and medication adherence in persons living with HIV/AIDS in rural southeastern North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Jeanne; Kim-Godwin, Yeoun Soo; Reynolds, Nancy R; Spencer, Valerie S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess personal beliefs about the causes and meaning of having HIV disease and personal beliefs about medication adherence in persons living in rural southeastern North Carolina. Of the total sample of 34 participants, 29 (85%) were African American. The sample included 21 men (62%) and 13 women (38%), with a self-reported mean CD4 count of 499.38 (SD = 377.69) and a mean duration of HIV of 8.0 years. The majority of participants held beliefs that HIV was a serious and chronic condition and that the disease could be controlled by HIV therapies. Participants offered disparate views about whether or not the course of HIV disease was amenable to personal control. The persons who held the belief that the cause of HIV/AIDS was because of chance/bad luck (p = .03) or God's will (p < .001) were also most likely to believe that the progression of their HIV disease depended on chance or fate. The respondents currently taking HIV medication were also more likely to believe that HIV was caused by chance or bad luck (p = .038) or God's will (p = .016). The results reflect the important role of spirituality on self- regulation of illness and treatment in the rural southern culture.

  7. Evaluation of Text Messaging Effects on Health Goal Adherence in the Management of Participants With Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Stagg, Sharon J; Speroni, Karen Gabel; Daniel, Marlon G; Eigenbrode, Melissa; Geisler, Lori

    The study purpose was to determine whether text messaging health-related messages, questions, and reminders to community case management participants with chronic diseases increased health goal adherence. This study was conducted by a rural community case management, hospital-affiliated program. This pilot, quasiexperimental study measured health goal adherence, the degree to which an individual continues work toward self-identified health goals under limited supervision, before and after a text messaging intervention. All participants were receiving community case management services for chronic disease. Participants completed baseline and follow-up surveys regarding a text messaging intervention. Most participants were African Americans, had diabetes, with equal numbers by gender, an average age of 57.8 years, and had been in the community case management program for 3-5 years. Participants were sent a total of 1,654 messages/questions and 571 reminders. At follow-up, respondents who reported "Did you work on your health goals?" increased significantly (p = .0430). However, no differences were found for "Did you go to your health care appointments?" and "Did you take your medicines as you should?" No differences were noted in reported visits/hospitalizations overall or specifically at the research site. Lastly, study member visit/hospitalization numbers did not change significantly at follow-up. Although text messaging is not meant to take the place of face-to-face interactions, it does provide community case managers with an additional modality of communication with patients to offer support and important care reminders, and to facilitate patient participation in his or her care.

  8. Effectiveness of motivational interviewing to improve therapeutic adherence in patients over 65 years old with chronic diseases: A cluster randomized clinical trial in primary care.

    PubMed

    Moral, Roger Ruiz; Torres, Luis Angel Pérula de; Ortega, Laura Pulido; Larumbe, Margarita Criado; Villalobos, Ana Roldán; García, Jose Angel Fernández; Rejano, Juan Manuel Parras

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of motivational interviewing (MI) in improving medication adherence in older patients being treated by polypharmacy. Cluster randomized clinical trial in 16 primary care centers with 27 health care providers and 154 patients. Thirty-two health care providers were assigned to an experimental (EG) or control group (CG). MI training program and review of patient treatments. Providers in the EG carried out MI, whereas those in the CG used an "advice approach". Three follow-up visits were completed, at 15 days and at 3 and 6 months. Medication adherence in both groups was compared (p<0.05). Patients recruited: 70/84 (EG/CG). Mean age: 76 years; female: 68.8%. The proportion of subjects changing to adherence was 7.6% higher in the EG (p<0.001). Therapeutic adherence was higher for patients in the EG (OR=2.84), women (OR=0.24) and those with high educational levels (OR=3.93). A face-to-face motivational approach in primary care helps elderly patients with chronic diseases who are being treated by polypharmacy to achieve an improved level of treatment adherence than traditional strategies of providing information and advice. MI is a patient-centered approach that can be used to improve medication adherence in primary care. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01291966). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intravital Imaging of Vascular Transmigration by the Lyme Spirochete: Requirement for the Integrin Binding Residues of the B. burgdorferi P66 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Devender; Ristow, Laura C.; Shi, Meiqing; Mukherjee, Priyanka; Caine, Jennifer A.; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kubes, Paul; Coburn, Jenifer; Chaconas, George

    2015-01-01

    Vascular extravasation, a key step in systemic infection by hematogenous microbial pathogens, is poorly understood, but has been postulated to encompass features similar to vascular transmigration by leukocytes. The Lyme disease spirochete can cause a variety of clinical manifestations, including arthritis, upon hematogenous dissemination. This pathogen encodes numerous surface adhesive proteins (adhesins) that may promote extravasation, but none have yet been implicated in this process. In this work we report the novel use of intravital microscopy of the peripheral knee vasculature to study transmigration of the Lyme spirochete in living Cd1d -/-mice. In the absence of iNKT cells, major immune modulators in the mouse joint, spirochetes that have extravasated into joint-proximal tissue remain in the local milieu and can be enumerated accurately. We show that BBK32, a fibronectin and glycosaminoglycan adhesin of B. burgdorferi involved in early steps of endothelial adhesion, is not required for extravasation from the peripheral knee vasculature. In contrast, almost no transmigration occurs in the absence of P66, an outer membrane protein that has porin and integrin adhesin functions. Importantly, P66 mutants specifically defective in integrin binding were incapable of promoting extravasation. P66 itself does not promote detectable microvascular interactions, suggesting that vascular adhesion of B. burgdorferi mediated by other adhesins, sets the stage for P66-integrin interactions leading to transmigration. Although integrin-binding proteins with diverse functions are encoded by a variety of bacterial pathogens, P66 is the first to have a documented and direct role in vascular transmigration. The emerging picture of vascular escape by the Lyme spirochete shows similarities, but distinct differences from leukocyte transmigration. PMID:26684456

  10. Differential Role of Passerine Birds in Distribution of Borrelia Spirochetes, Based on Data from Ticks Collected from Birds during the Postbreeding Migration Period in Central Europe▿

    PubMed Central

    Dubska, Lenka; Literak, Ivan; Kocianova, Elena; Taragelova, Veronika; Sychra, Oldrich

    2009-01-01

    Borrelia spirochetes in bird-feeding ticks were studied in the Czech Republic. During the postbreeding period (July to September 2005), 1,080 passerine birds infested by 2,240 Ixodes ricinus subadult ticks were examined. Borrelia garinii was detected in 22.2% of the ticks, Borrelia valaisiana was detected in 12.8% of the ticks, Borrelia afzelii was detected in 1.6% of the ticks, and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto was detected in 0.3% of the ticks. After analysis of infections in which the blood meal volume and the stage of the ticks were considered, we concluded that Eurasian blackbirds (Turdus merula), song thrushes (Turdus philomelos), and great tits (Parus major) are capable of transmitting B. garinii; that juvenile blackbirds and song thrushes are prominent reservoirs for B. garinii spirochetes; that some other passerine birds investigated play minor roles in transmitting B. garinii; and that the presence B. afzelii in ticks results from infection in a former stage. Thus, while B. garinii transmission is associated with only a few passerine bird species, these birds have the potential to distribute millions of Lyme disease spirochetes between urban areas. PMID:19060160

  11. Detection of relapsing fever spirochetes (Borrelia hermsii and Borrelia coriaceae) in free-ranging mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) from Nevada, United States.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Nathan C; Teglas, Mike B; Stewart, Kelley M; Wasley, Tony; Wolff, Peregrine L

    2012-02-01

    Surveillance of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus, Rafinesque, 1917) populations for tick-borne diseases has helped define the distribution of these pathogens and their subsequent risk of transmission to humans and domestic animals. We surveyed three mule deer herds across the state of Nevada for infection with relapsing fever Borrelia spp. spirochetes. Bacterial prevalence varied by the county where deer were sampled but Borrelia spirochetes were detected in 7.7% of all deer sampled. Infected deer were identified in every location from which mule deer samples were obtained. Sequencing of the Borrelia intergenic spacer gene (IGS) revealed that one individual was infected with Borrelia coriaceae and all others were infected with Borrelia hermsii. The vector of B. hermsii, Ornithodoros hermsi (Acari: Argasidae, Wheeler, Herms, and Meyer, 1935), feeds primarily on wild rodents and has not been identified infesting deer. Additionally, Ornithodoros coriaceus (Acari: Argasidae, Koch, 1844), which readily feeds on deer and is frequently infected with B. coriaceae, has not been shown to be a competent vector for B. hermsii. Our data represent the first sylvatic evidence of B. hermsii infection in mule deer. Additionally, our data provide evidence that infection with relapsing fever spirochetes in Nevada is wide ranging in the state's deer populations.

  12. Differential role of passerine birds in distribution of Borrelia spirochetes, based on data from ticks collected from birds during the postbreeding migration period in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Dubska, Lenka; Literak, Ivan; Kocianova, Elena; Taragelova, Veronika; Sychra, Oldrich

    2009-02-01

    Borrelia spirochetes in bird-feeding ticks were studied in the Czech Republic. During the postbreeding period (July to September 2005), 1,080 passerine birds infested by 2,240 Ixodes ricinus subadult ticks were examined. Borrelia garinii was detected in 22.2% of the ticks, Borrelia valaisiana was detected in 12.8% of the ticks, Borrelia afzelii was detected in 1.6% of the ticks, and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto was detected in 0.3% of the ticks. After analysis of infections in which the blood meal volume and the stage of the ticks were considered, we concluded that Eurasian blackbirds (Turdus merula), song thrushes (Turdus philomelos), and great tits (Parus major) are capable of transmitting B. garinii; that juvenile blackbirds and song thrushes are prominent reservoirs for B. garinii spirochetes; that some other passerine birds investigated play minor roles in transmitting B. garinii; and that the presence B. afzelii in ticks results from infection in a former stage. Thus, while B. garinii transmission is associated with only a few passerine bird species, these birds have the potential to distribute millions of Lyme disease spirochetes between urban areas.

  13. Implementation and adherence to osteoporosis screening guidelines among coeliac disease patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant; Garber, John J

    2016-12-01

    There are no studies evaluating the implementation of American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) guidelines on osteoporosis screening in coeliac disease. To investigate implementation of osteoporosis screening guidelines in coeliac disease patients and determine how often bone mineral density (BMD) assessment leads to therapeutic intervention. We screened all patients with biopsy-proven coeliac disease at our center from 2003 to 2013 and collected data on indication and results of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning (DXA) and therapeutic interventions. Of 222 adults with coeliac, only 80 (36%) underwent DXA after their diagnosis. Of those, 43 had DXA for osteoporosis screening specifically related to their coeliac diagnosis. Of these 43 patients, 28 (65.1%) had low BMD. A therapeutic intervention was made in the majority of these patients (21/28, 75%). Of 330 pediatric coeliac cases, 52 (15.8%) had DXA specifically in the context of the coeliac disease diagnosis with only 5 being complicated coeliac disease. Of these, 3 (5.8%) had low BMD and only 2 underwent therapeutic intervention. Osteoporosis screening guidelines are not followed in the majority of patients with coeliac disease but, when followed, frequently lead to therapeutic intervention. Osteoporosis screening guidelines in coeliac disease need to be updated, strengthened and publicized. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Heart surgery for immigrants in Italy: burden of cardiovascular disease, adherence to treatment and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Antonio; Vermi, Anna Chiara; Cammalleri, Valeria; Castiglioni, Alessandro; Pappalardo, Federico; Taramasso, Maurizio; Baratto, Francesca; Alfieri, Ottavio

    2016-02-01

    Italy is a country with high rates of immigration and the knowledge of immigrant health is very fragmentary. We provide a current picture of cardiovascular disease causes and clinical outcomes following heart surgery. A clinical and echocardiographic survey was conducted on 154 consecutive immigrants referred for heart surgery to San Raffaele Hospital in Milan between 2003 and 2011. Major causes of heart disease were rheumatic heart disease (RHD) (n = 64, 41%), nonrheumatic valvulopathies (n = 41, 27%), ischemic heart disease (IHD) (n = 25, 16%), congenital heart disease (n = 13, 9%) and miscellaneous (n = 11, 7%). Median age was 49 years [interquartile range (IQR) 7-81]; 55% of patients were male. Among valvulopathies, rheumatic mitral disease was predominant (n = 56, 53%) as both single and multivalvular disease (n = 46, 73%); myxomatous prolapse emerged as the second main pattern of mitral disease (n = 30, 33%). Among patients with IHD, 72% had a high cardiovascular risk. Surgery was scheduled in 138 patients (90%). Clinical follow-up was available in 96 patients (62%) [median time 62 months (IQR 15-123)], among whom 92 (96%) were alive, four patients (4%) had died and 58 (38%) were lost. Cardiovascular diseases represent a major health topic among immigrants in developed countries. RHD still is the predominant cause of hospitalization for heart surgery, nonrheumatic valvulopathies and IHD emerging as second and third causes, respectively. Data underline the need of reinforcement of prevention and care strategies in the matter of immigrant health and warrant the urgent attention of the international public health and research communities.

