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Sample records for disease symposium fukuoka

  1. IUTAM Symposium on Vortex Dynamics: Formation, Structure and Function, 10-14 March 2013, Fukuoka, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2014-06-01

    This special issue of Fluid Dynamics Research contains the first of a two-part publication of the papers presented at the IUTAM Symposium on Vortex Dynamics: Formation, Structure and Function, held at the Centennial Hall, Kyushu University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan, during the week of 10-14 March 2013. Vortices are ubiquitous structures in fluid mechanics spanning the range of scales from nanofluidics and microfluidics to geophysical and astrophysical flows. Vortices are the key to understanding many different phenomena. As a result, the subject of vortex dynamics continues to evolve and to constantly find new applications in biology, biotechnology, industrial and environmental problems. Vortices can be created by the separation of a flow from the surface of a body or at a density interface, and evolve into coherent structures. Once formed, a vortex acquires a function, depending on its individual structure. In this way, for example, insects gain lift and fish gain thrust. Surprisingly, despite the long history of vortex dynamics, only recently has knowledge about formation, structure and function of vortices been combined to yield new perspectives in the subject, thereby helping to solve outstanding problems brought about by modern advances in computer technology and improved experimental techniques. This symposium is a continuation, five years on, of the IUTAM Symposium '50 Years of Vortex Dynamics', Lyngby, Denmark that took place between 12-16 October 2008, organized by the late Professor Hassan Aref. Originally, Professor Aref was a member of the International Scientific Committee of this symposium and offered his enthusiasm and great expertise, to support its organization. To our shock, he suddenly passed away on 9 September 2011. Furthermore, Professor Slava Meleshko, a leading scientist of fluid and solid mechanics and an intimate friend of Professor Aref, was expected to make an eminent contribution to the symposium. Soon after this sad loss

  2. Impact of dietary fiber intake on glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hiroki; Iwase, Masanori; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ogata-Kaizu, Shinako; Ide, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Yohei; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Joudai, Tamaki; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2013-12-11

    Dietary fiber is beneficial for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, although it is consumed differently in ethnic foods around the world. We investigated the association between dietary fiber intake and obesity, glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 4,399 patients were assessed for dietary fiber intake using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire. The associations between dietary fiber intake and various cardiovascular risk factors were investigated cross-sectionally. Body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein negatively associated with dietary fiber intake after adjusting for age, sex, duration of diabetes, current smoking, current drinking, total energy intake, fat intake, saturated fatty acid intake, leisure-time physical activity and use of oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin. The homeostasis model assessment insulin sensitivity and HDL cholesterol positively associated with dietary fiber intake. Dietary fiber intake was associated with reduced prevalence of abdominal obesity, hypertension and metabolic syndrome after multivariate adjustments including obesity. Furthermore, dietary fiber intake was associated with lower prevalence of albuminuria, low estimated glomerular filtration rate and chronic kidney disease after multivariate adjustments including protein intake. Additional adjustments for obesity, hypertension or metabolic syndrome did not change these associations. We demonstrated that increased dietary fiber intake was associated with better glycemic control and more favorable cardiovascular disease risk factors including chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic patients should be encouraged to consume more dietary fiber in daily life.

  3. Impact of dietary fiber intake on glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary fiber is beneficial for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, although it is consumed differently in ethnic foods around the world. We investigated the association between dietary fiber intake and obesity, glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Methods A total of 4,399 patients were assessed for dietary fiber intake using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire. The associations between dietary fiber intake and various cardiovascular risk factors were investigated cross-sectionally. Results Body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein negatively associated with dietary fiber intake after adjusting for age, sex, duration of diabetes, current smoking, current drinking, total energy intake, fat intake, saturated fatty acid intake, leisure-time physical activity and use of oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin. The homeostasis model assessment insulin sensitivity and HDL cholesterol positively associated with dietary fiber intake. Dietary fiber intake was associated with reduced prevalence of abdominal obesity, hypertension and metabolic syndrome after multivariate adjustments including obesity. Furthermore, dietary fiber intake was associated with lower prevalence of albuminuria, low estimated glomerular filtration rate and chronic kidney disease after multivariate adjustments including protein intake. Additional adjustments for obesity, hypertension or metabolic syndrome did not change these associations. Conclusion We demonstrated that increased dietary fiber intake was associated with better glycemic control and more favorable cardiovascular disease risk factors including chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic patients should be encouraged to consume more dietary fiber in daily life. PMID:24330576

  4. Toxoplasmosis encephalitis following severe graft-vs.-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: 17 yr experience in Fukuoka BMT group.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yayoi; Takeishi, Shoichiro; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Nonami, Atsushi; Kikushige, Yoshikane; Kunisaki, Yuya; Kamezaki, Kenjiro; Tu, Liping; Hisaeda, Hajime; Takenaka, Katsuto; Harada, Naoki; Kamimura, Tomohiko; Ohno, Yuju; Eto, Tetsuya; Teshima, Takanori; Gondo, Hisashi; Harada, Mine; Nagafuji, Koji

    2007-10-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a rare but rapidly fatal complication that can occur following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Over a 17-yr period at our institutions, a definite diagnosis of toxoplasmosis was made in only two of 925 allogeneic HSCT recipients (0.22%) and none of 641 autologous HSCT recipients. These two patients received a conventional conditioning regimen followed by transplantation from an HLA-matched donor; however, they developed severe graft-vs.-host disease, which required intensive immunosuppressive therapy. Despite prophylactic treatment with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, their immunosuppressive state, as indicated by a low CD4(+) cell count, might have resulted in toxoplasmosis encephalitis. Rapid and non-invasive methods such as a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test of their cerebrospinal fluid for Toxoplasma gondii and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were useful for providing a definitive diagnosis and prompt therapy in these patients: one patient stabilized and survived after responding to treatment with pyrimethamine/sulfodiazine whereas the other died of bacterial infection. In addition, retrospective PCR analyses of the frozen stored peripheral blood samples disclosed that detection of T. gondii preceded the onset of disease, indicating routine PCR testing of peripheral blood specimens may be an early diagnostic tool. It should be noted that when patients receiving HSCT have an unexplained fever and/or neurological complications, PCR tests should be considered to avoid cerebral lesions and improve the outcome of the patients.

  5. Fatigue in Parkinson's disease: report from a mutidisciplinary symposium

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joseph H; Beck, James C; Chou, Kelvin L; Clark, Gracia; Fagundes, Christopher P; Goetz, Christopher G; Herlofson, Karen; Kluger, Benzi; Krupp, Lauren B; Lang, Anthony E; Lou, Jao-Shin; Marsh, Laura; Newbould, Anne; Weintraub, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is a severe problem for many people living with Parkinson's disease (PD). Best estimates suggest that more than 50% of patients experience this debilitating symptom. Little is known about its etiology or treatment, making the understanding of fatigue a true unmet need. As part of the Parkinson's Disease Foundation Community Choice Research Program, patients, caregivers, and scientists attended a symposium on fatigue on 16 and 17 October 2014. We present a summary of that meeting, reviewing what is known about the diagnosis and treatment of fatigue, its physiology, and what we might learn from multiple sclerosis (MS), depression, and cancer—disorders in which fatigue figures prominently too. We conclude with focused recommendations to enhance our understanding and treatment of this prominent problem in PD. PMID:27239558

  6. Alzheimer's disease: a report from the 7th Kuopio Alzheimer symposium.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Pikkarainen, Maria; Soininen, Hilkka

    2015-10-01

    The 7th Kuopio Alzheimer symposium was held on 11-13 June, 2015, in Kuopio, Finland and attracted ~250 attendees from 14 different countries around the world. The theme for the symposium in its seventh year was 'From mechanisms to prevention and intervention of Alzheimer's disease'. The 3-day international scientific symposium composed of seven oral sessions and a poster session. The program, spanning from molecular mechanisms to prevention, prediction, diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, provided a forum for the attendees to share their research, network and to obtain a comprehensive overview of the current status and future directions of research into Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Quality of life and disease understanding: impact of attending a patient-centered cancer symposium.

    PubMed

    Padrnos, Leslie; Dueck, Amylou C; Scherber, Robyn; Glassley, Pamela; Stigge, Rachel; Northfelt, Donald; Mikhael, Joseph; Aguirre, Annette; Bennett, Robert M; Mesa, Ruben A

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of a patient-centered symposium as an educational intervention on a broad population of cancer patients. We developed a comprehensive patient symposium. Through voluntary questionnaires, we studied the impact of this cancer symposium on quality of life, cancer-specific knowledge, and symptom management among cancer patients. Symposium attendees were provided surveys prior to and 3 months following the educational intervention. Surveys included (1) EORTC-QLQ-C30; (2) disease understanding tool developed for this conference; (3) validated disease-specific questionnaires. Changes over time were assessed using McNemar's tests and paired t-tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. A total of 158 attendees completed the pre-convention survey. Most respondents reported at least "quite a bit" of understanding regarding treatment options, screening modalities, symptomatology, and cancer-related side effects. Attendees endorsed the least understanding of disease-related stress, risk factors, fatigue management, and legal issues related to disease/treatment. At 3 months, there was improvement in understanding (12 of 14 areas of self-reported knowledge especially regarding nutrition, and stress/fatigue management). However, no significant change was seen in QLQ-C30 functioning, fatigue, pain, or insomnia. A patient symposium, as an educational intervention improves a solid knowledge base amongst attendees regarding their disease, increases knowledge in symptom management, but may be insufficient to impact QoL as a single intervention.

  8. Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in developing countries: a symposium report.

    PubMed

    Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful; Purnat, Tina Dannemann; Phuong, Nguyen Thi Anh; Mwingira, Upendo; Schacht, Karsten; Fröschl, Günter

    2014-12-11

    In recent years, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have globally shown increasing impact on health status in populations with disproportionately higher rates in developing countries. NCDs are the leading cause of mortality worldwide and a serious public health threat to developing countries. Recognizing the importance and urgency of the issue, a one-day symposium was organized on NCDs in Developing Countries by the CIHLMU Center for International Health, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich on 22nd March 2014. The objective of the symposium was to understand the current situation of different NCDs public health programs and the current trends in NCDs research and policy, promote exchange of ideas, encourage scientific debate and foster networking, partnerships and opportunities among experts from different clinical, research, and policy fields. The symposium was attended by more than seventy participants representing scientists, physicians, academics and students from several institutes in Germany and abroad. Seven key note presentations were made at the symposium by experts from Germany, UK, France, Bangladesh and Vietnam. This paper highlights the presentations and discussions during the symposium on different aspects of NCDs in developing countries. The symposium elucidated the dynamics of NCDs in developing countries and invited the participants to learn about evidence-based practices and policies for prevention and management of major NCDs and to debate the way forward.

  9. European symposium on precision medicine in allergy and airways diseases: report of the European Union parliament symposium (October 14, 2015).

    PubMed

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S; Borrelli, D; Agache, I; Bousquet, J; Costigliola, V; Joos, G; Lund, V J; Poulsen, L K; Price, D; Rolland, C; Zuberbier, T; Hellings, P W

    2015-12-01

    On 14 October 2015, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the European Rhinologic Society (ERS) and the European Medical Association (EMA) organized a symposium in the European Parliament in Brussels on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases, hosted by MEP David Borrelli and with active participation of the European Respiratory Society (ERS), the European Federations of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients Associations (EFA), the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (Ga2len), Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) and the Respiratory Effectiveness Group (REG). MEP Sirpa Pietikainen, Chair of the European Parliament Interest Group on Allergy and Asthma, underlined the importance of the need for a better diagnostic and therapeutic approach for patients with Allergies and Chronic Airways Diseases, and encouraged a joint initiative to control the epidemic of Allergy and Asthma in Europe. The socio-economic impact of allergies and chronic airways diseases cannot be underestimated, as they represent the most frequently diagnosed chronic non-communicable diseases in the EU. Despite the fact that 30% of the total European population is nowadays suffering from allergies and asthma, more than half of these patients are deprived from adequate diagnosis and treatment. Precision Medicine represents a novel approach in medicine, embracing 4 key features: personalized care based on molecular, immunologic and functional endotyping of the disease, with participation of the patient in the decision making process of therapeutic actions, and taking into account predictive and preventive aspects of the treatment. Implementation of Precision Medicine into clinical practice may help to achieve the arrest of the Epidemic of Allergies and Chronic Airways Diseases. This report summarizes the key messages delivered during the symposium by the speakers, including the EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vitenys Andriukaitis. The

  10. The 12th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium: host plant resistance and disease management, current status and future outlook

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The 12th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium was held on 6 August 2012 during the Annual meeting of the American Phytopathological Society (APS) in Providence, RI. The theme for this symposium was “Host Plant Resistance and Disease Management: Current Status and Future Outlook”. The APS Host R...

  11. European Symposium on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases: Report of the European Union Parliament Symposium (October 14, 2015).

    PubMed

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S; Borrelli, D; Agache, I; Bousquet, J; Costigliola, V; Joos, G; Lund, V J; Poulsen, L K; Price, D; Rolland, C; Zuberbier, T; Hellings, P W

    2016-05-01

    The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the European Rhinologic Society (ERS), and the European Medical Association (EMA) organized, on October 14, 2015, a symposium in the European Parliament in Brussels on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases, hosted by MEP David Borrelli, and with active participation of the EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vytenis Andriukaitis, MEP Sirpa Pietikainen, Chair of the European Parliament Interest Group on Allergy and Asthma, the European Respiratory Society (ERS), the European Federations of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients Associations (EFA), the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (Ga2len), Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA), and the Respiratory Effectiveness Group (REG). The socioeconomic impact of allergies and chronic airways diseases cannot be underestimated, as they represent the most frequently diagnosed chronic noncommunicable diseases in the EU; 30% of the total European population is suffering from allergies and asthma, and more than half are deprived from adequate diagnosis and treatment. Precision medicine represents a novel approach, embracing four key features: personalized care based on molecular, immunologic, and functional endotyping of the disease, with participation of the patient in the decision-making process of therapeutic actions, and considering predictive and preventive aspects of the treatment. Implementation of precision medicine into clinical practice may help to achieve the arrest of the epidemic of allergies and chronic airways diseases. Participants underscored the need for optimal patient care in Europe, supporting joint action plans for disease prevention, patient empowerment, and cost-effective treatment strategies.

  12. Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium V: New Frontiers in Aortic Disease and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Mohamad; Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Field, Mark; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Desmond, Michael; Harrington, Deborah; Rashid, Abbas; Oo, Aung

    2014-06-01

    Aortic aneurysm disease is a complex condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach in management. The innovation and collaboration among vascular surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, interventional radiology, and other related specialties is essential for progress in the management of aortic aneurysms. The Fifth Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium that was held in May 2013 aimed at bringing national and international experts from across the United Kingdom and the globe to deliver their thoughts, applications, and advances in aortic and vascular surgery. In this report, we present a selected short synopsis of the key topics presented at this symposium.

  13. Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium V: New Frontiers in Aortic Disease and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamad; Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Field, Mark; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Desmond, Michael; Harrington, Deborah; Rashid, Abbas; Oo, Aung

    2014-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm disease is a complex condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach in management. The innovation and collaboration among vascular surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, interventional radiology, and other related specialties is essential for progress in the management of aortic aneurysms. The Fifth Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium that was held in May 2013 aimed at bringing national and international experts from across the United Kingdom and the globe to deliver their thoughts, applications, and advances in aortic and vascular surgery. In this report, we present a selected short synopsis of the key topics presented at this symposium. PMID:26798724

  14. Highlights of the Keystone Symposium: sirtuins in metabolism, aging and disease

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Michele M; Zaldivar-Jolissaint, Julien Francisco; Mai, Antonello; Outeiro, Tiago F; Kazanstev, Aleksey G

    2012-01-01

    From February 12–16, 2012, leading members of the sirtuin scientific community assembled in Tahoe, CA to attend the Keystone Symposium “Sirtuins in Aging, Metabolism, and Disease.” It was a vibrant and lively meeting, and in the spirit of Keystone Symposia, both established sirtuin researchers and those new to the field enjoyed a unique opportunity to interact and exchange ideas. PMID:22610822

  15. Dudrick Research Symposium 2015-Lean Tissue and Protein in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Earthman, Carrie P; Wolfe, Robert R; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2017-02-01

    The 2015 Dudrick Research Symposium "Lean Tissue and Protein in Health and Disease: Key Targets and Assessment Strategies" was held on February 16, 2015, at Clinical Nutrition Week in Long Beach, California. The Dudrick Symposium honors the many pivotal and innovative contributions to the development and advancement of parenteral nutrition made by Dr Stanley J. Dudrick, physician scientist, academic leader, and a founding member of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. As the 2014 recipient of the Dudrick award, Dr Carrie Earthman chaired the symposium and was the first of 3 speakers, followed by Dr Robert Wolfe and Dr Steven Heymsfield. The symposium addressed the importance of lean tissue to health and response to disease and injury, as well as the many opportunities and challenges in its assessment at the bedside. Lean tissue assessment is beneficial to clinical care in chronic and acute care clinical settings, given the strong relationship between lean tissue and outcomes, including functional status. Currently available bioimpedance techniques, including the use of bioimpedance parameters, for lean tissue and nutrition status assessment were presented. The connection between protein requirements and lean tissue was discussed, highlighting the maintenance of lean tissue as one of the most important primary end points by which protein requirements can be estimated. The various tracer techniques to establish protein requirements were presented, emphasizing the importance of practical considerations in research protocols aimed to establish protein requirements. Ultrasound and other new and emerging technologies that may be used for lean tissue assessment were discussed, and areas for future research were highlighted.

  16. Report of the TFOS/ARVO Symposium on global treatments for dry eye disease: an unmet need.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, David A; Hammitt, Katherine M; Schaumberg, Debra A; Sullivan, Benjamin D; Begley, Carolyn G; Gjorstrup, Per; Garrigue, Jean-Sébastien; Nakamura, Masatsugu; Quentric, Yann; Barabino, Stefano; Dalton, Michelle; Novack, Gary D

    2012-04-01

    In September 2010, a Symposium in Florence, Italy, was held to address the unmet need for global treatments for dry eye disease (DED). It was sponsored by The Tear Film & Ocular Surface Society (TFOS; www.TearFilm.org) and co-sponsored by the Association for Research in Vision & Ophthalmology (www.arvo.org). The Symposium objectives were two-fold: first, to discuss accepted and emerging clinical endpoints of DED with regulatory experts from around the world; and second, to consider how to improve clinical trials of treatments for DED. The Symposium focused on the personal and collective burden of DED, as well as the developmental and regulatory challenges associated with generating new DED therapeutics. This article provides a synopsis of many of the presentations, discussions and recommendations of this Symposium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. First Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM) Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Musselwhite, Laura W.; Maciag, Karolina; Lankowski, Alex; Gretes, Michael C.; Wellems, Thomas E.; Tavera, Gloria; Goulding, Rebecca E.; Guillen, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Universities Allied for Essential Medicines organized its first Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium to address expanding roles of public sector research institutions in innovation in research and development of biomedical technologies for treatment of diseases, particularly neglected tropical diseases. Universities and other public research institutions are increasingly integrated into the pharmaceutical innovation system. Academic entities now routinely undertake robust high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry research programs to identify lead compounds for small molecule drugs and novel drug targets. Furthermore, product development partnerships are emerging between academic institutions, non-profit entities, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to create diagnostics, therapies, and vaccines for diseases of the poor. With not for profit mission statements, open access publishing standards, open source platforms for data sharing and collaboration, and a shift in focus to more translational research, universities and other public research institutions are well-placed to accelerate development of medical technologies, particularly for neglected tropical diseases. PMID:22232453

  18. First Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM) Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium.

    PubMed

    Musselwhite, Laura W; Maciag, Karolina; Lankowski, Alex; Gretes, Michael C; Wellems, Thomas E; Tavera, Gloria; Goulding, Rebecca E; Guillen, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Universities Allied for Essential Medicines organized its first Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium to address expanding roles of public sector research institutions in innovation in research and development of biomedical technologies for treatment of diseases, particularly neglected tropical diseases. Universities and other public research institutions are increasingly integrated into the pharmaceutical innovation system. Academic entities now routinely undertake robust high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry research programs to identify lead compounds for small molecule drugs and novel drug targets. Furthermore, product development partnerships are emerging between academic institutions, non-profit entities, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to create diagnostics, therapies, and vaccines for diseases of the poor. With not for profit mission statements, open access publishing standards, open source platforms for data sharing and collaboration, and a shift in focus to more translational research, universities and other public research institutions are well-placed to accelerate development of medical technologies, particularly for neglected tropical diseases.

  19. Molecular approaches to human polygenic disease - Symposium 130

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This volume deals with the application of recombinant DNA techniques to the identification of diseases that have more than one inherited component. Focus is on the polygenic factors responsible for coronary atherosclerosis. Several other disorders having a polygenic orgin are also discussed, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, psychiatric diseases, and autoimmune (HLA-related) disorders. Problems raised by the study of different families or different populations are covered, as well as the possibility of applying molecular techniques to disease prevention-for example, through gene therapy. Also explored are some of the ethical issues that relate to human gene mapping.

  20. South Asia symposium on pneumococcal disease and the promise of vaccines – Meeting report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Arora, Narendra; Santosham, Mathuram

    2016-01-01

    Despite the licensure of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in the US and other Western countries for over 14 years, as of September 2014 only 4 South Asian countries were using PCV in their universal immunization program. To generate momentum toward addressing this issue a “South Asia symposium on pneumococcal disease and the promise of vaccines” was organized just prior to the 9th international symposium on pneumococci and pneumococcal diseases held in India recently. Leading scientists, program managers, and decision makers including ministry officials from the region participated in the meeting. The participants discussed available data on pneumococcal disease burden in South Asia, surveillance methods, efficacy and safety of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV), the status of PCV introduction, programmatic challenges in introducing PCV and available data on the impact of PCV in South Asia and globally. There was a strong consensus that available data on disease burden and the global experience with PCV justified the introduction PCV in all Asian countries in order to accelerate the gains in child survival in the region. PMID:27026150

  1. Reeducation for Design Engineers in Fukuoka System LSI College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Kazuyuki; Sasao, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Akira; Ito, Fumiaki

    Silicon Sea Belt Project started in 2001 on keeping context of East Asian economic growth. Fukuoka System LSI College, a subsidiary of the project, opened on December for supplying reeducated design engineers to the semiconductor industries after trying System LSI design training programs in cooperation with industry, academia, and government. The college approaches the PDCA, i.e., Plan, Do, Check, and Action, techniques making up quality control methodologies in manufacturing, and has applied the PDCA techniques to improving qualities of the training programs. The major semiconductor companies have adopted our programs for eight years from 2004, and given our programs excellent scores. We hope our PDCA process, useful for human resource development of other technological fields.

  2. Personalized Comments on Challenges and Opportunities in Kidney Disease Therapeutics: The Glom-NExT Symposium.

    PubMed

    Greka, Anna; Gibson, Deb; Mundel, Peter; Demetri, George; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Pollak, Martin; Florez, Jose

    2016-11-01

    In the face of ever-increasing incidence and prevalence of kidney disease worldwide, the unmet need for new treatments is unprecedented. Precision medicine is defined as the use of modern technologies to identify mechanisms of diseases in individual patients, and thus deploy treatment using tailored, targeted approaches, in the hopes of avoiding unnecessary toxicities and complications. Is there a place for kidney disease therapeutics in this space? If so, what is required to make significant progress toward precision nephrology? To answer these critical questions, we present a series of personalized comments corresponding to the responses offered to these very questions during the Inaugural Glom-NExT Symposium held at Harvard Medical School on October 23, 2014, a national meeting focused exclusively on kidney disease therapeutics. Copyright © 2016.

  3. Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation (AA&MDSIF): Bone Marrow Failure Disease Scientific Symposium 2014.

    PubMed

    Visconte, Valeria; Lindsley, R Coleman; Berlyne, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) are characterized by a failure of the hematopoietic stem cells to produce adequate blood cells, resulting in either cytopenia (defect in one or more blood cell lineages) or pancytopenia (defect in all blood cell lineages). BMFS can be inherited or acquired. The pathogenesis of these diseases is very heterogeneous. Research efforts have been made all over the world to improve the basic knowledge of these diseases. The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation (AA&MDSIF) is an independent nonprofit organization whose mission is to help patients and family members cope with BMFS. Here, we summarize novel scientific discoveries in several BMFS that were presented at the 4th International Bone Marrow Failure Disease Scientific Symposium 2014 that AA&MDSIF sponsored on March 27-28, 2014, in Rockville, MD.

  4. Proceedings of the symposium on research and management of annosus root disease (Heterobasidion annosum) in western North America; April 18-21, 1989; Monterey, CA.

    Treesearch

    William J. Otrosina; Robert F. Scharpf

    1989-01-01

    The proceedings is a collection of papers presented at the Symposium on Research and Management of Annosus Root Disease (Heterobasidion annosum) in Western North America held in Monterey, California, April 18-21, 1989. As the first symposium dealing with this subject in the western United States, the papers presented address current research and...

  5. Proceedings of the 2016 Santa Fe Bone Symposium: New Concepts in the Management of Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Bilezikian, John P; Bukata, Susan V; Camacho, Pauline; Clarke, Bart L; McClung, Michael R; Miller, Paul D; Shepherd, John

    The Santa Fe Bone Symposium is an annual meeting of healthcare professionals and clinical researchers that details the clinical relevance of advances in knowledge of skeletal diseases. The 17th Santa Fe Bone Symposium was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, on August 5-6, 2016. The program included plenary lectures, oral presentations by endocrinology fellows, meet-the-professor sessions, and panel discussions, all aimed to provide ample opportunity for interactive discussions among all participants. Symposium topics included recent developments in the translation of basic bone science to patient care, new clinical practice guidelines for postmenopausal osteoporosis, management of patients with disorders of phosphate metabolism, new and emerging treatments for rare bone diseases, strategies to enhance fracture healing, and an update on Bone Health Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes, using a teleconferencing platform to elevate the level of knowledge of healthcare professionals in underserved communities to deliver best practice care for skeletal diseases. The highlights and important clinical messages of the 2016 Santa Fe Bone Symposium are provided herein by each of the faculty presenters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Key outcomes from stakeholder workshops at a symposium to inform the development of an Australian national plan for rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Molster, Caron; Youngs, Leanne; Hammond, Emma; Dawkins, Hugh

    2012-08-10

    Calls have been made for governments to adopt a cohesive approach to rare diseases through the development of national plans. At present, Australia does not have a national plan for rare diseases. To progress such a plan an inaugural Australian Rare Diseases Symposium was held in Western Australia in April 2011. This paper describes the key issues identified by symposium attendees for the development of a national plan, compares these to the content of EUROPLAN and national plans elsewhere and discusses how the outcomes might be integrated for national planning. The symposium was comprised of a series of plenary sessions followed by workshops. The topics covered were; 1) Development of national plans for rare diseases; 2) Patient empowerment; 3) Patient care, support and management; 4) Research and translation; 5) Networks, partnerships and collaboration. All stakeholders within the rare diseases community were invited to participate, including: people affected by rare diseases such as patients, carers, and families; clinicians and allied health practitioners; social and disability services; researchers; patient support groups; industry (e.g. pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies); regulators and policy-makers. All of these stakeholder groups were represented at the symposium. Workshop participants indicated the need for a national plan, a national peak body, a standard definition of 'rare diseases', education campaigns, lobbying of government, research infrastructure, streamlined whole-of-lifetime service provision, case co-ordination, early diagnosis, support for health professionals and dedicated funding. These findings are consistent with frameworks and initiatives being undertaken internationally (such as EUROPLAN), and with national plans in other countries. This implies that the development of an Australian national plan could plausibly draw on frameworks for plan development that have been proposed for use in other jurisdictions. The

  7. Proceedings of the 2015 Santa Fe Bone Symposium: Clinical Applications of Scientific Advances in Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Disease.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Baron, Roland; Bilezikian, John P; Gagel, Robert E; Leonard, Mary B; Leslie, William D; McClung, Michael R; Miller, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 Santa Fe Bone Symposium was a venue for healthcare professionals and clinical researchers to present and discuss the clinical relevance of recent advances in the science of skeletal disorders, with a focus on osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease. Symposium topics included new developments in the translation of basic bone science to improved patient care, osteoporosis treatment duration, pediatric bone disease, update of fracture risk assessment, cancer treatment-related bone loss, fracture liaison services, a review of the most significant studies of the past year, and the use of telementoring with Bone Health Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes, a force multiplier to improve the care of osteoporosis in underserved communities. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Proceedings from the CIH(LMU) 5th Infectious Diseases Symposium 2016 "Drug Resistant Tuberculosis: Old Disease - New Challenge".

    PubMed

    Khosa, Celso; Patel, Krutarth; Abdiyeva, Karlygash; Turebekov, Nurkeldi; Prüller, Bettina; Heinrich, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    The 5th CIH(LMU) Infectious Disease Symposium, Munich, Germany, March 12, 2016 brought together Tuberculosis Experts from developed and low middle-income countries to discuss the control of drug resistance Tuberculosis. The meeting featured 9 presentations: Tuberculosis history and current scenario, Tuberculosis and migration - current scenario in Germany, Mechanism of Tuberculosis resistance development, Epidemiology of resistance - transmission vs. new generation of resistance, The impact of diagnostic in patients beyond - sensitivity and specificity, The Bangladesh regimen - new hope trough old drugs, New drugs and regimens - an overview on studies and Multi and Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis from Europe. The presentations were followed by a panel discussion. Serious Multidrug Resistance epidemic in some countries may jeopardize the progress in Tuberculosis control. In this meeting epidemiology, mechanism, immigration and screening, diagnosis, research and treatment of drug resistant tuberculosis were discussed.

  9. Clinical study of childhood acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, multiple sclerosis, and acute transverse myelitis in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Torisu, Hiroyuki; Kira, Ryutaro; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Yamaguchi, Yui; Yasumoto, Sawa; Murakami, Yoshihiko; Shimono, Masayuki; Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Masuzaki, Mayumi; Amamoto, Masano; Kondo, Rikako; Uozumi, Tomohiko; Aibe, Miyuki; Gondo, Kenjiro; Hanai, Toshio; Hirose, Sinichi; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Shirahata, Akira; Mitsudome, Akihisa; Hara, Toshiro

    2010-06-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) has recently been studied in several countries owing to the development and wide spread use of imaging technology, but few epidemiological studies of childhood ADEM have been undertaken in Asian countries. To perform a comprehensive survey of ADEM and related diseases in Japanese children, we conducted a multicenter, population-based study on childhood ADEM, multiple sclerosis, and acute isolated transverse myelitis in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. We identified 26 children with ADEM, 8 with multiple sclerosis, and 4 with acute transverse myelitis during 5 years between September 1998 and August 2003. The incidence of childhood ADEM under the age of 15 years was 0.64 per 100,000 person-years, mean age at onset was 5.7 years, and male-female ratio was 2.3:1. The prevalence of childhood multiple sclerosis was 1.3 per 100,000 persons. The mean age at onset of multiple sclerosis, 9.3 years, was significantly higher than that of ADEM. Nineteen (73%) and four (15%) patients with ADEM experienced antecedent infectious illnesses and vaccinations, respectively, within 1 month before the onset. Clinical and radiological findings of ADEM revealed that the frequency of seizures, mean white blood cell counts in cerebrospinal fluid, and the frequency of subcortical lesions in Fukuoka study, seemed to be higher than those in previous non-Asian studies. These findings suggest that there are ethnic or geographical differences in the incidence and clinical features of ADEM, and that there might be potent genetic or environmental risk factors for ADEM distinct from those for multiple sclerosis.

  10. Relation between structure and low-temperature geothermal systems in Fukuoka city, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saibi, H.; Nishijima, J.; Hirano, T.; Fujimitsu, Y.; Ehara, S.

    2008-08-01

    The Fukuoka area is located in the southwestern part of Japan. The Yokote-Ijiri area, located in the southern part of Fukuoka city, has several low-temperature geothermal systems, including eleven hot springs. From 1996 to 2008, the Fukuoka area was investigated by gravity survey, using Scintrex CG-3 and CG-3M gravimeters, in an attempt to delineate its subsurface structure. The surveys were intended to improve the understanding of the relation between the geothermal systems and the subsurface structure as well as to locate the active faults in the surveyed area, which are responsible for generating large earthquakes. The gravity data were analyzed using integrated gradient interpretation techniques, such as the Horizontal Gradient (HG), Tilt Derivative (TDR), and Euler deconvolution methods. With these techniques, many faults were detected, including the famous Kego fault, which is an active fault in Fukuoka city. A 2-D gravity model was constructed to show the relationship between the faults and the geothermal systems. The results of the present study will hopefully lead to an understanding of the relationships between the interpreted faults and the location of the low-temperature geothermal systems and possibly aid in future geothermal exploration of the area.

  11. Mechanisms and management of fatigue in health and disease: symposium introduction.

    PubMed

    Green, Howard J

    2004-06-01

    Exercise intolerance is a condition commonly experienced by both the healthy and those with disease. Yet we have only a limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms and, consequently, the management of this condition. In this Symposium, a major objective was to address the role of the muscle cell in weakness and fatigue. We have focused on addressing the advances made in characterizing the basis of muscle cell contractility with particular respect to the processes and proteins involved in excitation and contraction, and how these processes can be modified during repetitive activity. Three reviews are provided on this subject. Each addresses a specific link in the cascade of events from neural activation of the muscle to the generation of force. In the first review the processes involved in signal transduction in the sarcolemma and T-tubule, and which regulate membrane excitability, are examined. The second review analyzes the sarcoplasmic reticulum regulation of the intracellular messenger that controls the myofibrillar complex, namely free calcium. The final review in this series deals with the events regulating actin-myosin behaviour and the mechanical response. All reviews place special emphasis on how different sites can be modified by repetitive activity and, as a consequence, how they can represent a potential source of fatigue. Since it is important to understand the nature, manifestations, and measurement of weakness and fatigue, a comprehensive review on these topics is also provided.

  12. New insights into the impact of the intestinal microbiota on health and disease: a symposium report.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Linda V; Ockhuizen, Theo

    2012-01-01

    The present report summarises key insights from a recent symposium focusing on the impact of the intestinal microbiota on health and disease. A more appropriate definition of health was proposed since health maintenance is a dynamic process better assessed in terms of ability to adapt to stress and maintain physiological homeostasis. Biomarkers specifically for health are needed; use of challenge models and subjects with suboptimal health or specific disease risk were advised. The complexity of interactions between external factors, the intestinal epithelium, intestinal microbiota, the immune system and health was exemplified by describing the effects of antibiotics, the Western diet and non-digestible carbohydrates on the microbiota. The association of certain bacteria with different states of health or disease was acknowledged but also that is not always clear whether this is a cause or effect. Recent identification of three robust faecal metagenome clusters may advance this understanding. It was speculated that knowledge of the intestinal microbiota profile may eventually help in the diagnosis of health risks and choice of therapy. It was agreed that beneficial manipulation of the commensal microbiota can improve health outcome. For this purpose, three areas were reviewed. Firstly, research into probiotics as vaccine adjuvants was considered useful for substantiation of immune function claims. Secondly, positive results with certain probiotics and synbiotics for colorectal cancer are emerging, mostly from in vitro and animal studies. Finally, studies in endurance athletes have shown strain-specific probiotic benefit in terms of maintenance of immune function and, for certain strains, reduction of episodes of respiratory and/or gastrointestinal tract infections.

  13. Utility of the 2006 Sendai and 2012 Fukuoka guidelines for the management of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chih-Yang; Yang, Ching-Yao; Wu, Jin-Ming; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Tien, Yu-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the utility of the 2006 Sendai and 2012 Fukuoka guidelines for differentiating malignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas from benign IPMN. Between January 2000 and March 2015, a total of 138 patients underwent surgery and had a pathologically confirmed pancreatic IPMN. Clinicopathological parameters were reviewed, and all patients were classified according to both the 2006 Sendai and 2012 Fukuoka guidelines. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used for identifying significant factors associated with malignancy in IPMN. There were 9 high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and 37 invasive cancers (ICs) in the 138 patients. The positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the Sendai and Fukuoka guidelines for HGD/IC was 35.1%, 43.3%, 100%, and 85.4%, respectively. Of the 36 patients with worrisome features using the Fukuoka guideline, 7 patients had HGD/IC in their IPMNs. According to the multivariate analysis, jaundice, tumors of ≥3 cm, presence of mural nodule on imaging, and aged <65 years were associated with HGD/IC in patients with IPMN. The Sendai guideline had a better NPV, but the Fukuoka guideline had a better PPV. We suggest that patients with worrisome features based on the Fukuoka guideline be aggressively managed. PMID:27661043

  14. Disease Management Partnerships: Creating Health Solutions. Proceedings from a special symposium of the 4th annual Canadian Therapeutics Congress, May 27, 2007, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    A symposium at the fourth annual Canadian Therapeutics Congress in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on May 27, 2007, discussed the ability of multistakeholder partnerships to create new and better ways to manage chronic disease; particularly, to achieve cost efficiency and better health outcomes for the ever-increasing number of patients dealing with chronic disease. The presentations included the experiences of three innovative programs under way in Nova Scotia, Alberta and Ontario, as well as the viewpoints of representatives from both the pharmaceutical industry and government. The symposium revealed that innovative partnerships are providing some encouraging signs of progress in this vital area.

  15. Spatiotemporal inhomogeneity in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) over Fukuoka observed by Car MAX-DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Maruyama, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) observations have been made using car Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) in Fukuoka, an urban area in Japan, to clarify the spatiotemporal inhomogeneity in NO2. We developed instruments for Car MAX-DOAS, and NO2 measurements were conducted on 15 August 2015 and 30 November 2015 on the Fukuoka Urban Expressway, along the closed circular route. For both days, in the morning, the maxima were observed around the city center (in the northeast part of the circular route), whereas in the afternoon, the maxima were observed in the south/southeast part of the circular route (to the south/southeast of the city center). Analysis of the surface wind field indicates that NO2 inhomogeneity is strongly related to the inhomogeneity of NOx sources and to horizontal transport of high concentrations from the city center and low concentrations from the ocean via a land-sea breeze.

