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Sample records for disease-specific outcome complications

  1. A meta-analysis on the impact of disease-specific education programs on health outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jing-Yu; Chen, Jin-Xiu; Liu, Xian-Liang; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Min; Mei, Li-Juan; Lin, Run

    2012-01-01

    Disease-specific education programs have become an important factor in the treatment and care of chronic conditions, such as heart failure and diabetes mellitus. However, the effectiveness of these educational methods on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains unclear. The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate whether disease-specific education programs were beneficial to health-related quality of life (HRQoL) variables and other long-term health outcomes in patients with COPD. Using electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, Science Direct, Chinese Biomedical Data System, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang Database) and individual searches (published and unpublished Chinese studies), we identified 12 randomized controlled trials (RCTs; English and/or Chinese) from 1991 to 2011. A meta-analysis on these studies revealed a positive relationship between disease-specific education programs and HRQoL scores (as measured by the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire). Moreover, educational programs were associated with increased knowledge about COPD, improved disease management skills, inhaler adherence, and decreased COPD-related emergency department visits and hospital admissions, as well as long-term effects on improving COPD patients' health outcomes. Although significant effects were not detected across all HRQoL variables and health measures, our findings suggest that education programs have the potential to be a valuable intervention for COPD patients. Our results provide a foundation for future research in this area, which we recommend as including more rigorously designed, large, randomized studies.

  2. Obesity, pregnancy complications, and birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Nicole E; Spong, Catherine Y

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is an increasingly common complication of pregnancy with over half of all women in the United States starting pregnancy overweight or obese. Obese women face unique physiological changes during pregnancy, and these women and their neonates are at increased risk for perinatal morbidity and mortality. In this review, we discuss physiological alterations in obese pregnant women and examine obesity-related antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum complications along with management options.

  3. Paternal influences on pregnancy complications and birth outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Cleghorn de Rohrmoser, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of selected characteristics of the paternal work environment and occupational history to the incidence of complications in pregnancy, complications in labor and anomalies in birth outcomes. The literature suggested that male exposure to teratogenic hazards in the form of radiation and chemical compounds, primarily in the form of solvents, has been implicated in reproductive disorders and malformed offspring in animals. Similarly, some recent research suggests that the exposure of male workers to such hazards on their job may have consequences for their spouses and children. Based on these experimental research studies and analyses of persons working in high risk occupations, a broader study of the potential contribution of paternal work environment variables to the success of pregnancy and birth outcomes seemed warranted. Based upon the literature review, a model was proposed for predicting complications in pregnancy, complications in labor and birth outcome (normal birth, low birth weight, congenital malformations and fetal death). From the 1980 National Natality Survey and the 1980 National Fetal Mortality Survey, four sub-samples of married couples, with both husband and wife employed, were selected on the basis of one of the four birth outcomes. The model called for controlling a range of maternal intrinsic and extrinsic health and behavioral variables known to be related to birth outcomes. Multiple logistic regression procedures were used to analyze the effects of father's exposure to radiation and solvents on the job, to complications in pregnancy and labor, and to birth outcome, while controlling for maternal variables. The results indicated that none of the paternal variables were predictors of complications in labor. Further, there was no clear pattern of results, though father's degree of exposure to solvents, and exposures to radiation did reach significance in some analyses.

  4. Breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomies: predictors of complications and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, Sophocles H.; Frank, Simon G.

    2015-01-01

    Breast reconstruction can be performed using a variety of techniques, most commonly categorized into an alloplastic approach or an autologous tissue method. Both strategies have certain risk factors that influence reconstructive outcomes and complication rates. In alloplastic breast reconstruction, surgical outcomes and complication rates are negatively impacted by radiation, smoking, increased body mass index (BMI), hypertension, and prior breast conserving therapy. Surgical factors such as the type of implant material, undergoing immediate breast reconstruction, and the use of fat grafting can improve patient satisfaction and aesthetic outcomes. In autologous breast reconstruction, radiation, increased BMI, certain previous abdominal surgery, smoking, and delayed reconstruction are associated with higher complication rates. Though a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common type of flap used for autologous breast reconstruction, pedicled TRAMs are more likely to be associated with fat necrosis than a free TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. Fat grafting can also be used to improve aesthetic outcomes in autologous reconstruction. This article focuses on factors, both patient and surgical, that are predictors of complications and outcomes in breast reconstruction. PMID:26645003

  5. Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients with Cancer-Related Complications

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Viviane B. L.; Vassalo, Juliana; Silva, Ulysses V. A.; Caruso, Pedro; Torelly, André P.; Silva, Eliezer; Teles, José M. M.; Knibel, Marcos; Rezende, Ederlon; Netto, José J. S.; Piras, Claudio; Azevedo, Luciano C. P.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Spector, Nelson; Salluh, Jorge I. F.; Soares, Marcio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer patients are at risk for severe complications related to the underlying malignancy or its treatment and, therefore, usually require admission to intensive care units (ICU). Here, we evaluated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in this subgroup of patients. Materials and Methods Secondary analysis of two prospective cohorts of cancer patients admitted to ICUs. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify variables associated with hospital mortality. Results Out of 2,028 patients, 456 (23%) had cancer-related complications. Compared to those without cancer-related complications, they more frequently had worse performance status (PS) (57% vs 36% with PS≥2), active malignancy (95% vs 58%), need for vasopressors (45% vs 34%), mechanical ventilation (70% vs 51%) and dialysis (12% vs 8%) (P<0.001 for all analyses). ICU (47% vs. 27%) and hospital (63% vs. 38%) mortality rates were also higher in patients with cancer-related complications (P<0.001). Chemo/radiation therapy-induced toxicity (6%), venous thromboembolism (5%), respiratory failure (4%), gastrointestinal involvement (3%) and vena cava syndrome (VCS) (2%) were the most frequent cancer-related complications. In multivariable analysis, the presence of cancer-related complications per se was not associated with mortality [odds ratio (OR) = 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 0.94–1.66), P = 0.131]. However, among the individual cancer-related complications, VCS [OR = 3.79 (1.11–12.92), P = 0.033], gastrointestinal involvement [OR = 3.05 (1.57–5.91), P = <0.001] and respiratory failure [OR = 1.96(1.04–3.71), P = 0.038] were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusions The prognostic impact of cancer-related complications was variable. Although some complications were associated with worse outcomes, the presence of an acute cancer-related complication per se should not guide decisions to admit a patient to ICU. PMID:27764143

  6. Arthroscopic Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repair: Technical Note, Outcomes, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Black, Eric M.; Lin, Albert; Srikumaran, Uma; Jain, Nitin; Freehill, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to review the authors’ initial experience with arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair. Thirty-one patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair over a 15-month period. Preoperatively, demographics and subjective scores were recorded. Postoperatively, pain levels, subjective shoulder values, satisfaction scores, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, complications, and reoperations were noted with a minimum 2-year follow-up. The relationships between pre- and intraoperative variables and outcome scores were determined with univariate analysis. Average patient age was 56 years, and 23 patients (74%) were men. Twenty patients (65%) underwent primary rotator cuff repair, and 11 patients (35%) underwent revision repair. Average time to follow-up was 26 months. Average preoperative pain level and subjective shoulder value were 5.1 of 10 and 35%, respectively. Average postoperative scores included pain level of 0.9 of 10, subjective shoulder value of 84%, satisfaction score of 90.6 of 100, and ASES score of 86.3 of 100. There were 3 (9.7%) major and 2 (6%) minor complications. Patients undergoing revision rotator cuff repair had significantly worse outcomes (pain level, subjective shoulder value, ASES score; P<.05) compared with those undergoing primary repair, and cortical augmentation did not significantly affect outcome. Overall, outcomes after arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair are good, although patients undergoing revision repair do not have the same outcomes as those undergoing primary cuff repair. The procedure is not without complications (9.7% major, 6% minor complications). Cortical augmentation may be used to supplement fixation, although it does not necessarily affect outcomes. Patients without such augmentation may be at increased risk for suture cutout through the bone. PMID:25970360

  7. Teenage pregnancy: a comparative study of the outcome and complications.

    PubMed

    Thekkekkara, Tina; Veenu, J

    2009-01-01

    This study compares the outcome and complications of pregnancy among teenagers with those above 19 years of age. This retrospective study conducted in a maternity hospital in rural Karnataka, under the guidance of the department of community medicine, St Johns National Academy of Health Sciences, Bangalore, included 221 women who delivered between February 2003 and April 2003. The data was tabulated in excel spreadsheet and analysed using epi 6 programme. Anaemia among teenage multigravidae was found to be a significant health problem. There were no statistically significant differences between the gestational age at delivery and the mode of delivery in the different age groups. Teenage pregnancy was not found to be associated with an increased risk for antenatal complications or postnatal complications. There was no increased incidence of low birth weight or congenital anomalies among the babies of teenage mothers. Mortality was not found to be increased both among the teenage mothers as well as their babies. PMID:19588686

  8. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation: outcomes and complications.

    PubMed

    Sanna, C; Saracco, G M; Reggio, D; Moro, F; Ricchiuti, A; Strignano, P; Mirabella, S; Ciccone, G; Salizzoni, M

    2009-05-01

    Biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) still remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The most frequent complications are strictures and leakages in OLT cases with duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction (D-D), which can be treated with dilatation or stent placement during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), although this procedure is burdened with potentially severe complications, such as retroperitoneal perforation, acute pancreatitis, septic cholangitis, bleeding, recurrence of stones, strictures due to healing process. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcome of this treatment and the complications related to the procedure. Among 1634 adult OLTs, we compared postprocedural complications and mortality rates with a group of 5852 nontransplanted patients (n-OLTs) who underwent ERCP. Of 472 (28,8%) post-OLT biliary complications, 319 (67.6%) occurred in D-D biliary anstomosis cases and 94 (29.5%) patients underwent 150 ERCP sessions. Among 49/80 patients (61.2%) who completed the procedure, ERCP treatment was successful. Overall complication rate was 10.7% in OLT and 12.8% in n-OLT (P = NS). Compared with the n-OLT group, post-ERCP bleeding was more frequent in OLT (5.3% vs 1.3%, P = .0001), while the incidence of pancreatitis was lower (4.7% vs 9.6%, P = .04). Procedure-related mortality rate was 0% in OLT and 0.1% in n-OLT (P = NS). ERCP is a safe procedure for post-OLT biliary complications in the presence of a D-D anastomosis. Morbidity and mortality related with this procedure are acceptable and similar to those among nontransplanted population. PMID:19460551

  9. Gastroscopy in Pediatric Surgery: Indications, Complications, Outcomes, and Ethical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Louise; Hambraeus, Mette; Arnbjörnsson, Einar

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to map gastroscopies performed at a single tertiary pediatric surgery centre to investigate indications, complications, outcomes, and ethical aspects. Material and Methods. A retrospective study of gastroscopies performed during two time periods (2001–2004 and 2011–2014) was conducted. Data regarding indications, outcomes, and complications of pediatric gastroscopies were analysed from a prospectively collected database. Results. The indications for gastroscopies changed over time. Therefore, 376 gastroscopies performed from 2011 through 2014 were studied separately. The median patient was four years old. The predominant indications were laparoscopic gastrostomy (40%), investigation of gastroenterological conditions (22%), obstruction in the upper gastrointestinal tract (20%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (15%), and other indications (3%). Percentages of gastroscopies with no positive findings for each condition were laparoscopic gastrostomy, 100%; gastroenterological conditions, 46%; obstruction in the upper gastrointestinal tract, 36%; GERD, 51%. Furthermore, gastroscopies did not lead to any further action or change in treatment in 45% of gastroenterological conditions and 72% of GERD cases. The overall complication rate was 1%. Conclusion. The results are valuable to educate pediatric surgeons and to inform health care planning when including gastroscopy within clinical practice. PMID:25883646

  10. Supratentorial Ependymoma: Disease Control, Complications, and Functional Outcomes After Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, Efrat; Boop, Frederick A.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Ependymoma is less commonly found in the supratentorial brain and has known clinical and molecular features that are unique. Our single-institution series provides valuable information about disease control for supratentorial ependymoma and the complications of supratentorial irradiation in children. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 children with newly diagnosed supratentorial ependymoma were treated with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT); conformal methods were used in 36 after 1996. The median age at RT was 6.5 years (range, 1-18.9 years). The entire group was characterized according to sex (girls 27), race (white 43), extent of resection (gross-total 46), and tumor grade (anaplastic 28). The conformal RT group was prospectively evaluated for neurologic, endocrine, and cognitive effects. Results: With a median follow-up time of 9.1 years from the start of RT for survivors (range, 0.2-23.2 years), the 10-year progression-free and overall survival were 73% + 7% and 76% + 6%, respectively. None of the evaluated factors was prognostic for disease control. Local and distant failures were evenly divided among the 16 patients who experienced progression. Eleven patients died of disease, and 1 of central nervous system necrosis. Seizure disorders were present in 17 patients, and 4 were considered to be clinically disabled. Clinically significant cognitive effects were limited to children with difficult-to-control seizures. The average values for intelligence quotient and academic achievement (reading, spelling, and math) were within the range of normal through 10 years of follow-up. Central hypothyroidism was the most commonly treated endocrinopathy. Conclusion: RT may be administered with acceptable risks for complications in children with supratentorial ependymoma. These results suggest that outcomes for these children are improving and that complications may be limited by use of focal irradiation methods.

  11. Vitreoretinal surgery for shotgun eye injuries: outcomes and complications

    PubMed Central

    Khoueir, Z; Cherfan, G; Assi, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To analyse the postoperative anatomic and functional outcomes in addition to complications after vitreoretinal surgery for patients with shotgun eye injuries related to hunting accidents. Materials Retrospective review of the clinical records of all cases of shotgun eye injuries presented between January 2000 and January 2011 and with a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Collection of demographics, type of injury, choice of management, complications and final surgical success with final visual acuity is reported. Results Twenty eyes of 19 patients (all male) with a mean age of 36.1 years (range 16−60 years) were included in the study. Mean postoperative follow-up was 47.5 months (range 15−118 months). Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at presentation ranged from perception of light to 20/200. Ten eyes had a penetrating injury and 10 others had a perforating injury. All the eyes underwent an initial vitrectomy and the intraocular pellet was removed in all the 10 penetrating injuries. Concurrent cataract surgery was performed in 12 cases, internal tamponade was used in 15 cases and a supplemental encircling scleral buckle was inserted in 12 cases. One additional vitreoretinal surgery was required in seven cases (35%) and two additional surgeries required in two other cases (10%). At last follow-up BCVA ranged from NPL to 20/20 and was 20/100 or better in 10 eyes (50%). All patients had a flat retina except for two cases (10%) that developed severe proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Conclusion These results suggest that vitreoretinal surgery can offer good visual rehabilitation in patients with shotgun eye injuries. PMID:25931167

  12. Outcome of Capsular Tension Ring (CTR) Implant in Complicated Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Sahai, Anshu; Kumar, Pukhrambam Ratan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgery in the presence of zonular weakness or subluxated lens was a great surgical challenge and included intracapsular cataract extraction with anterior chamber IOL implantation or pars plana lensectomy and vitrectomy with a sutured (IOL). Modern surgical approache involves placement of endocapsular flexible PMMA ring that prevents iatrogenic loss of zonular support, minimizing vitreous loss and enables placement of in the bag IOL. Aim To evaluate frequency and indications of capsular tension ring (CTR) implant and analyse the visual and anatomical outcome in various complicated cataract surgeries. Materials and Methods Retrospective screening of database of 6000 consecutive cataract surgeries was done. BCVA, complete ocular examination with SLEx, intraocular pressure, direct ophthalmoscope, fundus examination with +78/+90D were noted. CTR was implanted in cases where Zonular dialysis of > 3 clock hours was present or capsular bag instability was detected during capsulorhexis or subsequent intraoperative maneuvers. In cases with capsulorrhexis extension, CTR was not implanted. Records were analysed for indication of CTR implant and clinical outcome on Day 1, 1 month and 6 month follow up. Results In this series CTR implant was done in 45 cases. The indications were hypermature senile cataract in 9 cases, hypermature senile cataract with lens induced glaucoma in 9 cases, pseudoexfoliation syndrome in 9 cases, post blunt injury traumatic cataract in 6 cases, iridochoroidal coloboma in 6 cases, hypermature cataract with pseudoexfoliation and marfan syndrome in 3 cases respectively. Decision of CTR implant was intraoperative in 42 patients. At 6 month follow up, 39 patients had best corrected visual acuity ≥6/12. IOL decentration was detected in only 3 cases, but without any subjective visual complaints. Conclusion As per the results CTR was used very infrequently (0.75%) but remains useful in cataract surgeries with difficult pre and intraoperative

  13. The imperative to prevent diabetes complications: a broadening spectrum and an increasing burden despite improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Twigg, Stephen M; Wong, Jencia

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus and its complications are common; the complications are, of themselves, a major reason to manage diabetes. Recent data from Australia and similar developed health care systems overseas indicate that morbidity and mortality outcomes relating to diabetes complications are improving. However, these benefits are offset by increasing numbers of people diagnosed with diabetes, resulting in an increased disease burden with significant health care implications. Thus the imperative to prevent diabetes and diabetes complications has never been greater. Furthermore, the recognised spectrum of diabetes complications is broadening, especially complications relating to lipid levels, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Clinicians now need to be aware of both traditional complications (eg, nephropathy and cardiovascular disease) and non-traditional complications (eg, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, some cancers and eating disorders). Complications outcomes could be further improved by decreasing the evidence-treatment gap - for example, by increasing personalisation of care in managing diabetes complications.

  14. Disease specific protein corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-03-01

    It is now well accepted that upon their entrance into the biological environments, the surface of nanomaterials would be covered by various biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and lipids). The absorption of these biomolecules, so called `protein corona', onto the surface of (nano)biomaterials confers them a new `biological identity'. Although the formation of protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles has been widely investigated, there are few reports on the effect of various diseases on the biological identity of nanoparticles. As the type of diseases may tremendously changes the composition of the protein source (e.g., human plasma/serum), one can expect that amount and composition of associated proteins in the corona composition may be varied, in disease type manner. Here, we show that corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles (after interaction with in the plasma of the healthy individuals) could induce unfolding of fibrinogen, which promotes release of the inflammatory cytokines. However, no considerable releases of inflammatory cytokines were observed for corona coated graphene sheets. In contrast, the obtained corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles from the hypofibrinogenemia patients could not induce inflammatory cytokine release where graphene sheets do. Therefore, one can expect that disease-specific protein coronas can provide a novel approach for applying nanomedicine to personalized medicine, improving diagnosis and treatment of different diseases tailored to the specific conditions and circumstances.

  15. Long-Term Outcomes and Complications in Patients With Craniopharyngioma: The British Columbia Cancer Agency Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Andrea C.; Howard, A. Fuchsia; Nichol, Alan; Sidhu, Keerat; Abdulsatar, Farah; Hasan, Haroon; Goddard, Karen

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: We report long-term outcomes and complications of craniopharyngioma patients referred to our institution. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 2010, 123 consecutive patients received primary treatment for craniopharyngioma in British Columbia and were referred to our institution. The median age was 30 years (range, 2-80 years). Thirty-nine percent of patients were treated primarily with subtotal resection (STR) and radiation therapy (RT), 28% with STR alone, 15% with gross total resection, 11% with cyst drainage (CD) alone, 5% with CD+RT, and 2% with RT alone. Eight percent of patients received intracystic bleomycin (ICB) therapy. Results: Median follow-up was 8.9 years, and study endpoints were reported at 10 years. Ten-year Kaplan-Meier progression-free survival (PFS) was 46%. Patients treated with STR+RT or CD+RT had the highest PFS (82% and 83%, respectively). There were no significant differences between PFS after adjuvant versus salvage RT (84% vs 74%, respectively; P=.6). Disease-specific survival (DSS) was 88%, and overall survival (OS) was 80%. Primary treatment modality did not affect DSS or OS, while older age was a negative prognostic factor for OS but not DSS. Kaplan-Meier rates for visual deterioration, anterior pituitary hormone deficiency, diabetes insipidus, seizure disorder, and cerebrovascular events (CVE) due to treatment, not tumor progression, were 27%, 76%, 45%, 16%, and 11%, respectively. The CVE rate was 29% in patients who received ICB compared to 10% in those who did not (P=.07). Conclusions: We report favorable PFS in patients with craniopharyngioma, especially in those who received RT after surgery. DSS and OS rates were excellent regardless of primary treatment modality. We observed a high incidence of hypopituitarism, visual deterioration, and seizure disorder. Eleven percent of patients experienced CVEs after treatment. There was a suggestion of increased CVE risk in patients treated with ICB.

  16. A Review of Complications and Outcomes following Vertebral Column Resection in Adults.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Sravisht; Nemani, Venu M; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-06-01

    The correction of rigid spinal deformities in adult patients can require a three-column osteotomy (pedicle subtraction osteotomy [PSO] or vertebral column resection [VCR]) to obtain spinal balance. Unfortunately, the existing adult deformity literature frequently reports the outcomes and complications of these procedures together even though VCR is a more extensive procedure with potentially higher rates of complications. We sought to address this shortcoming and provide clinicians with an overview of the existing literature regarding VCR in adult patients. The goals of this review are: to determine the rate of overall and neurologic complications following VCR, the rate of complications with VCR compared to PSO, and the impact of VCR on clinical and radiographic outcomes. An electronic literature search was used to identify studies reporting outcomes or complications following VCR in adult patients. Raw data on patient demographics, case information, radiographic outcomes, complications and clinical outcomes were extracted. Data were pooled to report a rate of overall complications and neurologic complications. A pooled relative risk of complications following PSO vs. VCR was also calculated. Eleven retrospective studies (Level IV) met our inclusion criteria. The overall rate of complications was 69.2%. The reoperation rate was 9.6%. The rate of neurologic complications was 13.3% (range, 6.3% to 15.8%) with most cases being transient. The rate of permanent neurologic deficits was 2.0%. We found a significantly higher rate of all complications with VCR compared to PSO (relative risk, 1.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-1.49; p<0.001). All studies reporting clinical outcomes showed significant improvements in functional outcome postoperatively. PMID:27340543

  17. A Review of Complications and Outcomes following Vertebral Column Resection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Sravisht; Nemani, Venu M.

    2016-01-01

    The correction of rigid spinal deformities in adult patients can require a three-column osteotomy (pedicle subtraction osteotomy [PSO] or vertebral column resection [VCR]) to obtain spinal balance. Unfortunately, the existing adult deformity literature frequently reports the outcomes and complications of these procedures together even though VCR is a more extensive procedure with potentially higher rates of complications. We sought to address this shortcoming and provide clinicians with an overview of the existing literature regarding VCR in adult patients. The goals of this review are: to determine the rate of overall and neurologic complications following VCR, the rate of complications with VCR compared to PSO, and the impact of VCR on clinical and radiographic outcomes. An electronic literature search was used to identify studies reporting outcomes or complications following VCR in adult patients. Raw data on patient demographics, case information, radiographic outcomes, complications and clinical outcomes were extracted. Data were pooled to report a rate of overall complications and neurologic complications. A pooled relative risk of complications following PSO vs. VCR was also calculated. Eleven retrospective studies (Level IV) met our inclusion criteria. The overall rate of complications was 69.2%. The reoperation rate was 9.6%. The rate of neurologic complications was 13.3% (range, 6.3% to 15.8%) with most cases being transient. The rate of permanent neurologic deficits was 2.0%. We found a significantly higher rate of all complications with VCR compared to PSO (relative risk, 1.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.24–1.49; p<0.001). All studies reporting clinical outcomes showed significant improvements in functional outcome postoperatively. PMID:27340543

  18. Diabetic microvascular complications: possible targets for improved macrovascular outcomes

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, John A; Bayliss, George; Roshan, Bijan; Maski, Manish; Gleason, Ray E; Weinrauch, Larry A

    2011-01-01

    The results of recent outcome trials challenge hypotheses that tight control of both glycohemoglobin and blood pressure diminishes macrovascular events and survival among type 2 diabetic patients. Relevant questions exist regarding the adequacy of glycohemoglobin alone as a measure of diabetes control. Are we ignoring mechanisms of vasculotoxicity (profibrosis, altered angiogenesis, hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and endothelial injury) inherent in current antihyperglycemic medications? Is the polypharmacy for lowering cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, and systolic blood pressure producing drug interactions that are too complex to be clinically identified? We review angiotensin–aldosterone mechanisms of tissue injury that magnify microvascular damage caused by hyperglycemia and hypertension. Many studies describe interruption of these mechanisms, without hemodynamic consequence, in the preservation of function in type 1 diabetes. Possible interactions between the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and physiologic glycemic control (through pulsatile insulin release) suggest opportunities for further clinical investigation. PMID:21694944

  19. Complications and oncologic outcomes of pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Somintara, Ongart; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Kongdan, Youwanush; Supsamutchai, Chairat; Sukpanich, Rupporn

    2016-01-01

    Background There are several techniques for harvesting the pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap after mastectomy in breast cancer patients. We examined the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique and determined factors associated with its complications and oncological outcomes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the results of 168 TRAM flaps performed between January 2003 and December 2010, focusing on complications and oncologic outcomes. Results Among the 168 pedicled TRAM flap procedures in 158 patients, flap complications occurred in 34%. Most of the flap complications included some degree of fat necrosis. There was no total flap loss. Flap complications were associated with elderly patients and the presence of major donor site complications. Abdominal bulging and hernia occurred in 12% of patients. The bi-pedicled TRAM flap and higher body mass index (BMI) were significant factors associated with increased donor site complications. Seven patients (4%) developed loco-regional recurrence. Within a median follow-up of 27 months, distant metastasis and death occurred in 6% and 4% of patients, respectively. Conclusions The pedicled TRAM flap using the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique in the present study is consistent with the results from previous studies in flap complication rates and oncological outcomes. PMID:27563562

  20. Subacute complications during recovery from severe traumatic brain injury: frequency and associations with outcome

    PubMed Central

    Godbolt, Alison K; Stenberg, Maud; Jakobsson, Jan; Sorjonen, Kimmo; Krakau, Karolina; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie; Nygren DeBoussard, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical complications after severe traumatic brain injury (S-TBI) may delay or prevent transfer to rehabilitation units and impact on long-term outcome. Objective Mapping of medical complications in the subacute period after S-TBI and the impact of these complications on 1-year outcome to inform healthcare planning and discussion of prognosis with relatives. Setting Prospective multicentre observational study. Recruitment from 6 neurosurgical centres in Sweden and Iceland. Participants and assessments Patients aged 18–65 years with S-TBI and acute Glasgow Coma Scale 3–8, who were admitted to neurointensive care. Assessment of medical complications 3 weeks and 3 months after injury. Follow-up to 1 year. 114 patients recruited with follow-up at 1 year as follows: 100 assessed, 7 dead and 7 dropped out. Outcome measure Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended. Results 68 patients had ≥1 complication 3 weeks after injury. 3 weeks after injury, factors associated with unfavourable outcome at 1 year were: tracheostomy, assisted ventilation, on-going infection, epilepsy and nutrition via nasogastric tube or percutaneous endoscopic gastroscopy (PEG) tube (univariate logistic regression analyses). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that tracheostomy and epilepsy retained significance even after incorporating acute injury severity into the model. 3 months after injury, factors associated with unfavourable outcome were tracheostomy and heterotopic ossification (Fisher's test), infection, hydrocephalus, autonomic instability, PEG feeding and weight loss (univariate logistic regression). PEG feeding and weight loss at 3 months were retained in a multivariate model. Conclusions Subacute complications occurred in two-thirds of patients. Presence of a tracheostomy or epilepsy at 3 weeks, and of PEG feeding and weight loss at 3 months, had robust associations with unfavourable outcome that were incompletely explained by acute injury severity. PMID

  1. Tracking the aesthetic outcomes of prosthetic breast reconstructions that have complications

    PubMed Central

    Mioton, Lauren M; Seth, Akhil; Gaido, Jessica; Fine, Neil A; Kim, John YS

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aesthetic results following breast reconstruction have been shown to be a major contributor to patient satisfaction. While many presume that complications after reconstruction impact final aesthetic results, little data exist to substantiate this putative relationship. OBJECTIVE: To track and evaluate aesthetic outcomes following implant reconstructions with complications. METHODS: A chart review was conducted on a series of consecutive expander-implant breast reconstructions performed by the senior author between 2004 and 2012. Included patients completed their prosthetic reconstruction or converted to autologous methods and had a minimum follow-up period of 130 days. Four blinded members of the division of plastic surgery independently rated postoperative anterior photographs of patients’ breasts using a validated scoring scale with respect to five distinct aesthetic domains: breast mound volume, contour, placement, scarring and inframammary fold. RESULTS: Of the 172 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 36 experienced a complication. The tissue expander in one-half of these patients was salvaged and the remaining patients converted to autologous reconstruction. The average aesthetic scores for each domain did not differ significantly between patients who experienced a complication and retained their expander and those who did not experience a complication. Patients who converted to autologous tissue reconstruction after experiencing a complication had the highest aesthetic scores. DISCUSSION: The ability to obtain aesthetic results following a complication that were not statistically different from results in those without complications may reflect the surgeon’s refined attempt to salvage the initial implant reconstruction; in other circumstances, the improved cosmesis was achieved through conversion to an autologous tissue-based method. CONCLUSION: The present study quantitatively assessed the impact of complications on aesthetic outcomes

  2. Clinical Outcomes and Complications of Cortical Button Distal Biceps Repair: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Andreas; Tatani, Irini; Tsoumpos, Pantelis; Ntourantonis, Dimitris; Pantazis, Konstantinos; Triantafyllopoulos, Ioannis K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical outcomes and complications of the cortical button distal biceps fixation method. Material and Methods. All methods followed the PRISMA guidelines. Included studies had to describe clinical outcomes and complications after acute distal biceps repair with cortical button fixation. Eligibility criteria also included English language, more than 5 cases with minimum follow-up of 6 months, and preferably usage of at least one relevant clinical score (MEPS, ASES, and/or DASH) for final outcome. A loss of at least 30° in motion-flexion, extension, pronation, or supination-and a loss of at least 30% of strength were considered an unsatisfactory result. Results. The review identified 7 articles including 105 patients (mean age 43.6 years) with 106 acute distal biceps ruptures. Mean follow-up was 26.3 months. Functional outcome of ROM regarding flexion/extension and pronation/supination was satisfactory in 94 (89.5%) and 86 (82%) patients in respect. Averaged flexion and supination strength had been reported in 6/7 studies (97 patients) and were satisfactory in 82.4% of them. The most common complication was transient nerve palsy (14.2%). The overall reoperation rate was 4.8% (5/105 cases). Conclusion. Cortical button fixation for acute distal biceps repair is a reproducible operation with good clinical results. Most of the complications can be avoided with appropriate surgical technique. PMID:27525303

  3. Clinical Outcomes and Complications of Cortical Button Distal Biceps Repair: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical outcomes and complications of the cortical button distal biceps fixation method. Material and Methods. All methods followed the PRISMA guidelines. Included studies had to describe clinical outcomes and complications after acute distal biceps repair with cortical button fixation. Eligibility criteria also included English language, more than 5 cases with minimum follow-up of 6 months, and preferably usage of at least one relevant clinical score (MEPS, ASES, and/or DASH) for final outcome. A loss of at least 30° in motion—flexion, extension, pronation, or supination—and a loss of at least 30% of strength were considered an unsatisfactory result. Results. The review identified 7 articles including 105 patients (mean age 43.6 years) with 106 acute distal biceps ruptures. Mean follow-up was 26.3 months. Functional outcome of ROM regarding flexion/extension and pronation/supination was satisfactory in 94 (89.5%) and 86 (82%) patients in respect. Averaged flexion and supination strength had been reported in 6/7 studies (97 patients) and were satisfactory in 82.4% of them. The most common complication was transient nerve palsy (14.2%). The overall reoperation rate was 4.8% (5/105 cases). Conclusion. Cortical button fixation for acute distal biceps repair is a reproducible operation with good clinical results. Most of the complications can be avoided with appropriate surgical technique. PMID:27525303

  4. Exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy: Impact on pregnancy complications and outcome.

    PubMed

    Ali, Z; Hansen, A V; Ulrik, C S

    2016-05-01

    Asthma is common among pregnant women, and the incidence of asthma exacerbations during pregnancy is high. This literature review provides an overview of the impact of exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy on pregnancy-related complications. The majority of published retrospective studies reveal that asthma exacerbations during pregnancy increase the risk of pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, placental abruption and placenta praevia. Furthermore, these women also have higher risk for breech presentation, haemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, caesarean delivery, maternal admission to the intensive care unit and longer postpartum hospital stay. Asthma has been associated with increased risk of intrauterine growth retardation, small-for-gestational age, low birth weight, infant hypoglycaemia and preterm birth, but more recent prospective studies have not revealed significant associations with regard to these outcomes. In conclusion, asthma exacerbations during pregnancy are associated with complications of pregnancy, labour and delivery. Prevention of exacerbations is essential to reduce the risk of complications and poor outcome.

  5. Predicting adverse obstetric outcome after early pregnancy events and complications: a review.

    PubMed

    van Oppenraaij, R H F; Jauniaux, E; Christiansen, O B; Horcajadas, J A; Farquharson, R G; Exalto, N

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to evaluate the impact of early pregnancy events and complications as predictors of adverse obstetric outcome. METHODS We conducted a literature review on the impact of first trimester complications in previous and index pregnancies using Medline and Cochrane databases covering the period 1980-2008. RESULTS Clinically relevant associations of adverse outcome in the subsequent pregnancy with an odds ratio (OR) > 2.0 after complications in a previous pregnancy are the risk of perinatal death after a single previous miscarriage, the risk of very preterm delivery (VPTD) after two or more miscarriages, the risk of placenta praevia, premature preterm rupture of membranes, VPTD and low birthweight (LBW) after recurrent miscarriage and the risk of VPTD after two or more termination of pregnancy. Clinically relevant associations of adverse obstetric outcome in the ongoing pregnancy with an OR > 2.0 after complications in the index pregnancy are the risk of LBW and very low birthweight (VLBW) after a threatened miscarriage, the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption, preterm delivery (PTD), small for gestational age and low 5-min Apgar score after detection of an intrauterine haematoma, the risk of VPTD and intrauterine growth restriction after a crown-rump length discrepancy, the risk of VPTD, LBW and VLBW after a vanishing twin phenomenon and the risk of PTD, LBW and low 5-min Apgar score in a pregnancy complicated by severe hyperemesis gravidarum. CONCLUSIONS Data from our literature review indicate, by finding significant associations, that specific early pregnancy events and complications are predictors for subsequent adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. Though, some of these associations are based on limited or small uncontrolled studies. Larger population-based controlled studies are needed to confirm these findings. Nevertheless, identification of these risks will improve obstetric care. PMID:19270317

  6. Distribution, Complications, and Outcome of Footpad Injuries in Pet and Military Working Dogs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lane A; Hazenfield, Kurt M; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Smeak, Dan D

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the findings of 120 traumatic pad injuries in pet and military dogs. Most dogs (68%) presented with a laceration to a thoracic limb footpad, and one-third of dogs were middle-aged castrated males. Metacarpal pads were most commonly injured. Short-term complications were noted in 27% of dogs. No long-term complications were identified. No disability from pad injury was present at the completion of healing. Concurrent injuries to adjacent structures were uncommon and did not affect outcome. Dogs with full-thickness pad lacerations were at greater risk for major short-term complications compared to dogs with partial-thickness pad lacerations (odds ratio, 7.27; P = .001). Military working dogs with full-thickness pad lacerations were at greater risk for major short-term complications than pet dogs with a similar injury. When major complications developed in dogs with full-thickness pad injuries, time to final healing was significantly longer (by a median of 12 days). The partial-thickness pad lesions healed uneventfully regardless of whether they were bandaged, surgically repaired, or left to heal by second intention. Suture repair and bandaging of full-thickness lesions could not be shown to either decrease the risk for complications or improve healing. Future work should focus on establishing standards for footpad treatment to reduce complications.