  15. β2-Integrins in demyelinating disease: not adhering to the paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xianzhen; Wohler, Jillian E.; Dugger, Kari J.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    The β2-integrins are a subfamily of integrins expressed on leukocytes that play an essential role in leukocyte trafficking, activation, and many other functions. Studies in EAE, the animal model for multiple sclerosis, show differential requirements for β2-integrins in this disease model, ranging from critical in the case of LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) to unimportant in the case of CD11d/CD18. Importantly, expression of β2-integrins on T cell subsets provides some clues as to the function(s) these adhesion molecules play in disease development. For example, transferred EAE studies have shown that Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) expression on αβ T cells is critical for disease development, and the absence of LFA-1 on Tregs in recipient mice results in exacerbated disease. In this review, we summarize recent findings regarding the role of β2-integrins in demyelinating disease and new information about the role of β2-integrins with respect to alterations in Treg numbers and function. In addition, we discuss the potential for targeting β2-integrins in human demyelinating disease in light of the recent animal model studies. PMID:20007244

  16. beta2-integrins in demyelinating disease: not adhering to the paradigm.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianzhen; Wohler, Jillian E; Dugger, Kari J; Barnum, Scott R

    2010-03-01

    The beta(2)-integrins are a subfamily of integrins expressed on leukocytes that play an essential role in leukocyte trafficking, activation, and many other functions. Studies in EAE, the animal model for multiple sclerosis, show differential requirements for beta(2)-integrins in this disease model, ranging from critical in the case of LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) to unimportant in the case of CD11d/CD18. Importantly, expression of beta(2)-integrins on T cell subsets provides some clues as to the function(s) these adhesion molecules play in disease development. For example, transferred EAE studies have shown that Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) expression on alphabeta T cells is critical for disease development, and the absence of LFA-1 on Tregs in recipient mice results in exacerbated disease. In this review, we summarize recent findings regarding the role of beta(2)-integrins in demyelinating disease and new information about the role of beta(2)-integrins with respect to alterations in Treg numbers and function. In addition, we discuss the potential for targeting beta(2)-integrins in human demyelinating disease in light of the recent animal model studies.

  17. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform.

  18. Adherence to the 2006 American Heart Association Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk reduction is associated with bone health in older Puerto Ricans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and osteoporosis are 2 major public health problems that share common pathophysiological mechanisms. It is possible that strategies to reduce CVD risk may also benefit bone health. We tested the hypothesis that adherence to the 2006 American Heart Association Diet and Li...

  19. Adherence index based on the American Heart Association 2006 diet and lifestyle recommendations: associations with cardiovascular disease risk factors in the Boston Puerto Rican health study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2006, the AHA released diet and lifestyle recommendations (AHA-DLR) for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduction. The effect of adherence to these recommendations on CVD risk is unknown. Our objective was to develop a unique diet and lifestyle score based on the AHA-DLR and to evaluate this sc...

  20. Adherence to the Overall Nutritional Quality Index and Risk of Total Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Sampson, Laura; Willett, Walter C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Overall Nutritional Quality Index (ONQI) algorithm is a nutrient profiling scheme that incorporates over 30 dietary components, and aims to rank foods by relative healthfulness. Purpose: To assess whether diets with a higher ONQI score predict lower risk of major chronic disease risk. Methods: A total of 62,284 healthy women from the Nurses’ Health Study and 42,382 healthy men from Health Professionals Follow-Up Study were followed from 1986 to 2006. Dietary data were collected from questionnaires at baseline. Each food was scored by the ONQI algorithm and the average ONQI score for the diet consumed by each participant was computed. Total chronic disease was defined as cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, diabetes and nontrauma death. Data analysis was conducted in 2010. Results: A total of 20,004 and 13,520 chronic disease events were documented in women and men, respectively. The ONQI score was inversely associated with risk of total chronic disease, CVD, diabetes and all-cause mortality (p-trend≤0.01), but not cancer, in both cohorts. Women in the highest compared to lowest quintile of the ONQI score had a relative risk (95% CI) of 0.91 (0.87, 0.95) for chronic disease, 0.79 (0.71, 0.88) for CVD, 0.86 (0.78, 0.96) for diabetes and 0.90 (0.84, 0.97) for all-cause mortality. Men in the highest compared to lowest quintile of the ONQI score had a relative risk of 0.88 (0.83, 0.93) for chronic disease, 0.77 (0.70, 0.85) for CVD, 0.84 (0.73, 0.96) for diabetes and 0.89 (0.83, 0.97) for all-cause mortality. Conclusions: The ONQI scoring system was associated with modestly lower risk of chronic disease and all-cause mortality. PMID:21496749

  1. Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial to assess the feasibility of an open label intervention to improve hydroxyurea adherence in youth with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Smaldone, Arlene; Findley, Sally; Bakken, Suzanne; Matiz, L. Adriana; Rosenthal, Susan L.; Jia, Haomiao; Matos, Sergio; Manwani, Deepa; Green, Nancy S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Community health workers (CHW) are increasingly recognized as a strategy to improve health outcomes for the underserved with chronic diseases but has not been formally explored in adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD). SCD primarily affects African American, Hispanic and other traditionally underserved populations. Hydroxyurea (HU), an oral, once-daily medication, is the only approved therapeutic drug for sickle cell disease and markedly reduces symptoms, morbidity and mortality and improves quality of life largely by increasing hemoglobin F blood levels. This paper presents the rationale, study design and protocol for an open label randomized controlled trial to improve parent-youth partnerships in self-management and medication adherence to HU in adolescents with SCD. Methods/Design A CHW intervention augmented by text messaging was designed for adolescents with SCD ages 10–18 years and their parents to improve daily HU adherence. Thirty adolescent parent dyads will be randomized with 2:1 intervention group allocation. Intervention dyads will establish a relationship with a culturally aligned CHW to identify barriers to HU use, identify cues to build a habit, and develop a dyad partnership to improve daily HU adherence and achieve their individualized “personal best” hemoglobin F target. Intervention feasibility, acceptability and efficacy will be assessed via a 2-site trial. Outcomes of interest are HU adherence, dyad self-management communication, quality of life, and resource use. Discussion Despite known benefits, poor HU adherence is common. If feasible and acceptable, the proposed intervention may improve health of underserved adolescents with SCD by enhancing long-term HU adherence. PMID:27327779

  2. Can You Teach a Teen New Tricks? Problem Solving Skills Training Improves Oral Medication Adherence in Pediatric Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Participating in a Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Greenley, Rachel N; Gumidyala, Amitha P; Nguyen, Eve; Plevinsky, Jill M; Poulopoulos, Natasha; Thomason, Molly M; Walter, Jennifer G; Wojtowicz, Andrea A; Blank, Ellen; Gokhale, Ranjana; Kirschner, Barbara S; Miranda, Adrian; Noe, Joshua D; Stephens, Michael C; Werlin, Steven; Kahn, Stacy A

    2015-11-01

    Medication nonadherence is associated with higher disease activity, greater health care utilization, and lower health-related quality of life in pediatric inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Problem solving skills training (PSST) is a useful tool to improve adherence in patients with chronic diseases but has not been fully investigated in IBD. This study assessed feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of PSST in pediatric IBD. Recruitment occurred during outpatient clinic appointments. After completion of baseline questionnaires, families were randomized to a treatment group or wait-list comparison group. The treatment group received either 2 or 4 PSST sessions. Youth health-related quality of life was assessed at 3 time points, and electronic monitoring of oral medication adherence occurred for the study duration. Seventy-six youth (ages 11-18 years) on an oral IBD maintenance medication participated. High retention (86%) and treatment fidelity rates (95%) supported feasibility. High satisfaction ratings (mean values ≥4.2 on 1-5 scale) supported intervention acceptability. Modest increases in adherence occurred after 2 PSST sessions among those with imperfect baseline adherence (d = 0.41, P < 0.10). Significant increases in adherence after 2 PSST sessions were documented for participants aged 16 to 18 years (d = 0.95, P < 0.05). Improvements in health-related quality of life occurred after 2 PSST sessions. No added benefit of 4 sessions on adherence was documented (d = 0.05, P > 0.05). Phone-delivered PSST was feasible and acceptable. Efficacy estimates were similar to those of lengthier interventions conducted in other chronic illness populations. Older adolescents benefited more from the intervention than their younger counterparts.

  3. Association between non-adherence to statin and hospitalization for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in a national cohort.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sukyoun; Jang, Sunmee; Lee, Tae-Jin; Kim, Ho

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates the effect of adherence to stain on hospitalization for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in South Korea. We performed a national cohort study on 423,786 individuals using the Korean National Health Insurance Claims Database. The cohort was composed of individuals who were aged between 18 and 84 years, were newly treated with statin, and were followed from 2005 to 2009. Adherence to statin was calculated using medication possession ratio (MPR) and associations between adherence to statin and health outcomes were evaluated using Cox's proportional hazards regression analysis. Of the study subjects, 41.9% were male, 7.4% were beneficiaries of a tax-financed medical aid program (MAP), 1.5% had prior cardiovascular disease (CVD), 13.0% had diabetes, and 27.5% had hypertension. Non-adherence to statin was found to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular hospitalization (HR 2.18, 95% CI: 2.02 - 2.35) and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.75, CI: 1.66 - 1.84). As the age of the study group increased, non-adherence was more strongly associated with the risk of hospitalization for CVD. In addition, the risk of hospitalization for CVD was relatively high in patients who were male, older or MAP beneficiaries, and who had hypertension, diabetes, and high Charlson's comorbidity index. This study supports that non-adherence to statin is associated with an elevated risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality.

  4. Adherence to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Gonococcal Treatment Guidelines Among Chicago Health Care Providers, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Tabidze, Irina L; Nicholson, Tracy F; Mikati, Tarek; Benbow, Nanette; Mehta, Supriya D

    2015-08-01

    Expansion of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae requires rapid adaptation of treatment guidelines and responsive provider practice. We evaluated patient factors associated with provider adherence to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention gonococcal treatment recommendations among Chicago providers in 2011 to 2012. Laboratory-confirmed cases of uncomplicated urogenital gonorrhea were classified via surveillance data as originating from Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) or non-CDPH providers. Recommended treatment was determined according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sexually transmitted disease treatment guidelines: April 2011-July 2012 (period 1) and August-December 2012 (period 2, after August 2012 revision). Multivariable log-binomial regression identified factors associated with recommended treatment over time, stratified by provider type. April 2011 through December 2012, 16,646 laboratory-confirmed gonorrhea cases were identified, of which 9597 (57.7%) had treatment information: 2169 CDPH cases and 7428 non-CDPH cases. Documented recommended treatment increased for CDPH (period 1: 71.3%, period 2: 80.8%; P < 0.01) and non-CDPH providers (period 1: 63.5%, period 2: 68.9%; P < 0.01). Among CDPH cases, statistically significant factors associated with recommended treatment were male sex (adjusted prevalence rate ratio [aPRR], 1.16) white versus black race (aPRR, 0.68), same-day treatment (aPRR, 1.07), and period 2 (aPRR, 1.11). Among non-CDPH cases, statistically significant factors were as follows: male sex (aPRR, 1.10), other versus black race (aPRR, 0.91), same-day treatment (aPRR, 1.31), greater number of within-facility reported cases (aPRRs ranging from 1.22 to 1.41), and at least 50% within-facility missing treatment data (aPRR, 0.84). Recommended treatment improved over time, yet remains suboptimal. Efforts to reduce variability and improve provider adherence to recommended treatment are urgently needed.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Adapts to Chronic Infection and Gastric Disease via pH-Responsive BabA-Mediated Adherence.

    PubMed

    Bugaytsova, Jeanna A; Björnham, Oscar; Chernov, Yevgen A; Gideonsson, Pär; Henriksson, Sara; Mendez, Melissa; Sjöström, Rolf; Mahdavi, Jafar; Shevtsova, Anna; Ilver, Dag; Moonens, Kristof; Quintana-Hayashi, Macarena P; Moskalenko, Roman; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Bylund, Göran; Schmidt, Alexej; Åberg, Anna; Brännström, Kristoffer; Königer, Verena; Vikström, Susanne; Rakhimova, Lena; Hofer, Anders; Ögren, Johan; Liu, Hui; Goldman, Matthew D; Whitmire, Jeannette M; Ådén, Jörgen; Younson, Justine; Kelly, Charles G; Gilman, Robert H; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Nair, G Balakrish; Papadakos, Konstantinos S; Martinez-Gonzalez, Beatriz; Sgouras, Dionyssios N; Engstrand, Lars; Unemo, Magnus; Danielsson, Dan; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Oscarson, Stefan; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A; Olofsson, Anders; Gröbner, Gerhard; Holgersson, Jan; Esberg, Anders; Strömberg, Nicklas; Landström, Maréne; Eldridge, Angela M; Chromy, Brett A; Hansen, Lori M; Solnick, Jay V; Lindén, Sara K; Haas, Rainer; Dubois, Andre; Merrell, D Scott; Schedin, Staffan; Remaut, Han; Arnqvist, Anna; Berg, Douglas E; Borén, Thomas

    2017-03-08

    The BabA adhesin mediates high-affinity binding of Helicobacter pylori to the ABO blood group antigen-glycosylated gastric mucosa. Here we show that BabA is acid responsive-binding is reduced at low pH and restored by acid neutralization. Acid responsiveness differs among strains; often correlates with different intragastric regions and evolves during chronic infection and disease progression; and depends on pH sensor sequences in BabA and on pH reversible formation of high-affinity binding BabA multimers. We propose that BabA's extraordinary reversible acid responsiveness enables tight mucosal bacterial adherence while also allowing an effective escape from epithelial cells and mucus that are shed into the acidic bactericidal lumen and that bio-selection and changes in BabA binding properties through mutation and recombination with babA-related genes are selected by differences among individuals and by changes in gastric acidity over time. These processes generate diverse H. pylori subpopulations, in which BabA's adaptive evolution contributes to H. pylori persistence and overt gastric disease.