  16. Evaluation of AGA and Fukuoka Guidelines for EUS and surgical resection of incidental pancreatic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alexander; Kadiyala, Vivek; Lee, Linda S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Management of asymptomatic pancreatic cysts is challenging. Guidelines by the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) and International Association of Pancreatology (Fukuoka) seek to identify high-risk patients. We assessed performance of these guidelines in selecting patients for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and/or surgery. Methods PART I – We retrospectively studied 143 asymptomatic cysts with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) followed by EUS. Appropriate selection for EUS was defined as: malignant cytology or surgical pathology, or development of concerning features on MRI as defined by the guidelines. PART II – We retrospectively studied 152 resected cysts to assess the performance of guidelines in selecting cysts for surgery using malignant histology as the outcome. Results PART I – Of 143 EUS, 43 (30.1 %) were male with median age 65.0 years (interquartile range [IQR] 58.0 – 73.0). AGA guideline demonstrated lower sensitivity (17.6 % versus 35.3 %, P = 0.03), higher specificity (94.5 % versus 66.1 %, p < 0.001), and higher accuracy (76.2 % versus 58.7 %, P = 0.002) than Fukuoka. There was no difference in positive predictive value (50.0 % versus 24.5 %, P = 0.15) and negative predictive value (78.6 % versus 76.6 %, p=0.75). PART II – Of 152 resected cysts, 45 (29.8 %) were male with median age 59.0 years (IQR 47.3 – 66.7). There was no difference in performance characteristics of the guidelines in selecting cysts for surgery. AGA and Fukuoka guidelines missed 25.0 % and 18.8 % of malignant cysts, respectively (P = 1.00). Conclusions For referral to EUS, the AGA guideline was highly specific compared to Fukuoka; both suffered from poor sensitivity, although the Fukuoka guideline was relatively more sensitive than AGA. For referral to surgery, both guidelines have modest sensitivity and specificity and miss a similar percentage of malignant lesions. PMID:28210708

  17. Autoimmune liver diseases in the Asia-Pacific region: Proceedings of APASL symposium on AIH and PBC 2016.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Ma, Xiong; Yokosuka, Osamu; Weltman, Martin; You, Hong; Amarapurkar, Deepak N; Kim, Yoon Jun; Abbas, Zaigham; Payawal, Diana A; Chang, Ming-Ling; Efe, Cumali; Ozaslan, Ersan; Abe, Masanori; Mitchell-Thain, Robert; Zeniya, Mikio; Han, Kwang Hyub; Vierling, John M; Takikawa, Hajime

    2016-11-01

    During the 25th annual meeting of the Asia-Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver (APASL 2016) in Tokyo, we organized and moderated an inaugural satellite symposium on the autoimmune liver diseases, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cholangitis (PBC). Following the keynote lecture by John M. Vierling (USA), speakers from the Asia-Pacific region provided an up-to-date perspective on the epidemiology, clinical practice and research in AIH and PBC in the Asia-Pacific region. Although epidemiology and clinical features of AIH seem to be similar in East Asia compared to those in western countries, the majority of patients with AIH are detected at an advanced stage and have higher mortality rates in South Asia, indicating an unmet need for earlier diagnosis and the initiation of appropriate immunosuppressive treatment. PBC is more commonly seen in Australia and East Asia. As of 2016, clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for PBC have been published in Japan and China. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is recommended as a first-line therapy by both CPG. Nevertheless, one of the unmet therapeutic needs in PBC is the treatment of patients refractory to or intolerant of UDCA. It is of interest that the prevalence of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in PBC patients was low in Taiwan and mainland China where the prevalence of CHB is very high. In this review, we overview this exciting and epoch-making symposium.

  18. A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Uses the framework of a symposium to present an imagined discussion by historical figures about whether and how knowledge might be acquired. Discussants include Democritus, Protagoras, Heraclitus, Socrates, Jesus, Gorgias, Nietzsche, Buddha, and Kierkegaard. (Contains 40 endnotes.) (SK)

  19. A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Uses the framework of a symposium to present an imagined discussion by historical figures about whether and how knowledge might be acquired. Discussants include Democritus, Protagoras, Heraclitus, Socrates, Jesus, Gorgias, Nietzsche, Buddha, and Kierkegaard. (Contains 40 endnotes.) (SK)

  20. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    U.S. Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX) addresses the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  1. Dynamics of Fukuoka Criteria and Patient Management in Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms (IPMNs) During Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Schellhaas, Barbara; Vitali, Francesco; Wildner, Dane; Görtz, Rüdiger S.; Pfeifer, Lukas; Konturek, Peter C.; Neurath, Markus F.; Strobel, Deike

    2017-01-01

    Background Pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) present a clinical challenge. Evidence-based guidelines are lacking. The so-called “Fukuoka criteria” were developed to assess the risk of malignancy in IPMNs upon imaging. However, little is known about their diagnostic value and the natural course of IPMNs. Thus, the aim of this study was the assessment of Fukuoka criteria and patient management in pancreatic IPMNs during follow-up. Material/Methods IPMNs were identified via retrospective survey of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) examinations. Fukuoka criteria were assessed on EUS findings and additional imaging (CT, MRI, ultrasound). Patients’ symptoms and comorbidities were recorded. Dynamics of Fukuoka criteria and patient management were compared at first presentation and during follow-up. Results We screened 1324 EUS examinations. Sixty-five patients (male/female, 14/37; mean age, 68.8 years; range, 48–85 years) with IPMNs were identified (57 branch duct (BD-)IPMNs, 3 main duct (MD-) IPMNs, 5 mixed-type (MT)-IPMNs). Seven patients received surgical resection (4 BD-IPMNs, 2 MD-IPMNs, 1 MT-IPMN). Nine BD-IPMNs had neither surgery nor follow-up. Fifty-one patients (44 BD-IPMNs, 2 MD-IPMNs, 5 MT-IPMNs) underwent follow-up (mean duration, 18.7 months; range, 3–139 months). There were 15/51 patients who were initially Fukuoka-positive. One MD-IPMN, 4/5 MT-IPMNs, and 13/44 BD-IPMNs showed progressive changes but were not resected due to patients’ refusal or comorbidities. Four BD-IPMNs converted to Fukuoka-positive. Conclusions Evidence-based guidelines for non-invasive dignity assessment of IPMNs are lacking. In our study, MD-IPMNs displayed greater dynamics than BD-IPMNs and MT-IPMNs concerning Fukuoka criteria. Prospective long-term studies are needed to clarify prognostic significance of the single Fukuoka criteria and sensible duration of follow-up. PMID:28348359

  2. Atherosclerosis is an old disease: Summary of the Ruffer Centenary Symposium, The Paleocardiology of Ancient Egypt, a meeting report of the Horus Study team.

    PubMed

    Finch, Caleb E

    2011-11-01

    A symposium in January 2011 "The Paleocardiology of Ancient Egypt" reviewed old and new evidence for the presence of advanced atherosclerotic lesions in ancient Egyptian mummies. This symposium was dedicated as a Centenary for the pioneering report of Marc Ruffer in 1911 (Ruffer, 1911). Based on CT scans, the Horus Study team concluded that atherosclerosis was present in the ancient Egyptian elites and is not a disease new to the 20th Century. Presentations included radiological data on vasculature, skeleton, and teeth, indicating degenerative diseases and poor health before age 50 in these specimens. Comparisons were made with the Bolivian Tsimane, a 20th Century population living without access to modern medicine with short life expectancy. Further research is needed to develop an epidemiological context for estimating population level prevalence of vascular disease and its risk factors in ancient Egyptian societies.

  3. Spatial epidemiology in zoonotic parasitic diseases: insights gained at the 1st International Symposium on Geospatial Health in Lijiang, China, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Lv, Shan; Yang, Guo-Jing; Kristensen, Thomas K; Bergquist, N Robert; Utzinger, Jürg; Malone, John B

    2009-01-01

    The 1st International Symposium on Geospatial Health was convened in Lijiang, Yunnan province, People's Republic of China from 8 to 9 September, 2007. The objective was to review progress made with the application of spatial techniques on zoonotic parasitic diseases, particularly in Southeast Asia. The symposium featured 71 presentations covering soil-transmitted and water-borne helminth infections, as well as arthropod-borne diseases such as leishmaniasis, malaria and lymphatic filariasis. The work made public at this occasion is briefly summarized here to highlight the advances made and to put forth research priorities in this area. Approaches such as geographical information systems (GIS), global positioning systems (GPS) and remote sensing (RS), including spatial statistics, web-based GIS and map visualization of field investigations, figured prominently in the presentation. PMID:19193214

  4. Influenza newspaper reports and the influenza epidemic: an observational study in Fukuoka City, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Shougo; Abe, Takeru

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined whether the weekly number of newspaper articles reporting on influenza was related to the incidence of influenza in a large city. Design Prospective, non-randomised, observational study. Setting Registry data of influenza cases in Fukuoka City, Japan. Participants A total of 83 613 cases of influenza cases that occurred between October 1999 and March 2007 in Fukuoka City, Japan. Main outcome measure A linear model with autoregressive time series errors was fitted to time series data on the incidence of influenza and the accumulated number of influenza-related newspaper articles with different time lags in Fukuoka City, Japan. In order to obtain further evidence that the number of newspaper articles a week with specific time lags is related to the incidence of influenza, Granger causality was also tested. Results Of the 16 models including ‘number of newspaper articles’ with different time lags between 2 and 17 weeks (xt-2 to t-17), the β coefficients of ‘number of newspaper articles’ at time lags between t-5 and t-13 were significant. However, the β coefficients of ‘number of newspaper articles’ that are significant with respect to the Granger causality tests (p<0.05) were the weekly number of newspaper articles at time lags between t-6 and t-10 (time shift of 10 weeks, β=−0.301, p<0.01; time shift of 9 weeks, β=−0.200, p<0.01; time shift of 8 weeks, β=−0.156, p<0.01; time shift of 7 weeks, β=−0.122, p<0.05; time shift of 6 weeks, β=−0.113, p<0.05). Conclusions We found that the number of newspaper articles reporting on influenza in a week was related to the incidence of influenza 6–10 weeks after media coverage in a large city in Japan. PMID:26719323

  5. Influenza newspaper reports and the influenza epidemic: an observational study in Fukuoka City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Shougo; Abe, Takeru

    2015-12-30

    We examined whether the weekly number of newspaper articles reporting on influenza was related to the incidence of influenza in a large city. Prospective, non-randomised, observational study. Registry data of influenza cases in Fukuoka City, Japan. A total of 83,613 cases of influenza cases that occurred between October 1999 and March 2007 in Fukuoka City, Japan. A linear model with autoregressive time series errors was fitted to time series data on the incidence of influenza and the accumulated number of influenza-related newspaper articles with different time lags in Fukuoka City, Japan. In order to obtain further evidence that the number of newspaper articles a week with specific time lags is related to the incidence of influenza, Granger causality was also tested. Of the 16 models including 'number of newspaper articles' with different time lags between 2 and 17 weeks (xt-2 to t-17), the β coefficients of 'number of newspaper articles' at time lags between t-5 and t-13 were significant. However, the β coefficients of 'number of newspaper articles' that are significant with respect to the Granger causality tests (p<0.05) were the weekly number of newspaper articles at time lags between t-6 and t-10 (time shift of 10 weeks, β=-0.301, p<0.01; time shift of 9 weeks, β=-0.200, p<0.01; time shift of 8 weeks, β=-0.156, p<0.01; time shift of 7 weeks, β=-0.122, p<0.05; time shift of 6 weeks, β=-0.113, p<0.05). We found that the number of newspaper articles reporting on influenza in a week was related to the incidence of influenza 6-10 weeks after media coverage in a large city in Japan. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Symposium: Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, Chris M.; Perelman, Les; Poe, Mya; Sommers, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article presents four symposium papers on assessment. It includes: (1) "Closed Systems and Standardized Writing Tests" (Chris M. Anson); (2) "Information Illiteracy and Mass Market Writing Assessments" (Les Perelman); (3) "Genre, Testing, and the Constructed Realities of Student Achievement" (Mya Poe); and (4)…

  7. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Carl Wieman, Associate Director, Office of Science and Technology Policy, The White House, speaks at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  8. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Christine Keller, right, Director of Research, APLU (Association of Public and Land-grant Universities) presents STEM initiative report findings at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  9. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Woodrow Whitlow, NASA Associate Administrator, Mission Support Directorate, gives opening remarks at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  10. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Christine Keller, Director of Research, APLU (Association of Public and Land-grant Universities) presents STEM initiative report findings at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  11. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    J. Keith Motley, Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Boston, and Chair, APLU (Association of Public and Land-grant Universities) Commission on Access, Diversity and Excellence, speaks at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  12. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Leland Melvin, Associate Administrator, Office of Education and former astronaut, gives opening remarks at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  13. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Lorenzo L. Esters, Vice President, APLU (Association of Public and Land-grant Universities), and Project Director, MMSI (Minority Male STEM Initiative) addresses STEM initiative report findings at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  14. Relation of occupations to the regional differences of lung cancer motality in Fukuoka Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, T; Yamasaki, M

    1977-07-01

    Geographic pattern of lung cancer mortality in Fukuoka Prefecture showed elevated mortalities among males in the Chikuho district where many coal-mines had long been operated as one of the biggest coal-mining areas in Japan. The analysis in relations of occupations to lung cancer mortality revealed that consistently significant correlations exist between lung cancer mortality, and mining and quarrying occupations in every census year after World War II. No other occupations showed consistent relations to lung cancer though a few significant correlations were found only in the recent years. The results appear to suggest that elevated risk of lung cancer among coal-mining workers may exist and deserve further analytical study.

  15. Gene and cytokine profile analysis of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in Fukuoka, Japan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent epidemiologic data suggest that the prevalence of macrolide resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MR-M. pneumoniae) is increasing rapidly worldwide. This study assessed the present status of M. pneumoniae infection in Japan and clinical end-points to distinguish children with MR-M. pneumoniae. Methods During an outbreak of M. pneumoniae infections in Fukuoka, Japan in 2010–11, a total of 105 children with clinically suspected M. pneumoniae infection were enrolled. M. pneumoniae was analyzed for macrolide resistance in domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. Sixty -five patients with PCR positive for M. pneumoniae were analyzed with regard to clinical symptoms, efficacy of several antimicrobial agents and several laboratory data. Results Causative pathogens were detected in 81.0% (85 of 105) and M. pneumoniae was identified 61.9% (65 of 105). The resistance rate of M. pneumoniae was 89.2% (58 of 65) in this general pediatric outpatient setting. Patients infected with MR-M. pneumoniae showed longer times to resolution of fever and required frequent changes of the initially prescribed macrolide to another antimicrobial agent. We observed three different genotypes of M. pneumoniae including the rarely reported A2063T mutation (A2063G: 31 strains, A2063T: 27 strains, no mutation: 7 strains). Drug susceptibility testing showed different antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for each genotype. Serum IFN-gamma, IL-6 and IP-10 levels were higher in patients with MR-genotypes than in those infected with no-mutation strains (p < 0.001). Conclusions Macrolide resistance is more common than previously thought and a small epidemic of rarely reported A2063T mutation was observed in Fukuoka, Japan. Furthermore our results reveal the possibility that levels of certain inflammatory cytokines may be a candidate to predict MR-M.pneumoniae infection. PMID:24330612

  16. Sudden oak death online symposium

    Treesearch

    S.D. Cohen; J., eds Juzwik

    2003-01-01

    This symposium is being made available to all who have an interest in the recent appearance of Sudden Oak Death, a plant disease with the potential to severely impact nursery growers, shippers, the lumber and wood products industry, landscapers, government programs and others. Scientific presentations dealing with the current status of the disease and ongoing research...

  17. Wakayama symposium: interface between innate and adaptive immunity in dry eye disease.

    PubMed

    Na, Kyung-Sun; Hwang, Kyu-Yeon; Lee, Hyun-Soo; Chung, So-Hyang; Mok, Jee Won; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2015-12-17

    Although the mechanism of dry eye disease is not clearly understood, it is certain that inflammation and the immune response play a major role in determining the health of the ocular surface in dry eye patients. Accurate ocular surface characterization during the early stages of dry eye disease is critical for successful treatment, because there exists no single standard, objective test to diagnose the early phase of dry eye disease. The treatment target should be direct to prevent the perpetuation of chronic inflammation and immune responses. Numerous studies have categorized dry eye disease as an autoimmune-related inflammatory disease. However, relatively little is known about how innate immune mechanisms act following a local insult, why some patients are particularly vulnerable, and why local inflammation fails to resolve in these patients. Within this review, particular attention will be given to the very early events and corresponding defense mechanism in dry eye disease. The transition from innate to adaptive immunity will also be discussed.

  18. Atmospheric radionuclides transported to Fukuoka, Japan remote from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power complex following the nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Momoshima, N; Sugihara, S; Ichikawa, R; Yokoyama, H

    2012-09-01

    Radionuclides were detected from the Fukushima nuclear accident at Fukuoka, Japan, 1000 km west of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power complex. Iodine-131 was first detected 3 d after the accident, indicating that it was probably transported dispersively because of local meteorological conditions, and not global air circulation. The maximum concentrations, 5.07 mBq m(-3) for (131)I, 4.04 mBq m(-3) for (134)Cs, and 4.12 mBq m(-3) for (137)Cs, were recorded in particles collected on April 6, 2011. However, these concentration levels decreased below the detection limit by April 26, 2011. Gaseous (131)I accounted for 30%-67% of the total (131)I content. The increase in dose by inhalation was negligible at Fukuoka. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Need for occupational and environmental allergology in occupational health - the 45th Japanese society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy Annual Meeting 2014 in Fukuoka].

    PubMed

    Kishikawa, Reiko; Oshikawa, Chie

    2014-12-01

    The 45th Japanese Society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy (OEA) Annual Meeting 2014 was held in Fukuoka city in conjunction with a technical course for occupational health physicians to learn occupational and environmental diseases more deeply. Allergic reaction due to low concentrations of chemical and biological materials is important in toxicological diseases due to highly concentrated chemical materials in the field of occupational and environmental medicine. In this paper we describe the activities of the OEA, which was established in 1970 and has completely cured patients with severe occupational asthma, such as the regional Konjac asthma in Gunma prefecture and Sea Squirt asthma in Hiroshima prefecture. Regard for the occupational environment will prevent the onset and/or exacerbation of allergic occupational disease in individual employees with allergy. Occupational cancer of the bile duct and asbestosis are also current, serious issues that should be resolved as soon as possible. It is desirable for the occupational health physician to have a large stock of knowledge about toxicological and allergic diseases in various occupational settings to maintain the health and safety of workers.

  20. Role of S-adenosylmethionine, folate, and betaine in the treatment of alcoholic liver disease: summary of a symposium.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Vishnudutt; Abdelmalek, Manal F; Barve, Shirish; Benevenga, Norlin J; Halsted, Charles H; Kaplowitz, Neil; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Liu, Qi-Ying; Lu, Shelly C; McClain, Craig J; Swanson, Christine; Zakhari, Samir

    2007-07-01

    This report is a summary of a symposium on the role of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), betaine, and folate in the treatment of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), which was organized by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in collaboration with the Office of Dietary Supplements and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine of the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD) and held on 3 October 2005. SAM supplementation may attenuate ALD by decreasing oxidative stress through the up-regulation of glutathione synthesis, reducing inflammation via the down-regulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and the up-regulation of interleukin-10 synthesis, increasing the ratio of SAM to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and inhibiting the apoptosis of normal hepatocytes and stimulating the apoptosis of liver cancer cells. Folate deficiency may accelerate or promote ALD by increasing hepatic homocysteine and SAH concentrations; decreasing hepatic SAM and glutathione concentrations and the SAM-SAH ratio; increasing cytochrome P4502E1 activation and lipid peroxidation; up-regulating endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, including sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1, and proapoptotic gene caspase-12; and decreasing global DNA methylation. Betaine may attenuate ALD by increasing the synthesis of SAM and, eventually, glutathione, decreasing the hepatic concentrations of homocysteine and SAH, and increasing the SAM-SAH ratio, which can trigger a cascade of events that lead to the activation of phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase, increased phosphatidylcholine synthesis, and formation of VLDL for the export of triacylglycerol from the liver to the circulation. Additionally, decreased concentrations of homocysteine can down-regulate endoplasmic reticulum stress, which leads to the attenuation of apoptosis and fatty acid synthesis.

  1. Trinations aging symposium.

    PubMed

    Kaeberlein, Matt; Kennedy, Brian K; Liu, Xinguang; Suh, Yousin; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2011-01-01

    The "Trinations Aging Symposium" was held on the campus of Guangdong Medical College in Dongguan, China from April 28 to 30, 2011. The goal was to promote interaction, collaboration, and exchange of ideas between scientists in the field of aging research from Japan, South Korea, and China. Aging research is on the rise in Asia. This represents an important development, since Korea and Japan are the two longest-lived countries in the world, and life expectancy is increasing rapidly in China and other Asian countries. The world will see a greater percentage of people over age 65 in coming years than any period in human history. Developing therapeutic approaches to increase healthspan has the potential not only to enhance quality of life, but would also help stem the looming economic crisis associated with a high percentage of elderly. The focus of the Trinations Aging Symposium was on the basic biology of aging, and topics discussed included genome maintenance, metabolism and aging, longevity genes and interventions, and new therapies for age-related diseases. The meeting finished with a commitment for another symposium next year that will include additional Asian countries and the formation of a new scientific organization, the Asian Association for Aging Research.

  2. Stroke in Children With Cardiac Disease: Report From the International Pediatric Stroke Study Group Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Adriane J.; Fox, Christine K.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Almond, Christopher S.; Bernard, Timothy J.; Beslow, Lauren A.; Chan, Anthony K.C.; Cheung, Michael; deVeber, Gabrielle; Dowling, Michael M.; Friedman, Neil; Giglia, Therese M.; Guilliams, Kristin P.; Humpl, Tilman; Licht, Daniel J.; Mackay, Mark T.; Jordan, Lori C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac disease is a leading cause of stroke in children, yet limited data support the current stroke prevention and treatment recommendations. A multidisciplinary panel of clinicians was convened in February 2014 by the International Pediatric Stroke Study group to identify knowledge gaps and prioritize clinical research efforts for children with cardiac disease and stroke. RESULTS Significant knowledge gaps exist, including a lack of data on stroke incidence, predictors, primary and secondary stroke prevention, hyperacute treatment, and outcome in children with cardiac disease. Commonly used diagnostic techniques including brain computed tomography and ultrasound have low rates of stroke detection, and diagnosis is frequently delayed. The challenges of research studies in this population include epidemiologic barriers to research such as small patient numbers, heterogeneity of cardiac disease, and coexistence of multiple risk factors. Based on stroke burden and study feasibility, studies involving mechanical circulatory support, single ventricle patients, early stroke detection strategies, and understanding secondary stroke risk factors and prevention are the highest research priorities over the next 5-10 years. The development of large-scale multicenter and multispecialty collaborative research is a critical next step. The designation of centers of expertise will assist in clinical care and research. CONCLUSIONS There is an urgent need for additional research to improve the quality of evidence in guideline recommendations for cardiogenic stroke in children. Although significant barriers to clinical research exist, multicenter and multispecialty collaboration is an important step toward advancing clinical care and research for children with cardiac disease and stroke. PMID:25532775

  3. Highlights from the 2014 International Symposium on HIV & Emerging Infectious Diseases (ISHEID): from cART management to the end of the HIV pandemic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 International Symposium on HIV and Emerging Infectious Diseases (ISHEID) provided a forum for investigators to hear the latest research developments in the clinical management of HIV and HCV infections as well as HIV cure research. Combined anti-retroviral therapy (c-ART) has had a profound impact on the disease prognosis and transformed this infection into a chronic disease. However, HIV is able to persist within the infected host and the pandemic is still growing. The main 2014 ISHEID theme was, hence “Together for a world without HIV and AIDS”. In this report we not only give details on this main topic but also summarize what has been discussed in the areas of HCV coinfection and present a short summary on currently emerging viral diseases. PMID:25165483

  4. Fisher symposium: strategies for the prevention of Alzheimer disease--overview of research planning meeting III.

    PubMed

    Radebaugh, T S; Buckholtz, N S; Khachaturian, Z S

    1996-01-01

    Even though the prospect for preventing Alzheimer disease seems remote now, a plan must be developed to reach this goal in order to avoid a fiscal crisis in the health care system. The goals of delaying Alzheimer disease and eventually preventing it will become possible as more is learned about the brain mechanisms and risk factors involved. In response to a 1994 Congressional report, the National Institute on Aging in cooperation with the Zachary and Elizabeth M. Fisher Medical Foundation sponsored a workshop to address potential strategies for the prevention of Alzheimer disease. The workshop helped to identify the necessary resources and the types of technical problems involved in developing methods to prevent Alzheimer disease. This volume presents the position papers which served as the springboard for the discussions at the workshop, out of which developed a number of specific recommendations including new epidemiological studies for well defined population groups, identification of high risk populations for treatment and prevention studies, and coupling of new questions and add-on investigations to in-progress studies.

  5. Salmonella in Liquid Eggs and Other Foods in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Koichi; Noda, Tamie; Sera, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of Salmonella in retail and wholesale foods in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. A total of 2,021 samples collected between 1999 and 2010 were tested using a culture method. Samples consisted of liquid eggs (n = 30), meat (beef and pork) (n = 781), offal (n = 69), processed meats (n = 2), seafood (n = 232), processed seafood (dried fish) (n = 76), vegetables (n = 481), processed vegetables (n = 87), fruits (n = 167), and herbs (n = 96) from 574 outlets and wholesale agents in 15 areas (five samples were undocumented regarding outlets). Overall, liquid egg showed significantly (P < 0.001) higher frequencies of Salmonella contamination (13.3%) than beef (1/423, 0.2%) and pork (3/235, 1.3%). Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis, the most common serovar as a human pathogen, were isolated from two liquid egg samples. No Salmonella were isolated from seafood and vegetable-related samples including seed sprouts (n = 261). In conclusion, liquid egg is a significant Salmonella vehicle, showing a need to continue the vaccination of chickens to prevent S. Enteritidis contamination in Japanese eggs. Moreover, further study is needed to evaluate Salmonella contamination in seed sprouts with more sampling from retailers there. PMID:24288539

  6. Salmonella in liquid eggs and other foods in fukuoka prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Koichi; Noda, Tamie; Onozuka, Daisuke; Sera, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of Salmonella in retail and wholesale foods in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. A total of 2,021 samples collected between 1999 and 2010 were tested using a culture method. Samples consisted of liquid eggs (n = 30), meat (beef and pork) (n = 781), offal (n = 69), processed meats (n = 2), seafood (n = 232), processed seafood (dried fish) (n = 76), vegetables (n = 481), processed vegetables (n = 87), fruits (n = 167), and herbs (n = 96) from 574 outlets and wholesale agents in 15 areas (five samples were undocumented regarding outlets). Overall, liquid egg showed significantly (P < 0.001) higher frequencies of Salmonella contamination (13.3%) than beef (1/423, 0.2%) and pork (3/235, 1.3%). Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis, the most common serovar as a human pathogen, were isolated from two liquid egg samples. No Salmonella were isolated from seafood and vegetable-related samples including seed sprouts (n = 261). In conclusion, liquid egg is a significant Salmonella vehicle, showing a need to continue the vaccination of chickens to prevent S. Enteritidis contamination in Japanese eggs. Moreover, further study is needed to evaluate Salmonella contamination in seed sprouts with more sampling from retailers there.

  7. Lidar observations of the El Chichon cloud in the stratosphere over Fukuoka

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujiwara, M.; Shibata, T.; Hirono, M.

    1985-01-01

    A volcanic cloud in the stratosphere, originating from the March to April 1982 eruptions of El Chichon, has been observed for about 2.5 years at Fukuoka (33.5 degrees N, 130.4 degrees E) with two wavelengths of Nd-YAG lidar, 1.06 and 0.53 microns. Time and height variabilities of the cloud are described, using the 1.06 microns data, and some results of the two-wavelength measurements are presented. A sudden enormous increase in the total aerosol backscattering from the stratosphere (backscattering coefficient for 1.06 microns integrated over 13.5 to 28.5 km range) was followed by a decrease from late spring to summer with large fluctuations. The cloud initially appeared stratified into two layers: the upper one with fine structure and sharp edges in the easterly wind region and the lower dumpy one in the westerly wind region. Most of the aerosols were contained in the upper layer. The two layers merged into a broad, single-peaked layer as the easterly prevailed in the whole region in fall, when the total aerosol backscattering began to increase. The layer then decreased its peak height as it broadened. The difference in shape of both layers and the increase of total backscattering from fall can be interpreted by the difference in velocity of material transport in the easterly and the westerly wind region.

  8. Proceedings from the Scientific Symposium: Sex Differences in Cardiovascular Disease and Implications for Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Saralyn; Boyan, Barbara D.; Jacobs, Alice K.; Shah, Prediman K.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Taylor, Doris; Marbán, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A consortium of investigator-thought leaders was convened at the Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and produced the following summary points: Point 1: Important sex differences exist in cardiovascular disease (CVD) that affect disease initiation, diagnosis, and treatment.Implication: Research that acknowledges these differences is needed to optimize outcomes in women and men.Point 2: Atherosclerosis is qualitatively and quantitatively different in women and men; women demonstrate more plaque erosion and more diffuse plaque with less focal artery lumen intrusion.Implication: Evaluation of CVD strategies that include devices should be used to explore differing anatomical shapes and surfaces as well as differing drug coating and eluting strategies.Point 3: Bone marrow progenitor cells (PCs) engraft differently based on the sex of the donor cell and the sex of the recipient.Implication: PC therapeutic studies need to consider the sex of cells of the source and the recipient.Point 4: Women have a greater risk of venous but not arterial thrombosis compared with men, as well as more bleeding complications related to anticoagulant treatment. Several genes coding for proteins involved in hemostasis are regulated by sex hormones.Implications: Research should be aimed at evaluation of sex-based differences in response to anticoagulation based on genotype.Point 5: Women and men can have differences in pharmacological response.Implication: Sex-specific pharmacogenomic studies should be included in pharmacological development.Point 6: CVD progression results from an imbalance of cell injury and repair in part due to insufficient PC repair, which is affected by sex differences, where females have higher circulating levels of PCs with greater rates of tissue repair.Implication: CVD regenerative strategies should be directed at learning to deliver cells that shift the recipient balance from injury toward repair. CVD repair strategies should ideally be tested

  9. Triennial Growth Symposium: neural regulation of feed intake: modification by hormones, fasting, and disease.

    PubMed

    Sartin, J L; Whitlock, B K; Daniel, J A

    2011-07-01

    Appetite is a complex process that results from the integration of multiple signals at the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus receives neural signals; hormonal signals such as leptin, cholecystokinin, and ghrelin; and nutrient signals such as glucose, FFA, AA, and VFA. This effect is processed by a specific sequence of neurotransmitters beginning with the arcuate nucleus and orexigenic cells containing neuropeptide Y or agouti-related protein and anorexigenic cells containing proopiomelanocortin (yielding the neurotransmitter α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone) or cells expressing cocaine amphetamine-related transcript. These so-called first-order neurons act on second-order orexigenic neurons (containing either melanin-concentrating hormone or orexin) or act on anorexigenic neurons (e.g., expressing corticotropin-releasing hormone) to alter feed intake. In addition, satiety signals from the liver and gastrointestinal tract signal through the vagus nerve to the nucleus tractus solitarius to cause meal termination, and in combination with the hypothalamus, integrate the various signals to determine the feeding response. The activities of these neuronal pathways are also influenced by numerous factors such as nutrients, fasting, and disease to modify appetite and hence affect growth and reproduction. This review will begin with the central nervous system pathways and then discuss the ways in which hormones and metabolites may alter the process to affect feed intake with emphasis on farm animals.

  10. Investigation of Heavy Thunderstorm With Tornadoes In Fukuoka, Japan, On June 29, 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakimizu, K.; Nishiyama, K.

    During a rainy season (BAIU) in Japan, many thunderstorms occur frequently and widely along a BAIU front, where maintains its strength and becomes stationary with repeating a slight movement along a latitude direction in the Japan Island according to a dynamical equilibrium between the 'warm' Pacific high pressure system and the 'cold' northern latitude high pressure system. Heavy thunderstorms in this season oc- cur as follows. Since abundant warm and humid air supplied continuously for a long term into the BAIU front under the influence of the Pacific high pressure contributes to the generation and maintenance of the strong atmospheric instability. Consequently, heavy thunderstorms occur frequently along the BAIU front and cause serious dis- asters involving intense flood due to heavy precipitation, dangerous tornadoes, wind gusts with a downburst which occasionally contains hailstones, etc. On June 29, 1999, heavy precipitation occurred in the Northern Kyushu, located in the western edge of Japan and was observed by the meteorological radar equipped in Kyushu University, which has the detective extent of 100 km by 100 km in the Northern Kyushu. As a result, Rainfall amounts of more than 70 mm/h were recorded at some observational points including AMeDAS, which represents the Automated Meteorological Data Ac- quisition System, in Fukuoka urban area and brought urban flood damage including inundation due to internal runoff. Furthermore, this heavy storm caused strong wind gusts and two weak tornadoes, which were confirmed through the investigation of de- stroyed houses and trees, in the southern area of Fukuoka as well as heavy precipita- tion over the Northern Kyushu. In this research, some features of PPI images detected by Kyushu University radar on this day were investigated using meteorological data from the observational networks in Japan. Consequently, some notable features as- sociated closely with serious disasters including tornadoes and wind gust and

  11. The Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center’s Symposium on Mild Cognitive Impairment. Cognitive Training in Older Adults: Lessons from the ACTIVE Study

    PubMed Central

    Unverzagt, Frederick W.; Smith, David M.; Rebok, George W.; Marsiske, Michael; Morris, John N.; Jones, Richard; Willis, Sherry L.; Ball, Karlene; King, Jonathan W.; Koepke, Kathy Mann; Stoddard, Anne; Tennstedt, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is based on a presentation made during the Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center’s Symposium on Mild Cognitive Impairment on April 19, 2008. The results of the ACTIVE study (Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly) were presented at the symposium including review of previously published study findings. The ACTIVE study is a multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial that has been examining the long-term effectiveness of cognitive training on enhancing mental abilities (memory, reasoning, and attention) and preserving activities of daily living (managing finances, taking medication, using the telephone, and driving) in older adults. Six centers across the eastern United States enrolled nearly 3000 people initially. Participants underwent detailed assessments of mental and functional ability on multiple occasions over several years of follow-up. ACTIVE has shown positive effects of cognitive training at 5 years post-intervention for basic mental abilities, health-related quality of life, and improved ability to perform instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). A subgroup analysis through 2 years of follow-up suggested that subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) did not benefit from memory training; however, they did benefit, to the same degree as cognitively normal participants, from training in reasoning and speed of processing. This finding suggests that MCI may interfere with a person’s ability to benefit from some forms of cognitive enhancement. Limitations of ACTIVE and directions for future research are reviewed. PMID:19689237

  12. Soy food and isoflavone intake and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Budhathoki, Sanjeev; Joshi, Amit Man; Ohnaka, Keizo; Yin, Guang; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Mibu, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2011-02-01

    It has been suggested that soy food and isoflavone intake may be protective against the risk of colorectal cancer. However, epidemiologic evidence remains sparse and inconsistent. We addressed this issue in the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study. The study subjects were the 816 incident cases of histologically confirmed colorectal cancer and 815 community controls. Intakes of soy foods and isoflavones were assessed by in-person interview using a computer-assisted dietary method. Logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of colorectal cancer with adjustment for dietary intakes of calcium and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as for body mass index, physical activity, alcohol use, and other lifestyle factors. Energy-adjusted intakes of soy foods (dry weight) and isoflavones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk in men and postmenopausal women, but not in premenopausal women. The multivariate-adjusted OR for the highest versus lowest quintile was 0.65 (95% CI 0.41-1.03, p for trend = 0.03) for soy foods and 0.68 (95% CI 0.42-1.10, p for trend = 0.051) for isoflavones in men. The corresponding values for postmenopausal women were 0.60 (95% CI 0.29-1.25, p for trend = 0.053) and 0.68 (95% CI 0.33-1.40, p for trend = 0.049). The site-specific analysis showed inverse associations of soy foods (p for trend = 0.007) and isoflavones (p for trend = 0.02) with rectal cancer in men. The findings add to epidemiologic evidence for protective effects of soy foods and isoflavones in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  13. Factors related to starting and continuing smoking among senior high school boys in Fukuoka, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Mio; Washio, Masakazu; Kiyohara, Chikako

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence starting and quitting smoking among Japanese male adolescents aged 15-18. Two thousand and twelve senior high school boys in Fukuoka City, Japan, answered unsigned self-administrated anonymous questionnaires in July 2001. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were computed to assess the strength of associations between students' smoking status and alcohol consumption habits. Additionally, the link between a students' smoking status and parental influence (parental smoking) was also assessed. Approximately 90% of the students, both current and ex-smokers, had ever smoked prior to senior high school while 77% of the students (smokers and non-smokers) had the experience of drinking alcohol prior to admission to senior high school. After adjustment for school year (i.e., freshman, sophomore, junior, senior), academic education level, after-school club activities, time of first drinking experience and the frequency of drinking, there was a significant increased risk to become a smoker when one parent was a smoker (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.18-2.37) or when both parents were smokers (OR = 2.94, 95% CI = 1.66-5.18) compared to both parents being non-smokers. The consumption of alcohol prior to entering senior high school was significantly associated with more than 2.5-fold greater risk for the onset of smoking when compared to the risk of becoming a smoker when alcohol consumption started after entering senior high school. An increased frequency of drinking was also associated with starting smoking (OR =14.00, 95% CI = 8.08-24.26; 2-3 times/week vs. never). Similarly, an increase in drinking frequency resulted in less likelihood of smoking cessation. For instance, the data showed that, the subjects were 1/3 less likely to quit smoking. Paternal smoking had a significant impact on whether or not a child would quit smoking (OR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.38-0.81) as compared to a child that had

  14. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Recent Trends from the Fukuoka Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Matsuo, Ryu; Hata, Jun; Kuroda, Junya; Ago, Tetsuro; Sugimori, Hiroshi; Inoue, Tooru; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a potentially serious complication of acute stroke, but its incidence appears to be decreasing. The aim of this study was to elucidate the etiology of GI bleeding and its impact on clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke in recent years. Methods Using the database of the Fukuoka Stroke Registry, 6,529 patients with acute ischemic stroke registered between June 2007 and December 2012 were included in this study. We recorded clinical data including any previous history of peptic ulcer, prestroke drug history including the use of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, steroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and poststroke treatment with suppressing gastric acidity. GI bleeding was defined as any episode of hematemesis or melena on admission or during hospitalization. The cause and origin of bleeding were diagnosed endoscopically. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for GI bleeding and its influence on deteriorating neurologic function, death, and poor outcome. Results GI bleeding occurred in 89 patients (1.4%) under the condition that 66% of the total patients received acid-suppressing agents after admission. Multivariate analysis revealed that GI bleeding was associated with the absence of dyslipidemia (p = 0.03), a previous history of peptic ulcer (p < 0.001), and the severity of baseline neurologic deficit (p = 0.002) but not with antiplatelet drugs, anticoagulants, and NSAIDs. The source was the upper GI tract in 51% of the cases; causes included peptic ulceration (28%) and malignancies (12%), and other or unidentified causes accounted for 60%. GI bleeding mostly occurred within 1 week after stroke onset. Hemoglobin concentration fell by a median value of 2.5 g/dl in patients with GI bleeding. Among them, 28 patients underwent blood transfusion (31.5%). After adjustment for confounding factors, GI bleeding was independently associated with neurologic

  15. Translational medicine as a new clinical tool and application which improves metabolic diseases: perspectives from 2012 Sino-American symposium on clinical and translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lin; López Villar, Elena; Chen, Chengshui

    2014-02-10

    Because of the economic growth and changes in lifestyle, metabolic diseases have become a major public health problem, which impose heavy economic burdens on individuals, families and health systems. However, its precise mediators and mechanisms remain to be fully understood. Clinical translational medicine (CTM) is an emerging area comprising multidisciplinary research from basic science to medical applications and as a new tool to improve human health by reducing disease incidence, morbidity and mortality. It can bridge knowledge of metabolic diseases processes, gained by in vitro and experimental animal models, with the disease pathways found in humans, further to identify their susceptibility genes and enable patients to achieve personalized medicament treatment. Thus, we have the reasons to believe that CTM will play even more roles in the development of new diagnostics, therapies, healthcare, and policies and the Sino-American Symposium on Clinical and Translational Medicine (SAS-CTM) will become a more and more important platform for exchanging ideas on clinical and translational research and entails a close collaboration among hospital, academia and industry.