  7. Nutritional Care of Gastric Cancer Patients with Clinical Outcomes and Complications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wook Jin

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer have been steadily decreased over the past few decades. However, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer deaths across many regions of the world, particularly in Asian countries. In previous studies, nutrition has been considered one of significant risk factors in gastric cancer patients. Especially, malnourished patients are at greater risk of adverse clinical outcomes (e.g., longer hospital stay) and higher incidence of complications (e.g., wound/infectious complications) compared to well-nourished patients. Malnutrition is commonly found in advanced gastric cancer patients due to poor absorption of essential nutrients after surgery. Therefore, nutritional support protocols, such as early oral and enternal feeding, have been proposed in many studies, to improve unfavorable clinical outcomes and to reduce complications due to delayed application of oral nutritional support or parental feeding. Also, the supplied with enternal immune-enriched diet had more benefits in improving clinical outcomes and fewer complications compared to a group supplied with control formula. Using nutritional screening tools, such as nutritional risk index (NRI) and nutritional risk screening (NRS 2002), malnourished patients showed higher incidence of complications and lower survival rates than non-malnourished patients. However, a long-term nutritional intervention, such as nutritional counseling, was not effective in the patients. Therefore, early assessment of nutritional status in patients using a proper nutritional screening tool is suggested to prevent malnutrition and adverse health outcomes. Further studies with numerous ethnic groups may provide stronger scientific evidences in association between nutritional care and recovery from surgery in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:27152296

  8. Neuropsychological Outcome and Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Complicated versus Uncomplicated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Panenka, William J.; Lange, Rael T.; Bouix, Sylvain; Shewchuk, Jason R.; Heran, Manraj K. S.; Brubacher, Jeffrey R.; Eckbo, Ryan; Shenton, Martha E.; Iverson, Grant L.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether intracranial neuroimaging abnormalities in those with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) (i.e., “complicated” MTBIs) are associated with worse subacute outcomes as measured by cognitive testing, symptom ratings, and/or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We hypothesized that (i) as a group, participants with complicated MTBIs would report greater symptoms and have worse neurocognitive outcomes than those with uncomplicated MTBI, and (ii) as a group, participants with complicated MTBIs would show more Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) abnormalities. Participants were 62 adults with MTBIs (31 complicated and 31 uncomplicated) who completed neurocognitive testing, symptom ratings, and DTI on a 3T MRI scanner approximately 6-8 weeks post injury. There were no statistically significant differences between groups on symptom ratings or on a broad range of neuropsychological tests. When comparing the groups using tract-based spatial statistics for DTI, no significant difference was found for axial diffusivity or mean diffusivity. However, several brain regions demonstrated increased radial diffusivity (purported to measure myelin integrity), and decreased fractional anisotropy in the complicated group compared with the uncomplicated group. Finally, when we extended the DTI analysis, using a multivariate atlas based approach, to 32 orthopedic trauma controls (TC), the findings did not reveal significantly more areas of abnormal DTI signal in the complicated vs. uncomplicated groups, although both MTBI groups had a greater number of areas with increased radial diffusivity compared with the trauma controls. This study illustrates that macrostructural neuroimaging changes following MTBI are associated with measurable changes in DTI signal. Of note, however, the division of MTBI into complicated and uncomplicated subtypes did not predict worse clinical outcome at 6-8 weeks post injury. PMID:25915776

  9. Long Term Clinical and Visual Outcomes of Retrofixated Iris Claw Lenses Implantation in Complicated Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Sri; Brar, Sheetal; Relekar, Kirti

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the visual outcomes and complications after implantation of retrofixated iris claw (RFIC) lens in various challenging situations. Settings and Design: Retrospective, single centre, 8 year clinical audit. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of cases who underwent RFIC lens implantation alone (group 1) or in combination with vitreoretinal (VR), corneal or glaucoma procedures (group 2) was performed. The main outcomes evaluated were corrected distant visual acuity (CDVA) and postoperative complications. The mean follow up was 13.09±6.8 (range 6-24) months. Results: The study involved 100 eyes of 83 patients with mean age of 51.1±25.4 years. Group 1 included 59 eyes and group 2 had 41 eyes. In group 1, the mean CDVA improved from 0.86±0.81 to 0.38±0.51 LogMAR (p<0.001) with 72.8% eyes having gain in lines (≥ 2 lines) of CDVA with safety index of 1.73. The mean CDVA in group 2 improved from 0.71±0.65 to 0.38±0.34 LogMAR (p=0.003) with 65.8% eyes having gain in lines (≥ 2 lines) of CDVA with a safety index of 1.54. Group 2 showed a higher complication rate of 36.59% compared to group 1 (20.34%). Significant complications noted were secondary glaucoma (8%), disenclavation of haptic (4%), subluxation of RFIC lens (1%). Conclusion: The visual outcome with RFIC lenses when combined with other intraocular procedures is mainly affected by the complexity of co-existing pathologies .The complications are more related to the combined procedures performed rather than RFIC lens implantation alone. This may still be acceptable when complication profile of other intraocular lenses is evaluated in similar challenging situations. PMID:27347246

  10. Complications and Outcomes of Primary Phacotrabeculectomy with Mitomycin C in a Multi-Ethnic Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Chelvin; Aquino, Maria C.; Chew, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the occurrence of intraoperative and postoperative complications up to three years after primary phacotrabeculectomy with intraoperative use of Mitomycin C (MMC) in primary open angle (POAG) and primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) patients, and the effect of postoperative complications on surgical outcome. Methods Retrospective review of 160 consecutive patients with POAG (n = 105) and PACG (n = 55), who underwent primary phacotrabeculectomy with MMC at the National University Hospital, Singapore, from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. Data was collected using a standardized form that included patient demographic information, ocular characteristics and postoperative complications, including hypotony (defined as intraocular pressure < 6 mmHg), shallow anterior chamber (AC) and hyphema. Results The mean age ± standard deviation (SD) of patients was 68.2 ± 8.2 years. No patient lost light perception during duration of follow-up. 77% of the postoperative complications occurred within the first month only. The commonest complications were hypotony (n = 41, 25.6%), hyphema (n = 16, 10.0%) and shallow AC (n = 16, 10.0%). Five patients (3.1%) required reoperation for their complications. Early hypotony (defined as hypotony < 30 days postoperatively) was an independent risk factor for surgical failure (hazard ratio [HR], 5.1; 95% CI, 1.6–16.2; p = 0.01). Hypotony with another complication was also a risk factor for surgical failure (p < 0.02). Conclusions Hypotony, hyphema and shallow AC were the commonest postoperative complications in POAG and PACG patients after phacotrabeculectomy with MMC. Most complications were transient and self-limiting. Early hypotony within the first month was a significant risk factor for surgical failure. PMID:25775362

  11. Disease Specific Therapies in Leukodystrophies and Leukoencephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Helman, Guy; Van Haren, Keith; Bonkowsky, Joshua L.; Bernard, Genevieve; Pizzino, Amy; Braverman, Nancy; Suhr, Dean; Patterson, Marc C.; Fatemi, S. Ali; Leonard, Jeff; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Back, Stephen A.; Damiani, Stephen; Goldman, Steven A.; Takanohashi, Asako; Petryniak, Magdalena; Rowitch, David; Messing, Albee; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Schiffmann, Raphael; Eichler, Florian; Escolar, Maria L.; Vanderver, Adeline

    2015-01-01

    The leukodystrophies are a heterogeneous, often progressive group of disorders manifesting a wide range of symptoms and complications. Most of these disorders have historically had no etiologic or disease specific therapeutic approaches. Recently, a greater understanding of the pathologic mechanisms associated with leukodystrophies has allowed clinicians and researchers to prioritize treatment strategies and advance research in therapies for specific disorders, some of which are on the verge of pilot or phase I/II clinical trials. This shifts the care of leukodystrophy patients from the management of the complex array of symptoms and sequelae alone to targeted therapeutics. The unmet needs of leukodystrophy patients still remain an overwhelming burden. While the overwhelming consensus is that these disorders collectively are symptomatically treatable, leukodystrophy patients are in need of advanced therapies and if possible, a cure. PMID:25684057

  12. Complications and oncologic outcomes following robot-assisted radical cystectomy: What is the real benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Dong Jae; Lee, You Jin; Woo, Myeong Jin; Chung, Jae-Wook; Ha, Yun-Sok; Kim, Hyun Tae; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Yoo, Eun Sang; Kim, Bup Wan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the advantages of robotic surgery, comparing perioperative and oncological outcomes between robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) and open radical cystectomy (ORC). Materials and Methods Between August 2008 and May 2014, 112 radical cystectomies (42 RARCs and 70 ORCs) were performed at a single academic institution following Institutional Review Board approval. Patient demographics, perioperative variables (e.g., complications), and oncologic outcomes including metastasis-free survival (MFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were reported using the Kaplan-Meier analyses. Results The median follow-up period was 40 months (range, 0–70 months) vs. 42 months (range, 0–74 months) in RARC and ORC, respectively. Baseline characteristics of both groups were balanced. Blood loss (median, [range]; 300 mL [125–925 mL] vs. 598 mL [150–2,000 mL], p=0.001) and perioperative transfusion rates (23.8% vs. 45.7%, p=0.020) were significantly lower in the RARC group than in the ORC group. The overall complication rates were greater in the ORC group, but this was not statistically significant (65.7% vs. 64.3%, p=0.878). However, there were significantly higher major complication rates in the ORC group (45.7% vs. 26.2%, p=0.040). No significant differences were found with regards to MFS, CSS, and OS. Conclusions While histopathological findings, overall complications, and survival rates do not reveal definite differences, RARC has more advantages compared to ORC in terms of estimated blood loss, perioperative transfusion rates and fewer perioperative major complications. We propose that RARC is a safer treatment modality with equivalent oncological outcomes compared to ORC. PMID:27437535

  13. Acute complications and outcomes of acute head injury in adult patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Núñez, Maria A; Borobia, Alberto M; García-Erce, Jose A; Martí de Gracia, Milagros; Pérez-Perilla, Patricia; Quintana-Díaz, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics, complications and outcome of patients with haemophilia and acute head injury (AHI) at the emergency department (ED), and develop a protocol to prevent early and late complications. This is a retrospective cohort study including all patients with haemophilia and AHI admitted to the ED. We identified 26 patients with AHI. A computed tomography scan was carried out on all patients at admission, and again on two patients (with neurosurgical complications) 48 h later. The discharge diagnosis was as follows: 3.8% subdural haematoma, 3.8% cerebellar epidural haematoma and 92.3% uncomplicated AHI. We propose the following protocol: a computed tomography scan upon arrival and another within 48 h post-AHI, unless there is an absence of clinical symptoms. In addition, all patients must self-administer a clotting factor as soon as possible and be observed in the ED for at least 48 h.

  14. Modern surgical techniques for management of soft tissue sarcomas involving the spine: outcomes and complications.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Tobias A; Teles, Alisson R; Mendel, Ehud

    2015-04-01

    Several types of soft tissue sarcomas may locally extend to the spine. The best therapeutic strategy for such lesions strongly depends on the histological diagnosis. In this article the authors provide an up-to-date review of current guidelines regarding the management of soft tissue sarcomas involving the spine. Special attention is given to outcomes and complications of modern surgical series in order to highlight current challenges in the management of such lesions.

  15. Implantable Port Devices, Complications and outcome in Pediatric Cancer, a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, H; Ghorbanpor, M; Tanasan, A

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral blood vessels, due to availability are used for many years in cancer patients, however in patients with potentially harmful drugs to skin (vesicant drugs) or difficult accessibility to vessels, the use of implantable port (totally implantable venous access port-TIVAP) devices with central vascular access are important. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, 85 pediatric cancer patients younger than 16 years, with TIVAP implantation, were followed for their complications and outcome. In addition to demographic data, patients’ port complications were assessed and compared with published articles. Results Mean days of implanted port usage were 531 ± 358 days in all patients. This period was 287 ±194 days in complicated patients. Complications included as infection (tunnel infection and catheter related blood-stream infection), malfunction and thrombosis, skin erosion, tube avulsion, and tube adhesion to the adjacent vessels were seen in 30.6% of patients. Conclusion According to the published data and this experience, the most common complications in TIVAP are infection and catheter malfunction. It is important to notice that in order to prolong its efficacious life, effective sterilization methods, prevention of clot formation and trauma, are the most useful measures. PMID:27222696

  16. Outcomes and Complications of Diabetes Mellitus on Patients Undergoing Degenerative Lumbar Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Javier Z.; Iatridis, James C.; Skovrlj, Branko; Cutler, Holt; Hecht, Andrew C.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Cho, Samuel K.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective database analysis. Objective To assess the effect glycemic control has on perioperative morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing elective degenerative lumbar spine surgery. Summary of background data Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a prevalent disease of glucose dysregulation that has been demonstrated to increase morbidity and mortality following spine surgery. However, there is limited understanding of whether glycemic control influences surgical outcomes in DM patients undergoing lumbar spine procedures for degenerative conditions. Methods The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was analyzed from 2002 to 2011. Hospitalizations were isolated based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for lumbar spine surgery and diagnoses codes for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine. Patients were then classified into three cohorts: controlled diabetics, uncontrolled diabetics and non-diabetics. Patient demographic data, acute complications and hospitalization outcomes were determined for each cohort. Results A total of 403,629 (15.7%) controlled diabetics and 19,421(0.75%) uncontrolled diabetics underwent degenerative lumbar spine surgery from 2002-2011. Relative to non-diabetics, uncontrolled diabetics had significantly increased odds of cardiac complications, deep venous thrombosis and post-operative shock; additionally, uncontrolled diabetics also had an increased mean length of stay (approximately 2.5 days), greater costs (1.3-fold) and a greater risk of inpatient mortality (odds ratio=2.6, 95% confidence interval=1.5-4.8, p < .0009). Controlled diabetics also had increased risk of acute complications and inpatient mortality when compared to non-diabetics, but not nearly to the same magnitude as uncontrolled diabetics. Conclusion Suboptimal glycemic control in diabetic patients undergoing degenerative lumbar spine surgery leads to increased risk of acute complications and poor outcomes

  17. Complications and pregnancy outcome following uterine compression suture for postpartum haemorrhage: a single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Mathur, M; Tagore, S

    2014-07-01

    In the treatment of postpartum haemorrhage from uterine atony, uterine compression sutures, such as the B-Lynch suture and its modifications have a role with the advantage of preservation of the uterus for fertility. There is however, a risk that apposition of the anterior and posterior walls of the uterus will impede drainage of lochia, resulting in undesirable complications. We undertook a five-year retrospective study of all women who underwent uterine compression sutures at the KK Women's and Children's Hospital, between 2008 and 2012. In total, 23 women had uterine compression sutures during the study period, of which, nineteen women managed to conserve their uterus. Our complication rate was 25%, which included persistent vaginal discharge, pyometra and endometritis. There were three conceptions, with two successful pregnancies. Our study shows uterine compression suture to be a safe and effective alternative to avoid hysterectomy with preservation of fertility at the time of major postpartum haemorrhage. The outcome of subsequent pregnancies is reassuring.

  18. Toxic scarlet fever complicating cellulitis: early clinical diagnosis is crucial to prevent a fatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Lau, S K; Woo, P C; Yuen, K Y

    2004-04-01

    We describe a case of toxic scarlet fever in a healthy adult with streptococcal cellulitis of the right elbow as a result of skin abrasion. The clinical picture mimicked that of drug eruption after treatment of cellulitis with antibiotics. Among the five cases of scarlet fever complicating cellulitis, including the present one, reported in the English literature, four had severe systemic complications and two died. As a result of re-emergence of invasive streptococcal infections, clinicians should be aware of the differential diagnosis of scarlet fever in patients presenting with cellulitis and skin rash. Early clinical diagnosis is crucial to exclude drug eruptions, prompt initiation of antibiotic treatment, and prevention of the potentially fatal outcome.

  19. Neurological Complications after Neonatal Bacteremia: The Clinical Characteristics, Risk Factors, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shih-Ming; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lien, Reyin; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Tsai, Ming-Horng

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonates with bacteremia are at risk of neurologic complications. Relevant information warrants further elucidation. Study Design This was a retrospective cohort study of neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications (BNCs) in a tertiary-level neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A systemic chart review was performed conducted to identify clinical characteristics and outcomes. A cohort of related conditions was constructed as the control group. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for BNC. Results Of 1037 bacteremia episodes, 36 (3.5%) had BNCs. Twenty-four cases of BNCs were related to meningitis, five were presumed meningitis, and seven occurred after septic shock. The most common causative pathogens were Group B streptococcus (41.7%) and E. coli (16.7%). The major BNCs consisted of seizures (28), hydrocephalus (20), encephalomalacia (11), cerebral infarction (7), subdural empyema (6), ventriculitis (8), and abscess (4). Eight (22.8%) neonates died and six (16.7%) were discharged in critical condition when the family withdrew life-sustaining treatment. Among the 22 survivors, eight had neurologic sequelae upon discharge. After multivariate logistic regression analysis, neonates with meningitis caused by Group B streptococcus (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 8.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.20–36.08; p = 0.002) and combined meningitis and septic shock (OR, 5.94; 95% CI: 1.53–23.15; p = 0.010) were independently associated with BNCs. Conclusions Neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications are associated with adverse outcomes or sequelae. Better strategies aimed at early detection and reducing the emergence of neurologic complications and aggressive treatment of Group B streptococcus sepsis are needed in neonates with meningitis and septic shock. PMID:25364821

  20. Unusual delayed presentation of head trauma complicating outcome of facial nerve decompression surgery.

    PubMed

    Thakur, J S; Shekar, Vidya; Saluja, Manika; Mohindroo, N K

    2013-08-20

    Late presentation of head trauma is rare. A young boy presented with a traumatic facial paralysis after head trauma. A CT scan of the head showed temporal bone fracture without intracranial insult. Facial nerve decompression was performed and paralysis started improving. However, he presented with vertigo and sensorineural hearing loss after 2 months. Clinical examination also showed cerebellar sign. We suspected iatrogenic injury to the cochlea; however, brain MRI showed haemorrhage in the area of anterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient was managed conservatively and the vertigo improved. This case stresses on unusual late presentation of head trauma and cerebellar artery injury that complicated the outcome of facial nerve paralysis.

  1. Genetic risk for schizophrenia, obstetric complications, and adolescent school outcome: evidence for gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Jennifer K; Ellman, Lauren M; Tanskanen, Antti; Mustonen, Ulla; Huttunen, Matti O; Suvisaari, Jaana; Cannon, Tyrone D

    2013-09-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) and hypoxia are among the environmental factors most reliably associated with schizophrenia; however, the nature of this relationship is unclear and both gene-environment interaction and gene-environment covariation models have been proposed as explanations. High-risk (HR) designs that explore whether obstetric complications differentially predict outcomes in offspring at low risk (LR) vs HR for schizophrenia, while accounting for differences in rates of maternal risk factors, may shed light on this question. This study used prospectively obtained data to examine relationships between LBW and hypoxia on school outcome at age 15-16 years in a Finnish sample of 1070 offspring at LR for schizophrenia and 373 offspring at HR for schizophrenia, based on parental psychiatric history. Controlling for offspring sex, maternal smoking, social support, parity, age, and number of prenatal care visits, HR offspring performed worse than LR offspring across academic, nonacademic, and physical education domains. LBW predicted poorer academic and physical education performance in HR offspring, but not in LR offspring, and this association was similar for offspring of fathers vs mothers with schizophrenia. Hypoxia predicted poorer physical education score across risk groups. Rates of LBW and hypoxia were similar for LR and HR offspring and for offspring of fathers vs mothers with schizophrenia. Results support the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia confers augmented vulnerability of the developing brain to the effects of obstetric complications, possibly via epigenetic mechanisms.

  2. Visual Outcomes and Complications of Piggyback Intraocular Lens Implantation Compared to Aphakia for Infantile Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Joshaghani, Mahmood; Soleimani, Mohammad; Foroutan, Alireza; Yaseri, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term visual outcomes and complications of the piggyback intraocular lens (IOL) implantation compared to aphakia for infantile cataract. Patients and Methods: In a comparative study from 1998 to 2007, piggyback IOL implantation (piggyback IOL group) was performed for 14 infants (23 eyes) with infantile cataract and 20 infants (32 eyes) who were aphakic (aphakia group) after infantile cataract surgery. Data were collected on logMAR visual acuity, and postoperative complications over a mean follow-up time of 6.2 ± 1.7 years and 5.8 ± 1.7 years. Results: The mean age at surgery was 7.5 ± 0.6 months and 6.0 ± 3.3 months for the piggyback and the aphakic group respectively (P > 0.05). At the last follow-up visit, visual acuity was 0.85 ± 0.73 (median = 0.70, interquartile range = 0.3–1.32) in the piggyback IOL group and 0.89 ± 0.56 (median = 0.86, interquartile range = 0.50–1.24) in the aphakic group (P > 0.05). There was a positive relationship between age and visual outcomes in the aphakic group (r = 0.4, P = 0.04) but not in the piggyback IOL group (P = 0.48). There was no significant difference between the mean myopic shift in the piggyback IOL group (∑5.28 ± 1.06 D) and the aphakic group (∑5.10 ± 1.02 D) (P > 0.05). The incidence of reoperation due to complications in piggyback IOL group was higher than aphakic group (%48 vs. %16, respectively, P ≤ 0.01). However, in patients older than 6 months, this risk was not significantly different compared to the aphakic group. Conclusions: Although piggyback IOL implantation for infantile cataract is optically acceptable as a treatment option, there is no significant difference in visual outcomes compared to aphakia. The incidence in reoperation due to complications in patients aged 6 months or younger is higher than those treated with aphakia. PMID:26692724

  3. Evaluation of functional outcomes and complications following modified Latarjet reconstruction in athletes with anterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    van der Watt, Christelle; de Beer, Joe F

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal management of anterior shoulder instability in athletes continues to be a challenge. The present study aimed to evaluate the functional outcomes of athletes with anterior shoulder instability following modified Latarjet reconstruction through assessing the timing of return to sport and complications. Methods Retrospective assessment was performed of athletes (n = 56) who presented with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and were treated with modified congruent arc Latarjet reconstruction over a 1-year period. Rugby union was the predominant sport performed. Pre-operative instability severity index scores were assessed. Postoperative complications were recorded as was the time taken for the athlete to return to sport. Results Arthroscopic evaluation revealed that 86% of patients had associated bony lesions affecting the glenohumeral joint. The overall complication rate relating to the Latarjet reconstruction was 7%. No episodes of recurrent shoulder instability were noted. Of the patients, 89% returned to competitive sport at the same level as that prior to surgery. The mean time post surgery to returning to full training was 3.2 months. Conclusions The modified congruent arc Latarjet procedure facilitates early rehabilitation and return to sport. These results support our systematic management protocol of performing modified Latarjet surgery in contact sport athletes with recurrent anterior instability. PMID:27582973

  4. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes.

  5. Long-term therapeutic outcome of ophthalmic complications following endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heping; Shen, Tao; Chen, Jingchang; Yan, Jianhua

    2016-09-01

    Ophthalmic complications associated with endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) are quite rare. There is a paucity of reliable data and limited experience on the clinical findings and treatments of these injuries. Our study here is to characterize the types of orbital injury following ESS, in particular extraocular muscle injury, and to evaluate the long-term therapeutic outcomes as compiled from a relatively large sample of Chinese patients.A series of 27 patients (21 males and 6 females; mean age = 42.6 years, ranges: 10-60 years) were retrospectively reviewed. The mean duration of orbital complication was 6.6 months (ranges: 1 day to 24 months). The right eye was affected in 19 patients and the left in 8 patients. All patients had various extraocular muscle dysfunction, including contusion, oculomotor nerve damage, muscle entrapment, muscle transection, and muscle destruction. All patients subjected to strabismus surgery showed an obvious reduction in deviation. Three patients achieved orthophoria without any surgery during the period of observation. All patients displayed mild to complicated orbital hemorrhage that often disappeared within 2 weeks. Optic nerve injury occurred in 29.6% of patients and vision damage in these patients was often irreversible.All patients with ophthalmic complications after ESS had strabismus and extraocular muscle dysfunction. Timing and type of strabismus surgery performed depended on the severity and number of muscles involved as well as the type of injury. This surgery is less effective in cases of restriction factor adhesion and/or entrapment as compared to that of patients with other types of strabismus. Orbital hemorrhages were usually resolved spontaneously, but optic nerve injury was mostly irreversible. PMID:27661034

  6. Long-term therapeutic outcome of ophthalmic complications following endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Heping; Shen, Tao; Chen, Jingchang; Yan, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ophthalmic complications associated with endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) are quite rare. There is a paucity of reliable data and limited experience on the clinical findings and treatments of these injuries. Our study here is to characterize the types of orbital injury following ESS, in particular extraocular muscle injury, and to evaluate the long-term therapeutic outcomes as compiled from a relatively large sample of Chinese patients. A series of 27 patients (21 males and 6 females; mean age = 42.6 years, ranges: 10–60 years) were retrospectively reviewed. The mean duration of orbital complication was 6.6 months (ranges: 1 day to 24 months). The right eye was affected in 19 patients and the left in 8 patients. All patients had various extraocular muscle dysfunction, including contusion, oculomotor nerve damage, muscle entrapment, muscle transection, and muscle destruction. All patients subjected to strabismus surgery showed an obvious reduction in deviation. Three patients achieved orthophoria without any surgery during the period of observation. All patients displayed mild to complicated orbital hemorrhage that often disappeared within 2 weeks. Optic nerve injury occurred in 29.6% of patients and vision damage in these patients was often irreversible. All patients with ophthalmic complications after ESS had strabismus and extraocular muscle dysfunction. Timing and type of strabismus surgery performed depended on the severity and number of muscles involved as well as the type of injury. This surgery is less effective in cases of restriction factor adhesion and/or entrapment as compared to that of patients with other types of strabismus. Orbital hemorrhages were usually resolved spontaneously, but optic nerve injury was mostly irreversible. PMID:27661034

  7. National assessment of early biliary complications following liver transplantation: incidence and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, David A; Lentine, Krista L; Xiao, Huiling; Dzebisashvilli, Nino; Schnitzler, Mark; Tuttle-Newhall, Janet E; Segev, Dorry L

    2014-04-01

    Despite improved overall liver transplant outcomes, biliary complications remain a significant cause of morbidity. A national data set linking transplant registry and Medicare claims data for 17,012 liver transplant recipients was used to identify all recipients with a posttransplant biliary diagnosis code within the first 6 months after transplantation. Patients were further categorized as follows: a diagnosis without a procedure, a diagnosis and an associated radiological or endoscopic procedure, or a diagnosis treated with surgery. Overall, 15.0% had a biliary diagnosis, 11.2% required a procedure, and 2.2% had a surgical revision. Factors independently associated with biliary complications included donation after cardiac death (DCD), donor age, recipient age, split grafts, and long cold ischemia times. Graft loss was significantly more common for patients with biliary diagnoses [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 1.89, confidence interval (CI) = 1.63-2.19], interventions (aHR = 2.08, CI = 1.77-2.44), and surgical procedures (aHR = 1.80, CI = 1.31-2.49). Mortality after transplantation was also markedly increased for patients with biliary diagnoses (aHR = 2.18, CI = 1.97-2.40), procedures (aHR = 2.21, CI = 1.99-2.46), and surgeries (aHR = 1.77, CI = 1.41-2.23). In stratified analyses, the impact of early biliary complications was greater for DCD liver recipients, but they remained highly significant for recipients of allografts from brain-dead donors as well. Reducing biliary complications should improve posttransplant survival and reduce graft loss. PMID:24478266

  8. Retrospective analysis of radial EBUS outcome for the diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesion: sensitivity and complications

    PubMed Central

    Durakovic, Amal; Andersen, Henrik; Christiansen, Anders; Hammen, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of the current study was to clarify the sensitivity and complication rate of the radial (endobronchial ultrasound, EBUS) without the use of guide-sheath (GS) and fluoroscopy for lung cancer (LC), by measuring the distance from the orifice of the bronchus to the pulmonary lesion, as well as to analyze factors that can predict the diagnostic outcome. Materials and methods A total of 147 patients with peripheral pulmonary lesions (PPL) underwent radial EBUS-guided transbronchial biopsy (TBB) in between August 1, 2013, and August 31, 2014. We analyzed retrospectively radiological data, diagnostic work-up in everyday clinical settings, final diagnosis and complication rates, as well as factors influencing the diagnostic outcome. Results Around 63.9% of PPLs were visualized by ultrasound. A definitive malignant diagnosis was established in 39 patients (26.5%) using radial EBUS. In the remaining 108 patients, additional procedures were performed. We missed LC diagnosis in 40 cases that results in a sensitivity of 49%. For malignant lesions visualized by radial EBUS, the sensitivity was 60%, compared with 24% for not visualized lesions. For malignant lesions, logistic regression was performed to identify the factors that had significant influence on visualization of the lesion and on diagnostic yield. Logistic regression analysis showed significant odds ratios (OR) for visualization depending on location of the lesion; upper lobe lesions were identified more frequent with OR of 3.85 (95% CI 1.42 – 10.98, p=0.009). Size above 30 mm had a non-significant OR of 2.11 (95% CI 0.80−5.73, p=0.134) for visualization. Diagnostic yield was only significantly influenced by visualization with the radial EBUS, OR 3.70 (95% CI 1.35−11.02, p=0.014). Location (p=0.745) and size above 30 mm (p=0.308) showed no significant increase in diagnostic yield. Other lesion characteristics defined on computed tomography, such as distance to carina and pleura, did not

  9. Impact of non-neurological complications in severe traumatic brain injury outcome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Non-neurological complications in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) are frequent, worsening the prognosis, but the pathophysiology of systemic complications after TBI is unclear. The purpose of this study was to analyze non-neurological complications in patients with severe TBI admitted to the ICU, the impact of these complications on mortality, and their possible correlation with TBI severity. Methods An observational retrospective cohort study was conducted in one multidisciplinary ICU of a university hospital (35 beds); 224 consecutive adult patients with severe TBI (initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) < 9) admitted to the ICU were included. Neurological and non-neurological variables were recorded. Results Sepsis occurred in 75% of patients, respiratory infections in 68%, hypotension in 44%, severe respiratory failure (arterial oxygen pressure/oxygen inspired fraction ratio (PaO2/FiO2) < 200) in 41% and acute kidney injury (AKI) in 8%. The multivariate analysis showed that Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) at one year was independently associated with age, initial GCS 3 to 5, worst Traumatic Coma Data Bank (TCDB) first computed tomography (CT) scan and the presence of intracranial hypertension but not AKI. Hospital mortality was independently associated with initial GSC 3 to 5, worst TCDB first CT scan, the presence of intracranial hypertension and AKI. The presence of AKI regardless of GCS multiplied risk of death 6.17 times (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.37 to 27.78) (P < 0.02), while ICU hypotension increased the risk of death in patients with initial scores of 3 to5 on the GCS 4.28 times (95% CI: 1.22 to15.07) (P < 0.05). Conclusions Low initial GCS, worst first CT scan, intracranial hypertension and AKI determined hospital mortality in severe TBI patients. Besides the direct effect of low GCS on mortality, this neurological condition also is associated with ICU hypotension which increases hospital mortality among patients with severe

  10. Optimizing outcomes in vasectomy: how to ensure sterility and prevent complications

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Vasectomy provides a long-term effective sterilization for men and is performed on nearly 500,000 men annually in the United States. Improvements in technique have led to a decreased failure rate and fewer complications, although significant variations in technique exist. Use of cautery occlusion with or without fascial interposition appears to have the least failures. A no-scalpel approach lowers risk of hematoma formation, infection and bleeding post-operatively. A patient can be considered sterile when azoospermia is achieved or the semen analysis shows less than 100,000 non-motile sperm per milliliter. Incorporating these principles may allow the physician to optimize outcomes in vasectomy. PMID:27141443

  11. Maternal and Perinatal Outcome of Life Threatening Obstetrical Complications Requiring Multiple Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Khatuja, Ritu; Radhakrishnan, Gita; Radhika, AG; Juneja, Atul; Singh, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obstetrical haemorrhage is the direct cause of maternal mortality, which can be prevented by timely recognition followed by quick and adequate treatment. Aim To evaluate maternal and perinatal outcome of life threatening obstetric complications requiring multiple transfusions. Materials and Methods It is an observational study conducted on 112 antenatal and postnatal women admitted in a tertiary level hospital, requiring blood and blood products transfusion of >1.5 liters in 24 hours, over a period of 15 months (Aug 2011 to Oct 2012). The demographic and obstetrical profile, amount transfused, mode of delivery, duration of hospital stay, maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality was evaluated. Statistical Analysis Statistical analysis of the data was performed using chi-squared test. Results There were 95 women who presented in antepartum period and 17 in the postpartum. Multigravidas comprised of 70 women, 81 had unsupervised pregnancies and 33 women presented in shock. At admission, 76 peripartum women had severe anaemia and 62 had coagulopathy. Obstetrical hysterectomy was done for 33 women and total 17 women expired. Haemorrhage was the most common indication for transfusion. The mean blood transfusion and volume replacement in 24 hours was 4.2 units & 2.25 liters respectively. The mean hospital stay was 10-15 days. Intra-uterine death at the time of admission was present in 40 women and 72 had live births. After birth, 21 babies required neonatal intensive care, of which 6 expired. Conclusion Antenatal care is important to prevent complications though pregnancy is always unpredictable. Patients’ condition at admission is single most important factor often influencing the maternal and perinatal outcome. PMID:26673661

  12. Treatment outcomes and late complications of 849 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with radiotherapy alone

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.-A. . E-mail: yehsa@hotmail.com; Tang Yeh; Lui, C.-C.; Huang, Y.-J.; Huang, E.-Y.

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to describe the treatment outcomes and treatment-related complications of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis was performed on 849 consecutive NPC patients treated between 1983 and 1998 in our institution. Potentially significant patient-related and treatment-related variables were analyzed. Radiation-related complications were recorded. Results: The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates of these patients were 59% and 52%, respectively. Advanced parapharyngeal space (PPS) invasion showed stronger prognostic value than PPS invasion. Multiple neck lymph node (LN) involvement was demonstrated to be one of the most powerful independent prognostic factors among all LN-related parameters. External beam radiation dose more than 72 Gy was associated with significantly higher incidence of hearing impairment, trismus, and temporal lobe necrosis. Conclusions: We recommend that the extent of PPS should be clarified and stratified. Multiple neck LN involvement could be integrated into the N-classification in further revisions of the American Joint Committee on Cancer stage. Boost irradiation is not suggested for node-negative necks. For node-positive necks, boost irradiation is indicated and a longer interval between initial and boost irradiation would reduce the incidence of neck fibrosis without compromising the neck control rate.