  6. At-Risk Screened Children with Celiac Disease are Comparable in Disease Severity and Dietary Adherence to Those Found because of Clinical Suspicion: A Large Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Kivelä, Laura; Kaukinen, Katri; Huhtala, Heini; Lähdeaho, Marja-Leena; Mäki, Markku; Kurppa, Kalle

    2017-04-01

    To assess whether children at risk for celiac disease should be screened systematically by comparing their baseline and follow-up characteristics to patients detected because of clinical suspicion. Five hundred four children with celiac disease were divided into screen-detected (n = 145) and clinically detected cohorts (n = 359). The groups were compared for clinical, serologic, and histologic characteristics and laboratory values. Follow-up data regarding adherence and response to gluten-free diet were compared. Subgroup analyses were made between asymptomatic and symptomatic screen-detected patients. Of screen-detected patients, 51.8% had symptoms at diagnosis, although these were milder than in clinically detected children (P < .001). Anemia (7.1% vs 22.9%, P < .001) and poor growth (15.7% vs 36.9%, P < .001) were more common, and hemoglobin (126 g/l vs 124 g/l, P = .008) and albumin (41.0 g/l vs 38.0 g/l, P = .016) were lower in clinically detected patients. There were no differences in serology or histology between the groups. Screen-detected children had better dietary adherence (91.2% vs 83.2%, P = .047). The groups showed equal clinical response (97.5% vs 96.2%, P = .766) to the gluten-free diet. In subgroup analysis among screen-detected children, asymptomatic patients were older than symptomatic (9.0  vs 5.8 years of age, P = .007), but the groups were comparable in other variables. More than one-half of the screen-detected patients with celiac disease had symptoms unrecognized at diagnosis. The severity of histologic damage, antibody levels, dietary adherence, and response to treatment in screen-detected cases is comparable with those detected on a clinical basis. The results support active screening for celiac disease among at-risk children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The riboswitch regulates a thiamine pyrophosphate ABC transporter of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jiang; Shen, Hongwu; Tu, Youbin; Yu, Aiming; Li, Chunhao

    2011-08-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), a biologically active form of thiamine (vitamin B₁), is an essential cofactor in all living systems. Microorganisms either synthesize TPP via de novo biosynthesis pathways or uptake exogenous thiamine from the environment via specific transporters. The oral spirochete Treponema denticola is an important pathogen that is associated with human periodontal diseases. It lacks a de novo TPP biosynthesis pathway and needs exogenous TPP for growth, suggesting that it may obtain exogenous TPP via a thiamine transporter. In this study, we identified a gene cluster that encodes a TPP ABC transporter which consists of a TPP-binding protein (TDE0143), a transmembrane permease (TDE0144), and a cytosolic ATPase (TDE0145). Transcriptional and translational analyses showed that the genes encoding these three proteins are cotranscribed and form an operon (tbpABC(Td)) that is initiated by a σ⁷⁰-like promoter. The expression level of this operon is negatively regulated by exogenous TPP and is mediated by a TPP-sensing riboswitch (Td(thi-)(box)). Genetic and biochemical studies revealed that the TDE0143 deletion mutant (T. denticola ΔtbpA) had a decreased ability to transport exogenous TPP, and the mutant failed to grow when exogenous TPP was insufficient. These results taken together indicate that the tbpABC(Td) operon encodes an ABC transporter that is required for the uptake of exogenous TPP and that the expression of this operon is regulated by a TPP-binding riboswitch via a feedback inhibition mechanism.

  8. Predictors of Long-Term Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Cardiovascular Disease in the SAVE Study

    PubMed Central

    Chai-Coetzer, Ching Li; Luo, Yuan-Ming; Antic, Nick A.; Zhang, Xi-Long; Chen, Bao-Yuan; He, Quan-Ying; Heeley, Emma; Huang, Shao-Guang; Anderson, Craig; Zhong, Nan-Shan; McEvoy, R. Doug

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine the clinical variables that best predict long- term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence among patients with cardiovascular disease who have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Design: 12-mo prospective within-trial observational study. Setting: Centers in China, Australia, and New Zealand participating in the Sleep Apnea cardioVascular Endpoints (SAVE) study. Patients: There were 275 patients age 45-70 y with cardiovascular disease (i.e., previously documented transient ischemic attack, stroke, or coronary artery disease) and OSA (4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI) > 12) who were randomized into the CPAP arm of the SAVE trial prior to July 1, 2010. Methods: Age, sex, country of residence, type of cardiovascular disease, baseline ODI, severity of sleepiness, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores plus CPAP side effects and adherence at 1 mo were entered in univariate analyses in an attempt to identify factors predictive of CPAP adherence at 12 mo. Variables with P < 0.2 were then included in a multivariate analysis using a linear mixed model with sites as a random effect and 12-mo CPAP use as the dependent outcome variable. Measurements and Results: CPAP adherence at 1, 6, and 12 mo was (mean ± standard deviation) 4.4 ± 2.0, 3.8 ± 2.3, and 3.3 ± 2.4 h/night, respectively. CPAP use at 1 mo (effect estimate ± standard error, 0.65 ± 0.07 per h increase, P < 0.001) and side effects at 1 mo (-0.24 ± 0.092 per additional side effect, P = 0.009) were the only independent predictors of 12- mo CPAP adherence. Conclusion: Continuous positive airway pressure use in patients with coexisting cardiovascular disease and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea decreases significantly over 12 months. This decline can be predicted by early patient experiences with continuous positive airway pressure (i.e., adherence and side effects at 1 month), raising the possibility that intensive early interventions could

  9. Chemical and Biological Attributes of Selected Periodontopathogens as Potential Indicators of Periodontal Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-21

    take up and dephosphorylate nutrients at a greater rate than other potential periodontopathogens may allow the oral spirochetes to complete and thrive...MAJOR RESULTS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS An acknowledged cause of periodontal disease is the dental plaque. The plaque bacteria include oral spirochetes which...components which may be potenti- ally harmful. Very little is known about tae chemistry and biological properties of oral spirochetes. Our investigation

  10. Free-living spirochetes from Cape Cod microbial mats detected by electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teal, T. H.; Chapman, M.; Guillemette, T.; Margulis, L.

    1996-01-01

    Spirochetes from microbial mats and anaerobic mud samples collected in salt marshes were studied by light microscopy, whole mount and thin section transmission electron microscopy. Enriched in cellobiose-rifampin medium, selective for Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, seven distinguishable spirochete morphotypes were observed. Their diameters ranged from 0.17 micron to > 0.45 micron. Six of these morphotypes came from southwest Cape Cod, Massachusetts: five from Microcoleus-dominated mat samples collected at Sippewissett salt marsh and one from anoxic mud collected at School Street salt marsh (on the east side of Eel Pond). The seventh morphotype was enriched from anoxic mud sampled from the north central Cape Cod, at the Sandy Neck salt marsh. Five of these morphotypes are similar or identical to previously described spirochetes (Leptospira, Spirochaeta halophila, Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi and Treponema), whereas the other two have unique features that suggest they have not been previously described. One of the morphotypes resembles Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi (the largest free-living spirochete described), in its large variable diameter (0.4-3.0 microns), cytoplasmic granules, and spherical (round) bodies with composite structure. This resemblance permits its tentative identification as a Sippewissett strain of Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi. Microbial mats samples collected in sterile Petri dishes and stored dry for more than four years yielded many organisms upon rewetting, including small unidentified spirochetes in at least 4 out of 100 enrichments.

  11. Free-living spirochetes from Cape Cod microbial mats detected by electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teal, T. H.; Chapman, M.; Guillemette, T.; Margulis, L.

    1996-01-01

    Spirochetes from microbial mats and anaerobic mud samples collected in salt marshes were studied by light microscopy, whole mount and thin section transmission electron microscopy. Enriched in cellobiose-rifampin medium, selective for Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, seven distinguishable spirochete morphotypes were observed. Their diameters ranged from 0.17 micron to > 0.45 micron. Six of these morphotypes came from southwest Cape Cod, Massachusetts: five from Microcoleus-dominated mat samples collected at Sippewissett salt marsh and one from anoxic mud collected at School Street salt marsh (on the east side of Eel Pond). The seventh morphotype was enriched from anoxic mud sampled from the north central Cape Cod, at the Sandy Neck salt marsh. Five of these morphotypes are similar or identical to previously described spirochetes (Leptospira, Spirochaeta halophila, Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi and Treponema), whereas the other two have unique features that suggest they have not been previously described. One of the morphotypes resembles Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi (the largest free-living spirochete described), in its large variable diameter (0.4-3.0 microns), cytoplasmic granules, and spherical (round) bodies with composite structure. This resemblance permits its tentative identification as a Sippewissett strain of Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi. Microbial mats samples collected in sterile Petri dishes and stored dry for more than four years yielded many organisms upon rewetting, including small unidentified spirochetes in at least 4 out of 100 enrichments.

  12. Spirochetes in mammals and ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) from a focus of Lyme borreliosis in California.

    PubMed

    Lane, R S; Burgdorfer, W

    1988-01-01

    In northern California, antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi were detected in 58 of 73 (79%), and spirochetemias in one of 26 (4%) black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus californicus), by indirect and direct immunofluorescence, respectively. Five species of ticks (Dermacentor occidentalis, D. parumapertus, Ixodes neotomae, I. pacificus, and Haemaphysalis leporispalustris) were collected from rabbits. Two of these species of ticks were found to contain spirochetes; two of 10 (20%) I. neotomae and two of 174 (1%) H. leporispalustris. A strain of B. burgdorferi was recovered from I. neotomae. One infected H. leporispalustris female passed spirochetes via eggs to about 67% of her progeny. The widespread distribution of the black-tailed jackrabbit, its infestation by at least four ticks (D. occidentalis, D. parumapertus, I. neotomae, and I. pacificus) known to be infected naturally with B. burgdorferi, and the high prevalence of spirochetal antibody in this lagomorph suggest that it might be useful as a sentinel for surveillance of Lyme borreliosis. Spirochetes were detected in 15% of 40 Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) by direct immunofluorescence bound with a Borrelia-specific monoclonal antibody (H9724), but not with a monoclonal antibody (H5332) specific for B. burgdorferi. The geographical overlap of different borreliae in ticks that bite wildlife such as deer may confound spirochetal serosurveys, and underscores the need for more specific serologic tests than those currently available.

  13. Examining whether the information–motivation–behavioral skills model predicts medication adherence for patients with a rare disease

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Dayna S; Hogan, Susan L; Jordan, Joanne M; DeVellis, Robert F; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2017-01-01

    The information–motivation–behavioral skills (IMB) model has been used to explain and promote medication adherence among patients with diabetes and HIV. The objective of this study was to examine whether the IMB model predicted medication adherence among vasculitis patients. Adult vasculitis patients (n=228) completed online questionnaires at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Linear regressions were calculated to determine the direct effects of information and motivation on medication adherence (P<0.05). A mediation analysis using a bootstrapping approach was used to test whether behavioral skills significantly mediated the effect of information and motivation on medication adherence. Participants reported high levels of information (M=4.0; standard deviation [SD]=0.68), moderate levels of motivation (M=2.7; SD=1.00), and high levels of behavioral skills (M=4.1; SD=0.74). In the regression model, only behavioral skills (B=0.38; P<0.001) were significantly associated with medication adherence; however, mediation analysis revealed that behavioral skills significantly mediated the effects of information and motivation on medication adherence. The results support the IMB-hypothesized relationships between information, motivation, behavioral skills, and medication adherence in our sample. Findings suggest that providers should work with vasculitis patients to increase their medication-related skills to improve medication adherence. PMID:28138225

  14. Examining whether the information-motivation-behavioral skills model predicts medication adherence for patients with a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Dayna S; Hogan, Susan L; Jordan, Joanne M; DeVellis, Robert F; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2017-01-01

    The information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model has been used to explain and promote medication adherence among patients with diabetes and HIV. The objective of this study was to examine whether the IMB model predicted medication adherence among vasculitis patients. Adult vasculitis patients (n=228) completed online questionnaires at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Linear regressions were calculated to determine the direct effects of information and motivation on medication adherence (P<0.05). A mediation analysis using a bootstrapping approach was used to test whether behavioral skills significantly mediated the effect of information and motivation on medication adherence. Participants reported high levels of information (M=4.0; standard deviation [SD]=0.68), moderate levels of motivation (M=2.7; SD=1.00), and high levels of behavioral skills (M=4.1; SD=0.74). In the regression model, only behavioral skills (B=0.38; P<0.001) were significantly associated with medication adherence; however, mediation analysis revealed that behavioral skills significantly mediated the effects of information and motivation on medication adherence. The results support the IMB-hypothesized relationships between information, motivation, behavioral skills, and medication adherence in our sample. Findings suggest that providers should work with vasculitis patients to increase their medication-related skills to improve medication adherence.