  16. Fukuoka-1 strain of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy agent infects murine bone marrow-derived cells with features of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cervenakova, Larisa; Akimov, Sergey; Vasilyeva, Irina; Yakovleva, Oksana; McKenzie, Carroll; Cervenak, Juraj; Piccardo, Pedro; Asher, David M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The possible risk of iatrogenic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, prion diseases) from transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is uncertain. While most cell lines resist infection, a few propagate TSE agents. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS We generated MSC-like (MSC-L) cell cultures from bone marrow (BM) of mice inoculated with the human-derived Fukuoka-1 (Fu) strain of TSE agent. Cultured cells were characterized for various markers and cellular prion protein (PrPC) by FACS and for PrPC and its pathologic TSE-associated form (PrPTSE) by Western blotting (WB). Cell cultures were tested for their susceptibility to infection with Fu in vitro. Infectivity of one Fu-infected cell culture was assayed in mice. RESULTS BM cells from Fu-infected mice expressed neither PrPC nor PrPTSE after three days in culture as demonstrated by WB. Cells adherent to plastic and maintained under two different culture conditions became spontaneously immortalized and began to express PrPC at about the same time. One culture became transformed shortly after exposure to Fu in vitro and remained persistently infected, continuously generating PrPTSE through multiple passages; infectivity of cultured cells was confirmed by intracerebral inoculation of lysates into mice. Both persistently TSE-infected and uninfected cells expressed a number of typical MSC markers. CONCLUSION BM-derived MSC-L cells of mice became persistently infected with the Fu agent under certain conditions in culture—conditions that differ substantially from those currently used to develop investigational human stem cell therapies. PMID:21303371

  17. Dietary polyphenols and colorectal cancer risk: The Fukuoka colorectal cancer study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen-Jie; Ohnaka, Keizo; Morita, Makiko; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the associations between dietary intake of polyphenols and colorectal cancer. METHODS: The study subjects were derived from the Fukuoka colorectal cancer study, a community-based case-control study. The study subjects were 816 cases of colorectal cancer and 815 community-based controls. The consumption of 148 food items was assessed by a computer-assisted interview. We used the consumption of 97 food items to estimate dietary intakes of total, tea and coffee polyphenols. The Phenol-Explorer database was used for 92 food items. Of the 5 foods which were not listed in the Phenol-Explorer Database, polyphenol contents of 3 foods (sweet potatoes, satoimo and daikon) were based on a Japanese study and 2 foods (soybeans and fried potatoes) were estimated by ORAC-based polyphenol contents in the United States Department of Agriculture Database. Odds ratios (OR) and 95%CI of colorectal cancer risk according to quintile categories of intake were obtained by using logistic regression models with adjustment for age, sex, residential area, parental history of colorectal cancer, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index 10 years before, type of job, leisure-time physical activity and dietary intakes of calcium and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. RESULTS: There was no measurable difference in total or tea polyphenol intake between cases and controls, but intake of coffee polyphenols was lower in cases than in controls. The multivariate-adjusted OR of colorectal cancer according to quintile categories of coffee polyphenols (from the first to top quintile) were 1.00 (referent), 0.81 (95%CI: 0.60-1.10), 0.65 (95%CI: 0.47-0.89), 0.65 (95%CI: 0.46-0.89) and 0.82 (95%CI: 0.60-1.10), respectively (Ptrend = 0.07). Similar, but less pronounced, decreases in the OR were also noted for the third and fourth quintiles of total polyphenol intake. Tea polyphenols and non-coffee polyphenols showed no association with colorectal cancer risk. The site-specific analysis

  18. Ninth international symposium on radiopharmacology

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this Symposium is to provide a forum for those international scientists involved in applying the principles of pharmacology and radiation biology to the development of agents for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The program will highlight state-of-the-art progress in the development of those agents used in conjunction with some form of radiation such as radiopharmaceuticals, radiopaques, photo- and radiosensitizing drugs, and neutron capture agents. An underlying pharmacokinetic parameter associated with all these agents is the need for site-specific delivery to an organ or tumor. Therefore, a major goal of the symposium will be to address those pharmacologic principles for targeting molecules to specific tissue sites. Accordingly, session themes will include receptor-mediated processes, membrane transporters, antibody interactions, metabolic trapping, and oligonucleotide-antisense mechanisms.

  19. First symposium of ichthyosis experts.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martín, A; Torrelo-Fernández, A; de Lucas-Laguna, R; Casco, F; González-Sarmiento, R; Vega, A; Pedreira-Massa, J L; de Unamuno-Pérez, P; Larcher, F; Arroyo, I; Traupe, H

    2013-12-01

    On June 22, 2012 the First Symposium of Ichthyosis Experts in Spain was held at the Hospital Niño de Jesús in Madrid. It was a one-day symposium for dermatologists, pediatricians, and physicians-in-training interested in this disease, as well as for other health care professionals involved in the care of patients with ichthyosis. The aim of the meeting was to try to structure the care of ichthyosis patients in Spain. As happens in other rare diseases, because of the low prevalence of ichthyosis and the absence of designated referral centers, the number of patients treated in each center is very low and few dermatologists have any real clinical experience with this condition or know how to order diagnostic genetic tests. This article summarizes the presentations given at the symposium and is intended as a reference for anyone interested in the subject. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  20. Interpretation of Gravity and Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Data in Low Temperature Hydrothermal Systems, Southeastern Part of Fukuoka, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, Jun; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro

    2016-12-01

    The Hakata hot springs area is located in Fukuoka City, which is in the southwestern part of Japan. Gamma-ray and gravity surveys were conducted to understand the relationship between the low-temperature hydrothermal systems and geophysical data of the area. The depth of the reservoir basement, which was derived from gravity data, gradually deepens toward the east; it includes some steep depth gradients in the Hakata hot springs area. High intensities of gamma-rays were detected around these gradients. In addition, higher hot spring temperatures and flow rates can be observed in this area. These results indicate that some part of the level of the basement where the hot springs are concentrated is a part of the Kego Fault and is similar to the fracture zone created by past activities of the fault. Moreover, these steep depth gradients act as a path for hot spring water from the deeper side of the granitic body to the surface.

  1. Proceedings of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases International Symposium on Epidemiologic Issues in Urinary Incontinence in Women.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeanette S; Nyberg, Leroy M; Kusek, John W; Burgio, Kathryn L; Diokno, Ananias C; Foldspang, Anders; Fultz, Nancy H; Herzog, A Regula; Hunskaar, Steinar; Milsom, Ian; Nygaard, Ingrid; Subak, Leslee L; Thom, David H

    2003-06-01

    The Epidemiologic Issues in Urinary Incontinence: Current Databases and Future Collaborations Symposium included an international group of 29 investigators from 10 countries. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the current understanding and knowledge gaps of prevalence, incidence, associated risk factors, and treatment outcomes for incontinence in women. During the symposium, investigators identified existing large databases and ongoing studies that provide substantive information on specific incontinence research questions. The investigators were able to form an international collaborative research working group and identify potential collaborative projects to further research on the epidemiology of urinary incontinence and bladder dysfunction.

  2. Oak Symposium Proceedings

    Treesearch

    Northeastern Forest Experiment Station

    1971-01-01

    As "tall oaks from little acorns grow", the germ of an idea blossomed into this symposium on the five upland oaks. Called simply the "Oak Symposium", that's what it's all about - a meeting to bring together a summation of the advances made on the silviculture, management, and utilization of the upland oaks. Part of this process is the...

  3. Flight Mechanics Symposium 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, Donna M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium. This symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  4. Impact of SAMMPRIS on the future of intracranial atherosclerotic disease management: polling results from the ICAD symposium at the International Stroke Conference.

    PubMed

    Zaidat, Osama O; Castonguay, Alicia C; Nguyen, Thanh N; Becker, Kyra J; Derdeyn, Colin P; Nelson, Peter K; Amarenco, Pierre; Brott, Thomas G

    2014-04-01

    There are few data regarding the effect of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial results on the management of intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD). We sought to understand the impact of the SAMMPRIS trial on current ICAD clinical practices and future trial design. During the ICAD symposium at the 2012 International Stroke Conference, electronic data were collected regarding attendees' clinical management of ICAD and opinions on the feasibility of future trials post-SAMMPRIS. 217 attendees from different specialties, including neurologists (57%), neurointerventionalists (9%) and neurosurgeons (5%), participated in the session. The majority of respondents (77%) indicated that the results of SAMMPRIS have impacted their consideration for intracranial stenting. Post-SAMMPRIS, 84% selected 'SAMMPRIS-style' medical management for the treatment of ICAD. For patients with ICAD who failed aggressive medical therapy, 82% would consider an alternative approach to continuing medical therapy (30% considered clinical trial enrollment, 28% suggested angioplasty and stenting and 24% angioplasty). The majority of participants (85%) were willing to randomize patients with symptomatic ICAD in future trials. For the next ICAD trial, 29% indicated that angioplasty alone should be compared with aggressive medical therapy. Our polling results suggest that the SAMMPRIS trial has had an impact on the current treatment of ICAD. Treatment of patients who failed medical therapy varied widely from aggressive medical therapy to balloon angioplasty, stenting or enrollment in future clinical trials. The willingness to continue clinical trials and randomize patients supports the need for future ICAD studies.

  5. Symposium on 'The challenge of translating nutrition research into public health nutrition'. Session 3: Joint Nutrition Society and Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute Symposium on 'Nutrition and autoimmune disease'. Nutrition in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Maria

    2009-05-01

    The exact aetiology of Crohn's disease remains unknown. The consensus is that the disease results from a complex interaction between genes, immunity and environmental factors. Diet is attractive, in theory, as an environmental risk factor in the aetiology of the disease. The epidemiological data, often impeded by methodological issues, have failed to confirm a direct link between pre-diet illness and the development of Crohn's disease. Once diagnosed, however, nutrition has an important role in disease management. Among the nutritional issues are malnutrition, weight loss and suboptimal nutritional status; these outcomes may be present at any stage of the disease but are likely to be overt during acute illness and hospitalisation. Malnutrition has been identified in approximately 40% of hospital admissions with Crohn's disease and is associated with higher mortality, longer hospital stays and higher healthcare costs. Patients in remission may indeed be overweight and appear to be influenced by the general population trends toward overweight and obesity. Irrespective of BMI, patients are at risk of micronutrient deficiencies. Vitamin D deficiency, for example, is common in Crohn's disease and has important implications for bone health. Moreover, newer evidence suggests that vitamin D has potential anti-inflammatory effects. Dietary approaches, in the form of enteral nutrition, have previously been shown to reduce inflammation and treat the active disease. Current guidelines now recommend that corticosteroids are more effective than enteral nutrition for treating adults. Enteral nutrition has important growth and developmental benefits and continues to be a recommended therapy for children with Crohn's disease.

  6. Space Symposium/76

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A symposium dealing with career opportunities in the aerospace program for minorities was conducted and evaluated. The symposium was attended by students from eleven predominantly minority colleges and universities in and around Washington, D. C. and the eastern region, and from high schools in five jurisdictions of the Washington metropolitan area. Speakers included representatives of Howard University, NASA, and private industry. On display during the symposium was a NASA exhibit of moon rocks, space shuttles, a lunar module, command module, pacemaker, LANDSAT, and other items of interest.

  7. [Relationships between characteristics of community and health service and activity states of medical care facilities in four regions of Fukuoka Prefecture].

    PubMed

    Egawa, H; Osada, H; Funatani, F; Nito, T; Yusu, K; Yokota, A; Ito, H; Matsuda, A

    1986-03-20

    In the present study, we assigned a geographical range to promote community health service planning according to the life-behavior spaces of inhabitants in Fukuoka prefecture and regarded the country-life zone, defined by the Ministry of Construction, as a region in which health services should be investigated. The social and economic characteristics of each individual region were then analyzed. As a result, four factors related to "Industrialization" and "Urbanization" were detected. Further, the states of space distribution of medical care facilities and medical care-related facilities were clarified, and relationships between the states and the above socio-economic characteristics were investigated. The states of space distribution in both facilities in Fukuoka prefecture were proved to be remarkably similar on an axis of the "Accumulation of Urbanism" factor. Moreover, Path Analysis was performed in order to clarify the patterns of treatment received by the inhabitants, and a model of these trends in relation to health care received was constructed, highlighting problems in the necessary planning of health service provision. It was specifically indicated that the problem of aging in Chikuho region would be an important factor affecting such planning in the future. We also analyzed the present state of emergency medical services in Fukuoka prefecture and the activities of health nurses in each individual region.

  8. Ninteenth Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the 19th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft/Shuttle latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for spacecraft docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  9. Symposium on thermal anemometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers given at a symposium on thermal anemometry. Topics include: wind turbines x-probe measurements in turbine wakes, air flow metering, fluid flow, and hot-film and hot-wire anemometers.

  10. 1999 Flight Mechanics Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, John P. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium held on May 18-20, 1999. Sponsored by the Guidance, Navigation and Control Center of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  11. ACS Symposium Support

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Jordan

    2010-02-20

    The funds from this DOE grant were used to help cover the travel costs of five students and postdoctoral fellows who attended a symposium on 'Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solutions' held at the Fall 2007 American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston, MA, August 19-23. The Symposium was sponsored by the Physical Chemistry Division, ACS. The technical program for the meeting is available at http://phys-acs.org/fall2007.html.

  12. 2009 Santa Fe Bone symposium.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Bilezikian, John P; Laster, Andrew J; Miller, Paul D; Recker, Robert R; Russell, R Graham G; Whyte, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disease with serious clinical consequences because of fractures. Despite the availability of clinical tools to diagnose osteoporosis and assess fracture risk, and drugs proven to reduce fracture risk, it remains a disease that is underdiagnosed and undertreated. When treatment is started, it is commonly not taken correctly or long enough to be effective. Recent advances in understanding of the regulators and mediators of bone remodeling have led to new therapeutic targets and the development of drugs that may offer advantages over current agents in reducing the burden of osteoporotic fractures. Many genetic factors that play a role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease have now been identified. At the 2009 Santa Fe Bone Symposium, held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, the links between advances in genetics, basic bone science, recent clinical trials, and new and emerging therapeutic agents were presented and explored. Socioeconomic challenges and opportunities in the care of osteoporosis were discussed. This is a collection of medical essays based on key presentations at the 2009 Santa Fe Bone Symposium. Copyright (c) 2010 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prestroke glycemic control is associated with the functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke: the Fukuoka Stroke Registry.

    PubMed

    Kamouchi, Masahiro; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hata, Jun; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Ago, Tetsuro; Sambongi, Yoshiki; Fukushima, Yoshihisa; Sugimori, Hiroshi; Kitazono, Takanari

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for stroke. However, it is uncertain whether prestroke glycemic control (PSGC) status affects clinical outcomes of acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to elucidate the association between PSGC status and neurological or functional outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. From the Fukuoka Stroke Registry (FSR), a multicenter stroke registry in Japan, 3627 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke within 24 hours after onset were included in the present analysis. The patients were categorized into 4 groups based on their PSGC status: excellent (hemoglobin [Hb] A1c on admission<6.2%), good (6.2-6.8%), fair (6.9-8.3%) and poor (≥8.4%). Study outcomes were neurological improvement (≥4 points decrease in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score during hospitalization or 0 points on NIHSS score at discharge), neurological deterioration (≥1 point increase in NIHSS score) and poor functional outcome (death or dependency at discharge, modified Rankin Scale 2-6). The age- and sex-adjusted ORs for neurological improvement were lower, and those for neurological deterioration and a poor functional outcome were higher in patients with poorer PSGC status. After adjusting for multiple confounding factors, these trends were unchanged (all probability values for trends were <0.002). These findings were comparable in patients with noncardioembolic and cardioembolic infarctions. In ischemic stroke patients, HbA1c on admission was an independent significant predictor for neurological and functional outcomes.

  14. An Amazonia Symposium: Mixed Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huerta, Gloria; Shand, Hope

    1978-01-01

    Reporting on the second symposium on "Amazonia: Extinction or Survival" (Madison, Wisconsin, 1978), this article summarizes papers presented on colonization, health, education, law, etc., and presents the symposium's six resolutions. (JC)

  15. 32nd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, S. W. (Compiler); Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    The proceedings of the 32nd Aerospace Mechanism Symposium are reported. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) hosted the symposium that was held at the Hilton Oceanfront Hotel in Cocoa Beach, Florida on May 13-15, 1998. The symposium was cosponsored by Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space and the Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium Committee. During these days, 28 papers were presented. Topics included robotics, deployment mechanisms, bearing, actuators, scanners, boom and antenna release, and test equipment.

  16. International Symposium on Nuclear Techniques in the Study and Control of Parasitic Diseases of Man and Animals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    sensitivity. The functional RIAs that are presently available for the major parasitic diseases of man, including amebiasis, toxoplasmosis , malaria...specificity. The antigen assays appear more specific and offer quantitative analyses which will aid investigators to explore the humoral response more fully. J

  17. Gaining insight into the health effects of soy but a long way still to go: commentary on the fourth International Symposium on the Role of Soy in Preventing and Treating Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Messina, Mark; Gardner, Christoper; Barnes, Stephen

    2002-03-01

    Research into the health effects of soyfoods and soybean constituents has increased at a phenomenal pace over the past decade. This research includes a wide range of areas, such as cancer, coronary heart disease, osteoporosis, cognitive function, menopausal symptoms and renal function. Importantly, there are an increasing number of clinical studies being conducted in this field, which was quite evident from the findings presented at the Fourth International Symposium on the Role of Soy in Preventing and Treating Chronic Disease, November 4-7, 2001, in San Diego, California. There is no doubt that progress in understanding the health effects of soy is being made, but much of the data are frustratingly inconsistent. For example, there were conflicting results presented at the symposium on the role of isoflavones in bone health. Similarly, presentations painted an unclear picture of the role of isoflavones in cholesterol reduction. The relatively short duration and small sample size of many of the human studies in this field likely contribute to the inconsistent results. Although there are some controversies regarding the safety of soy for certain subsets of the population, special sessions at the symposium on breast cancer and cognitive function did much to alleviate concerns that soy could have detrimental effects in these areas. Furthermore, published data and new research presented at this meeting suggest that the consumption of even 10 g (typical of Asian intake) of isoflavone-rich soy protein per day may be associated with health benefits. If this modest amount of soy protein were to be incorporated in the American diet, it would represent only approximately 15% of total U. S. protein intake.

  18. Meat, fish and fat intake in relation to subsite-specific risk of colorectal cancer: The Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasumi; Kono, Suminori; Toyomura, Kengo; Nagano, Jun; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Moore, Malcolm A; Mibu, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Yasunami, Yohichi; Maekawa, Takafumi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Imaizumi, Nobutoshi

    2007-04-01

    High intake of red meat has been associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer in Western countries. There has been much interest in the role of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in colorectal cancer prevention, but epidemiological findings are limited and inconsistent. The objective of our study was to examine associations of meat, fish and fat intake with risk of colorectal cancer, paying particular attention to the subsite within the colorectum. Data were from the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study, covering 782 cases and 793 controls. Diet was assessed by interview, using newly developed personal-computer software for registering semiquantitative food frequencies. The intake of beef/pork, processed meat, total fat, saturated fat or n-6 PUFA showed no clear association with the overall or subsite-specific risk of colorectal cancer. There was an almost significant inverse association between n-3 PUFA and the risk of colorectal cancer; the covariate-adjusted odds ratio for the highest (median 3.94 g/day) versus lowest (median 1.99 g/day) quintile of energy-adjusted intake was 0.74 (95% confidence interval 0.52-1.06, trend P=0.050). The consumption of fish and fish products was similarly inversely related to the risk although the association was not statistically significant. These associations were more evident for distal colon cancer; adjusted odds ratio for the highest versus lowest quintile of n-3 PUFA intake was 0.56 (95% confidence interval 0.34-0.92, trend P=0.02). Our findings do not support the hypothesis that consumption of red meat increases colorectal cancer risk but do suggest that high intake of fish may decrease the risk, particularly of distal colon cancer.

  19. Implementation of the semi-aerobic landfill system (Fukuoka method) in developing countries: a Malaysia cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Chong, Theng Lee; Matsufuji, Yasushi; Hassan, Mohd Nasir

    2005-01-01

    Most of the existing solid waste landfill sites in developing countries are practicing either open dumping or controlled dumping. Proper sanitary landfill concepts are not fully implemented due to technological and financial constraints. Implementation of a fully engineered sanitary landfill is necessary and a more economically feasible landfill design is crucial, particularly for developing countries. This study was carried out by focusing on the economics from the development of a new landfill site within a natural clay area with no cost of synthetic liner up to 10 years after its closure by using the Fukuoka method semi-aerobic landfill system. The findings of the study show that for the development of a 15-ha landfill site in Malaysia with an estimated volume of 2,000,000 m(3), the capital investment required was about US 1,312,895 dollars, or about US 0.84 dollars/tonne of waste. Assuming that the lifespan of the landfill is 20 years, the total cost of operation was about US 11,132,536 dollars or US 7.15 dollars/tonne of waste. The closure cost of the landfill was estimated to be US 1,385,526 dollars or US 0.89 dollars/tonne of waste. Therefore, the total cost required to dispose of a tonne of waste at the semi-aerobic landfill was estimated to be US 8.89 dollars. By considering an average tipping fee of about US 7.89 dollars/tonne of waste in Malaysia in the first year, and an annual increase of 3% to about US 13.84 dollars in year-20, the overall system recorded a positive revenue of US 1,734,749 dollars. This is important information for the effort of privatisation of landfill sites in Malaysia, as well as in other developing countries, in order to secure efficient and effective landfill development and management.

  20. Day-by-Day Blood Pressure Variability and Functional Outcome After Acute Ischemic Stroke: Fukuoka Stroke Registry.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Kenji; Kai, Hisashi; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Hata, Jun; Ago, Tetsuro; Nakane, Hiroshi; Imaizumi, Tsutomu; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-07-01

    The relationship between blood pressure (BP) variability and functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke remains unclear. This study aimed to elucidate whether in-hospital day-by-day BP variability is associated with functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Using the Fukuoka Stroke Registry, we included 2566 patients with a first-ever ischemic stroke who had been functionally independent before the onset and were hospitalized within 24 hours. BP was measured daily, and its variability was assessed by SD, coefficients of variance, and variations independent of mean. Poor functional outcome was assessed by modified Rankin Scale scores ≥3 at 3 months. After adjustment for multiple confounding factors including age, sex, risk factors, stroke features, baseline severity, thrombolytic therapy, antihypertensive agents, and mean BP, day-by-day BP variability during the subacute stage (4-10 days after onset) was independently associated with a poor functional outcome (multivariable-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] in the top versus bottom quartile of systolic BP variability, 1.51 [1.09-2.08] for SD; 1.63 [1.20-2.22] for coefficients of variance; 1.64 [1.21-2.24] for variations independent of mean). Similar trends were also observed for diastolic BP variability. These trends were unchanged in patients who were not treated with antihypertensive drugs. In contrast, no association was found between indices of BP variability during the acute stage and functional outcome after adjusting for potential confounders. These data suggest that intraindividual day-by-day BP variability during the subacute stage is associated with the 3-month functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. 2001 Flight Mechanics Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, John P. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium held on June 19-21, 2001. Sponsored by the Guidance, Navigation and Control Center of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to attitude/orbit determination, prediction and control; attitude simulation; attitude sensor calibration; theoretical foundation of attitude computation; dynamics model improvements; autonomous navigation; constellation design and formation flying; estimation theory and computational techniques; Earth environment mission analysis and design; and, spacecraft re-entry mission design and operations.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Campylobacter jejuni CAM970 and C. coli CAM962, Associated with a Large Outbreak of Foodborne Illness in Fukuoka, Japan, in 2016.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Naoto; Yamamoto, Shiori; Maruyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-15

    Here, we report the draft genome sequences of Campylobacter jejuni CAM970 and C. coli CAM962, which were associated with a large outbreak of foodborne illness originating from undercooked chicken sushi in Fukuoka, Japan, in May 2016. Their genome sizes were 1,690,901 and 1,704,736 bp, with 22 and 23 rRNAs, 9 and 9 tRNAs, and 411× and 419× coverage for C. jejuni CAM970 and C. coli CAM962, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Asakura et al.

  3. PREFACE: Fourteenth International Symposium on Laser-Aided Plasma Diagnostics (LAPD14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2010-04-01

    The attached PDF contains, the full preface, a list of the scientific committee, former LAPD chairmen, local organizers, previous locations of LAPD meetings, participants email contacts and a list of the contributed papers. logo The Fourteenth International Symposium on Laser-Aided Plasma Diagnostics (LAPD14), was held from 21-24 September 2009 in Castelbrando, Treviso, Italy. The series of LAPD symposia was originally started at Kyushu University in 1983, and since then it has been organized every two years alternately in Japan, Europe and the United States, traveling around the world five times. Each LAPD Symposium brings together scientists working in different disciplines all related to the diagnostics of any type of plasma by laser or similar techniques. Researchers working on nuclear fusion, industrial process, low temperature plasma chemistry, laser development and material science, are invited to present prominent new diagnostic developments, with the aim of synergetic discussions. The broad spectrum of contributions represents one of the strengths of this symposium, which is an important, unique and fruitful source of cross-fertilization between these fields and a forum of discussions. The scope of LAPD14 was very broad, including many techniques related to laser probing of plasmas: incoherent and coherent Thomson scattering, polarimetry, interferometry, reflectometry, laser induced fluorescence, laser absorption spectroscopy, laser photodetachment spectroscopy, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, Raman scattering, reflectometry, microwave diagnostics and related laser and hardware developments. LAPD14 was attended by 66 researchers, from 15 different countries who presented a total of 57 papers (13 general, 12 topical, 10 short talks and 23 poster contributions). It is a tradition of LAPD that the first lecture of each meeting, which is more general and aims to review prominent new developments, is called 'the Akazaki lecture' in honor of Professor Masanori

  4. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    2008-04-01

    13me Symposium qui se déroule du 27 au 31 juillet pour la première fois au Cern. Brian Pattison ouvre la cérémonie et donne la parole à Dr.Ugland (qui représente le DG C.Rubbia excusé) et d'autres intervenants

  5. AERA Symposium Papers 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldeway, Dan O.; And Others

    Five American Educational Research Association symposium papers (1979) are provided. "The Program Analysis Phase of Instructional Systems Design: Details of Phase II" (E. Curtis) describes the program analysis subsystem within the context of a systematic approach to instructional design, and reviews the process of carrying out such an…

  6. University HRD Programs. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of four papers on university human resource development (HRD) programs. "Passions for Excellence: HRD Graduate Programs at United States Universities" (K. Peter Kuchinke) presents an analysis of case studies that reveals convergent and divergent themes related to the genesis of programs and subsequent…

  7. Standards and Certification. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on standards and certification in human resource development (HRD). "Implementing Management Standards in the UK" (Jonathan Winterton, Ruth Winterton) reports on a study that explored the implementation of management standards in 16 organizations and identified 36 key themes and…

  8. Issues of HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on issues of human resource development (HRD). "The Complex Roots of Human Resource Development" (Monica Lee) discusses the roots of HRD within the framework of the following views of management: (1) classic (the view that managers must be able to create appropriate rules and…

  9. ASSA Symposium 2012 Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-10-01

    of papers presented at the ASSA Symposium held in Cape Town 12-14 October 2012. Videos are available on You tube. See http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8odLrzpzMkHS-cSEfPFIr3YLPAq4d5MU for a playlist.

  10. Issues of Gender. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on issues of gender in human resource development (HRD). "The Impact of Awareness and Action on the Implementation of a Women's Network" (Laura L. Bierema) reports on research to examine how gender consciousness emerges through the formation of in-company networks to promote corporate women's…

  11. Recruitment and Training. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on recruitment and training. "College Choice: The State of Marketing and Effective Student Recruitment Strategies" (Fredrick Muyia Nafukho, Michael F. Burnett) reports on a study of the recruitment strategies used by Louisiana State University's admissions office and College of…

  12. Technical Entrepreneurship: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Arnold C., Ed.; Komives, John L., Ed.

    Contained in this document are papers presented at the Symposium on Technical Entrepreneurship at Purdue University by researchers who were then or had previously been engaged in research in the area. Because formal research in this area was in its infancy, there was a particular need to afford investigators in the field opportunities to compare…

  13. Quality of Life Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. New Mexico Environmental Inst.

    Comments, speeches, and questions delivered at the Quality of Life Symposium are compiled in these proceedings. As an exploratory session, the conference objectives were to (1) become better informed about New Mexico--its resource base, the economy, social and cultural base, and the environment; and (2) to evaluate and discuss the role of New…

  14. Birch symposium proceedings

    Treesearch

    W.T. Doolittle; P.E. Bruns

    1969-01-01

    This symposium on yellow and paper birch is the third in a series of meetings devoted to discussion of our fine hardwood timber species. The first meeting, held at Carbondale, Illinois, in 1966, dealt with black walnut. The second, held at Houghton, Michigan, in 1968, dealt with sugar maple. The purpose of this third meeting is to bring together our present knowledge...

  15. Online Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on online learning that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "An Instructional Strategy Framework for Online Learning Environments" (Scott D. Johnson, Steven R. Aragon) discusses the pitfalls of modeling online courses after traditional instruction…

  16. Globalism and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on globalization and human resource development (HRD). "Challenges and Strategies of Developing Human Resources in the Surge of Globalization: A Case of the People's Republic of China" (De Zhang, Baiyin Yang, Yichi Zhang) analyzes the challenges and strategies of HRD in China and…

  17. Research Symposium I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The proceedings of this symposium consist of abstracts of talks presented by interns at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The interns assisted researchers at GRC in projects which primarily address the following topics: aircraft engines and propulsion, spacecraft propulsion, fuel cells, thin film photovoltaic cells, aerospace materials, computational fluid dynamics, aircraft icing, management, and computerized simulation.

  18. Tools in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on tools in human resource development (HRD). "Game Theory Methodology in HRD" (Thomas J. Chermack, Richard A. Swanson) explores the utility of game theory in helping the HRD profession address the complexity of integrating multiple theories for disciplinary understanding and…

  19. Team Based Work. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on team-based work in human resource development (HRD). "Toward Transformational Learning in Organizations: Effects of Model-II Governing Variables on Perceived Learning in Teams" (Blair K. Carruth) summarizes a study that indicated that, regardless of which Model-II variable (valid…

  20. Values: A Symposium Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, T. A., Ed.

    This publication brings together a set of four papers prepared for a symposium on values at the 1972 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. The first paper, by Fred N. Kerlinger, establishes a rationale for values research. The discussion focuses on the definition of values, relationship between values and attitudes,…

  1. Competencies in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on competencies in human resource development (HRD). "The Development of a Competency Model and Assessment Instrument for Public Sector Leadership and Management Development" (Sharon S. Naquin, Elwood F. Holton III) reports on a streamlined methodology and process used to develop a competency…

  2. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  3. AERA Symposium Papers 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldeway, Dan O.; And Others

    Five American Educational Research Association symposium papers (1979) are provided. "The Program Analysis Phase of Instructional Systems Design: Details of Phase II" (E. Curtis) describes the program analysis subsystem within the context of a systematic approach to instructional design, and reviews the process of carrying out such an…

  4. Summary and Findings of the EPA and CDC Symposium on Air Pollution Exposure and Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) co-organized a symposium on "Air Pollution Exposure and Health" at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina on September 19–20, 2006. The symposium brought together health and environmenta...

  5. Summary and Findings of the EPA and CDC Symposium on Air Pollution Exposure and Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) co-organized a symposium on "Air Pollution Exposure and Health" at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina on September 19–20, 2006. The symposium brought together health and environmenta...

  6. Risk Factors for Malignancy of Branch-Duct Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms: A Critical Evaluation of the Fukuoka Guidelines With a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Claudio; Casadei, Riccardo; Taffurelli, Giovanni; Zani, Elia; Pagano, Nico; Pacilio, Carlo Alberto; Ingaldi, Carlo; Bogoni, Selene; Santini, Donatella; Migliori, Marina; Di Marco, Mariacristina; Serra, Carla; Calculli, Lucia; De Giorgio, Roberto; Minni, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the risk factors proposed by Fukuoka guidelines in detecting malignancy of branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. Diagnostic meta-analysis of cohort studies. A systematic literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Scopus, and the ISI-Web of Science databases to identify all studies published up to 2014. Twenty-five studies (2025 patients) were suitable for the meta-analysis. The "high risk stigmata" showed the highest pooled diagnostic odds ratio (jaundice, 6.3; positive citology, 5.5; mural nodules, 4.8) together with 2 "worrisome features" (thickened/enhancing walls, 4.2; duct dilatation, 4.0) and 1 "other parameters" (carbohydrate antigen 19-9 serum levels, 4.6). An "ideal risk factor" capable of recognizing all malignant branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms was not identified and some "dismal areas" remain. However, "high risk stigmata" were strongly related to malignancy, mainly enhancing mural nodules. Among the "worrisome features," duct dilatation and thickened/enhancing walls were underestimated, and their diagnostic performance was similar to those of "high risk stigmata." The carbohydrate antigen 19-9 serum level should be added to the Fukuoka algorithm because this value could help in carrying out correct management.

  7. Joint BAPEN and British Society of Gastroenterology Symposium on 'Coeliac disease: basics and controversies'. Dietitians are better than clinicians in following up coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Claire; Lowdon, Jacqui; Howdle, Peter

    2009-08-01

    It seems obvious to healthcare professionals that patients with coeliac disease should receive regular follow-up. Surprisingly, there is little evidence that patients benefit in terms of reduced morbidity or mortality. However, several authoritative bodies have published guidelines on the management of coeliac disease that recommend regular follow-up. There is good evidence that compliance with a gluten-free diet reduces the risk of complications such as osteoporosis or small bowel lymphoma. Compliance is enhanced particularly by education about the disease and the gluten-free diet and by support from peers or professionals. Such input can be provided by regular follow-up, which thereby should improve compliance and hence long-term health. The consensus of the recommendations for follow-up suggests an annual review by a physician and dietitian. At annual follow-up the disease status can be checked and nutritional advice can be given, including checking the adequacy of, and the compliance with, the gluten-free diet. Complications and associated medical conditions can be sought, genetic risks explained and support and reassurance given. Specialist dietitians have particular expertise in relation to diet and nutritional management; specialist clinicians have a broader range of expertise in many aspects of management of the disease. A team approach for providing follow-up is the ideal, with a clinician and dietitian, both with expertise in coeliac disease, being involved. No one particular group of healthcare professionals is necessarily better than the other at providing follow-up.

  8. Unconventional gas recovery symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the SPE and DOE in organizing this symposium has been to bring together in a single annual meeting the best of the professional community engaged in unconventional gas recovery technology. The first venture will focus on discussions of the realities and potentials of unconventional gas sources and an exchange of technology developments. Unconventional gas sources are expected to have an important impact on new gas supplies as technological developments rapidly emerge and become mature technologies in the recovery of natural gas from coal, tight formations, Devonian shale geopressured reservoirs and other alternative high-cost gas sources. It is hoped that this symposium will provide a state-of-art perspective on geology, exploration and production research, recovery technology and field test results. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual articles for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  9. Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium, held at the NASA Lewis Research Center, September 9 to 10, 1986, focused on future research in the microgravity fluid management field. The symposium allowed researchers and managers to review space applications that require fluid management technology, to present the current status of technology development, and to identify the technology developments required for future missions. The 19 papers covered three major categories: (1) fluid storage, acquisition, and transfer; (2) fluid management applications, i.e., space power and thermal management systems, and environmental control and life support systems; (3) project activities and insights including two descriptions of previous flight experiments and a summary of typical activities required during development of a shuttle flight experiment.

  10. 1979 DOE statistical symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, D.A.; Truett T.

    1980-09-01

    The 1979 DOE Statistical Symposium was the fifth in the series of annual symposia designed to bring together statisticians and other interested parties who are actively engaged in helping to solve the nation's energy problems. The program included presentations of technical papers centered around exploration and disposal of nuclear fuel, general energy-related topics, and health-related issues, and workshops on model evaluation, risk analysis, analysis of large data sets, and resource estimation.

  11. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    13me Symposium qui se déroule du 27 au 31 juillet pour la première fois au Cern. Brian Pattison ouvre la cérémonie et donne la parole à Dr.Ugland (qui représente le DG C.Rubbia excusé) et d'autres intervenants

  12. Space 2000 Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Space 2000 Symposium is to present the creativity and achievements of key figures of the 20th century. It offers a retrospective discussion on space exploration. It considers the future of the enterprise, and the legacy that will be left for future generations. The symposium includes panel discussions, smaller session meetings with some panelists, exhibits, and displays. The first session entitled "From Science Fiction to Science Facts" commences after a brief overview of the symposium. The panel discussions include talks on space exploration over many decades, and the missions of the millennium to search for life on Mars. The second session, "Risks and Rewards of Human Space Exploration," focuses on the training and health risks that astronauts face on their exploratory mission to space. Session three, "Messages and Messengers Informing and Inspire Space Exploration and the Public," focuses on the use of TV medium by educators and actors to inform and inspire a wide variety of audiences with adventures of space exploration. Session four, "The Legacy of Carl Sagan," discusses the influences made by Sagan to scientific research and the general public. In session five, "Space Exploration for a new Generation," two student speakers and the NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin address the group. Session six, "Destiny or Delusion? -- Humankind's Place in the Cosmos," ends the symposium with issues of space exploration and some thought provoking questions. Some of these issues and questions are: what will be the societal implications if we discover the origin of the universe, stars, or life; what will be the impact if scientists find clear evidence of life outside the domains of the Earth; should there be limits to what humans can or should learn; and what visionary steps should space-faring people take now for future generations.

  13. Simulation 󈨔 Symposium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-21

    on the methodological and technological sessions. The report is divided into four topical areas: (1) methodological issues, (2) computing hardware, (3...SYMPOSIUM S[Ar Cn Richard E. Nance* 21 November 1980BRANCH OFFICE *Department of Management Science, Imperial College LONDON of Science and Technology ...nimber) 𔃻Bond graphs Language comparison Computer aided modeling Methodology fDistributed systems Software * Ha~dware 20. V~tRACT (Continue an rovers

  14. Space 2000 Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Space 2000 Symposium is to present the creativity and achievements of key figures of the 20th century. It offers a retrospective discussion on space exploration. It considers the future of the enterprise, and the legacy that will be left for future generations. The symposium includes panel discussions, smaller session meetings with some panelists, exhibits, and displays. The first session entitled "From Science Fiction to Science Facts" commences after a brief overview of the symposium. The panel discussions include talks on space exploration over many decades, and the missions of the millennium to search for life on Mars. The second session, "Risks and Rewards of Human Space Exploration," focuses on the training and health risks that astronauts face on their exploratory mission to space. Session three, "Messages and Messengers Informing and Inspire Space Exploration and the Public," focuses on the use of TV medium by educators and actors to inform and inspire a wide variety of audiences with adventures of space exploration. Session four, "The Legacy of Carl Sagan," discusses the influences made by Sagan to scientific research and the general public. In session five, "Space Exploration for a new Generation," two student speakers and the NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin address the group. Session six, "Destiny or Delusion? -- Humankind's Place in the Cosmos," ends the symposium with issues of space exploration and some thought provoking questions. Some of these issues and questions are: what will be the societal implications if we discover the origin of the universe, stars, or life; what will be the impact if scientists find clear evidence of life outside the domains of the Earth; should there be limits to what humans can or should learn; and what visionary steps should space-faring people take now for future generations.