  13. Cognitive outcome varies in adolescents born preterm, depending on gestational age, intrauterine growth and neonatal complications

    PubMed Central

    Lundequist, Aiko; Böhm, Birgitta; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Forssberg, Hans; Smedler, Ann-Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate long-term cognitive outcome in a cohort of 18-year-olds born preterm and previously assessed at the age of 5.5. Methods We tested 134 adolescents born preterm with a very low birthweight of <1500 g and 94 term-born controls with a comprehensive cognitive battery at 18 years of age. The cohort was subdivided into 73 extremely preterm, 42 very preterm and 19 moderately preterm infants with gestational ages of 23–27, 28–31 and 32–36 weeks, respectively. The moderately preterm group was dominated by adolescents born small for gestational age. Results Very preterm adolescents performed on a par with term-born controls. In contrast, extremely preterm adolescents displayed inferior results on all cognitive tests, more so if they had suffered neonatal complications. Moderately preterm adolescents scored lower than very preterm and full-term born adolescents, particularly on complex cognitive tasks. Conclusion Adolescents born at 28 weeks of gestation or later, with appropriate birthweight and no perinatal complications, functioned like term-born peers at 18 years of age. Extremely preterm birth per se posed a risk for long-term cognitive deficits, particularly executive deficits. Adolescents born moderately preterm but small for gestational age were at risk of general cognitive deficits. PMID:25394225

  14. Complications and fetal outcome in diabetic pregnancy. Intensified conventional versus insulin pump therapy.

    PubMed

    Burkart, W; Hanker, J P; Schneider, H P

    1988-01-01

    From 1978 to 1986 a total of 189 pregnant diabetic women gave birth at our hospital. In this randomized prospective study the influence of maternal diabetes treatment in normoglycemic patients, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (n = 48) versus intensified conventional treatment (n = 41), is evaluated. These two groups of patients are further compared to patients (n = 28) who underwent conventional diabetes treatment during pregnancy. It can be shown from our data that the rate of complications such as preeclampsia, intrauterine growth retardation, premature labor and premature delivery can be reduced by intensified conventional and insulin pump treatment as compared to conventionally treated patients with late onset of pregnancy care. As expected, in the groups of CSII and ICT patients no difference in the rate of pregnancy complications nor in fetal outcome could be demonstrated. Among CSII pregnancies 12/48 were complicated, in the ICT population the respective figure was 13/41 (CT: 20/28). The mean gestational age at the time of delivery ranged between 38 and 40 weeks, depending on the severity of maternal diabetes. CT patients were delivered earlier in all White classes. Fetal morbidity was nearly equal in CSII and ICT children, in CT patients it was greatly enhanced. Also the mortality (perinatal and neonatal) was considerably larger in CT patients (6/28), again, in the CSII and ICT population the mortality was nearly identical (2/48 and 3/41). We conclude, from our prospective information, that insulin pump therapy during pregnancy is indicated if intensified conventional treatment does not lead to normoglycemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Vertebral augmentation by kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty: 8 years experience outcomes and complications

    PubMed Central

    Yaltirik, Kaan; Ashour, Ahmed M; Reis, Conner R; Özdoğan, Selçuk; Atalay, Başar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Context: Minimally invasive percutaneous vertebral augmentation techniques; vertebroplasty, and kyphoplasty have been treatment choices for vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of the patients who underwent vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty regarding complications, correction of vertebral body height, kyphosis angle and pain relief assessment using visual analog score (VAS) for pain. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the hospital records for 100 consecutive patients treated with kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty in our department database. Patients with osteoporotic compression fractures, traumatic compressions, and osteolytic vertebral lesions, including metastases, hemangiomas, and multiple myeloma, were included in the study. Preoperative and postoperative VAS pain scores, percentages of vertebral compression and kyphotic angles were measured and compared as well as demographic characteristics and postoperative complications. Mobilization and length of stay (LOS) were recorded. Results: One hundred patients were treated by 110 procedures. 64 patients were operated on due to osteoporosis (72 procedures). Twelve patients were operated on because of metastasis (13 procedures), 8 patients were operated on because of multiple myeloma (9 procedures). Five patients had two surgeries, 1 patient had 3 surgeries, and 1 patient had 5 surgeries. The mean preoperative VAS was 74.05 ± 9.8. In total, 175 levels were treated, 46 levels by kyphoplasty and 129 by vertebroplasty. The mean postoperative VAS was 20.94 ± 11.8. Most of the patients were mobilized in the same day they of surgery. Mean LOS was 1.83 days. Six patients had nonsymptomatic leakage of polymethlymethacrylate, and patient had epidural hematoma, which was operated on performing hemi-laminectomy. Conclusions: Percutaneous vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty are both effective and safe minimally invasive procedures for the

  16. Vertebral augmentation by kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty: 8 years experience outcomes and complications

    PubMed Central

    Yaltirik, Kaan; Ashour, Ahmed M; Reis, Conner R; Özdoğan, Selçuk; Atalay, Başar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Context: Minimally invasive percutaneous vertebral augmentation techniques; vertebroplasty, and kyphoplasty have been treatment choices for vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of the patients who underwent vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty regarding complications, correction of vertebral body height, kyphosis angle and pain relief assessment using visual analog score (VAS) for pain. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the hospital records for 100 consecutive patients treated with kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty in our department database. Patients with osteoporotic compression fractures, traumatic compressions, and osteolytic vertebral lesions, including metastases, hemangiomas, and multiple myeloma, were included in the study. Preoperative and postoperative VAS pain scores, percentages of vertebral compression and kyphotic angles were measured and compared as well as demographic characteristics and postoperative complications. Mobilization and length of stay (LOS) were recorded. Results: One hundred patients were treated by 110 procedures. 64 patients were operated on due to osteoporosis (72 procedures). Twelve patients were operated on because of metastasis (13 procedures), 8 patients were operated on because of multiple myeloma (9 procedures). Five patients had two surgeries, 1 patient had 3 surgeries, and 1 patient had 5 surgeries. The mean preoperative VAS was 74.05 ± 9.8. In total, 175 levels were treated, 46 levels by kyphoplasty and 129 by vertebroplasty. The mean postoperative VAS was 20.94 ± 11.8. Most of the patients were mobilized in the same day they of surgery. Mean LOS was 1.83 days. Six patients had nonsymptomatic leakage of polymethlymethacrylate, and patient had epidural hematoma, which was operated on performing hemi-laminectomy. Conclusions: Percutaneous vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty are both effective and safe minimally invasive procedures for the

  17. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset still's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes. PMID:26834930

  18. Variation in biliary complication rates following liver transplantation: implications for cost and outcome.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, D A; Dzebisashvili, N; Lentine, K L; Xiao, H; Schnitzler, M; Tuttle-Newhall, J E; Segev, D L

    2015-01-01

    Although biliary complications (BCs) have a significant impact on the outcome of liver transplantation (LT), variation in BC rates among transplant centers has not been previously analyzed. BC rate, LT outcome and spending were assessed using linked Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients and Medicare claims (n = 16,286 LTs). Transplant centers were assigned to BC quartiles based upon risk-adjusted observed to expected (O:E) ratio of BC separately for donation after brain death (DBD) and donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors. The median incidence of BC was 300% greater in the highest versus lowest DBD quartiles (19.0% vs. 5.9%) and varied 250% between DCD quartiles (20.3%-8.4%). Donor and recipient characteristics suggest that high BC centers actually used lower donor risk index organs, fewer split livers and fewer imports (p < 0.001 for all). Transplant at a center in the highest O:E quartile was associated with increased posttransplant mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 2.53, p = 0.007) in DCD transplant and increased graft loss (aHR 1.21, p = 0.02) in DBD transplant. Medicare spending was $22,895 (p < 0.0001) higher at centers in highest versus lowest BC quartile. In summary, BC rates vary widely among transplant centers and higher rates are a marker for an increased risk of death, graft failure and health-care spending. PMID:25534447

  19. Indications, Outcomes, and Complications of Pedicled Propeller Perforator Flaps for Upper Body Defects: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Davide; Huemer, Georg M.; Nicoli, Fabio; Larcher, Lorenz; Dashti, Talal; Grassetti, Luca; Li, Qingfeng; Spinelli, Giuseppe; Agostini, Tommaso

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this investigation was to systematically review the current literature to provide the best data for indications, outcomes, survival, and complication rates of pedicled propeller perforator flaps for upper body defects. Methods A comprehensive literature review for articles published from January 1991 to December 2011 was performed using the PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane Databases. Articles without available full-text, single case reports or papers with excessive missing data were excluded. Papers reporting pedicle-perforator (propeller) flaps used for lower extremity reconstruction were excluded from meta-analysis. Results From the initial 1,736 studies our search yielded, 343 studies qualified for the second stage of selection. Of 117 full-text reports screened, 41 studies, met the definitive inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of the selected 41 articles, 26 were case series, original papers or retrospective reviews and were included, whereas 15 were case report papers and therefore were excluded. Two hundred ninety-five propeller flaps were reported to have been used in a total of 283 patients. Indications include repair of trauma-induced injuries, post-trauma revision surgery, cancer resection, chronic infection, pressure sores, and chronic ulcers with a major complication rate (3.3%) comparable to that of free flaps. No specific exclusion criteria for the procedure were presented in the studies reviewed. Conclusions Pedicled propeller flaps are a versatile and safe reconstructive option that are easy and quick to raise and that provide unlimited clinical solutions because of the theoretical possibility of harvesting them based on any perforator chosen among those classified in the body. PMID:23362479

  20. Reproductive Outcomes and Nononcologic Complications After Radioactive Iodine Ablation for Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Young, Stephanie; Ro, Kevin; Li, Ning; Leung, Angela M.; Chiu, Harvey K.; Harari, Avital; Yeh, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation is frequently performed after initial surgery for well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC). We examined the frequency and timing of childbirth as well as nononcologic complications after RAI ablation for WDTC on a population level. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 25,333 patients (18,850 women) with WDTC was performed using the California Cancer Registry and California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development database, 1999–2008. The primary outcomes were birthrate and median time to first live birth among women of childbearing age. Secondary outcomes were nononcologic diagnoses occurring outside the acute setting (>30 days) after ablation. Results: RAI ablation did not affect birthrate among women in the full dataset. However, in subgroup analyses, birthrate among women age 35–39 was significantly decreased in those who received RAI versus those who did not (11.5 versus 16.3 births per 1000 woman-years, p<0.001). Median time to first live birth after diagnosis of WDTC was prolonged among women who received RAI compared to those who did not (34.5 versus 26.1 months; p<0.0001). When 5-year age groups were examined individually, delay to first live birth was observed in women age 20–39 (p<0.05). This remained significant after adjustment for tumor characteristics, socioeconomic status, and marital status. The only nononcologic, nonreproductive adverse effect associated with RAI ablation was an increased rate of nasolacrimal stenosis (RR 3.44, p<0.0001). Conclusions: RAI ablation is associated with delayed childbearing in women across most of the reproductive lifespan, and with decreased birthrate in the late reproductive years. The underlying mechanism likely involves physician recommendation to delay pregnancy, as well as a potential impact of RAI on both reproductive choice and reproductive health. Further investigation is merited. PMID:25289542

  1. From multidimensional neuropsychological outcomes to a cognitive complication rate: The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Richard B; Eccles, Fiona; Lloyd, Andrew; Carpenter, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Background The neuropsychological arm of the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (N-ISAT) evaluated the cognitive outcome of 573 patients at 12 months following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). The assessment included 29 psychometric measures, yielding a substantial and complex body of data. We have explored alternative and optimal methodologies for analysing and summarising these data to enable the estimation of a cognitive complication rate (CCR). Any differences in cognitive outcome between the two arms of the trial are not however reported here. Methods All individual test scores were transformed into z-scores and a 5th percentile cut-off for impairment was established. A principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to these data to mathematically transform correlated test scores into a smaller number of uncorrelated principal components, or cognitive 'domains'. These domains formed the basis for grouping and weighting individual patients' impaired scores on individual measures. In order to increase the sample size, a series of methods for handling missing data were applied. Results We estimated a 34.1% CCR in all those patients seen face-to-face, rising to 37.4% CCR with the inclusion of patients who were unable to attend assessment for reason related to the index SAH. This group demonstrated significantly more self and carer/relative rated disability on a Health Related Quality of Life questionnaire, than patients classified as having no functionally significant cognitive deficits. Conclusion Evaluating neuropsychological outcome in a large RCT involves unique methodological and organizational challenges. We have demonstrated how these problems may be addressed by re-classifying interval data from 29 measures into a dichotomous CCR. We have presented a 'sliding scale' of undifferentiated individual cognitive impairments, and then on the basis of PCA-derived cognitive 'domains', included consideration of the distribution of impairments in these terms

  2. Association Between Nutritional Status, Inflammatory Condition, and Prognostic Indexes with Postoperative Complications and Clinical Outcome of Patients with Gastrointestinal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Costa, Milena Damasceno de Souza; Vieira de Melo, Camila Yandara Sousa; Amorim, Ana Carolina Ribeiro de; Cipriano Torres, Dilênia de Oliveira; Dos Santos, Ana Célia Oliveira

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and relate nutritional and inflammatory status and prognostic indexes with postoperative complications and clinical outcome of patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. Twenty-nine patients were evaluated; nutritional assessment was carried out by subjective and objective parameters; albumin, pre-albumin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) were determined. To assess prognosis, the Glasgow scale, the Prognostic Inflammatory Nutritional Index (PINI), and CRP/albumin ratio were used; the clinical outcomes considered were hospital discharge and death. A high Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) score was associated with the occurrence of postoperative complications: 73% of the patients with postoperative complications had the highest SGA score, but only 6% of those without postoperative complications had the highest SGA score (P < 0.001). Greater occurrence of death was observed in patients with a high SGA score, low serum albumin, increased CRP, PINI > 1, and Glasgow score 2. There was a positive correlation between weight loss percentage with serum CRP levels (P = 0.002), CRP/albumin (P = 0.002), PINI (P = 0.002), and Glasgow score (P = 0.000). This study provides evidence that the assessment of the nutritional status and the use of prognostic indexes are good tools for predicting postoperative complications and clinical outcome in patients with gastrointestinal neoplasia.

  3. Postoperative complications and clinical outcomes among patients undergoing thoracic and gastrointestinal cancer surgery: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Martos-Benítez, Frank Daniel; Gutiérrez-Noyola, Anarelys; Echevarría-Víctores, Adisbel

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study sought to determine the influence of postoperative complications on the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent thoracic and gastrointestinal cancer surgery. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted regarding 179 consecutive patients who received thorax or digestive tract surgery due to cancer and were admitted to an oncological intensive care unit. The Postoperative Morbidity Survey was used to evaluate the incidence of postoperative complications. The influence of postoperative complications on both mortality and length of hospital stay were also assessed. Results Postoperative complications were found for 54 patients (30.2%); the most common complications were respiratory problems (14.5%), pain (12.9%), cardiovascular problems (11.7%), infectious disease (11.2%), and surgical wounds (10.1%). A multivariate logistic regression found that respiratory complications (OR = 18.68; 95%CI = 5.59 - 62.39; p < 0.0001), cardiovascular problems (OR = 5.06, 95%CI = 1.49 - 17.13; p = 0.009), gastrointestinal problems (OR = 26.09; 95%CI = 6.80 - 100.16; p < 0.0001), infectious diseases (OR = 20.55; 95%CI = 5.99 - 70.56; p < 0.0001) and renal complications (OR = 18.27; 95%CI = 3.88 - 83.35; p < 0.0001) were independently associated with hospital mortality. The occurrence of at least one complication increased the likelihood of remaining hospitalized (log-rank test, p = 0.002). Conclusions Postoperative complications are frequent disorders that are associated with poor clinical outcomes; thus, structural and procedural changes should be implemented to reduce postoperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:27096675

  4. Endovascular Treatment of Venous Sinus Stenosis in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Complications, Neurological Outcomes, and Radiographic Results

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Robert M.; Wang, Tony; Ding, Dale; Durst, Christopher R.; Crowley, R. Webster; Chalouhi, Nohra; Hasan, David M.; Dumont, Aaron S.; Jabbour, Pascal; Liu, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) may result in a chronic debilitating disease. Dural venous sinus stenosis with a physiologic venous pressure gradient has been identified as a potential etiology in a number of IIH patients. Intracranial venous stenting has emerged as a potential treatment alternative. Methods. A systematic review was carried out to identify studies employing venous stenting for IIH. Results. From 2002 to 2014, 17 studies comprising 185 patients who underwent 221 stenting procedures were reported. Mean prestent pressure gradient was 20.1 mmHg (95% CI 19.4–20.7 mmHg) with a mean poststent gradient of 4.4 mmHg (95% CI 3.5–5.2 mmHg). Complications occurred in 10 patients (5.4%; 95% CI 4.7–5.4%) but were major in only 3 (1.6%). At a mean clinical follow-up of 22 months, clinical improvement was noted in 130 of 166 patients with headaches (78.3%; 95% CI 75.8–80.8%), 84 of 89 patients with papilledema (94.4%; 95% CI 92.1–96.6%), and 64 of 74 patients with visual symptoms (86.5%; 95% CI 83.0–89.9%). In-stent stenosis was noted in six patients (3.4%; 95% CI 2.5–4.3%) and stent-adjacent stenosis occurred in 19 patients (11.4%; 95% CI 10.4–12.4), resulting in restenting in 10 patients. Conclusion. In IIH patients with venous sinus stenosis and a physiologic pressure gradient, venous stenting appears to be a safe and effective therapeutic option. Further studies are necessary to determine the long-term outcomes and the optimal management of medically refractory IIH. PMID:26146651

  5. Cosmetic Outcomes and Complications Reported by Patients Having Undergone Breast-Conserving Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Kayser, Christine E.; Vachani, Carolyn; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Metz, James M.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Over the past 30 years, much work in treatment of breast cancer has contributed to improvement of cosmetic and functional outcomes. The goal of breast-conservation treatment (BCT) is avoidance of mastectomy through use of lumpectomy and adjuvant radiation. Modern data demonstrate 'excellent' or 'good' cosmesis in >90% of patients treated with BCT. Methods and Materials: Patient-reported data were gathered via a convenience sample frame from breast cancer survivors using a publically available, free, Internet-based tool for creation of survivorship care plans. During use of the tool, breast cancer survivors are queried as to the cosmetic appearance of the treated breast, as well as perceived late effects. All data have been maintained anonymously with internal review board approval. Results: Three hundred fifty-four breast cancer survivors having undergone BCT and voluntarily using this tool were queried with regard to breast cosmesis and perceived late effects. Median diagnosis age was 48 years, and median current age 52 years. 'Excellent' cosmesis was reported by 27% (n = 88), 'Good' by 44% (n = 144), 'Fair' by 24% (n = 81), and 'Poor' by 5% (n = 18). Of the queries posted to survivors after BCT, late effects most commonly reported were cognitive changes (62%); sexual concerns (52%); changes in texture and color of irradiated skin (48%); chronic pain, numbness, or tingling (35%); and loss of flexibility in the irradiated area (30%). Survivors also described osteopenia/osteoporosis (35%), cardiopulmonary problems (12%), and lymphedema (19%). Conclusions: This anonymous tool uses a convenience sample frame to gather patient reported assessments of cosmesis and complications after breast cancer. Among the BCT population, cosmetic assessment by survivors appears less likely to be 'excellent' or 'good' than would be expected, with 30% of BCT survivors reporting 'fair' or 'poor' cosmesis. Patient reported incidence of chronic pain, as well as cognitive and

  6. Complication rates and outcomes stratified by treatment modalities in proximal humeral fractures: a systematic literature review from 1970–2009

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The optimal treatment of complex, displaced proximal humeral fractures is controversial. A systematic literature review of the time period from 1970 to 2009 was conducted. The purpose was to evaluate the clinical success and complications of the available treatment modalities to determine specific treatment recommendations for the different fracture patterns. Methods The databases (PubMed/EMBASE) were searched for the time period (01/1970–09/2009). Study quality, treatment modalities, classification, outcome scores and complications of 200 publications including 9377 patients were analyzed. Interventions were compared by analysis of variance with subsequent Tukey’s-test. Complication rates among methods were compared by using Pearson’s-chi-square-test and pairwise comparisons using Fisher’s-two-tailed-exact-test. Results Hemiarthroplasty, angle-stable plate and non-operative treatment were used for 63% of the follow-up-patients. For 3- and 4-part fractures, patients with hemiarthroplasty [3-Part: 56.4 (lower/upper 95% confidence interval (CI): 43.3-68.7); 4-Part: 49.4 (CI: 42.2-56.7)] received a lower score than different surgical head-preserving methods such as ORIF [3-Part: 82.4 (CI: 76.6-86.9); 4-Part: 83.0 (CI:78.7-86.6)], intramedullary nailing [3-Part: 79.1 (CI:74.0-83.4)] or angle-stable plates [4-Part: 66.4 (CI: 59.7-72.4)]. The overall complication rate was 56%. The most common complications were fracture-displacement, malunion, humeral head necrosis and malreduction. The highest complication rates were documented for conventional plate and hemiarthroplasty and for AO-C, AO-A, for 3- and 4-part fractures. Only 25% of the data were reported with detailed classification results and the corresponding outcome scores. Discussion Despite the large amount of patients included, it is difficult to determine adequate recommendations for the treatment of proximal humeral fractures because a relevant lack of follow-up data impaired subsequent

  7. Disease-Specific Probabilistic Brain Atlases

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Paul; Mega, Michael S.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2009-01-01

    Atlases of the human brain, in health and disease, provide a comprehensive framework for understanding brain structure and function. The complexity and variability of brain structure, especially in the gyral patterns of the human cortex, present challenges in creating standardized brain atlases that reflect the anatomy of a population. This paper introduces the concept of a population-based, disease-specific brain atlas that can reflect the unique anatomy and physiology of a particular clinical subpopulation. Based on well-characterized patient groups, disease-specific atlases contain thousands of structure models, composite maps, average templates, and visualizations of structural variability, asymmetry and group-specific differences. They correlate the structural, metabolic, molecular and histologic hallmarks of the disease. Rather than simply fusing information from multiple subjects and sources, new mathematical strategies are introduced to resolve group-specific features not apparent in individual scans. High-dimensional elastic mappings, based on covariant partial differential equations, are developed to encode patterns of cortical variation. In the resulting brain atlas, disease-specific features and regional asymmetries emerge that are not apparent in individual anatomies. The resulting probabilistic atlas can identify patterns of altered structure and function, and can guide algorithms for knowledge-based image analysis, automated image labeling, tissue classification, data mining and functional image analysis. PMID:19424457

  8. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  9. A fatal outcome of complicated severe diabetic ketoacidosis in a 11-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Severinski, Srećko; Butorac Ahel, Ivona; Ovuka, Aleksandar; Verbić, Arijan

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a complex metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis and ketonuria. Cerebral edema is the most common rare complication of DKA in children. The objective of the study was to emphasize the importance of careful evaluation and monitoring for signs and symptoms of cerebral edema in all children undergoing treatment for DKA. We present a case of 11-year-old girl with a history of diabetes mellitus type I (T1DM) who presented with severe DKA complicated by hypovolemic shock, cerebral edema and hematemesis. Considering the fact that complications of DKA are rare and require a high index of clinical suspicion, early recognition and treatment are crucial for avoiding permanent damage.

  10. A fatal outcome of complicated severe diabetic ketoacidosis in a 11-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Severinski, Srećko; Butorac Ahel, Ivona; Ovuka, Aleksandar; Verbić, Arijan

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a complex metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis and ketonuria. Cerebral edema is the most common rare complication of DKA in children. The objective of the study was to emphasize the importance of careful evaluation and monitoring for signs and symptoms of cerebral edema in all children undergoing treatment for DKA. We present a case of 11-year-old girl with a history of diabetes mellitus type I (T1DM) who presented with severe DKA complicated by hypovolemic shock, cerebral edema and hematemesis. Considering the fact that complications of DKA are rare and require a high index of clinical suspicion, early recognition and treatment are crucial for avoiding permanent damage. PMID:27226096

  11. Intraoperative radiotherapy in colorectal cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis of techniques, long-term outcomes, and complications

    PubMed Central

    Mirnezami, Reza; Chang, George J.; Das, Prajnan; Chandrakumaran, Kandiah; Tekkis, Paris; Darzi, Ara; Mirnezami, Alexander H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The precise contribution of IORT to the management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer (CRC) remains uncertain. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the value of IORT in this setting. Methods Studies published between 1965 and 2011 that reported outcomes after IORT for advanced or recurrent CRC were identified by an electronic literature search. Studies were assessed for methodological quality and design, and evaluated for technique of IORT delivery, oncological outcomes, and complications following IORT. Outcomes were analysed with fixed-effect and random-effect model meta-analyses and heterogeneity and publication bias examined. Results 29 studies comprising 14 prospective and 15 retrospective studies met the inclusion criteria and were assessed, yielding a total of 3003 patients. The indication for IORT was locally advanced disease in 1792 patients and locally recurrent disease in 1211 patients. Despite heterogeneity in methodology and reporting practice, IORT is principally applied for the treatment of close or positive margins. When comparative studies were evaluated, a significant effect favouring improved local control (OR 0.22; 95% CI=0.05-0.86; p=0.03), disease free survival (HR 0.51; 95% CI=0.31-0.85; p=0.009), and overall survival (HR 0.33; 95% CI=0.2-0.54; p=0.001) was noted with no increase in total (OR 1.13; 95% CI=0.77-1.65; p=0.57), urologic (OR 1.35; 95% CI=0.84-2.82; p=0.47), or anastomotic complications (OR 0.94; 95% CI=0.42-2.1; p=0.98). Increased wound complications were noted after IORT (OR 1.86; 95% CI=1.03-3.38; p=0.049). Conclusions Despite methodological weaknesses in the studies evaluated, our results suggest that IORT may improve oncological outcomes in advanced and recurrent CRC. PMID:23270946

  12. Non-Disease Specific Risk Factors Affecting Hospital Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ron L.; And Others

    Extended hospital stay after medical treatment has been completed represents a major problem in health care. Space misuse can occur late in the hospitalization, often because planning is not initiated until discharge is imminent. This study sought to determine if variables assessed soon after hospital admission could be used to screen patients at…

  13. Influence of renal dysfunction on clinical outcomes in patients with congestive heart failure complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Seong; Kim, Min Jee; Kang, Yong Un; Choi, Joon Seok; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Ahn, Young-Keun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Kim, Soo Wan

    2013-01-01

    The clinical course and medical treatment of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) complicating acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are not well established, especially in patients with concomitant renal dysfunction. We performed a retrospective analysis of the prospective Korean Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry to assess the medical treatments and clinical outcomes of patients with CHF (Killip classes II or III) complicated by AMI, in the presence or absence of renal dysfunction. Of 13,498 patients with AMI, 2769 (20.5%) had CHF on admission. Compared to CHF patients with preserved renal function, in-hospital mortality and major adverse cardiac events were increased both at 1 month and at 1 year after discharge in patients with renal dysfunction (1154; 41.7%). Postdischarge use of aspirin, betablockers, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin II receptor blockers and statins significantly reduced the 1-year mortality rate for CHF patients with renal dysfunction; such reduction was not observed for those without renal dysfunction, except in the case of aspirin. Patients with CHF complicating AMI, which is accompanied by renal dysfunction, are at higher risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes than patients without renal dysfunction. However, they receive fewer medications proven to reduce mortality rates.

  14. Technique, Complication, and Long-Term Outcome for Endovascular Treatment of Iliac Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkan, Ugur Oguzkurt, Levent; Tercan, Fahri

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this study was to report technical details, procedure-related complications, and results of endovascular treatment in chronic iliac artery occlusion. Between 2001 and 2008, endovascular treatments of 127 chronic iliac artery occlusions in 118 patients (8 women and 110 men; mean age, 59 years) were retrospectively reviewed. The study was based on Ad Hoc Committee on Reporting Standards (Society for Vascular Surgery/International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery Standards). All occlusions were treated with stent placement with or without preliminary balloon angioplasty. Kaplan-Meier estimators were used to determine patency rates. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine variables affecting successful recanalization, major complications, early stent thrombosis ({<=}30 days), and primary and secondary patency rates. Initial technical success was achieved in 117 (92%) procedures. Successful recanalization was obtained by antegrade approach in 69 of 77 (90%) procedures and by retrograde approach in 52 of 105 (50%) procedures (p < 0.001). Complications were encountered in 28 (24%) patients [minor in 7 patients (6%) and major in 22 patients (19%)]. One death occurred in the operative period secondary to iliac artery rupture. Early stent thrombosis was seen in eight (7%) patients. Presence of critical limb ischemia (p = 0.03), subintimal recanalization (p = 0.03), and major complication (p = 0.02) were the independent predictors of early stent thrombosis on multivariate analysis. Primary and secondary patency rates at 5 years were 63 and 93%, respectively. Presence of critical limb ischemia, TASC type C iliac lesions, combined occlusions of both common and external iliac arteries, and major complications were associated with decreased patency rates on univariate analysis, whereas these factors were not independent predictors of stent patency on multivariate analysis. In conclusion, endovascular treatment of iliac artery occlusion has a

  15. Successful outcome of Langerhans cell histiocytosis complicated by therapy-related myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Khalid A; Alshehri, Abdulrahman; Al-Zahrani, Hazza A; Al-Mohareb, Fahad I; Maghfoor, Irfan; Ajarim, Dahish

    2008-01-01

    Background Various therapeutic options are available for the management of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. However, treatment administered to control this disease may be complicated by acute leukemia. Case presentation A 34 years old male was diagnosed to have Langerhans cell histiocytosis in March 1999. Unfortunately, the cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy given to control the repeated relapses and exacerbations of the primary disease predisposed him to therapy-induced myelodysplastic syndrome which transformed into acute myeloid leukemia. After achieving complete remission of his leukemia, the patient received an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The allograft was complicated by chronic graft versus host disease that was controlled by various immunosuppressive agents and extracorporal photophoresis. Conclusion Management of complicated cases of histiocytosis requires various therapeutic modalities and a multidisciplinary approach. Having complications of therapy eg myelodysplasia or acute leukemia make the outcome more dismal and the management options limited to aggressive forms of treatment. High dose chemotherapy followed by an allograft may be a curative option not only for therapy-related myelodysplasia/acute leukemia, but also for frequently relapsing and poorly controlled Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PMID:18710527

  16. Prenatal management and perinatal outcome in giant placental chorioangioma complicated with hydrops fetalis, fetal anemia and maternal mirror syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Giant placental chorioangiomas have been associated with a number of severe fetal complications and high perinatal mortality. Case presentation We report a case of giant chorioangioma with fetal hydrops, additionally complicated by severe anemia, mild cardiomegaly with hyperdinamic heart circulation and maternal mirror syndrome. Intrauterine blood transfusion and amniodrainage was performed at 29 weeks. Worsening of the fetal and maternal condition prompted us to proceed with delivery at 29 + 5 weeks. The newborn died 3 hours later due to pulmonary hypoplasia and hemodynamic failure. Maternal course was favourable, mirror syndrome resolved in the second day and the patient was discharged four days following delivery. Conclusions In the case described here, fetal condition got worse despite of the anemia correction and amniodrainage. Our outcome raises the issue whether additional intrauterine clinical intervention, as intersticial laser, should have been performed to stop further deterioration of the fetal condition when progressive severe hydrops develops. PMID:22840187

  17. Myelofibrosis-associated complications: pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and effects on outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mughal, Tariq I; Vaddi, Kris; Sarlis, Nicholas J; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2014-01-01

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is a rare chronic BCR-ABL1 (breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homologue 1)-negative myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by progressive bone marrow fibrosis, inefficient hematopoiesis, and shortened survival. The clinical manifestations of MF include splenomegaly, consequent to extramedullary hematopoiesis, cytopenias, and an array of potentially debilitating abdominal and constitutional symptoms. Dysregulated Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling underlies secondary disease-associated effects in MF, such as myeloproliferation, bone marrow fibrosis, constitutional symptoms, and cachexia. Common fatal complications of MF include transformation to acute leukemia, thrombohemorrhagic events, organ failure, and infections. Potential complications from hepatosplenomegaly include portal hypertension and variceal bleeding, whereas extramedullary hematopoiesis outside the spleen and liver – depending on the affected organ – may result in intracranial hypertension, spinal cord compression, pulmonary hypertension, pleural effusions, lymphadenopathy, skin lesions, and/or exacerbation of abdominal symptoms. Although allogeneic stem cell transplantation is the only potentially curative therapy, it is suitable for few patients. The JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib is effective in improving splenomegaly, MF-related symptoms, and quality-of-life measures. Emerging evidence that ruxolitinib may be associated with a survival benefit in intermediate- or high-risk MF suggests the possibility of a disease-modifying effect. Consequently, ruxolitinib could provide a treatment backbone to which other (conventional and novel) therapies may be added for the prevention and effective management of specific MF-associated complications. PMID:24501543

  18. Feto-maternal outcomes of pregnancy complicated by ovarian sex-cord stromal tumor: a systematic review of literature.

    PubMed

    Blake, Erin A; Carter, Charelle M; Kashani, Banafsheh N; Kodama, Michiko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsuo, Koji

    2014-04-01

    Sex-cord stromal tumors (SCSTs) are rare ovarian cancers and their behavior during pregnancy is not well understood. To evaluate the maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancy complicated by ovarian SCST, a systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE using entry key words "pregnancy" and each type of ovarian SCST ("sex cord stromal tumor," "granulosa cell tumor," "thecoma," "Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor," or "gynandroblastoma") between 1955 and 2012 that identified 46 cases eligible for the analysis. Clinical characteristics, pregnancy outcome, tumor characteristics, and survival outcomes were evaluated. Serious adverse events were defined as complications related to the SCST that resulted in severe morbidity or mortality for mother, fetus, or both. The most common histology was granulosa cell tumor (22.0%), followed by thecoma (18.6%) and Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor (8.5%). Abdomino-pelvic pain (45.7%), palpable mass (30.4%), and virilization (26.1%) were the three most common symptoms. The majority were stage I (76.1%), tumor size <15cm (64.9%), and underwent unilateral adnexectomy (80.4%). Fetal conservation surgery was seen in 54.3%. Most cases had live births (78.3%) at full term (60.9%). Among cases proceeded expectant delay of delivery (45.7%), most cases resulted in live birth (95.2%) with median expectant interval of 20.7 weeks. Maternal and/or fetal serious adverse events (SAEs) were observed in 41.3% with maternal shock/hemoperitoneum being the most common complication (13.0%). Logistic regression test identified younger age (<30 versus ≥30, 73.3% versus 26.7%, odds ratio [OR] 11.7, 95%CI 1.35-101, p=0.026), large tumor (size ≥15cm versus <15cm, 64.9% versus 35.1%, OR 10.0, 95%CI 1.29-26.2, p=0.004), and advanced-stage (stages II-IV versus I, 76.1% versus 23.9%, OR 5.82, 95%CI 2.05-48.9, p=0.022) as risk factors of increased SAE. Overall survival of patients diagnosed with ovarian SCST during pregnancy was comparable to ovarian SCST not

  19. Does previous open renal surgery or percutaneous nephrolithotomy affect the outcomes and complications of percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Ozgor, Faruk; Kucuktopcu, Onur; Sarılar, Omer; Toptas, Mehmet; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Gurbuz, Zafer Gokhan; Akbulut, Mehmet Fatih; Muslumanoglu, Ahmet Yaser; Binbay, Murat

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we aim to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of PNL in patients with a history of open renal surgery or PNL by comparing with primary patients and to compare impact of previous open renal surgery and PNL on the success and complications of subsequent PNL. Charts of patients, who underwent PNL at our institute, were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into three groups according to history of renal stone surgery. Patients without history of renal surgery were enrolled into Group 1. Other patients with previous PNL and previous open surgery were categorized as Group 2 and Group 3. Preoperative characteristic, perioperative data, stone-free status, and complication rates were compared between the groups. Stone-free status was accepted as completing clearance of stone and residual fragment smaller than 4 mm. Eventually, 2070 patients were enrolled into the study. Open renal surgery and PNL had been done in 410 (Group 2) and 131 (Group 3) patients, retrospectively. The mean operation time was longer (71.3 ± 33.5 min) in Group 2 and the mean fluoroscopy time was longer (8.6 ± 5.0) in Group 3 but there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. Highest stone clearance was achieved in primary PNL patients (81.62%) compared to the other groups (77.10% in Group 2 and 75.61% in Group 3). Stone-free rate was not significantly different between Group 2 and Group 3. Fever, pulmonary complications, and blood transfusion requirement were not statically different between groups but angioembolization was significantly higher in Group 2. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a safe and effective treatment modality for patients with renal stones regardless history of previous PNL or open renal surgery. However, history of open renal surgery but not PNL significantly reduced PNL success.