  15. Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  16. Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  17. Association between adherence to statin therapy and lipid control in Hong Kong Chinese patients at high risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Caroline W R; Woo, Kam-sang; Chan, Juliana C N; Tomlinson, Brian; You, Joyce H S

    2004-01-01

    Aims To examine the pattern of adherence to statin therapy and to determine the association of adherence to statin therapy and the control of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol in a cohort of Hong Kong Chinese patients at high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods This was a prospective observational cohort study conducted at the outpatient clinics of a public teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Patients at high risk of CHD who had been initiated on statin monotherapy for <12 months were recruited. The statin prescription was dispensed in a bottle with the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Adherence was assessed in two dimensions: dose-count was defined as the percentage of doses taken, and dose-time was defined as the percentage of doses taken within the suggested time interval. Lipid profiles were obtained at baseline and during two follow-up visits at month 3 and month 6. Results Eighty-three patients completed the study. The median adherence to dose-count and to dose-time were 95% (25-75th percentile = 87–99%) and 78% (25–75th percentile = 17–92%), respectively. Both dose-count and dose-time adherence declined slightly over the first 6 months of therapy. Living with family [relative risk (RR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63, 0.91] and duration of therapy (RR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.98, 1.00) were negative predictors while number of family members (among those living with family) (RR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.00, 1.08) was a positive predictor for adherence to dose-count. Monthly household income (RR = 1.01, 95% CI 1.00, 1.02) and angina (RR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.05, 1.58) were positive predictors while living with family (RR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.55, 0.90) was a negative predictor for dose-time adherence. Percent reduction in serum LDL-cholesterol was correlated to dose-count (P < 0.001) and dose-time (P = 0.047) adherence. Statistically significant correlations were observed between adherence to dose-count and LDL reduction (R2 = 0.130; P = 0

  18. Monitoring exercise delivery to increase participation adherence in older adults with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Watson, Elle; Yu, Fang

    2013-05-01

    There are many established benefits of exercise for older adults. Emerging studies suggest that it may even be able to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in older adults with the disease. However, it is yet unknown how bedside nurses can monitor ongoing exercise participation in this population due to the complexity and impact of AD symptoms. The purpose of this study is to provide bedside nurses with tools to capture actual received exercise doses to ensure adequate exercise participation by older adults with AD. This study is a secondary data analysis of a master study in which 8 participants who were clinically diagnosed with AD participated in moderate intensity aerobic exercise for 10 to 45 minutes, three times per week, for 6 months. The results show that participants were able to meet the overall exercise prescription 74.3% of the time. The findings of this study suggest that bedside nurses are able to monitor the actual exercise delivery (frequency, intensity, and duration) to ensure exercise participation. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Do Brazilian scientific journals promote the adherence of Chagas disease researchers to international ethical principles?

    PubMed

    Malafaia, Guilherme; Guilhem, Dirce; Talvani, André

    2013-01-01

    The ethical aspects of the Brazilian publications about human Chagas disease (CD) developed between 1996 and 2010 and the policy adopted by Brazilian medical journals were analyzed. Articles were selected on the SciELO Brazil data basis, and the evaluation of ethical aspects was based on the normative contents about ethics in research involving human experimentation according to the Brazilian resolution of the National Health Council no. 196/1996. The editorial policies of the section "Instructions to authors" were analyzed. In the period of 1996-2012, 58.9% of articles involving human Chagas disease did not refer to the fulfillment of the ethical aspects concerning research with human beings. In 80% of the journals, the requirements and confirmation of the information about ethical aspects in the studies of human CD were not observed. Although a failure in this type of service is still observed, awareness has been raised in federal agencies, educational institutions/research and publishing groups to standardize the procedures and ethical requirements for the Brazilian journals, reinforcing the fulfillment of the ethical parameters, according to the resolution of NHC no. 196/1996.

  20. Expression Profiles of Toll-Like Receptors in the Differentiation of an Infection with Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Slawomir; Ziółko, Ewa; Kimsa-Dudek, Magdalena; Solarz, Krzysztof; Mazurek, Urszula; Wierzgoń, Aleksander; Kokot, Teresa; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata

    2017-04-01

    The similarity of Lyme borreliosis to other diseases and its complex pathogenesis present diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. The changes that occur at the cellular and molecular levels after a Borrelia sp. infection still remain poorly understood. Therefore, the present study focused on the expression of TLR and TLR-signaling genes in human dermal fibroblasts in the differentiation of an infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato spirochetes. Normal human dermal fibroblasts were cultured with the spirochetes of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii. Total RNA was extracted from the cells using TRIzol reagent. The analysis of the expression profiles of TLRs and TLR-related genes was performed using commercially available oligonucleotide microarrays of HG-U133A. The GeneSpring 12.0 platform and significance analysis of microarrays were used for the statistical analysis of microarray data. The analyses using the oligonucleotide microarray and QRT-PCR techniques permitted to identify the genes encoding TLR4 and TLR6 as specific for infection with B. afzelii and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. In turn, TLR3 was only characteristic for an infection with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. There were no changes in the TLR gene expression after infection with B. garinii. Our findings confirm that Borrelia has a major effect on fibroblast gene expression. Further characterization of changes in gene expression may lead to valuable insights into the role of the toll-like receptor in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease and may provide guidelines for the development of diagnostic markers for an infection with a particular Borrelia genospecies. Moreover, this will help to identify better treatment strategies for Lyme disease.

  1. Adalimumab maintains remission of Crohn's disease after up to 4 years of treatment: data from CHARM and ADHERE

    PubMed Central

    Panaccione, R; Colombel, J-F; Sandborn, W J; D'Haens, G; Zhou, Q; Pollack, P F; Thakkar, R B; Robinson, A M

    2013-01-01

    Background Therapies that maintain remission for patients with Crohn's disease are essential. Stable remission rates have been demonstrated for up to 2 years in adalimumab-treated patients with moderately to severely active Crohn's disease enrolled in the CHARM and ADHERE clinical trials. Aim To present the long-term efficacy and safety of adalimumab therapy through 4 years of treatment. Methods Remission (CDAI <150), response (CR-100) and corticosteroid-free remission over 4 years, and maintenance of these endpoints beyond 1 year were assessed in CHARM early responders randomised to adalimumab. Corticosteroid-free remission was also assessed in all adalimumab-randomised patients using corticosteroids at baseline. Fistula healing was assessed in adalimumab-randomised patients with fistula at baseline. As observed, last observation carried forward and a hybrid nonresponder imputation analysis for year 4 (hNRI) were used to report efficacy. Adverse events were reported for any patient receiving at least one dose of adalimumab. Results Of 329 early responders randomised to adalimumab induction therapy, at least 30% achieved remission (99/329) or CR-100 (116/329) at year 4 of treatment (hNRI). The majority of patients (54%) with remission at year 1 maintained this endpoint at year 4 (hNRI). At year 4, 16% of patients taking corticosteroids at baseline were in corticosteroid-free remission and 24% of patients with fistulae at baseline had healed fistulae. The incidence rates of adverse events remained stable over time. Conclusions Prolonged adalimumab therapy maintained clinical remission and response in patients with moderately to severely active Crohn's disease for up to 4 years. No increased risk of adverse events or new safety signals were identified with long-term maintenance therapy. (http://clinicaltrials.gov number: NCT00077779). PMID:24134498

  2. Direct Measurement of Helical Cell Motion of the Spirochete Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Leshansky, Alexander; Magariyama, Yukio; Namba, Keiichi; Kudo, Seishi

    2014-01-01

    Leptospira are spirochete bacteria distinguished by a short-pitch coiled body and intracellular flagella. Leptospira cells swim in liquid with an asymmetric morphology of the cell body; the anterior end has a long-pitch spiral shape (S-end) and the posterior end is hook-shaped (H-end). Although the S-end and the coiled cell body called the protoplasmic cylinder are thought to be responsible for propulsion together, most observations on the motion mechanism have remained qualitative. In this study, we analyzed the swimming speed and rotation rate of the S-end, protoplasmic cylinder, and H-end of individual Leptospira cells by one-sided dark-field microscopy. At various viscosities of media containing different concentrations of Ficoll, the rotation rate of the S-end and protoplasmic cylinder showed a clear correlation with the swimming speed, suggesting that these two helical parts play a central role in the motion of Leptospira. In contrast, the H-end rotation rate was unstable and showed much less correlation with the swimming speed. Forces produced by the rotation of the S-end and protoplasmic cylinder showed that these two helical parts contribute to propulsion at nearly equal magnitude. Torque generated by each part, also obtained from experimental motion parameters, indicated that the flagellar motor can generate torque >4000 pN nm, twice as large as that of Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the S-end torque was found to show a markedly larger fluctuation than the protoplasmic cylinder torque, suggesting that the unstable H-end rotation might be mechanically related to changes in the S-end rotation rate for torque balance of the entire cell. Variations in torque at the anterior and posterior ends of the Leptospira cell body could be transmitted from one end to the other through the cell body to coordinate the morphological transformations of the two ends for a rapid change in the swimming direction. PMID:24411236

  3. Evidence-based medication adherence in Hispanic patients with systolic heart failure in a disease management program.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Kathy; Beltran, Julieta; Tamariz, Leonardo; Julian, Elyse; Dias, Andre; Trahan, Pat; Arcement, Lee

    2010-01-01

    The Hispanic population is the fastest growing minority in the United States, yet there is a paucity of data regarding patient follow-up in heart failure disease management programs (HFDMPs) and evidence-based medication adherence. The purpose of this study is to measure the compliance of evidence-based medication use, specifically measuring angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and beta-blockers (BBs) in the Hispanic population, and compare these data to the white and black population. The authors conducted a cross-sectional study of 561 patients enrolled in an HFDMP at Jackson Medical Hospital in Miami, Florida. At the first visit, 82% of Hispanic, 75% of white, and 79% of black patients were taking ACEIs/ARBs, but only 21% of Hispanic, 35% of white, and 32% of black patients were taking target doses. Hispanic patients are as compliant with ACEI/ARB and BB regimens as are the white and black populations in HFDMPs in a setting of similar socioeconomic features. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Benefit and adherence of the disease management program "diabetes 2": a comparison of Turkish immigrants and German natives with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Anna Christin; Kofahl, Christopher

    2014-09-17

    There is an ongoing debate about equity and equality in health care, and whether immigrants benefit equally from services as the non-immigrant population. The study focuses on benefits from and adherence to the diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2) disease management program (DMP) among Turkish immigrants in Germany. So far, it has not been researched whether this group benefits from enrollment in the DMP as well as diabetics from the non-immigrant population. Data on the non-immigrant sample (N = 702) stem from a survey among members of a German health insurance, the Turkish immigrant sample (N = 102) was recruited in the area of Hamburg. Identical questions in both surveys enable comparing major components. Regarding process quality, Turkish diabetics do not differ from the non-immigrant sample; moreover, they have significantly more often received documentation and diabetes training. In terms of outcome quality however, results display a greater benefit on behalf of the non-immigrant sample (e.g., blood parameters and body mass index), and they also met more of the DMP criteria. This underlines the need of diabetics with Turkish background for further education and information in order to become the empowered patient as is intended by the DMP as well as to prevent comorbidities.

  5. Differential risk for Lyme disease along hiking trail, Germany.

    PubMed

    Richter, Dania; Matuschka, Franz-Rainer

    2011-09-01

    To estimate relative risk for exposure to ticks infected with Lyme disease-causing spirochetes in different land-use types along a trail in Germany, we compared tick density and spirochete prevalence on ruminant pasture with that on meadow and fallow land. Risk was significantly lower on pasture than on meadow and fallow land.

  6. Duodenal biopsies for the diagnosis of coeliac disease: are we adhering to current guidance?

    PubMed

    Husnoo, Nilofer; Ahmed, Wafaa; Shiwani, Muhammad Hanif

    2017-01-01

    The British Society of Gastroenterology guidelines recommend taking at least four duodenal biopsy specimens at the time of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy if coeliac disease (CD) is suspected and it has been shown to increase the diagnostic yield of CD. We assessed the compliance to these guidelines within our institution. We then applied measures to improve our compliance rate and assessed the resulting impact on our diagnostic rate of CD. We performed a retrospective audit of electronic records for all patients, with no prior diagnosis of CD, who underwent UGI endoscopy with duodenal biopsies between August 2014 and May 2015. We implemented measures to raise awareness among endoscopy users at our institution and carried out a reaudit between February and May 2016. 924 patients were found to be eligible in the first part of the study and 278 in the second part. The proportion of patients who had ≥4 biopsy specimens submitted increased from 21.9% to 60.8% (p<0.001). The diagnostic rate of CD increased from 3.5% in the audit group to 7.6% in the reaudit group (p=0.004). A positive serology result and suspected CD as an indication for biopsy were found to be independent predictors of the likelihood of complying with guidelines. Our study suggests that taking <4 duodenal biopsy specimens to assess for the presence of CD may lead to the diagnosis of CD being missed. Simple measures can improve the local compliance rate to current guidelines.

  7. [Adherence to a diet and the social aspects of patients with celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Ansaldi, N; Dell'Olio, D; Tavassoli, K; Faussone, D; La Vecchia, A; Bramante, L

    1992-01-01

    We studied the social behaviour and dietary habits of 335 coeliacs older than 6 yrs diagnosed in our paediatric gastroenterology unit by a mailed questionnaire, 156 patients (45.2%) answered all questions; their median age was 14.7 yrs (range 6-29). We found that the disease does not compromise educational achievement and working capacity of patients. A majority of our coeliacs are students (from primary school to university) and rather successful ones since 55% of them passed their previous year examinations. Some are already employed and work as clerks, artisans, masons or skilled workers. 89.6% of our patients reported to be on a strict gluten-free diet, 9% introduce small amounts of gluten and 1.4% are on a normal diet by their own decision. Coeliac patients originating from Northern Italy have more of their gluten-free foods home made and use more gliadin free cereals (rice, maize), whereas coeliacs originating from the Southern regions consume more ready made gluten-free foods. We have assessed the amount of gluten-free products consumed monthly by our patients and their food preferences. Females eat less than males and prefer bread and flour based dishes, whereas males east more pasta and biscuits.