  15. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  16. Assessing the Evidence for Maternal Pertussis Immunization: A Report From the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Symposium on Pertussis Infant Disease Burden in Low- and Lower-Middle-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Sobanjo-Ter Meulen, Ajoke; Duclos, Philippe; McIntyre, Peter; Lewis, Kristen D C; Van Damme, Pierre; O'Brien, Katherine L; Klugman, Keith P

    2016-12-01

    Implementation of effective interventions has halved maternal and child mortality over the past 2 decades, but less progress has been made in reducing neonatal mortality. Almost 45% of under-5 global mortality now occurs in infants <1 month of age, with approximately 86% of neonatal deaths occurring in low- and lower-middle-income countries (LMICs). As an estimated 23% of neonatal deaths globally are due to infectious causes, maternal immunization (MI) is one intervention that may reduce mortality in the first few months of life, when direct protection often relies on passively transmitted maternal antibodies. Despite all countries including pertussis-containing vaccines in their routine childhood immunization schedules, supported through the Expanded Programme on Immunization, pertussis continues to circulate globally. Although based on limited robust epidemiologic data, current estimates derived from modeling implicate pertussis in 1% of under-5 mortality, with infants too young to be vaccinated at highest risk of death. Pertussis MI programs have proven effective in reducing infant pertussis mortality in high-income countries using tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccines in their maternal and infant programs; however, these vaccines are cost-prohibitive for routine use in LMICs. The reach of antenatal care programs to deliver maternal pertussis vaccines, particularly with respect to infants at greatest risk of pertussis, needs to be further evaluated. Recognizing that decisions on the potential impact of pertussis MI in LMICs need, as a first step, robust contemporary mortality data for early infant pertussis, a symposium of global key experts was held. The symposium reviewed current evidence and identified knowledge gaps with respect to the infant pertussis disease burden in LMICs, and discussed proposed strategies to assess the potential impact of pertussis MI. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases

  17. 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The proceedings of the 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Ames Research Center hosted the conference, which was held at the Four Points Sheraton, Sunnyvale, California, on May 9-11, 2001. The symposium was sponsored by the Mechanisms Education Association. Technology areas covered included bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; and other mechanisms for spacecraft and large space structures.

  18. 41st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    The proceedings of the 41st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held in Pasadena Hilton, Pasadena, California on May 16-18, 2012. Lockheed Martin Space Systems cosponsored the symposium. Technology areas covered include gimbals and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and Mars Science Laboratory mechanisms.

  19. 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Litty, Edward C. (Compiler); Sevilla, Donald R. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of the 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held at the Pasadena Conference and Exhibition Center, Pasadena, California, on May 19-21, 1999. Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space cosponsored the symposium. Technology areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  20. Expert systems in government symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Karna, K.N.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on various applications of expert systems. Topics considered at the symposium included knowledge-based reasoning, new directions in knowledge acquisition, software, programming languages, systems engineering, intelligent information retrieval, reactor safety assessment, medical applications, uncertainty management, algorithms, parallel processing, and artificial intelligence.

  1. Proceedings of the 2011 Santa Fe Bone symposium.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Bilezikian, John P; Jankowski, Lawrence G; McCloskey, Eugene V; Miller, Paul D; Morgan, Sarah L; Orwoll, Eric S; Potts, John T

    2012-01-01

    The 11th Santa Fe Bone Symposium was held in Santa Fe, NM, USA, on August 6-7, 2010. This annual event addresses the clinical relevance of recent scientific advances in the fields of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease. The symposium format included plenary presentations, oral abstracts, and interactive panel discussions, with participation of clinicians, researchers, and bone densitometry technologists. Among the many topics included in the symposium were new developments in nutritional therapy for osteoporosis, parathyroid hormone for the assessment and treatment of skeletal disease, osteoporosis in men, new and emerging concepts in osteoporosis therapy, report on the 2010 International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD)-International Osteoporosis Foundation FRAX Initiative and the ISCD Position Development Conference, balancing benefits and risks of bisphosphonate therapy, and an advanced bone densitometry workshop for clinicians and technologists. Copyright © 2012 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Joint BAPEN and British Society of Gastroenterology Symposium on 'Coeliac disease: basics and controversies'. Coeliac disease in the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Dickey, William

    2009-08-01

    Coeliac disease (CD), traditionally perceived as a rare childhood condition presenting with malabsorption, is instead an autoimmune multisystem disorder usually presenting in adulthood, affecting > or = 1% of the population and linked to the genetic expression of human leucocyte antigens (HLA) DQ2 and DQ8. Presentation occurs most often in the 40-60 years age-group, but potentially at any age. Symptoms attributable to the gut or to malabsorption may be mild, non-specific or absent; under one-third of patients have diarrhoea and almost half are overweight. Histological diagnosis no longer requires small intestine villous atrophy. The Marsh classification recognizes increased intraepithelial lymphocytes and crypt hyperplasia with intact villi as part of the gluten enteropathy spectrum, while some individuals have more subtle abnormalities identified only on electron microscopy. Serological testing for CD autoantibodies (to endomysium and tissue transglutaminase) has revolutionized diagnosis, shifting the process towards primary care. However, a substantial number of patients with CD are seronegative, particularly those without villous atrophy. The autoantibody to endomysium may be produced before histological change. The immune response to transglutaminase is crucial to the disease process. An exciting new development is the link between antibodies to organ-specific transglutaminases and clinical presentation; transglutaminases 2 (gut), 3 (skin) and 6 (nervous system). Negative testing for CD does not preclude its development later and HLA testing may allow 'once and for all' exclusion. In conclusion, an increasing proportion of patients with CD do not meet the 'classic' picture of malabsorption, positive serological testing and villous atrophy. Insisting on all these criteria for diagnosis will result in under diagnosis.

  3. Assessing the Evidence for Maternal Pertussis Immunization: A Report From the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Symposium on Pertussis Infant Disease Burden in Low- and Lower-Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Sobanjo-ter Meulen, Ajoke; Duclos, Philippe; McIntyre, Peter; Lewis, Kristen D. C.; Van Damme, Pierre; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Klugman, Keith P.

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of effective interventions has halved maternal and child mortality over the past 2 decades, but less progress has been made in reducing neonatal mortality. Almost 45% of under-5 global mortality now occurs in infants <1 month of age, with approximately 86% of neonatal deaths occurring in low- and lower-middle-income countries (LMICs). As an estimated 23% of neonatal deaths globally are due to infectious causes, maternal immunization (MI) is one intervention that may reduce mortality in the first few months of life, when direct protection often relies on passively transmitted maternal antibodies. Despite all countries including pertussis-containing vaccines in their routine childhood immunization schedules, supported through the Expanded Programme on Immunization, pertussis continues to circulate globally. Although based on limited robust epidemiologic data, current estimates derived from modeling implicate pertussis in 1% of under-5 mortality, with infants too young to be vaccinated at highest risk of death. Pertussis MI programs have proven effective in reducing infant pertussis mortality in high-income countries using tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccines in their maternal and infant programs; however, these vaccines are cost-prohibitive for routine use in LMICs. The reach of antenatal care programs to deliver maternal pertussis vaccines, particularly with respect to infants at greatest risk of pertussis, needs to be further evaluated. Recognizing that decisions on the potential impact of pertussis MI in LMICs need, as a first step, robust contemporary mortality data for early infant pertussis, a symposium of global key experts was held. The symposium reviewed current evidence and identified knowledge gaps with respect to the infant pertussis disease burden in LMICs, and discussed proposed strategies to assess the potential impact of pertussis MI. PMID:27838664

  4. IAU Symposium 317 Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Raffaele G.

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of the halo yields fundamental information on the formation and evolution of galaxies: this was quite exhaustively discussed at this very important symposium. I present a brief personal summary of the meeting, outlining those points that I found more exciting and suggestive. I also remarked a few areas that were possibly not enough expanded. I found this research field extremely interesting and I think there are great expectations for new developments in the next few years, thanks to the new large spectroscopic surveys and the ESA GAIA satellite.

  5. RICIS Symposium 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Integrated Environments for Large, Complex Systems is the theme for the RICIS symposium of 1988. Distinguished professionals from industry, government, and academia have been invited to participate and present their views and experiences regarding research, education, and future directions related to this topic. Within RICIS, more than half of the research being conducted is in the area of Computer Systems and Software Engineering. The focus of this research is on the software development life-cycle for large, complex, distributed systems. Within the education and training component of RICIS, the primary emphasis has been to provide education and training for software professionals.

  6. The first Brazilian Dinosaur Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Anjos Candeiro, Carlos Roberto; da Silva Marinho, Thiago

    2015-08-01

    The 1st Brazilian Dinosaur Symposium gathered paleontologists, geologists, and paleoartists in the city of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, from April 21st to 24th, 2013. The Dinosaur Symposium in the Pontal Campus of the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil provided an opportunity to share many new results of dinosaur research being conducted around the world. The symposium coincided with a new dawn of scientific advances in dinosaur paleontology further expanding its importance, interest and credibility worldwide.

  7. Women's technical and professional symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K; Mack, L

    1999-10-01

    This is the fourth LLNL-sponsored Women's Technical and Professional Symposium. This year's theme: ''Excellence through the Millennium,'' focuses on the cutting edge work being done at LLNL and the many contributions of women to our science and technology mission. We hope this Symposium gives each person attending a better idea of the broad scope of the Laboratory's mission and their place within the organization. It is easy to lose sight of the fact that we all work in support of science and technology despite the diversity of our experience. This Symposium provides an opportunity to reflect on our past and to begin to plan our future.

  8. Developmental programming: State-of-the-science and future directions-summary from a Pennington biomedical symposium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    On December 8-9, 2014, the Pennington Biomedical Research Center convened a scientific symposium to review the state-of-the-science and future directions for the study of developmental programming of obesity and chronic disease. The objectives of the symposium were to discuss: (i) past and current s...

  9. Scientific Respiratory Symposium, Paris June 2010

    PubMed Central

    Dalglish, Gavin; Priestley, Graham

    2011-01-01

    At a 2010 Respiratory Symposium in Paris, chaired by Professors Bousquet and Roche of the University of Paris, recent trends in research, therapy and treatment guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were reviewed and discussed by a faculty of expert European and US respiratory physicians. This article reviews five key clinical presentations with particular emphasis given to the importance of small airways in the pathology and treatment of asthma and COPD. Further analysis of the economics of treatment in Europe and the US shows a wide variance in direct and indirect costs. PMID:21792320

  10. Research symposium proceedings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    THE research symposium was organized to present the cutting edge research for PET by individuals from leading institutions throughout the world. The Institute for Clinical PET (ICP) has focused its annual meeting on the clinical applications of PET.

  11. Trees for Reclamation Symposium Proceedings

    Treesearch

    Northeastern Forest Experiment Station

    1980-01-01

    A collection of 30 papers presented at the symposium on trees for reclamation in the Eastern United States held October 27-29, 1980, Lexington, Kentucky, and sponsored by the USDA Forest Service and Interstate Mining Compact Commission.

  12. Fourth symposium on macrocyclic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J. J.; Izatt, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Both theoretical and experimental aspects of the properties and behavior of synthetic and naturally occurring macrocyclic compounds are covered in this symposium. This document contains abstracts of the papers. (DLC)

  13. 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Obie H., Jr. (Compiler); Rogers, John F. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The proceedings of the 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. NASA Langley Research Center hosted the proceedings held at the Radisson Hotel in Hampton, Virginia on May 15-17, 1996, and Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company, Inc. co-sponsored the symposium. Technological areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  14. 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, O.H. Jr.; Rogers, J.F.

    1996-05-01

    The proceedings of the 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. NASA Langley Research Center hosted the proceedings held at the Radisson Hotel in Hampton, Virginia on May 15-17, 1996, and Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company, Inc. co-sponsored the symposium. Technological areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for some articles from this proceedings.

  15. Symposium on Plant Polyphenols: Nutrition, Health and Innovations, June 2009.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ann S; Yeong, Boon-Yee; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2010-04-01

    Reported here is a summary of the proceedings of the Symposium on Plant Polyphenols: Nutrition, Health and Innovations, which was cosponsored by the Southeast Asia Region branch of the International Life Sciences Institute and the Nutrition Society of Malaysia in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, June 22-23, 2009. The symposium provided a timely update of research regarding the protective effects of polyphenols in chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, as well as the development of innovative polyphenol-containing food products with enhanced nutritive and health properties. Presentations covered polyphenols from a wide range of food sources such as tea, coffee, nuts and seeds, cocoa and chocolate, soy, and Asian fruits, vegetables, and spices. The symposium was attended by a large and diverse group of nutritionists, dietitians, researchers and allied health professionals, as well as management, research and development, and marketing personnel from the food and beverage industry. Their enthusiastic participation was a testament to the increasing awareness and interest in polyphenols in the prevention and control of chronic diseases. Presented here are some of the highlights and important information from the symposium.

  16. Regulation of drug metabolism and toxicity by multiple factors of genetics, epigenetics, lncRNAs, gut microbiota, and diseases: a meeting report of the 21(st) International Symposium on Microsomes and Drug Oxidations (MDO).

    PubMed

    Yu, Ai-Ming; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Cherrington, Nathan J; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Zanger, Ulrich M; Xie, Wen; Jeong, Hyunyoung; Morgan, Edward M; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Klaassen, Curtis D; Bhatt, Aadra P; Redinbo, Matthew R; Hao, Pengying; Waxman, David J; Wang, Li; Zhong, Xiao-Bo

    2017-03-01

    Variations in drug metabolism may alter drug efficacy and cause toxicity; better understanding of the mechanisms and risks shall help to practice precision medicine. At the 21(st) International Symposium on Microsomes and Drug Oxidations held in Davis, California, USA, in October 2-6, 2016, a number of speakers reported some new findings and ongoing studies on the regulation mechanisms behind variable drug metabolism and toxicity, and discussed potential implications to personalized medications. A considerably insightful overview was provided on genetic and epigenetic regulation of gene expression involved in drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) and drug response. Altered drug metabolism and disposition as well as molecular mechanisms among diseased and special populations were presented. In addition, the roles of gut microbiota in drug metabolism and toxicology as well as long non-coding RNAs in liver functions and diseases were discussed. These findings may offer new insights into improved understanding of ADME regulatory mechanisms and advance drug metabolism research.

  17. Global Environmental Change Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan M.

    The global environmental warming issue has been catapulted to the forefront of media attention as a result of the drought of 1988 and extremely warm temperatures. NASA scientist James Hansen testified last year that the warming trend has begun and that part of the temperature rise is due to gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and chlorofluro-carbons (CFCs) being released into the atmosphere by human activity.In response to recent scientific speculation on the issue, the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C., hosted the symposium Global Environmental Change April 24 as part of their annual meeting. Speakers included Bert Bolin, University of Stockholm; Robert White, National Academy of Engineering; Stephen Schneider, National Center for Atmospheric Research; and Peter Raven, Missouri Botanical Garden. Moderator was Russell Train, World Wildlife Fund.

  18. Action Theory, Control and Motivation: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckensberger, L. H.; Meacham, J. A., Eds.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the symposium on action theory presented at the 1983 meeting of the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development in Munich. The symposium included reactions to action theory from a variety of theoretical perspectives. (Author/RH)

  19. The 1986 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1986 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium will provide a formal opportunity for GAS Experimenter's to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that will be flown in the future.

  20. Niobium - Proceedings of the international symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on niobium. Topics considered at the symposium included niobium mining, ore processing, uses, fabrication, microstructure, mechanical properties, physical properties, corrosion, physical radiation effects, and marketing.

  1. 69th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-17

    69th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy The proceedings from the 69th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy , held June 16...ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 International, Symposium, Molecular Spectroscopy REPORT...reviewed journals: Final Report: 69th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy Report Title The proceedings from the 69th International

  2. [An analysis of medical expenses of outpatient service for the elderly at one health insurance society in Fukuoka prefecture--focused on medical service and concentration of medical expenses].

    PubMed

    Homan, M; Matsuda, S

    2001-09-01

    To determine the best way to reduce medical expenses of the elderly, we analyzed the aged outpatients' receipts covered by the Health and Medical Service Law for the Aged at one health insurance society in Fukuoka prefecture. We used 312 medical receipts during July, 1997. The proportion of frequency of each medical service was 89.7% for medications, 45.8% for laboratory tests and 26.3% for procedures. The proportion of expenses of each medical service was 38.3% for medications, 20.0% for examinations and 12.1% for laboratory tests. Medication is considered as one of the main causes of increasing medical expenses. As a result of multiple regression analysis, the number of consulting days, urinary and genital disorder, the number of diseases, home care, laboratory tests and prescriptions for outside pharmacies were detected as statistically significant factors associated with medical expenses. There was a concentration of medical expenses, i.e. about 10% of higher rank receipts consumed around 40% of total outpatients' expenses and included 6 of 10 home medical care receipts. One of the causes of expensive outpatients' medical expenses was medication. The separation of dispensary and prescription of drugs does not contribute to the reduction of medical expenses. In the higher rank of the expenses group, compared with the lower rank of the expenses group, the consultation days were longer, the number of diseases was greater and the proportions of expenses for procedures and home care were larger. Medical expenditures for patients receiving home medical care were higher than those of others, but home care should be compared with admissions. Because the insurance societies are now facing financial difficulties in Japan, analyzing the data of medical receipts is very important. During our analysis, we had to make an enormous effort to combine two data sources, because the receipts were made separately by clinics and pharmacies. It is strongly suggested that a

  3. The Schoolwide Symposium: A Model for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottingham, Walt

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the first schoolwide symposium at Hendersonville High School (North Carolina) in which, for one week, students and faculty were immersed in the culture and history of the Vietnam War era. Explains that because this first symposium was so successful in gaining student enthusiasm, the school organized three more symposiums. (CMK)

  4. Strong Motion Prediction Method Using Statistical Green's Function Estimated From K-Net Records and its Application to the Hypothesized Fukuoka Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, H.; Shigeo Itoh, S.; Kuhara, H.; Matsuo, H.

    2001-12-01

    First we extract statistical characteristics of seismic ground motions from K-Net records observed in the Kyushu region. We select ground motions for earthquakes with shallow depths (<60km) and moderate magnitudes (>4.5), observed within 200km from hypocenters. For the envelope characteristics first we express them by Boore's envelope function (Boore, 1983) and identify its model parameters. Then we express them as a function of the magnitude M and the hypocentral distance X using two step regression analysis. For the spectral characteristics we separate source, path, and site effects from the observed Fourier spectra and express them also as a function of M and X. Once we obtain these statistical parameters, we can synthesize ground motions hypothetically observed at any location of the K-Net sites for arbitrary source. We validate them by comparing them with observed data. Next we use them to predict strong motions for future large earthquakes through the so-called statistical Green's function method. Before to predict ground motions for a hypothesized earthquake we must test our method against the observed ground motions in previous large earthquakes. We first apply the method to the Kagoshima-ken Hokuseibu earthquake with Mjma 6.3 where we observe strong directivity at one K-Net station. Then, we simulate strong motion at the bedrock level during the Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake. In either case synthetic waveforms match well with the observed. Thus it is proved that we can predict the ground motions using our statistical Green's function if we properly express the source. Finally, we apply this method to a hypothesized Fukuoka earthquake. First strong motions at the bedrock level are predicted and then the strong motions at the ground surface are obtained by the 1-D wave propagation theory. We assume the same source scenario as in Kobe. The peak ground velocity (PGV) estimated reaches 100 cm/s at most, which is much less than the PGV observed in Kobe, primarily

  5. [Juniper pollen monitoring by Burkard sampler in Galveston, Texas, USA and Japanese cedar pollen counting in Fukuoka, Japan -- introduction of Pan American Aerobiology Association protocol counting technique].

    PubMed

    Kishikawa, Reiko; M-Horiuti, Terumi; Togawa, Akihisa; Kondoh, Yasuto; Janzy, Paul D; Goldblum, Randal M; Kotoh, Eiko; Shimoda, Teruhumi; Shoji, Shunsuke; Nishima, Sankei; Brooks, Edward G

    2004-06-01

    We have monitored Juniper pollen which caused winter allergy symptoms by Burkard sampler in Galveston, Texas. We identified and counted Juniper pollen grains by PAAA protocol which was a comprehensive guideline for the operation of Hirst-Type suction bioaerosol sampler, (original of Burkard sampler) in the USA. In Galveston we were able to detect the Mountain Cedar (Juniperus ashei) pollen from December to of January, and Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana) which has cross reactivity to MC from almost middle of January to February. There is no MC vegetation in Galveston. We found the pollen grains were transported from west at Edward Plateau in West Texas where it was thickly wooded. Then, we tried to monitor Japanese Cedar (JC) pollen grains in Fukuoka, Japan according with the same method. We found the significant positive correlation between the pollen counts using one single longitudinal traverse counting technique in the PAAA protocol and the JC pollen counting on the whole of Melinex tape per 24 hours (R2=0.9212, p=0.0001), and the gravitational method that is Durham sampler's pollen counting in 2002 (R2=0.489, p=0.0001), and in 2003 (R2=0.948, p=0.0001) respectively. We suggested that we can use the PAAA protocol for airborne pollen investigation in Japan by Burkard sampler.

  6. A Comparison Study of the Amplification Characteristics of the Seismic Observation Sites Using Coda Wave, Background Noise, and S-Wave Energy from Fukuoka Earthquakes Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    Since design response spectrum does not reflect local soil characteristics, site specific response spectrum from observed ground motions appears relatively higher than design response spectrum at high frequency range. These problems have been pointed out from the domestic seismic design industry. Among various estimation methods, this study used the method H/V ratio of ground motion for estimating site amplification. The method has been extended to background noise, Coda waves and S waves recently for estimating site amplification. This study applied the method to the 3 kinds of seismic energy simultansously, that is, background noise, Coda wave energy and S waves. This study analysed more than 267 background noises from 15 macro earthquakes including main Fukuoka earthquake (2005/03/20, M=6.5) and then compared results from background noise, Coda wave energy, and S waves, at the specific seismic station, for all the 8 main domestic seismic stations(KRA, GSU, GKP1, TJN, HKU, HSB, SNU, and KHD). The results showed that, at the specific sesimic station, most of the domestic seismic stations showed similar results among 3 different seismic energies. Each station showed its own characteristics of site amplification property in low, high and specific resonance frequency ranges. Comparison of this study to other studies using different method can give us much information about dynamic amplification of domestic sites characteristics and site classification.

  7. Effect of a rotation training system on the mental health status of postgraduate dental trainees at Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Tohru; Asada, Tetsunosuke; Sumi, Yoshihisa; Higuchi, Yoshinori

    2014-02-01

    In Japan, the increasing frequency of mental health problems in postgraduate dental trainees has recently become apparent. To our knowledge, there has been no previous research to investigate the influence of the type of training program on the mental health of dental residents during one year of postgraduate clinical training. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare changes in the mental health of two groups of dental trainees at Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan: those who undertook a rotation training program and those who trained solely in one department (the control group). Study subjects in both groups completed the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) at five intervals throughout the postgraduate training year. Analysis of the questionnaire responses were performed by Student's t-test, analysis of variance, Bonferroni's test, and the chi-square test. Statistical tests showed differences in the mean scores of POMS-30 subscales and GHQ-28. The mood of anger was the factor that seemed to best describe the trainees' response to stress. The study results led to the conclusion that dental trainees' mental health is influenced by the type of training program and that dental trainees in rotation training programs may need more mental health support.

  8. The association of culling and death rate within 30 days after calving with productivity or reproductive performance in dairy herds in Fukuoka, Southern Japan

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Akira; NAKADA, Ken; KATAMOTO, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of peripartum disorders in dairy herds negatively influences productivity and reproductive performance. Concrete data from local areas are helpful for explaining the importance of peripartum management to dairy farmers. This study was conducted to clarify the association of culling and death rate within 30 days after calving with productivity or reproductive performance in 179 dairy herds in Fukuoka, Southern Japan. A database was compiled from the records of the Livestock Improvement Association of Japan, the Dairy Cooperative Association and the Federation of Agricultural Mutual Relief Association. In this study, we created a comprehensive database of dairy farm production data for epidemiological analysis and used a general linear mixed model to analyze the association of culling and death rate within 30 days after calving with milk production or reproductive performance. The database can be used to describe, analyze and predict the risk of production. A cross-sectional analysis with contrasts was applied to investigate the association of cows served by AI/all cows, pregnant cows/cows served by AI, days open, milk yield and somatic cell counts with culling and death rate within 30 days after calving. The days open value significantly increased with increasing rate of culling and death within 30 days after calving (P for trend <0.001). No significant differences were found for the other comparisons. Our data suggest that proper feeding and management in the dry period may lead to improved postpartum reproductive performance in this dairy cow cohort. PMID:26666177

  9. 1992 STEP Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, Tony

    The year 1992 marks the quincentenary jubilee of the famous voyage of Christopher Columbus to the New World, a trip which initiated sustained contact between Europe and the American continent. Courageous explorations often lead to advancement of mankind, be they in uncharted territory or science. As much as Columbus was unaware of what lay in store for his voyage, we were just as poorly informed about what lay beyond our home planet when we began space exploration about three decades ago. There is much similarity among the pioneering spirits characteristic of both endeavors. It is thus fitting to celebrate this quincentenary occasion by declaring 1992 International Space Year (ISY).In conjunction with the COSPAR Meeting and the International Convention of the World Space Congress to be held in Washington, D.C., from August to September 1992, a 4-day symposium on the initial results from the Solar-Terrestrial Energy Program (STEP) Facilities and Theory Campaigns will be held at Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., August 24-27. 1992.

  10. 43rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Sponsored and organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, responsibility for hosting the AMS is shared by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC). Now in its 43rd symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 43rd AMS was held in Santa Clara, California on May 4, 5 and 6, 2016. During these three days, 42 papers were presented. Topics included payload and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and mechanism testing. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components. The high quality of this symposium is a result of the work of many people, and their efforts are gratefully acknowledged. This extends to the voluntary members of the symposium organizing committee representing the eight NASA field centers, LMSSC, and the European Space Agency. Appreciation is also extended to the session chairs, the authors, and particularly the personnel at ARC responsible for the symposium arrangements and the publication of these proceedings. A sincere thank you also goes to the symposium executive committee who is responsible for the year-to-year management of the AMS, including paper processing and preparation of the program. The use of trade names of manufacturers in this publication does not constitute an official endorsement of such products or manufacturers, either expressed or implied, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  11. Overview to symposium "Nutrients and epigenetic regulation of gene expression".

    PubMed

    Ho, Emily; Zempleni, Janos

    2009-12-01

    The American Society for Nutrition hosted a symposium entitled Nutrients and Epigenetic Regulation of Gene Expression at the Experimental Biology meeting on April 20, 2009, in New Orleans, LA. The symposium was cochaired by Emily Ho from Oregon State University and the Linus Pauling Institute, and Janos Zempleni from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. The goal of this symposium was to highlight the interactions among nutrients, epigenetics, and disease susceptibility. The symposium featured 4 speakers, each presenting novel insights into mechanisms by which nutrients participate in gene regulation. Janos Zempleni elucidated mechanisms by which the covalent binding of biotin to histones represses transposable elements, thereby enhancing genome stability. Emily Ho shared valuable insights into bioactive food compounds that inhibit histone deacetylases. James Kirkland from the University of Guelph in Canada talked about a niacin-dependent poly(ADP-ribosylation) of histones, an epigenetic mark that is not currently being given full consideration in nutrition. Patrick Stover from Cornell University described the interrelationships among 1-carbon metabolism, DNA methylation, gene silencing, and their influence in the etiology of folate-related pathologies. All 4 presentations were videotaped and can be viewed online (www.nutrition.org).

  12. LHC Symposium 2003: Summary Talk

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Appel

    2003-08-12

    This summary talk reviews the LHC 2003 Symposium, focusing on expectations as we prepare to leap over the current energy frontier into new territory. We may learn from what happened in the two most recent examples of leaping into new energy territory. Quite different scenarios appeared in those two cases. In addition, they review the status of the machine and experiments as reported at the Symposium. Finally, I suggest an attitude which may be most appropriate as they look forward to the opportunities anticipated for the first data from the LHC.

  13. Symposium Summary and the Scope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, Toshitaka

    It was a great pleasure for us to organize the 14th International Symposium on Nuclei in the Cosmos (NIC-XIV) in Niigata Japan, which shall illuminate the new horizon of nuclear astrophysics and related fields. This was co-hosted by National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and RIKEN Nishina Center, supported by IUPAP, JINA-CEE, JSPS, JEC Fund, Niigata Prefecture and Niigata City, and many other institutes and associations, and also sponsored by PTEP, Bourbone, and many other companies. I feel highly honored to have hosted this symposium as the Chair of NIC-XIV.

  14. Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    1999-06-24

    The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

  15. The Third International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology: Symposium proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the symposium are presented that are relevant to the generation, detection, and use of the terahertz spectral region for space astronomy and remote sensing of the Earth's upper atmosphere. The program included thirteen sessions covering a wide variety of topics including solid-state oscillators, power-combining techniques, mixers, harmonic multipliers, antennas and antenna arrays, submillimeter receivers, and measurement techniques.

  16. Scientific Overview: 2013 BBC Plenary Symposium on Tobacco Addiction

    PubMed Central

    De Biasi, M.; McLaughlin, I.; Perez, E.E.; Crooks, P.A.; Dwoskin, L.P.; Bardo, M.T.; Pentel, P.R.; Hatsukami, D.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine dependence plays a critical role in addiction to tobacco products, and thus contributes to a variety of devastating tobacco-related diseases (SGR 2014). Annual costs associated with smoking in the US are estimated to be between $289 and $333 billion. Effective interventions for nicotine dependence, especially in smokers, are a critical barrier to the eradication of tobacco-related diseases. This overview highlights research presented at the Plenary Symposium of Behavior, Biology and Chemistry: Translational Research in Addiction Conference (BBC), hosted by the UT Health Science Center San Antonio, on March 9–10, 2013. The Plenary Symposium focused on tobacco addiction, and covered topics ranging from basic science to national policy. As in previous years, the meeting brought together globally-renowned scientists, graduate student recruits, and young scientists from underrepresented populations in Texas and other states with the goal of fostering interest in drug addiction research in young generations. PMID:24934691

  17. Symposium: What Is College English?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Lynn Z.; White, Edward M.; Enoch, Jessica; Hawk, Byron

    2013-01-01

    This symposium explores the role(s) College English has (or has not) had in the scholarly work of four scholars. Lynn Bloom explores the many ways College English influenced her work and the work of others throughout their scholarly lives. Edward M. White examines four articles he has published in College English and draws connections between…

  18. Learning on the Job. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains two papers from a symposium on learning on the job. "Professional Crisis Workers: Impact of Repeated Exposure to Human Pain and Destructiveness" (Lynn Atkinson-Tovar) examines the following topics: (1) the secondary and vicarious traumatic stress disorder that affects many professional crisis workers who are…

  19. Learning at the Top. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on learning at the top that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Learning at the Top: An Investigation of Nonprofit CEOs' (Chief Executive Officers') Learning Experiences" (John J. Sherlock) reports on a study that used Mezirow's theory of adult…

  20. Cross-Cultural HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    The first of three papers from this symposium on cross-cultural human resource development (HRD), "Determinants of Supply of Technical Training Opportunities for Human Capital Development in Kenya" (Moses Waithanji Ngware, Fredrick Muyia Nafukho) reports findings from interviews of technical training institute department heads in Kenya…

  1. Unconventional gas recovery symposium. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This conference contains 51 papers and 4 abstracts of papers presented at the symposium on unconventional gas recovery. Some of the topics covered are: coalbed methane; methane recovery; gas hydrates; hydraulic fracturing treatments; geopressured systems; foam fracturing; evaluation of Devonian shales; tight gas sands; propping agents; and economics of natural gas production. All papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

  2. Symposium: What Is College English?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Lynn Z.; White, Edward M.; Enoch, Jessica; Hawk, Byron

    2013-01-01

    This symposium explores the role(s) College English has (or has not) had in the scholarly work of four scholars. Lynn Bloom explores the many ways College English influenced her work and the work of others throughout their scholarly lives. Edward M. White examines four articles he has published in College English and draws connections between…

  3. Arena Symposium: Dearing and Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalkley, Brian; Quigley, George; Toyne, Peter; Johnston, Ron; Butlin, Robin A.; Beer, Andrew; Cutler, Cecile

    1998-01-01

    Presents eight papers delivered at a symposium on the impact of the Dearing Report on geography instruction in the United Kingdom. The Dearing Report reviews higher education and charts the course of curriculum and instruction for the next 20 years. The papers address standards, regional applications, and criticisms. (MJP)

  4. Black Women in Film Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara

    1974-01-01

    Describes a symposium sponsored in April of last year by the Afro-American and American Studies Departments at Boston University on "Black Image in Films, Stereotyping and Self-Perception"; participants included Susan Batson, Cynthia Belgrave, Ruby Dee, Beah Richards, and Cicely Tyson. (Author/JM)

  5. Women and Career Development. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on women and career development. "Enhancing the Career Success of Women Faculty: Mentoring as a Human Resource Development (HRD) Initiative in Higher Education" (Sharon K. Gibson) explores mentoring of women faculty, focusing on the key dimensions of roles and functions, outcomes, gender, and formal…

  6. HRD Future and Trends. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on the future of human resource development (HRD) and trends in HRD. "Searching for the Future of Human Resource Development" (Wendy E.A. Ruona, Susan A. Lynham, Tom Chermack) reports on a survey of 55 HRD and HRD-related practitioners and academics that examined trends in the HRD…

  7. Creative Literature in Canada Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Grace, Ed.; McDonough, Irma, Ed.

    The contents of this booklet were presented at a symposium on Canadian creative literature at the University of Toronto in March 1974. Included are five papers, summaries of two talks (one by Bill Sault on the oral tradition of Canada's native peoples and one by Robert Weaver on discovering and encouraging Canadian writers) and of a panel…

  8. 1999 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daelemans, Gerard (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The 1999 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS), Space Experiment Module (SEM), and Hitchhiker programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

  9. Black Women in Film Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara

    1974-01-01

    Describes a symposium sponsored in April of last year by the Afro-American and American Studies Departments at Boston University on "Black Image in Films, Stereotyping and Self-Perception"; participants included Susan Batson, Cynthia Belgrave, Ruby Dee, Beah Richards, and Cicely Tyson. (Author/JM)

  10. Adult Learning and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium on adult learning and human resource development consists of three presentations. "Adult Learning Principles and Concepts in the Workplace: Implications for Training in HRD" (Margot B. Weinstein) reports on findings from interviews with restaurant employees who reported that training practices using adult learning…

  11. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  12. The Symposium on Integration Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Mary, Ed.

    This symposium of the ad hoc committee on integration of the Ontario (Canada) Teachers of English as a Second Language (TESL) reports educators' concerns with providing adequate support for immigrant and refugee students, maintaining the integrity, voice, and visibility of ESL education in school boards, and advocating and providing guidelines for…

  13. Technological Change and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on technological change and human resource development. "New Technologies, Cognitive Demands, and the Implications for Learning Theory" (Richard J. Torraco) identifies four specific characteristics of the tasks involved in using new technologies (contingent versus deterministic tasks,…

  14. Diversity in the Workplace. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on diversity in the workplace. "Factors That Assist and Barriers That Hinder the Success of Diversity Initiatives in Multinational Corporations" (Rose Mary Wentling) reports that factors that assisted in the success were classified under diversity department, human, and work environment; barriers were…

  15. Learning and Job Satisfaction. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on learning and job satisfaction. "The Relationship Between Workplace Learning and Job Satisfaction in United States Small to Mid-Sized Businesses" (Robert W. Rowden) reports findings that revealed sufficient evidence to conclude that learning is pervasive in the small to mid-sized businesses…

  16. Creative Literature in Canada Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Grace, Ed.; McDonough, Irma, Ed.

    The contents of this booklet were presented at a symposium on Canadian creative literature at the University of Toronto in March 1974. Included are five papers, summaries of two talks (one by Bill Sault on the oral tradition of Canada's native peoples and one by Robert Weaver on discovering and encouraging Canadian writers) and of a panel…

  17. Consumer and Homemaking Education Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Anza Coll., Cupertino, CA.

    Six contributions from the Consumer and Homemaking Education Symposium (March 1, 1974) are included. Elaine Shudlick discussed the role of the consumer education teacher, particularly in relation to a management of personal and family finance course, illustrated by a course outline including course description, prerequisities, text and references,…

  18. The VLT Opening Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    Scientists Meet in Antofagasta to Discuss Front-Line Astrophysics To mark the beginning of the VLT era, the European Southern Observatory is organizing a VLT Opening Symposium which will take place in Antofagasta (Chile) on 1-4 March 1999, just before the start of regular observations with the ESO Very Large Telescope on April 1, 1999. The Symposium occupies four full days and is held on the campus of the Universidad Catolica del Norte. It consists of plenary sessions on "Science in the VLT Era and Beyond" and three parallel Workshops on "Clusters of Galaxies at High Redshift" , "Star-way to the Universe" and "From Extrasolar Planets to Brown Dwarfs" . There will be many presentations of recent work at the major astronomical facilities in the world. The meeting provides a very useful forum to discuss the latest developments and, in this sense, contributes to the planning of future research with the VLT and other large telescopes. The symposium will be opened with a talk by the ESO Director General, Prof. Riccardo Giacconi , on "Paranal - an observatory for the 21st century". It will be followed by reports about the first scientific results from the main astronomical instruments on VLT UT1, FORS1 and ISAAC. The Symposium participants will see the VLT in operation during special visits to the Paranal Observatory. Press conferences are being arranged each afternoon to inform about the highlights of the conference. After the Symposium, there will be an Official Inauguration Ceremony at Paranal on 5 March Contributions from ESO ESO scientists will make several presentations at the Symposium. They include general reviews of various research fields as well as important new data and results from the VLT that show the great potential of this new astronomical facility. Some of the recent work is described in this Press Release, together with images and spectra of a large variety of objects. Note that all of these data will soon become publicly available via the VLT Archive

  19. Indoor air and human health revisited: A recent IAQ symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    Indoor Air and Human Health Revisited was a speciality symposium examining the scientific underpinnings of sensory and sensitivity effects, allergy and respiratory disease, neurotoxicity and cancer. An organizing committee selected four persons to chain the sessions and invite experts to give state-of-the-art presentations that will be published as a book. A summary of the presentations is made and some critical issues identified.

  20. Meeting Report: International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History II.

    PubMed

    Artan, Murat; Hwang, Ara B; Lee, Seung V; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-06-01

    The second International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History was held at the campus of Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, South Korea, from May 14 to 16, 2014. Many leading scientists in the field of aging research from all over the world contributed to the symposium by attending and presenting their recent work and thoughts. The aim of the symposium was to stimulate international collaborations and interactions among scientists who work on the biology of aging. In the symposium, the most recent and exciting work on aging research was presented, covering a wide range of topics, including the genetics of aging, age-associated diseases, and cellular senescence. The work was conducted in various organisms, includingC. elegans, mice, plants, and humans. Topics covered in the symposium stimulated discussion of novel directions for future research on aging. The meeting ended with a commitment for the third International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History, which will be held in 2016.

  1. Meeting Report: International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History II

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung‐Jae V.; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-01-01

    The second International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History was held at the campus of Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, South Korea, from May 14 to 16, 2014. Many leading scientists in the field of aging research from all over the world contributed to the symposium by attending and presenting their recent work and thoughts. The aim of the symposium was to stimulate international collaborations and interactions among scientists who work on the biology of aging. In the symposium, the most recent and exciting work on aging research was presented, covering a wide range of topics, including the genetics of aging, age‐associated diseases, and cellular senescence. The work was conducted in various organisms, including C. elegans, mice, plants, and humans. Topics covered in the symposium stimulated discussion of novel directions for future research on aging. The meeting ended with a commitment for the third International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History, which will be held in 2016. PMID:26115541

  2. Report on the 2009 ESO Fellows Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emsellem, Eric; West, Michael; Leibundgut, Bruno

    2009-09-01

    The fourth ESO Fellows Symposium took place in Garching from 8-10 June 2009. This year's symposium brought together 28 ESO Fellows from Chile and Germany to meet their colleagues from across the ocean, discuss their research and provide feedback on ESO's Fellowship programme. This year's symposium also included training workshops to enhance the practical skills of ESO Fellows in today's competitive job market.

  3. New horizons in the understanding of the causes and management of diabetic foot disease: report from the 2017 Diabetes UK Annual Professional Conference Symposium.