  20. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in elderly patients – analysis of outcome and complications

    PubMed Central

    Vesper, Jan; Haak, Susanne; Ostertag, Christoph; Nikkhah, Guido

    2007-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing discussion about age limits for deep brain stimulation (DBS). Current indications for DBS are tremor-dominant disorders, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia. Electrode implantation for DBS with analgesia and sedation makes surgery more comfortable, especially for elderly patients. However, the value of DBS in terms of benefit-risk ratio in this patient population is still uncertain. Methods Bilateral electrode implantation into the subthalamic nucleus (STN) was performed in a total of 73 patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Patients were analyzed retrospectively. For this study they were divided into two age groups: group I (age <65 years, n = 37) and group II (age ≥ 65 years, n = 36). Examinations were performed preoperatively and at 6-month follow-up intervals for 24 months postoperatively. Age, UPDRS motor score (part III) on/off, Hoehn & Yahr score, Activity of Daily Living (ADL), L-dopa medication, and complications were determined. Results Significant differences were found in overall performance determined as ADL scores (group I: 48/71 points, group II: 41/62 points [preoperatively/6-month postoperatively]) and in the rate of complications (group I: 4 transient psychosis, 4 infections in a total of 8 patients, group II: 2 deaths [unrelated to surgery], 1 intracerebral hemorrhage, 7 transient psychosis, 3 infections, 2 pneumonia in a total of 13 patients), (p < 0.05). Interestingly, changes in UPDRS scores, Hoehn & Yahr scores, and L-dopa medication were not statistically different between the two groups. Conclusion DBS of the STN is clinically as effective in elderly patients as it is in younger ones. However, a more careful selection and follow-up of the elderly patients are required because elderly patients have a higher risk of surgery-related complications and a higher morbidity rate. PMID:17367531

  1. Does previous open renal surgery or percutaneous nephrolithotomy affect the outcomes and complications of percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Ozgor, Faruk; Kucuktopcu, Onur; Sarılar, Omer; Toptas, Mehmet; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Gurbuz, Zafer Gokhan; Akbulut, Mehmet Fatih; Muslumanoglu, Ahmet Yaser; Binbay, Murat

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we aim to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of PNL in patients with a history of open renal surgery or PNL by comparing with primary patients and to compare impact of previous open renal surgery and PNL on the success and complications of subsequent PNL. Charts of patients, who underwent PNL at our institute, were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into three groups according to history of renal stone surgery. Patients without history of renal surgery were enrolled into Group 1. Other patients with previous PNL and previous open surgery were categorized as Group 2 and Group 3. Preoperative characteristic, perioperative data, stone-free status, and complication rates were compared between the groups. Stone-free status was accepted as completing clearance of stone and residual fragment smaller than 4 mm. Eventually, 2070 patients were enrolled into the study. Open renal surgery and PNL had been done in 410 (Group 2) and 131 (Group 3) patients, retrospectively. The mean operation time was longer (71.3 ± 33.5 min) in Group 2 and the mean fluoroscopy time was longer (8.6 ± 5.0) in Group 3 but there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. Highest stone clearance was achieved in primary PNL patients (81.62%) compared to the other groups (77.10% in Group 2 and 75.61% in Group 3). Stone-free rate was not significantly different between Group 2 and Group 3. Fever, pulmonary complications, and blood transfusion requirement were not statically different between groups but angioembolization was significantly higher in Group 2. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a safe and effective treatment modality for patients with renal stones regardless history of previous PNL or open renal surgery. However, history of open renal surgery but not PNL significantly reduced PNL success. PMID:26141983

  2. Costs and outcomes associated with hospitalized cancer patients with neutropenic complications: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Schilling, M Blane; Parks, Connie; Deeter, Robert G

    2011-09-01

    The average total hospitalization costs for adult cancer patients with neutropenic complications were quantified and the average length of hospital stay (LOS), all-cause mortality during hospitalization and reimbursement rates were determined. This observational retrospective cohort study identified adult patients with cancer who were hospitalized from January 2005 through June 2008 using a large private US health care database (>342 inpatient facilities). ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes identified patients by cancer type and who had neutropenic complications. The utilization and accounting systems of the hospitals were used to calculate mean (±95% confidence interval) hospitalization costs and LOS and percent all-cause mortality and reimbursement. Costs were adjusted to 2009 US dollars. There were 3,814 patients who had cancer and neutropenia, 1,809 (47.4%) also had an infection or fever and 1,188 (31.1%) had infection. Mean hospitalization costs were $18,042 (95% CI 16,997-19,087) for patients with neutropenia, $22,839 (95% CI 21,006-24,672) for patients with neutropenia plus infection or fever and $27,587 (95% CI 24,927-30,247) for patients with neutropenia plus infection. Mean LOS were 9 days (95% CI 8.7-9.3), 10.7 days (95% CI 10.2-11.2) and 12.6 days (95% CI 11.9-13.3), respectively. Mortality followed a similar trend; 8.3, 13.7 and 19.4%, respectively. By cancer type, hematologic malignancies had the highest average hospitalization costs and longest mean LOS of $52,579 (95% CI 42,183-62,975) and 20.3 days (95% CI 17.4-23.2), and a high mortality rate of 20.0%, while primary breast cancer patients had the lowest cost of $8,413 (95% CI 6,103-10,723), shortest LOS of 5.5 days (95% CI 4.2-6.8) and lowest mortality (0%). Mean reimbursement rates were 100.0, 101.5 and 95.4% for patients with neutropenia, neutropenia plus infection or fever and neutropenia plus infection, respectively. Hospitalized cancer patients with neutropenic complications had a higher all

  3. Budd-Chiari syndrome complicating essential thrombocythemia in an adolescent: favorable outcome of TIPS procedure.

    PubMed

    Tantawy, Azza Abdel-Gawad; Adly, Amira Abdel-Monem; Elhenawy, Yasmine Ibrahim

    2015-09-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is a liver disorder characterized by hepatic venous outflow obstruction, mainly resulting from thrombosis of the terminal part of the hepatic veins or the inferior vena cava. It causes hepatic congestion, ascites, portal hypertension, and collateral circulation between the obstructed and contiguous patent venous territories. BCS is reported complicating myeloproliferative disorders, as well other prothrombotic events. Essential thrombocythemia is one of the most frequent myeloproliferative disorders that cause BCS, and in some cases, it may be the initial presentation. Many treatment options have been proposed for BCS, routine anticoagulation therapy being recommended as the first therapeutic approach.

  4. Lumbar Endoscopic Microdiscectomy: Where Are We Now? An Updated Literature Review Focused on Clinical Outcome, Complications, and Rate of Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Anichini, Giulio; Landi, Alessandro; Caporlingua, Federico; Beer-Furlan, André; Brogna, Christian; Delfini, Roberto; Passacantilli, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic disc surgery (EDS) for lumbar spine disc herniation is a well-known but developing field, which is increasingly spreading in the last few years. Rate of recurrence/residual, complications, and outcomes, in comparison with standard microdiscectomy (MD), is still debated and need further data. We performed an extensive review based on the last 6 years of surgical series, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses reported in international, English-written literature. Articles regarding patients treated through endoscopic transforaminal or interlaminar approaches for microdiscectomy (MD) were included in the present review. Papers focused on endoscopic surgery for other spinal diseases were not included. From July 2009 to July 2015, we identified 51 surgical series, 5 systematic reviews, and one meta-analysis reported. In lumbar EDS, rate of complications, length of hospital staying, return to daily activities, and overall patients' satisfaction seem comparable to standard MD. Rate of recurrence/residual seems higher in EDS, although data are nonhomogeneous among different series. Surgical indication and experience of the performing surgeon are crucial factors affecting the outcome. There is growing but still weak evidence that lumbar EDS is a valid and safe alternative to standard open microdiscectomy. Statistically reliable data obtained from randomized controlled trials (better if multicentric) are desirable to further confirm these results. PMID:26688809

  5. Lumbar Endoscopic Microdiscectomy: Where Are We Now? An Updated Literature Review Focused on Clinical Outcome, Complications, and Rate of Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Anichini, Giulio; Landi, Alessandro; Caporlingua, Federico; Beer-Furlan, André; Brogna, Christian; Delfini, Roberto; Passacantilli, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic disc surgery (EDS) for lumbar spine disc herniation is a well-known but developing field, which is increasingly spreading in the last few years. Rate of recurrence/residual, complications, and outcomes, in comparison with standard microdiscectomy (MD), is still debated and need further data. We performed an extensive review based on the last 6 years of surgical series, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses reported in international, English-written literature. Articles regarding patients treated through endoscopic transforaminal or interlaminar approaches for microdiscectomy (MD) were included in the present review. Papers focused on endoscopic surgery for other spinal diseases were not included. From July 2009 to July 2015, we identified 51 surgical series, 5 systematic reviews, and one meta-analysis reported. In lumbar EDS, rate of complications, length of hospital staying, return to daily activities, and overall patients' satisfaction seem comparable to standard MD. Rate of recurrence/residual seems higher in EDS, although data are nonhomogeneous among different series. Surgical indication and experience of the performing surgeon are crucial factors affecting the outcome. There is growing but still weak evidence that lumbar EDS is a valid and safe alternative to standard open microdiscectomy. Statistically reliable data obtained from randomized controlled trials (better if multicentric) are desirable to further confirm these results. PMID:26688809

  6. Diabetes mellitus in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: admissions, complications and outcomes in a large referral hospital.

    PubMed

    Gizaw, M; Harries, A D; Ade, S; Tayler-Smith, K; Ali, E; Firdu, N; Yifter, H

    2015-03-21

    Contexte : Hôpital de référence du Black Lion, Addis Ababa, Ethiopie.Objectif : Documenter les indications d’admission, les complications et le devenir des patients atteints de diabète (DM) admis à l’hôpital entre 2010 et 2013.Schéma : Etude descriptive rétrospective sur dossiers médicaux.Résultats : Sur 8048 admissions, 523 (6,5%) avaient un DM et parmi eux, 418 dossiers médicaux ont été retrouvés : 301 (72%) patients avaient un DM de type 2 et 104 (28%) avaient un DM de type 1 ; les hommes (62%) et les personnes âgées (âge médian 60 ans) étaient caractéristiques du type 2. Les diagnostics d’admission les plus fréquents du type 2 étaient l’ulcère diabétique du pied (39%) et les problèmes cardiovasculaires (21%), et celui du type 1, l’acidocétose diabétique (62%). L’hypertension, les neuropathies, les néphropathies, la rétinopathie et le pied diabétique représentaient 85% des 756 complications existantes. La mortalité totale des patients admis a été de 21%. Sur ces 89 décès, 77 patients étaient de type 2 avec comme indications principales d’admission l’ulcère diabétique du pied/la gangrène et les problèmes cardiovasculaires.Conclusion : Le DM, surtout de type 2, est une cause importante d’admission dans le plus grand hôpital de référence du pays. De nombreux patients avaient déjà développé des complications liées au DM lors de l’admission, et la mortalité a été élevée. Il est nécessaire d’améliorer la connaissance et les soins relatifs au DM en Ethiopie.

  7. A comparison of preliminary oncologic outcome and postoperative complications between patients undergoing either open or robotic radical cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cusano, Antonio; Haddock, Peter; Jackson, Max; Staff, Ilene; Wagner, Joseph; Meraney, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To compare complications and outcomes in patients undergoing either open radical cystectomy (ORC) or robotic-assisted radical cystectomy (RRC). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively identified patients that underwent ORC or RRC between 2003- 2013. We statistically compared preliminary oncologic outcomes of patients for each surgical modality. Results: 92 (43.2%) and 121 (56.8%) patients underwent ORC and RRC, respectively. While operative time was shorter for ORC patients (403 vs. 508 min; p<0.001), surgical blood loss and transfusion rates were significantly lower in RRC patients (p<0.001 and 0.006). Length of stay was not different between groups (p=0.221). There was no difference in the proportion of lymph node-positive patients between groups. However, RRC patients had a greater number of lymph nodes removed during surgery (18 vs. 11.5; p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the incidence of pre-existing comorbidities or in the Clavien distribution of complications between groups. ORC and RRC patients were followed for a median of 1.38 (0.55-2.7) and 1.40 (0.582.59) years, respectively (p=0.850). During this period, a lower proportion (22.3%) of RRC patients experienced disease recurrence vs. ORC patients (34.8%). However, there was no significant difference in time to recurrence between groups. While ORC was associated with a higher all-cause mortality rate (p=0.049), there was no significant difference in disease-free survival time between groups. Conclusions: ORC and RRC patients experience postoperative complications of similar rates and severity. However, RRC may offer indirect benefits via reduced surgical blood loss and need for transfusion. PMID:27564275

  8. A comparative study of complications and outcomes associated with radical retropubic prostatectomy and robot assisted radical prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettman, Matthew T.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes among a matched cohort of prostate cancer patients treated with radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) and robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Materials and methods: Between 2002 and 2005, 294 patients underwent RARP at our institution. Comparison RRP patients were matched 2:1 for surgical year, age, PSA, clinical stage, and biopsy grade (n=588). Outcomes among groups were compared. From an oncologic standpoint, pathologic features among groups were assessed and Kaplan-Meier estimates of PSA recurrence free survival were compared. Results: Overall margin positivity was not significantly different between groups (RARP, 15.6%, RRP, 17%), yet risk of apical margin was significantly less with RARP. RARP was associated with significantly shorter hospitalization (p<0.01) and lower incidence of blood transfusion (p < 0.01). Early complications were higher in the RARP group (16% vs 10%, p<0.01). Among late complications, risk of bladder neck contracture was lower with RARP (1.2%, p=0.02). Adjuvant hormonal therapy was significantly higher in the RRP group (6.6% p<0.01). Continence at 1 year among groups was equivalent (p=0.15). Potency at 1 year was better among RARP patients (p=0.02). At a median followup of 1.3 years, PSA recurrence free estimates were not significantly different (92% vs 92%, p=0.69). Conclusions: Early complications were higher in this RARP group, but this experience includes cases performed in the learning curve. Oncologic, quality of life, and functional data in this study revealed encouraging results for RARP when compared to RRP.

  9. Influence of Glenosphere Design on Outcomes and Complications of Reverse Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Cassandra; Williams, Gerald R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Different implant designs are utilized in reverse shoulder arthroplasty. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the results of reverse shoulder arthroplasty using a traditional (Grammont) prosthesis and a lateralized prosthesis for the treatment of cuff tear arthropathy and massive irreparable rotator cuff tears. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed via a search of two electronic databases. Two reviewers evaluated the quality of methodology and retrieved data from each included study. In cases where the outcomes data were similar between studies, the data were pooled using frequency-weighted mean values to generate summary outcomes. Results Thirteen studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Demographics were similar between treatment groups. The frequency-weighted mean active external rotation was 24° in the traditional group and 46° in the lateralized group (p = 0.0001). Scapular notching was noted in 44.9% of patients in the traditional group compared to 5.4% of patients in the lateralized group (p = 0.0001). The rate of clinically significant glenoid loosening was 1.8% in the traditional group and 8.8% in the lateralized group (p = 0.003). Conclusions Both the traditional Grammont and the lateralized offset reverse arthroplasty designs can improve pain and function in patients with diagnoses of cuff tear arthropathy and irreparable rotator cuff tear. While a lateralized design can result in increased active external rotation and decreased rates of scapular notching, there may be a higher rate of glenoid baseplate loosening. PMID:27583112

  10. Chronic hepatitis C: treatment, complications, and long-term outcomes in a population of Latino veterans

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Rolon, Amarilys; Purcell, Dagmary; Grigg, Nicole; Toro, Doris H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a major public health problem in Puerto Rico. It is the most common cause of chronic liver disease and the most frequent indication for liver transplantation in the United States." Our main objectives were to estimate the seroprevalence of CHC infection, to describe the demographic and histological parameters of the infection in our sample population, and to evaluate the treatment outcomes in Puerto Rican veterans. Methods To determine overall seroprevalence, we reviewed all the hepatitis C cases (encompassing from January 1, 2002, to December 31, 2009) of the VA Caribbean Healthcare System, Department of Veterans Affairs. The records of only those individuals who received treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin were reviewed to determine risks factors for infection, response rates, adverse events, and outcomes. Results During the study period, there were a total of 1,496 patients identified as being infected with HCV, for an estimated seroprevalence of 2.3%. Of these, approximately 10% (137) were treated with combination therapy and were included in this study. The mean age was 58 (±6.4); 96.4% were men. The most common genotype was type 1. The responses to treatment were generally poor, with only 48.4% of the patients achieving Ssustained virological response. Discussion Though the seroprevalence of chronic hepatitis C in the Latino veteran population of Puerto Rico is high, relatively few patients have received treatment, most probably because of the contraindications of the medications used. Combination therapy with pegylated interferon plus weight-based ribavirin was inefficient and plagued with side effects; as a whole, this therapy was not found to be overly beneficial to our patients. New emerging and approved therapies will change this paradigm, allowing the treatment of a larger population without the side effects of the studied therapy. PMID:26932282

  11. Endoscopic approach for excision of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: complications and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ardehali, Mojtaba Mohammadi; Samimi Ardestani, Seyed-Hadyi; Yazdani, Nasrin; Goodarzi, Hassan; Bastaninejad, Shahin

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to report the efficacy of the endoscopic approach for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) and to compare its related intra- and postoperative complications with findings from traditional approaches in the literatures. This study is a retrospective report of 47 cases of JNA that were treated with nasal endoscopic surgery between 1998 and 2005. According to the staging system by Radkowski et al (Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1996;122:122-129), the staging of the included patients were the following: 21 in stages IA to IIB, 22 in IIC, 3 in IIIA, and 1 in IIIB. Five patients were embolized before surgery. The mean blood hemorrhage in embolized patients was 770 mL, whereas in nonembolized patients, it was 1403.6 mL. In the follow-up period (mean, 2.5 years), the recurrence was found in 9 patients (19.1%), and mean time of recurrence was 17 months after surgery. The rupture of cavernous sinus occurred in 2 cases with no mortality. The mean hospital stay was 3.1 days in all cases and 1.8 days in embolized patients. The findings of this study demonstrate that endoscopic resection of JNA is a safe and effective technique because of decrease in blood loss, hospitalization, and recurrence rate, especially in tumors that are not extended through intracranial space. It is therefore strongly recommended that this modality is implemented as the first surgical step for tumors with stages I to IIIA of the Radkowski's staging system.

  12. Trends in Coronary Angiography, Revascularization, and Outcomes of Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Kolte, Dhaval; Khera, Sahil; Dabhadkar, Kaustubh C; Agarwal, Shikhar; Aronow, Wilbert S; Timmermans, Robert; Jain, Diwakar; Cooper, Howard A; Frishman, William H; Menon, Venu; Bhatt, Deepak L; Abbott, J Dawn; Fonarow, Gregg C; Panza, Julio A

    2016-01-01

    Early revascularization is the mainstay of treatment for cardiogenic shock (CS) complicating acute myocardial infarction. However, data on the contemporary trends in management and outcomes of CS complicating non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) are limited. We used the 2006 to 2012 Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases to identify patients aged ≥ 18 years with NSTEMI with or without CS. Temporal trends and differences in coronary angiography, revascularization, and outcomes were analyzed. Of 2,191,772 patients with NSTEMI, 53,800 (2.5%) had a diagnosis of CS. From 2006 to 2012, coronary angiography rates increased from 53.6% to 60.4% in patients with NSTEMI with CS (ptrend <0.001). Among patients who underwent coronary angiography, revascularization rates were significantly higher in patients with CS versus without CS (72.5% vs 62.6%, p <0.001). Patients with NSTEMI with CS had significantly higher risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 10.09, 95% confidence interval 9.88 to 10.32) as compared to those without CS. In patients with CS, an invasive strategy was associated with lower risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.43, 95% confidence interval 0.42 to 0.45). Risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and total hospital costs decreased over the study period in patients with and without CS (ptrend <0.001). In conclusion, we observed an increasing trend in coronary angiography and decreasing trend in in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and total hospital costs in patients with NSTEMI with and without CS. Despite these positive trends, overall coronary angiography and revascularization rates remain less than optimal and in-hospital mortality unacceptably high in patients with NSTEMI and CS.

  13. Day of Injury CT and Late MRI Findings: Cognitive Outcome in a Pediatric Sample with Complicated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jantz, Paul B; Farrer, Thomas J.; Abildskov, Tracy J.; Dennis, Maureen; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H. Gerry; Vannatta, Kathryn; Yeates, Keith Owen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Complicated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or cmTBI is based on the presence of visibly identifiable brain pathology on the day-of-injury computed tomography (CT) scan. In a pediatric sample the relation of DOI CT to late MRI findings and neuropsychological outcome was examined. Methods MRI (> 12 months) was obtained in pediatric cmTBI patients and a sample of orthopedically injured (OI) children. Those children with positive imaging findings (MRI+) were quantitatively compared to those without (MRI-) or with the OI sample. Groups were also compared in neurocognitive outcome from WASI subtests and the WISC-IV Processing Speed Index (PSI), along with the Test of Everyday Attention for Children (TEA-Ch) and a parent-rated behavioral functioning measure (ABAS-II). Results Despite the MRI+ group having significantly more DOI CT findings than the MRI-group, no quantitative differences were found. WASI Vocabulary and Matrix Reasoning scores were significantly lower, but not PSI, TEA-Ch or ABAS-II scores. MRI+ and MRI-groups did not differ on these measures. Conclusions Heterogeneity in the occurrence of MRI-identified focal pathology was not associated with uniform changes in quantitative analyses of brain structure in cmTBI. Increased number of DOI CT abnormalities was associated with lowered neuropsychological performance. PMID:26186038

  14. Activities of daily living as an additional predictor of complications and outcomes in elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Jiro; Totsuka, Nobuyuki; Miyazawa, Izumi; Usui, Tatsuya; Urasawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Mochidome, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Age is an important determinant of outcome in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, in clinical settings, there is an occasional mismatch between chronological age and physical age. We evaluated whether activities of daily living (ADL), which reflect physical age, also predict complications and prognosis in elderly patients with AMI. Design Single-center, observational, and retrospective cohort study. Methods Preserved ADL and low ADL were defined according to the scale for independence degree of daily living for the disabled elderly by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare. We examined 82 consecutive patients aged ≥75 years with AMI who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients were divided into preserved ADL (n=52; mean age, 81.8±4.8 years; male, 59.6%) and low ADL (n=30; mean age, 85.8±4.7 years; male, 40.0%) groups according to prehospital ADL. Results The prevalence of Killip class II–IV and in-hospital mortality rate were significantly higher with low ADL compared to that with preserved ADL (23.1% vs 60.0%, P=0.0019; 5.8% vs 30.0%, P=0.0068, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that ADL was an independent predictor of Killip class II–IV and 1-year mortality after adjusting for age, sex, and other possible confounders (odds ratio 5.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52–17.2, P=0.0083; hazard ratio 4.32, 95% CI 1.31–14.3, P=0.017, respectively). Conclusion Prehospital ADL is a significant predictor of heart failure complications and prognosis in elderly patients with AMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention, irrespective of age and sex. PMID:27601890

  15. Activities of daily living as an additional predictor of complications and outcomes in elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Jiro; Totsuka, Nobuyuki; Miyazawa, Izumi; Usui, Tatsuya; Urasawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Mochidome, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Age is an important determinant of outcome in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, in clinical settings, there is an occasional mismatch between chronological age and physical age. We evaluated whether activities of daily living (ADL), which reflect physical age, also predict complications and prognosis in elderly patients with AMI. Design Single-center, observational, and retrospective cohort study. Methods Preserved ADL and low ADL were defined according to the scale for independence degree of daily living for the disabled elderly by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare. We examined 82 consecutive patients aged ≥75 years with AMI who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients were divided into preserved ADL (n=52; mean age, 81.8±4.8 years; male, 59.6%) and low ADL (n=30; mean age, 85.8±4.7 years; male, 40.0%) groups according to prehospital ADL. Results The prevalence of Killip class II–IV and in-hospital mortality rate were significantly higher with low ADL compared to that with preserved ADL (23.1% vs 60.0%, P=0.0019; 5.8% vs 30.0%, P=0.0068, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that ADL was an independent predictor of Killip class II–IV and 1-year mortality after adjusting for age, sex, and other possible confounders (odds ratio 5.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52–17.2, P=0.0083; hazard ratio 4.32, 95% CI 1.31–14.3, P=0.017, respectively). Conclusion Prehospital ADL is a significant predictor of heart failure complications and prognosis in elderly patients with AMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention, irrespective of age and sex.

  16. Epidemiology and Outcomes of Complicated Skin and Soft Tissue Infections among Inpatients in Southern China from 2008 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weiguo; Ouyang, Wenwei; Wei, Jia; Wen, Zehuai

    2016-01-01

    Complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTI) are some of the most commonly treated infections in hospitals, and place heavy economic burdens on patients and society. Here we report the findings from an analysis of cSSTI based on a retrospective study which was conducted within the Chinese inpatient population. We focused our research on the analysis of the patient population, antibiotic treatment, clinical outcome and economic burden. The study population comprised 527 selected patients hospitalized between 2008 and 2013. Among the hospitalizations with microbiological diagnoses, 61.41% (n = 113) were diagnosed as infected with Gram-positive bacteria, while 46.20% (n = 85) were infected with Gram-negative bacteria. The most commonly found Gram-positive bacteria was Staphylococcus aureus (40.76%, n = 75), and the most common Gram-negative bacteria was Escherichia coli (14.13%, n = 26). About 20% of the Staphylococcus aureus were methicillin-resistant. The resistance rate of isolated Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli to penicillin was around 90%; in contrast, the resistance rate to vancomycin, linezolid or imipenem was low (<20%). A large percentage of patients were treated with cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones, while vancomycin and imipenem were also included to treat drug-resistant pathogens. Over half of the hospitalizations (58.43%, n = 336) experienced treatment modifications. The cost to patients with antibiotic modifications was relatively higher than to those without. In conclusion, our study offers an analysis of the disease characteristics, microbiological diagnoses, treatment patterns and clinical outcomes of cSSTI in four hospitals in Guangdong Province, and sheds lights on the current clinical management of cSSTI in China. PMID:26918456

  17. Epidemiology and Outcomes of Complicated Skin and Soft Tissue Infections among Inpatients in Southern China from 2008 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Chen, Yunqin; Gao, Weiguo; Ouyang, Wenwei; Wei, Jia; Wen, Zehuai

    2016-01-01

    Complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTI) are some of the most commonly treated infections in hospitals, and place heavy economic burdens on patients and society. Here we report the findings from an analysis of cSSTI based on a retrospective study which was conducted within the Chinese inpatient population. We focused our research on the analysis of the patient population, antibiotic treatment, clinical outcome and economic burden. The study population comprised 527 selected patients hospitalized between 2008 and 2013. Among the hospitalizations with microbiological diagnoses, 61.41% (n = 113) were diagnosed as infected with Gram-positive bacteria, while 46.20% (n = 85) were infected with Gram-negative bacteria. The most commonly found Gram-positive bacteria was Staphylococcus aureus (40.76%, n = 75), and the most common Gram-negative bacteria was Escherichia coli (14.13%, n = 26). About 20% of the Staphylococcus aureus were methicillin-resistant. The resistance rate of isolated Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli to penicillin was around 90%; in contrast, the resistance rate to vancomycin, linezolid or imipenem was low (<20%). A large percentage of patients were treated with cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones, while vancomycin and imipenem were also included to treat drug-resistant pathogens. Over half of the hospitalizations (58.43%, n = 336) experienced treatment modifications. The cost to patients with antibiotic modifications was relatively higher than to those without. In conclusion, our study offers an analysis of the disease characteristics, microbiological diagnoses, treatment patterns and clinical outcomes of cSSTI in four hospitals in Guangdong Province, and sheds lights on the current clinical management of cSSTI in China. PMID:26918456

  18. Complex fractures of the proximal humerus in the elderly--outcome and complications after locking plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Schliemann, B; Siemoneit, J; Theisen, Ch; Kösters, C; Weimann, A; Raschke, M J

    2012-05-01

    Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with locking plates or primary arthroplasty remains a controversial issue in the management of complex proximal humerus fractures. Aim of this study was to evaluate the surgeon- and patient-based outcome of patients older than 65 years who underwent ORIF using locking plate fixation of a 3- or 4-part fracture of the proximal humerus. Twenty-seven patients older than 65 years were treated with locking plate fixation (PHILOS, Fa. Synthes, Umkirch, Germany). At an average follow-up of 44 months, the clinical and the subjective outcome were evaluated, and complications were analyzed. The mean age- and gender-related Constant score was 70% (30–100%) compared with 92% (47–108%) of the contralateral non-injured shoulder. The mean DASH score was 29 points (0–71). Five patients (18.5%) showed clinical signs of an impingement, which was related to malpositioning of the plate in 3 cases. Screw cutout was seen in 22.2% (6 patients). Avascular necrosis of the head or the tubercula was found in 8 patients (29.6%). The revision rate was 29.6%. However, the patients considered the functional status of their shoulder as “good” or “satisfactory.” The functional and patient-orientated results of the locking plate fixation of complex displaced proximal humerus fractures in the elderly are comparable to those of primary arthroplasty and minimally invasive treatment. Proper surgical technique (screw length, plate position) is mandatory for reducing the revision rate.

  19. The 2011 survey on hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) in China: prevalence, risk factors, complications, pregnancy and perinatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chun; Ruan, Yan; Zou, Liying; Li, Guanghui; Li, Changdong; Chen, Yi; Jia, Chaoxia; Megson, Ian L; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Weiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) are a group of medical complications in pregnancy and also a risk factor for severe pregnancy outcomes, but it lacks a large-scale epidemiological investigation in recent years. This survey represents a multicenter cross-sectional retrospective study to estimate the prevalence and analyze the risk factors for HDP among the pregnant women who had referred for delivery between January 1st 2011 and December 31st 2011 in China Mainland. A total of 112,386 pregnant women were investigated from 38 secondary and tertiary specialized or general hospitals randomly selected across the country, of which 5,869 had HDP, accounting for 5.22% of all pregnancies. There were significant differences in the prevalence of HDP between geographical regions, in which the North China showed the highest (7.44%) and Central China showed the lowest (1.23%). Of six subtypes of HDP, severe preeclampsia accounted for 39.96%, gestational hypertension for 31.40%, mild preeclampsia for 15.13%, chronic hypertension in pregnancy for 6.00%, preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension for 3.68% and eclampsia for 0.89%. A number of risk factors for HDP were identified, including twin pregnancy, age of >35 years, overweight and obesity, primipara, history of hypertension as well as family history of hypertension and diabetes. The prevalence of pre-term birth, placental abruption and postpartum hemorrhage were significantly higher in women with HDP than those without HDP. The possible risk factors confirmed in this study may be useful for the development of early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of HDP.

  20. The 2011 Survey on Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy (HDP) in China: Prevalence, Risk Factors, Complications, Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chun; Ruan, Yan; Zou, Liying; Li, Guanghui; Li, Changdong; Chen, Yi; Jia, Chaoxia; Megson, Ian L.; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Weiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) are a group of medical complications in pregnancy and also a risk factor for severe pregnancy outcomes, but it lacks a large-scale epidemiological investigation in recent years. This survey represents a multicenter cross-sectional retrospective study to estimate the prevalence and analyze the risk factors for HDP among the pregnant women who had referred for delivery between January 1st 2011 and December 31st 2011 in China Mainland. A total of 112,386 pregnant women were investigated from 38 secondary and tertiary specialized or general hospitals randomly selected across the country, of which 5,869 had HDP, accounting for 5.22% of all pregnancies. There were significant differences in the prevalence of HDP between geographical regions, in which the North China showed the highest (7.44%) and Central China showed the lowest (1.23%). Of six subtypes of HDP, severe preeclampsia accounted for 39.96%, gestational hypertension for 31.40%, mild preeclampsia for 15.13%, chronic hypertension in pregnancy for 6.00%, preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension for 3.68% and eclampsia for 0.89%. A number of risk factors for HDP were identified, including twin pregnancy, age of >35 years, overweight and obesity, primipara, history of hypertension as well as family history of hypertension and diabetes. The prevalence of pre-term birth, placental abruption and postpartum hemorrhage were significantly higher in women with HDP than those without HDP. The possible risk factors confirmed in this study may be useful for the development of early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of HDP. PMID:24937406

  1. Effect of complications within 90 days on patient-reported outcomes 3 months and 12 months following elective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Sielatycki, J Alex; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT There is a paradigm shift toward rewarding providers for quality rather than volume. Complications appear to occur at a fairly consistent frequency in large aggregate data sets. Understanding how complications affect long-term patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following degenerative lumbar surgery is vital. The authors hypothesized that 90-day complications would adversely affect long-term PROs. METHODS Nine hundred six consecutive patients undergoing elective surgery for degenerative lumbar disease over a period of 4 years were enrolled into a prospective longitudinal registry. The following PROs were recorded at baseline and 12-month follow-up: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score, numeric rating scales for back and leg pain, quality of life (EQ-5D scores), general physical and mental health (SF-12 Physical Component Summary [PCS] and Mental Component Summary [MCS] scores) and responses to the North American Spine Society (NASS) satisfaction questionnaire. Previously published minimum clinically important difference (MCID) threshold were used to define meaningful improvement. Complications were divided into major (surgicalsite infection, hardware failure, new neurological deficit, pulmonary embolism, hematoma and myocardial infarction) and minor (urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and deep venous thrombosis). RESULTS Complications developed within 90 days of surgery in 13% (118) of the patients (major in 12% [108] and minor in 8% [68]). The mean improvement in ODI scores, EQ-5D scores, SF-12 PCS scores, and satisfaction at 3 months after surgery was significantly less in the patients with complications than in those who did not have major complications (ODI: 13.5 ± 21.2 vs 21.7 ± 19, < 0.0001; EQ-5D: 0.17 ± 0.25 vs 0.23 ± 0.23, p = 0.04; SF-12 PCS: 8.6 ± 13.3 vs 13.0 ± 11.9, 0.001; and satisfaction: 76% vs 90%, p = 0.002). At 12 months after surgery, the patients with major complications had higher ODI scores than those without complications (29.1

  2. Effect of complications within 90 days on patient-reported outcomes 3 months and 12 months following elective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Sielatycki, J Alex; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT There is a paradigm shift toward rewarding providers for quality rather than volume. Complications appear to occur at a fairly consistent frequency in large aggregate data sets. Understanding how complications affect long-term patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following degenerative lumbar surgery is vital. The authors hypothesized that 90-day complications would adversely affect long-term PROs. METHODS Nine hundred six consecutive patients undergoing elective surgery for degenerative lumbar disease over a period of 4 years were enrolled into a prospective longitudinal registry. The following PROs were recorded at baseline and 12-month follow-up: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score, numeric rating scales for back and leg pain, quality of life (EQ-5D scores), general physical and mental health (SF-12 Physical Component Summary [PCS] and Mental Component Summary [MCS] scores) and responses to the North American Spine Society (NASS) satisfaction questionnaire. Previously published minimum clinically important difference (MCID) threshold were used to define meaningful improvement. Complications were divided into major (surgicalsite infection, hardware failure, new neurological deficit, pulmonary embolism, hematoma and myocardial infarction) and minor (urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and deep venous thrombosis). RESULTS Complications developed within 90 days of surgery in 13% (118) of the patients (major in 12% [108] and minor in 8% [68]). The mean improvement in ODI scores, EQ-5D scores, SF-12 PCS scores, and satisfaction at 3 months after surgery was significantly less in the patients with complications than in those who did not have major complications (ODI: 13.5 ± 21.2 vs 21.7 ± 19, < 0.0001; EQ-5D: 0.17 ± 0.25 vs 0.23 ± 0.23, p = 0.04; SF-12 PCS: 8.6 ± 13.3 vs 13.0 ± 11.9, 0.001; and satisfaction: 76% vs 90%, p = 0.002). At 12 months after surgery, the patients with major complications had higher ODI scores than those without complications (29.1

  3. A Prospective Study Assessing Complication Rates and Patient-Reported Outcomes in Breast Reconstructions Using a Novel, Deep Dermal Human Acellular Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Michael M.; De Oliveira, Gildasio S.; Mayer, Kristen E.; Blough, Jordan T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The value proposition of an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) taken from the deep dermis is that the allograft may be more porous, allowing for enhanced integration and revascularization. In turn, this characteristic may attenuate complications related to foreign body reactions, seromas, and infection. However, this is juxtaposed against the potential loss of allograft structural integrity, with subsequent risk of malposition and extrusion. Despite the active use of novel, deep dermal ADMs, the clinical outcomes of this new technology has not been well studied. Methods: This is a prospective study to evaluate surgical and patient-reported outcomes using a deep dermal ADM, FlexHD Pliable. Surgical outcomes and BREAST-Q patient-reported outcomes were evaluated postoperatively at 2- and 6-month time points. Results: Seventy-two breasts (41 patients) underwent reconstruction. Complication rate was 12.5%, including 2 hematomas and 7 flap necroses. One case of flap necrosis led to reconstructive failure. Notably, there were no cases of infection, seroma, or implant extrusion or malposition. Average BREAST-Q scores were satisfaction with outcome (70.13 ± 23.87), satisfaction with breasts (58.53 ± 20.00), psychosocial well being (67.97 ± 20.93), sexual well being (54.11 ± 27.72), and physical well being (70.45 ± 15.44). Two-month postoperative BREAST-Q scores decreased compared with baseline and returned to baseline by 6 months. Postoperative radiation therapy had a negative effect on satisfaction with breasts (P = 0.004) and sexual well being (P = 0.006). Conclusions: Deep dermal ADM is a novel modification of traditional allograft technology. Use of the deep dermal ADM yielded acceptably low complication rates and satisfactory patient-reported outcomes. PMID:26894010

  4. Evaluation of surgical outcome, complications, and mortality in dogs undergoing preoperative computed tomography angiography for diagnosis of an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt: 124 cases (2005–2014)

    PubMed Central

    Brunson, Benjamin W.; Case, J. Brad; Ellison, Gary W.; Fox-Alvarez, W. Alexander; Kim, Stanley E.; Winter, Matthew; Garcia-Pereira, Fernando L.; Farina, Lisa L.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety of preoperative computed tomography angiography (CTA) and its effect on surgical time and clinical outcomes in dogs that underwent surgical correction of a single congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (CEPSS). Patient data were retrospectively collected from medical records and owner communications for 124 dogs with single CEPSS, undergoing preoperative CTA (n = 43) or not (n = 81) which were surgically treated from 2005 to 2014. The frequency of major postoperative complications was 4.7% and 9.9% for the CTA and no CTA groups, respectively (P = 0.49). Mean ± standard deviation (SD) surgical time for the preoperative CTA group was 84 ± 40 min and 81 ± 31 min for the no CTA group (P = 0.28). We conclude that anesthetized preoperative CTA appears to be a safe method for diagnosis and surgical planning in dogs with single CEPSS, and does not appear to affect surgical procedure time, complication rate, or clinical outcome. PMID:26740699

  5. Anatomical and functional outcomes after Densiron 68 heavy silicone oil tamponade for complicated retinal detachment in Chinese eyes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Li, Hui; Feng, Le; Wang, Fang

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the safety and efficacy of Densiron 68 heavy silicone oil (HSO) tamponade for complicated retinal detachment (RD) in Chinese eyes. METHODS Twenty-one eyes of 21 patients with complicated RD were included in this retrospective study. All patients underwent pars plana vitrectomy with an internal tamponade using Densiron 68 HSO. Anatomical and functional results and complications were evaluated, including retinal status, visual acuity (VA), intraocular pressure (IOP), intraocular inflammation, lens opacity, and HSO emulsification. RESULTS All the patients were followed up for 3mo to 1y (5.8±1.16mo). Retinal reattachment was achieved in 19 of 21 patients (90.5%). VA improved in 18 of 21 patients (85.7%), from 1.93 logMAR (±0.48) to 1.52 logMAR (±0.45) (P=0.001). Postoperative complications included early dispersion of HSO in 7 eyes (38.8%), cataract in 10 of 18 phakic eyes (55.5%), moderate postoperative inflammation reaction in 10 eyes (47.6%), and elevated IOP in 5 eyes (23.8%), all of which were controlled by medication or by surgery. CONCLUSION High anatomical and functional success rates can be achieved with primary vitrectomy for complicated RD by using Densiron 68 HSO; however, it should not be ignored that Densiron 68 HSO can cause some complications in the eye. PMID:24967193

  6. Treatment Outcomes of a Crisis Intervention Program for Dementia with Severe Psychiatric Complications: The Kansas Bridge Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David Kevin; Niedens, Michelle; Wilson, Jessica R.; Swartzendruber, Lora; Yeager, Amy; Jones, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although declines in memory and attention are hallmark symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), noncognitive symptoms are prevalent. Over 80% of individuals will experience neuropsychiatric symptoms, which complicates symptom profiles. Research indicates a community-integrated response to dementia crisis can reduce negative consequences…

  7. Prediction model for outcome after low-back surgery: individualized likelihood of complication, hospital readmission, return to work, and 12-month improvement in functional disability.