  8. Duodenal biopsies for the diagnosis of coeliac disease: are we adhering to current guidance?

    PubMed Central

    Husnoo, Nilofer; Ahmed, Wafaa; Shiwani, Muhammad Hanif

    2017-01-01

    Background The British Society of Gastroenterology guidelines recommend taking at least four duodenal biopsy specimens at the time of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy if coeliac disease (CD) is suspected and it has been shown to increase the diagnostic yield of CD. We assessed the compliance to these guidelines within our institution. We then applied measures to improve our compliance rate and assessed the resulting impact on our diagnostic rate of CD. Methods We performed a retrospective audit of electronic records for all patients, with no prior diagnosis of CD, who underwent UGI endoscopy with duodenal biopsies between August 2014 and May 2015. We implemented measures to raise awareness among endoscopy users at our institution and carried out a reaudit between February and May 2016. Results 924 patients were found to be eligible in the first part of the study and 278 in the second part. The proportion of patients who had ≥4 biopsy specimens submitted increased from 21.9% to 60.8% (p<0.001). The diagnostic rate of CD increased from 3.5% in the audit group to 7.6% in the reaudit group (p=0.004). A positive serology result and suspected CD as an indication for biopsy were found to be independent predictors of the likelihood of complying with guidelines. Conclusions Our study suggests that taking <4 duodenal biopsy specimens to assess for the presence of CD may lead to the diagnosis of CD being missed. Simple measures can improve the local compliance rate to current guidelines. PMID:28761690

  9. Evidence for an ABC-Type Riboflavin Transporter System in Pathogenic Spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Biddy, Brent A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial transporter proteins are involved in the translocation of many essential nutrients and metabolites. However, many of these key bacterial transport systems remain to be identified, including those involved in the transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2). Pathogenic spirochetes lack riboflavin biosynthetic pathways, implying reliance on obtaining riboflavin from their hosts. Using structural and functional characterizations of possible ligand-binding components, we have identified an ABC-type riboflavin transport system within pathogenic spirochetes. The putative lipoprotein ligand-binding components of these systems from three different spirochetes were cloned, hyperexpressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to homogeneity. Solutions of all three of the purified recombinant proteins were bright yellow. UV-visible spectra demonstrated that these proteins were likely flavoproteins; electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and thin-layer chromatography confirmed that they contained riboflavin. A 1.3-Å crystal structure of the protein (TP0298) encoded by Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete, demonstrated that the protein’s fold is similar to the ligand-binding components of ABC-type transporters. The structure also revealed other salient details of the riboflavin binding site. Comparative bioinformatics analyses of spirochetal genomes, coupled with experimental validation, facilitated the discovery of this new ABC-type riboflavin transport system(s). We denote the ligand-binding component as riboflavin uptake transporter A (RfuA). Taken together, it appears that pathogenic spirochetes have evolved an ABC-type transport system (RfuABCD) for survival in their host environments, particularly that of the human host. PMID:23404400

  10. Bloodmeal Size and Spirochete Acquisition of Ornithodoros hermsi (Acari: Argasidae) During Feeding

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Brandi N.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Lopez, Job E.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2011-01-01

    Ornithodoros hermsi Wheeler (Acari: Argasidae) is the vector of Borrelia hermsii, the primary cause of tick-borne relapsing fever in North America. This tick is one of the smallest Ornithodoros species involved with the biological transmission of spirochetes; yet, the amount of blood ingested while feeding is unknown. Therefore, we determined the amount of blood O. hermsi ingested during a bloodmeal to establish its potential for spirochete acquisition while feeding on an infected host. Ticks at different developmental stages were weighed before and after feeding and the volume of blood ingested was calculated. Females ingested the most blood, averaging ≈15 µl per meal, but late-stage nymphs took in the most blood in proportion to unfed body weight. A cohort of nymphs was weighed three more times during the 48 h after feeding, which demonstrated that O. hermsi may have excreted coxal fluid ranging from 24 –36% of the bloodmeal weight. We also developed a quantitative polymerase chain reaction method to determine the number of spirochetes ingested and maintained within the ticks after feeding. The density of spirochetes in ticks having just engorged was slightly less than in the host’s blood. In the first 5 d after feeding, the number of spirochetes within the ticks declined from the number initially ingested but then remained constant through 15 d. These observations establish a basis for future studies to determine the minimum number of spirochetes required in the host’s blood to allow O. hermsi to become persistently infected and transmit during subsequent bloodmeals. PMID:21175068

  11. Medication Adherence Clubs: a potential solution to managing large numbers of stable patients with multiple chronic diseases in informal settlements.

    PubMed

    Khabala, Kelly B; Edwards, Jeffrey K; Baruani, Bienvenu; Sirengo, Martin; Musembi, Phylles; Kosgei, Rose J; Walter, Kizito; Kibachio, Joseph M; Tondoi, Monique; Ritter, Helga; Wilkinson, Ewan; Reid, Tony

    2015-10-01

    To assess the care of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and/or HIV patients enrolled into Medication Adherence Clubs (MACs). Retrospective descriptive study was carried out using routinely collected programme data from a primary healthcare clinic at informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya. All patients enrolled into MACs were selected for the study. MACs are nurse-facilitated mixed groups of 25-35 stable hypertension, diabetes mellitus and/or HIV patients who met quarterly to confirm their clinical stability, have brief health discussions and receive medication. Clinical officer reviewed MACs yearly, when a patient developed complications or no longer met stable criteria. A total of 1432 patients were enrolled into 47 clubs with 109 sessions conducted between August 2013 and August 2014. There were 1020 (71%) HIV and 412 (29%) non-communicable disease patients. Among those with NCD, 352 (85%) had hypertension and 60 (15%) had DM, while 12 had HIV concurrent with hypertension. A total of 2208 consultations were offloaded from regular clinic. During MAC attendance, blood pressure, weight and laboratory testing were completed correctly in 98-99% of consultations. Only 43 (2%) consultations required referral for clinical officer review before their routine yearly appointment. Loss to follow-up from the MACs was 3.5%. This study demonstrates the feasibility and early efficacy of MACs for mixed chronic disease in a resource-limited setting. It supports burden reduction and flexibility of regular clinical review for stable patients. Further assessment regarding long-term outcomes of this model should be completed to increase confidence for deployment in similar contexts. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Confidence in correct inhaler technique and its association with treatment adherence and health status among US patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh N; Ganapathy, Vaidyanathan; Roughley, Adam; Small, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Improper use of bronchodilators is associated with poor disease control, nonadherence to long-term therapy, and poor clinical outcomes. Our current understanding of factors associated with correct inhaler use and adherence is limited. We measured physician-and patient-reported confidence in device usage and associations with treatment adherence and COPD-related health status. This was an analysis of a US observational, point-in-time survey of physicians and patients. Physicians who met study eligibility criteria completed surveys for 5 consecutive, eligible patients who were then invited to respond to questionnaires. We assessed patient demographics, type of prescribed inhaler device(s), device training, COPD severity, comorbidities, physician-and patient self-reported confidence in device usage, treatment adherence, and health status. Completed questionnaires for 373 patients were provided by 134 physicians. Complete confidence in device usage was observed for 22% and 17% of patients as reported by patients and physicians, respectively. Greater confidence was associated with higher self-reported adherence to inhaler usage. Physicians were more likely than patients to report lower levels of patient confidence in device usage. High physician- and patient-reported confidence were associated with more favorable health status. Predictors of confidence in device usage included fewer comorbidities, no depression, and higher education levels. Low confidence in inhaler usage was associated with lower adherence and poor COPD-related health status. Choice of inhaler device tailored to patients' ability to use specific devices and ongoing education to support optimal inhaler usage may improve patient confidence and enhance both adherence and health status.

  13. Confidence in correct inhaler technique and its association with treatment adherence and health status among US patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Alpesh N; Ganapathy, Vaidyanathan; Roughley, Adam; Small, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background Improper use of bronchodilators is associated with poor disease control, nonadherence to long-term therapy, and poor clinical outcomes. Our current understanding of factors associated with correct inhaler use and adherence is limited. We measured physician-and patient-reported confidence in device usage and associations with treatment adherence and COPD-related health status. Methods This was an analysis of a US observational, point-in-time survey of physicians and patients. Physicians who met study eligibility criteria completed surveys for 5 consecutive, eligible patients who were then invited to respond to questionnaires. We assessed patient demographics, type of prescribed inhaler device(s), device training, COPD severity, comorbidities, physician-and patient self-reported confidence in device usage, treatment adherence, and health status. Results Completed questionnaires for 373 patients were provided by 134 physicians. Complete confidence in device usage was observed for 22% and 17% of patients as reported by patients and physicians, respectively. Greater confidence was associated with higher self-reported adherence to inhaler usage. Physicians were more likely than patients to report lower levels of patient confidence in device usage. High physician- and patient-reported confidence were associated with more favorable health status. Predictors of confidence in device usage included fewer comorbidities, no depression, and higher education levels. Conclusion Low confidence in inhaler usage was associated with lower adherence and poor COPD-related health status. Choice of inhaler device tailored to patients’ ability to use specific devices and ongoing education to support optimal inhaler usage may improve patient confidence and enhance both adherence and health status. PMID:28744110

  14. Immune Evasion and Recognition of the Syphilis Spirochete in Blood and Skin of Secondary Syphilis Patients: Two Immunologically Distinct Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Adriana R.; Ramirez, Lady G.; Zuluaga, Ana V.; Pillay, Allan; Abreu, Christine; Valencia, Carlos A.; La Vake, Carson; Cervantes, Jorge L.; Dunham-Ems, Star; Cartun, Richard; Mavilio, Domenico; Radolf, Justin D.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical syndrome associated with secondary syphilis (SS) reflects the propensity of Treponema pallidum (Tp) to escape immune recognition while simultaneously inducing inflammation. Methods To better understand the duality of immune evasion and immune recognition in human syphilis, herein we used a combination of flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transcriptional profiling to study the immune response in the blood and skin of 27 HIV(-) SS patients in relation to spirochetal burdens. Ex vivo opsonophagocytosis assays using human syphilitic sera (HSS) were performed to model spirochete-monocyte/macrophage interactions in vivo. Results Despite the presence of low-level spirochetemia, as well as immunophenotypic changes suggestive of monocyte activation, we did not detect systemic cytokine production. SS subjects had substantial decreases in circulating DCs and in IFNγ-producing and cytotoxic NK-cells, along with an emergent CD56−/CD16+ NK-cell subset in blood. Skin lesions, which had visible Tp by IHC and substantial amounts of Tp-DNA, had large numbers of macrophages (CD68+), a relative increase in CD8+ T-cells over CD4+ T-cells and were enriched for CD56+ NK-cells. Skin lesions contained transcripts for cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α), chemokines (CCL2, CXCL10), macrophage and DC activation markers (CD40, CD86), Fc-mediated phagocytosis receptors (FcγRI, FcγR3), IFN-β and effector molecules associated with CD8 and NK-cell cytotoxic responses. While HSS promoted uptake of Tp in conjunction with monocyte activation, most spirochetes were not internalized. Conclusions Our findings support the importance of macrophage driven opsonophagocytosis and cell mediated immunity in treponemal clearance, while suggesting that the balance between phagocytic uptake and evasion is influenced by the relative burdens of bacteria in blood and skin and the presence of Tp subpopulations with differential capacities for binding opsonic antibodies. They also

  15. [Treatment adherence: a key element].

    PubMed

    Bastida, Guillermo; Sánchez Montes, Cristina; Aguas, Mariam

    2011-12-01

    A substantial percentage of patients fail to follow health professionals' recommendations, which affects the management of chronic diseases, reducing the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions and increasing the costs of the disease. Lack of adherence is a multidimensional phenomenon and is influenced by numerous factors that should be identified. A multiplicity of measures is available to improve adherence, such as simplifying treatment administration, but none of these measures is effective when used alone. One way of tackling lack of adherence is by identifying patients' barriers to medication and involving them in decision making. Ulcerative colitis (UC) poses a risk for lack of treatment adherence. In this disease, poor adherence correlates with poor disease control (drug effectiveness) and with higher costs. As in other chronic diseases, the causes associated with poor adherence are multiple, including psychosocial factors, the physician-patient relationship and patients' prejudices toward medication. A single dose of aminosalycylates (5-ASA) should be recommended, as this dose is as safe and effective as other regimens. However, by itself, this recommendation does not seem to improve adherence. Identifying the scale of the problem and developing strategies to involve the patient in decision making is crucial to improve treatment adherence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease

    PubMed Central

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process. PMID:23326202

  17. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process.