    PubMed

    Clokie, M; Greenway, A L; Harding, K; Jones, N J; Vedhara, K; Game, F; Dhatariya, K K

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes-related foot disease remains a common problem. For wounds, classic teaching recommends the treatment of any infection, offloading the wound and ensuring a good blood supply, as well as ensuring that the other modifiable risk factors are addressed and optimized. There remain, however, several questions about these and other aspects of the care of diabetes-related foot disease. Some of these questions are addressed in the present report; in particular, the impact of newer technologies in the identification of any organisms present in a wound, as well as the use of novel approaches to treat infections. The use of new remote sensing technology to identify people at risk of developing foot ulceration is also considered, in an attempt to allow early intervention and prevention of foot ulcers. The psychological impact of foot disease is often overlooked, but with an increasing number of publications on the subject, the cause-and-effect role that psychology plays in foot disease, such as ulcers and Charcot neuroarthropathy, is considered. Finally, because of heterogeneity in diabetic foot studies, comparing results is difficult. A recently published document focusing on ensuring a standardized way of reporting foot disease trials is discussed. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  4. Commentary on "Developing a national strategy to prevent dementia: Leon Thal Symposium 2009." Developing a blood test for Alzheimer's disease using advanced genomic expression technology.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Richard

    2010-03-01

    There is a significant need for reliable molecular biomarkers to aid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical diagnosis. RNA transcriptional profiling, although extensively applied for biomarker development in other diseases, is first defining its role in AD. Application of this technology has the sensitivity and power to provide sufficient information for the development of tests to determine disease severity, progression, heterogeneity, and potential for therapeutic response in the AD population. In order to bring forth the potential of this technology, however, the community needs to make a concerted effort to begin sample collection as soon as patients/subjects are identified. Only then can these powerful technologies be applied in a well controlled study for the development of novel diagnostics. 2010 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A guide for authors of symposium papers

    Treesearch

    Edwin vH. Larson

    1971-01-01

    Suggestions for preparing a symposium paper for publication, including length, general style, manuscript format, and details of handling tables, illustrations, footnotes, literature references, etc. Also suggestions for typing.

  6. Update on osteoporosis from the 2014 Santa Fe Bone symposium.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Bilezikian, John P; Binkley, Neil; Hans, Didier; Krueger, Diane; Miller, Paul D; Oates, Mary; Shane, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Santa Fe Bone Symposium provided a setting for the presentation and discussion of the clinical relevance of recent advances in the fields of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease. The format included oral presentations of abstracts by endocrinology fellows, plenary lectures, panel discussions and breakout sessions, with ample opportunities for informal discussions before and after scheduled events. Topics addressed in these proceedings included a review of the important scientific publications in the past year, fracture prevention in patients with dysmobility and immobility, fracture liaison services for secondary fracture prevention, management of pre-menopausal osteoporosis, the role of bone microarchitecture in determining bone strength, measurement of microarchitecture in clinical practice and methods to improve the quality of bone density testing. This is a report of the proceedings of the 2014 Santa Fe Bone Symposium.

  7. Osteoporosis update from the 2010 santa fe bone symposium.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Bilezikian, John P; Khosla, Sundeep; Marcus, Robert; McClung, Michael R; Miller, Paul D; Watts, Nelson B; Maricic, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The 11th Santa Fe Bone Symposium was held in Santa Fe, NM, USA, on August 6-7, 2010. This annual event addresses clinically relevant advances in the fields of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease. The venue includes plenary presentations by internationally recognized experts, oral presentations of abstracts, and interactive panel discussions of challenging cases and controversial issues. Attendees are active participants throughout the symposium program. Topics for the 2010 symposium included potential applications of novel technologies for the assessment of skeletal health for research and clinical practice; new and emerging treatments for osteoporosis; appropriate use of pharmacological agents to prevent osteoporosis; controversies with bisphosphonate therapy; practical applications of the World Health Organization fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX; World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield, UK); insights into the use of osteoanabolic agents to enhance fracture healing; and challenges in laboratory testing in the assessment of factors contributing to skeletal fragility. Concurrent sessions focused on critical thinking for technologists in the acquisition and analysis of data with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The key messages from each presentation, including the best available medical evidence and potential current and future clinical applications, are provided here. Copyright © 2011 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 39th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, E. A. (Compiler)

    2008-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production, and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 39th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the United States and abroad. The 39th AMS was held in Huntsville, Alabama, May 7-9, 2008. During these 3 days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals and positioning mechanisms, tribology, actuators, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and sensors. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  9. 38th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2006-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 38th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 38th AMs, hosted by the NASA Langley Research Center in Williamsburg, Virginia, was held May 17-19, 2006. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals, tribology, actuators, aircraft mechanisms, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  10. The 1975 Ride Quality Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation is presented of papers reported at the 1975 Ride Quality Symposium held in Williamsburg, Virginia, August 11-12, 1975. The symposium, jointly sponsored by NASA and the United States Department of Transportation, was held to provide a forum for determining the current state of the art relative to the technology base of ride quality information applicable to current and proposed transportation systems. Emphasis focused on passenger reactions to ride environment and on implications of these reactions to the design and operation of air, land, and water transportation systems acceptable to the traveling public. Papers are grouped in the following five categories: needs and uses for ride quality technology, vehicle environments and dynamics, investigative approaches and testing procedures, experimental ride quality studies, and ride quality modeling and criteria.

  11. 37th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is reporting problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 37th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 37th AMS, hosted by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Galveston, Texas, was held May 19, 20 and 21, 2004. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included deployment mechanisms, tribology, actuators, pointing and optical mechanisms, Space Station and Mars Rover mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  12. Microwaves and Thermoregulation: A Symposium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    realization that body -a~rtne Increase Ip an experimental animl exposed to microwaves lirplies a breakdown of thenirulatory mechanisms. On the other hand, low...febrile states, cardiovascular adjustments, behavioral mechanisms, and models of human thermoregulation participated in the Symposium program. Their...refinement of simulation models of human ther- moregulation on the one hand and of the deposition of microwave energy in humans on the other hand. Recent

  13. Association of severe hypoglycemia with depressive symptoms in patients with type 2 diabetes: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Yohei; Iwase, Masanori; Fujii, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Kaizu, Shinako; Ide, Hitoshi; Jodai, Tamaki; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although many studies have investigated the clinical characteristics of patients with diabetes with depression in Western populations, there is a lack of information regarding other ethnicities. We studied the association between clinical characteristics and depressive symptoms in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods A total of 4218 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes who were not taking antidepressants were divided into four groups according to the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score. The relationship between the severity of depressive symptoms and clinical parameters was examined cross-sectionally. Results After multivariate adjustments, the severity of depressive symptoms was significantly associated with body mass index, leisure-time physical activity, current smoking, sleep duration, sucrose intake, skipping breakfast, insulin use, severe hypoglycemia, dysesthesia of both feet, history of foot ulcer, photocoagulation, ischemic heart disease, and stroke. ORs for severe hypoglycemia increased significantly with the CES-D score in 2756 sulfonylurea and/or insulin-treated patients after multivariate adjustment including age, sex, duration of diabetes, glycated hemoglobin, insulin use, self-monitoring of blood glucose, leisure-time physical activity, skipping breakfast, dysesthesia of both feet, ischemic heart disease, and stroke (CES-D score ≤9, referent; 10–15, OR 1.64; 16–23, OR 2.09; ≥24, OR 3.66; p for trend <0.01). Conclusions Severe hypoglycemia was positively associated with the severity of depressive symptoms in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes independent of glycemic control, insulin therapy, lifestyle factors, and diabetic complications. As both severe hypoglycemia and depression are known risk factors for morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes, clinicians should be aware of this association. UMIN Clinical Trial Registry 000002627. PMID:26019877

  14. 2nd SEDI Symposium Held

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loper, D.

    Geomagnetism and paleomagnetism were the emphasis of the second SEDI (Study of the Earth's Deep Interior) symposium, “Reversals, Secular Variation and Dynamo Theory,” convened by Gary Glatzmaier and Paul Roberts at St. Johns College, Santa Fe, N.Mex., August, 6-10, 1990. The program included sessions on structure of the core and lower mantle and on mineral physics.The organizers and participants of the meeting wish to thank the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and the Center for Nonlinear Studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Center for Earth and Planetary Interiors at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Geophysics Program of the Earth Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation for their support of the symposium. What follows is a condensed summary of some of the highlights of the symposium, compiled by J . Bloxham, M. Brown, J . Cain, D. Fearn, D. Loper, and R. Merrill. A more complete summary is available from David Loper, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Institute, B-153, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-3017.

  15. The 1988 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium was held to provide a formal opportunity for GAS experimenters to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that have been flown on shuttle missions and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the future. Experiment design and payload integration issues are also examined.

  16. The Second Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Summaries of the papers presented at the Second Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium are presented. The purpose of the symposium was to present an overwiew of recent developments in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars and to present future international plans.

  17. The 1987 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelme, Neal (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The 1987 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's symposium provides a formal opportunity for GAS Experimenter's to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium was on payloads that were flown on Shuttle missions, and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the future.

  18. The 1992 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a continuation of the Get Away Special Symposium convened from 1984 through 1988, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

  19. Proceedings of the Symposium on Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers, Inc., New York, NY.

    The papers given at a symposium on cable television (CATV) are collected in this volume. The chairman of the symposium notes that "the phrase 'cable television' is not totally pertinent since we are talking about a wired-city concept that may encompass many services other than television." He prefers the term "broadband communications network,"…

  20. Conserving biodiversity on native rangelands: Symposium proceedings

    Treesearch

    Daniel W. Uresk; Greg L. Schenbeck; James T. O' Rourke

    1997-01-01

    These proceedings are the result of a symposium, "Conserving biodiversity on native rangelands" held on August 17, 1995 in Fort Robinson State Park, NE. The purpose of this symposium was to provide a forum to discuss how elements of rangeland biodiversity are being conserved today. We asked, "How resilient and sustainable are rangeland systems to the...

  1. Proceedings of the pipeline engineering symposium - 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Seiders, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on the transport of petroleum and natural gas through pipelines. Topics considered at the symposium included explosion welding, flash-butt welding, computerized welding, flow improvers, carbon dioxide pipelines, submarine pipelines, computer-aided design, repair, reinforced concrete, monitoring, storage, waste processing, and gas condensate pipelines.

  2. Summary of the forest recreation symposium

    Treesearch

    Northeastern Forest Experiment Station

    1972-01-01

    Those who attended the Forest Recreation Symposium held 12-14 Octoher 1971 at Syracuse, New York, heard 26 papers about various aspects of forest recreation. Those papers have already been printed, in Proceedings made available at the Symposium, and also available upon request from the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, 6816 Market Street, Upper Darby, Pa. 19082...

  3. International Symposium for Literacy: Declaration of Persepolis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Convergence, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The full text of the Declaration of Persepolis, adopted by the International Symposium for Literacy, is presented. The Symposium considers literacy to be not only the process of attaining reading, writing, and arithmetic skills, but also a contribution to the liberation and development of the human race. (LH)

  4. Proceedings of the Symposium on Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers, Inc., New York, NY.

    The papers given at a symposium on cable television (CATV) are collected in this volume. The chairman of the symposium notes that "the phrase 'cable television' is not totally pertinent since we are talking about a wired-city concept that may encompass many services other than television." He prefers the term "broadband communications network,"…

  5. First Annual Symposium. Volume 1: Plenary Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Presentations from the symposium are presented. The progress of the Center for Space Construction is reviewed to promote technology transfer from the University of Colorado at Boulder to the national aerospace community. This symposium was heavily weighted toward plans and methodology.

  6. The 21st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    During the symposium technical topics addressed included deployable structures, electromagnetic devices, tribology, actuators, latching devices, positioning mechanisms, robotic manipulators, and automated mechanisms synthesis. A summary of the 20th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium panel discussions is included as an appendix. However, panel discussions on robotics for space and large space structures which were held are not presented herein.

  7. Association between Sleep Duration and Urinary Albumin Excretion in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Fujii, Hiroki; Iwase, Masanori; Ogata-Kaizu, Shinako; Ide, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Yohei; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Jodai, Tamaki; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2013-01-01

    Objective Few studies have so far investigated the impact of sleep duration on chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients. The objective of the present study was to examine the relationship between sleep duration and albuminuria in type 2 diabetic patients. Research Design and Methods A total of 4,870 Japanese type 2 diabetic patients ≥20 years of age were divided into six groups according to self-reported sleep duration: less than 4.5 hours, 4.5–5.4 hours, 5.5–6.4 hours, 6.5–7.4 hours, 7.5–8.4 hours and more than 8.5 hours. The association between sleep duration and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) was examined cross-sectionally. Results Both short and long sleep durations were significantly associated with higher UACR levels and higher proportions of patients with albuminuria (≥30 mg/g) and macroalbuminuria (≥300 mg/g) compared with a sleep duration of 6.5–7.4 hours (P for quadratic trend <0.001). A U-shaped association between sleep duration and UACR remained significant even after adjustment for potential confounders, including age, sex, duration of diabetes, current smoking habits, former smoking habits, current drinking habits, regular exercise habits, total energy intake, total protein intake, hypnotic use and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Furthermore, the association remained substantially unchanged after additional adjustment for body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure, renin-angiotensin system inhibitor use and depressive symptoms. Conclusions Our findings suggest that sleep duration has a U-shaped association with the UACR levels in type 2 diabetic patients, independent of potential confounders. PMID:24265736

  8. Berries and human health: research highlights from the Fifth Biennial Berry Health Benefits Symposium.

    PubMed

    Seeram, Navindra P

    2014-05-07

    The fifth biennial Berry Health Benefits Symposium showcased recent research supporting the positive effects of berry consumption on human health and disease. Remarkably, the vast majority of oral papers covered data accumulated from in vivo studies, which underscores how berry health research has advanced since the inception of this symposium in 2005. Similar to the past, research presented at this meeting was primarily focused on the major commercially cultivated berries in North America, namely, blackberry, blueberry, black raspberry, cranberry, red raspberry, and strawberry. Despite this, on the basis of similar compositional chemistry, it is possible that similar biological effects may also be extended to other small soft-fleshed "berry-type" fruits popular in other parts of the world including Europe, Asia, and South America. Overall, this symposium continues to add to the growing body of data supporting the positive impact of berry fruit consumption on human health promotion and disease risk reduction.

  9. 2008 Santa Fe Bone Symposium: update on osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Baim, Sanford; Bilezikian, John P; Eastell, Richard; LeBoff, Meryl S; Miller, Paul D

    2009-01-01

    The Ninth Annual Santa Fe Bone Symposium was held on August 1-2, 2008, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. The symposium faculty presented the current best evidence on selected topics of clinical relevance in the fields of osteoporosis, metabolic bone disease, and assessment of skeletal health. The educational venues were in the form of didactic presentations, panel discussions, challenging cases, and numerous interactive discussions. Knowledge of basic science and clinical trials was applied to real-world patient scenarios that were discussed by faculty experts and clinician participants. Topics included an update on the rationale and development of new agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, the use of bone turnover markers in clinical practice, hospital-based pathways for the management of hip fracture patients, injectable bisphosphonates for the treatment of osteoporosis, combination therapy with anabolic and antiresorptive agents, and assessment of skeletal health with devices other than central dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. This is a collection of scientific essays based on presentations and discussions at the 2008 Santa Fe Bone Symposium.

  10. Proceedings of the 2011 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Boorman, Gary; Crabbs, Torrie A.; Kolenda-Roberts, Holly; Latimer, Ken; Miller, Andrew D.; Muravnick, Kathleen B.; Nyska, Abraham; Ochoa, Ricardo; Pardo, Ingrid D.; Ramot, Yuval; Rao, Deepa B.; Schuh, JoAnn; Suttie, Andrew; Travlos, Greg S.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Elmore, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled “Pathology Potpourri,” was held in Denver, Colorado in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology’s 30th Annual Meeting. The goal of the NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers’ presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting or discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium include: proliferative lesions from various fish species including ameloblastoma, gas gland hyperplasia, nodular regenerative hepatocellular hyperplasia, and malignant granulosa cell tumor; spontaneous cystic hyperplasia in the stomach of CD1 mice and histiocytic aggregates in the duodenal villous tips of treated mice; an olfactory neuroblastoma in a cynomolgus monkey; various rodent skin lesions, including follicular parakeratotic hyperkeratosis, adnexal degeneration, and epithelial intracytoplasmic accumulations; oligodendroglioma and microgliomas in rats; a diagnostically challenging microcytic, hypochromic, responsive anemia in rats; a review of microcytes and microcytosis; nasal lesions associated with green tea extract and Ginkgo biloba in rats; corneal dystrophy in Dutch belted rabbits; valvulopathy in rats; and lymphoproliferative disease in a cynomolgus monkey. PMID:22089839

  11. 2011 International Ranavirus symposium

    Treesearch

    Rachel E. Marschang; Debra. Miller

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the state of Ranavirus knowledge, ongoing research, and future activities. Ranaviruses are large dsDNA viruses in the family Iridoviridae. They were originally detected in frogs (hence the name of the genus, Ranavirus) but are now known to infect and cause disease in fish and reptiles as well as in...

  12. Space Transportation Propulsion Technology Symposium. Volume 2: Symposium proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Transportation Propulsion Symposium was held to provide a forum for communication within the propulsion technology developer and user communities. Emphasis was placed on propulsion requirements and initiatives to support current, next generation, and future space transportation systems, with the primary objectives of discerning whether proposed designs truly meet future transportation needs and identifying possible technology gaps, overlaps, and other programmatic deficiencies. Key space transportation propulsion issues were addressed through four panels with government, industry, and academia membership. The panels focused on systems engineering and integration; development, manufacturing and certification; operational efficiency; and program development and cultural issues.

  13. Symposium: "Oncology Leadership in Asia".

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong-Young; Roh, Jae Kyung; Kim, Yeul Hong; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Baba, Hideo; Samson-Fernando, Marie Cherry Lynn; Misra, Sanjeev; Aziz, Zeba; Umbas, Rainy; P Singh, Yogendra; Shu Kam Mok, Tony; Yang, Han-Kwang; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2017-03-09

    The Symposium on "Oncology Leadership in Asia" was held as part of the official program of the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association. Given the increasing incidence of cancer in all countries and regions of Asia, regardless of developmental stage, and also in light of the recognized need for Asian countries to enhance collaboration in cancer prevention, research, treatment and follow-up, the symposium was held with the aim of bringing together oncology specialists from eight countries and regions in Asia to present the status in their own national context and discuss the key challenges and requirements in order to establish a greater Asian presence in the area of cancer control and research. The task of bringing together diverse countries and regions is made all the more urgent in that while Asia now accounts for more than half of all new cancer cases globally, clinical guidelines are based predominantly on practices adopted in western countries, which may not be optimized for unique ethnic, pharmacogenomic and cultural characteristics in Asia. Recognizing the need for Asia to better gather information and data for the compilation of Asia-specific clinical guidelines, the participants discussed the current status in Asia in the national and regional contexts and identified future steps towards integrated and collaborative initiatives in Asia. A key outcome of the symposium was a proposal to combine and integrate the activities of existing pan-Asian societies, including the Asia Pacific Federation of Organizations for Cancer Research and Control (APFOCC) and Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS). Further proposals included the expansion of pan-Asian society membership to include individuals and the essential need to encourage the participation of young researchers in order to ensure self-sustainability of cancer control efforts in the future.

  14. Space Station Freedom Evolution Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    Information on the Space Station Freedom Evolution Symposium is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include industry development needs and the Office of Commercial Programs strategy, the three-phase program to develop commercial space, Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), key provisions of the Joint Endeavor agreement, current commercial flight experiment requirements, the CCDS expendable launch vehicle program, the Commercial Experiment Transporter (COMET) program, commercial launch dates, payload sponsors, the commercial roles of the Space Station Freedom, and a listing of the Office of Commercial Programs Space Station Freedom payloads.

  15. Symposium: Neuroergonomics, technology, and cognition.

    PubMed

    Parasuraman, Raja; Baldwin, Carryl L; Knott, Benjamin; Warm, Joel S; Finomore, Victor; Boehm-Davis, Deborah; Galster, Scott M

    2012-01-01

    This symposium describes collaborative research on neuroergonomics, technology, and cognition being conducted at George Mason University and the US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) as part of the Center of Excellence in Neuroergonomics, Technology, and Cognition (CENTEC). Six presentations describe the latest developments in neuroergonomics research conducted by CENTEC scientists. The individual papers cover studies of: (1) adaptive learning systems; (2) neurobehavioral synchronicity during team performance; (3) genetics and individual differences in decision making; (4) vigilance and mindlessness; (5) interruptions and multi-tasking; and (6) development of a simulation capability that integrates measures across these domains and levels of analysis.

  16. Spring, 1980, DECUS symposium review

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.J.; Duffy, J.M.; McDonald, W.M.; Oppenheimer, J.L.; Brandt, J.J.; Grant, C.W.; O'Brien, D.W.; VanLehn, A.L.

    1980-10-24

    The Digital Equipment Computer Users Society (DECUS) holds biannual symposia where its membership and the host company can exchange ideas, problems, and solutions. This report by the newly formed DECUS Local User Group at LLL collects information gathered at the Spring '80 symposium in Chicago on April 22-25. Information is presented for the following special interest groups (SIGs): RSX/IAS SIG, VAX/VSM SIG, PASCAL (languages) SIG, networks SIG, TECO SIG, LSI-11 SIG, RT-11 SIG, site manager SIG, and database SIG. (RWR)

  17. The Eighth International Symposium On Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemonnier, Denis; Webb, Brent W.; Mengüç, M. Pınar

    2017-08-01

    This Special Issue of The Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer is based on the papers selected from RAD-16, the Eighth International Symposium on Radiative Transfer, which was held June 2016, in Cappadocia, Turkey. This Symposium is a follow-up of the seven previous meetings held in Kuşadası in 1995, 1997, and 2013; Antalya in 2001 and 2010; Istanbul in 2004; and Bodrum in 2007, all in Turkey. The Symposium was another enjoyable opportunity for the international radiation transfer community to assemble in a comfortable setting to present and discuss the state-of-the-art in research and application.

  18. Acute Pancreatitis-Progress and Challenges: A Report on an International Symposium.

    PubMed

    Afghani, Elham; Pandol, Stephen J; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Sutton, Robert; Wu, Bechien U; Vege, Santhi Swaroop; Gorelick, Fred; Hirota, Morihisa; Windsor, John; Lo, Simon K; Freeman, Martin L; Lerch, Markus M; Tsuji, Yoshihisa; Melmed, Gil Y; Wassef, Wahid; Mayerle, Julia

    2015-11-01

    An international symposium entitled "Acute pancreatitis: progress and challenges" was held on November 5, 2014 at the Hapuna Beach Hotel, Big Island, Hawaii, as part of the 45th Anniversary Meeting of the American Pancreatic Association and the Japanese Pancreas Society. The course was organized and directed by Drs. Stephen Pandol, Tooru Shimosegawa, Robert Sutton, Bechien Wu, and Santhi Swaroop Vege. The symposium objectives were to: (1) highlight current issues in management of acute pancreatitis, (2) discuss promising treatments, (3) consider development of quality indicators and improved measures of disease activity, and (4) present a framework for international collaboration for development of new therapies. This article represents a compilation and adaptation of brief summaries prepared by speakers at the symposium with the purpose of broadly disseminating information and initiatives.

  19. The symposium in context

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biggins, Dean E.

    2006-01-01

    The black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) is a member of the weasel family (Mustelidae) and is closely related to the Siberian polecat (M. eversmannii) of Asian steppes and the European polecat (M. putorius). Compared to its relatives, the black-footed ferret is an extreme specialist, depending on the prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) of North American grasslands for food and using prairie dog burrows for shelter. The black-footed ferret’s close association with prairie dogs was an important factor in its decline. Prairie dogs were regarded as an agricultural pest as human settlement progressed westward, and they became important hosts for plague as that disease colonized eastward from its sources of introduction on the west coast. Prairie dog numbers were dramatically reduced by poisoning, cropland conversions, and plague during the first half of the 20th century, and black-footed ferret populations declined precipitously. The black-footed ferret was included on the first lists of endangered species, and its status was precarious by the time the Endangered Species Act of 1973 was passed. Its rebound from a low point of 10 known individuals in spring of 1985 (Biggins and others, 2006) is impressive, but the species is not yet “recovered” in either the biological or legal sense (for further details, see Lockhart and others, this volume).

  20. The National Pancreas Foundation fellows symposium program 2006 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Gelrud, Andres; Whitcomb, David C

    2010-04-01

    Clinical and translational research is critical for the development of improvement in care of pancreatic diseases. Major concerns are the lack of dedicated trainees in pancreatic research and the difficulty for the remaining trainees to develop independent research careers to be included into the pancreas research community. This article describes the efforts of Solvay Pharmaceuticals and American academic leaders working through the National Pancreas Foundation to facilitate the development and expansion of a new generation of pancreas-related clinical and translational researchers through a 3-year fellows symposium.

  1. Gaining weight: the Keystone Symposium on PPAR and LXR

    PubMed Central

    Lehrke, Michael; Pascual, Gabriel; Glass, Christopher K.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear receptor superfamily consists of 48 mammalian transcription factors that regulate nearly all aspects of development, inflammation, and metabolism. Two subclasses, the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) and Liver X Receptors (LXRs), are lipid-sensing receptors that have critical roles in lipid and glucose metabolism. The parallel epidemics of obesity and diabetes shine a spotlight on the potential for therapeutic manipulation of PPARs and LXRs to combat these diseases. In recognition of this, a recent Keystone Symposium was devoted to these metabolic receptors. Here, we summarize some of the major highlights and future projections discussed at the meeting. PMID:16077002

  2. The 24th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings of the symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors, and other mechanisms for large space structures.

  3. Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium (PIERS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The third Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium (PIERS) was held 12-16 Jul. 1993, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California. More than 800 presentations were made, and those abstracts are included in this publication.

  4. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  5. Symposium on Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at a symposium titled Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics are set forth. The abstracts emphasize photometric, spectroscopic, polarization, and theoretical results on a broad range of current topics in infrared astrophysics.

  6. Plant-Incorporated Protectants Data Symposium

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA held a public symposium on data that support registration of plant incorporated protectants (PIPs). It provided firsthand information on the scope of the scientific review process regarding the safety of PIPs and on the pesticide registration process.

  7. Bolden Speaks at the URC Virtual Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden delivered a welcome address via video to support the NASA University Research Centers inaugural Virtual Poster Session and Symposium event November 8, 2012. A dive...

  8. Performance, Productivity and Continuous Improvement. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on performance, productivity, and continuous improvement. "Investigating the Association between Productivity and Quality Performance in Two Manufacturing Settings" (Constantine Kontoghiorghes, Robert Gudgel) summarizes a study that identified the following quality management variables…

  9. The 1992 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, L.R.; Mosier, F.L.

    1992-10-01

    The 1992 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a continuation of the Get Away Special Symposium convened from 1984 through 1988, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts. Separate abstracts have been prepared for papers in this report.

  10. The 1996 IDA Cost Research Symposium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-01

    Planning Research 7 5. Research Categories 8 A. INTRODUCTION On 23 May 1996, representatives from selected offices and organizations that sponsor...defense cost research symposium. This symposium facilitates the exchange of research findings, leads to avoidance of costly duplication of effort...to the highest priority, avoids duplication of effort, and facilitates sharing of results among the DoD Components. Further, the CAIG is to make

  11. 2005 Non-Lethal Defense VI Symposium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-16

    Untitled Document 2005 Non Lethal Defense VI Symposium.html[8/22/2016 9:24:13 AM] Non- Lethal Defense "VI" Symposium “Non- Lethal Weapon Options in...Current and Desired Capabilities Forum Army Non- Lethal Requirements, Brigadier General Coker, USA, TRADOC Successful Non- Lethal Illegal Alien...Interdiction Case, Rear Admiral Kunkle, USCG, Non Lethal IPT Member Luncheon Keynote Speaker, by Lieutenant General Jan Huly, USMC, Deputy Commandant for Plans

  12. Proceedings of the third international pump symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on centrifugal pumps. Topics considered at the symposium included power recovery turbines for the process industry, gas-liquid flow through centrifugal pumps, the development of an advanced gas turbine driven high-speed centrifugal pump for injection services at oil fields, cavitation, structural resonance problems, electric motors, nozzles, and rotodynamic developments for high speed multistage pumps.

  13. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greatorex, Scott (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This conference publication includes 34 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/ Estimation Theory Symposium on May 14-16, 1996. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  14. International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingle, Craig S.

    1990-01-01

    Cryospheric Sciences Program "International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow" (PI, C. Lingle) provided partial support for publication of Annals of Glaciology 36 by the International Glaciological Society. Annals of Glaciology is a peer-reviewed journal. Annals 36, which was published in 2003, contains 39 peer-reviewed and edited papers from the International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow, which was held in Yakutat, Alaska, 10-14 June 2002.

  15. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Kathy R. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This conference publication includes 41 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/ Estimation Theory Symposium on May 16-18, 1995. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  16. The Fifth NASA Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The fifth annual NASA Symposium on VLSI Design had 13 sessions including Radiation Effects, Architectures, Mixed Signal, Design Techniques, Fault Testing, Synthesis, Signal Processing, and other Featured Presentations. The symposium provides insights into developments in VLSI and digital systems which can be used to increase data systems performance. The presentations share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design.

  17. PREFACE: 26th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-26)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    26th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-26) Takayuki Watanabe The 26th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-26) was held in Fukuoka, Japan on September 23-24, 2013. SPSM has been held annually since 1988 under the sponsorship of The 153rd Committee on Plasma Materials Science, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This symposium is one of the major activities of the Committee, which is organized by researchers in academia and industry for the purpose of advancing intersectional scientific information exchange and discussion of science and technology of plasma materials processing. Plasma processing have attracted extensive attention due to their unique advantages, and it is expected to be utilized for a number of innovative industrial applications such as synthesis of high-quality and high-performance nanomaterials. The advantages of plasmas including high chemical reactivity in accordance with required chemical reactions are beneficial for innovative processing. In recent years, plasma materials processing with reactive plasmas has been extensively employed in the fields of environmental issues and biotechnology. This conference seeks to bring different scientific communities together to create a forum for discussing the latest developments and issues. The conference provides a platform for the exploration of both fundamental topics and new applications of plasmas by the contacts between science, technology, and industry. The conference was organized in plenary lectures, invited, contributed oral presentations, and poster sessions. At this meeting, we had 142 participants from 10 countries and 104 presentations, including 11 invited presentations. This year, we arranged special topical sessions that cover Plasma Medicine and Biotechnologies, Business and Academia Cooperation, Plasma with Liquids, Plasma Processes for Nanomaterials, together with Basic, Electronics, and Thermal Plasma sessions. This special issue presents 28

  18. Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Santa Fe Bone Symposium, August 3-4, 2007.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Bilezikian, John P; Cooper, Cyrus; Hochberg, Marc C; Luckey, Marjorie M; Maricic, Michael; Miller, Paul D

    2008-01-01

    The Eighth Annual Santa Fe Bone Symposium convened August 3-4, 2007, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, immediately preceded by the Research Symposium in Metabolic Bone Disease and Osteoporosis Update for Endocrine Fellows, and followed by the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) Bone Densitometry Course. The symposium faculty consists of internationally recognized experts in osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease who presented state-of-the-art research data and late-breaking developments in the fields of osteoporosis, metabolic bone disease, and assessment of skeletal health. The presentations and numerous interactive discussions that followed focused on applying what is known from clinical trials, knowledge of bone pathophysiology, and the mechanisms of action of therapeutic interventions, to making real-world patient management decisions. Topics included an update on reimbursement issues for bone density testing in the United States, a report on the 2007 ISCD Pediatric and Adult Position Development Conferences, present and future therapeutic concepts, new paradigms for fracture risk assessment and intervention thresholds, evaluation for secondary causes of osteoporosis, nonvertebral fracture risk reduction-medical evidence and clinical practice, epidemiological insights into the prevention of osteoporotic fractures, osteonecrosis of the jaw facts and fictions, and osteomalacia. Presented here are short essays based on the key clinical presentations of the 2007 Santa Fe Bone Symposium.

  19. Proceedings of the TOUGH Symposium 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Doughty, Christine; Finsterle, Stefan; Sonnenthal, Eric

    2009-10-01

    Welcome to the TOUGH Symposium 2009. Within this volume are the Symposium Program for eighty-nine papers to be presented in both oral and poster formats. The full papers are available as pdfs linked from the Symposium Program posted on the TOUGH Symposium 2009 website http://esd.lbl.gov/newsandevents/events/toughsymposium09/program.html Additional updated information including any changes to the Program will also be available at the website. The papers cover a wide range of application areas and reflect the continuing trend toward increased sophistication of the TOUGH codes. A CD containing the proceedings papers will be published immediately following the Symposium and sent to all participants. As in the prior Symposium, selected papers will be invited for submission to a number of journals for inclusion in Special Issues focused on applications and developments of the TOUGH codes. These journals include, Transport in Porous Media, Geothermics, Energy Conversion and Management, Journal of Nuclear Science and Technology, and the Vadose Zone Journal.

  20. Symposium on "Space and education"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of the symposium is to encourage agencies, businessmen and teachers from all countries to share their ideas, programmes and strategies to meet the needs of primary and secondary school pupils and university students and provide in-service training for professionals in the space industry. States are constantly required to meet the challenge of ensuring that educational methods keep pace with a changing world. The new technologies loom ever larger in our daily lives and we must all be given an opportunity to familiarise ourselves with this aspect of the modern world and extend the boundaries of our knowledge by taking part in the rapid advances in this area. Space applications too play an increasing part in our lives, pointing the way to the future. Space can be an excellent adjunct to education, contributing to a better understanding of the world around us and providing young people with the basic knowledge that is an essential part of their training. Space activities play a key role in prompting explorers, pioneers and inventors to press forward, to provide a source of innovation at the service of mankind and improve our quality of life. The space industry and space agencies can contribute to national education by providing and maintaining programmes at all levels and using the most effective teaching methods to foster enthusiasm for space among the young and encourage them to work in that sector later. The symposium will open with an official ceremony at 9.30 on Monday 3 April, and end with a formal dinner on Wednesday 5 April. The programme will include plenary sessions and workshops, starting with four plenary sessions: two on Monday, at which representatives of space firms and agencies will speak, and two on Tuesday morning, at which teachers, students and pupils, will have their say. These will be followed by five workshops, to be held on Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday morning. Media representatives wishing to attend the Symposium are asked to

  1. Sixth BHD Symposium and First International Upstate Kidney Cancer Symposium: latest scientific and clinical discoveries.

    PubMed

    Bratslavsky, Gennady; Woodford, Mark R; Daneshvar, Michael; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-03-29

    The Sixth BHD Symposium and First International Upstate Kidney Cancer Symposium concluded in September 2015, in Syracuse, NY, USA. The program highlighted recent findings in a variety of areas, including drug development, therapeutics and surgical management of patients with BHD and multi-focal renal tumors, as well as multidisciplinary approaches for patients with localized, locally advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  2. Osteoporosis update: proceedings of the 2013 Santa Fe Bone Symposium.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Bilezikian, John P; Bonewald, Lynda; Compston, Juliet E; Heaney, Robert P; Kiel, Douglas P; Miller, Paul D; Schousboe, John T

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Santa Fe Bone Symposium included plenary sessions on new developments in the fields of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease, oral presentations of abstracts, and faculty panel discussions of common clinical conundrums: scenarios of perplexing circumstances where treatment decisions are not clearly defined by current medical evidence and clinical practice guidelines. Controversial issues in the care of osteoporosis were reviewed and discussed by faculty and participants. This is a review of the proceedings of the Santa Fe Bone Symposium, constituting in its entirety an update of advances in the understanding of selected bone disease topics of interest and the implications for managing patients in clinical practice. Topics included the associations of diabetes and obesity with skeletal fragility, the complexities and pitfalls in assessing the benefits and potential adverse effects of nutrients for treatment of osteoporosis, uses of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry beyond measurement of bone mineral density, challenges in the care of osteoporosis in the very elderly, new findings on the role of osteocytes in regulating bone remodeling, and current concepts on the use of bone turnover markers in managing patients with chronic kidney disease who are at high risk for fracture. Copyright © 2014 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 34th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for organizing the AMS. Now in its 34th year, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 34th AMS, hosted by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland, was held May 10, 11 and 12, 2000. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included deployment mechanisms, bearings, actuators, pointing and optical mechanisms, Space Station mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the vendor fair gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  4. Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedics Symposium (AROS)

    PubMed Central

    Foldager, Casper B; Bendtsen, Michael; Berg, Lise C; Brinchmann, Jan E; Brittberg, Mats; Bunger, Cody; Canseco, Jose; Chen, Li; Christensen, Bjørn B; Colombier, Pauline; Deleuran, Bent W; Edwards, James; Elmengaard, Brian; Farr, Jack; Gatenholm, Birgitta; Gomoll, Andreas H; Hui, James H; Jakobsen, Rune B; Joergensen, Natasja L; Kassem, Moustapha; Koch, Thomas; Kold, Søren; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Lauridsen, Henrik; Le, Dang; Le Visage, Catherine; Lind, Martin; Nygaard, Jens V; Olesen, Morten L; Pedersen, Michael; Rathcke, Martin; Richardson, James B; Roberts, Sally; Rölfing, Jan H D; Sakai, Daisuke; Toh, Wei Seong; Urban, Jill; Spector, Myron

    2016-01-01

    The combination of modern interventional and preventive medicine has led to an epidemic of ageing. While this phenomenon is a positive consequence of an improved lifestyle and achievements in a society, the longer life expectancy is often accompanied by decline in quality of life due to musculoskeletal pain and disability. The Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedics Symposium (AROS) 2015 was motivated by the need to address regenerative challenges in an ageing population by engaging clinicians, basic scientists, and engineers. In this position paper, we review our contemporary understanding of societal, patient-related, and basic science-related challenges in order to provide a reasoned roadmap for the future to deal with this compelling and urgent healthcare problem. PMID:28271925

  5. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  6. NASA Space Sciences Symposium-1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The primary objective of the symposium was to motivate American Indians and other minority youths and women to select science and engineering as viable career choices, thereby making them available to the technical work force. Other objectives were: (1) to determine how aerospace technology careers and aerospace activities can be made more relevant to minorities and women; (2) to provide an opportunity for key NASA officials to interact with teachers and counselors of the participating schools; (3) to stimulate a greater interest among American Indian organizations and students in NASA's research and development programs; (4) to help NASA's efforts in the recruiting of minorities and women into its work force; and (5) to provide opportunities for minority aerospace scientists and engineers to interact with the minority community, particularly with youths at the junior high school and high school levels.

  7. Proceedings: 1987 Symposium on Chemistry in High-Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    1990-03-01

    This report summarizes each symposium session and includes complete papers or abstracts. Attracting an international audience, the symposium created the opportunity for presentations and discussions on the latest laboratory and field developments.

  8. 77 FR 21785 - Medical Countermeasures Initiative Regulatory Science Symposium

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Countermeasures Initiative Regulatory Science... Administration (FDA) is announcing the following meeting: Medical Countermeasures Initiative Regulatory Science Symposium. The symposium is intended to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas for medical countermeasure...