    PubMed

    McGirt, Matthew J; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Asher, Anthony L; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Lumbar spine surgery has been demonstrated to be efficacious for many degenerative spine conditions. However, there is wide variability in outcome after spine surgery at the individual patient level. All stakeholders in spine care will benefit from identification of the unique patient or disease subgroups that are least likely to benefit from surgery, are prone to costly complications, and have increased health care utilization. There remains a large demand for individual patient-level predictive analytics to guide decision support to optimize outcomes at the patient and population levels. METHODS One thousand eight hundred three consecutive patients undergoing spine surgery for various degenerative lumbar diagnoses were prospectively enrolled and followed for 1 year. A comprehensive patient interview and health assessment was performed at baseline and at 3 and 12 months after surgery. All predictive covariates were selected a priori. Eighty percent of the sample was randomly selected for model development, and 20% for model validation. Linear regression was performed with Bayesian model averaging to model 12-month ODI (Oswestry Disability Index). Logistic regression with Bayesian model averaging was used to model likelihood of complications, 30-day readmission, need for inpatient rehabilitation, and return to work. Goodness-of-fit was assessed via R(2) for 12-month ODI and via the c-statistic, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), for the categorical endpoints. Discrimination (predictive performance) was assessed, using R(2) for the ODI model and the c-statistic for the categorical endpoint models. Calibration was assessed using a plot of predicted versus observed values for the ODI model and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test for the categorical endpoint models. RESULTS On average, all patient-reported outcomes (PROs) were improved after surgery (ODI baseline vs 12 month: 50.4 vs 29.5%, p < 0.001). Complications occurred in 121 patients (6

  8. Prediction model for outcome after low-back surgery: individualized likelihood of complication, hospital readmission, return to work, and 12-month improvement in functional disability.

    PubMed

    McGirt, Matthew J; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Asher, Anthony L; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Lumbar spine surgery has been demonstrated to be efficacious for many degenerative spine conditions. However, there is wide variability in outcome after spine surgery at the individual patient level. All stakeholders in spine care will benefit from identification of the unique patient or disease subgroups that are least likely to benefit from surgery, are prone to costly complications, and have increased health care utilization. There remains a large demand for individual patient-level predictive analytics to guide decision support to optimize outcomes at the patient and population levels. METHODS One thousand eight hundred three consecutive patients undergoing spine surgery for various degenerative lumbar diagnoses were prospectively enrolled and followed for 1 year. A comprehensive patient interview and health assessment was performed at baseline and at 3 and 12 months after surgery. All predictive covariates were selected a priori. Eighty percent of the sample was randomly selected for model development, and 20% for model validation. Linear regression was performed with Bayesian model averaging to model 12-month ODI (Oswestry Disability Index). Logistic regression with Bayesian model averaging was used to model likelihood of complications, 30-day readmission, need for inpatient rehabilitation, and return to work. Goodness-of-fit was assessed via R(2) for 12-month ODI and via the c-statistic, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), for the categorical endpoints. Discrimination (predictive performance) was assessed, using R(2) for the ODI model and the c-statistic for the categorical endpoint models. Calibration was assessed using a plot of predicted versus observed values for the ODI model and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test for the categorical endpoint models. RESULTS On average, all patient-reported outcomes (PROs) were improved after surgery (ODI baseline vs 12 month: 50.4 vs 29.5%, p < 0.001). Complications occurred in 121 patients (6

  9. Clinical outcomes of endovascular aneurysm repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated with hypertension: A 5-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xi-Tao; Yuan, Qi-Dong; Cui, Ming-Zhe; Fang, Hong-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) complicated with hypertension. Methods: Fifty-two patients with AAA complicated with hypertension treated in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. They were divided into an observation group (34 cases) and a control group (18 cases). The control group was treated by incision of AAA and artificial blood vessel replacement, and the observation group was treated by EVAR. Results: All surgeries were performed successfully. However, compared with the control group, the observation group had significantly less surgical time, intraoperative blood loss and blood transfusion, as well as significantly higher total hospitalization expense (P<0.05). During the one-month follow-up, the observation group was significantly less prone to pulmonary infection, surgical site infection, lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis and lower extremity weakness than the control group (P<0.05). The observation group enjoyed significantly better quality of life than the control group did one and three months after surgery (P<0.05). Conclusion: Given sufficient funding, EVAR should be preferentially selected in the treatment of AAA complicated with hypertension due to minimal invasion, safety, stable postoperative vital signs and improved quality of life. PMID:27022336

  10. The influence of maternal age on the outcomes of pregnancies complicated by bleeding at less than 12 weeks.

    PubMed

    Mbugua Gitau, Godfrey; Liversedge, Helen; Goffey, Dawn; Hawton, Annemarie; Liversedge, Neil; Taylor, Myles

    2009-01-01

    The effect of maternal age on the outcome of threatened miscarriage after ultrasound has confirmed fetal heart (FH) pulsation was assessed. At a university teaching hospital, 138 women presenting with bleeding before 12 weeks' gestation were followed up until delivery or pregnancy loss. Those with multiple or ectopic pregnancy, social termination of pregnancy, assisted conception and temporary residence were excluded. Outcome measures were pregnancy loss, fetal abnormalities, preterm delivery, low birthweight and cesarean delivery. Age over 35 years was significantly associated with reduced live-birth and increased miscarriage rates. Women over 35 years of age had higher cesarean section and pregnancy loss rates than the younger women. The combination of bleeding in early pregnancy and advanced age increases risk of pregnancy loss even after ultrasound has confirmed FH pulsation. PMID:19140048

  11. Coronectomy of Deeply Impacted Lower Third Molar: Incidence of Outcomes and Complications after One Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Heijsters, Guido; Salem, Ahmed Sobhy; Van Slycke, Sarah; Schepers, Serge; Politis, Constantinus; Vrielinck, Luc

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of present study was to assess the surgical management of impacted third molar with proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve and complications associated with coronectomy in a series of patients undergoing third molar surgery. Material and Methods The position of the mandibular canal in relation to the mandibular third molar region and mandibular foramen in the front part of the mandible (i.e., third molar in close proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve [IAN] or not) was identified on panoramic radiographs of patients scheduled for third molar extraction. Results Close proximity to the IAN was observed in 64 patients (35 females, 29 males) with an impacted mandibular third molar. Coronectomy was performed in these patients. The most common complication was tooth migration away from the mandibular canal (n = 14), followed by root exposure (n = 5). Re-operation to remove the root was performed in cases with periapical infection and root exposure. Conclusions The results indicate that coronectomy can be considered a reasonable and safe treatment alternative for patients who demonstrate elevated risk for injury to the inferior alveolar nerve with removal of the third molars. Coronectomy did not increase the incidence of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and would be safer than complete extraction in situations in which the root of the mandibular third molar overlaps or is in close proximity to the mandibular canal. PMID:26229580

  12. Clinical characteristics, risk factors, and outcomes in adults experiencing dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated with acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ing-Kit; Liu, Jien-Wei; Yang, Kuender D

    2009-04-01

    In a retrospective study, acute renal failure (ARF) was found in 10 (3.3%) among 304 hospitalized adults with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and 6 (60%) of the 10 patients with ARF died, whereas all 294 patients without ARF (controls) survived (P < 0.001). Compared with the controls, DHF patients with ARF were found to be significantly older (P = 0.002) and male predominant (P < 0.001) and to have higher frequency of previous stroke (P = 0.005), chronic renal insufficiency (P = 0.046), dengue shock syndrome (DSS; P < 0.001), gastrointestinal bleeding (P < 0.001), and concurrent bacteremia (P = 0.009), lower hemoglobin (P = 0.003) and serum albumin levels (P = 0.003), and higher incidences of prolonged prothrombin time (P < 0.001), elevated aspartate aminotransferase (P < 0.001), and alanine aminotransferase levels (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed DSS (odd ratio = 220.0; P < 0.001) was an independent risk factor for development of ARF in DHF patients. The high fatality rate in DHF patients complicated with ARF in our series underscore the importance of clinicians' alertness to this potentially fatal complication so that initiation of timely appropriate treatment is possible.

  13. Neurodegenerative disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Haruhisa

    2010-10-01

    Neurodegenerative disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) research contributes to the following 3 areas; "Disease modeling", "Disease material" and "Disease therapy". "Disease modeling", by recapitulating the disease phenotype in vitro, will reveal the pathomechanisms. Neurodegenerative disease-specific iPSC-derived non-neuronal cells harboring disease-causative protein(s), which play critical roles in neurodegeneration including motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, could be "Disease material", the target cell(s) for drug screening. These differentiated cells also could be used for "Disease therapy", an autologous cellular replacement/neuroprotection strategy, for patients with neurodegenerative disease. Further progress in these areas of research can be made for currently incurable neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. One-year clinical outcomes in invasive treatment strategies for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeon Pyo; Kang, Ki-Woon; Yoon, Hyeon Soo; Myung, Jin Cheol; Choi, Yu Jeong; Kim, Won Ho; Park, Sang Hyun; Jung, Kyung Tae; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical outcomes of an invasive strategy for elderly (aged ≥ 75 years) patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) complicated by cardiogenic shock (CS). Methods Data on 366 of 409 elderly CS patients from a total of 6,132 acute STEMI cases enrolled in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry between January 2008 and June 2011, were collected and analyzed. In-hospital deaths and the 1-month and 1-year survival rates free from major adverse cardiac events (MACE; defined as all cause death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization) were reported for the patients who had undergone invasive (n = 310) and conservative (n = 56) treatment strategies. Results The baseline clinical characteristics were not significantly different between the two groups. There were fewer in-hospital deaths in the invasive treatment strategy group (23.5% vs. 46.4%, P < 0.001). In addition, the 1-year MACE-free survival rate after invasive treatment was significantly lower compared with the conservative treatment (51% vs. 66%, P = 0.001). Conclusions In elderly patients with acute STEMI complicated by CS, the outcomes of invasive strategy are similar to those in younger patients at the 1-year follow-up. PMID:24133510

  15. Disease-specific classification using deconvoluted whole blood gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Oh, William K; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Blood-based biomarker assays have an advantage in being minimally invasive. Diagnostic and prognostic models built on peripheral blood gene expression have been reported for various types of disease. However, most of these studies focused on only one disease type, and failed to address whether the identified gene expression signature is disease-specific or more widely applicable across diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis of 46 whole blood gene expression datasets covering a wide range of diseases and physiological conditions. Our analysis uncovered a striking overlap of signature genes shared by multiple diseases, driven by an underlying common pattern of cell component change, specifically an increase in myeloid cells and decrease in lymphocytes. These observations reveal the necessity of building disease-specific classifiers that can distinguish different disease types as well as normal controls, and highlight the importance of cell component change in deriving blood gene expression based models. We developed a new strategy to develop blood-based disease-specific models by leveraging both cell component changes and cell molecular state changes, and demonstrate its superiority using independent datasets. PMID:27596246

  16. Disease-specific classification using deconvoluted whole blood gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Oh, William K.; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Blood-based biomarker assays have an advantage in being minimally invasive. Diagnostic and prognostic models built on peripheral blood gene expression have been reported for various types of disease. However, most of these studies focused on only one disease type, and failed to address whether the identified gene expression signature is disease-specific or more widely applicable across diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis of 46 whole blood gene expression datasets covering a wide range of diseases and physiological conditions. Our analysis uncovered a striking overlap of signature genes shared by multiple diseases, driven by an underlying common pattern of cell component change, specifically an increase in myeloid cells and decrease in lymphocytes. These observations reveal the necessity of building disease-specific classifiers that can distinguish different disease types as well as normal controls, and highlight the importance of cell component change in deriving blood gene expression based models. We developed a new strategy to develop blood-based disease-specific models by leveraging both cell component changes and cell molecular state changes, and demonstrate its superiority using independent datasets. PMID:27596246

  17. Multimodal data and machine learning for surgery outcome prediction in complicated cases of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Memarian, Negar; Kim, Sally; Dewar, Sandra; Engel, Jerome; Staba, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study sought to predict postsurgical seizure freedom from pre-operative diagnostic test results and clinical information using a rapid automated approach, based on supervised learning methods in patients with drug-resistant focal seizures suspected to begin in temporal lobe. Method We applied machine learning, specifically a combination of mutual information-based feature selection and supervised learning classifiers on multimodal data, to predict surgery outcome retrospectively in 20 presurgical patients (13 female; mean age±SD, in years 33±9.7 for females, and 35.3±9.4 for males) who were diagnosed with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and subsequently underwent standard anteromesial temporal lobectomy. The main advantage of the present work over previous studies is the inclusion of the extent of ipsilateral neocortical gray matter atrophy and spatiotemporal properties of depth electrode-recorded seizures as training features for individual patient surgery planning. Results A maximum relevance minimum redundancy (mRMR) feature selector identified the following features as the most informative predictors of postsurgical seizure freedom in this study's sample of patients: family history of epilepsy, ictal EEG onset pattern (positive correlation with seizure freedom), MRI-based gray matter thickness reduction in the hemisphere ipsilateral to seizure onset, proportion of seizures that first appeared in ipsilateral amygdala to total seizures, age, epilepsy duration, delay in the spread of ipsilateral ictal discharges from site of onset, gender, and number of electrode contacts at seizure onset (negative correlation with seizure freedom). Using these features in combination with a least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) classifier compared to other commonly used classifiers resulted in very high surgical outcome prediction accuracy (95%). Conclusions Supervised machine learning using multimodal compared to unimodal data accurately predicted

  18. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Functional Outcomes and Complications Following the Photoselective Vaporization of the Prostate and Monopolar Transurethral Resection of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong Hyuk; Cho, Kang Su; Ham, Won Sik; Choi, Young Deuk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate (MTURP) and photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) in order to provide the most up-to-date and reliable recommendations possible. Materials and Methods Relevant RCTs were identified from electronic databases for meta-analysis of the surgical outcomes and complications of MTURP and PVP. Meta-analytical comparisons were made using qualitative and quantitative syntheses. The outcome variables are presented as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results In total, 11 articles were included in this comparative analysis of PVP versus MTURP. Most of the recently published studies exhibited low risk in terms of quality assessment. MTURP was superior to PVP regarding operative time; however, with regard to catheterization and hospitalization time, the mean differences were -1.39 (95% CI=-1.83~-0.95, p<0.001) and -2.21 (95% CI=-2.73~-1.69, p<0.001), respectively, in favor of PVP. PVP was superior to MTURP with regard to transfusion rate and clot retention, but no statistically significant differences were found with regard to acute urinary retention and urinary tract infection. The long-term complications of bladder neck contracture and urethral stricture showed no statistically significant differences between PVP and MTURP. Long-term functional outcomes, including the International Prostate Symptom Score and maximum flow rate, likewise did not display statistically significant differences between PVP and MTURP. Conclusions Based on our findings, we believe that PVP should be considered as an alternative surgical procedure for treating male lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:27574594

  19. Medium-term outcomes and complications after total replacement of the temporomandibular joint. Prospective outcome analysis after 3 and 5 years.

    PubMed

    Gruber, E A; McCullough, J; Sidebottom, A J

    2015-05-01

    In this prospective analysis, we assess the medium-term benefits, efficacy, and safety of the TMJ Concepts joint replacement system in the United Kingdom. Outcome measures of pain, maximum mouth opening, and diet were recorded preoperatively and at intervals up to 3 and 5 years. All patients who had replacement temporomandibular joints (TMJ) within a 6-year period were included. A total of 58 patients (84 joints) were followed up for 3 years (mean age 47, range 19-72) and 26 (42 joints) for 5 years (mean age 46, range 27-70). The female to male ratio was 52:6 at 3 years and 23:3 at 5 years. The most common diagnosis was degenerative disease, and the mean number of previous TMJ procedures was 2.4 (range 0-14). There were significant improvements in pain scores (7.4 reduced to 0.6 at 3 years and 0.8 at 5 years), maximum mouth opening (21.0-35.5mm at 3 years and 23.8-33.7mm at 5 years), and dietary scores (4.1-9.7 at 3 years and 3.7-9.6 at 5 years). Revision operations were required in 2 patients (not included in the outcome data) for biofilm infection of the prosthesis secondary to local infection in the head and neck. One patient had weakness of the temporal branch of the facial nerve that needed correction. TMJ replacement is an effective form of management for an irreparably damaged joint, particularly in cases of ankylosis. It lessens pain and improves function with minimal long-term morbidity. PMID:25818493

  20. Clinical Outcomes of Wulingsan Subtraction Decoction Treatment of Postoperative Brain Edema and Fever as a Complication of Glioma Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wei-rong; Zhang, Feng-e; Diao, Bao-zhong; Zhang, Yue-ying

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of Wulingsan subtraction (五苓散加减 WLSS) decoction in the treatment of postoperative brain edema and fever as a complication of glioma neurosurgery. Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Neurosurgery of Liaocheng People's Hospital. Patients hospitalized between March 2011 and December 2014 were divided into three groups: Group A received WLSS oral liquid (50 mL), twice a day; Group B received an intravenous infusion of mannitol; and Group C received WLSS combined with mannitol (n = 30 patients per group). All patients were treated for 10 days continuously. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by measuring body temperature and indicators of renal function before and 3, 5, and 10 days after treatment. Results. Compared to the other two groups, significantly greater clinical efficacy was observed in the patients treated with mannitol (Group B; P < 0.05), although marked clinical efficacy was also observed over time in patients treated with WLSS (Group A). After 5 days, the quantifiable effects of the WLSS and mannitol combination group (Group C) were substantial (P < 0.05). The renal damage in Group B was more obvious after 5 days and 10 days. Conclusion. Compared with mannitol treatment alone, WLSS combined with mannitol induced a more rapid reduction in body temperature. Our findings suggest that patients should be started on mannitol for 3 days and then switched to WLSS to achieve obvious antipyretic effects and protect renal function. This method of treatment should be considered for clinical applications. PMID:27019661

  1. T Cell Receptor Excision Circle (TREC) Monitoring after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation; a Predictive Marker for Complications and Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Gaballa, Ahmed; Sundin, Mikael; Stikvoort, Arwen; Abumaree, Muhamed; Uzunel, Mehmet; Sairafi, Darius; Uhlin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a well-established treatment modality for a variety of malignant diseases as well as for inborn errors of the metabolism or immune system. Regardless of disease origin, good clinical effects are dependent on proper immune reconstitution. T cells are responsible for both the beneficial graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect against malignant cells and protection against infections. The immune recovery of T cells relies initially on peripheral expansion of mature cells from the graft and later on the differentiation and maturation from donor-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The formation of new T cells occurs in the thymus and as a byproduct, T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) are released upon rearrangement of the T cell receptor. Detection of TRECs by PCR is a reliable method for estimating the amount of newly formed T cells in the circulation and, indirectly, for estimating thymic function. Here, we discuss the role of TREC analysis in the prediction of clinical outcome after allogeneic HSCT. Due to the pivotal role of T cell reconstitution we propose that TREC analysis should be included as a key indicator in the post-HSCT follow-up. PMID:27727179

  2. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty using an implant with a lateral center of rotation: outcomes, complications, and the influence of experience.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Samer S; Gordon, Matthew P; Ramsey, Jason A; Levy, Martin S

    2014-09-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) has revolutionized treatment of arthritis and rotator cuff insufficiency and is performed using implants with either a medial or a lateral center of rotation. We conducted a study of the outcomes and the effect of surgeon learning after the first 60 consecutive lateral-center-of-rotation RSAs implanted by a single surgeon unaffiliated with the design team for this particular reverse shoulder prosthesis. At minimum 2-year followup, mean improvements in active forward elevation, abduction, and external rotation were 69°, 55°, and 23°, respectively; mean active internal rotation improved significantly as well (P < .001 for all). Mean Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores improved from 1.8 (range, 0-6) to 6.9 (range, 0-12) (P < .0001), and mean final American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score was 72 (range, 27-100). Final radiographs showed scapular notching in 5 shoulders (11%). Gains in SST scores, active forward elevation, and active abduction were lower for the first 15 cases than for the next 45 cases, and 5 of the 8 reoperations were performed after the first 15 cases. Overall improvements in active motion and self-assessed shoulder function in this series are comparable to those previously reported by the design team. Experience with RSA appears to influence efficacy, but the learning curve may not be as steep as previously reported.

  3. Retrospective Analysis of Clinical and Cost Outcomes Associated with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections Treated with Daptomycin, Vancomycin, or Linezolid

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Bradley M.; Eiland, Edward H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this analysis was to compare clinical and cost outcomes associated with patients who had suspected or documented methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections treated with daptomycin, vancomycin, or linezolid in complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSIs). Design. This was a retrospective analysis conducted from February to June of 2007. Appropriate data was collected, collated, and subsequently evaluated with the purpose of quantifying length of stay, antibiotic therapy duration, clinical cure rates, adverse drug events, and cost of hospitalization. Results. All 82 patients included in the analysis experienced clinical cure. The duration of antibiotic therapy was similar among the three groups yet the length of hospitalization was slightly shorter in the daptomycin group. Conclusions. The incidence of resistant staphylococcal infections is increasing; therefore, judicious use of MRSA active agents is paramount. Future studies are necessary to determine if MRSA treatment options can be stratified based on the severity of the infectious process. PMID:22567330

  4. The Impact of Inherited Thrombophilia Types and Low Molecular Weight Heparin Treatment on Pregnancy Complications in Women with Previous Adverse Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Aracic, Nada; Roje, Damir; Jakus, Ivana Alujevic; Bakotin, Marinela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the distribution of births and spontaneous abortions, first-trimester abortion (FTA) and mid-trimester abortion (MTA), in untreated (n=128) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) treated pregnancies (n=50) of the same women with inherited thrombophilias and adverse pregnancy outcome (APO) in previous pregnancies. We particularly investigated the impact of LMWH on reducing the pregnancy complications in two thrombophilia types, "Conventional" and "Novel". Materials and Methods 50 women with inherited thrombophilia (26 Conventional and 24 Novel) and APO in previous pregnancies were included in the study. Conventional group included factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin G20210A (PT) mutations and antithrombin (AT), protein S (PS), and protein C (PC) deficiency, while the Novel group included methylentetrahydrofolate-reductase (MTHFR), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphism. APO was defined as one of the following: preterm birth (PTB), fetal growth restriction (FGR), preeclampsia (PE), intrauterine fetal death (IUFD), placental abruption (PA) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Results There was no difference in distribution of births and spontaneous abortions between Conventional and Novel thrombophilia in untreated pregnancies (χ2=2.7; p=0.100) and LMWH treated pregnancies (χ2=0.442; p=0.506). In untreaed pregnancies thrombophilia type did not have any impact on the frequency of FTA and MTA (χ2=0.14; p=0.711). In birth-ended pregnancies LMWH treatement reduced the incidence of IUFD (p=0.011) in Conventional and FGR, IUFD, and PTB in Novel thrombophilia group. Conclusion The equal impact of two thrombophilia types on the pregnancy outcomes and a more favorable effect of LMWH therapy on pregnancy complications in Novel thrombophilia group point the need for Novel thrombophilias screening and the future studies on this issue should be recommended. PMID:27401656

  5. EMR is not inferior to ESD for early Barrett’s and EGJ neoplasia: An extensive review on outcome, recurrence and complication rates

    PubMed Central

    Komeda, Yoriaki; Bruno, Marco; Koch, Arjun

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aims In recent years, it has been reported that early Barrett’s and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) neoplasia can be effectively and safely treated using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Multiband mucosectomy (MBM) appears to be the safest EMR method. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the safety and efficacy of MBM compared with ESD for the treatment of early neoplasia in Barrett’s or at the EGJ. Methods A literature review of studies published up to May 2013 on EMR and ESD for early Barrett’s esophagus (BE) neoplasia and adenocarcinoma at the EGJ was performed through MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Results on outcome parameters such as number of curative resections, complications and procedure times are compared and reported. Results A total of 16 studies met the inclusion criteria for analysis in this study. There were no significant differences in recurrence rates when comparing EMR (10/380, 2.6 %) to ESD (1/333, 0.7 %) (OR 8.55; 95 %CI, 0.91 – 80.0, P = 0.06). All recurrences after EMR were treated with additional endoscopic resection. The risks of delayed bleeding, perforation and stricture rates in both groups were similar. The procedure was considerably less time-consuming in the EMR group (mean time 36.7 min, 95 %CI, 34.5 – 38.9) than in the ESD group (mean time 83.3 min, 95 %CI, 57.4 – 109.2). Conclusions The MBM technique for EMR is as effective as ESD when comparing outcomes related to recurrence and complication rates for the treatment of early Barrett’s or EGJ neoplasia. The MBM technique is considerably less time-consuming. PMID:26135261

  6. Personality changes in dementia: are they disease specific and universal?

    PubMed

    Torrente, Fernando; Pose, Mariángeles; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Torralva, Teresa; López, Pablo; Cetkovich-Bakmas, Marcelo; Manes, Facundo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies about personality changes in dementia suggest that they may be due to the disruption of the biological basis of personality traits, and hence, that they are disease specific and universal. However, evidence about its specificity is still limited and scarce regarding culturally diverse populations. Accordingly, our aim was to compare personality changes in Argentinean patients with Alzheimer disease, behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia, and primary progressive aphasia. The closest living relatives of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer disease (n=19), behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (n=16), and primary progressive aphasia (n=15) were asked to complete 2 versions of the personality inventory NEO Personality Inventory-Revised, one for assessing patients' premorbid personality traits, and the other for assessing current traits. All groups showed changes in several domains and facets of the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised. Globally, the observed pattern of changes was fairly consistent with previous studies based on the same model of personality. Nevertheless, our results regarding disease-specificity were less conclusive. Even if there were some indicators of specific differences between groups, most traits varied similarly across the 3 groups, revealing a pattern of generalized changes in personality expression after illness onset. More studies are needed that help to distinguish real personality changes from other affective or cognitive symptoms that accompany dementia, as well as further data from culturally diverse populations.

  7. Introducing Interlaminar Full-Endoscopic Lumbar Diskectomy: A Critical Analysis of Complications, Recurrence Rates, and Outcome in View of Two Spinal Surgeons' Learning Curves.

    PubMed

    Joswig, Holger; Richter, Heiko; Haile, Sarah Roberta; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Fournier, Jean-Yves

    2016-09-01

    Background and Study Objective Interlaminar full-endoscopic diskectomy is a minimally invasive surgical alternative to microdiskectomy for the treatment of lumbar disk herniation. The authors analyze their surgical results and learning curves during and after the introductory phase of this surgical technique. Patients and Methods We present a case review of 76 patients operated on using interlaminar full-endoscopic diskectomy. We retrospectively analyzed two spinal surgeons' learning curves in terms of operation time with respect to intraoperative blood loss, conversion rates, complications, infections, length of hospitalization, need for rehabilitation, recurrence rates, pain intensity, and opioid use. Patients' functional status and Health-related Quality of Life were assessed by follow-up questionnaires for 47 patients, using the North American Spine Society Score and the Short Form 12 in addition to long-term pain intensity, work capacity, and patient satisfaction with the operation. Results A steady state of the learning curve (operation time) of an experienced spinal surgeon was reached after 40 cases. Supervision by a more experienced surgeon can shorten the learning curve. The rate of conversions (10%), complications (5%), and recurrent lumbar disk herniations (28%) did not negatively affect the long-term outcome in patients operated on before and after the learning phase. Patient satisfaction was high. Conclusions The rate of conversions, complications, and recurrent lumbar disk herniations compared with microdiskectomy combined with the challenging learning curve should be considered before surgeons adopt this procedure. Supervision by an endoscopically experienced spinal surgeon during the introductory phase is highly advisable. PMID:27064582

  8. Introducing Interlaminar Full-Endoscopic Lumbar Diskectomy: A Critical Analysis of Complications, Recurrence Rates, and Outcome in View of Two Spinal Surgeons' Learning Curves.

    PubMed

    Joswig, Holger; Richter, Heiko; Haile, Sarah Roberta; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Fournier, Jean-Yves

    2016-09-01

    Background and Study Objective Interlaminar full-endoscopic diskectomy is a minimally invasive surgical alternative to microdiskectomy for the treatment of lumbar disk herniation. The authors analyze their surgical results and learning curves during and after the introductory phase of this surgical technique. Patients and Methods We present a case review of 76 patients operated on using interlaminar full-endoscopic diskectomy. We retrospectively analyzed two spinal surgeons' learning curves in terms of operation time with respect to intraoperative blood loss, conversion rates, complications, infections, length of hospitalization, need for rehabilitation, recurrence rates, pain intensity, and opioid use. Patients' functional status and Health-related Quality of Life were assessed by follow-up questionnaires for 47 patients, using the North American Spine Society Score and the Short Form 12 in addition to long-term pain intensity, work capacity, and patient satisfaction with the operation. Results A steady state of the learning curve (operation time) of an experienced spinal surgeon was reached after 40 cases. Supervision by a more experienced surgeon can shorten the learning curve. The rate of conversions (10%), complications (5%), and recurrent lumbar disk herniations (28%) did not negatively affect the long-term outcome in patients operated on before and after the learning phase. Patient satisfaction was high. Conclusions The rate of conversions, complications, and recurrent lumbar disk herniations compared with microdiskectomy combined with the challenging learning curve should be considered before surgeons adopt this procedure. Supervision by an endoscopically experienced spinal surgeon during the introductory phase is highly advisable.

  9. Diabetes in Algeria and challenges for health policy: a literature review of prevalence, cost, management and outcomes of diabetes and its complications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes has become an increasingly prevalent and severe public health issue in Algeria. This article investigates the prevalence, the cost and the management of this disease. Its first objective is to better understand the burden (both from an epidemiological and economic perspective) and management of diabetes. The second objective is to understand the health policy strategy adopted by Algeria in order to respond to the disease. Methods We conducted a literature review of prevalence, costs, management and outcomes of diabetes and its complications. This was complemented by data compilations and results of expert consultations. Results The epidemiology of diabetes is continually evolving and is becoming more problematic. The national evidence suggests that the prevalence of diabetes in Algeria has increased from 6.8% in 1990 to 12.29% in 2005, but is quite higher among certain groups and areas of the country. This disease affects all population groups, especially 35–70 year olds, who constitute a large segment of the working population. There are very few estimates of the cost of diabetes. These include a 1998 study on the total cost of type 1 diabetes (USD 11.6 million, which, inflated to 2013 value, totals to USD 16.6 million), a study on the cost of complications in 2010 (at 2013 value, ranging from USD 141 for first-year treatment of peripheral vascular disease to USD 30,441 for first-year cost of renal transplantation) and the 2013 IDF estimates of total cost of type 1 and type 2 diabetes (USD 513 million). Conclusions As the prevalence of diabetes continues to increase, the financial burden will increasingly weigh heavily on social security resources and the government budget. Future priorities must focus on empowering general practitioners in treating type 2 diabetes, improving screening of diabetes and its complications, tackling the growing obesity epidemic, strengthening health information systems and implementing the national diabetes

  10. Complications of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gasche, C

    2000-01-01

    Complications in inflammatory bowel disease determine the severity of disease as well as the complexities of medical or surgical treatment opportunities. Therefore, in known inflammatory bowel disease, the prevention, the early detection and the adequate therapeutic response to certain complications are important goals in the follow-up of inflammatory bowel disease patients. Disease complications are separated into intestinal and extraintestinal complications. Intestinal complications are somewhat disease specific, which means that they occur exclusively in either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis (e.g., enteric fistulas are particularly found in Crohn's disease and toxic megacolon in ulcerative colitis). Most extraintestinal complications occur in both forms of inflammatory bowel disease (e.g., anemia, thromboembolic events or osteoporosis). The current knowledge on pathogenesis, diagnostic tools, prevention and treatment of certain intestinal and extraintestinal complications is reviewed. PMID:10690585

  11. Extended-criteria donors in liver transplantation Part II: reviewing the impact of extended-criteria donors on the complications and outcomes of liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Balázs; Gámán, György; Polak, Wojciech G; Gelley, Fanni; Hara, Takanobu; Ono, Shinichiro; Baimakhanov, Zhassulan; Piros, Laszlo; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    Extended-criteria donors (ECDs) have an impact on early allograft dysfunction (EAD), biliary complications, relapse of hepatitis C virus (HCV), and survivals. Early allograft dysfunction was frequently seen in grafts with moderate and severe steatosis. Donors after cardiac death (DCD) have been associated with higher rates of graft failure and biliary complications compared to donors after brain death. Extended warm ischemia, reperfusion injury and endothelial activation trigger a cascade, leading to microvascular thrombosis, resulting in biliary necrosis, cholangitis, and graft failure. The risk of HCV recurrence increased by donor age, and associated with using moderately and severely steatotic grafts. With the administration of protease inhibitors sustained virological response was achieved in majority of the patients. Donor risk index and EC donor scores (DS) are reported to be useful, to assess the outcome. The 1-year survival rates were 87% and 40% respectively, for donors with a DS of 0 and 3. Graft survival was excellent up to a DS of 2, however a DS >2 should be avoided in higher-risk recipients. The 1, 3 and 5-year survival of DCD recipients was comparable to optimal donors. However ECDs had minor survival means of 85%, 78.6%, and 72.3%. The graft survival of split liver transplantation (SLT) was comparable to that of whole liver orthotopic liver transplantation. SLT was not regarded as an ECD factor in the MELD era any more. Full-right-full-left split liver transplantation has a significant advantage to extend the high quality donor pool. Hypothermic oxygenated machine perfusion can be applied clinically in DCD liver grafts. Feasibility and safety were confirmed. Reperfusion injury was also rare in machine perfused DCD livers. PMID:26831547

  12. Long-term Outcomes of Percutaneous Venoplasty and Gianturco Stent Placement to Treat Obstruction of the Inferior Vena Cava Complicating Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Jonathan M. Beek, Darren van; Funaki, Brian; Ha, Thuong G. Van; Zangan, Stephen; Navuluri, Rakesh; Leef, Jeffery A.

    2013-05-11

    PurposeEvaluation of long-term outcomes of venoplasty and Gianturco stents to treat inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction after liver transplantation.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed records from 33 consecutive adult patients referred with the intent to treat suspected IVC obstruction after liver transplantation. Treatment was performed for occlusion or stenosis with a gradient exceeding 3 mmHg. The primary treatment was venoplasty and, if refractory, Gianturco stent placement. Recurrence prompted repeat venoplasty or stent placement.ResultsOf the 33 patients, 25 (aged 46.9 ± 12.2 years) required treatment at a mean of 2.3 years (14 days to 20.3 years) after transplantation. For technically successful cases, primary treatment was venoplasty alone (14) or with stent placement (10). Technical success was 96 % (24 of 25) reflecting failure to cross one occlusion. Clinical success was 88 % (22 of 25) reflecting the technical failure and two that died of unrelated complications within 5 weeks. Cumulative primary patencies were 57.1 % at 6 months (n = 21) and 51.4 % at 1 (n = 10), 3 (n = 7), 5 (n = 6), and 7 (n = 5) years. Cumulative primary assisted patency was 95.2 % at 6 months (n = 21) and at 1 (n = 15), 3 (n = 9), 5 (n = 8), and 7 (n = 8) years. The 17 patients stented for refractory (n = 10) or recurrent (n = 7) stenosis had cumulative primary and primary assisted patencies of 86.0 and 100 %, respectively, from 6 months (n = 14) to 7 years (n = 3). No major complications occurred; one fractured stent was observed after 11.6 years.ConclusionFor IVC obstruction following liver transplantation, excellent long-term outcomes can be achieved by venoplasty and Gianturco stent placement.