  18. Treatment adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus correlates with different coping styles, low perception of self-influence on disease, and depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kokoszka, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Background Insulin analogs are regarded as more convenient to use than human insulin; however, they require a different administration scheme due to their unique pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. This study aimed to assess difficulties with adherence to treatment with insulin analogs in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), who had previously been treated with human insulin. The associations between difficulties with adherence and clinical, demographic, and psychological characteristics were also evaluated. Patients and methods The study was conducted on 3,467 consecutively enrolled patients with T2DM (54.4% women), mean age 63.9 years (SD =9.57), who had recently undergone a physician-directed change in treatment from human insulin to insulin analogs. The questionnaires addressed difficulties with switching the therapy, coping styles, well-being, and perception of self-influence on the disease. Results No adherence problems in switching therapy were reported in 56.6% of patients. Specific moderate difficulties were reported in 10.4%–22.1% of patients, major difficulties in 0.7%–6.9% of patients, and very significant difficulties in 0.03%–1.3% of patients. Overall, remembering to modify the insulin dose in the case of additional meals was the most frequently reported difficulty, and problems with identifying hypoglycemic symptoms were the least frequently reported. The increased risk of difficulties was moderately related to low perception of self-influence on diabetes and poor well-being. The intensity of problems was higher among those who were less-educated, lived in rural areas, had complications, and/or reported maladaptive coping styles. Conclusion Switching from human insulin to an insulin analog did not cause adherence problems in more than half of the patients. In the remaining patients, difficulties in adherence correlated with maladaptive coping styles, low perception of self-influence on disease course, and depressive

  19. Predictors of adherence to screening guidelines for chronic diseases of lifestyle, cancers, and HIV in a health-insured population in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Adonis, Leegale; Basu, Debashis; Luiz, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Adherence to screening guidelines has been widely accepted to reduce morbidity, mortality, and cost outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of adherence to screening guidelines for chronic diseases of lifestyle (CDL), cancers, and HIV in a health-insured population in South Africa, some of whom voluntarily opt into a wellness program that incentivizes screening. Method A cross-sectional study for the period 2007–2011 was conducted using a random sample of 170,471 health insurance members from a single insurer. Adherence to screening guidelines was calculated from medical claims data. Results Adherence to screening guidelines ranged from 1.1% for colorectal cancer to 40.9% for cholesterol screening. Members of the wellness program were up to three times more likely to screen for diseases (odds ratio [OR]=3.2 for HIV screening, confidence interval [CI]=2.75–3.73). Plan type (full comprehensive plan) was most strongly associated with cholesterol screening (OR=3.53, CI=3.27–3.80), and most negatively associated (hospital-only core plan) with cervical cancer screening (OR= 0.44, CI=0.28–0.70). Gender was a negative predictor for glucose screening (OR=0.88, CI=0.82–0.96). Provincial residence was most strongly associated with cervical cancer screening (OR=1.89, CI=0.65–5.54). Conclusion Adherence to screening recommendations was <50%. Plan type, gender, provincial residence, and belonging to an incentivized wellness program were associated with disproportionate utilization of screening services, even with equal payment access. PMID:24647130

  20. Treatment Adherence and Its Impact on Disease-Free Survival in the Breast International Group 1-98 Trial of Tamoxifen and Letrozole, Alone and in Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Coates, Alan S.; Price, Karen N.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Debled, Marc; Gelber, Richard D.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Smith, Ian; Rabaglio, Manuela; Forbes, John F.; Neven, Patrick; Láng, István; Colleoni, Marco; Thürlimann, Beat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate adherence to endocrine treatment and its relationship with disease-free survival (DFS) in the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 clinical trial. Methods The BIG 1-98 trial is a double-blind trial that randomly assigned 6,193 postmenopausal women with hormone receptor–positive early breast cancer in the four-arm option to 5 years of tamoxifen (Tam), letrozole (Let), or the agents in sequence (Let-Tam, Tam-Let). This analysis included 6,144 women who received at least one dose of study treatment. Conditional landmark analyses and marginal structural Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relationship between DFS and treatment adherence (persistence [duration] and compliance with dosage). Competing risks regression was used to assess demographic, disease, and treatment characteristics of the women who stopped treatment early because of adverse events. Results Both aspects of low adherence (early cessation of letrozole and a compliance score of < 90%) were associated with reduced DFS (multivariable model hazard ratio, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.93; P = .01; and multivariable model hazard ratio, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.08 to 2.38; P = .02, respectively). Sequential treatments were associated with higher rates of nonpersistence (Tam-Let, 20.8%; Let-Tam, 20.3%; Tam 16.9%; Let 17.6%). Adverse events were the reason for most trial treatment early discontinuations (82.7%). Apart from sequential treatment assignment, reduced adherence was associated with older age, smoking, node negativity, or prior thromboembolic event. Conclusion Both persistence and compliance are associated with DFS. Toxicity management and, for sequential treatments, patient and physician awareness, may improve adherence. PMID:27217455

  1. Socioecologic factors as predictors of readiness for self-management and transition, medication adherence, and health care utilization among adolescents and young adults with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Javalkar, Karina; Fenton, Nicole; Cohen, Sarah; Ferris, Maria

    2014-07-10

    The objective of our study was to determine the socioecologic factors that predict readiness for self-management and transition from pediatric to adult health care services, adherence to taking medications, and health care utilization among adolescents and young adults with chronic kidney disease. We enrolled 52 adolescents and young adults aged 13 to 21 (96.5% participation). Participants were administered measures that examined: socioecologic factors, individualized education plans or 504 plans, readiness for self-management and transition (the University of North Carolina TRxANSITION scale), triangulated measures of adherence to taking medications (parent reported, physician reported, and medication-possession ratios), and health care utilization (number of visits to the emergency department, number of inpatient admissions, and number of inpatient days in the previous year). Overall, our sample had moderate levels of readiness for self-management and transition, high rates of parent- and physician-reported medication adherence, and high rates of health care utilization. Age was a significant positive predictor of readiness for self-management and transition. Compared with participants who had private health insurance, participants who had public insurance had more emergency department visits, inpatient admissions, and inpatient days, and lower rates of physician-reported medication adherence. Participants who did not have an individualized education plan or 504 plan had significantly more emergency department visits, inpatient admissions, and inpatient days. Socioecologic factors play an important role in readiness for self-management and transition, medication adherence, and health care utilization in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease. Age, insurance status, and having an individualized education plan or 504 plan may be key factors.

  2. Adherence to clinical practice guidelines for 7 chronic conditions in long-term-care patients who received pharmacist disease management services versus traditional drug regimen review.

    PubMed

    Horning, Kristin K; Hoehns, James D; Doucette, William R

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that adherence to published clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) reduces disease morbidity and mortality. However, few benchmarks exist that demonstrate the rate of adherence to CPGs in patients in long-term-care facilities (LTCFs). To evaluate CPG adherence in patients in LTCFs who received consultation from pharmacists who emphasize disease state management (DSM) compared with patients in other LTCFs who received traditional drug regimen review (DRR). A retrospective chart review was conducted in November 2005 for 107 patients who received DSM services in 2 LTCFs and 304 patients who received DRR services in 4 LTCFs for the service period ending September 30, 2005. Chart review was conducted on all patients included in the current census as of September 1, 2005; residents were excluded from the analysis if they were discharged or deceased between September 1, 2005, and the date of chart review. CPG adherence was evaluated for the following 7 conditions: diabetes, coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, heart failure (HF), hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and osteoporosis. In addition, the 6 most recent pharmacist recommendations for each patient were classified according to disease state. Adherence to CPGs was significantly better (all P <0.05) in patients receiving DSM services for the following performance measures for 4 of the 7 disease states: (1) diabetes: antiplatelet or warfarin use or contraindication for use (hypersensitivity or history of serious bleeding event), 89.7% for DSM services versus 71.0% for DRR services, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) adherence rates for patients receiving DSM services remained

  3. Certain canine weakly beta-hemolytic intestinal spirochetes are phenotypically and genotypically related to spirochetes associated with human and porcine intestinal spirochetosis.

    PubMed Central

    Duhamel, G E; Muniappa, N; Mathiesen, M R; Johnson, J L; Toth, J; Elder, R O; Doster, A R

    1995-01-01

    Four canine weakly beta-hemolytic intestinal spirochetes associated with intestinal spirochetosis (IS-associated WBHIS) were compared with IS-associated human and porcine WBHIS and the type species for Serpulina hyodysenteriae and S. innocens by using phenotypic and genotypic parameters. The IS-associated canine, human, and porcine WBHIS belonged to a phyletic group distinct from but related to previously described Serpulina type species. PMID:7559984

  4. Examining Time to Initiation of Biologic Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs and Medication Adherence and Persistence Among Texas Medicaid Recipients With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gilwan; Barner, Jamie C; Rascati, Karen; Richards, Kristin

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the transition from nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) to biologic DMARDs or about individual nonbiologic DMARD use patterns among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study examined time to initiation of biologic DMARDs and nonbiologic DMARD medication adherence and persistence among Texas Medicaid recipients with RA taking nonbiologic DMARDs. In this retrospective study (July 1, 2003-December 31, 2010) of the Texas Medicaid database, patients were aged 18 to 62 years at index, were diagnosed with RA (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, code 714.xx), had no claims for nonbiologic or biologic DMARDs in the preindex period, and had a minimum of 2 prescription claims for the same nonbiologic DMARD in the postindex period. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests were used to compare time to initiation of biologic DMARDs according to nonbiologic DMARD type and therapy. Adherence and persistence were examined according to nonbiologic type and therapy by using ANOVA models and χ(2), Duncan, and t tests. On average, patients were 47.9 (± 10.4) years of age, mostly female (89.1%) and Hispanic (55.2%). Methotrexate (MTX) and leflunomide (LEF) users took the shortest time to initiate biologic DMARDs (207 [190] days and 188 [205] days, respectively). LEF users had the highest mean adherence of 37.5% (27.5%), which was similar to MTX users (35.7% [26.9%]), whereas dual-therapy users had the lowest mean adherence at 17.1% (14.4%). Sulfasalazine users (108 [121] days) had the lowest persistence, whereas LEF (227 [231] days) and MTX (211 [222] days) users had the longest persistence. Nonbiologic DMARD monotherapy users were more adherent than dual-therapy users (32.6% [25.8%] vs 17.1% [14.4%]). These results should be interpreted in light of some study limitations, such as using proportion of days covered as a proxy for adherence, not having clinical data to control for

  5. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  6. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  7. Adherence to antiepilepsy drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Faught, Edward

    2012-11-01

    Adherence to antiepilepsy drug (AED) therapy is critical for effective disease management, yet adherence and persistence rates are low due to several barriers. The definitions of adherence (80% rate of total pills taken, medication possession ratio, and days covered by prescriptions filled) and methods of measurement (patient self-reports, serum drug levels, pill counts, electronic bottle tops, and reviews of pharmacy records) are not without limitations, and their applicability to epilepsy is not clear. The use of simple adherence scales during office visits can provide an overall impression of a patient's adherence and can serve as a basis for practitioner-patient dialog. Efforts to improve adherence should focus on provider and healthcare system determinants versus those focused only on the patient. These interventions include non-judgmental communication, patient education, simplification of the dosage regimen with once-daily therapies, and the use of patient reminders.

  8. Gynecologic and obstetric findings related to nutritional status and adherence to a gluten-free diet in Brazilian patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kotze, L M S

    2004-08-01

    This study shows a broad analysis of gynaecological and obstetrical disturbances in patients with celiac disease in relation to their nutritional status and adherence to a gluten-free diet. Seventy-six adult celiac patients were analyzed according to nutritional status and 18 children/adolescents to gluten-free diet adherence. As controls, 84 adults and 22 adolescents with irritable bowel syndrome were used The significant findings were observed as follow: adult celiac patients, irrespective of the nutritional status, were younger than controls, presented delayed menarche, secondary amenorrhea, a higher percentage of spontaneous abortions, anemia and hypoalbuminemia. No differences were observed regarding the number of pregnancies, age at menopause and duration of the reproductive period. After treatment, patients presented with normal pregnancies and one patient presented spontaneous abortion. The adolescents who were not adherent to gluten-free diet presented delayed menarche and secondary amenorrhea. In conclusion, gluten per se could explain the disturbances and malnutrition would worsen the disease in a consequent vicious cycle. Therefore, celiac disease should be included in the screening of reproductive disorders.

  9. Patient adherence to allergy immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Reisacher, William R; Visaya, Jiovani M

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the literature on patient adherence to two different approaches to allergen-specific immunotherapy for allergic disease. Factors related to adherence in general, as well as the various methods used to measure adherence, will be discussed. Although a complex interaction of factors related to both the physician and the patient influence the adherence to a particular therapeutic regimen, effective communication between these two parties and the simplicity of the regimen are frequently noted to be of primary importance. Variability with respect to the definition of adherence, the method of measuring adherence, and the length of the measuring period has resulted in a wide range of adherence rates to allergy immunotherapy reported in the literature. Patients most often site inconvenience, side-effects, and poor efficacy as reasons for discontinuing allergy immunotherapy. Adherence to therapy not only improves individual patient outcomes, but also helps determine the best treatment modalities and reduces the burden of disease on society. As new methods of delivering immunotherapy are being developed, such as allergy immunotherapy tablets and oral mucosal immunotherapy, the factors associated with patient adherence should be carefully considered.

  10. Antigenic Targets of the Bovine Humoral Response to PDD-associated Spirochetes Change with Subsequent Exposure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Papillomatous digital dermatitis (PDD), also known as hairy heel wart, is a major cause of lameness of cows in the U.S. dairy industry. Cattle are known to mount a humoral response to spirochetes isolated from PDD lesions. This study was undertaken to evaluate the progression of the bovine humoral i...

  11. Molecular characterization of a chemotaxis operon in the oral spirochete, Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Greene, S R; Stamm, L V

    1999-05-17

    A chemotaxis gene cluster from Treponema denticola (Td), a pathogenic spirochete associated with human periodontal diseases, was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed. The gene cluster contained three chemotaxis (che) genes (cheA, cheW, and cheY) and an open reading frame (cheX) that is homologous with Treponema pallidum (Tp) and Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) cheX. The Td che genes have the same transcriptional orientation with a sigma 70-like promoter located upstream of cheA and a stem-loop structure characteristic of a Rho-independent transcriptional terminator downstream of cheY. Primer extension analysis identified a transcriptional start point six nucleotides (nt) downstream of the -10 (TAAAAA) promoter sequence. Reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) data indicated that cheA through cheY are co-transcribed and suggested that transcription is terminated after cheY. The gene organization of the Td che operon is identical to that of the Tp che operon. Southern blot analysis indicated the presence of one copy of each che gene on the Td genome. The cheA, cheW, cheX, and cheY genes are 2403, 1332, 462, and 438nt long, respectively, and encode proteins with predicted molecular masses of 88.2, 49.7, 16.8, and 16. 0kDa, respectively. Functional domains of the T. denticola CheA and CheY proteins are highly conserved with those of the Escherichia coli (Ec) CheA and CheY proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of Td CheY indicated that it is closely related to Tp CheY and Bb CheY3.