  9. Literacy on Our Minds: A Student-Inspired Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Peggy; Cowan, Kay

    2006-01-01

    In the context of an imagined symposium, this article addresses the literacy practices of elementary students ranging from first through sixth grade. The arguments the students make throughout the symposium, as well as the practices they relate, are drawn from arts-based literacy research conducted by the two authors. The imagined symposium begins…

  10. Proceedings of the fifth annual forest inventory and analysis symposium

    Treesearch

    Ronald E. McRoberts; Gregory A. Reams; Paul C. Van Deusen; William H., eds. McWilliams

    2005-01-01

    The Fifth Annual Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium was held in New Orleans, Louisiana, the second consecutive year at this location. Given the positive response to the 2002 symposium in New Orleans, we decided to return in 2003. Each year of this symposium series the range of presentations has increased; 2003 was no exception, with several presentations related...

  11. Highlights from the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2015

    PubMed Central

    Jassem, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    A critical review on the practice changing studies presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held December 2015, is presented in this podcast. A number of areas, including neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment, treatment of metastatic disease and the emergence of new biomarkers are addressed. Trials discussed include the WSG-ADAPT HER2+/HR+ phase II trial, which assessed 12-weeks of neoadjuvant TDM1 with or without endocrine therapy versus trastuzumab+endocrine therapy in HER2-positive hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer, the CREATE-X study, which assessed adjuvant capecitabine in patients with HER2-negative pathologic residual invasive disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and the TH3RESA study, which investigated trastuzumab emtansine use in patients with previously treated HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Further, studies on new promising biomarkers such as the prognostic value of circulating tumour cells in follow up of early breast cancer patients after adjuvant chemotherapy are highlighted. Overall, the present podcast represents a comprehensive overview on some of the most important studies presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. PMID:27843589

  12. Osteoporosis update from the 2012 Santa Fe Bone Symposium.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Adler, Robert A; Bilezikian, John P; Bouxsein, Mary L; Marcus, Robert; McClung, Michael R; Miller, Paul D; Tanner, S Bobo; Randall, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The core of the 2012 Santa Fe Bone Symposium consisted of plenary presentations on new developments in the fields of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease, with a focus on current and future implications for patient care. These were complemented by oral abstracts, interactive discussions of challenging cases, a debate on benefits and risks of long-term bisphosphonate therapy, and a panel discussion of controversial issues in the management of osteoporosis. Other topics included a review of the most important scientific publications in the past year, new and emerging therapy for osteoporosis, the benefits and limitations of clinical practice guidelines in the care of individual patients, the effects of metallic elements on skeletal health, clinical applications of bone turnover markers, an engineering perspective of skeletal health and disease, and an update on the role of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry in education, certification, accreditation, and advocacy for high-quality bone density testing. The symposium was highlighted by an inaugural presentation of "2 Million 2 Many," a national campaign of the National Bone Health Alliance to increase awareness of osteoporosis. Copyright © 2013 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. All rights reserved.

  13. Twelfth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research.

    PubMed

    Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-05-04

    During the past century, environmental hazards have become a major concern, not only to public health professionals, but also to the society at large because of their tremendous health, socio-cultural and economic impacts. Various anthropogenic or natural factors have been implicated in the alteration of ecosystem integrity, as well as in the development of a wide variety of acute and/or chronic diseases in humans. It has also been demonstrated that many environmental agents, acting either independently or in combination with other toxins, may induce a wide range of adverse health outcomes. Understanding the role played by the environment in the etiology of human diseases is critical to designing cost-effective control/prevention measures. This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health includes the proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium provided an excellent opportunity to discuss the scientific advances in biomedical, environmental, and public health research that addresses global environmental health issues.

  14. Twelfth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    During the past century, environmental hazards have become a major concern, not only to public health professionals, but also to the society at large because of their tremendous health, socio-cultural and economic impacts. Various anthropogenic or natural factors have been implicated in the alteration of ecosystem integrity, as well as in the development of a wide variety of acute and/or chronic diseases in humans. It has also been demonstrated that many environmental agents, acting either independently or in combination with other toxins, may induce a wide range of adverse health outcomes. Understanding the role played by the environment in the etiology of human diseases is critical to designing cost-effective control/prevention measures. This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health includes the proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium provided an excellent opportunity to discuss the scientific advances in biomedical, environmental, and public health research that addresses global environmental health issues. PMID:27153079

  15. Toward human organ printing: Charleston Bioprinting Symposium.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The First Annual Charleston Bioprinting Symposium was organized by the Bioprinting Research Center of the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and convened July 21, 2006, in Charleston, South Carolina. In broad terms, bioprinting is the application of rapid prototyping technology to the biomedical field. More specifically, it is defined as the layer by layer deposition of biologically relevant material. The 2006 Symposium included four sessions: Computer-aided design and Bioprinting, Bioprinting Technologies; Hydrogel for Bioprinting and, finally, a special session devoted to ongoing research projects at the MUSC Bioprinting Research Center. The Symposium highlight was the presentation of the multidisciplinary Charleston Bioengineered Kidney Project. This symposium demonstrated that bioprinting or robotic biofabrication is one of the most exciting and fast-emerging branches in the tissue engineering field. Robotic biofabrication will eventually lead to industrial production of living human organs suitable for clinical transplantation. The symposium demonstrated that although there are still many technological challenges, organ printing is a rapidly evolving feasible technology.

  16. A Haptics Symposium Retrospective: 20 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgate, J. Edward; Adelstein, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The very first "Haptics Symposium" actually went by the name "Issues in the Development of Kinesthetic Displays of Teleoperation and Virtual environments." The word "Haptic" didn't make it into the name until the next year. Not only was the most important word absent but so were RFPs, journals and commercial markets. And yet, as we prepare for the 2012 symposium, haptics is a thriving and amazingly diverse field of endeavor. In this talk we'll reflect on the origins of this field and on its evolution over the past twenty years, as well as the evolution of the Haptics Symposium itself. We hope to share with you some of the excitement we've felt along the way, and that we continue to feel as we look toward the future of our field.

  17. IDEAL Symposium on the East African Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Kelts, K.; Lehman, J. T.; Wuest, A.

    A vast array of interdisciplinary problems presented by the African Great Lakes were highlighted at the International Symposium on the Limnology, Climatology and Paleoclimatology of the East African Lakes, organized by the International Decade for the East African Lakes (IDEAL) February 17-21 in Jinja, Uganda. Approximately 125 scientists attended from North America, Europe, Africa, and New Zealand. Jinja is located on the northern shore of Lake Victoria at the head-waters of the Nile and is the site of the host institution for the symposium, the Uganda Freshwater Fisheries Research Organization (UFFRO). The conveners of the symposium were Tom Johnson of Duke University, George Kitaka of UNESCO-ROSTA, and Eric Odada of the University of Nairobi.

  18. International Equine Ophthalmology Consortium (IEOC) Symposium.

    PubMed

    Gilger, B C; Brooks, D E

    2009-07-01

    This first IEOC symposium met its goals of gathering a group of leading equine ophthalmology clinicians and researchers to identify the challenges of the field. To facilitate collaboration, notes from round-table discussions, including the ideas and plans that were discussed are being complied and will be distributed to the attendees. Development of an IEOC membership organisation and website was discussed and supported by the group in an effort further to advance the science of equine ophthalmology. To present results from the collaborations made at this first IEOC meeting, an IEOC mini-symposium will be held at the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists Annual Meeting in Chicago Illinois, on 6th November 2009. The second annual IEOC symposium will be held in Vienna, Austria on 4th and 5th June 2010.

  19. Nonpetroleum vehicular fuels: symposium papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A three day symposium on Nonpetroleum Vehicular Fuels was held in Arlington, Virginia, February 11 to 13, 1980. The central theme of the conference was the exchange of information on the successful use of nonpetroleum vehicular fuels and the identification of problems which might hinder the acceptance of these alternative fuels. Presentations and discussions included: current domestic and foreign activities to develop nonconventional vehicular energy; research and development efforts to provide new engines, vehicles and on-board hardware for economical, safe, and environmentally acceptable operation; programs to produce, market, and utilize such fuels; institutional constraints such as tax laws, environmental and safety regulations which may slow acceptance; programs needed to speed growth of the nongasoline alternative and increase customer acceptance; and commercial applications. In attendance were experts on fuels, engines, electric vehicles, energy delivery systems, government regulations, and environmental regulations. The papers presented are reproduced in full in this volume. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  20. Fourth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.; Watson, E.E.

    1986-04-01

    The focus of the Fourth International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium was to explore the impact of current developments in nuclear medicine on absorbed dose calculations. This book contains the proceedings of the meeting including the edited discussion that followed the presentations. Topics that were addressed included the dosimetry associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and blood elements, ultrashort-lived radionuclides, and positron emitters. Some specific areas of discussion were variations in absorbed dose as a result of alterations in the kinetics, the influence of radioactive contaminants on dose, dose in children and in the fetus, available instrumentation and techniques for collecting the kinetic data needed for dose calculation, dosimetry requirements for the review and approval of new radiopharmaceuticals, and a comparison of the effect on the thyroid of internal versus external irradiation. New models for the urinary blader, skeleton including the active marrow, and the blood were presented. Several papers dealt with the validity of traditional ''average-organ'' dose estimates to express the dose from particulate radiation that has a short range in tissue. These problems are particularly important in the use of monoclonal antibodies and agents used to measure intracellular functions. These proceedings have been published to provide a resource volume for anyone interested in the calculation of absorbed radiation dose.

  1. 2016 AMS Mario J. Molina Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Renyi

    2016-11-29

    A named symposium to honor Dr. Mario J. Molina was held 10–14 January 2016, as part of the 96th American Meteorological Society (AMS) Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Molina first demonstrated that industrially produced chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) decompose in the stratosphere and release chlorine atoms, leading to catalytic ozone destruction. His research in stratospheric chemistry was instrumental to the establishment of the 1987 United Nations Montreal Protocol to ban ozone-depleting substances worldwide. Dr. Molina’s contributions to preserving the planet Earth not only save the atmospheric ozone layer, but also protect the climate by reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases. He was awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his pioneering research in understanding the stratospheric ozone loss mechanism. In 2013, President Barack Obama announced Dr. Molina as a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The 2016 AMS Molina Symposium honored Dr. Molina’s distinguished contributions to research related to atmospheric chemistry. The symposium contained an integrated theme related to atmospheric chemistry, climate, and policy. Dr. Molina delivered a keynote speech at the Symposium. The conference included invited keynote speeches and invited and contributed oral and poster sessions, and a banquet was held on Tuesday January 12, 2016. The symposium covered all aspects of atmospheric chemistry, with topics including (1) Stratospheric chemistry, (2) Tropospheric chemistry, (3) Aerosol nucleation, growth, and transformation, (4) Aerosol properties, (5) Megacity air pollution, and (6) Atmospheric chemistry laboratory, field, and modeling studies. This DOE project supported 14 scientists, including graduate students, post docs, junior research scientists, and non-tenured assistant professors to attend this symposium.

  2. International Symposium on Advanced Materials (ISAM 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    This proceeding is a compilation of peer reviewed papers presented at the 13th International Symposium on Advanced Materials (ISAM 2013) held from September 23-27, 2013, at Islamabad, Pakistan. In my capacity as ISAM-2013 Secretary, I feel honoured that the symposium has ended on a positive note. The ever increasing changes and intricacies that characterize modern industry necessitate a growing demand for technical information on advanced materials. ISAM and other similar forums serve to fulfill this need. The five day deliberations of ISAM 2013, consisted of 19 technical sessions and 2 poster sessions. In all, 277 papers were presented, inclusive of 80 contributory, invited and oral presentations. The symposium also hosted panel discussions led by renowned scientists and eminent researchers from foreign as well as local institutes. The ultimate aim of this proceeding is to record in writing the new findings in the field of advanced materials. I hope that the technical data available in this publication proves valuable to young scientists and researchers working in this area of science. At the same time, I wish to acknowledge Institute of Physics (IOP) Publishing UK, for accepting the research papers from ISAM-2013 for publication in the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. The proceeding will be available on the IOP website as an online open access document. I am profoundly thankful to the Symposium Chairman for his steadfast support and valuable guidance without which ISAM 2013 could not have been the mega event that it turned out to be. My gratitude to all our distinguished participants, session chairs/co-chairs, and reviewers for their active role in the symposium. I appreciate the entire organizing committee for the zest and ardor with which each committee fulfilled its obligations to ISAM. Last yet not the least, my thankfulness goes to all our sponsors for wilfully financing the event. Dr. Sara Qaisar Symposium Secretary Further

  3. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium, 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Kathy R. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This conference publication includes 41 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium on May 17-19, 1994. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  4. Fifth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P.

    2000-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Fifth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Radisson Hotel Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, on December 1-3, 1999. The symposium included 18 sessions in which a total of 53 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, controls, modeling, electromagnetic launch, magnetic suspension in wind tunnels, applications flywheel energy storage, rotating machinery, vibration isolation, and maglev. A list of attendees is included in the document.

  5. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This conference publication includes 28 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium on May 10 to 11, 1988. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium features technical papers on a wide range of issue related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  6. Fourth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Fourth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at The Nagaragawa Convention Center in Gifu, Japan, on October 30 - November 1, 1997. The symposium included 13 sessions in which a total of 35 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of maglev, controls, high critical temperature (T(sub c)) superconductivity, bearings, magnetic suspension and balance systems (MSBS), levitation, modeling, and applications. A list of attendees is included in the document.

  7. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This conference publication includes 32 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium on May 22-25, 1990. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium features technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  8. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This conference publication includes 40 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium on May 5-7, 1992. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  9. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

  10. Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Holiday Inn Capital Plaza in Tallahassee, Florida on 13-15 Dec. 1995. The symposium included 19 sessions in which a total of 55 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, superconductivity, vibration isolation, maglev, controls, space applications, general applications, bearing/actuator design, modeling, precision applications, electromagnetic launch and hypersonic maglev, applications of superconductivity, and sensors.

  11. Kitasato Symposium 2009: New Prospects for Cytokine Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The Kitasato Symposium 2009: New Prospects for Cytokine Inhibition was held in Berlin, Germany from 7 to 9 May 2009. The key aims of this meeting were to bring together a group of front-line researchers and rheumatologists to evaluate the use of cytokine blockade and to examine the role of certain cytokines in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. A keynote lecture delivered by Professor Jean-Michel Dayer provided an up-to-date overview of the interactions occurring between the immune system and acute phase proteins. Other speakers discussed the role of cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis, including their role in joint destruction, as well as their regulatory role upon T cells and B cells. The involvement of cytokines in other autoimmune diseases was also addressed. PMID:20067593

  12. Conference report: 1st Medicon Valley Inhalation Symposium.

    PubMed

    Lastow, Orest

    2013-02-01

    The 1st Medicon Valley Inhalation Symposium was arranged by the Medicon Valley Inhalation Consortium. It was held at the Medicon Village site, which is the former AstraZeneca site in Lund, Sweden. It was a 1-day symposium focused on inhaled drug delivery and inhalation product development. A total of 90 delegates listened to 15 speakers. The program was organized to follow the value chain of an inhalation product development. The benefits and future opportunities of inhaled drug delivery were discussed together with some new disease areas that can be targeted with inhalation. The pros and cons of the two main formulation types; dry powder and liquid formulations, were discussed by a panel. The different requirements of the drug molecules from a pharmacology, chemical and physical perspective were explained. The modeling of the physics inside an inhaler was demonstrated and the potential strategic benefits of device design were highlighted together with the many challenges of formulation manufacturing. Lung deposition mechanisms and the difficulties of the generic bioequivalence concept were discussed. Using an anatomically correct impactor inlet is a valuable tool in lung deposition predictions and the planning of clinical trials. The management of the biological material generated in clinical studies is key to successful studies.

  13. Annual Symposium on Subtypes of Muscarinic Receptors (6th) Held in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida on November 9 -12, 1994.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-03

    Alzheimer’s disease was also presented. Funds granted by USAMRAA made it possible to publish quickly and disseminate widely the Symposium Proceedings. The edited manuscripts of the invited papers and the abstracts of poster papers were published Feb.10, 1995 as Vol.56, Nos.11/12 of Life Sciences and sent free to its thousands of subscribers and to hundreds of others. Grants from NSF and NIH supported the attendance of 29 pre- and postdoctoral fellows, 26 of whom presented posters. The choice of dates and venue for the Symposium also made it possible for many to

  14. The publication of sponsored symposiums in medical journals.

    PubMed

    Bero, L A; Galbraith, A; Rennie, D

    1992-10-15

    An increasing proportion of spending by the pharmaceutical industry has gone to funding symposiums that are published by peer-reviewed medical journals. This study tests the hypothesis that such sponsorship, particularly by a single pharmaceutical company, is associated with a promotional orientation of the symposium and a distortion of the peer-review process. We counted the symposiums published in 58 journals of clinical medicine and surveyed the journal editors regarding their policies for symposium issues. We analyzed the symposium issues that appeared in the 11 journals that published the most symposiums in order to determine the sponsor or sponsors, the topics, whether the titles were misleading, whether brand names were used, and whether the featured drugs were classified by the Food and Drug Administration as innovative or approved. The number of symposiums published per year increased steadily from 1966 through 1989. Forty-two percent of those analyzed (262 of 625) had a single pharmaceutical company as the sponsor. These symposiums were more likely than those with other sponsors to have misleading titles (P less than 0.001) and to use brand names (P less than 0.001), and less likely to be peer-reviewed in the same manner as other articles in the parent journal (P less than 0.001). Of the 161 symposiums that focused on a single drug, 51 percent concerned unapproved therapies; 14 percent concerned drugs classified as bringing important therapeutic gains. Symposiums sponsored by drug companies often have promotional attributes and are not peer-reviewed. Financial relations among symposium participants, sponsors, and journals should be completely disclosed, symposiums should be clearly identified, and journal editors should maintain editorial control over contributions from symposiums.

  15. Neurovascular and Immuno-Imaging: From Mechanisms to Therapies. Proceedings of the Inaugural Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Akassoglou, Katerina; Agalliu, Dritan; Chang, Christopher J.; Davalos, Dimitrios; Grutzendler, Jaime; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Khakh, Baljit S.; Kleinfeld, David; McGavern, Dorian B.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2016-01-01

    Breakthrough advances in intravital imaging have launched a new era for the study of dynamic interactions at the neurovascular interface in health and disease. The first Neurovascular and Immuno-Imaging Symposium was held at the Gladstone Institutes, University of California, San Francisco in March, 2015. This highly interactive symposium brought together a group of leading researchers who discussed how recent studies have unraveled fundamental biological mechanisms in diverse scientific fields such as neuroscience, immunology, and vascular biology, both under physiological and pathological conditions. These Proceedings highlight how advances in imaging technologies and their applications revolutionized our understanding of the communication between brain, immune, and vascular systems and identified novel targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological diseases. PMID:26941593

  16. Neurovascular and Immuno-Imaging: From Mechanisms to Therapies. Proceedings of the Inaugural Symposium.

    PubMed

    Akassoglou, Katerina; Agalliu, Dritan; Chang, Christopher J; Davalos, Dimitrios; Grutzendler, Jaime; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Khakh, Baljit S; Kleinfeld, David; McGavern, Dorian B; Nelson, Sarah J; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2016-01-01

    Breakthrough advances in intravital imaging have launched a new era for the study of dynamic interactions at the neurovascular interface in health and disease. The first Neurovascular and Immuno-Imaging Symposium was held at the Gladstone Institutes, University of California, San Francisco in March, 2015. This highly interactive symposium brought together a group of leading researchers who discussed how recent studies have unraveled fundamental biological mechanisms in diverse scientific fields such as neuroscience, immunology, and vascular biology, both under physiological and pathological conditions. These Proceedings highlight how advances in imaging technologies and their applications revolutionized our understanding of the communication between brain, immune, and vascular systems and identified novel targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological diseases.

  17. The 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancini, Ron (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The proceedings of the 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at ARC, Moffett Field, California, on 12-14 May 1993, are reported. Technological areas covered include the following: actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for large space structures.

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF "THE LEAD REMEDIATION EFFECTIVENESS SYMPOSIUM"

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Symposium on Lead Remediation Effectiveness, sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency, was held at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, USA from 22-25 May, 2000. International participants from various levels of government, educational institutions, industry, and community represen...

  19. Competencies: Fuzzy Concepts to Context. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium titled "Competence: Fuzzy Concepts to Context.""Sales Superstars: Defining Competencies Needed for Sales Performance" (Darlene Russ-Eft, Edward Del Gaizo, Jeannie Moulton, Ruth Pangilinan) discusses a study in which an analysis of 1,688 critical incidents revealed 16…

  20. Training Retail Managers--A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, F. G., Ed.

    This symposium focuses on training programs for managers of department stores, multiple shops, supermarkets and self-service stores, and small independent shops. The authors of each of the four sections in the publication have had experience in training managers in the retail trade. For conceptual and managerial aspects of the manager's job,…

  1. Organizational Change. Symposium 19. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on organizational change consists of three presentations. "Institutionalizing Organizational Change Through Cascade Training: Implications for Human Resource Development (HRD) Research" (Ronald L. Jacobs, Darlene Russ-Eft, Suhail Zidan) proposes the institutionalization of change should be addressed as a major part of the…

  2. The 1995 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Frann (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The 1995 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS) and Hitchhiker programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

  3. Intergas `95: International unconventional gas symposium. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The International Unconventional Gas Symposium was held on May 14--20, 1995 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama where 52 reports were presented. These reports are grouped in this proceedings under: geology and resources; mine degasification and safety; international developments; reservoir characterization/coal science; and environmental/legal and regulatory. Each report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. The 31st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, C. L. (Compiler); Boesiger, E. A. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    The proceedings of the 31st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Topics covered include: robotics, deployment mechanisms, bearings, actuators, scanners, boom and antenna release, and test equipment. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms.

  5. Achievement and Its Correlates: Symposium III A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Maznah; And Others

    This symposium contains a report of a study which (1) examined the relationship between Malaysian children's perception of control and their academic achievement, by Maznah Ismail and Choo Piang Foong, and two abstracts of studies which (2) investigated achievement motivation and attribution of success in rural and urban Malaysian ethnic groups,…

  6. Self Directed Learning and Self Management. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on self-directed learning and self-management. "Validating a More-Dimensional Conception of Self-Directed Learning" (Gerald A. Straka, Cornelia Schaefer) discusses the development and validation of a conception of self-directed learning as a dynamic interplay between behavior,…

  7. Board of Regents Symposium on Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    As discussed in several addresses at a New York State Board of Regents symposium, the task of continuing education in New York State includes adult basic education, job training, and other forms of involvement by educators and other segments of society in efforts to enable individuals, communities, and organizations to function effectively in a…

  8. The 22nd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings of the symposium, which was held at the NASA Langley Research Center, on May 4 to 6, 1988, are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for space station docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  9. Fifth International Symposium on Liquid Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R. (Compiler)

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the fiollowing: Theme: Life-life Combustion Devices Technology. Technical Sessions: International Perspectives. System Level Effects. Component Level Processes. Material Considerations. Design Environments -- Predictions. Injector Design Technology. Design Environments -- Measurements. Panel Discussion: Views on future research and development needs and Symposium observations. Aquarium Welcome and Southern Belle Riverboat Recognition Banquet evening events.

  10. Aircraft Piston Engine Exhaust Emission Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A 2-day symposium on the reduction of exhaust emissions from aircraft piston engines was held on September 14 and 15, 1976, at the Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Papers were presented by both government organizations and the general aviation industry on the status of government contracts, emission measurement problems, data reduction procedures, flight testing, and emission reduction techniques.

  11. Symposium: Aesthetic Education in Japan Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okazaki, Ako; Masuda, Kingo; Kaneda, Takuya; Hino, Yoko; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fukumoto, Kinichi; Nagamori, Motoki; Yamada, Kazumi; Motomura, Kenta; Ishizaki, Kazhiro; Okada, Masashi; Kaneko, Yoshimasa; Naoe, Toshio; Fujie, Mitsuru; Iwano, Masako

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this symposium is to provide readers with a general understanding of Japanese art and aesthetics education and its interaction with other cultures. The essays cover a variety of topics, including historical, cross-cultural, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Following an introduction by Ako Okazaki, the following papers are…

  12. Continuing the Development of Career: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiedeman, David V., Ed.

    Following a brief introduction by the editor, four symposium papers are presented on continuing the development of career: "Career Development in Adults. Why do People 35 and Over Change Jobs?" Nancy K. Schlossberg; "Applying Vocational Theory to Adult Problems," John L. Holland; "Career Development of Adults: Why, When, Where, How," Elinor…

  13. The 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The proceedings of the 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at the Goddard Space Flight Center on May 13, 14, and 15, 1992 are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors and other mechanisms for large space structures.

  14. The 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, R.

    1993-05-01

    The proceedings of the 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at ARC, Moffett Field, California, on 12-14 May 1993, are reported. Technological areas covered include the following: actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for large space structures. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  15. University Programs. Symposium 20. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on university programs consists of three presentations. "Institutional and Curricular Characteristics of Leading Graduate Human Resource Development (HRD) Programs in the United States" (K. Peter Kuchinke) reports a study on institutional arrangements, student enrollments, and core curriculum content and found a large…

  16. Abstracts, Third Space Processing Symposium, Skylab results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Skylab experiments results are reported in abstracts of papers presented at the Third Space Processing Symposium. Specific areas of interest include: exothermic brazing, metals melting, crystals, reinforced composites, glasses, eutectics; physics of the low-g processes; electrophoresis, heat flow, and convection demonstrations flown on Apollo missions; and apparatus for containerless processing, heating, cooling, and containing materials.

  17. Life Affirming Work and Social Justice. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on life-affirming work and social justice that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Doing Good or Doing Well? A Counter-story of Continuing Professional Education (CPE)" (Laurel Jeris, Linda Armacost) reports on an exploratory study in which a…

  18. The 17th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The proceedings of the Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft/Shuttle latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for spacecraft tether, magnetic bearing suspension, explosive welding, and a deployable/retractable mast are also described.

  19. Upland Oak Ecology Symposium: A Synthesis

    Treesearch

    Martin A. Spetich

    2004-01-01

    Recent changes in upland forests of the Interior Highlands have raised the interest of and questions from professional resource specialists and the public. This renewed interest in Interior Highland forests provided researchers an opportunity to update resource specialists on new knowledge regarding upland oak ecology. Symposium presentations and the papers presented...

  20. The 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The proceedings of the 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at the Goddard Space Flight Center on May 13, 14, and 15, 1992 are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors and other mechanisms for large space structures.

  1. The 1985 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, L. R. (Editor); Mosier, F. L. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium provided a formal opportunity for GAS experimenters to share the results of their projects. The focus is on payloads that have been flown on Shuttle missions, and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the near future.

  2. Approaches to Measuring Library Effectiveness. A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershfield, Allan F., Ed.; Boone, Morell D., Ed.

    A symposium was held in 1971 at Syracuse University on the topic of measuring library effectiveness. The first speaker, Allen Hershfield, introduced the topic with emphasis on the importance and critical need for measurements of library effectiveness. The next speaker, Ernest DeProspo, was concerned with methodological problems and the relation…

  3. Achievement and Its Correlates: Symposium III A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Maznah; And Others

    This symposium contains a report of a study which (1) examined the relationship between Malaysian children's perception of control and their academic achievement, by Maznah Ismail and Choo Piang Foong, and two abstracts of studies which (2) investigated achievement motivation and attribution of success in rural and urban Malaysian ethnic groups,…

  4. Symposium: A Beginning in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Peter; Fry, Paul H.; Carnochan, W. B.; Culler, Jonathan; Lerer, Seth; Marshall, Donald G.; Johnson, Barbara; Steiner, Wendy; Haack, Susan; Nussbaum, Martha C.

    2002-01-01

    2001 marked Yale's 300th birthday. It seemed an opportunity for reflection on the evolution of the institution, and particularly on the vicissitudes of the humanities over those three centuries. This article presents essays which represent a selection from the symposium, "Beginning With the Humanities," held at the Whitney Humanities Center on…

  5. Cost Analysis, Evaluation and Feedback. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on cost analysis, evaluation, and feedback in human resource development. "Training Evaluation with 360-Degree Feedback" (Froukje A. Jellema) reports on a quasi-experimental study that examined the effectiveness of 360-degree feedback in evaluating the training received by nurses in a…

  6. Emotional Intelligence, Identity Salience, and Metaphors. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on emotional intelligence, identity salience, and metaphors in human resource development (HRD). "Applying Client and Consultant Generated Metaphors in HRD: Lessons from Psychotherapy" (Darren Short) reviews some techniques that psychotherapists have devised for using their own…

  7. Summation of the Symposium on Arkansas Forests

    Treesearch

    B.G. Blackmon

    2001-01-01

    This brings us to the conclusion of a wonderful 2 days together--the culmination of the symposium on Arkansas Forests. We heard from a wide range of speakers who presented details of the forest survey and those who interpreted that information in light of the important resource issues in Arkansas and the region. My task here is to summarize and possibly interpret the...

  8. Highlights of the heavy ion fusion symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    The current status and prospects for inertial confinement fusion based on the use of intense beams of heavy ions will be described in the light of results presented at the International Symposium on Heavy Ion Fusion, (Washington, DC, May 27-29, 1986).

  9. Symposium on Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Steven D.; Rice, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    In this Symposium focused on MOOCs, this journal carries forward a tradition of attending to the technologies associated with composing and the teaching of composing. In the May 1983 issue of "College Composition and Communication," for example, most of the articles focus on composing and include a mix of inquiries, from Jack Selzer's on the…

  10. Women in Librarianship: Melvil's Rib Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Margaret, Ed.; Scarborough, Mayra, Ed.

    In April 1973, the Graduate School of Library Service Alumni Association and the Graduate School of Library Service at Rutgers University jointly sponsored a symposium on the position of women in the library profession. Three major presentations, and the discussions which followed, dealt with various aspects of this issue. The first presentation,…

  11. The 29th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The proceedings of the 29th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was hosted by NASA Johnson Space Center and held at the South Shore Harbour Conference Facility on May 17-19, 1995, are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, pointing mechanisms joints, bearings, release devices, booms, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  12. Learning Organization. Symposium 36. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on learning organization consists of three presentations. "Perception of Learning Culture and Concerns About the Innovation on Use of Innovation: A Question of Level of Analysis" (Rebecca Fatima Sta. Maria, Karen E. Watkins) reports a study of the relationship between organizational members' perception of learning culture…

  13. Center for Space Construction Third Annual Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs from presentations given at the symposium are presented. The topics covered include the following: orbital assembly, large space structures, space stations, expert systems, lunar regolith and structure mechanics, lunar shelter construction from lunar resources, telerobotic rovers, lunar construction equipment, lunar based equipment, and lunar construction.

  14. HRD Effectiveness and Transfer of Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on human resource development (HRD) effectiveness and transfer of learning. "Factors Affecting Transfer of Training in Thailand" (Siriporn Yamnill, Gary N. McLean) discusses how the Learning Transfer System Inventory was validated in Thailand by administering it to 1,029 employers and…

  15. Leadership Development. Symposium 13. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on leadership development consists of three presentations. "Organizational Performance: The Future Focus of Leadership Development Programs" (Doris B. Collins) reports research that analyzed 54 leadership studies from 1984-2000 and confirmed that organizations have begun to take a more systemic approach to leadership…

  16. The 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, Douglas A. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The proceedings of the 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was hosted by the NASA Lewis Research Center and held at the Cleveland Marriott Society Center on May 18, 19, and 20, 1994, are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, pointing mechanisms joints, bearings, release devices, booms, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  17. Organization Development. Symposium 16. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on organization development (OD) consists of three presentations. "A Study of Gender Management Preferences as Related to Predicted Organizational Management Paradigms for the Twenty-First Century" (Cathy Bolton McCullough) reports a study that found that access to diverse management preferences and the manner in which the…

  18. Theory Building. Symposium 21. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on theory building consists of three presentations. "A Multilevel Theory of Organizational Performance: Seeing the Forest and the Trees" (Susan Reynolds Fisher) presents the process used to develop this theory and analyzes emergent insights. It discusses how the theory succeeds in mapping relationships across aspects and…

  19. The Second International Symposium on Plant Cryopreservation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Second International Symposium on Plant Cryopreservation was held in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA, from August 11-14, 2013, under the auspices of the International Society for Horticultural Science. The town of Fort Collins is home to the USDA-ARS, National Center for Genetic Resources Preservati...

  20. Eighth international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Eckelman, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Eighth International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry was held on June 25--29, in Princeton, New Jersey. Topics covered in the meeting include: Technetium Chemistry; Perfusion Agents; Radionuclide Production; Synthetic Precursors; Analysis/Automation; Antibodies; Receptors; Metabolism, DOPA FDG; Receptors, D2 D1; Metabolism; and Metabolism, Cancer. Individual papers in each of these areas are abstracted separately. (MHB)

  1. Approaches to Research in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on approaches to research in human resource development (HRD). "HRD, Feminism, and Adult Education: A Foundation for Collaborative Approaches to Research and Practice" (Yvonne M. Johnson) identifies common interests among HRD professionals, feminists, and practitioners in the field of…

  2. SIAM symposium on control problems in industry

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This symposium focused on industrial control applications that have benefited from recent mathematical and technological developments. The themes featured included: applications of control techniques in aerospace industry, automotive industry, environmental sciences, manufacturing processes, and petroleum industry; optimal shape design in aerospace applications; optimal design of micro-optics; robust control and H-infinity methods.

  3. Job Demands and Worker Health. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, John R., Jr.; And Others

    Seventeen years ago a group of researchers at the University of Michigan became interested in the possibility that occupational health may be determined by psychological as well as physical hazards in the work environment. This symposium reports on current work in testing a unified theory of the effects of psychosocial stresses on mental and…

  4. Emotional and Personality Development: Symposium III C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durrani, Naeem; And Others

    This symposium reports an investigation of correlates of self-disclosure among Indian college students, by Sarla Jawa, and provides abstracts of both a Pakistani perspective on personality and moral development, by Naeem Durrani, and a study of Indian students' attitudes toward sex, by Premala S. Kale. Findings of the study of correlates of…

  5. Movement Studies. AAHPER Research Consortium Symposium Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, Charles B., Ed.

    This collection of symposium papers provides current synthesis of research in the field of physical education and health. The importance of movement, body coordination, and physical activity in promoting better understanding and relationships between different ethnic groups is discussed. The hopeful possibilities provided by motor activities for…

  6. The ninth international veterinary immunology symposium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This Introduction to the special issue of Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology summarizes the Proceedings of the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (9th IVIS) held August, 2010, in Tokyo, Japan. Over 340 delegates from 30 countries discussed research progress analyzing the immune...

  7. 1989 SYMPOSIUM ON STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes information and results presented at the 1989 Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOX Control, held March 6-9, 1989 in San Francisco. Cosponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the symposiu...

  8. Counselling and Career Planning: Symposium V A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awang, Amir; And Others

    Focusing generally on counseling and career planning, this symposium provides (1) a review and critique of guidance and counseling in Malaysian schools, by Amir Awang and Latiff Mirasa; (2) a discussion of the needs of Malaysian youth, by Mohd. Yunus Mohd. Noor; and (3) an abstract of the findings of a study of some aspects of student development…

  9. Expanding Perspectives on HRD Research. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on expanding perspectives in human resource development (HRD) research. "The Concept of Culture in International and Comparative HRD Research: Methodological Problems and Possible Solutions" (Alexander Ardichvili, K. Peter Kuchinke) discusses the following topics: (1) alternative…

  10. Dissection Symposium: A Meeting of Minds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Pat

    1997-01-01

    Educators at a symposium on dissection shared a variety of views on dissection through their personal experiences as educators and as students. For example, one was turned off to science because of dissection. Another mentioned the frivolous attitudes of students who are insensitive to animals. Another indicated that most people perceive their…

  11. Computer Simulation in Undergraduate Instruction: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, Warren R.; And Others

    These symposium papers discuss the instructional use of computers in psychology, with emphasis on computer-produced simulations. The first, by Rich Edwards, briefly outlines LABSIM, a general purpose system of FORTRAN programs which simulate data collection in more than a dozen experimental models in psychology and are designed to train students…

  12. Emotional and Personality Development: Symposium III C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durrani, Naeem; And Others

    This symposium reports an investigation of correlates of self-disclosure among Indian college students, by Sarla Jawa, and provides abstracts of both a Pakistani perspective on personality and moral development, by Naeem Durrani, and a study of Indian students' attitudes toward sex, by Premala S. Kale. Findings of the study of correlates of…

  13. Proceedings of Plenary Session: The LACIE Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A technology assessment of the LACIE data processing and information systems was discussed during the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment Symposium. Crop inventories of wheat yield in the United States as well as several other nations (such as the U.S.S.R., Canada, etc.) were discussed, along with the methodology involved in acquiring this data.

  14. Income Tax Reform and Agriculture: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economic Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Five papers are provided from a symposium organized to present several economic studies relating to income tax structure and reform in agriculture. "Toward an Optimal Income Tax Policy for Southern and U.S. Agriculture" (Harold F. Breimyer) is a structured argument for comprehensive tax reform that increases the equity of the income tax…

  15. Values: Relations and Implications. Symposium V C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Wit, Jan; Keats, D. M.

    Reported at a symposium generally concerned with values and adolescents are discussions of (1) socialization issues and the impact of values on adolescents, and (2) dimensions of Asian youths' confrontation with the problem of modernization. In the first study (by Jan de Witt), the conceptual shift in socialization research to a focus on…

  16. Ethics Scenarios: A Critical Theory Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jane; And Others

    This symposium chaired by John C. Belland addressed the ethical position of educational communications and technology in society. Presenters created ethics scenarios and applied critical theory to provide insight. Intended to stimulate questions, the approach was philosophical, literary, and sociopolitical, and reflected Derrida, Foucault, and…

  17. Cognition and Written Language: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purves, Alan, Ed.

    Originally presented at a symposium on cognition and written language, the 14 papers in this collection discuss research findings regarding reading and writing processes, ways that the development of effective reading and writing can be abetted by instruction, and research needs in the area of cognition and written language. The papers focus on…

  18. HRD: Past, Present and Future. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on the past, present, and future of human resource development (HRD). "Revisiting the New Deal: A Longitudinal Case Study" (Judy Pate, Graeme Martin, Jim McGoldrick) draws upon data from a longitudinal case study of the links between job security and HRD to examine the new…

  19. Symposium on Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Steven D.; Rice, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    In this Symposium focused on MOOCs, this journal carries forward a tradition of attending to the technologies associated with composing and the teaching of composing. In the May 1983 issue of "College Composition and Communication," for example, most of the articles focus on composing and include a mix of inquiries, from Jack Selzer's on the…

  20. Approaches to Measuring Library Effectiveness. A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershfield, Allan F., Ed.; Boone, Morell D., Ed.

    A symposium was held in 1971 at Syracuse University on the topic of measuring library effectiveness. The first speaker, Allen Hershfield, introduced the topic with emphasis on the importance and critical need for measurements of library effectiveness. The next speaker, Ernest DeProspo, was concerned with methodological problems and the relation…

  1. Proceedings of the Sierra Nevada Science Symposium

    Treesearch

    Dennis D. Murphy; Peter A. Stine

    2004-01-01

    Land and resource management issues in the Sierra Nevada are becoming increasingly complex and controversial. The objective of the Sierra Nevada Science Symposium was to provide a synoptic overview of the current state of scientific knowledge related to key management issues. Attempts were made to tie recent scientific findings to applications in land management and...