  13. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes.

  14. Determinants of Complications and Outcome in High-Risk Squamous Cell Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Perioperative High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy (PHDRB)

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Pagola Divasson, Maria; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Moreno, Marta; Arbea, Leire; Montesdeoca, Nestor; Alcalde, Juan

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the impact of a set of patient, tumor, and treatment factors on toxicity and outcome in patients with head-and-neck squamous cell cancer treated with surgical resection and perioperative high-dose rate brachytherapy (PHDRB) alone (single-modality [SM] group) (n = 46) or PHDRB combined with postoperative radiation or chemoradiation (combined-modality [CM] group) (n = 57). Methods and Materials: From 2000 to 2008, 103 patients received PHDRB after complete macroscopic resection. SM patients received 32 or 40 Gy of PHDRB in 8 or 10 twice-daily treatments for R0 and R1 resections. CM patients received 16 or 24 Gy of PHDRB in 4 or 6 twice-daily treatments for R0 and R1 resections, followed by external radiation of 45 Gy in 25 fractions with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Results: Grade {>=}4 complications according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group were more frequent in the SM group than in the CM group (p = 0.024). Grade {>=}3 and {>=}4 complications increased with the antecedent of prior irradiation (p = 0.032 and p = 0.006, respectively) and with TV{sub 150} values of 13 mL or greater (p = 0.032 and p = 0.032, respectively). After a median follow-up of 34.8 and 60.8 months for SM and CM patients, respectively, patients with high-risk margins had a 9-year local control rate of 68.0% whereas patients with wider margins had a 9-year local control of 93.7% (p = 0.045). Patients with primary and recurrent tumors had 9-year actuarial locoregional control rates of 81.8% and 54.2%, respectively (p = 0.003). Patients with lymph-vascular space invasion (LVSI)-positive and LVSI-negative tumors had 9-year distant control rates of 62.8% and 81.6%, respectively (p = 0.034). Disease-free survival rates decreased in recurrent cases (p = 0.006) as well as in LVSI-positive patients (p = 0.035). Conclusions: The complications observed are largely attributable to the antecedent of prior irradiation but can possibly be minimized by meticulous mapping and

  15. Radiation Therapy after Radical Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer: Evaluation of Complications and Influence of Radiation Timing on Outcomes in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, Sarah E.; Hyslop, Terry; Dicker, Adam P.; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the influence of timing of salvage and adjuvant radiation therapy on outcomes after prostatectomy for prostate cancer. Methods Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database, we identified prostate cancer patients diagnosed during 1995–2007 who had one or more adverse pathological features after prostatectomy. The final cohort of 6,137 eligible patients included men who received prostatectomy alone (n = 4,509) or with adjuvant (n = 894) or salvage (n = 734) radiation therapy. Primary outcomes were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and erectile dysfunction events and survival after treatment(s). Results Radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with higher rates of gastrointestinal and genitourinary events, but not erectile dysfunction. In adjusted models, earlier treatment with adjuvant radiation therapy was not associated with increased rates of genitourinary or erectile dysfunction events compared to delayed salvage radiation therapy. Early adjuvant radiation therapy was associated with lower rates of gastrointestinal events that salvage radiation therapy, with hazard ratios of 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67–0.95) for procedure-defined and 0.70 (95% CI, 0.59, 0.83) for diagnosis-defined events. There was no significant difference between ART and non-ART groups (SRT or RP alone) for overall survival (HR = 1.13 95% CI = (0.96, 1.34) p = 0.148). Conclusions Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal and genitourinary events. However, earlier radiation therapy is not associated with higher rates of gastrointestinal, genitourinary or sexual events. These findings oppose the conventional belief that delaying radiation therapy reduces the risk of radiation-related complications. PMID:25706657

  16. Perinatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by preterm premature rupture of the membranes before 34 weeks of gestation in a tertiary center in China: A retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyan; Wang, Xiaodong; Gao, Haocheng; You, Yong; Xing, Aiyun

    2015-02-01

    Preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM) remains the leading cause of preterm deliveries and neonatal mortality and morbidity. The current cohort study sought to retrospectively examine perinatal outcomes in cases of PPROM < 34 weeks' gestation that were managed conservatively from 2010 to 2012 and to identify risk factors for short-term neonatal outcomes. Subjects were 510 pregnancies consisting of 114 twin and 396 singleton pregnancies. Clinical chorioamnionitis occurred in 17.8% of the pregnancies. Neonatal mortality was 7.4%, the rate of major neonatal conditions was 40%, and the rate of NICU admission was 72.9%. The latency period exceeded 48 h in 62.5% of the pregnancies and 7 days in 24.3% of the pregnancies. Twin pregnancies had a shorter latency period than singleton pregnancies (median of 2 days versus 4 days, p < 0.001). Pregnancies complicated with early vaginal bleeding had a higher neonatal mortality (13.95% vs. 6.36%, p = 0.013) and morbidity (51.16% vs. 38.32%, p = 0.024), fewer weeks of gestation at PPROM (p = 0.029). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that weeks of gestation at PPROM (OR: 0.953, 95% CI: 0.939-0.966, p < 0.001) and a latency period (OR: 0.948, 95%CI: 0.926-0.970, p < 0.001) were associated with neonatal mortality or morbidity. A twin pregnancy (OR: 0.319, 95% CI: 0.17-0.6, p < 0.001) and weeks of gestation at PPROM (OR: 0.737, 95% CI: 0.66-0.822, p < 0.001) were associated with the latency period. Gestational age at PPROM, a twin pregnancy, and the latency period are associated with neonatal mortality and morbidity.

  17. Evaluation of Tigecycline Efficacy and Post-Discharge Outcomes in a Clinical Practice Population with Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infection: A Propensity Score–Matched Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, C. Daniel; Quintana, Alvaro; Eckmann, Christian; Shelbaya, Ahmed; Ernst, Frank R.; Krukas, Michelle R.; Reisman, Arlene

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The utility of tigecycline as compared with other antibiotic therapies in the treatment of patients with complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI) and the short- and long-term outcomes of a large cohort of severely ill patients were examined. We provide the first published data on post-discharge events for these patients. Methods: Retrospective data for the cIAI cohort were obtained from a large clinical database. Patients aged ≥18 y were selected for inclusion based on hospitalization with a relevant diagnosis code and procedure code, and guideline-compliant antimicrobial therapy. Propensity scoring was used to reduce treatment-selection bias introduced by the use of observational data. Tigecycline patients were placed into quintiles based on propensity score and were matched 1:3. Results: The final model based on propensity score matching included 2,424 patients: Tigecycline (n = 606) and other antibiotic therapy (n = 1,818). Treatment was successful in 426 (70.3%) tigecycline-treated patients and in 1,294 (71.2%) patients receiving other antibiotics. Similar treatment success occurred across all infection sites. Among survivors, treatment failure was associated with a greater need for all-cause re-hospitalization at 30 d and 180 d. No differences in cIAI-related re-hospitalization and discharge status were observed. Conclusions: Using propensity scores to match populations, similar outcomes were demonstrated between treatment with tigecycline and other antibiotics as expressed by treatment success, the need for re-admission, similar 30-d discharge status, and the need for re-admission at 180 d. PMID:26981640

  18. The postanesthetic period. Complications.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1987-01-01

    Postanesthetic complications can occur even in the best of circumstances. Proper preparation of the staff, aggressive monitoring of the recovering patient, and early recognition and management of the complications are essential if the outcome is to be successful. In reviewing postanesthetic complications, two factors are present in the overwhelming majority of situations--hypoxia and hypercarbia--often the direct result of inadequate monitoring during the postanesthetic period. The anesthetic procedure is not over once the anesthetic agents are discontinued. The skillful anesthetist is aware of the possibilities of postoperative complications and prevents problems by employing enhanced monitoring techniques during the recovery phase.

  19. Systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary hypertension: why disease-specific composite endpoints are needed

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious complication of systemic sclerosis (SSc). In clinical trials PAH-SSc has been grouped with other forms, including idiopathic PAH. The primary endpoint for most pivotal studies was improvement in exercise capacity. However, composite clinical endpoints that better reflect long-term outcome may be more meaningful. We discuss potential endpoints and consider why the same measures may not be appropriate for both idiopathic PAH and PAH-SSc due to inherent differences in clinical outcome and management strategies of these two forms of PAH. Failure to take this into account may compromise progress in managing PAH in SSc. PMID:21699746

  20. Long-Term Behavioral Outcomes after a Randomized, Clinical Trial of Counselor-Assisted Problem Solving for Adolescents with Complicated Mild-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Wade, Shari L; Taylor, H Gerry; Cassedy, Amy; Zhang, Nanhua; Kirkwood, Michael W; Brown, Tanya M; Stancin, Terry

    2015-07-01

    Family problem-solving therapy (FPST) has been shown to reduce behavior problems after pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is unclear whether treatment gains are maintained. We sought to evaluate the maintenance of improvements in behavior problems after a Web-based counselor-assisted FPST (CAPS) intervention compared to an Internet resource comparison (IRC) intervention provided to adolescents within the initial year post-TBI. We hypothesized that family socioeconomic status, child educational status, and baseline levels of symptoms would moderate the efficacy of the treatment over time. Participants included 132 adolescents ages 12-17 years who sustained a complicated mild-to-severe TBI 1-6 months before study enrollment. Primary outcomes were the Child Behavior Checklist Internalizing and Externalizing Totals. Mixed-models analyses, using random intercepts and slopes, were conducted to examine group differences over time. There was a significant group×time×grade interaction (F(1,304)=4.42; p=0.03) for internalizing problems, with high school-age participants in CAPS reporting significantly lower symptoms at 18 months postbaseline than those in the IRC. Post-hoc analyses to elucidate the nature of effects on internalizing problems revealed significant group×time×grade interactions for the anxious/depressed (p=0.03) and somatic complaints subscales (p=0.04). Results also indicated significant improvement over time for CAPS participants who reported elevated externalizing behavior problems at baseline (F(1, 310)=7.17; p=0.008). Findings suggest that CAPS may lead to long-term improvements in behavior problems among older adolescents and those with pretreatment symptoms.

  1. IgG Autoantibodies Induced by T. cruzi During Pregnancy: Correlation with Gravidity Complications and Early Outcome Assessment of the Newborns.

    PubMed

    Vicco, Miguel Hernán; Rodeles, Luz; Capovilla, Gabriela Soledad; Perrig, Melina; Choque, Ana Gabriela Herrera; Marcipar, Iván; Bottasso, Oscar; Rodriguez, Celeste; Cuña, Washington

    2016-10-01

    Objective The aim of the present research was to evaluate the correlation of vertically transmitted IgG antibodies induced by T. cruzi and newborn early outcome assessment, mainly birth weight and gestational age. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study with 183 pregnant women (64 with asymptomatic Chagas disease) and their newborns. Both were subjected to complete clinical examination. Peripheral parasitemia was assessed in mother and neonates by parasite detection through microscopic examination of the buffycoat from mother's peripheral and cord blood. Antibodies induced by T. cruzi, such as anti-FRA, anti-B13, anti-p2β and anti-T. cruzi were assessed by immunoassay. Birth weight, general condition evaluation by APGAR Score and gestational age by Capurro Score, were determined in newborns. Results The rate of stillbirth background and pregnancy-induced hypertension were higher in patients with Chagas disease (p = 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). Parasitemia was detectable in 17 mothers and 4 newborns. The newborns of mothers with detectable parasitemia presented decreased gestational age (p = 0.006) and body weight (p = 0.04). Mostly all the mothers with Chagas disease and all their newborns have positive values of antibodies induced by T. cruzi; however, only anti-p2β showed to be related to the presence of complication during pregnancy (OR 2.35, p = 0.036), and to low birth weight (OR 1.55, p = 0.02). Conclusions Low birth weight and decreased postnatal estimation of maturity were related to detectable parasitemia in the mother. Also, vertical transmission of T. cruzi-induced autoantibodies might have clinical implication in newborns given the negative association between anti-p2β values and weight.

  2. Correlates of disease-specific knowledge in Chinese patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carlos KH; Yu, WC

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the associations of various sociodemographic factors with the level of disease-specific knowledge among Hong Kong Chinese patients with COPD. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 100 Chinese adults with COPD recruited from outpatient clinics was conducted from September 2009 to September 2010. Data on the knowledge specific to COPD and patients’ sociodemographics were collected from face-to-face interviews. Primary outcome of disease-specific knowledge was measured using 65-item Bristol COPD Knowledge Questionnaire (BCKQ), summing up the 65 items as the BCKQ overall score. Associations of sociodemographic factors with the BCKQ overall score were evaluated using the linear regression model. Results The mean BCKQ overall score of our patients was 41.01 (SD: 10.64). The knowledge in topics of “Smoking” and “Phlegm” achieved the first (3.97, SD: 0.82) and second (3.91, SD: 1.17) highest mean scores, respectively, while the topic of “Oral steroids” returned the lowest mean score of 1.89 (SD: 1.64). The BCKQ overall score progressively declined (P<0.001) with increase in education level, with the highest BCKQ overall score of 46.71 at no formal education among all subgroups. Compared to nondrinkers, current drinkers were associated with lower total BCKQ score. Conclusion We found that among COPD patients in outpatient clinics, impairments in the level of COPD knowledge were evident in patients who were current drinkers or had higher level of education. PMID:27695309

  3. Correlates of disease-specific knowledge in Chinese patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carlos KH; Yu, WC

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the associations of various sociodemographic factors with the level of disease-specific knowledge among Hong Kong Chinese patients with COPD. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 100 Chinese adults with COPD recruited from outpatient clinics was conducted from September 2009 to September 2010. Data on the knowledge specific to COPD and patients’ sociodemographics were collected from face-to-face interviews. Primary outcome of disease-specific knowledge was measured using 65-item Bristol COPD Knowledge Questionnaire (BCKQ), summing up the 65 items as the BCKQ overall score. Associations of sociodemographic factors with the BCKQ overall score were evaluated using the linear regression model. Results The mean BCKQ overall score of our patients was 41.01 (SD: 10.64). The knowledge in topics of “Smoking” and “Phlegm” achieved the first (3.97, SD: 0.82) and second (3.91, SD: 1.17) highest mean scores, respectively, while the topic of “Oral steroids” returned the lowest mean score of 1.89 (SD: 1.64). The BCKQ overall score progressively declined (P<0.001) with increase in education level, with the highest BCKQ overall score of 46.71 at no formal education among all subgroups. Compared to nondrinkers, current drinkers were associated with lower total BCKQ score. Conclusion We found that among COPD patients in outpatient clinics, impairments in the level of COPD knowledge were evident in patients who were current drinkers or had higher level of education.

  4. What are the functional outcomes of right hemisphere stroke patients with or without hemi-inattention complications? A critical narrative review and suggestions for further research

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Maria Stella; Kilbride, Cherry; Reynolds, Frances Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: There is widespread acceptance that patients demonstrating neglect/hemi-inattention (HI) following right hemisphere stroke (RHS) underachieve functionally compared to their counterparts without neglect. However, empirical evidence for this view needs examination. The purpose of this review is to critically appraise relevant studies that compared outcomes from RHS patients with/without hemi-attention and suggest more robust follow-up research. Method: Twelve studies published in 1995–2013 were critically reviewed. Two independent reviewers appraised design features including sample representation, assessment and data analysis methods. Strengths and limitations were highlighted. Results: Results were largely inconsistent. Considerable heterogeneity within patient groups and across studies complicated interpretation. Evidence suggested average group disparity in scores between patients with and without HI at discharge but the cause of functional disparity could not be attributed specifically to HI from the data and modelling results available. Conclusion: The relationship between HI status and functional recovery warrants further investigation in studies with stronger methodology to ensure rigour and robustness in the results. Pending further research, HI status should not be regarded as a key predictor of functional recovery or rehabilitation potential in patients with RHSs. This group should continue to receive appropriate therapeutic intervention aimed at maximising their functional recovery post-stroke.Implications for RehabilitationFindings from this review demonstrate a paucity of evidence to support the presence of hemi-inattention as a key predictor of functional recovery in patients with right hemisphere stroke; as such, practitioners should take this into consideration when planning rehabilitation programmes of their patients.In the initial months following right hemisphere stroke, there are wide-ranging differences in the rate and amount

  5. [Complications in pediatric anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Becke, K

    2014-07-01

    As in adult anesthesia, morbidity and mortality could be significantly reduced in pediatric anesthesia in recent decades. This fact cannot conceal the fact that the incidence of anesthetic complications in children is still much more common than in adults and sometimes with a severe outcome. Newborns and infants in particular but also children with emergency interventions and severe comorbidities are at increased risk of potential complications. Typical complications in pediatric anesthesia are respiratory problems, medication errors, difficulties with the intravenous puncture and pulmonal aspiration. In the postoperative setting, nausea and vomiting, pain, and emergence delirium can be mentioned as typical complications. In addition to the systematic prevention of complications in pediatric anesthesia, it is important to quickly recognize disturbances of homeostasis and treat them promptly and appropriately. In addition to the expertise of the performing anesthesia team, the institutional structure in particular can improve quality and safety in pediatric anesthesia. PMID:25004872

  6. A Large Institutional Study on Outcomes and Complications after Transcatheter Closure of a Perimembranous-Type Ventricular Septal Defect in 890 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Zhen; Gao, Lei; Tan, Hui-Lian; Zheng, Qinghou; Zhang, Mi-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the incidence, cause, and prevention of complications associated with interventional therapy for perimembranous ventricular septal defects (pmVSDs). Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 890 patients with pmVSDs after interventional therapy. The complications were then analyzed by electrocardiography and echocardiography during or after interventional therapy. During the follow-up period of 12-52 (mean of 26.9 ± 21.6) months, the technical success rate was 97.9% (871/890). Results The incidence of serious complication was 1.12% (10/890), including five cases of third-degree atrioventricular block, two of severe tricuspid valve regurgitation, one of cerebral infarction in the basal ganglia area, and two of femoral artery thrombosis. No death was reported during patient follow-up. Conclusions Transcatheter closure of pmVSDs in selected patients was found to be effective and safe. PMID:27122716

  7. Apple intake is inversely associated with all-cause and disease-specific mortality in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jonathan M; Prince, Richard L; Woodman, Richard J; Bondonno, Catherine P; Ivey, Kerry L; Bondonno, Nicola; Rimm, Eric B; Ward, Natalie C; Croft, Kevin D; Lewis, Joshua R

    2016-03-14

    Higher fruit intake is associated with lower risk of all-cause and disease-specific mortality. However, data on individual fruits are limited, and the generalisability of these findings to the elderly remains uncertain. The objective of this study was to examine the association of apple intake with all-cause and disease-specific mortality over 15 years in a cohort of women aged over 70 years. Secondary analyses explored relationships of other fruits with mortality outcomes. Usual fruit intake was assessed in 1456 women using a FFQ. Incidence of all-cause and disease-specific mortality over 15 years was determined through the Western Australian Hospital Morbidity Data system. Cox regression was used to determine the hazard ratios (HR) for mortality. During 15 years of follow-up, 607 (41·7%) women died from any cause. In the multivariable-adjusted analysis, the HR for all-cause mortality was 0·89 (95% CI 0·81, 0·97) per sd (53 g/d) increase in apple intake, HR 0·80 (95% CI 0·65, 0·98) for consumption of 5-100 g/d and HR 0·65 (95% CI 0·48, 0·89) for consumption of >100 g/d (an apple a day), compared with apple intake of <5 g/d (P for trend=0·03). Our analysis also found that higher apple intake was associated with lower risk for cancer mortality, and that higher total fruit and banana intakes were associated lower risk of CVD mortality (P<0·05). Our results support the view that regular apple consumption may contribute to lower risk of mortality. PMID:26787402

  8. Apple intake is inversely associated with all-cause and disease-specific mortality in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jonathan M; Prince, Richard L; Woodman, Richard J; Bondonno, Catherine P; Ivey, Kerry L; Bondonno, Nicola; Rimm, Eric B; Ward, Natalie C; Croft, Kevin D; Lewis, Joshua R

    2016-03-14

    Higher fruit intake is associated with lower risk of all-cause and disease-specific mortality. However, data on individual fruits are limited, and the generalisability of these findings to the elderly remains uncertain. The objective of this study was to examine the association of apple intake with all-cause and disease-specific mortality over 15 years in a cohort of women aged over 70 years. Secondary analyses explored relationships of other fruits with mortality outcomes. Usual fruit intake was assessed in 1456 women using a FFQ. Incidence of all-cause and disease-specific mortality over 15 years was determined through the Western Australian Hospital Morbidity Data system. Cox regression was used to determine the hazard ratios (HR) for mortality. During 15 years of follow-up, 607 (41·7%) women died from any cause. In the multivariable-adjusted analysis, the HR for all-cause mortality was 0·89 (95% CI 0·81, 0·97) per sd (53 g/d) increase in apple intake, HR 0·80 (95% CI 0·65, 0·98) for consumption of 5-100 g/d and HR 0·65 (95% CI 0·48, 0·89) for consumption of >100 g/d (an apple a day), compared with apple intake of <5 g/d (P for trend=0·03). Our analysis also found that higher apple intake was associated with lower risk for cancer mortality, and that higher total fruit and banana intakes were associated lower risk of CVD mortality (P<0·05). Our results support the view that regular apple consumption may contribute to lower risk of mortality.

  9. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination.

  10. An example of prompt and appropriate multidisciplinary management leading to an exceptionally good outcome: a case complicated by amniotic fluid embolism.

    PubMed

    Patel, Deesha; Osakwe, Osaeloke; Ghosh, Sayanti

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare and serious phenomenon; we describe a rare case of AFE occurring after a second trimester surgical termination in a private clinic, which, with prompt transfer and appropriate multidisciplinary management, had an exceptionally good outcome. The patient developed hypotension, respiratory arrest and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy following the procedure but with aggressive management she made a full recovery without any neurological or long-term sequelae.

  11. An example of prompt and appropriate multidisciplinary management leading to an exceptionally good outcome: a case complicated by amniotic fluid embolism.

    PubMed

    Patel, Deesha; Osakwe, Osaeloke; Ghosh, Sayanti

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare and serious phenomenon; we describe a rare case of AFE occurring after a second trimester surgical termination in a private clinic, which, with prompt transfer and appropriate multidisciplinary management, had an exceptionally good outcome. The patient developed hypotension, respiratory arrest and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy following the procedure but with aggressive management she made a full recovery without any neurological or long-term sequelae. PMID:26604229

  12. Measuring disease-specific health status in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Measurement Committee of The American Urological Association.

    PubMed

    Barry, M J; Fowler, F J; O'Leary, M P; Bruskewitz, R C; Holtgrewe, H L; Mebust, W K

    1995-04-01

    In preparation for an outcomes study of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), two measures of disease-specific health status were developed to supplement a symptom score and overall health status measures. The symptom problem index (SPI) captures how troublesome patients find their urinary symptoms. The BPH impact index (BII) measures how much their urinary problems affect various domains of health. A prospective revalidation of the refined instruments (N = 108 BPH patients and 50 controls) documented that both indices had good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.88 and 0.79, respectively) and test-retest (r = 0.88 for both) reliabilities, correlated strongly with symptom scores (r = 0.86 and 0.77), and discriminated between BPH and control subjects (receiver-operating characteristic areas = 0.87 and 0.85, respectively). These indices were nearly as responsive as symptom scores in 50 men actively treated for BPH, and much more responsive than a non-disease-specific General Health Index (GHI), a Mental Health Index (MHI), and an Activity Index (AI). Finally, these measures capture most of the health status significance of BPH symptoms. In linear regression models constructed to predict scores on the GHI, MHI, and AI, symptom scores added little explanatory power to the SPI and, particularly, to the BII. These measures help clarify how BPH affects overall health status and function. Such measures have an important role to play in studies of the outcomes of treatment for BPH, and probably for other conditions that interfere with health status and function.

  13. Differences in pregnancy outcomes, prenatal care utilization, and maternal complications between teenagers and adult women in Korea: A nationwide epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hyung; Lee, Seung Mi; Lim, Nam Gu; Kim, Hyun Joo; Bae, Sung-Hee; Ock, Minsu; Kim, Un-Na; Lee, Jin Yong; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Teenage mothers are at high risk for maternal and neonatal complications. This study aimed to evaluate the socioeconomic circumstances of teenage pregnancy, and determine whether these increased risks remained after adjustment for socioeconomic circumstances in Korea. Using the National Health Insurance Corporation database, we selected women who terminated pregnancy, by delivery or abortion, from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010. Abortion, delivery type, and maternal complications were defined based on the International Classification of Diseases-10th Revision. We compared teenagers (13-19 years at the time of pregnancy termination) with other age groups and investigated differences based on socioeconomic status, reflected by Medical Aid (MA) and National Health Insurance (NHI) beneficiaries. We used multivariate analysis to define the factors associated with preterm delivery. Among 463,847 pregnancies, 2267 (0.49%) involved teenagers. Teenage mothers were more likely to have an abortion (33.4%) than deliver a baby when compared with other age groups (20.8%; P < 0.001). About 14.4% of teenage mothers had never received prenatal care throughout pregnancy. Among teenage mothers, 61.7% of MA recipients made fewer than 4 prenatal care visits (vs 38.8% of NHI beneficiaries) (P < 0.001). Teenage mothers more often experienced preterm delivery and perineal laceration (P < 0.001). Teenage mothers (<20 years) were 2.47 times more likely to have preterm delivery than older mothers (20-34 years; P < 0.001). Teenage mothers had higher risk of inadequate prenatal care and subsequently of preterm delivery, which remained significantly higher after adjusting for socioeconomic confounding variables and adequacy of prenatal care in Korean teenagers (P < 0.001). PMID:27559960

  14. Capturing structured, pulmonary disease-specific data elements in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Peter E; Gronkiewicz, Cynthia; Diamond, Edward J; French, Kim D; Christodouleas, John

    2015-04-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have the potential to improve health-care quality by allowing providers to make better decisions at the point of care based on electronically aggregated data and by facilitating clinical research. These goals are easier to achieve when key, disease-specific clinical information is documented as structured data elements (SDEs) that computers can understand and process, rather than as free-text/natural-language narrative. This article reviews the benefits of capturing disease-specific SDEs. It highlights several design and implementation considerations, including the impact on efficiency and expressivity of clinical documentation and the importance of adhering to data standards when available. Pulmonary disease-specific examples of collection instruments are provided from two commonly used commercial EHRs. Future developments that can leverage SDEs to improve clinical quality and research are discussed. PMID:25846531

  15. Outcome Prediction after Mild and Complicated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: External Validation of Existing Models and Identification of New Predictors Using the TRACK-TBI Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lingsma, Hester F.; Yue, John K.; Maas, Andrew I.R.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Cooper, Shelly R.; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Gordon, Wayne A.; Menon, David K.; Mukherjee, Pratik; Okonkwo, David O.; Puccio, Ava M.; Schnyer, David M.; Valadka, Alex B.; Vassar, Mary J.; Yuh, Esther L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the majority of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) recover completely, some still suffer from disabling ailments at 3 or 6 months. We validated existing prognostic models for mTBI and explored predictors of poor outcome after mTBI. We selected patients with mTBI from TRACK-TBI Pilot, an unselected observational cohort of TBI patients from three centers in the United States. We validated two prognostic models for the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOS-E) at 6 months after injury. One model was based on the CRASH study data and another from Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Possible predictors of 3- and 6-month GOS-E were analyzed with univariate and multi-variable proportional odds regression models. Of the 386 of 485 patients included in the study (median age, 44 years; interquartile range, 27–58), 75% (n=290) presented with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) of 15. In this mTBI population, both previously developed models had a poor performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.49–0.56). In multivariable analyses, the strongest predictors of lower 3- and 6-month GOS-E were older age, pre-existing psychiatric conditions, and lower education. Injury caused by assault, extracranial injuries, and lower GCS were also predictive of lower GOS-E. Existing models for mTBI performed unsatisfactorily. Our study shows that, for mTBI, different predictors are relevant as for moderate and severe TBI. These include age, pre-existing psychiatric conditions, and lower education. Development of a valid prediction model for mTBI patients requires further research efforts. PMID:25025611

  16. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  17. DISEASE-SPECIFIC SUSCEPTIBILITY TO ACUTE OZONE-INDUCED INJURY AND INFLAMMATION IN EIGHT RAT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Susceptibility to environmental pollutant-induced injuries may be influenced by presence of disease and genetic make-up. To identify disease-specific susceptibility phenotype, we used eight rat strains with or without genetic cardiovascular disease. Male 12-15 wk old Sprague Dawl...

  18. Predictive value of the Diverticular Inflammation and Complication Assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification on the outcome of diverticular disease of the colon: An international study

    PubMed Central

    Brandimarte, Giovanni; Di Mario, Francesco; Annunziata, Maria L; Bafutto, Mauro; Bianco, Maria A; Colucci, Raffaele; Conigliaro, Rita; Danese, Silvio; De Bastiani, Rudi; Elisei, Walter; Escalante, Ricardo; Faggiani, Roberto; Ferrini, Luciano; Forti, Giacomo; Latella, Giovanni; Graziani, Maria G; Oliveira, Enio C; Papa, Alfredo; Penna, Antonio; Portincasa, Piero; Søreide, Kjetil; Spadaccini, Antonio; Usai, Paolo; Bonovas, Stefanos; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Picchio, Marcello; Lecca, Piera G; Zampaletta, Costantino; Cassieri, Claudio; Damiani, Alberto; Desserud, Kari F; Fiorella, Serafina; Landi, Rosario; Goni, Elisabetta; Lai, Maria A; Pigò, Flavia; Rotondano, Gianluca; Schiaccianoce, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Diverticular Inflammation and Complication Assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification has been recently developed for patients suffering from diverticulosis and diverticular disease. Aims We assessed retrospectively the predictive value of DICA in patients for whom endoscopic data and clinical follow-up were available. Methods For each patient, we recorded: age, severity of DICA, presence of abdominal pain, C-reactive protein and faecal calprotectin test (if available) at the time of diagnosis; months of follow-up; therapy taken during the follow-up to maintain remission (if any); occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis; need of surgery. Results We enrolled 1651 patients (793 M, 858 F, mean age 66.6 ± 11.1 years): 939 (56.9%) patients were classified as DICA 1, 501 (30.3%) patients as DICA 2 and 211 (12.8%) patients as DICA 3. The median follow-up was 24 (9–38) months. Acute diverticulitis (AD) occurred/recurred in 263 (15.9%) patients; surgery was necessary in 57 (21.7%) cases. DICA was the only factor significantly associated to the occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis and surgery either at univariate (χ2 = 405.029; p < 0.0001) or multivariate analysis (hazard ratio = 4.319, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.639–5.126; p < 0.0001). Only in DICA 2 patients was therapy effective for prevention of AD occurrence/recurrence with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.598 (0.391–0.914) (p = 0.006, log rank test). Mesalazine-based therapies reduced the risk of AD occurrence/recurrence and needs of surgery with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.2103 (0.122–0.364) and 0.459 (0.258–0.818), respectively. Conclusions DICA classification is a valid parameter to predict the risk of diverticulitis occurrence/recurrence in patients suffering from diverticular disease of the colon. PMID:27536372

  19. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Louise E.; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  20. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Louise E; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question.

  1. Salvage surgery in post-chemoradiation laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma: outcome and review.

    PubMed

    Putten, L; Bree, R; Doornaert, P A; Buter, J; Eerenstein, S E J; Rietveld, D H F; Kuik, D J; Leemans, C R

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate recurrence patterns of hypopharyngeal and laryngeal carcinoma after chemoradiation and options for salvage surgery, with special emphasis on elderly patients. In a retrospective study all patients who underwent chemoradiation for hypopharyngeal and laryngeal carcinoma in a tertiary care academic center from 1990 through 2010 were evaluated. Primary outcome measures were the survival and complication rates of patients undergoing salvage surgery, especially in elderly patients. Secondary outcome measures were the predictors for salvage surgery for patients with locoregional recurrence after failed chemoradiotherapy. A review of the literature was performed. Of the 136 included patients, 60 patients had recurrent locoregional disease, of whom 22 underwent salvage surgery. Fifteen patients underwent a total laryngectomy with neck dissection(s) and 7 neck dissection without primary tumour surgery. Independent predictors for salvage surgery within the group of 60 patients with recurrent disease, were age under the median of 59 years (p = 0.036) and larynx vs. hypopharynx (p = 0.002) in multivariate analyses. The complication rate was 68% (14% major and 54% minor), with fistulas in 23% of the patients. Significantly more wound related complications occurred in patients with current excessive alcohol use (p = 0.04). Five-year disease free control rate of 35%, overall survival rate of 27% and disease specific survival rate of 35% were found. For the 38 patients who were not suitable for salvage surgery, median survival was 12 months. Patients in whom the tumour was controlled had a 5-year overall survival of 70%. In patients selected for salvage surgery age was not predictive for complications and survival. In conclusion, at two years follow-up after chemoradiation 40% of the patients were diagnosed with recurrent locoregional disease. One third underwent salvage surgery with 35% 5-year disease specific survival and 14% major complications

  2. Development of a multivalent, PrP(Sc)-specific prion vaccine through rational optimization of three disease-specific epitopes.

    PubMed

    Marciniuk, Kristen; Määttänen, Pekka; Taschuk, Ryan; Airey, T Dean; Potter, Andrew; Cashman, Neil R; Griebel, Philip; Napper, Scott

    2014-04-01

    Prion diseases represent a novel form of infectivity caused by the propagated misfolding of a self-protein (PrP(C)) into a pathological, infectious conformation (PrP(Sc)). Efforts to develop a prion vaccine have been complicated by challenges and potential dangers associated with induction of strong immune responses to a self protein. There is considerable value in the development of vaccines that are specifically targeted to the misfolded conformation. Conformation specific immunotherapy depends on identification and optimization of disease-specific epitopes (DSEs)(1) that are uniquely exposed upon misfolding. Previously, we reported development of a PrP(Sc)-specific vaccine through empirical expansions of a YYR DSE. Here we describe optimization of two additional prion DSEs, YML of β-sheet 1 and a rigid loop (RL) linking β-sheet 2 to α-helix 2, through in silico predictions of B cell epitopes and further translation of these epitopes into PrP(Sc)-specific vaccines. The optimized YML and RL vaccines retain their properties of immunogenicity, specificity and safety when delivered individually or in a multivalent format. This investigation supports the utility of combining DSE prediction models with algorithms to infer logical peptide expansions to optimize immunogenicity. Incorporation of optimized DSEs into established vaccine formulation and delivery strategies enables rapid development of peptide-based vaccines for protein misfolding diseases.

  3. Disease-specific self-efficacy in the eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ballou, Sarah; Taft, Tiffany; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-08-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGIDs) are chronic inflammatory conditions with increasing global prevalence. Self-efficacy is important for patients' ability to manage chronic disease. We sought to evaluate disease-specific self-efficacy in the EGIDs via a modified version of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Self-Efficacy Scale (IBD-SES). Ninety-one Participants reported demographic, clinical, and psychosocial variables. The IBD-SES demonstrated excellent reliability and validity in this population. Self-efficacy was higher in men, patients with less severe disease, and those who had consulted a dietitian. The IBD-SES is a useful measure of disease-specific self-efficacy in the EGIDs. Further research is necessary to understand the role of self-efficacy in the management of these illnesses.

  4. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  5. Identification of disease-specific motifs in the antibody specificity repertoire via next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pantazes, Robert J; Reifert, Jack; Bozekowski, Joel; Ibsen, Kelly N; Murray, Joseph A; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific antibodies can serve as highly effective biomarkers but have been identified for only a relatively small number of autoimmune diseases. A method was developed to identify disease-specific binding motifs through integration of bacterial display peptide library screening, next-generation sequencing (NGS) and computational analysis. Antibody specificity repertoires were determined by identifying bound peptide library members for each specimen using cell sorting and performing NGS. A computational algorithm, termed Identifying Motifs Using Next- generation sequencing Experiments (IMUNE), was developed and applied to discover disease- and healthy control-specific motifs. IMUNE performs comprehensive pattern searches, identifies patterns statistically enriched in the disease or control groups and clusters the patterns to generate motifs. Using celiac disease sera as a discovery set, IMUNE identified a consensus motif (QPEQPF[PS]E) with high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in a validation sera set, in addition to novel motifs. Peptide display and sequencing (Display-Seq) coupled with IMUNE analysis may thus be useful to characterize antibody repertoires and identify disease-specific antibody epitopes and biomarkers. PMID:27481573

  6. Identification of disease-specific motifs in the antibody specificity repertoire via next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Pantazes, Robert J.; Reifert, Jack; Bozekowski, Joel; Ibsen, Kelly N.; Murray, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Patrick S.