  12. [Anticancer drug adherence].

    PubMed

    Despas, Fabien; Roche, Henri; Laurent, Guy

    2013-05-01

    A large number of anticancer drugs have been introduced during the two last decades with significant impact for survival, making cancer a chronic disease in a growing number of indications. However, these drugs are costly, induce adverse effects and their efficacy frequently depends on the dose. For all these reasons, adherence in cancer therapy is critical for an optimal benefit-risk ratio. Patient adherence remains virtually unexplored in many cancers, such as malignant blood diseases. When measured, adherence is poor, especially when the drug is administered as oral and prolonged therapy (hormonotherapy in breast cancer, imatinib). Physician nonadherence represents another form of drug misadministration; poorly documented, its mechanism remains obscure. Adherence may be measured by a panel of methods, each of them displaying limits and pitfalls, suggesting that several complementary methods should be used in the context of prospective studies. Risk factors are age, socio-educative profile, disease stage and physician profile. This review emphasizes some methods to prevent nonadherence. Finally, this review argues for prospective studies, which should integrate a social pharmacology approach, including medicine, psycho-sociology and economics.

  13. Effect of pharmaceutical care on medication adherence and hospital admission in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Li; Yang, Xinyun; Li, Jie; Liu, Lianghui; Luo, Hongying; Zheng, Zeguang

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor adherence leads to a high rate of exacerbation and poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, few strategies are acceptable and effective in improving medication adherence. We investigated whether pharmaceutical care by clinical pharmacists could reinforce medication adherence to reduce exacerbation and improve HRQoL. Methods A randomized controlled study was carried out at The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University from February 2012 to January 2014. Non-adherence patients were randomly assigned to receive pharmaceutical care or to usual care. The pharmaceutical care consisted of individualized education and a series of telephone counseling for 6 months provided by clinical pharmacists. Medication adherence was measured by pill counts plus direct interview at 1- and 6-month pharmaceutical care and one-year follow-up. Severe exacerbations were defined as events that led to hospitalization for acute COPD attack. An interview was conducted to investigate hospital admissions and evaluate severe exacerbations at one-year follow-up. HRQoL was measured by St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire at 6 months. Results At 6-month pharmaceutical care and one-year follow-up, the pharmaceutical care group exhibited higher medication adherence than the usual care group (73.4±11.1 vs. 55.7±11.9, P=0.016 and 54.4±12.5 vs. 66.5±8.6, P=0.039, respectively). There are 60 acute exacerbations resulted in a hospital admission in the usual group while 37 ones in the pharmaceutical care group during one-year follow-up (P=0.01). Hospital admissions due to acute exacerbation in the pharmaceutical care group were 56.3% less than the usual care group (P=0.01). There was a significant difference in the symptoms and impact subscales respectively at 6-month pharmaceutical care between two groups (P=0.032, P=0.018). Conclusions Individualized pharmaceutical care improved medication

  14. The roles of self-efficacy and motivation in the prediction of short- and long-term adherence to exercise among patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Slovinec D'Angelo, Monika E; Pelletier, Luc G; Reid, Robert D; Huta, Veronika

    2014-11-01

    Poor adherence to regular exercise is a documented challenge among people with heart disease. Identifying key determinants of exercise adherence and distinguishing between the processes driving short- and long-term adherence to regular exercise is a valuable endeavor. The purpose of the present study was to test a model of exercise behavior change, which incorporates motivational orientations and self-efficacy for exercise behavior, in the prediction of short- and long-term exercise adherence. Male and female patients (N = 801) hospitalized for coronary heart disease were recruited from 3 tertiary care cardiac centers and followed for a period of 1 year after hospital discharge. A prospective, longitudinal design was used to examine the roles of motivation and self-efficacy (measured at recruitment and at 2 and 6 months after discharge) in the prediction of exercise behavior at 6 and 12 months. Baseline measures of exercise and clinical and demographic covariates were included in the analyses. Structural equation modeling showed that both autonomous motivation and self-efficacy were important determinants of short-term (6-month) exercise behavior regulation, but that only autonomous motivation remained a significant predictor of long-term (12-month) exercise behavior. Self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between motivation for exercise and 6-month exercise behavior. This research confirmed the roles of autonomous motivation and self-efficacy in the health behavior change process and emphasized the key function of autonomous motivation in exercise maintenance. Theoretical and cardiac rehabilitation program applications of this research are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of the correlation among antibiotic resistance, adherence to abiotic and biotic surfaces, invasion and cytotoxicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from diseased gilthead sea bream.

    PubMed

    Lamari, Faouzi; Chakroun, Ibtissem; Rtimi, Sami

    2017-07-01

    Improper uses of antibiotics to treat fish disease pose an increase of multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In order to escape host antimicrobial agents and induce cytotoxicity, different virulence properties are needed by these bacteria such as, biofilm formation, adhesion and invasion ability. This study was conducted to isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa from diseased cultured gilthead sea bream. Seventeen isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were identified by PCR. All of the isolates tested were susceptible to Gentamicin and Ciprofloxacin. Highest level of resistance was observed against Erythromycin, Ampicillin and Tetracycline. Among the 17 isolates, 11 showed multi-drug resistance. The isolates were screened for biofilm formation in abiotic surfaces, adherence, invasion and cytotoxicity against Hep-2 cells. We found that some strains were able to adhere to abiotic and biotic surface and to enter inside Hep-2 cells. Using cytochalasin D inhibitor, we observed a significant decrease in invasion of epithelial cells. The 17 washed bacterial cells induce variable degree of cytotoxicity. However, no cytotoxic effects on Hep-2 cells were obtained among the totality of cell free filtrate of Pseudomonas strains. By studying the relationship between different virulence properties, a significant positive correlation was obtained between both biofilm formation and adherence, and between adherence and invasion to epithelial cells. Subsequently, we found that the mean values of adhesion and invasion in the MDR group were significantly higher than those observed in the non-MDR group. Likewise, a significant positive correlation was found among adhesive and invasive capacities of Pseudomonas strains and their antibiotic resistance phenotypes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  17. Treatment acceptance and adherence in HIV disease: patient identity and the perceived impact of physician–patient communication

    PubMed Central

    Laws, M Barton; Rose, Gary S; Bezreh, Tanya; Beach, Mary Catherine; Taubin, Tatiana; Kogelman, Laura; Gethers, Marcia; Wilson, Ira B

    2012-01-01

    Studies have found that physician–patient relationships and communication quality are related to medication adherence and outcomes in HIV care. Few qualitative studies exist of how people living with HIV experience clinical communication about their self-care behavior. Eight focus groups with people living with HIV in two US cities were conducted. Participants responded to a detailed discussion guide and to reenactments of actual physician–patient dialogue about antiretroviral adherence. The 82 participants were diverse in age, sex, and ethnicity. Most had been living with HIV for many years and had stable relationships with providers. They appreciated providers who knew and cared about their personal lives, who were clear and direct about instructions, and who were accessible. Most had struggled to overcome addiction, emotional turmoil, and/or denial before gaining control over their lives and becoming adherent to medications. They made little or no causal attribution for their transformation to any outside agency, including their providers. They generally saw medication adherence as a function of autonomous motivation. Successful coping with HIV with its prevalent behavioral comorbidities, stigma, and other challenges requires a transformation of identity and internalization of motivation to maintain health. Effective methods for clinicians to support such development are needed. PMID:23271898

  18. Optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Seema; Reddy, K. Srikanth; Dhayarkar, Sampada

    2011-01-01

    HIV has now become a manageable chronic disease. However, the treatment outcomes may get hampered by suboptimal adherence to ART. Adherence optimization is a concrete reality in the wake of ‘universal access’ and it is imperative to learn lessons from various studies and programmes. This review examines current literature on ART scale up, treatment outcomes of the large scale programmes and the role of adherence therein. Social, behavioural, biological and programme related factors arise in the context of ART adherence optimization. While emphasis is laid on adherence, retention of patients under the care umbrella emerges as a major challenge. An in-depth understanding of patients’ health seeking behaviour and health care delivery system may be useful in improving adherence and retention of patients in care continuum and programme. A theoretical framework to address the barriers and facilitators has been articulated to identify problematic areas in order to intervene with specific strategies. Empirically tested objective adherence measurement tools and approaches to assess adherence in clinical/ programme settings are required. Strengthening of ART programmes would include appropriate policies for manpower and task sharing, integrating traditional health sector, innovations in counselling and community support. Implications for the use of theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, community involvement and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is suggested. PMID:22310817

  19. Optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Seema; Reddy, K Srikanth; Dhayarkar, Sampada

    2011-12-01

    HIV has now become a manageable chronic disease. However, the treatment outcomes may get hampered by suboptimal adherence to ART. Adherence optimization is a concrete reality in the wake of 'universal access' and it is imperative to learn lessons from various studies and programmes. This review examines current literature on ART scale up, treatment outcomes of the large scale programmes and the role of adherence therein. Social, behavioural, biological and programme related factors arise in the context of ART adherence optimization. While emphasis is laid on adherence, retention of patients under the care umbrella emerges as a major challenge. An in-depth understanding of patients' health seeking behaviour and health care delivery system may be useful in improving adherence and retention of patients in care continuum and programme. A theoretical framework to address the barriers and facilitators has been articulated to identify problematic areas in order to intervene with specific strategies. Empirically tested objective adherence measurement tools and approaches to assess adherence in clinical/ programme settings are required. Strengthening of ART programmes would include appropriate policies for manpower and task sharing, integrating traditional health sector, innovations in counselling and community support. Implications for the use of theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, community involvement and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is suggested.

  20. Correlation of adherence to the 2012 Infectious Diseases Society of America practice guidelines with patient outcomes in the treatment of diabetic foot infections in an outpatient parenteral antimicrobial programme.

    PubMed

    Pence, L M; Mock, C M; Kays, M B; Damer, K M; Muloma, E W; Erdman, S M

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate adherence to the 2012 Infectious Diseases Society of America practice guidelines for the management of patients with diabetic foot infections and to determine an association between adherence and clinical outcome. A retrospective chart review was performed to evaluate the management and clinical outcomes of patients with diabetic foot infections treated with outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy between 1 January 2011 and 30 June 2012 at Wishard Health Services/Eskenazi Health. Adherence to individual Infectious Diseases Society of America diabetic foot infection treatment guideline recommendations was measured, and then assessed in relation to clinical outcome. A total of 57 patients (61% male, mean age 54 years) with moderate to severe diabetic foot infection met the inclusion criteria. None of the treatment courses of these patients adhered to all the Infectious Diseases Society of America guideline recommendations. The recommendations most frequently adhered to were consultation of appropriate multidisciplinary teams (n=54, 94.7%) and performance of diagnostic imaging (n=52, 89.5%). The recommendations least frequently adhered to were diabetic foot wound classification scoring on admission (n=0, 0%), appropriate culture acquisition (n=12, 21.2%), surgical intervention when indicated (n=32, 46.2%) and appropriate empiric antibiotic selection (n=34, 59.7%). Of 56 patients, 52 (92.9%) experienced clinical cure at the end of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy compared with 34 of 53 patients (64%) at 6 months after the completion of therapy. Adherence to individual guidelines was not associated with clinical outcome. Patients who experienced treatment failure were more likely to have severe diabetic foot infection or peripheral neuropathy. Adherence to the Infectious Diseases Society of America diabetic foot infection guideline recommendations was found to be suboptimal in the present study. The effect of adhering to individual Infectious

  1. Engaging community pharmacists in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: protocol for the Pharmacist Assessment of Adherence, Risk and Treatment in Cardiovascular Disease (PAART CVD) pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mc Namara, Kevin P; George, Johnson; O'Reilly, Sharleen L; Jackson, Shane L; Peterson, Gregory M; Howarth, Helen; Bailey, Michael J; Duncan, Gregory; Trinder, Peta; Morabito, Elizabeth; Finch, Jill; Bunker, Stephen; Janus, Edward; Emery, Jon; Dunbar, James A

    2010-09-07

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death globally. Community pharmacist intervention studies have demonstrated clinical effectiveness for improving several leading individual CVD risk factors. Primary prevention strategies increasingly emphasise the need for consideration of overall cardiovascular risk and concurrent management of multiple risk factors. It is therefore important to demonstrate the feasibility of multiple risk factor management by community pharmacists to ensure continued currency of their role. This study will be a longitudinal pre- and post-test pilot study with a single cohort of up to 100 patients in ten pharmacies. Patients aged 50-74 years with no history of heart disease or diabetes, and taking antihypertensive or lipid-lowering medicines, will be approached for participation. Assessment of cardiovascular risk, medicines use and health behaviours will be undertaken by a research assistant at baseline and following the intervention (6 months). Validated interview scales will be used where available. Baseline data will be used by accredited medicines management pharmacists to generate a report for the treating community pharmacist. This report will highlight individual patients' overall CVD risk and individual risk factors, as well as identifying modifiable health behaviours for risk improvement and suggesting treatment and behavioural goals. The treating community pharmacist will use this information to finalise and implement a treatment plan in conjunction with the patient and their doctor. Community pharmacists will facilitate patient improvements in lifestyle, medicines adherence, and medicines management over the course of five counselling sessions with monthly intervals. The primary outcome will be the change to average overall cardiovascular risk, assessed using the Framingham risk equation. This study will assess the feasibility of implementing holistic primary CVD prevention programs into community pharmacy, one of