  2. Ethics Scenarios: A Critical Theory Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jane; And Others

    This symposium chaired by John C. Belland addressed the ethical position of educational communications and technology in society. Presenters created ethics scenarios and applied critical theory to provide insight. Intended to stimulate questions, the approach was philosophical, literary, and sociopolitical, and reflected Derrida, Foucault, and…

  3. Conflict Management and Decision Making. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium on conflict management and decision making is comprised of three papers. "Two Approaches to Conflict Management in Teams: A Case Study" (Mychal Coleman, Gary N. McLean) describes a study that provided conflict management training to two employee teams using the traditional lecture method and cooperative learning (CL).…

  4. Organizational Learning, Change and Socialization. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on organizational learning, change, and socialization. "A Study of the Organizational Learning Profile (OLP)" (Rae Dorai, Adela J. McMurray) reports findings that show the OLP (Pace et al. 1998) is a reliable instrument for measuring organizational learning and its content validity is high.…

  5. Third LDEF Post-Retrieval Symposium Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Arlene S. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This volume is a compilation of abstracts submitted to the Third Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Post-Retrieval Symposium. The abstracts represent the data analysis of the 57 experiments flown on the LDEF. The experiments include materials, coatings, thermal systems, power and propulsion, science (cosmic ray, interstellar gas, heavy ions, micrometeoroid, etc.), electronics, optics, and life science.

  6. The Special Child: Symposium II C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaneja, Gurvinder Kaur; And Others

    Focusing on the exceptional child, this symposium contains a study which reports findings concerning the adjustment problems of the Malaysian visually handicapped student, by Chua Tee Tee, an abstract on adjustment and personality patterns in normal and problem children by Gurvinder Kaur Khaneja and Gopa Bharawaj, and an abstract of a study on…

  7. Counselling and Career Planning: Symposium V A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awang, Amir; And Others

    Focusing generally on counseling and career planning, this symposium provides (1) a review and critique of guidance and counseling in Malaysian schools, by Amir Awang and Latiff Mirasa; (2) a discussion of the needs of Malaysian youth, by Mohd. Yunus Mohd. Noor; and (3) an abstract of the findings of a study of some aspects of student development…

  8. Symposium: A Beginning in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Peter; Fry, Paul H.; Carnochan, W. B.; Culler, Jonathan; Lerer, Seth; Marshall, Donald G.; Johnson, Barbara; Steiner, Wendy; Haack, Susan; Nussbaum, Martha C.

    2002-01-01

    2001 marked Yale's 300th birthday. It seemed an opportunity for reflection on the evolution of the institution, and particularly on the vicissitudes of the humanities over those three centuries. This article presents essays which represent a selection from the symposium, "Beginning With the Humanities," held at the Whitney Humanities Center on…

  9. Work Ethic and Values in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on work ethic and values in human resource development (HRD). "Value Priorities of HRD Scholars and Practitioners" (Reid Bates, Hsin Chih Chen, Tim Hatcher) presents the results of a study that identified and analyzed six HRD values reflecting two value facets (locus of HRD influence…

  10. Symposium: Aesthetic Education in Japan Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okazaki, Ako; Masuda, Kingo; Kaneda, Takuya; Hino, Yoko; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fukumoto, Kinichi; Nagamori, Motoki; Yamada, Kazumi; Motomura, Kenta; Ishizaki, Kazhiro; Okada, Masashi; Kaneko, Yoshimasa; Naoe, Toshio; Fujie, Mitsuru; Iwano, Masako

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this symposium is to provide readers with a general understanding of Japanese art and aesthetics education and its interaction with other cultures. The essays cover a variety of topics, including historical, cross-cultural, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Following an introduction by Ako Okazaki, the following papers are…

  11. Characteristics Orientation, Needs and Expectations. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on characteristics orientation, needs, and expectations. "Characteristics Orientation of Emerging Professions: Implications for Research, Policy, and Practice of Continuing Professional Education" (William H. Young, Margot B. Weinstein) reports on a qualitative study that examined…

  12. Mental Health and Adjustment: Symposium IV B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garside, Jayne G.; And Others

    This symposium contains reports on two studies on the following topics: (1) ways of helping children manage stress, by Jayne G. Garside, (2) psychological stress and coping in adolescent victims of sexual abuse in Singapore, by Colleen Ward, and (3) an abstract of a study on estrangement, by Jaya Nagaraja. The article on stress management…

  13. Women on Campus: 1970; A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor. Center for Continuing Education for Women.

    The symposium: Women on Campus, 1970, held at Michigan University on October 14, 1970, centered on 3 major topics: "Toward a New Psychology of Women"; "The Case of the Woman Graduate Student"; and "The University and Women." The papers that were presented concerning the first topic included: "Internal Barriers to…

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF "THE LEAD REMEDIATION EFFECTIVENESS SYMPOSIUM"

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Symposium on Lead Remediation Effectiveness, sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency, was held at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, USA from 22-25 May, 2000. International participants from various levels of government, educational institutions, industry, and community represen...

  15. Training Retail Managers--A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, F. G., Ed.

    This symposium focuses on training programs for managers of department stores, multiple shops, supermarkets and self-service stores, and small independent shops. The authors of each of the four sections in the publication have had experience in training managers in the retail trade. For conceptual and managerial aspects of the manager's job,…

  16. The 42nd Aerospace Mechanism Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Editor); Hakun, Claef (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production, and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development, and flight certification of new mechanisms.

  17. The 1993 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS), Hitchhiker, and Complex Autonomous Payloads (CAP) programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

  18. Philosophy and Education--A Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Paul; Carr, Wilfred

    2005-01-01

    This symposium begins with a critique by Paul Hirst of Wilfred Carr's "Philosophy and Education" ("Journal of Philosophy of Education, 2004, 38.1"), where Carr argues that philosophy of education should be concerned with practical philosophy rather than "theoretical philosophy." Hirst argues that the philosophy of education is best understood as a…

  19. "Ranaviruses: an emerging threat to ectothermic vertebrates" report of the First International Symposium on Ranaviruses, Minneapolis MN July 8, 2011.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jacques; Gregory Chinchar, V

    2012-02-01

    This is a report of the First International Symposium on Ranaviruses held on July 8, 2011 in conjunction with the annual Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (JMIH) in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. The emerging threat of ranavirus infectious diseases to the global biodiversity of ectothermic vertebrates was addressed by 23 scientists from nine countries with expertise in ecology, pathology, virology, veterinary medicine and immunology.

  20. A Comparison Study of the Dynamic Amplification Characteristics of the Major Domestic Seismic Observation Sites using Background Noise and S-wave Energy of Ground Motions from 15 Fukuoka Earthquakes Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kwon, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Observed ground motions are mainly composed of 3 main factors such as seismic source, seismic wave attenuation and site amplification. Among them, site amplification is also important factor and should be considered to estimate soil-structure dynamic interaction with more reliability. Though various estimation methods are suggested, this study used the method by Castro et. al.(1997) for estimating site amplification. This method has been extended to background noise, coda waves and S waves recently for estimating site amplification. This study applied the Castro et. al.(1997)'s method to the background noise. This study analysed more than 298 background noises from 15 macro earthquakes including main Fukuoka earthquake (2005/03/20, M=6.5) and then compared to results from S waves(2013), at 8 main domestic seismic stations. The results showed that most of the domestic seismic stations gave similar results to those from S waves(2013). Each station showed its own characteristics of site amplification property in low, high and specific resonance frequency ranges. Comparison of this study to other studies can give us much information about dynamic amplification of domestic sites characteristics and site classification.

  1. Immunologic aspects of chronic fatigue syndrome. Report on a Research Symposium convened by The CFIDS Association of America and co-sponsored by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Gerrity, Timothy R; Papanicolaou, Dimitris A; Amsterdam, Jay D; Bingham, Stephen; Grossman, Ashley; Hedrick, Terry; Herberman, Ronald B; Krueger, Gerhard; Levine, Susan; Mohagheghpour, Nahid; Moore, Rebecca C; Oleske, James; Snell, Christopher R

    2004-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a serious health concern affecting over 800,000 Americans of all ages, races, socioeconomic groups and genders. The etiology and pathophysiology of CFS are unknown, yet studies have suggested an involvement of the immune system. A symposium was organized in October 2001 to explore the possibility of an association between immune dysfunction and CFS, with special emphasis on the interactions between immune dysfunction and other abnormalities noted in the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems of individuals with CFS. This paper represents the consensus of the panel of experts who participated in this meeting. Data suggest that persons with CFS manifest changes in immune responses that fall outside normative ranges, but current research does not provide definitive evidence on whether these immune abnormalities are a cause or result of the illness. It has become clear that CFS cannot be understood based on single measurements of immune, endocrine, cardiovascular, or autonomic nervous system dysfunction. This panel encourages a new emphasis on multidisciplinary research into CFS.

  2. 2009 Biospecimen research network symposium: advancing cancer research through biospecimen science.

    PubMed

    Moore, Helen M; Compton, Carolyn C; Lim, Mark D; Vaught, Jimmie; Christiansen, Katerina N; Alper, Joe

    2009-09-01

    This report details the proceedings of the 2009 Biospecimen Research Network (BRN) Symposium that took place on March 16 to 18, 2009, the second in a series of annual symposia sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research. The BRN Symposium is a public forum addressing the relevance of biospecimen quality to progress in cancer research and the systematic investigation needed to understand how different methods of collection, processing, and storage of human biospecimens affect subsequent molecular research results. More than 300 participants from industry, academia, and government attended the symposium, which featured both formal presentations and a day of workshops aimed at addressing several key issues in biospecimen science. An additional 100 individuals participated via a live webcast (archived at http://brnsymposium.com). The BRN Symposium is part of a larger program designed as a networked, multidisciplinary research approach to increase the knowledge base for biospecimen science. Biospecimens are generally understood to represent an accurate representation of a patient's disease biology, but can instead reflect a combination of disease biology and the biospecimen's response to a wide range of biological stresses. The molecular signatures of disease can thus be confounded by the signatures of biospecimen biological stress, with the potential to affect clinical and research outcomes through incorrect diagnosis of disease, improper use of a given therapy, and irreproducible research results that can lead to misinterpretation of artifacts as biomarkers. Biospecimen research represents the kind of bricks-and-mortar research that provides a solid scientific foundation for future advances that will directly help patients.

  3. 15th International Symposium on Cells of the Hepatic Sinusoid, 2010.

    PubMed

    DeLeve, Laurie D; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Kalra, Vijay K; Asahina, Kinji; Brenner, David A; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2011-07-01

    This is a meeting report of the presentations given at the 15th International Symposium on Cells of the Hepatic Sinusoid, held in 2010. The areas covered include the contributions of the various liver cell populations to liver disease, molecular and cellular targets involved in steatohepatitis, hepatic fibrosis and cancer and regenerative medicine. In addition to a review of the science presented at the meeting, this report provides references to recent literature on the topics covered at the meeting.

  4. PREFACE: Third International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasumori, Atsuo

    2009-09-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The Third Symposium (ISAT-3) was held on 5-6 March 2009 at the Tokyo International Exchange Center, Tokyo, Japan jointed with the Third Polyscale Technology Workshop (PTW-3). The ISAT-3 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion of the latest progress in atomic technologies, which was successively held after ISAT-1 at Tsukuba and ISAT-2 at Awaji in 2007. The symposium was attended by 136 participants. There were 12 invited and 4 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 101. From all the contributions, 32 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The 'Atomic Technology Project' and the 'Polyscale Technology Project' were started in 2006 as the joint project of three institutions; (1) Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing atomic and polyscale technologies. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of these projects is to contribute to the development of atomic and polyscale science and technologies. In this symposium, four research fields were focused on: Biomedical Applications, Fabrication for Advanced Materials and Devices, Magnetic Applications, and Quantum and Molecular Engineering for Advanced Technologies. Atsuo Yasumori Conference Chair Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan.

  5. 3rd Pavia international symposium on advanced kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Porta, Camillo; Bracarda, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    Kidney cancers' natural history has radically changed in the past few years, due to the development of novel targeted agents. Despite these improvements, several unanswered questions still remain on the table, regarding the best first-line treatment, the ideal sequence of treatments, the management of specific subgroups of patients (e.g., elderly patients or those with comorbidities) and the relevance of prognostic factors, among many others. To foster discussions among clinicians and investigators working in this field, and to exchange different viewpoints concerning the newest advances in kidney cancer pathogenesis and treatment, the 3rd Pavia International Symposium on Advanced Kidney cancer was held in Pavia (Italy) between 30 June and 1 July 2011. The aim of this report is to summarize the most significant advances in the different disciplines applied to advanced kidney cancer, which were presented and discussed during the meeting, and how these advances will be changing the perspective of patients with this disease.

  6. Overview of symposium "Systems Genetics in Nutrition and Obesity Research".

    PubMed

    Kalupahana, Nishan S; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima

    2011-03-01

    Systems genetics is a novel approach for identifying the complex genetic architecture of quantitative traits and gene-environment interactions via detection of connections from genetic variation through intermediate phenotypes to overlying systems level phenotypes. This symposium, conducted at the Experimental Biology 2010 conference, aimed at educating nutrition researchers about the use of systems genetics as a tool for linking genetic variation to nutrient metabolism and energy balance and their overlying effects on health and disease. Basic concepts of systems genetics and the analytical framework used in these studies were presented. Further, the utility of genetic reference populations for gene-environment interaction studies along with specific studies addressing genetic variation in responsiveness to nutrients were discussed.

  7. Manned Space Flight Experiments Symposium: Gemini Missions III and IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    This is a compilation of papers on in-flight experiments presented at the first symposium of a series, Manned Space Flight Experiments Symposium, sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The results of experiments conducted during the Gemini Missions III and IV are covered. These symposiums are to be conducted for the scientific community at regular intervals on the results of experiments carried out in conjunction with manned space flights.

  8. PREFACE: XV Chilean Physics Symposium, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, José; Ávila, Ricardo; Cubillos, Karla

    2008-02-01

    The Chilean Physics Symposium is the main gathering of Physics in Chile, and its organization is one of the central activities of the Chilean Physical Society (Sociedad Chilena de Física, SOCHIFI). The Symposium assembles the largest number of Chilean and foreign physicists resident in the country. Recent advances in the various research areas in Physics are presented, by researchers from Universities and national research centres. At the same time this is an occasion for the participation of Physics students from both the pre- and post-graduate programs. The Symposium has gathered continuously every two years, since 1978. The organization of the XV symposium was in charge of the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, and it took place on 15-17 November 2006, at La Reina Nuclear Studies Centre, in the city of Santiago, Chile. During this symposium the relation of research in Physics with education and with the productive sector in the country was also analysed. During the Symposium, 121 abstracts were submitted, from 255 authors. All authors were invited to submit articles for publication in the Symposium Proceedings. The articles received were reviewed by the Symposium Scientific Committee and by invited peers. The criteria for review focussed on the demand for a consistent piece of research, and a clear statement of results. Most of the articles received report the work of research groups where advanced students and young investigators are prominent. Thanks to their enthusiasm, 52 articles are presented in this issue. We would like to express our appreciation to their authors. Finally, my personal apology is in order regarding my delay in publishing these proceedings. A sequence of personal and professional highly demanding circumstances have been in the way. I would like to thank Journal of Physics: Conference Series for providing very fast publication of the proceedings, having published them online less than 4 weeks after my

  9. Proceedings of the Third Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication contains summaries of the papers presented at the Third Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, in Pasadena, California, on 18-21 Jan. 1993. The purpose of the symposium was to present an overview of recent developments in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars and to present future international plans. This symposium is the third in a series of 'Spaceborne Imaging Radar' symposia held at JPL. The first symposium was held in Jan. 1983 and the second in 1986.

  10. Proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The Twelfth International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology was held February 14-16, 2001 in San Diego, California, USA. This symposium was jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. The symposium featured sixty nine presentations covering a wide variety of technical topics relevant to Terahertz Technology. The presentations can be divided into five broad technology areas: Hot Electron Bolometers, superconductor insulator superconductor (SIS) technology, local oscillator (LO) technology, Antennas and Measurements, and Direct Detectors. The symposium provides scientists, engineers, and researchers working in the terahertz technology and science fields to engineers their work and exchange ideas with colleagues.

  11. Third International Kharkov Symposium "Physics and Engineering of Millimeter and Submillimeter Waves" MSMW󈨦 Symposium Proceedings, Volume 1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    1 Jf» Third International Kharkov Symposium "Physics and Engineering of Millimeter and Submillimeter Waves" Kharkov, Ukraine September 15-17...34PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING OF MILLIMETER AND SUBMILLIMETER WAVES" MSMW󈨦 Symposium Volume 1 Kharkov, Ukraine September 15-17,1998 DISTRIBUTION...STATEMENT A Approved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited THIRD INTERNATIONAL KHARKOV SYMPOSIUM "PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING OF MILLIMETER AND

  12. The Palade symposium: celebrating cell biology at its best.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Sandra L; Farquhar, Marilyn G

    2010-07-15

    A symposium was held at the University of California, San Diego, to honor the contributions of Nobel Laureate, George Palade, to cell biology. The speakers included Günter Blobel, on the structure and function of nuclear pore complexes; Peter Walter, on the unfolded protein response in health and disease; Randy Schekman, on human disease-linked mutations in the COPII machinery; Scott Emr, on the regulation of plasma membrane composition by selective endocytosis; Roger Kornberg, on the structure and function of the transcription machinery; Peter Novick, on the regulation of rab GTPases along the secretory pathway; Jim Spudich, on the mechanism of the enigmatic myosin VI motor; and Joe Goldstein, on the function of the Niemann-Pick C (NPC)-linked gene products, NPC1 and NPC2, in cholesterol transport. Their work showcased the multidisciplinary nature, diversity, and vitality of cell biology. In the words of George Palade, their talks also illustrated "how cell biology could be used to understand disease and how disease could be used to discover normal cell biology." An integrated understanding of the cellular machinery will be essential in tackling the plethora of questions and challenges posed by completion of the human genome and for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease.

  13. The Palade Symposium: Celebrating Cell Biology at Its Best

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, Marilyn G.

    2010-01-01

    A symposium was held at the University of California, San Diego, to honor the contributions of Nobel Laureate, George Palade, to cell biology. The speakers included Günter Blobel, on the structure and function of nuclear pore complexes; Peter Walter, on the unfolded protein response in health and disease; Randy Schekman, on human disease-linked mutations in the COPII machinery; Scott Emr, on the regulation of plasma membrane composition by selective endocytosis; Roger Kornberg, on the structure and function of the transcription machinery; Peter Novick, on the regulation of rab GTPases along the secretory pathway; Jim Spudich, on the mechanism of the enigmatic myosin VI motor; and Joe Goldstein, on the function of the Niemann-Pick C (NPC)-linked gene products, NPC1 and NPC2, in cholesterol transport. Their work showcased the multidisciplinary nature, diversity, and vitality of cell biology. In the words of George Palade, their talks also illustrated “how cell biology could be used to understand disease and how disease could be used to discover normal cell biology.” An integrated understanding of the cellular machinery will be essential in tackling the plethora of questions and challenges posed by completion of the human genome and for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease. PMID:20505070

  14. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America--a 23rd symposium.

    PubMed

    Clark, Gary G; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso

    2013-09-01

    The 23rd Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 79th Annual Meeting in Atlantic City, NJ, in February 2013. The principal objective, as for the previous 22 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control specialists, public health workers, and academicians from Latin America. This publication includes summaries of 49 presentations that were given orally in Spanish or presented as posters by participants from Colombia, Mexico, and the USA. Topics addressed in the symposium included: surveillance, ecology, chemical and biological control, and insecticide resistance associated with Aedes aegypti; surveillance and control of Anopheles vectors of malaria; and studies of dengue and West Nile viruses, Chagas disease, and Lutzomyia.

  15. Mosquito vector control and biology in Latin America--a fourteenth symposium. Abstracts.

    PubMed

    Clark, Gary G; Quiroz Martínez, Humberto

    2004-12-01

    The 14th annual Latin American symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 70th Annual Meeting in Savannah, GA, in February 2004. The principal objective, as for the previous 13 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control specialists, public health workers, and academicians from Latin America. This publication includes summaries of 37 presentations that were given orally in Spanish or presented as posters by participants from 7 countries in Latin America. Topics addressed in the symposium included results from chemical and biological control programs and studies; studies of insecticide resistance; and population genetics, molecular, ecological, and behavioral studies of vectors of dengue (Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus) and other arboviruses, malaria (Anopheles albimanus and Anopheles pseudopunctipennis), leishmaniasis (Lutzomyia), and Chagas disease (Triatoma).

  16. Mosquito vector control and biology in Latin America--a tenth symposium. Abstracts.

    PubMed

    2000-12-01

    The 10th annual Latin American symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 66th Annual Meeting in Atlantic City, NJ, in March 2000. The principal objective, as for the previous 9 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control specialists, public health workers, and academicians from Latin America. This publication includes summaries of 57 presentations that were given orally in Spanish or presented as posters by participants from 9 countries in Latin America. Topics addressed in the symposium included results from chemical and biological control programs and studies; studies of insecticide resistance; and molecular, ecological, and behavioral studies of vectors of dengue (Aedes aegypti). malaria (Anopheles albimanus and Anopheles aquasalis). leishmaniasis (Lutzomyia), and Chagas' disease (Triatoma). Related topics included biology and control of scorpions and Chironomus plumosus.

  17. Mosquito vector control and biology in Latin America--a 15th symposium. Abstracts.

    PubMed

    Clark, Gary G; Quiroz Martínez, Humberto

    2005-12-01

    The 15th Annual Latin American symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 71st Annual Meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, in April 2005. The principal objective, as for the previous 14 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control specialists, public health workers, and academicians from Latin America. This publication includes summaries of 40 presentations that were given orally in Spanish or presented as posters by participants from 8 countries in Latin America and the USA. Topics addressed in the symposium included results from chemical and biological control programs and studies; studies of insecticide resistance; and population genetics, molecular, ecological, and behavioral studies of vectors of dengue (Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus) and other arboviruses, malaria (Anopheles albimanus, An. aquasalis, An. neomaculipalpus, An. pseudopunctipennis), leishmaniasis (Lutzomyia), and Chagas Disease (Triatoma), as well as a vaccine for control of Boophilus ticks on cattle.

  18. A review of the CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2012

    PubMed Central

    Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABC) is a multidisciplinary conference that covers basic molecular and cellular biology, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of all types of breast cancer and premalignant breast disease. In 2012, this meeting was held at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio, Texas, United States, from 4 to 8 December. The symposium consisted of lectures within six general sections covering a range of topics in breast cancer research. These included discussions on research of breast cancer posters, a large number of specialist sessions, and several minisymposia. The report below describes much of the research presented in those general lecture sessions. The abstracts of all papers and posters presented at this conference have been published in Cancer Research as a supplement: Cancer Research (2012) 72(24), 1s–608s. PMID:23441137

  19. Introduction to the Paper Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, D. K.

    1996-05-01

    Most students of physical chemistry, as well as their teachers, regard equilibrium chemical thermodynamics as an impressive, useful, and stable subject that was "finished" long ago. As part of their education, students in physical chemistry have been taught the importance and the usefulness of the Gibbs function (formerly called the Gibbs free energy function). The antiquity of the subject and the presumed mastery of its basics by physical chemistry teachers are taken for granted as given parts of the educational and scientific scene in chemical education. It comes as a surprise to occasionally discover that even those who teach this venerable subject sometimes disagree, not merely in matters of style or organization of the subject, or in matters of mathematical elegance, but in matters of real substance. The following four papers are examples of this. My role here is simply to introduce this set of papers and to provide some orientation regarding their contents. The authors have been in private communication with each other for a period of over four years about the use and the proper definition of the Gibbs function. The lengthy period of correspondence has not resulted in any significant agreement. The Editor of this Journal was unable to settle the resulting controversy by normal review procedures. In an attempt to break the deadlock he asked me, as an impartial outsider to the situation, for assistance in deciding an appropriate literary form in which the authors could present their own points of view as well as comments on the views of the other authors. The original hope was that agreement could eventually be reached on disputed points by the give and take of the interchange of further correspondence, and that the outcome would be published in the form of a "paper symposium" on the subject, with me as the "chairman" of the symposium. It must be said at the outset that the prolonged correspondence has not produced much agreement among the authors. This is

  20. PREFACE: XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Rodal, E.; Bijker, R.

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo The XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held at Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico from January 3-6 2012. Conceived in 1978 as a small meeting, over the years and thanks to the efforts of various organizing committees, the symposium has become a well known international conference on nuclear physics. To the best of our knowledge, the Mexican Symposium on Nuclear Physics represents the conference series with longest tradition in Latin America and one of the longest-running annual nuclear physics conferences in the world. The Symposium brings together leading scientists from all around the world, working in the fields of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, physics with radioactive ion beams, hadronic physics, nuclear astrophysics, neutron physics and relativistic heavy-ion physics. Its main goal is to provide a relaxed environment where the exchange of ideas, discussion of new results and consolidation of scientific collaboration are encouraged. To celebrate the 35th edition of the symposium 53 colleagues attended from diverse countries including: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Japan, Saudi Arabia and USA. We were happy to have the active participation of Eli F Aguilera, Eduardo Andrade, Octavio Castaños, Alfonso Mondragón, Stuart Pittel and Andrés Sandoval who also participated in the first edition of the Symposium back in 1978. We were joined by old friends of Cocoyoc (Stuart Pittel, Osvaldo Civitarese, Piet Van Isacker, Jerry Draayer and Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri) as well as several first time visitors that we hope will come back to this scientific meeting in the forthcoming years. The scientific program consisted of 33 invited talks, proposed by the international advisory committee, which nicely covered the topics of the Symposium giving a balanced perspective between the experimental and the theoretical work that is currently underway in each line of research. Fifteen posters complemented the scientific sessions giving the opportunity

  1. First LDEF Post-Retrieval Symposium abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Arlene S. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    The LDE facility was designed to better understand the environments of space and the effects of prolonged exposure in these environments on future spacecraft. The symposium abstracts presented here are organized according to the symposium agenda into five sessions. The first session provides an overview of the LDEF, the experiments, the mission, and the natural and induced environments the spacecraft and experiments encountered during the mission. The second session presents results to date from studies to better define the environments of near-Earth space. The third session addresses studies of the effects of the space environments on spacecraft materials. The fourth session addresses studies of the effects of the space environments on spacecraft systems. And the fifth session addresses other subjects such as results of the LDEF life science and crystal growth experiments.

  2. Tenth international symposium on environmental biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, H.L.

    1992-01-01

    The primary task of this Symposium on Environmental Biogeochemistry was to examine our current understanding of GLOBAL CHANGE AND THE BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF RADIATIVE TRACE GASES. The symposium was divided into 12 non-overlapping sessions: Paleoatmospheres and paleoclimates; Global distributions and atmospheric reactions; Poster presentations on the topics of sessions 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7; Terrestrial systems and land use change - 1; Terrestrial and land use change - 11; Fluxes and cycling in aquatic systems; Metals, organics, and depositional environments; Poster presentations on the topics of sessions 6, 9, 10 and 12; Biological Mechanisms of formation and destruction - 1; Biological mechanisms of formation and destruction - 11; High latitude systems; and Global sources, sinks, and feedbacks.

  3. John B. Little Center Annual Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Demple, Bruce F.

    2007-11-02

    The Annual Symposium of the John B. Little Center for Radiation Sciences and Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Public Health seeks to educate radiobiologists and biomedical scientists in related areas on the leading research related to the effects of ionizing radiation and related environmental agents in biological systems. This effort seeks to further the training of individuals in this field, and to foment productive interactions and collaborations among scientists at Harvard and with other institutions. The Symposium attracts world-class scientists as speakers, and a broad cross-section of attendees from academic, government, and industrial research centers, as well as editorial staff from leading scientific publications. In order to maintain this quality, funding to support the travel and local expenses of invited speakers is sought, along with funds to allow use of appropriate conference facilities.

  4. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z. |

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  5. IAHS/AGU symposium on groundwater contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abriola, Linda M.; Bahr, Jean M.

    1991-05-01

    Papers presented at a two-day jointly sponsored IAHS/AGU symposium on groundwater contamination are briefly summarized. This international symposium was held 11 12 May, 1989, in Baltimore, Maryland. Presentations encompassed recent research developments in three general areas: abiotic and biotic processes governing contaminant transport; aquifer rehabilitation; and the influence of agricultural practices and nonpoint sources on aquifer quality. Contributions offered an interesting mixture of theoretical, mathematical, laboratory, and field studies. In the first session, transport processes explored ranged from dispersion and fingering to nonequilibrium sorption, metals complexation, and bacteria migration. The use of optimization modeling in the design of remediation strategies was the focus of another session. Here theoretical studies were presented alongside case histories of aquifer rehabilitation. In a final session, a number of models for agricultural management were described. These presentations were complemented by case studies of actual aquifer degradation resulting from land-use and management practices.

  6. Preface: The Ninth International Flatfish Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loher, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume of the Journal of Sea Research, and in a second issue to be published subsequently, represent research findings that were presented in whole or in part at the Ninth International Flatfish Symposium (IFS), convened in Cle Elum, Washington, USA, in November of 2014. This conference represented the most recent in a series that was begun nearly three decades ago (see Berghahn, this issue), and established to bring together the world's leading flatfish scientists, as well as students and researchers just beginning to embark upon flatfish research, to share emerging results, exchange ideas, and foster greater international collaboration and understanding of this taxon. For each symposium, an overarching theme is chosen and papers are presented within a series of Topic Sessions that both encompass the general theme while allowing unfettered presentation of research that may lie outside of that primary focus.

  7. Special Issue International CAWSES-II Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Nakamura, Takuji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-01-01

    This special issue gathered papers from the International CAWSES-II Symposium (November 18-22, 2013 at Nagoya University, Japan). Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth System II (CAWSES-II) is an international scientific program sponsored by Scientific Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Physics (SCOSTEP) that continued from 2009 to 2013. The program was established with the aim of significantly enhancing our understanding of the space environment and its impacts on life and society. The International CAWSES-II Symposium was successful with 388 presentations; and from that, 38 papers were published in this special issue. In this preface, we briefly discuss the contents of the special issue as well as the CAWSES-II review papers published in Progress in Earth and Planetary Science (PEPS) in 2014-2015.

  8. FINDINGS OF A SYMPOSIUM ON COAL QUALITY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Garbini, Susan

    1985-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been doing research on coal quality for almost a century. Most of the work of the USGS regarding coal went into efforts to assess the quantity of coal in the United States, not the quality. On April 9-11, 1985, the U. S. Geological Survey, along with cosponsors - the Association of American State Geologists, the U. S. Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, and the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency - convened a symposium on coal quality at the headquarters of the USGS in Reston, Virginia. The coal-quality symposium provided a forum for the discussion of a wide variety of topics with regard to coal-quality research and related activities. The coal community took advantage of that opportunity to recommend a large agenda of coal-research needs, not only for the USGS but for the entire spectrum of organizations that either actively pursue or fund research on coal quality.

  9. Complex Disease Endotypes and Implications for GWAS and Exposomics***

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation Type: Symposia Symposium Title: Human Exposome Discovery and Disease Investigation Abstract Title: Complex Disease Endotypes and Implications for GWAS and Exposomics Authors: Stephen W. Edwards1, David M. Reif, Elaine Cohen Hubaf, ClarLynda Williams-DeVa...

  10. Complex Disease Endotypes and Implications for GWAS and Exposomics***

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation Type: Symposia Symposium Title: Human Exposome Discovery and Disease Investigation Abstract Title: Complex Disease Endotypes and Implications for GWAS and Exposomics Authors: Stephen W. Edwards1, David M. Reif, Elaine Cohen Hubaf, ClarLynda Williams-DeVa...

  11. The 1993 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, L.R.; Mosier, F.L.

    1993-10-01

    The 1993 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS), Hitchhiker, and Complex Autonomous Payloads (CAP) programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  12. The 1995 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, F.; Mosier, F.L.

    1995-09-01

    The 1995 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS) and Hitchhiker programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts. Separate abstracts have been submitted for contributions to this report.

  13. Artiss Symposium 2014: Psychiatry and Pain Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME{S) AND ADDRESS{ES) -Department of Psychiatry, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Wisconsin Ave, Bethesda, MD 20814 -Center...National Military Medical Center, 8901 Wsconsin Ave, Bethesda, MD 20814 Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress; Dept. of Psychiatry, Uniformed Services...SYMPOSIUM 2014 Psychiatry and Pain Management Department of Psychiatry, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center National Intrepid Center of

  14. Climate Symposium 2014: Findings and Recommendations

    DOE PAGES

    Asrar, Ghassem; Bony, Sandrine; Boucher, Olivier; ...

    2015-10-05

    Here, the Climate Symposium 2014, organized by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) and the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), with support from the European Commission (EC), European Space Agency (ESA), and other agencies, took place in Darmstadt, Germany, from 13 to 17 October 2014. Around 500 participants from 49 countries attended the event and represented over 200 organizations. Another 500 individuals participated remotely via “live streaming.”

  15. Assessing a Science Graduate School Recruitment Symposium

    PubMed Central

    González-Espada, Wilson; Díaz-Muñoz, Greetchen; Feliú-Mójer, Mónica; Flores-Otero, Jacqueline; Fortis-Santiago, Yaihara; Guerrero-Medina, Giovanna; López-Casillas, Marcos; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A.; Fernández-Repollet, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Ciencia Puerto Rico, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting science, research and scientific education among Latinos, organized an educational symposium to provide college science majors the tools, opportunities and advice to pursue graduate degrees and succeed in the STEM disciplines. In this article we share our experiences and lessons learned, for others interested in developing large-scale events to recruit underrepresented minorities to STEM and in evaluating the effectiveness of these efforts. PMID:26770074

  16. 24th International Symposium on Ballistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-26

    by changed projectile shape , which leads to enhanced plugging failure. • Importance of in-situ testing!!! • Be careful with norms and standards...shown). Mach 0.7 Mach 1.25 24th Int’l Symposium on Ballistics, 22-26 Sep 2008 14 Conclusions & Future Work • Projectile base shape is an important...strength is the parameter that permits the projectile to maintain the designed armor-piercing shape during the penetration process. – The projectile

  17. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  18. PREFACE: Fourth International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shigefumi

    2010-04-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The 4th Symposium (ISAT-4) was held on November 18-19, 2009 at the Seaside Hotel MAIKO VILLA KOBE, Kobe City, Japan presided by the "Atomic Technology Project". The ISAT-4 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion on the latest progress in the atomic technologies. The symposium was attended by 107 delegates. There were 10 invited and 6 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 69. From all the contributions, 22 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The "Atomic Technology Project" was started in 2006 as a joint project of three institutions; (1) the Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) the Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) the Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing nano-technologies and was developing atomic scale operation and diagnostics, functional materials, micro processing and device. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of the project is to contribute to the development of atomic-scale science and technologies such as functional molecules, biomaterials, and quantum functions of atomic-scale structures. Shigefumi Okada Conference Chair Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Conference photograph Kobe photograph

  19. Assessing a Science Graduate School Recruitment Symposium.

    PubMed

    González-Espada, Wilson; Díaz-Muñoz, Greetchen; Feliú-Mójer, Mónica; Flores-Otero, Jacqueline; Fortis-Santiago, Yaihara; Guerrero-Medina, Giovanna; López-Casillas, Marcos; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Fernández-Repollet, Emma

    2015-12-01

    Ciencia Puerto Rico, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting science, research and scientific education among Latinos, organized an educational symposium to provide college science majors the tools, opportunities and advice to pursue graduate degrees and succeed in the STEM disciplines. In this article we share our experiences and lessons learned, for others interested in developing large-scale events to recruit underrepresented minorities to STEM and in evaluating the effectiveness of these efforts.

  20. PREFACE: XXXIV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, Libertad; Bijker, Roelof

    2011-10-01

    In the present volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series we publish the proceedings of the 'XXXIV Symposium on Nuclear Physics', which was held from 4-7 January 2011 at the Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico. The proceedings consist of 19 contributions that were presented as invited talks at the meeting. The abstracts of all contributions, plenary talks and posters were published in the Conference Handbook. The Symposium on Nuclear Physics has a long and distinguished history. From the beginning it was intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in the field. Its most distinctive feature is to provide a forum for specialists in different areas of nuclear physics, both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists, in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. From the first meeting in Oaxtepec in 1978, the Symposium has been organized every year without interruption, which makes the present Symposium the 34th in a row. The scientific program consisted of 27 invited talks and 17 posters on a wide variety of hot topics in contemporary nuclear physics, ranging from the traditional fields of nuclear structure (Draayer, Pittel, Van Isacker, Fraser, Lerma, Cejnar, Hirsch, Stránský and Rath) and nuclear reactions (Aguilera, Gómez-Camacho, Scheid, Navrátil and Yennello) to radioactive beams (Padilla-Rodal and Galindo-Uribarri), nuclear astrophysics (Aprahamian, Civitarese and Escher), hadronic physics (Bijker, Valcarce and Hess), fundamental symmetries (Liu, Barrón-Palos and Baessler) and LHC physics (Menchaca-Rocha and Paic). The high quality of the talks, the prestige of the speakers and the broad spectrum of subjects covered in the meeting, shows that nuclear physics is a very active area at the frontier of scientific research which establishes bridges between many different disciplines. Libertad Barr

  1. Sixth underground coal-conversion symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The sixth annual underground coal conversion symposium was held at Shangri-la near Afton, Oklahoma, July 13 to 17, 1980. Sessions were developed to: Doe Field Programs, Major Industry Activity, Mathematical Modeling, Laboratory Studies, Environmental Studies, Economics, Instruments and Controls, and General Topics. Fifty-two papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. Thirteen papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  2. Proceedings of the DMS medical ethics symposium.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, D J

    2011-12-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a symposium on medical ethics held at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine in October 2010. The nature of current operations continually generates challenging ethical problems, many of which are unique to the military environment. This article is intended to generate a debate on these difficult issues and readers are encouraged to contribute to this debate by emailing the Editor.

  3. PREFACE: The International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Yasuharu

    2008-03-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The Second Symposium (ISAT-2) was held on 1-2 October 2007 at the Awaji Yumebutai Conference Center, Awaji City, Japan presided by the `Atomic Technology Project'. The ISAT-2 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion of the latest progress in atomic technologies. The symposium was attended by 106 delegates. There were 9 invited and 5 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 73. From all the contributions, 24 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The `Atomic Technology Project' was started in 2006 as a joint project of three institutions; (1) Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing nano-technologies and were developing atomic scale operation and diagnostics, functional materials, micro processing and devices. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of the project is to contribute to the development of atomic-scale science and technologies such as functional molecules, biomaterials, and quantum functions of atomic-scale structures. Yasuharu Shirai Conference Chair Center for Atomic Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Conference photograph

  4. Symposium on Human-Computer Information Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Tunkelang, Daniel; Capra, Robert; Golovchinsky, Gene; Kules, Bill; Smith, Catherine; White, Ryen

    2013-03-01

    Human-computer information retrieval (HCIR) is the study of information retrieval techniques that integrate human intelligence and algorithmic search to help people explore, understand, and use information. Since 2007, we have held an annual gathering of researchers and practitioners to advance the state of the art in this field. This meeting report summarizes the history of the HCIR symposium and emphasizes its relevance to the data science community.

  5. Land Subsidence International Symposium held in Venice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Third International Symposium on Land Subsidence was held March 18-25, 1984, in Venice, Italy. Sponsors were the Ground-Water Commission of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS), the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Italian National Research Council (CNR), the Italian Regions of Veneto and Emilia-Romagna, the Italian Municipalities of Venice, Ravenna, and Modena, the Venice Province, and the European Research Office. Cosponsors included the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH), the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering (ISSMFE), and the Association of Geoscientists for International Development (AGID).Organized within the framework of UNESCO's International Hydrological Program, the symposium brought together over 200 international interdisciplinary specialists in the problems of land subsidence due to fluid and mineral withdrawal. Because man's continuing heavy development of groundwater, gas, oil, and minerals is changing the natural regime and thus causing more and more subsiding areas in the world, there had been sufficient new land subsidence occurrence, problems, research, and remedial measures since the 1976 Second International Symposium held in Anaheim, California, to develop a most interesting program of nearly 100 papers from about 30 countries. The program consisted of papers covering case histories of fluid and mineral withdrawal, engineering theory and analysis, karst “sink-hole”-type subsidence, subsidence due to dewatering of organic deposits or due to application of water (hydrocompaction), instrumentation, legal, socioeconomic, and environmental effects of land subsidence, and remedial works.