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific antibodies can serve as highly effective biomarkers but have been identified for only a relatively small number of autoimmune diseases. A method was developed to identify disease-specific binding motifs through integration of bacterial display peptide library screening, next-generation sequencing (NGS) and computational analysis. Antibody specificity repertoires were determined by identifying bound peptide library members for each specimen using cell sorting and performing NGS. A computational algorithm, termed Identifying Motifs Using Next- generation sequencing Experiments (IMUNE), was developed and applied to discover disease- and healthy control-specific motifs. IMUNE performs comprehensive pattern searches, identifies patterns statistically enriched in the disease or control groups and clusters the patterns to generate motifs. Using celiac disease sera as a discovery set, IMUNE identified a consensus motif (QPEQPF[PS]E) with high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in a validation sera set, in addition to novel motifs. Peptide display and sequencing (Display-Seq) coupled with IMUNE analysis may thus be useful to characterize antibody repertoires and identify disease-specific antibody epitopes and biomarkers. PMID:27481573

  7. The Validity of Disease-specific Quality of Life Attributions Among Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ware, John E.; Gandek, Barbara; Allison, Jeroan

    2016-01-01

    Background A crucial assumption underlying all disease-specific quality of life (QOL) measures, that patients can validly differentiate a specific disease in the presence of multiple chronic conditions, has not been tested using multiple methods. Our objective was to evaluate the convergent and discriminant validity of QOL attributions to specific diseases among adults with multiple chronic conditions (MCC). Methods Adults age 18 and older (N=4,480) sampled from eight pre-identified condition groups (asthma, COPD, angina/MI with angina, congestive heart failure, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis) completed an Internet survey. Comorbid conditions were determined using a 35-condition checklist. Product-moment correlations were analyzed separately by pre-identified condition group using the multitrait-multimethod of construct validation, where traits were defined by 9–26 conditions and each condition was measured by two methods: disease severity rating and Disease-specific Quality of Life Impact Scale (QDIS) global rating. A third method (symptom or clinical marker) was available for the eight pre-identified conditions. Convergent validity was supported when correlations among different methods of measuring the same condition (trait) were substantial (r≥0.40). Discriminant validity was supported when correlations between the same and different methods of measuring different conditions were significantly lower than corresponding convergent correlations. Results In support of convergent validity, 22 of 24 convergent correlations were substantial (r=0.38–0.84, median=0.53). In support of discriminant validity, 833 of 924 tests (90.2%) yielded significantly higher convergent than discriminant correlations across the eight pre-identified conditions. Exceptions to this pattern of results were most often observed for comorbid conditions within the same clinical area. Conclusions Collectively, convergent and discriminant test results

  8. Disease-specific quality-of-life measurement tools for haemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Remor, E; Young, N L; Von Mackensen, S; Lopatina, E G

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the state of the art in measuring quality of life in haemophila populations. The paper reviews the measures recently included in haemophila trials in the published literature. It also summarizes the development of four new disease-specific measures of health-related quality of life. Two of these were developed for children (the Haemo-QoL and the CHO-KLAT), and two for adults (the Hemofilia-QoL and the Hemolatin-QoL). These new measures show promise for use in clinical trials. Further research is in progress to complete the psychometric testing and cross-cultural validation.

  9. Macrovascular complications in pregnancy and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Rakesh Kumar; Pydi, Venu Madhavi

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses macrovascular conditions which may occur during pregnancy complicated by diabetes. It describes the effect of dyslipidaemia and hypertension on foeto-maternal outcomes and explores the pathogenesis of these states. PMID:27582155

  10. Retrospective observational study to assess the clinical management and outcomes of hospitalised patients with complicated urinary tract infection in countries with high prevalence of multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria (RESCUING)

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Evelyn; Addy, Ibironke; Stoddart, Margaret; Vank, Christiane; Grier, Sally; Wiegand, Irith; Leibovici, Leonard; Eliakim-Raz, Noa; Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Morris, Stephen; MacGowan, Alasdair; Carratalà, Jordi; Pujol, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria (GNB), including carbapenemase-producing strains, has become a major therapeutic challenge. These MDR isolates are often involved in complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI), and are associated with poor clinical outcomes. The study has been designed to gain insight into the epidemiology, clinical management, outcome and healthcare cost of patients with cUTI, especially in countries with high prevalence of MDR GNB. Methods and analysis This multinational and multicentre observational, retrospective study will identify cases from 1 January 2013 to 31 December 2014 in order to collect data on patients with cUTI as a cause of hospital admission, and patients who develop cUTI during their hospital stay. The primary end point will be treatment failure defined as the presence of any of the following criteria: (1) signs or symptoms of cUTI present at diagnosis that have not improved by days 5–7 with appropriate antibiotic therapy, (2) new cUTI-related symptoms that have developed within 30 days of diagnosis, (3) urine culture taken within 30 days of diagnosis, either during or after completion of therapy, that grows ≥104 colony-forming unit/mL of the original pathogen and (4) death irrespective of cause within 30 days of the cUTI diagnosis. Sample size 1000 patients afford a power of 0.83 (α=0.05) to detect an absolute difference of 10% in the treatment failure rate between MDR bacteria and other pathogens. This should allow for the introduction of about 20 independent risk factors (or their interaction) in a logistic regression model looking at risk factors for failure. Ethics and dissemination Approval will be sought from all relevant Research Ethics Committees. Publication of this study will be considered as a joint publication by the participating investigator leads, and will follow the recommendations of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). Trial

  11. Periorbital Injectables: Understanding and Avoiding Complications

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Catherine J

    2016-01-01

    Periorbital rejuvenation with neurotoxins and dermal fillers address several aging changes. Safe and effective results require a thorough understanding of periorbital anatomy, proper injection techniques, and complications of these products. Prompt recognition and treatment of complications can minimize their adverse impacts. Complications can be divided into ischaemic and non-ischaemic effects. Hylauronidase, an enzyme that degrades hyaluronic acid, may improve outcomes after intravascular hyaluronic acid fillers. PMID:27398006

  12. Complications from international surgery tourism.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Mark M; Alizadeh, Kaveh

    2011-08-01

    Medical tourism is an increasing trend, particularly in cosmetic surgery. Complications resulting from these procedures can be quite disruptive to the healthcare industry in the United States since patients often seek treatment and have no compensation recourse from insurance. Despite the increasing number of plastic surgery patients seeking procedures abroad, there have been little reported data concerning outcomes, follow-up, or complication rates. Through a survey of American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) members, the authors provide data on trends to help define the scope of the problem. PMID:21813883

  13. Complications from international surgery tourism.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Mark M; Alizadeh, Kaveh

    2011-08-01

    Medical tourism is an increasing trend, particularly in cosmetic surgery. Complications resulting from these procedures can be quite disruptive to the healthcare industry in the United States since patients often seek treatment and have no compensation recourse from insurance. Despite the increasing number of plastic surgery patients seeking procedures abroad, there have been little reported data concerning outcomes, follow-up, or complication rates. Through a survey of American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) members, the authors provide data on trends to help define the scope of the problem.

  14. Bringing prosocial values to translational, disease-specific stem cell research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Disease-specific stem cell therapies, created from induced pluripotent stem cell lines containing the genetic defects responsible for a particular disease, have the potential to revolutionize the treatment of refractory chronic diseases. Given their capacity to differentiate into any human cell type, these cell lines might be reprogrammed to correct a disease-causing genetic defect in any tissue or organ, in addition to offering a more clinically realistic model for testing new drugs and studying disease mechanisms. Clinical translation of these therapies provides an opportunity to design a more systematic, accessible and patient-influenced model for the delivery of medically innovative treatments to chronically ill patients. Discussion I focus on disease-specific cell therapies because the types of patients who would benefit from them have congenital, severe, high-maintenance chronic conditions. They accordingly have a very strong claim for medical need and therapeutic intervention, must interact regularly with health providers, and so have the greatest stake in influencing, at a systemic level, the way their care is delivered. Given such patients’ shared, aggregate needs for societal support and access to medical innovation, they constitute “patient communities”. To reify the relevance of patient communities within a clinical context, I propose competitive grants or “prizes” to spur innovation in delivery of care, promoting “prosocial” values of transparency, equity, patient empowerment, and patient-provider and inter-institutional collaboration. As facilitators of participant-driven advocacy for health and quality of life-improving measures, patient communities may be synergistic with the broad-based, geo-culturally embedded public health networks typically referred to as “communities” in the public health literature. Summary Prosocial values acquire a strong ethical justification based on shared need, and can be clearly defined as

  15. A situational approach to the design of a patient-oriented disease-specific knowledge base.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Matthew I.; Ladenson, Paul; Johnson, Kevin B.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a situational approach to the organization of disease-specific information that seeks to provide patients with targeted access to content in a knowledge base. Our approach focuses on dividing a defined knowledge base into sections corresponding to discrete clinical events associated with the evaluation and treatment of a specific disorder. Common reasons for subspecialty referral are used to generate situational statements that serve as entry points into the knowledge base. Each section includes defining questions generated using keywords associated with specific topics. Defining questions are linked to patient-focused answers. Evaluation of a thyroid cancer web site designed using this approach has identified high ratings for usability, relevance, and comprehension of retrieved information. This approach may be particularly useful in the development of resources for newly diagnosed patients. PMID:12463852

  16. TALEN-mediated generation and genetic correction of disease-specific human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Sivaprakash; Annaluru, Narayana; Kandavelou, Karthikeyan; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Generation and precise genetic correction of patient-derived hiPSCs have great potential in regenerative medicine. Such targeted genetic manipulations can now be achieved using gene-editing nucleases. Here, we report generation of cystic fibrosis (CF) and Gaucher's disease (GD) hiPSCs respectively from CF (homozygous for CFTRΔF508 mutation) and Type II GD [homozygous for β-glucocerebrosidase (GBA) 1448T>C mutation] patient fibroblasts, using CCR5- specific TALENs. Site-specific addition of loxP-flanked Oct4/Sox2/Klf4/Lin28/Nanog/eGFP gene cassette at the endogenous CCR5 site of patient-derived disease-specific primary fibroblasts induced reprogramming, giving rise to both monoallele (heterozygous) and biallele CCR5-modified hiPSCs. Subsequent excision of the donor cassette was done by treating CCR5-modified CF and GD hiPSCs with Cre. We also demonstrate site-specific correction of sickle cell disease (SCD) mutations at the endogenous HBB locus of patient-specific hiPSCs [TNC1 line that is homozygous for mutated β- globin alleles (βS/βS)], using HBB-specific TALENs. SCD-corrected hiPSC lines showed gene conversion of the mutated βS to the wild-type βA in one of the HBB alleles, while the other allele remained a mutant phenotype. After excision of the loxP-flanked DNA cassette from the SCD-corrected hiPSC lines using Cre, we obtained secondary heterozygous βS/βA hiPSCs, which express the wild-type (βA) transcript to 30-40% level as compared to uncorrected (βS/βS) SCD hiPSCs when differentiated into erythroid cells. Furthermore, we also show that TALEN-mediated generation and genetic correction of disease-specific hiPSCs did not induce any off-target mutations at closely related sites.

  17. Agreement between a generic and disease-specific quality-of-life instrument: the 15D and the SGRQ in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Ritva, K; Pekka, R; Harri, S

    2000-01-01

    The generic health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instrument 15D, and the disease-specific St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) were highly correlated in cross-sectional and in follow-up data among asthmatic patients. However, a high correlation does not mean that these instruments yield similar results about outcome. We measured among 134 asthmatic patients the mathematical relationship between the changes in the scores of these instruments by regression techniques and agreement by cross-tabulation. The prospective data included measurements at baseline and at one, three and five years. The three measurements of change in HRQOL were compared with the baseline. There was a close mathematical relationship between the scores, but it was affected significantly by confounding factors such as patient's age, gender and smoking habits. The instruments agreed on the direction of change in HRQOL (positive or negative) in 64.8% of patients, while in 15.8% the changes were in opposite direction. There was a statistically significant difference in indicating the direction of changes (improvement or decline) of these instruments. The changes in the SGRQ scores agreed slightly better than those in the 15D with the changes in clinical parameters. The conclusion was that these instruments do not necessarily yield similar results of effectiveness. Therefore, the choice of HRQOL instrument may influence the economic attractiveness of different asthma interventions. The disease-specific SGRQ agreed slightly better than the generic 15D with the changes in clinical parameters. PMID:11332228

  18. Surgery for Diabetic Eye Complications.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, María H; Acaba, Luis A; Acaba, Alexandra

    2016-10-01

    New modalities for the treatment of diabetic eye complications have emerged in the past decade. Nevertheless, many severe diabetic retinopathy complications can only be treated with vitreoretinal surgery. Technological advances in pars plana vitrectomy have expanded the gamut of pathologies that can be successfully treated with surgery. The most common pathologies managed surgically include vitreous opacities and traction retinal detachment. The indications, surgical objectives, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, microincisional surgical techniques, and outcomes of diabetic vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetic tractional retinal detachment will be discussed. With the availability of new microincisional vitrectomy technology, wide angle microscope viewing systems, and pharmacologic agents, vitrectomy can improve visual acuity and achieve long-term anatomic stability in eyes with severe complications from proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Complications of measles during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Atmar, R L; Englund, J A; Hammill, H

    1992-01-01

    Twelve pregnant women and one woman who had just given birth were hospitalized with measles in Houston between 1988 and 1990. The most common and serious maternal complication was pneumonitis (seven patients). Other maternal complications included hepatitis (seven patients), premature labor (four patients), spontaneous abortion (one patient), and death (one patient). For four of 13 patients, all of whom had severe measles and pneumonitis due to measles virus, an adverse fetal outcome such as abortion or prematurity was associated with their conditions. Historical accounts describing maternal sequelae of measles have suggested more severe disease in pregnant women, although this observation has not always been confirmed by more recent reports in developed countries. The clinical course in our patients suggests that measles during pregnancy may be associated with serious complications.

  20. Surgery for Diabetic Eye Complications.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, María H; Acaba, Luis A; Acaba, Alexandra

    2016-10-01

    New modalities for the treatment of diabetic eye complications have emerged in the past decade. Nevertheless, many severe diabetic retinopathy complications can only be treated with vitreoretinal surgery. Technological advances in pars plana vitrectomy have expanded the gamut of pathologies that can be successfully treated with surgery. The most common pathologies managed surgically include vitreous opacities and traction retinal detachment. The indications, surgical objectives, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, microincisional surgical techniques, and outcomes of diabetic vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetic tractional retinal detachment will be discussed. With the availability of new microincisional vitrectomy technology, wide angle microscope viewing systems, and pharmacologic agents, vitrectomy can improve visual acuity and achieve long-term anatomic stability in eyes with severe complications from proliferative diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27612846

  1. The Liver Disease Symptom Index 2.0; validation of a disease-specific questionnaire.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Simone M; Hansen, Bettina E; de Boer, Josien B; Stijnen, Theo; Passchier, Jan; de Man, Rob A; Schalm, Solko W

    2004-10-01

    The available liver disease-specific questionnaires do address severity of symptoms but hardly evaluate how patients experience these specific symptoms during daily activities. The Liver Disease Symptom Index 2.0 (LDSI) includes 18 items that measure symptom severity and symptom hindrance in the past week. In a large survey (n = 1175) conducted in collaboration with the Dutch liver patient association, convergent and divergent construct validity and the surplus value of including symptom severity and symptom hindrance items in the LDSI were examined. The LDSI items showed expected convergent and divergent correlations with Short Form-36 (SF-36) and Multidimensional Fatigue Index-20 (MFI-20) scales. Correlations revealed only a slight to moderate overlap between LDSI items and SF-36 and MFI-20 scales. The impact of symptom severity and symptom hindrance on generic health related quality of life (HRQoL) varied in a different way across liver patients, which indicated that symptom severity items and the symptom hindrance items measure different aspects of HRQoL. We conclude that the LDSI provides information complementary to the information given by the SF-36 and the MFI-20 and that it is psychometrically sound to include both symptom severity items and symptom hindrance items in the LDSI. PMID:15503842

  2. Pathophysiology of childhood polycystic kidney diseases: new insights into disease-specific therapy.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, William E; Avner, Ellis D

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in children and young adults. ADPKD, with an incidence of 1:400 to 1:1,000, affects more than 13 million individuals worldwide and is a major cause of end-stage renal disease in adults. However, symptomatic disease is increasingly recognized in children. ARPKD is a dual-organ hepatorenal disease with an incidence of 1:20,000 to 1:40,000 and a heterozygote carrier rate of 1 in 70. Currently, no clinically significant disease-specific therapy exists for ADPKD or ARPKD. The genetic basis of both ADPKD and ARPKD have been identified, and delineation of the basic molecular and cellular pathophysiology has led to the discovery that abnormal ADPKD and ARPKD gene products interact to create "polycystin complexes" located at multiple sites within affected cells. The extracellular matrix and vessels produce a variety of soluble factors that affect the biology of adjacent cells in many dynamic ways. This review will focus on the molecular and cellular bases of the abnormal cystic phenotype and discuss the clinical translation of such basic data into new therapies that promise to alter the natural history of disease for children with genetic PKDs.

  3. Disease-specific target gene expression profiling of molecular imaging probes: database development and clinical validation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lawrence Wing-Chi; Ngo, Connie Hiu-Ching; Wang, Fengfeng; Zhao, Moss Y; Zhao, Mengying; Law, Helen Ka-Wai; Wong, Sze Chuen Cesar; Yung, Benjamin Yat-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging probes can target abnormal gene expression patterns in patients and allow early diagnosis of disease. For selecting a suitable imaging probe, the current Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD) provides descriptive and qualitative information on imaging probe characteristics and properties. However, MICAD does not support linkage with the expression profiles of target genes. The proposed Disease-specific Imaging Probe Profiling (DIPP) database quantitatively archives and presents the gene expression profiles of targets across different diseases, anatomic regions, and subcellular locations, providing an objective reference for selecting imaging probes. The DIPP database was validated with a clinical positron emission tomography (PET) study on lung cancer and an in vitro study on neuroendocrine cancer. The retrieved records show that choline kinase beta and glucose transporters were positively and significantly associated with lung cancer among the targets of 11C-choline and [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-2-d-glucose (FDG), respectively. Their significant overexpressions corresponded to the findings that the uptake rate of FDG increased with tumor size but that of 11C-choline remained constant. Validated with the in vitro study, the expression profiles of disease-associated targets can indicate the eligibility of patients for clinical trials of the treatment probe. A Web search tool of the DIPP database is available at http://www.polyu.edu.hk/bmi/dipp/. PMID:25022454

  4. Natural and disease-specific autoantibodies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Daffa, N I; Tighe, P J; Corne, J M; Fairclough, L C; Todd, I

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmunity may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Studies have identified disease-specific autoantibodies (DSAAbs) in COPD patients, but natural autoantibodies (NAAbs) may also play a role. Previous studies have concentrated on circulating autoantibodies, but lung-associated autoantibodies may be most important. Our aim was to investigate NAAbs and DSAAbs in the circulation and lungs of COPD smoking (CS) patients compared to smokers (S) without airway obstruction and subjects who have never smoked (NS). Immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies that bind to lung tissue components were significantly lower in the circulation of CS patients than NS (with intermediate levels in S), as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The levels of antibodies to collagen-1 (the major lung collagen) detected by ELISA were also reduced significantly in CS patients' sera compared to NS. The detection of these antibodies in NS subjects indicates that they are NAAbs. The occurrence of DSAAbs in some CS patients and S subjects was indicated by high levels of serum IgG antibodies to cytokeratin-18 and collagen-5; furthermore, antibodies to collagen-5 eluted from homogenized lung tissue exposed to low pH (0·1 M glycine, pH 2·8) were raised significantly in CS compared to S and NS. Thus, this study supports a role in COPD for both NAAbs and DSAAbs.

  5. Does targeted, disease-specific public research funding influence pharmaceutical innovation?

    PubMed

    Blume-Kohout, Margaret E

    2012-01-01

    Public funding for biomedical research is often justified as a means to encourage development of more (and better) treatments for disease. However, few studies have investigated the relationship between these expenditures and downstream pharmaceutical innovation. In particular, although recent analyses have shown a clear contribution of federally funded research to drug development, there exists little evidence to suggest that increasing targeted public research funding for any specific disease will result in increased development of drugs to treat that disease. This paper evaluates the impact of changes in the allocation of U. S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) extramural research grant funding across diseases on the number of drugs entering clinical testing to treat those diseases, using new longitudinal data on NIH extramural research grants awarded by disease for years 1975 through 2006. Results from a variety of distributed lag models indicate that a sustained 10 percent increase in targeted, disease-specific NIH funding yields approximately a 4. 5 percent increase in the number of related drugs entering clinical testing (phase I trials) after a lag of up to 12 years, reflecting the continuing influence of NIH funding on discovery and testing of new molecular entities. In contrast, we do not see evidence that increases in NIH extramural grant funding for research focused on specific diseases will increase the number of related treatments investigated in the more expensive, late-stage (phase III) trials.

  6. Disease-specific adaptive immune biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease and related pathologies.

    PubMed

    Dorothée, G; Sarazin, M; Aucouturier, P

    2013-10-01

    Identification of disease-specific diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers allowing for an early characterization and accurate clinical follow-up of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients is a major clinical objective. Increasing evidences implicate both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses in the pathophysiology of AD. Such disease-related B- and T-cell responses constitute a promising source of potential specific early biomarkers. Among them, levels of anti-Aβ antibodies in the serum and/or cerebrospinal fluid of patients may correlate with AD progression, clinical presentation of the disease, and occurrence of associated pathologies related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy. In the same line, Aβ-specific T cell responses and immune regulatory populations implicated in their modulation appear to play a role in the pathophysiology of AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Further characterization of both autoantibodies and T cell responses specific for disease-related proteins, i.e. Aβ and hyperphosphorylated Tau, will allow better deciphering their interest as early diagnostic and prognostic markers in AD. Biomarkers of adaptive immune responses specific for other pathological proteins may also apply to other neurological disorders associated with abnormal protein deposition.

  7. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  8. Clinical Outcome of Sacral Chordoma With Carbon Ion Radiotherapy Compared With Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshihiro; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Hideshi; Shido, Yoji; Wasa, Junji; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy, post-treatment function, toxicity, and complications of carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) for sacral chordoma compared with surgery. Methods and Materials: The records of 17 primary sacral chordoma patients treated since 1990 with surgery (n = 10) or carbon ion RT (n = 7) were retrospectively analyzed for disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, complications, and functional outcome. The applied carbon ion dose ranged from 54.0 Gray equivalent (GyE) to 73.6 GyE (median 70.4). Results: The mean age at treatment was 55 years for the surgery group and 65 years for the carbon ion RT group. The median duration of follow-up was 76 months for the surgery group and 49 months for the carbon ion RT group. The local recurrence-free survival rate at 5 years was 62.5% for the surgery and 100% for the carbon ion RT group, and the disease-specific survival rate at 5 years was 85.7% and 53.3%, respectively. Urinary-anorectal function worsened in 6 patients (60%) in the surgery group, but it was unchanged in all the patients who had undergone carbon ion RT. Postoperative wound complications requiring reoperation occurred in 3 patients (30%) after surgery and in 1 patient (14%) after carbon ion RT. The functional outcome evaluated using the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society scoring system revealed 55% in the surgery group and 75% in the carbon ion RT group. Of the six factors in this scoring system, the carbon ion RT group had significantly greater scores in emotional acceptance than did the surgery group. Conclusion: Carbon ion RT results in a high local control rate and preservation of urinary-anorectal function compared with surgery.

  9. Identification of Disease Specific Pathways Using in Vivo SILAC Proteomics in Dystrophin Deficient mdx Mouse*

    PubMed Central

    Rayavarapu, Sree; Coley, William; Cakir, Erdinc; Jahnke, Vanessa; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Grodish-Dressman, Heather; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Brown, Kristy J.; Hathout, Yetrib; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked neuromuscular disorder caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. DMD is characterized by progressive weakness of skeletal, cardiac, and respiratory muscles. The molecular mechanisms underlying dystrophy-associated muscle weakness and damage are not well understood. Quantitative proteomics techniques could help to identify disease-specific pathways. Recent advances in the in vivo labeling strategies such as stable isotope labeling in mouse (SILAC mouse) with 13C6-lysine or stable isotope labeling in mammals (SILAM) with 15N have enabled accurate quantitative analysis of the proteomes of whole organs and tissues as a function of disease. Here we describe the use of the SILAC mouse strategy to define the underlying pathological mechanisms in dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle. Differential SILAC proteome profiling was performed on the gastrocnemius muscles of 3-week-old (early stage) dystrophin-deficient mdx mice and wild-type (normal) mice. The generated data were further confirmed in an independent set of mdx and normal mice using a SILAC spike-in strategy. A total of 789 proteins were quantified; of these, 73 were found to be significantly altered between mdx and normal mice (p < 0.05). Bioinformatics analyses using Ingenuity Pathway software established that the integrin-linked kinase pathway, actin cytoskeleton signaling, mitochondrial energy metabolism, and calcium homeostasis are the pathways initially affected in dystrophin-deficient muscle at early stages of pathogenesis. The key proteins involved in these pathways were validated by means of immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry in independent sets of mdx mice and in human DMD muscle biopsies. The specific involvement of these molecular networks early in dystrophic pathology makes them potential therapeutic targets. In sum, our findings indicate that SILAC mouse strategy has uncovered previously unidentified pathological pathways in mouse models of human

  10. Dairy intake after prostate cancer diagnosis in relation to disease-specific and total mortality.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Kenfield, Stacey A; Van Blarigan, Erin L; Wilson, Kathryn M; Batista, Julie L; Sesso, Howard D; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir J; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2015-11-15

    Information regarding postdiagnostic dairy intake and prostate cancer survival is limited. We evaluated intake of total, high-fat and low-fat dairy after prostate cancer diagnosis in relation to disease-specific and total mortality. We included 926 men from the Physicians' Health Study diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer between 1982 and 2000 who completed a diet questionnaire a median of 5 years after diagnosis and were followed thereafter for a median of 10 years to assess mortality. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate associations between dairy intake and prostate cancer specific and all-cause mortality. During 8,903 person-years of follow-up, 333 men died, 56 due to prostate cancer. Men consuming ≥3 servings/day of total dairy products had a 76% higher risk of total mortality and a 141% higher risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality compared to men who consumed less than 1 dairy product/day (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21, 2.55, ptrend  < 0.001 for total mortality; HR = 2.41, 95% CI: 0.96, 6.02, ptrend  = 0.04 for prostate cancer-specific mortality). The association between high-fat dairy and mortality risk appeared to be stronger than that of low-fat dairy, but the difference between them was not statistically significant (p for difference = 0.57 for prostate cancer-specific mortality and 0.56 for total mortality). Among men without metastases when diagnosed, higher intake of dairy foods after prostate cancer diagnosis may be associated with increased prostate cancer-specific and all-cause mortality.

  11. Dietary patterns after prostate cancer diagnosis in relation to disease-specific and total mortality.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Kenfield, Stacey A; Van Blarigan, Erin L; Batista, Julie L; Sesso, Howard D; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir J; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2015-06-01

    Men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer have a long life expectancy, and many die of unrelated causes. It is therefore important to know to what extent post-diagnostic diet may affect disease-specific and overall mortality. A total of 926 men participating in the Physicians' Health Study diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer completed diet questionnaires for a median of 5.1 years after diagnosis, and were followed thereafter to assess mortality for a median of 9.9 years since questionnaire completion. Two post-diagnostic dietary patterns were identified: a Prudent pattern, characterized by higher intake of vegetables, fruits, fish, legumes, and whole grains; and a Western pattern, characterized by higher intake of processed and red meats, high-fat dairy and refined grains. Cox regression was used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). During 8,093 person-years of follow-up, 333 men died, 56 (17%) of prostate cancer. The Western pattern was significantly related to a higher risk of prostate cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. Comparing men in the highest versus the lowest quartile of the Western pattern, the HRs were 2.53 (95% CI, 1.00-6.42; Ptrend = 0.02) for prostate cancer-specific mortality and 1.67 (95% CI, 1.16-2.42; Ptrend = 0.01) for all-cause mortality. The Prudent pattern was associated with a significantly lower all-cause mortality (HRQuartile 4 vs. Quartile 1: 0.64; 95% CI, 0.44-0.93; Ptrend = 0.02); the relationship with prostate cancer-specific mortality was inverse but not statistically significant. A post-diagnostic Western dietary pattern was associated with higher prostate cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, whereas a Prudent dietary pattern was related to lower all-cause mortality after prostate cancer diagnosis.

  12. Dietary patterns after prostate cancer diagnosis in relation to disease-specific and total mortality

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meng; Kenfield, Stacey A.; Van Blarigan, Erin L.; Batista, Julie L.; Sesso, Howard D.; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir J.; Chavarro, Jorge E.

    2015-01-01

    Men diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer have a long life expectancy and many die of unrelated causes. It is therefore important to know to what extent post-diagnostic diet may impact disease-specific and overall mortality. 926 men participating in the Physicians' Health Study diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer completed diet questionnaires a median of 5.1 years after diagnosis, and were followed thereafter to assess mortality for a median of 9.9 years since questionnaire completion. Two post-diagnostic dietary patterns were identified: a Prudent pattern, characterized by higher intake of vegetables, fruits, fish, legumes, and whole grains; and a Western pattern, characterized by higher intake of processed and red meats, high-fat dairy and refined grains. Cox regression was used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During 8,093 person-years of follow-up, 333 men died, 56 (17%) of prostate cancer. The Western pattern was significantly related to a higher risk of prostate cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. Comparing men in the highest versus the lowest quartile of the Western pattern, the HRs were 2.53 (95%CI: 1.00-6.42; Ptrend=0.02) for prostate cancer-specific mortality and 1.67 (95%CI: 1.16-2.42; Ptrend=0.01) for all-cause mortality. The Prudent pattern was associated with a significantly lower all-cause mortality (HRQuartile 4 vs Quartile 1: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.44-0.93; Ptrend=0.02); the relationship with prostate cancer-specific mortality was inverse but not statistically significant. Post-diagnostic Western dietary pattern was associated with higher prostate cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, whereas a Prudent dietary pattern was related to lower all-cause mortality after prostate cancer diagnosis. PMID:26031631

  13. Longitudinal Algorithms to Estimate Cardiorespiratory Fitness: Associations with Nonfatal Cardiovascular Disease and Disease-Specific Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Artero, Enrique G.; Jackson, Andrew S.; Sui, Xuemei; Lee, Duck-chul; O’Connor, Daniel P.; Lavie, Carl J.; Church, Timothy S.; Blair, Steven N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To predict risk for non-fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) and disease-specific mortality using CRF algorithms that do not involve exercise testing. Background Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is not routinely measured, as it requires trained personnel and specialized equipment. Methods Participants were 43,356 adults (21% women) from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study followed between 1974 and 2003. Estimated CRF was based on sex, age, body mass index, waist circumference, resting heart rate, physical activity level and smoking status. Actual CRF was measured by a maximal treadmill test. Results During a median follow-up of 14.5 years, 1,934 deaths occurred, 627 due to CVD. In a sub-sample of 18,095 participants, 1,049 cases of non-fatal CVD events were ascertained. After adjusting for potential confounders, both measured CRF and estimated CRF were inversely associated with risk of all-cause mortality, CVD mortality and non-fatal CVD incidence in men, and with all-cause mortality and non-fatal CVD in women. The risk reduction per 1-metabolic equivalent (MET) increase ranged approximately from 10 to 20 %. Measured CRF had a slightly better discriminative ability (c-statistic) than estimated CRF, and the net reclassification improvement (NRI) of measured CRF vs. estimated CRF was 12.3% in men (p<0.05) and 19.8% in women (p<0.001). Conclusions These algorithms utilize information routinely collected to obtain an estimate of CRF that provides a valid indication of health status. In addition to identifying people at risk, this method can provide more appropriate exercise recommendations that reflect initial CRF levels. PMID:24703924

  14. Identification of disease specific pathways using in vivo SILAC proteomics in dystrophin deficient mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Rayavarapu, Sree; Coley, William; Cakir, Erdinc; Jahnke, Vanessa; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Grodish-Dressman, Heather; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Hoffman, Eric P; Brown, Kristy J; Hathout, Yetrib; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked neuromuscular disorder caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. DMD is characterized by progressive weakness of skeletal, cardiac, and respiratory muscles. The molecular mechanisms underlying dystrophy-associated muscle weakness and damage are not well understood. Quantitative proteomics techniques could help to identify disease-specific pathways. Recent advances in the in vivo labeling strategies such as stable isotope labeling in mouse (SILAC mouse) with (13)C6-lysine or stable isotope labeling in mammals (SILAM) with (15)N have enabled accurate quantitative analysis of the proteomes of whole organs and tissues as a function of disease. Here we describe the use of the SILAC mouse strategy to define the underlying pathological mechanisms in dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle. Differential SILAC proteome profiling was performed on the gastrocnemius muscles of 3-week-old (early stage) dystrophin-deficient mdx mice and wild-type (normal) mice. The generated data were further confirmed in an independent set of mdx and normal mice using a SILAC spike-in strategy. A total of 789 proteins were quantified; of these, 73 were found to be significantly altered between mdx and normal mice (p < 0.05). Bioinformatics analyses using Ingenuity Pathway software established that the integrin-linked kinase pathway, actin cytoskeleton signaling, mitochondrial energy metabolism, and calcium homeostasis are the pathways initially affected in dystrophin-deficient muscle at early stages of pathogenesis. The key proteins involved in these pathways were validated by means of immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry in independent sets of mdx mice and in human DMD muscle biopsies. The specific involvement of these molecular networks early in dystrophic pathology makes them potential therapeutic targets. In sum, our findings indicate that SILAC mouse strategy has uncovered previously unidentified pathological pathways in mouse models of

  15. Determinants of disease-specific health-related quality of life in Turkish stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Safaz, İsmail; Kesikburun, Serdar; Adigüzel, Emre; Yilmaz, Bilge

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is a worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality that affects health-related quality of life. In this study, our objective was to identify determinants of disease-specific health-related quality of life in Turkish stroke survivors. A total of 114 consecutive patients who experienced a stroke at least 6 months earlier were studied. Health-related quality of life was measured using Stroke-specific Quality of Life (SS-QoL) consisting of 12 domains. Demographic and clinical data were collected, including age, sex, marital status, years of education, time since stroke, whether the patient received rehabilitation before enrollment, stroke etiology, whether the dominant hand was affected or not, presence of vision defect, neglect, aphasia, and dysarthria. The patients were assessed by the functional independence measure (FIM) and the Mini-Mental State Examination. A multiple linear regression analysis was carried out using a stepwise method to determine the predictors of 12 domains and the total score of the SS-QoL. The domains of work, social roles, mobility, and self-care had the lowest SS-QoL scores, whereas the highest scores were for the domains of personality, thinking, language, and vision. The total SS-QoL score was explained by the total FIM and Mini-Mental State Examination. Among the 12 domains, the mobility domain was explained the best (R=0.50) by motor FIM, previously received rehabilitation, and age, followed by the language domain (R=0.37) explained by the presence of aphasia and dysarthria, and previously received rehabilitation. The domains of mood (R=0.13) and upper extremity (R=0.19) were explained the worst. The results indicated that functional independence, age, cognitive status, and receiving a rehabilitation program were the primary determinants of the SS-QoL. PMID:26795717

  16. Radiation complications and tumor control after {sup 125}I plaque brachytherapy for ocular melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Ashley W.; Petersen, Ivy A. . E-mail: petersen.ivy@mayo.edu; Kline, Robert W.; Stafford, Scott L.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Robertson, Dennis M.

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the outcome of {sup 125}I plaque brachytherapy at our institution and identify the risk factors associated with the development of radiation complications, tumor recurrence, and metastasis. Patients and Methods: From 1986 to 2000, 156 patients underwent {sup 125}I episcleral plaque (COMS design) application for the treatment of ocular melanoma. Chart analysis of follow-up ophthalmologic appointments assessed the incidence of ocular side effects after therapy. Statistical analysis assessed outcomes and significant influencing factors. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.2 years, the 5-year overall survival was 83%. The 5-year disease-specific survival was 91%. Initial local control at 5 years was 92%, with 100% ultimate local control after secondary therapy that included 9 enucleations. The risk of metastasis was 10% at 5 years and 27% at 10 years. Vision stayed the same or improved in 25% of patients, and 44% of patients maintained visual acuity better than 20/200. Thirteen percent of patients experienced chronic pain or discomfort in the treated eye. Dose rates to the tumor apex greater than 90 to 100 cGy/h were associated with increased systemic control but worse radiation toxicity. Conclusion: Patients in our series experienced excellent local tumor control. Higher dose rates to the tumor apex were associated with reduced rates of distant metastases but worse ocular function.