  2. Engaging community pharmacists in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: protocol for the Pharmacist Assessment of Adherence, Risk and Treatment in Cardiovascular Disease (PAART CVD) pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death globally. Community pharmacist intervention studies have demonstrated clinical effectiveness for improving several leading individual CVD risk factors. Primary prevention strategies increasingly emphasise the need for consideration of overall cardiovascular risk and concurrent management of multiple risk factors. It is therefore important to demonstrate the feasibility of multiple risk factor management by community pharmacists to ensure continued currency of their role. Methods/Design This study will be a longitudinal pre- and post-test pilot study with a single cohort of up to 100 patients in ten pharmacies. Patients aged 50-74 years with no history of heart disease or diabetes, and taking antihypertensive or lipid-lowering medicines, will be approached for participation. Assessment of cardiovascular risk, medicines use and health behaviours will be undertaken by a research assistant at baseline and following the intervention (6 months). Validated interview scales will be used where available. Baseline data will be used by accredited medicines management pharmacists to generate a report for the treating community pharmacist. This report will highlight individual patients' overall CVD risk and individual risk factors, as well as identifying modifiable health behaviours for risk improvement and suggesting treatment and behavioural goals. The treating community pharmacist will use this information to finalise and implement a treatment plan in conjunction with the patient and their doctor. Community pharmacists will facilitate patient improvements in lifestyle, medicines adherence, and medicines management over the course of five counselling sessions with monthly intervals. The primary outcome will be the change to average overall cardiovascular risk, assessed using the Framingham risk equation. Discussion This study will assess the feasibility of implementing holistic primary CVD prevention

  3. Construction of a three-dimensional model of cardiovascular disease and deployment of a new method of fostering patient adherence to instruction

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Masuyo; Shirotake, Shoichi

    2013-01-01

    Background For the patient-oriented medical services, it is important to assist the patient in understanding the management of cardiovascular diseases. The strategy of medication instruction is particularly important to enhance medication adherence. Objective and methods The original model was newly constructed and covers multiple factors, including those related to renin–angiotensin, metabolism of glucose and lipids, blood coagulation, and the organic basis of the disease. The four factors of cardiovascular diseases and their relationship with the disease state are expressed in the form of a tetrahedral model. Results and discussion This disease model illustrates in points, lines, surfaces, and spaces that the factors combine with each other and result in a pathological condition, as determined by the degree of involvement of each factor in a discontinuous manner. The model helps cardiovascular patients to understand visually that there is more than one pathological condition. Our model allowed patients to quickly comprehend the complex pharmacotherapy of cardiovascular diseases by presenting the information in the form of a three-dimensional structure. Lifestyle-related diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, involve complicated factors and require careful pharmacotherapy which is tailored to individual patient needs. In this regard, the development of instructional tools is particularly effective. Conclusion The three-dimensional model shows optimum treatment by correctly considering both the quantity and quality of the four pathological factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. Appropriate patient compliance instruction based on life guidance is thought to be essential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23836964

  4. [Strategies to improve medication adherence].

    PubMed

    Laufs, U; Böhm, M; Kroemer, H K; Schüssel, K; Griese, N; Schulz, M

    2011-08-01

    Up to 50 % of patients with chronic diseases do not take their medication regularly. Poor adherence to drug therapy is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. A selective literature search using the terms adherence, compliance, concordance, persistence, medication management, and pharmaceutical care was performed. Evidence for improving adherence has been provided for the following principles: individual counselling of patients and care givers, medication management including simplifying dosing and use of combination tablets as well as the use of individual unit doses, e. g. blister cards. The effectiveness has only been shown for the duration of the interventions. The improvement of medication adherence represents an area of research with high impact on outcomes and cost. Measures to improve adherence may be as important as the development of novel therapies. However, prospective clinical evaluations with clinical endpoints are missing especially for the German health care system in order to develop recommendations for clinical practice. Joint efforts of physicians and pharmacists are needed.

  5. Adherence to Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Dietary Pattern in Relation to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Mohammad Emami; Onvani, Shokouh; Esmailzadeh, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat; Azadbakht, Leila

    2017-01-01

    This case-control study was designed to investigate the association between adherences to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in comparison to subjects without COPD. This is a case-control study. Usual dietary intake was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Lung function was evaluated with spirometry testing, and one of the researchers inquired about other respiratory symptoms, including chronic cough, sputum, and breathlessness. Adherence to the DASH dietary pattern was assessed according to the Fung method. This study was conducted at Alzahra University Hospital of Isfahan, Iran, in 2015. Eight-four patients with COPD and 80 subjects without a history of COPD participated in study. The mean age of participants was 57 years. Average smoking in the case group was about 27.5 pack-years. Spirometry tests including forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and FEV1/FVC were significantly lower in patients with COPD (p = 0.0001). Among COPD symptoms, cough was significantly decreased across tertiles of DASH score (p = 0.03). Significant differences were found for DASH score between patients with COPD and control subjects (19.82 + 3.63 vs 21.13 + 3.82, p = 0.02). Vitamin C, vitamin E, and dietary fiber intake were lower in patients with COPD (144.32 + 70.51 vs 166.97 + 71.88, p = 0.04, 7.49 + 3.91 vs 8.72 + 3.21, p = 0.02 and 19.34 + 7.05 vs 22.19 + 7.87, p = 0.01, respectively). We observed that adherence to a DASH dietary pattern among patients with COPD was significantly lower compared to the control group. Cough was significantly decreased by increments in adherence to a DASH dietary pattern.

  6. A qualitative analysis of coronary heart disease patient views of dietary adherence and web-based and mobile-based nutrition tools

    PubMed Central

    Yehle, Karen S.; Chen, Aleda M. H.; Plake, Kimberly S.; Yi, Ji Soo; Mobley, Amy R.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Dietary adherence can be challenging for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), as they may require multiple dietary changes. Choosing appropriate food items may be difficult or take extensive amounts of time without the aid of technology. The objective of this project was to (1) examine the dietary challenges faced by patients with CHD, (2) examine methods of coping with dietary challenges, (3) explore the feasibility of a web-based food decision support system, and (4) explore the feasibility of a mobile-based food decision support system. METHODS Food for the Heart (FFH), a website-based food decision support system, and Mobile Magic Lens (MML), a mobile-based system, were developed to aid in daily dietary choices. Three CHD patient focus groups were conducted and focused on CHD-associated dietary changes as well as the FFH and MML prototypes. A total of 20 CHD patients and 7 informal caregivers participated. Qualitative, content analysis was performed to find themes grounded in the responses. RESULTS Five predominant themes emerged: 1) decreasing carbohydrate intake and portion control are common dietary challenges, 2) clinician and social support makes dietary adherence easier, 3) FFH could make meal-planning and dietary adherence less complicated, 4) MML could save time and assist with healthy choices, and 5) additional features need to be added to make both tools more comprehensive. CONCLUSIONS FFH and MML may be tools that CHD patients would value in making food choices and adhering to dietary recommendations, especially if additional features are added to assist patients with changes. PMID:22760245

  7. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies to Enumerate Spirochetes and Identify Treponema denticola in Dental Plaque of Children, Adolescents and Young Adults,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    ANTIBODIES TO ENUMERATE SPIROCHETES AND IDENTIFY TREPONEMA DENTICOLA IN DENTAL PLAQUE OF CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS S. L. BARRON G. R...TREPONEMA DENTICOLA IN DENTAL PLAQUE OF CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS S. L. BARRON G. R. RIVIERE L. G. SIMONSON S. A. LUKEHART D. E. TIRA D. W...enumerate spirochetes and identify Treponema denticola o . in dental plaque of children, adolescents and young adults. ’................. Oral Microbiol

  8. MedDietScore: a computer program that evaluates the adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern and its relation to cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Milias, George A; Pitsavos, Christos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2006-07-01

    Mediterranean dietary traditions have long been associated with lower mortality rates and better health status. The Mediterranean dietary pattern has become customary to be represented in the form of a pyramid, the base of which refers to foods which are suggested to be consumed most frequently and the top of the pyramid to those foods consumed rarely. Recently, an index (diet score) that estimates the adherence level to Mediterranean diet was developed and associated with cardiovascular disease risk and biomarkers. In this work we present a computer program that can easily calculate this diet score, as well as its association with cardiovascular disease risk. The application of this software to the general public might be a useful tool for the reduction of the disease burden related with nutritional habits at population level.

  9. Spirochete and protist symbionts of a termite (Mastotermes electrodominicus) in Miocene amber.

    PubMed

    Wier, Andrew; Dolan, Michael; Grimaldi, David; Guerrero, Ricardo; Wagensberg, Jorge; Margulis, Lynn

    2002-02-05

    Extraordinary preservation in amber of the Miocene termite Mastotermes electrodominicus has led to the discovery of fossil symbiotic microbes. Spirochete bacteria and wood-digesting protists were identified in the intestinal tissue of the insect. Fossil wood (xylem: developing vessel-element cells, fibers, pit connections), protists (most likely xylophagic amitochondriates), an endospore (probably of the filamentous intestinal bacterium Arthromitus = Bacillus), and large spirochetes were seen in thin section by light and transmission electron microscopy. The intestinal microbiota of the living termite Mastotermes darwiniensis, a genus now restricted to northern Australia, markedly resembles that preserved in amber. This is a direct observation of a 20-million-year-old xylophagus termite fossil microbial community.

  10. THE RESISTANCE OF SPIROCHETES TO THE ACTION OF HEXAMETHYLENETETRAMINE DERIVATIVES AND MERCURIAL AND ARSENIC COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Akatsu, Seinai

    1917-01-01

    The majority of the 76 new compounds possessed spirocheticidal powers ranging between 1: 1,000 (30) to 1:2,500 (14), while only 2 attained the power of 1:5,000, 1 of 1: 25,000, and 2 of 1: 50,000. On the other hand, 8 killed the spirochetes in a dilution of 1: 750, 10 in 1:500, 7 in 1:250. 1 in 1: 100, and 1 in 1:50. It may be mentioned that the 2 (M1, M4) of 1:50,000 and 1 (M7) of 1:25,000 belong to the mercury compounds, and that mercuric chloride kills the organisms in a dilution of 1: 100,000 under the same experimental conditions. It is also interesting to compare some of the more common chemicals and therapeutic reagents. Phenol is spirocheticidal in a dilution of 1: 2,500, lysol in 1: 5,000, formalin in 1: 750, salvarsan in 1: 7,500, and neosalvarsan in 1: 2,500. Thus, of the new compounds there are at least 14 which have the same spirocheticidal power in vitro as has neosalvarsan. It is of interest to note that nine compounds possessing the 1:1,000 spirocheticidal power showed only one-tenth of the antiseptic action when tested upon Bacillus dysenteriæ and Streptococcus, while some showed an even greater difference in this respect. Nos. 16, 21, 29, 218, and 244 were effective in a dilution of 1:2,500 for spirochetes and in a 1:100 or lower dilution for the bacteria just referred to. Preparations 46 and 84 appear to exert about the same effect both on the spirochetes and the bacteria, neither being very strong. Atoxyl killed the spirochetes in a 1:50 dilution. One of the most striking results was obtained with various hemolytic substances. Neufeld and von Prowazek found that spirochetes, unlike bacteria in general, are highly susceptible to the lytic action of sodium taurocholate and saponin, and they considered that this phenomenon was of differential diagnostic value in determining plant and animal organisms. Their observations were confirmed by Gonder, who found, however, that spirochetes, especially treponemata, offer a great deal of resistance at the

  11. Ribotyping and whole-cell protein analysis of spirochetes isolated from arthropods in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Bunková, Leona; Svec, Pavel; Halouzka, Jirí; Rudolf, Ivo; Nemec, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    In the presented work, six Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato isolates were recovered from Ixodes ricinus ticks and one strain of spirochete with uncertain taxonomic position isolated from Culex pipiens mosquito collected in the Valtice area (South Moravia, Czech Republic), as well as representative type strains, were further characterized by ribotyping and whole-cell protein fingerprinting. The ribotype patterns obtained with HindII and EcoRV ribotype patterns showed good correlations with the recently proposed genotypes and grouped each genospecies in a well-separated cluster. The whole-cell protein profiles of genospecies were more heterogeneous than the ribotype patterns. The non-identified spirochetal strain was clearly separated from the Borrelia isolates in both methods thus proving their good capacity to characterize Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato strains.

  12. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) and spirochetes (spirochaetaceae: spirochaetales) recovered from birds on a Georgia Barrier Island.

    PubMed

    Durden, L A; Oliver, J H; Kinsey, A A

    2001-03-01

    From September 1997 through July 1999, 300 individuals and 46 species of birds were mist-netted and screened for ticks and spirochetes on St. Catherine's Island, Liberty County, GA. Seventy-six (25%) of the birds were parasitized by a meal intensity of 4.6 ticks. Seasonally, more birds were infested with ticks during the summer (50% in 1998, 34% in 1999) than in spring (15% in 1998, 11% in 1999) or fall (21% in 1997, 20% in 1998), mainly because of severe infestations on some birds by immature stages of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.), during this season. Eight species ofticks were recovered from 14 species of birds during this study: A. americanum (74 nymphs, 168 larvae); the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say (11 nymphs, 28 larvae), the Gulf Coast tick, Amblyomma maculatum Koch (two nymphs, 29 larvae); Ixodes minor Neumann (16 larvae); the rabbit tick. Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard) (one nymph, 14 larvae); the bird tick Ixodes brunneus Koch (two larvae); the American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis (Say) (one nymph); and Ixodes affinis Neumann (one larva). The Carolina wren was parasitized by more species of ticks (seven) than any other bird species, followed by the northern cardinal