  6. Final report, International Symposium on Environmental Biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Donald L.

    2000-03-20

    This meeting included technical presentations of state-of-the-art research which were integrated with tutorials and workshops by practicing technologies in the broad field of environmental biotechnology. This meeting was designed to be, in every respect, truly global. Over 150 excellent abstracts from around the world were accepted. For example, presentations were heard from technical workers in Southeast Asia, Russia, China, Europe, North Africa, India, and the US. By having these selected presenters, as well as identified experienced tutors with focused workshops, all participants benefited from this interactive symposium. A number of social events further promoted informal exchange of ideas, discussions of technical problems, and exploration of new applications. This international symposium on environmental biotechnology was on the campus of Northeastern University but all Boston area universities were included and participated using designed conference Co-Chairs. This symposium, with an attendance of several hundred people, was considered a major success. Workers with experience in one area of environmental biotechnology learned from the wealth of established backgrounds of those in other areas of environmental biotechnology. To formally disseminate conference results, it was pre-arranged that all technical presentations were reviewed for formal publications.

  7. Reduced liquid movement subject of Denver Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reduction of subsurface movement of liquids was the subject of a 1-day symposium sponsored by Committee D-18 on Soil and Rock of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and cosponsored by the U.S. Committee on Large Dams (USCOLD) of the International Commission on Large Dams. The Symposium on Impermeable Barriers for Soil and Rock, the first specialized symposium of its kind, was held in Denver, Colorado, on June 25, 1984. The program emphasized the interaction of the environmental system of soil and rock containment, impermeable barriers, and enclosed liquids. The theory, testing, and design considerations of such interactive systems was explored in relation to slurry walls and clay and earth additive linings as applied to geotechnical engineering projects such as tailings and waste containment ponds, landfills, solar and biomass ponds, ditches, canals, and reservoirs. A number of papers presented research results on the interaction of various chemical and hazardous wastes with the soil and rock materials and lining or slurry materials.

  8. What scientists can learn from Plato's Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Conferences and scientific meetings are as old as science itself. The ancient Greeks where (in)famous for organizing so-called symposiums. During a symposium (from Greek, drinking together), attendees followed a program that contained both social and scientific aspects, focused around a certain topic. Whilst drinking and eating, all participants were expected to share their vision on the topic of interest by giving an oral presentation. The goal of these meetings was to arrive at a new common understanding and to come closer to the truth. Plato et al. knew very well how to organize an effective scientific conference, which should make use overthink the way we are organizing present-day conferences. Scientific meetings aim to connect researchers, share research and unravel the truth. The question is now: how do we get this done effectively? Plato knew that discussing science with strangers is difficult and he believed that talking about heavy matter could be done best when combined with social events. What if we try to go back to the times of Plato and model our conferences after the ancient symposiums? We might drop laying on couches and covering ourselves in ivy and flowers. However, a mix of social and scientific events will contribute to achieving the ultimate goal of why scientists go to conferences: to connect, to share and to unravel the truth.

  9. PREFACE: XXXVII Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, R.; Lerma, S.; Lizcano, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Symposium on Nuclear Physics is an international meeting organized every year since 1978 by the Division of Nuclear Physics of the Mexican Physical Society. The 37th edition was held at the Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc in the state of Morelos, Mexico, from 6-9 January, 2014. The symposium is intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in different areas of nuclear physics (nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, neutrino physics, hadron physics and nuclear reactions among others). Both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists gathered in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. The symposium was organized in plenary sessions with invited talks and a poster session. In this edition the program consisted of 26 invited talks and 19 posters, whose subjects reflected the active areas and interests of the mexican nuclear physics community. The organization encouraged the participation of young scientist as speakers in the plenary sessions. Seven of the 26 invited talks were given by postdoctoral and doctoral students working in different institutions from Mexico, USA and Europe. The proceedings collect a total of 16 manuscripts from the invited speakers.

  10. Are the Sendai and Fukuoka consensus guidelines for cystic mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas useful in the initial triage of all suspected pancreatic cystic neoplasms? A single-institution experience with 317 surgically-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Goh, Brian K P; Tan, Damien M Y; Thng, Choon-Hua; Lee, Ser-Yee; Low, Albert S C; Chan, Chung-Yip; Wong, Jen-San; Lee, Victor T W; Cheow, Peng-Chung; Chow, Pierce K H; Chung, Alexander Y F; Wong, Wai-Keong; Ooi, London L P J

    2014-06-01

    The Sendai Consensus Guidelines (SCG) were formulated in 2006 and updated in Fukuoka in 2012 (FCG) to guide management of cystic mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas. This study aims to evaluate the clinical utility of the SCG and FCG in the initial triage of all suspected pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Overall, 317 surgically-treated patients with a suspected pancreatic cystic neoplasm were classified according to the SCG as high risk (HR(SCG)) and low risk (LR(SCG)), and according to the FCG as high risk (HR(FCG)), worrisome (W(FCG)), and low risk (LR(FCG)). Cystic lesions of the pancreas (CLP) were classified as potentially malignant/malignant or benign according to the final pathology. The presence of symptoms, proximal lesions with obstructive jaundice, elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen/carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CEA/CA 19-9), size ≥3 cm, presence of solid component, main pancreatic duct dilatation, thickened enhancing walls, and change in ductal caliber with distal atrophy were predictive of a potentially malignant/malignant CLP on univariate analyses. The positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of HR(SCG) and HR(ICG2012) for a potentially malignant/malignant lesion was 67 and 88 %, and 88 and 92.5 %, respectively. There were no malignant lesions in both LR groups but some potentially malignant lesions such as cystic pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms with uncertain behavior were classified as LR. The updated FCG was superior to the SCG for the initial triage of all suspected pancreatic cystic neoplasms. CLP in the LR(FCG) group can be safely managed conservatively, and those in the HR(FCG) group should undergo resection.

  11. Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium. Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium on “Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers” was held at the joint annual meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, July 10 to 14, 2011. The objective of the symposium w...

  12. STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL: A SUMMARY OF THE 1991 SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1991 Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOX Control was held March 25-28,1991 in Washington, DC. The sixth meeting in a biennial series, the Symposium was cosponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Approxima...

  13. Meeting the Government's Technology Challenge: Results of a GAO Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Information Management and Technology Div.

    In October, 1989, the General Accounting Office sponsored a symposium, "Meeting the Government's Technology Challenge," that brought together leaders from industry and government to explore ways of better using information technology to meet the demands facing the government into the next century. Building on the symposium's results to provide a…

  14. System analysis in forest resources: proceedings of the 2003 symposium.

    Treesearch

    Michael Bevers; Tara M. Barrett

    2005-01-01

    The 2003 symposium of systems analysis in forest resources brought together researchers and practitioners who apply methods of optimization, simulation, management science, and systems analysis to forestry problems. This was the 10th symposium in the series, with previous conferences held in 1975, 1985, 1988, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1997, 2000, and 2002. The forty-two papers...

  15. Proceedings of the SPE unconventional gas technology symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on the recovery of natural gas from unconventional sources. Topics considered at the symposium included tight sandstones, Devonian shales, hydraulic fracturing, coalbed methane, gas hydrates, interference testing, naturally fractured reservoirs, gas condensate wells, formation damage, hydraulic fracture mechanics, and computerized simulation.

  16. Comparative gut physiology symposium: The microbe-gut-brain axis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Comparative Gut Physiology Symposium titled “The Microbe-Gut-Brain Axis” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Society of Animal Science and the American Dairy Science Association on Thursday, July 21, 2016, in Salt Lake City Utah. The goal of the symposium was to present basic r...

  17. Programming, Managing, and Judging Science Symposium Poster Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    The Pacific Region Junior Science and Humanities Symposium has operated for 14 years as a region of the National Junior Science and Humanities Symposium. In response to the trend among professional science and science education societies to include both formal research report presentations and informal poster presentations, the Pacific Region…

  18. A Symposium on Career Information Systems: Issues for Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gerald C.; And Others

    The document consists of three symposium addresses, pertaining to the provision and use of career information systems. Gerald C. Smith, Department of Labor, opened the symposium with an address on "Occupational Information systems: Uses, Developments, and Issues", which focused on career information systems currently being developed by the…

  19. 76 FR 17137 - Pregnancy and Prescription Medication Use Symposium

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pregnancy and Prescription Medication Use Symposium AGENCY... announcing the following meeting: Pregnancy and Prescription Medication Use Symposium. The topic to be discussed is ``Prescription Drug Use in Pregnancy.'' Date and Time: The meeting will be held on May 17, 2011...

  20. Proceedings of the materials processing symposium. Volume 38

    SciTech Connect

    Metzbower, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on materials working using lasers. Topics considered at the symposium included preionization techniques, beam profiles of carbon dioxide lasers, beam focusing, laser welding, porosity decrease in laser welds of stainless steel, underwater welding, laser surface treatments, and laser hardening of carbon steels.

  1. Go Tell Alcibiades: Tragedy, Comedy, and Rhetoric in Plato's "Symposium"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crick, Nathan; Poulakos, John

    2008-01-01

    Plato's "Symposium" is a significant but neglected part of his elaborate and complex attitude toward rhetoric. Unlike the intellectual discussion of the "Gorgias" or the unscripted conversation of the "Phaedrus," the "Symposium" stages a feast celebrating and driven by the forces of "Eros." A luxuriously stylish performance rather than a rational…

  2. The Humanities in the Schools: A Contemporary Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Harold, Ed.

    A symposium at the University of Kentucky in 1965 brought together 15 educators and six writers concerned with cultural values in an attempt to develop ideas for improving arts and humanities instruction in the public secondary schools. The papers presented in the symposium comprise this publication. In an introductory essay, Harold Taylor surveys…

  3. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1992 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND MITIGATION RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the 1992 Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Research Symposium held in Washington, DC, August 18-20, 1992. The symposium provided a forum for exchange of technical information on global change emissions and potential mitigation technologies. The primary ...

  4. 78 FR 10180 - Annual Computational Science Symposium; Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Annual Computational Science Symposium; Conference AGENCY... public conference entitled ``The FDA/PhUSE Annual Computational Science Symposium.'' The purpose of the conference is to help the broader community align and share experiences to advance computational science. At...

  5. Welcome to the sudden oak death third science symposium

    Treesearch

    Susan J. Frankel

    2008-01-01

    On behalf of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)-Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station and the California Oak Mortality Task Force, it is my pleasure to welcome you to the Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium. Looking back at the first sudden oak death science symposium held in Monterey in December 2002, it is amazing to see how far we...

  6. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 8th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1977-05-01

    The Eighth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, from 13 to 15 July 1976. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Office of Naval Research. About 160 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and Brazil. The Symposium was divided into five half-day sessions concerning Bulk Material Properties and Thermal Behavior, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Film Properties, Thin Film Damage, and Scaling Laws and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to new materials for use at 10.6 microm in mirror substrates, windo s, and coatings. New techniques in film deposition and advances in diamond-turning of optics were described. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons of the Symposium. The Ninth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 4-6 October 1977 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  7. Go Tell Alcibiades: Tragedy, Comedy, and Rhetoric in Plato's "Symposium"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crick, Nathan; Poulakos, John

    2008-01-01

    Plato's "Symposium" is a significant but neglected part of his elaborate and complex attitude toward rhetoric. Unlike the intellectual discussion of the "Gorgias" or the unscripted conversation of the "Phaedrus," the "Symposium" stages a feast celebrating and driven by the forces of "Eros." A luxuriously stylish performance rather than a rational…

  8. The fescue toxicosis symposium: introduction to the proceedings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fescue Toxicosis was a symposium presented at the 2008 joint meetings of the Amercian Forage and Grssland Council and the Society for Range Management in Louisville, Kentucky. The purpose of the symposium was to: 1) provide updated information on toxic and non-toxic endophyte interactions with her...

  9. The 16th James L. Waters Annual Symposium: Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Adrian C.

    2007-04-01

    The 16th Annual James L. Waters Symposium focused on electrochemistry, with emphasis on methods involving the flow of current. The speakers in this year's symposium are uniquely qualified to review the history of electroanalytical chemistry starting with Heyrovsky's initial studies and culminating with the present state of the art. Each has contributed significantly to the scientific, technical, and commercial development of the field.

  10. Proceedings of the Symposium on Nondestructive Testing of Wood.

    Treesearch

    1964-01-01

    This report summarizes the main points considered and the conclusions reached during the Symposium on Nondestructive Testing, October 7 to 9, 1963, at the Forest Products Laboratory. The purpose of this symposium was to bring research and industry leaders together to examine what is being done in nondestructive testing and discuss its applications to the wood products...

  11. STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL: A SUMMARY OF THE 1991 SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1991 Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOX Control was held March 25-28,1991 in Washington, DC. The sixth meeting in a biennial series, the Symposium was cosponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Approxima...

  12. CPTAC Scientific Symposium Highlights - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The first CPTAC Public Scientific Symposium was recently held on November 13, 2013 at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. The symposium brought together a record number of registrants, 450 scientists, who shared and discussed novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data.

  13. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1992 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND MITIGATION RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the 1992 Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Research Symposium held in Washington, DC, August 18-20, 1992. The symposium provided a forum for exchange of technical information on global change emissions and potential mitigation technologies. The primary ...

  14. Symposium on Population and Human Rights.

    PubMed

    1981-06-01

    The objectives of the Symposium on Population and Human Rights, held at the Vienna International Center during June 1981, included the following: to review the progress or lack thereof in the observance of human rights in the context of demographic, economic and social conditions and changes since the Amsterdam Symposium of 1974; to review leading population trends and policy changes since 1974 and also examine some possible implications of recent development in the field of medicine, biology, and genetic engineering; and to identify which conceptions of human rights relating to demographic phenomenon are appropriate for today's population problems and to formulate guidelines and standards suitable for these problems. The agenda for the Symposium, attended by about 27 distinguished jurists and demographers, covered the following items: human rights and population trends and policies; morbidity/mortality and human rights; fertility and human rights; internal migration and human rights; status of women, population, and human rights; and new institutional functions in the area of human rights and population. The following were among the main themes and recommendations of the Symposium: 1) the problems of human rights should be contextually handled in such a way as to take adequate account of prevailing socioeconomic and cultural conditions; 2) the realization of a positive right to individual and social development is often impeded, particularly in developing areas, by the prevalence of high mortality, malnutrition, and inadequate health services; 3) policies designed to influence fertility should, within the framework of general population policies, be part of the national strategy for general development; 4) the Symposium recognized the problems of monitoring and appraising the observance or violation of human rights as they relate to the rights of the individual to free movement and residence and the rights to work and decent living; 5) considering the significant

  15. PREFACE: Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics was held at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden during August 19 24, 2004. Invited to the symposium were around 40 globally leading researchers in the field of neutrino physics, both experimental and theoretical. In addition to these participants, some 30 local researchers and graduate students participated in the symposium. The dominant theme of the lectures was neutrino oscillations, which after several years were recently verified by results from the Super-Kamiokande detector in Kamioka, Japan and the SNO detector in Sudbury, Canada. Discussion focused especially on effects of neutrino oscillations derived from the presence of matter and the fact that three different neutrinos exist. Since neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have mass, this is the first experimental observation that fundamentally deviates from the standard model of particle physics. This is a challenge to both theoretical and experimental physics. The various oscillation parameters will be determined with increased precision in new, specially designed experiments. Theoretical physics is working intensively to insert the knowledge that neutrinos have mass into the theoretical models that describe particle physics. It will probably turn out that the discovery of neutrino oscillations signifies a breakthrough in the description of the very smallest constituents of matter. The lectures provided a very good description of the intensive situation in the field right now. The topics discussed also included mass models for neutrinos, neutrinos in extra dimensions as well as the `seesaw mechanism', which provides a good description of why neutrino masses are so small. Also discussed, besides neutrino oscillations, was the new field of neutrino astronomy. Among the questions that neutrino astronomy hopes to answer are what the dark matter in the Universe consists of and where cosmic radiation at extremely high energies comes from. For this purpose, large neutrino

  16. Alternatives to antibiotics: a symposium on the challenges and solutions for animal production.

    PubMed

    Seal, Bruce S; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Donovan, David M; Gay, Cyril G

    2013-06-01

    Antibiotics are one of the most important medical discoveries of the 20th century and will remain an essential tool for treating animal and human diseases in the 21st century. However, antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens and concerns over their extensive use in food animals has garnered global interest in limiting antibiotic use in animal agriculture. Yet, limiting the availability of medical interventions to prevent and control animal diseases on the farm will directly impact global food security and safety as well as animal and human health. Insufficient attention has been given to the scientific breakthroughs and novel technologies that provide alternatives to antibiotics. The objectives of the symposium 'Alternatives to Antibiotics' were to highlight promising research results and novel technologies that could potentially lead to alternatives to conventional antibiotics, and assess challenges associated with their commercialization, and provide actionable strategies to support development of alternative antimicrobials. The symposium focused on the latest scientific breakthroughs and technologies that could provide new options and alternative strategies for preventing and treating diseases of animals. Some of these new technologies have direct applications as medical interventions for human health, but the focus of the symposium was animal production, animal health and food safety during food-animal production. Five subject areas were explored in detail through scientific presentations and expert panel discussions, including: (1) alternatives to antibiotics, lessons from nature; (2) immune modulation approaches to enhance disease resistance and to treat animal diseases; (3) gut microbiome and immune development, health and diseases; (4) alternatives to antibiotics for animal production; and (5) regulatory pathways to enable the licensure of alternatives to antibiotics.

  17. Human life symposium: a synopsis and critique.

    PubMed

    Taub, S

    1982-06-01

    A brief summary of the major issues raised by each address during the Human Life Symposium is presented and critiqued by the author. Multidisciplinary perspectives were solicited concerning the possibility of ascribing personhood status to a fetus. Several speakers addressed the issue of the ability of science to define "person." Science may be able to define stages in an organism's development, but cannot decide what rights and obligations should be accrued at any given stage. In philosophy, a single concept of person does not exist, however science, according to 1 speaker, should be able to develop a definition. The author points out that scientific definitions are generally utilitarian and are molded to fit their eventual purpose and questions the role of science in solving the abortion debate in the US. Waste in the reproductive process was reviewed in terms of the number of ova, sperm, fertilized ova, and implanted embryos that nature prohibits from attaining full reproductive potential as a viable pregnancy. Medical technology has allowed many parents to selectively have offspring free of genetic disease who would not have opted to conceive or continue a pregnancy. Medical advances in fetal treatment and surgery raise new ethical dilemmas including the right of the mother to not consent to treatment or in the case of multiple pregnancy, the right of other fetuses not to be jeopardized to save the life of one fetus. The expected impact of bestowing personhood on a fetus would be seen in the abolition of screening programs, of parents' rights to bear only healthy children, in the increased prevalence of children with abnormalities, in the dilemma which would arise in providing necessary treatment to a woman that would endanger the fetus, in the banning of contraceptives which act after fertilization, and in the incidence of illegal abortion. Attempts to define life in terms of legally accepted definitions of death, i.e., loss of capacity and future potential of

  18. What Comes First: The Food or the Nutrient? Executive Summary of a Symposium123

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, David R.

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes background materials and presentations at a symposium that considered the issue of the role of foods and dietary patterns vs. nutrients in relation to chronic disease risk. A model of food synergy is presented as a basis for studying whole foods and dietary patterns. Findings from a series of studies of walnuts were presented and support the concept that walnuts are a healthy food, with specific benefits in a mouse model of breast cancer growth, reductions in cardiovascular disease risk factors in humans, and motor performance and in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo cellular response to challenge in an aged-rat model. PMID:24500931

  19. FOREWORD: International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) was held in Beijing, China during 18th-21st October, 2014, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China. The co-organizer was the State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing, China. Cavitation and multiphase flow is one of paramount topics of fluid mechanics with many engineering applications covering a broad range of topics, e.g. hydraulic machinery, biomedical engineering, chemical and process industry. In order to improve the performances of engineering facilities (e.g. hydraulic turbines) and to accelerate the development of techniques for medical treatment of serious diseases (e.g. tumors), it is essential to improve our understanding of cavitation and Multiphase Flow. For example, the present development towards the advanced hydrodynamic systems (e.g. space engine, propeller, hydraulic machinery system) often requires that the systems run under cavitating conditions and the risk of cavitation erosion needs to be controlled. The purpose of the ISCM 2014 was to discuss the state-of-the-art cavitation and multiphase flow research and their up-to-date applications, and to foster discussion and exchange of knowledge, and to provide an opportunity for the researchers, engineers and graduate students to report their latest outputs in these fields. Furthermore, the participants were also encouraged to present their work in progress with short lead time and discuss the encountered problems. ISCM 2014 covers all aspects of cavitation and Multiphase Flow, e.g. both fundamental and applied research with a focus on physical insights, numerical modelling and applications in engineering. Some specific topics are: Cavitating and Multiphase Flow in hydroturbines, pumps, propellers etc. Numerical simulation techniques Cavitation and multiphase flow erosion and anti-erosion techniques Measurement techniques for cavitation and

  20. First Symposium on Aviation Psychology. Proceedings of the Symposium on Aviation Psychology (Columbus, Ohio, April 21 and 22, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, R. S.

    This volume contains five complete manuscripts and two abstracts presented, and three papers submitted but not presented, at this symposium on aviation psychology. The objective of the symposium was to critically examine the impact of high technology on the role, responsibility, authority, and performance of human operators in modern aircraft and…

  1. New Perspectives in Evaluation. Symposium 6. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on new perspectives in education that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "A Systems Model for Evaluating Learning and Performance" (Hallie Preskill, Darlene Russ-Eft) describes a model for HRD developers to use in evaluating learning and performance that…

  2. Developing Employee Competence. Symposium 25. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains three papers from a symposium on developing employee competence. The first paper, "Coaching in Organizations: Self-Assessment of Competence" (Gary N. McLean, Min-Hsun [Christine] Kuo), reports on development and pilot-testing of an instrument to identify the developmental needs of managers and peers to function more…

  3. Workforce Development. Symposium 37. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Three presentations are provided from Symposium 37, Workforce Development, of the Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) 2000 Conference Proceedings. "Unemployment and Low-Literacy among Welfare Recipients: Continuum of Literacy Program Models" (Larry G. Martin) presents a continuum of four types of literacy programs--academic, situated…

  4. Increasing Participation in Learning. Symposium 19. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on increasing participation in learning that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Factors Influencing Employee Participation in Training: An Empirical Investigation" (Reid A. Bates) reports on a mediated model of employee participation in training…

  5. Knowledge Management. Symposium 36. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Three presentations are provided from Symposium 36, Knowledge Management, of the Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) 2000 Conference Proceedings. "Corporate Knowledge Management and New Challenges for HRD" (Hunseok Oh) identifies new challenges for HRD: training and developing knowledge workers, developing managers and team…

  6. Assessing University Programs. Symposium 9. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains three papers from a symposium on evaluating university human resource development (HRD) programs. The first paper, "Where Have All the Young Ones Gone? An Analysis of the Graduates of an Human Resource Development Program" (Douglas H. Smith, Jo D. Gallagher), reports the results of a survey of graduates between 1998…

  7. Research Methods in HRD. Symposium 40. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on research methods in human resource development (HRD) that was conducted as part of a conference on HRD. "Utilizing Electronic Mail To Survey Human Resource Development Practitioners: A Comparison between Electronic Mail and the U.S. Postal Service for the Purpose of Data Collection:…

  8. Feedback Systems. Symposium 28. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains three papers from a symposium on feedback systems held at a conference on human resource development (HRD). The first paper, "The Role of Feedback in Management Development Training" (K. Peter Kuchinke), reports on a survey-based study that investigated the role of feedback in nine management development training…

  9. Knowledge and Intellectual Capital. Symposium 13. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Three presentations are provided from Symposium 13, Knowledge and Intellectual Capital, of the Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) 2000 Conference proceedings. "Human Capital Measurement" (Joanne Provo) begins with a literature review that provides a context for understanding how investments in human capital add value to the…

  10. Images of HRD. Symposium 4. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on images of human resource development (HRD) that was conducted as part of a conference on HRD. "Analyzing HRD through Metaphor: Why, How, and Some Likely Findings" (Darren C. Short) examines the question of what the uses of metaphor in HRD say about how those in the field view the…

  11. Identity, Influence, and Politics. Symposium 7. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains three papers on gender identity; power and influence styles in program planning; and white male backlash from a symposium on human resource development (HRD). The first paper, "Identification of Power and Influence Styles in Program Planning Practice" (Baiyin Yang), explores the relationship between HRD practitioners…

  12. Cross-Cultural Issues in HRD. Symposium 29. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains three papers from a symposium on cross-cultural issues in human resource development (HRD). The first paper, "The Perceptions of Physical Therapy Students Regarding the Provision of Transcultural Care" (Theresa J. Kraemer), examines the perceptions of 12 entry-level master's degree program physical therapy (PT)…

  13. Career Development. Symposium 34. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Three presentations are provided from Symposium 34, Career Development, of the Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) 2000 Conference Proceedings. "Emerging Career Development Needs as Reported by Adult Students at Four Ohio Institutions of Higher Education: A Qualitative Study" (Kathryn S. Hoff) reports 4 major themes emerged from…

  14. Core Directions in HRD. Symposium 32. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Three presentations are provided from Symposium 32, Core Directions in HRD (Human Resource Development), of the Academy of HRD 2000 Conference Proceedings. "Exploring the Convergence of Political and Managerial Cultures in the Dominican Republic: Implications for Management Development and Training" (Max U. Montesino) reports a survey of…

  15. HRD and Employee Outcomes. Symposium 42. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on human resource development (HRD) and employee outcomes that was conducted as part of a HRD conference. "The Impact of Participating in Human Resource Development Activities on Individuals' Job Level and Income" (Tim de Jong, Bob Witziers, Martin Mulder) presents the results of a…

  16. Organizational Culture and Climate. Symposium 24. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on organizational culture and climate that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "A Comparative Profile of Workgroup Climate in Different Organizational Settings" (Allan H. Church) reports on a comparative analysis of climate data on more than 5,000…

  17. Individual Learning Issues. Symposium 44. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on individual learning issues that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Communication in the Workplace: Using Myers-Briggs To Build Communication Effectiveness" (Patrice M. Scanlon, Judy K. Schmitz, Tracey Murray, Lisa M. Hooper) reports on a…

  18. Advances in Distance Learning. Symposium 38. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Three presentations are provided from Symposium 38, Advances in Distance Learning, of the Academy of Human Resource Development 2000 Conference Proceedings. "Teaching Strategies in a Synchronous Learning Environment for Adult Students" (Luis A. C. Lima, Kathryn S. Hoff) reports the responses of intact cohort groups enrolled in spring semester 1999…

  19. Organizations in Transition. Symposium 41. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on organizations in transition that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Human Resource Development in an Industry in Transition: The Case of the Russian Banking Sector" (Alexander Ardichvili, Alexander Gasparishvili) reports on a study…

  20. Ethics and Integrity. Symposium 27. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains three papers on ethics and integrity from a symposium on human resource development (HRD). The first paper, "Factors Influencing Ethical Resolution Efficacy: A Model for HRD Practitioners" (Kimberly S. McDonald), proposes a model of ethical resolution efficacy for HRD practitioners. The model suggests that factors related to…

  1. Designing Effective HRD Programs. Symposium 23. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on designing effective human resource development (HRD) programs that was conducted as part of a conference on HRD. "Leveraging System Factors for Increased Training Effectiveness" (David Ripley) is a conceptual paper that critiques current training design models and the lack of…

  2. Improving HRD Practice through Research. Symposium 16. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Three presentations are provided from Symposium 16, Improving Human Resource Development (HRD) Practice through Research, of the Academy of HRD 2000 Conference Proceedings. "Why HRD Practitioners Can Lack Respect: Sizing the Credibility Gap between What Top Managers Want and HRD Professionals Deliver" (Robert L. Dilworth, Timothy…

  3. Organizational Structure and Strategy. Symposium 30. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains four papers on organizational structure and strategy from a symposium on human resource development (HRD). The first paper, "Exploring Alignment: A Comparative Case Study of Alignment in Two Organizations" (Steven W. Semler), reports on a case study that compared the results of an alignment measurement instrument…

  4. Assessing the Learning Organization. Symposium 10. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains three papers from a symposium on assessing the learning organization. The first paper, "Relationship between Learning Organization Strategies and Performance Driver Outcomes" (Elwood F. Holton III, Sandra M. Kaiser), reports on a study of a new learning organization assessment instrument that was administered to 440…

  5. Action Learning. Symposium 21. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on action learning that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Searching for Meaning in Complex Action Learning Data: What Environments, Acts, and Words Reveal" (Verna J. Willis) analyzes complex action learning documents produced as course…

  6. Instructional Technology. Symposium 18. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Three presentations are provided from Symposium 18, Instructional Technology, of the Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) 2000 Conference Proceedings. "Strategies for Facilitating Interaction When Using Technology-Mediated Training Methods [TMTM]" (Jeffrey S. Lewis, Gary D. Geroy, Orlando Griego) focuses on differences between…

  7. Increasing Job Satisfaction. Symposium 22. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on increasing job satisfaction that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "A Systematic Model of Job Design by Examining the Organizational Factors Affecting Satisfaction" (Zhichao Cheng, Danyang Yang, Fenglou Liu) reports on a project in which…

  8. Emotion and Behavior in the Workplace. Symposium 20. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on emotion and behavior in the workplace that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Emotion Work, and Perceptions of Affective Culture in a Military Nonprofit Organization" (Jamie L. Callahan, David R. Schwandt) reports on a study of the emotion…

  9. Motivation for Learning and Performance. Symposium 3. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on motivation for learning and performance that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "A Holistic Approach towards Motivation To Learn" (Constantine Kontoghiorghes) reports on a study that identified the following key variables within and outside…

  10. Workplace Issues. Symposium 5. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on workplace issues that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Maximizing Opportunities for the Aging Workforce through Workplace Design" (Virginia W. Kupritz), reports on the second phase of study of the office design features needed to provide…

  11. Management Development. Symposium 15. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Three presentations are provided from Symposium 15, Management Development, of the Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) 2000 Conference Proceedings. "Conceptualizing Global Leadership from Multiple Perspectives: An Analysis of Behavioral Ratings" (Allan H. Church) examines the underlying nature of global leadership behavior using…

  12. Organizational Change. Symposium 11. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains three papers from a symposium on organizational change. The first paper, "Kaizen Blitz: Rapid Learning to Facilitate Immediate Organizational Improvements" (Robert B. Gudgel, Fred C. Feitler), describes rapid and dramatic improvement in the organizational performance of a manufacturing firm after use of a series of…

  13. The first international mini-symposium on methionine restriction and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Ables, Gene P; Brown-Borg, Holly M; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Church, Christopher D; Elshorbagy, Amany K; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Huang, Tsang-Hai; Miller, Richard A; Mitchell, James R; Richie, John P; Rogina, Blanka; Stipanuk, Martha H; Orentreich, David S; Orentreich, Norman

    2014-01-01

    It has been 20 years since the Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science, under the leadership Dr. Norman Orentreich, first reported that low methionine (Met) ingestion by rats extends lifespan (Orentreich et al., 1993). Since then, several studies have replicated the effects of dietary methionine restricted (MR) in delaying age-related diseases (Richie et al., 1994; Miller et al., 2005; Ables et al., 2012; Sanchez-Roman and Barja, 2013). We report the abstracts from the First International Mini-Symposium on Methionine Restriction and Lifespan held in Tarrytown, NY, September 2013. The goals were (1) to gather researchers with an interest in MR and lifespan, (2) to exchange knowledge, (3) to generate ideas for future investigations, and (4) to strengthen relationships within this community. The presentations highlighted the importance of research on cysteine, growth hormone (GH), and ATF4 in the paradigm of aging. In addition, the effects of dietary restriction or MR in the kidneys, liver, bones, and the adipose tissue were discussed. The symposium also emphasized the value of other species, e.g., the naked mole rat, Brandt's bat, and Drosophila, in aging research. Overall, the symposium consolidated scientists with similar research interests and provided opportunities to conduct future collaborative studies (Figure 3).

  14. The Second Canadian Symposium on Hepatitis C Virus: A call to action

    PubMed Central

    Grebely, Jason; Bilodeau, Marc; Feld, Jordan J; Bruneau, Julie; Fischer, Benedikt; Raven, Jennifer F; Roberts, Eve; Choucha, Norma; Myers, Rob P; Sagan, Selena M; Wilson, Joyce A; Bialystok, Frank; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Houghton, Michael; Krajden, Mel

    2013-01-01

    In Canada, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in considerable morbidity, mortality and health-related costs. Within the next three to 10 years, it is expected that tolerable, short-duration (12 to 24 weeks) therapies capable of curing >90% of those who undergo treatment will be approved. Given that most of those already infected are aging and at risk for progressive liver disease, building research-based interdisciplinary prevention, care and treatment capacity is an urgent priority. In an effort to increase the dissemination of knowledge in Canada in this rapidly advancing field, the National CIHR Research Training Program in Hepatitis C (NCRTP-HepC) established an annual interdisciplinary Canadian Symposium on Hepatitis C Virus. The first symposium was held in Montreal, Quebec, in 2012, and the second symposium was held in Victoria, British Columbia, in 2013. The current article presents highlights from the 2013 meeting. It summarizes recent advances in HCV research in Canada and internationally, and presents the consensus of the meeting participants that Canada would benefit from having its own national HCV strategy to identify critical gaps in policies and programs to more effectively address the challenges of expanding HCV screening and treatment. PMID:24199209

  15. Reaching every child with rotavirus vaccine: Report from the 10th African rotavirus symposium held in Bamako, Mali.

    PubMed

    Sow, Samba O; Steele, A Duncan; Mwenda, Jason M; Armah, George E; Neuzil, Kathleen M

    2017-09-08

    The Center for Vaccine Development - Mali (CVD - Mali), the World Health Organization's regional office in Africa (WHO/AFRO), and the CVD at the University of Maryland School of Medicine hosted the 10th African Rotavirus Symposium in Bamako, Mali on 1-2 June 2016. The symposium is coordinated by WHO/AFRO, the Regional Rotavirus Reference Laboratories, and the African Rotavirus Network (ARN), with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The event brings together leading rotavirus researchers, scientists, and policy-makers from across Africa and the world. Over 150 participants, from 31 countries, including 27 in Africa, joined forces to address the theme "Reaching Every Child in Africa with Rotavirus Vaccines." This symposium, the first in francophone Africa, occurred at an unprecedented time when 33 African countries had introduced rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs. The symposium concluded with a Call to Action to introduce rotavirus vaccines in the 21 remaining African countries, to increase access in countries with existing vaccination programs, and to continue surveillance and research on rotavirus and other diarrheal diseases. Copyright © 2017.

  16. Annual symposium on Frontiers in Science

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, N.; Fulton, K.R.

    1998-12-31

    This final report summarizes activities conducted for the National Academy of Sciences' Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Science with support from the US Department of Energy for the period July 1, 1993 through May 31, 1998. During the report period, five Frontiers of Science symposia were held at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. For each Symposium, an organizing committee appointed by the NAS President selected and planned the eight sessions for the Symposium and identified general participants for invitation by the NAS President. These Symposia accomplished their goal of bringing together outstanding younger (age 45 or less) scientists to hear presentations in disciplines outside their own and to discuss exciting advances and opportunities in their fields in a format that encourages, and allows adequate time for, informal one-on-one discussions among participants. Of the 458 younger scientists who participated, over a quarter (124) were women. Participant lists for all symposia (1993--1997) are attached. The scientific participants were leaders in basic research from academic, industrial, and federal laboratories in such disciplines as astronomy, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biochemistry, cell biology, chemistry, computer science, earth sciences, engineering, genetics, material sciences, mathematics, microbiology, neuroscience, physics, and physiology. For each symposia, the 24 speakers and discussants on the program were urged to focus their presentations on current cutting-edge research in their field for a scientifically sophisticated but non-specialist audience, and to provide a sense of the experimental data--what is actually measured and seen in the various fields. They were also asked to address questions such as: What are the major research problems and unique tools in their field? What are the current limitations on advances as well as the frontiers? Speakers were asked to provide a 2500- to

  17. Symposium: “Oncology Leadership in Asia”

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Dong-Young; Roh, Jae Kyung; Kim, Yeul Hong; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Baba, Hideo; Samson-Fernando, Marie Cherry Lynn; Misra, Sanjeev; Aziz, Zeba; Umbas, Rainy; P. Singh, Yogendra; Shu Kam Mok, Tony; Yang, Han-Kwang; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    The symposium on “Oncology Leadership in Asia” was held as part of the official program of the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association with International Cancer Conference. Given the increasing incidence of cancer in all countries and regions of Asia, regardless of developmental stage, and also in light of the recognized need for Asian countries to enhance collaboration in cancer prevention, research, treatment and follow-up, the symposium was held with the aim of bringing together oncology specialists from eight countries and regions in Asia to present the status in their own national context and discuss the key challenges and requirements in order to establish a greater Asian presence in the area of cancer control and research. The task of bringing together diverse countries and regions is made all the more urgent in that while Asia now accounts for more than half of all new cancer cases globally, clinical guidelines are based predominantly on practices adopted in Western countries, which may not be optimized for unique ethnic, pharmacogenomic and cultural characteristics in Asia. Recognizing the need for Asia to better gather information and data for the compilation of Asia-specific clinical guidelines, the participants discussed the current status in Asia in the national and regional contexts and identified future steps towards integrated and collaborative initiatives in Asia. A key outcome of the symposium was a proposal to combine and integrate the activities of existing pan-Asian societies, including the Asian Pacific Federation of Organizations for Cancer Research and Control (APFOCC) and Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS). Further proposals included the expansion of pan-Asian society membership to include individuals and the essential need to encourage the participation of young researchers in order to ensure self-sustainability of cancer control efforts in the future. PMID:28279063

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Symposium on Aeropropulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Recognizing the considerable advances that have been made in computational fluid dynamics, the Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of NASA Lewis Research Center sponsored this symposium with the objective of providing a forum for exchanging information regarding recent developments in numerical methods, physical and chemical modeling, and applications. This conference publication is a compilation of 4 invited and 34 contributed papers presented in six sessions: algorithms one and two, turbomachinery, turbulence, components application, and combustors. Topics include numerical methods, grid generation, chemically reacting flows, turbulence modeling, inlets, nozzles, and unsteady flows.

  19. 20th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings of the 20th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, hosted by the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, on May 7-9, 1986, is documented herein. During the 3 days, 23 technical papers were presented by experts from the United States and Western Europe. A panel discussion by an International group of experts on future directions In mechanisms was also presented; this discussion, however, is not documented herein. The technical topics addressed included deployable structures, electromagnetic devices, tribology, thermal/mechanical/hydraulic actuators, latching devices, positioning mechanisms, robotic manipulators, and computerized mechanisms synthesis.

  20. Symposium melds past and future polar research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Leonard

    An international symposium, Perspectives of Modern Polar Research, was convened in Bad Durkeim, Germany to celebrate the 175th anniversary of the birth of Georg von Neumayer, the noted polar explorer and facilitator of German and international polar science. Neumayer, who lived from 1826 to 1909, began his career as a seaman in the merchant marine. Through his skill in geophysics and meteorology, he rose to become the founder and director of the Flagstaff Observatory in Melbourne, Australia, hydrographer to the German Navy, and director of the Hamburg Oceanic Observatory. He was instrumental in organizing the first International Polar Year (IPY) in 1882-1883.