  17. Complications in Percutaneous Vertebroplasty Associated with Puncture or Cement Leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Clemens Fuchs, Heiko; Kiwit, Juergen; Westphalen, Kerstin; Hierholzer, Johannes

    2007-04-15

    Due to the minimally invasive character and excellent clinical outcome of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP), the procedure is being performed in greatly increasing numbers. While PVP has a low complication rate in general, severe complications can occur. We focus on the imaging appearance of complications of PVP associated with puncture or cement leakage-from harmless to life-threatening.

  18. Postoperative Complications: Looking Forward to a Safer Future.

    PubMed

    Tevis, Sarah E; Kennedy, Gregory D

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal surgery patients frequently suffer from postoperative complications. Patients with complications have been shown to be at higher risk for mortality, poor oncologic outcomes, additional complications, and worse quality of life. Complications are increasingly recognized as markers of quality of care with more use of risk-adjusted national surgical databases and increasing transparency in health care. Quality improvement work in colorectal surgery has identified methods to decrease complication rates and improve outcomes in this patient population. Future work will continue to identify best practices and standardized ways to measure quality of care. PMID:27582650

  19. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  20. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Go Back Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Email Print + Share The kidneys filter the ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered ...

  1. Pregnancy Complications: Preexisting Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preexisting diabetes Preexisting diabetes E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... and your baby are healthy. What is preexisting diabetes? About 9 out of 100 women (9 percent) ...

  2. Pulmonary Complications due to Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shirinzadeh, Abulfazl; Talebi, Yashar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal carcinoma is the scourge of human beings. Pulmonary complications in patients who have undergone operation are common (20-30% of cases) and there are no suitable tools and ways to predict these complications. Methods During a period of 10 years, from March 1998 to February 2007, 200 patients (150 male and 50 female) underwent Esophagectomy due to esophageal carcinoma in thoracic surgery ward retrospectively. Complications include the length of hospitalization, mechanical ventilation, morbidity and mortality. Patients’ risk factors include age, preoperative chemo-radiotherapy, stage of the disease and preoperative spirometry condition. Results We grouped our patients into three categories: Normal (FEV1 ≥ 80% predicted), mildly impaired (FEV1 65% to 79% predicted), more severely impaired (FEV1 < 65% predicted).Although almost all patients had radiographic pulmonary abnormalities, significant pulmonary complications occurred in 40 patients (20%) which underwent Esophagectomy. Pleural effusion and atelectasia in 160 patients (80%). 24 patients needed chest-tube insertion. 20 patients (10%) developed ARDS. 14 patients (7%) developed chylothorax. 20 patients (10%) of patients died during their postoperative hospital stay. 30 patients (15%) required mechanical ventilation for greater than 48 hours. Conclusion We reviewed a number of preoperative clinical variables to determine whether they contributed to postoperative pulmonary complications as well as other outcomes. In general, age, impaired pulmonary function especially in those patients with FEV1 less than 65% predicted was associated with prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS). In fact pulmonary complications rate after Esophagectomy are high and there was associated mortality and morbidity. PMID:24250962

  3. Bodylifting: indications, technique and complications.

    PubMed

    Jones, B M; Toft, N J

    2008-07-01

    Bodylifting is often considered a high-risk surgical procedure. There is a widely held perception is that the operation is both time consuming and physically demanding for the surgeon, with, potentially, a long recovery and high complication rate for the patient. The senior author's experience of 16 consecutive bodylift procedures does not reflect this. Fourteen female patients and two male patients underwent Lockwood-type bodylifting procedures at two different hospitals over a 5 year period. Patients studied were unsuitable for a standard abdominoplasty either because of excess lateral abdominal tissue, or had undergone significant weight loss and developed redundant folds of skin in a circumferential pattern around the waistline. The average Body Mass Index (BMI) prior to surgery was 26.7. Mean surgical time and hospital stay was 4.2 hrs and 3.5 days respectively. No patient required blood transfusion. The follow up period was between 3 and 24 months. Levels of patient satisfaction were high and complications few. Only one patient required minor revisional surgery. No major complications were recorded. The commonest problem, seroma, developed in 4 out of 16 patients and was managed by simple aspiration. This study supports the effectiveness of the lower body lift as a procedure with the potential to produce an outcome unachievable by other means with a low incidence of minor complications.

  4. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T

    2013-05-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients' experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

  5. Disease-specific health-related quality of life instruments for IgE-mediated food allergy.

    PubMed

    Salvilla, S A; Dubois, A E J; Flokstra-de Blok, B M J; Panesar, S S; Worth, A; Patel, S; Muraro, A; Halken, S; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K; DunnGalvin, A; Hourihane, J O'B; Regent, L; de Jong, N W; Roberts, G; Sheikh, A

    2014-07-01

    This is one of seven interlinked systematic reviews undertaken on behalf of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology as part of their Guidelines for Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis, which focuses on instruments developed for IgE-mediated food allergy. Disease-specific questionnaires are significantly more sensitive than generic ones in measuring the response to interventions or future treatments, as well as estimating the general burden of food allergy. The aim of this systematic review was therefore to identify which disease-specific, validated instruments can be employed to enable assessment of the impact of, and investigations and interventions for, IgE-mediated food allergy on health-related quality of life (HRQL). Using a sensitive search strategy, we searched seven electronic bibliographic databases to identify disease-specific quality of life (QOL) tools relating to IgE-mediated food allergy. From the 17 eligible studies, we identified seven disease-specific HRQL instruments, which were then subjected to detailed quality appraisal. This revealed that these instruments have undergone formal development and validation processes, and have robust psychometric properties, and therefore provide a robust means of establishing the impact of food allergy on QOL. Suitable instruments are now available for use in children, adolescents, parents/caregivers, and adults. Further work must continue to develop a clinical minimal important difference for food allergy and for making these instruments available in a wider range of European languages.

  6. Neurologic Complications of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The rate and outcomes of neurologic complications of patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to identify these parameters in ECMO patients. Methods All patients receiving ECMO were selected from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 2001-2011. The rate and outcomes of neurologic complications [acute ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), and seizures] among these patients was determined. Discharge status, mortality, length of stay, and hospitalization costs were compared between patients with and without neurologic complications using chi-squared tests for categorical variables and Student's t-test for continuous variables. Results In total, 23,951 patients were included in this study, of which 2,604 (10.9%) suffered neurologic complications of seizure (4.1%), stroke (4.1%), or ICH (3.6%). When compared to patients without neurologic complications, acute ischemic stroke patients had significantly higher rates of discharge to a long-term facility (12.2% vs. 6.8%, p<0.0001) and a significantly longer mean length of stay (41.6 days vs. 31.9 days, p<0.0001). ICH patients had significantly higher rates of discharge to a long-term facility (9.5% vs. 6.8%, p=0.007), significantly higher mortality rates (59.7% vs. 50.0%, p<0.0001), and a significantly longer mean length of stay (41.8 days vs. 31.9 days) compared to patients without neurologic complications. These outcomes did not differ significantly between seizure patients and patients without neurologic complications. Conclusions Given the increasing utilization of ECMO and the high costs and poor outcomes associated with neurologic complications, more research is needed to help determine the best way to prevent these sequelae in this patient population. PMID:26320848

  7. Parenteral nutrition: risks, complications, and management.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Patricia H; Gilbert, Karen A

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving modality, but one that also carries risks for potentially life-threatening complications. Comprehensive management of patients receiving parenteral nutrition includes careful selection of candidates, individualizing formulas to meet patients' unique needs, monitoring response to therapy, and implementing strategies designed to avoid complications. Measures to mitigate the risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections are particularly important. As with all complex therapies, a collaborative, multidisciplinary approach promotes optimal outcomes. PMID:22222292

  8. Prognostic factors and disease-specific survival among immigrants diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Simberg-Danell, Caroline; Lyth, Johan; Månsson-Brahme, Eva; Frohm-Nilsson, Margareta; Carstensen, John; Hansson, Johan; Eriksson, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) among immigrants in Europe. We aimed to investigate clinical characteristics and disease-specific survival among first- and second-generation immigrants in Sweden. This nationwide population-based study included 27,235 patients from the Swedish Melanoma Register diagnosed with primary invasive CMM, 1990-2007. Data were linked to nationwide, population-based registers followed up through 2013. Logistic regression and Cox regression models were used to determine the association between immigrant status, stage and CMM prognosis, respectively. After adjustments for confounders, first generation immigrants from Southern Europe were associated with significantly more advanced stages of disease compared to Swedish-born patients [Stage II vs. I: Odds ratio (OR) = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.61-3.50. Stage III-IV vs I: OR = 2.40, 95% CI = 1.08-5.37]. The ORs of stage II-IV versus stage I disease were increased among men (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.1-3.3; p = 0.020), and women (OR = 4.8; 95% CI = 2.6-9.1; p < 0.001) in a subgroup of immigrants from former Yugoslavia compared to Swedish-born patients. The CMM-specific survival was significantly decreased among women from former Yugoslavia versus Swedish-born women [hazard ratio (HR)=2.2; 95% CI = 1.1-4.2; p = 0.043]. After additional adjustments including stage, the survival difference was no longer significant. No survival difference between the second generation immigrant group and Swedish-born patients were observed. In conclusion, a worse CMM-specific survival in women from former Yugoslavia was associated with more advanced stages of CMM at diagnosis. Secondary prevention efforts focusing on specific groups may be needed to further improve the CMM prognosis. PMID:27004457

  9. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  10. Complications of Distal Biceps Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Nirav H.; Volpi, Alex; Lynch, T. Sean; Patel, Ronak M.; Cerynik, Douglas L.; Schickendantz, Mark S.; Jones, Morgan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anatomic reinsertion of the distal biceps is critical for restoring flexion and supination strength. Single- and double-incision surgical techniques have been reported, analyzing complications and outcomes measures. Which technique results in superior clinical outcomes and the lowest associated complications remains unclear. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that rerupture rates would be similar between the 2 techniques, while nerve complications would be higher for the single-incision technique and heterotopic ossification would be more frequent with the double-incision technique. Study Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review was conducted using the PubMed, MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), SPORTSDiscus, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases to identify articles reporting distal biceps ruptures up to August 2013. We included English-language articles on adult patients with a minimum of 3 cases reporting single- and double-incision techniques. Frequencies of each complication as a percentage of total cases were calculated. Fisher exact tests were used to test the association between frequencies for each repair method, with P < .05 considered statistically significant. Odds ratios with 95% CIs were also computed. Results: A total of 87 articles met the inclusion criteria. Lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve neurapraxia was the most common complication in the single-incision group, occurring in 77 of 785 cases (9.8%). Heterotopic ossification was the most common complication in the double-incision group, occurring in 36 of 498 cases (7.2%). Conclusion: The overall frequency of reported complications is higher for single-incision distal biceps repair than for double-incision repair. The frequencies of rerupture and nerve complications are both higher for single-incision repairs while the frequency of heterotopic ossification is higher for

  11. Did the use of the Guideliner V2TM guide catheter extension increase complications? A review of the incidence of complications related to the use of the V2 catheter, the influence of right brachiocephalic arterial anatomy and the redesign of the V3TM Guideliner and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalil, Mohammad; Smyth, Alison; Walsh, Simon J; McQuillan, Conor; Spence, Mark S; Owens, Colum G; Hanratty, Colm G

    2016-01-01

    Objective We sought to investigate the incidence of complications associated with V2 Guideliner, understand the mechanisms and evaluate the impact of alterations made to the V3 Guideliner. Methods Retrospective analysis of consecutive cases employing V2 Guideliner from two university teaching hospitals. Complications were identified, analysed and classified into major versus minor ones. To understand the potential anatomical mechanism of these complications, analysis of normal great vessel anatomy was undertaken in separate cohort of patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation via right radial approach. Further analysis of consecutive cases employing V3 Gudieliner took place and the incidence of complications were compared between V2 and V3 groups. Results Total of 188 cases of V2 Guideliner use were identified. One major complication was reported (coronary dissection). Proximal collar interaction and stent damage occurred in 19 cases (10%). Anatomical data suggest that extending the V2 Guideliner tubing sited the proximal collar of the device in the brachiocephalic/subclavian artery, a potential site of tortuosity and potential cause of the Guideliner proximal collar-stent interaction. Further analysis of 124 cases of V3 Guideliner use demonstrated no cases with proximal collar-stent interactions, one case of longitudinal stent deformation and two incidents of stent interaction with the distal edge of the V3 Guideliner. Conclusions We have demonstrated a higher incidence of V2 Guideliner complications compared to previous series. The change in design of the V2 Guideliner was a likely contributor but the modifications with V3 Guideliner appear to have ameliorated this issue. PMID:26848394

  12. Interventional Management of Vascular Renal Transplant Complications.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Kanti Pallav; LaBerge, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    Renal transplantation is the therapy of choice in patients with end stage renal disease. Although transplant rejection remains the most common complication after renal transplantation, vascular anatomical complications occur in 1%-23% of renal transplant recipients. Interventional radiologists play an important role in the management of these complications. This review discusses the role of image-guided interventions within the context of multidisciplinary patient management. Particular emphasis is given to anatomical considerations unique to this patient population, techniques used for image-guided interventions, and outcomes of image-guided interventions. PMID:27641457

  13. [Orthognathic surgery: surgical failures and complications].

    PubMed

    Guyot, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Orthognathic surgery procedures mark the endpoint of lengthy orthodontic-surgical preparations and herald the completion of treatment for patients and their families. The main types of procedure are full maxillary Le Fort I osteotomies, mandibular osteotomies and chin surgery. To ensure a successful outcome, all require a favorable environment and extreme technical skill. But, like all surgical operations, they are also subject to peri- and post-operative complications resulting from treatment hazards or errors. Whatever the cause, surgical complications can entail failures in the management of the malformation. By seeking to understand and analyzing these complications, we can already help to prevent and reduce the contingent risks of failure.

  14. Maternal complications in pregnancy with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Vidushi; Agarwal, Nutan

    2016-09-01

    Maternal complications of diabetes in pregnancy include obstetric complications such as pre-eclampsia, preterm labour, polyhydramnios, increased operative delivery and increased infective morbidity. These can be minimized with optimal glycaemic control. Additionally, pregnancies with overt/pregestational diabetes may have diabetes related complications such as hypoglycaemia, worsening of retinopathy, nephropathy and diabetic ketoacidosis. Women with pre-existing diabetic vasculopathy should be managed with multi-disciplinary approach with maternal and foetal surveillance to detect any deterioration. Such patients have a poor pregnancy outcome. Gastropathy and coronary artery disease in diabetics is a contraindication to pregnancy. PMID:27582159

  15. [Complications in the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Eggeling, S

    2015-05-01

    The therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax is a common necessity in hospitals of all care hierarchies In addition to sufficient primary treatment by placement of a thorax drainage, knowledge of complicationg constellations, recognition of complications and irregular courses during the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax are of fundamental importance for achieving a satisfactory treatment outcome. Furthermore, the enlightenment of patients regarding the pathogenesis of the disease, possible measures for influencing the recurrence rate and information about future behavioral and lifestyle modifications are important. The principal complications during hospital treatment can be subdivided into complications of the surgical placement of the thorax drain and relief of the pleural cavity, problems in the management of treatment of the pleural negative pressure, the possibly demanding management of a persisting air leak and the individualized decision-making with respect to an interventional or operative procedure. The most common complicating constellations and possible complications during the inpatient hospital stay are described, the.

  16. [Complications in the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Eggeling, S

    2015-05-01

    The therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax is a common necessity in hospitals of all care hierarchies In addition to sufficient primary treatment by placement of a thorax drainage, knowledge of complicationg constellations, recognition of complications and irregular courses during the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax are of fundamental importance for achieving a satisfactory treatment outcome. Furthermore, the enlightenment of patients regarding the pathogenesis of the disease, possible measures for influencing the recurrence rate and information about future behavioral and lifestyle modifications are important. The principal complications during hospital treatment can be subdivided into complications of the surgical placement of the thorax drain and relief of the pleural cavity, problems in the management of treatment of the pleural negative pressure, the possibly demanding management of a persisting air leak and the individualized decision-making with respect to an interventional or operative procedure. The most common complicating constellations and possible complications during the inpatient hospital stay are described, the. PMID:25995086

  17. GO-QOL--disease-specific quality of life questionnaire in Graves' orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    Sawicka-Gutaj, Nadia; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Daroszewski, Jacek; Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Miśkiewicz, Piotr; Sowiński, Jerzy; Bolanowski, Marek; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of therapy for Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is to restore visual function and to improve quality of life (QOL); therefore, the idea of self-assessment of eye changes by the patient has been developed. We developed a validated Polish version of the GO-QOL questionnaire (GO-QOLpl). As an original version we used the English version of GO-QOL, which consists of 15 questions summarised in two subscales. GO-QOLpl was translated and validated in accordance with standard principles for translation of patient-reported outcomes (PRO). GO-QOLpl is a linguistically validated version of the original GO-QOL questionnaire, which is recommended by the European Group of Graves' Orbitopathy (EUGOGO). We strongly support the use of GO-QOLpl for the assessment of QOL among Polish patients with GO in clinical practice.

  18. Thromboembolic complications of thyroid storm

    PubMed Central

    Min, T; Benjamin, S; Cozma, L

    2014-01-01

    Summary Thyroid storm is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of hyperthyroidism. Early recognition and prompt treatment are essential. Atrial fibrillation can occur in up to 40% of patients with thyroid storm. Studies have shown that hyperthyroidism increases the risk of thromboembolic events. There is no consensus with regard to the initiation of anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation in severe thyrotoxicosis. Anticoagulation is not routinely initiated if the risk is low on a CHADS2 score; however, this should be considered in patients with thyroid storm or severe thyrotoxicosis with impending storm irrespective of the CHADS2 risk, as it appears to increase the risk of thromboembolic episodes. Herein, we describe a case of thyroid storm complicated by massive pulmonary embolism. Learning points Diagnosis of thyroid storm is based on clinical findings. Early recognition and prompt treatment could lead to a favourable outcome.Hypercoagulable state is a recognised complication of thyrotoxicosis.Atrial fibrillation is strongly associated with hyperthyroidism and thyroid storm.Anticoagulation should be considered for patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and atrial fibrillation irrespective of the CHADS2 score.Patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and clinical evidence of thrombosis should be immediately anticoagulated until hyperthyroidism is under control. PMID:24683480

  19. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Živković, Saša A

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  20. [Complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Ramadan, E; Chaimoff, C

    1992-04-15

    92% of our first 60 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were successful. Postoperative complications included fever in 10 cases (17%), urinary retention in 5 (8%), intraabdominal abscess in 2 (3%), biliary leakage in 1 (2%) and unexplained abdominal pain in 10 (17%). Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy has obvious advantages, it also has major as well as minor complications. PMID:1398315

  1. Facial flap complications.

    PubMed

    Zoumalan, Richard A; Murakami, Craig S

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of fundamental concepts can help decrease the chance of complications in plastic surgery. Local flap reconstruction for facial defects has many pitfalls. This article describes common complications in local flap reconstruction of the face and describes strategies that prevent problems.

  2. Complications and Great Escapes: Equipment and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Rory; Buckenham, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    All endovascular procedures have the potential for complications. The primary aims should always be avoidance of preventable complications and to minimize the impact of any complication. The core principles of an effective preventive strategy are: involving the interventional and clinical teams in a clear outline of the procedure and its potential adverse outcomes; ensuring an adequate inventory of required and backup equipment; the use of “time-out” to minimize wrong patient/wrong side adverse events; and an active audit program to identify areas of improvement. In the event of an adverse outcome there are many strategies that can be employed to rectify the situation or minimize the iatrogenic injury. This article provides a case-based discussion highlighting some of these techniques and how they can be used in a clinical setting. PMID:25435662

  3. Bulimia Nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Rylander, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    As with anorexia nervosa, there are many medical complications associated with bulimia nervosa. In bulimia nervosa, these complications are a direct result of both the mode and the frequency of purging behaviours. For the purposes of this article, we will review in detail the many complications of the two major modes of purging, namely, self-induced vomiting and laxative abuse; these two account for more than 90% of purging behaviours in bulimia nervosa. Some of these complications are potentially extremely dangerous and need to be well understood to effectively treat patients with bulimia nervosa. Other methods of purging, such as diuretic abuse, are much less frequently utilized and will only be mentioned briefly. In a subsequent article, the treatments of these medical complications will be presented.

  4. Anorexia nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Brown, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to other mental health disorders, eating disorders have a high prevalence of concomitant medical complications. Specifically, patients suffering from anorexia nervosa (AN) have a litany of medical complications which are commonly present as part of their eating disorders. Almost every body system can be adversely, affected by this state of progressive malnutrition. Moreover, some of the complications can have permanent adverse effects even after there is a successful program of nutritional rehabilitation and weight restoration. Within this article we will review all body systems affected by AN. There is also salient information about both, how to diagnose these medical complications and which are the likely ones to result in permanent sequelae if not diagnosed and addressed early in the course of AN. In a subsequent article, the definitive medical treatment for these complications will be presented in a clinically practical manner.

  5. [Complications of blepharoplasty].

    PubMed

    Morax, S

    2004-06-01

    Blepharoplasty complications are infrequent, most often minor and transitory, rarely major and permanent with functional or esthetic consequences. Treatment is above all preventive: screening at risk patients with a history of ophthalmic problems, but also general illnesses that would contraindicate blepharoplasty. Patients must be informed of possible risks through informative booklets with the most important points underlined. Complications can be purely ophthalmological, the more serious sequelae being partial or complete visual loss due to ischemic optical neuropathy, with very poor prognosis, or more rarely compression of the ocular globe by intraorbital hemorrhage, which has a better prognosis provided the origins are quickly recognized and treated immediately. Other visual complications include oculomotor problems, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, epiphora, and chemosis of lymphatic origin. Eyelid complications are more frequent: ptosis on the upper eyelid or lagophthalmia caused by incorrect resection of the skin, scarring and eyelid fold anomalies. The most serious esthetic complication is the malposition of the lower eyelid, which can manifest as retraction, lagophthalmia, ectropion, deformation of the external canthus, or lower eyelid tissue relaxation. These malpositions are quite often minor, sometimes reversible, but at times major, with psychological, esthetic and functional consequences that are difficult for the patient. Other local complications also arise: enophthalmia with a sunken lid, as well as under- and overcorrection. General complications can include scarring related to pigmentation problems and residual hematomas, and exceptionally infections going as far as the orbital fat tissue. Finally, other complications are related to new laser surgical techniques that are responsible for ectropion of the lower eyelid and even burns or residual redness, or complications related to periocular injections of filling material. A comprehensive review of

  6. Complications of glioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christina; Westphal, Manfred; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Even with current advances in adjunctive therapies, including radiation, chemotherapy, and various clinical trials of gene therapy and immunotherapy, surgical resection remains one of the most effective treatment for intra-axial gliomas. Survival in these patients has been shown to be related to the extent of resection. In some cases, it can provide cures of long-term remission; in others, it can provide disease control when combined with the above adjunctive treatments. However, surgical resection carries its own risks and complications. These complications can be broadly divided into neurologic, regional, and systemic, including direct cortical and vascular injury, surgical wound complications, and postsurgical medical complications. Certain patient characteristics, including Karnofsky performance status score (KPS) and pathology of the tumor, have been shown to have an impact on the risk of postsurgical complications. Advancement in preoperative and intraoperative adjunct technology such as cortical mapping and navigation has improved the surgeon's ability to safely and maximally resect the tumors. It is therefore important to understand the perioperative complications after craniotomy and tumor resection and factors affecting morbidity and mortality in order for surgeons to optimally select and counsel patients who will benefit the most from surgical resection. This chapter will focus on the complications associated with craniotomy for intrinsic glioma and ways of avoiding these events.

  7. Complications Following Radical Nephroureterectomy.

    PubMed

    Raman, Jay D; Jafri, Syed M

    2016-05-01

    Radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) is the gold standard treatment strategy for bulky, high-grade, or muscle-invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Many patients with UTUC who require RNU are elderly, comorbid, and at risk for perioperative complications. Recognition of likelihood and extent of such complications guides preoperative counseling, decision-making process for major surgery, and perioperative care. A critical review of such data is essential, given the inevitable impact of complications on hospital duration, need for readmission, resource utilization, and costs associated with management. PMID:26968416

  8. Adverse Event and Complication Management in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Richter, James M; Kelsey, Peter B; Campbell, Emily J

    2016-03-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a remarkably safe set of diagnostic and therapeutic techniques, and yet a small number of significant complications and adverse events are expected. Serious complications may have a material effect on the patient's health and well-being. They need to be anticipated and prevented if possible and managed effectively when identified. When complications occur they need to be discussed frankly with patients and their families. Informed consent, prevention, early detection, reporting, and systems improvement are critical aspects of effective complication management. Optimal complication management may improve patient satisfaction and outcome, as well as preserving the reputation and confidence of the endoscopist, and may minimize litigation.

  9. Alternatives to Indwelling Catheters Cause Unintended Complications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jessica; Harvey, Ellen M; Lollar, Daniel I; Bradburn, Eric H; Hamill, Mark E; Collier, Bryan R; Love, Katie M

    2016-08-01

    To reduce the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), limiting use of indwelling catheters is encouraged with alternative collection methods and early removal. Adverse effects associated with such practices have not been described. We also determined if CAUTI preventative measures increase the risk of catheter-related complications. We hypothesized that there are complications associated with early removal of indwelling catheters. We described complications associated with indwelling catheterization and intermittent catheterization, and compared complication rates before and after policy updates changed catheterization practices. We performed retrospective cohort analysis of trauma patients admitted between August 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013 who required indwelling catheter. Associations between catheter days and adverse outcomes such as infection, bladder overdistention injury, recatheterization, urinary retention, and patients discharged with indwelling catheter were evaluated. The incidence of CAUTI and the total number of catheter days pre and post policy change were similar. The incidence rate of urinary retention and associated complications has increased since the policy changed. Practices intended to reduce the CAUTI rate are associated with unintended complications, such as urinary retention. Patient safety and quality improvement programs should monitor all complications associated with urinary catheterization practices, not just those that represent financial penalties. PMID:27657581

  10. Neurological complications in adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Justin A; Reid, Patrick; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    The number of surgeries performed for adult spinal deformity (ASD) has been increasing due to an aging population, longer life expectancy, and studies supporting an improvement in health-related quality of life scores after operative intervention. However, medical and surgical complication rates remain high, and neurological complications such as spinal cord injury and motor deficits can be especially debilitating to patients. Several independent factors potentially influence the likelihood of neurological complications including surgical approach (anterior, lateral, or posterior), use of osteotomies, thoracic hyperkyphosis, spinal region, patient characteristics, and revision surgery status. The majority of ASD surgeries are performed by a posterior approach to the thoracic and/or lumbar spine, but anterior and lateral approaches are commonly performed and are associated with unique neural complications such as femoral nerve palsy and lumbar plexus injuries. Spinal morphology, such as that of hyperkyphosis, has been reported to be a risk factor for complications in addition to three-column osteotomies, which are often utilized to correct large deformities. Additionally, revision surgeries are common in ASD and these patients are at an increased risk of procedure-related complications and nervous system injury. Patient selection, surgical technique, and use of intraoperative neuromonitoring may reduce the incidence of complications and optimize outcomes. PMID:27250041

  11. Complications of Measles (Rubeola)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Complications of Measles Language: English ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Language: English Español (Spanish) File ...

  12. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated with topical creams or sitz baths. MALABSORPTION & MALNUTRITION Another complication in people with Crohn’s disease is ... the gut that absorbs most nutrients. Malabsorption and malnutrition usually do not develop unless the disease is ...

  13. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage 3 Infection and Other Complications NLN Position Papers Lymphedema Awareness Campaign Education Kits Educational Videos What ... Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (175) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) Become a member now » ...

  14. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  15. Evidence for validity of a national physician and patient-reported, cross-sectional survey in China and UK: the Disease Specific Programme

    PubMed Central

    Babineaux, S M; Curtis, B; Holbrook, T; Milligan, G; Piercy, J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Diabetes represents a significant challenge for Chinese healthcare providers. Healthcare decision-making is generally based on many data sources, including randomised controlled and real-world studies; however, good-quality data from Chinese diabetes patients are scarce. We performed an initial validation to assess the representativeness of one source of real-world data—the Diabetes Adelphi Disease Specific Programme (DSP) in China. Setting China, UK. Participants The Chinese DSP included 2060 patients with previously diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) sampled by 200 physicians. The reference Chinese population comprised 238 639 patients with previously diagnosed T2DM. The UK DSP contained 1481 patients with T2DM sampled by 125 physicians; the reference UK population comprised 289 patients with diabetes. Primary and secondary outcomes The primary outcome was comparison of unweighted China DSP and reference data for sex, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (BP), patients achieving glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c)<7%, total cholesterol, coronary heart disease and dyslipidaemia. The secondary outcome was comparison of weighted UK DSP and reference data for BMI, BP, mean HbA1c, total cholesterol, smoking and insulin status. Results Comparison of unweighted China DSP and reference data revealed statistical equivalence for BMI, systolic BP, proportion of patients achieving HbA1c <7%, total cholesterol, coronary heart disease and dyslipidaemia. Sex, age, diabetes duration, diastolic BP and mean HbA1c level were not equivalent, although differences were generally small. Weighting of data did not substantially affect the results. A similar pattern was observed for UK data. Conclusions This study provides evidence that the methodology used for the China and UK parts of the Diabetes DSP produces representative samples that are comparable with other independent sources of patient treatment outcomes data, which may ultimately inform public health decision

  16. On complicity theory.

    PubMed

    Kline, A David

    2006-04-01

    The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper examines the Complicity Theory. The supposed anomalies rest on misunderstandings of the received view or misreadings of model cases of whistleblowing, for example, the Challenger disaster and the Ford Pinto. Nevertheless, the Complicity Theory is important for as in science the contrast with alternative competing accounts often helps us better understand the received view. Several aspects of the received view are reviewed and strengthened through comparison with Complicity Theory, including why whistleblowing needs moral justification. Complicity Theory is also critiqued. The fundamental failure of Complicity Theory is its failure to explain why government and the public encourage and protect whistleblowers despite the possibility of considerable harm to the relevant company in reputation, lost jobs, and lost shareholder value.

  17. Complications of auricular correction

    PubMed Central

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  18. Complications of auricular correction.

    PubMed

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  19. Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Gauhar; Lee, Jessica D

    2013-10-01

    Infective endocarditis is an infection of the inner surface or endocardium of the heart, in most instances involving the heart valves or the mural portion of the endocardium. As nonbacterial organisms such as rickettsia, fungi, and even viruses may also cause endocarditis, the term "infective endocarditis" is preferred over the older terminology of "bacterial endocarditis." Despite advancements in medical treatment and surgical therapies over the last few decades, infective endocarditis continues to be associated with a poor prognosis. There are many different factors affecting the clinical outcome in patient with infective endocarditis, including the type of organism and its virulence, patient characteristics, comorbid illness, time to diagnosis and treatment, indications for surgery, and time to surgery when indicated. In this article, we will review the epidemiology of endocarditis, the neurologic complications of infective endocarditis, and the current therapeutic strategies.

  20. Renal infarction complicating fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gavalas, M; Meisner, R; Labropoulos, N; Gasparis, A; Tassiopoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease that most commonly affects the renal and extracranial carotid arteries. We present 3 cases of renal infarction complicating renal artery FMD in 42-, 43-, and 46-year-old females and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic. In our patients, oral anticoagulation therapy was used to treat all cases of infarction, and percutaneous angioplasty was used nonemergently in one case to treat refractory hypertension. All patients remained stable at 1-year follow-up. This is consistent with outcomes in previously published reports where conservative medical management was comparable to surgical and interventional therapies. Demographic differences may also exist in patients with renal infarction and FMD. A higher prevalence of males and a younger age at presentation have been found in these patients when compared to the general population with FMD.

  1. [Cardiovascular complications of hypertensive crisis].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    It is inexorable that a proportion of patients with systemic arterial hypertension will develop a hypertensive crisis at some point in their lives. The hypertensive crises can be divided in hypertensive patients with emergency or hypertensive emergency, according to the presence or absence of acute end-organ damage. In this review, we discuss the cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, congestive heart failure, aortic dissection and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises (those caused by cocaine use included). Each is presented in a unique way, although some patients with hypertensive emergency report non-specific symptoms. Treatment includes multiple medications for quick and effective action with security to reduce blood pressure, protect the function of organs remaining, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications and improve patient outcomes.

  2. Cancer and the kidney: complications of neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Fer, M.F.; McKinney, T.D.; Richardson, R.L.; Hande, K.R.; Oldham, R.K.; Greco, F.A.

    1981-10-01

    Various renal complications occur during the course of neoplastic disease. The therapeutic and prognostic implications differ according to the reversibility of both the underlying malignancy and the superimposed complications in the kidney. Since the mechanisms of renal failure vary significantly in patients with different types of malignancy, it is essential to avoid generalizations about etiologic factors or likely outcomes of the disease processes. The pathophysiologic abnormalities should be determined in each patient, and the reversibility of both the neoplastic and problems assessed before therapeutic decisions are made. This often requires a team effort by the internist, oncologist, nephrologist, urologist and, most importantly, the patient.

  3. Disease-specific cardiovascular positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging: a brief review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jeffrey M C; Zheng, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) is a new imaging tool that has garnered immense research interest for its potentials to assist clinical investigations. PET/MR combines the quantitative measurement of PET with dynamic functional and anatomic assessment of MR and can deliver a robust clinical examination. Currently, simultaneous cardiovascular PET/MR imaging remains in the pre-clinical research stage, and most institutions have not adopted a clinical PET/MR clinical imaging service. Nevertheless, PET/MR examination has unique promises in several areas of cardiovascular medicine, and in recent years more and more research publications have become available to lend us insight into its utility in cardiovascular imaging. Here we review the existing literature on simultaneous cardiovascular PET/MR imaging, with an emphasis on organizing the current literature into disease-specific discussions. These areas include coronary artery disease (CAD), carotid atherosclerosis, various infiltrative, inflammatory and hereditary heart diseases, myocarditis, vasculitis, and cardiac mass assessment. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the current understanding of cardiovascular PET/MR clinical imaging, in a disease-specific manner, from a clinician's perspective. Potential limitations of simultaneous PET/MR, such as cost effectiveness, artifacts, contraindications, and radiation exposure, are briefly discussed. PMID:27429913

  4. Disease-specific cardiovascular positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging: a brief review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) is a new imaging tool that has garnered immense research interest for its potentials to assist clinical investigations. PET/MR combines the quantitative measurement of PET with dynamic functional and anatomic assessment of MR and can deliver a robust clinical examination. Currently, simultaneous cardiovascular PET/MR imaging remains in the pre-clinical research stage, and most institutions have not adopted a clinical PET/MR clinical imaging service. Nevertheless, PET/MR examination has unique promises in several areas of cardiovascular medicine, and in recent years more and more research publications have become available to lend us insight into its utility in cardiovascular imaging. Here we review the existing literature on simultaneous cardiovascular PET/MR imaging, with an emphasis on organizing the current literature into disease-specific discussions. These areas include coronary artery disease (CAD), carotid atherosclerosis, various infiltrative, inflammatory and hereditary heart diseases, myocarditis, vasculitis, and cardiac mass assessment. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the current understanding of cardiovascular PET/MR clinical imaging, in a disease-specific manner, from a clinician’s perspective. Potential limitations of simultaneous PET/MR, such as cost effectiveness, artifacts, contraindications, and radiation exposure, are briefly discussed. PMID:27429913

  5. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-01

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications.

  6. Osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero, J D; Reguera, J M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Cabrera-Franquelo, F

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty three patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis between January 1984 and December 1987 were studied prospectively. Sixty five patients (25%) developed osteoarticular complications. These patients had a more prolonged course than those with no complications. Spondylitis in 38 (58%) and sacroiliitis in 29 (45%) were the most prevalent. There were no significant laboratory, serological, or bacteriological differences between patients with and without osteoarticular complications. At diagnosis 47 patients (72%) showed radiographic abnormalities, commonly in axial sites but rarely in peripheral sites. Radionuclide bone scan was positive with no radiographic abnormalities in 17 (26%) of cases. Fifty seven patients received medical treatment alone, 51 (89%) being cured with a single course of treatment. Treatment failed or there was a relapse in six patients (11%), of whom five had spondylitis. Eight of the 65 patients (12%), all of whom had spondylitis and paravertebral or epidural abscesses, also required surgical treatment. Images PMID:1994863

  7. Ophthalmic complications of dengue.

    PubMed

    Chan, David P L; Teoh, Stephen C B; Tan, Colin S H; Nah, Gerard K M; Rajagopalan, Rajesh; Prabhakaragupta, Manjunath K; Chee, Caroline K L; Lim, Tock H; Goh, Kong Y

    2006-02-01

    We report 13 cases of ophthalmic complications resulting from dengue infection in Singapore. We performed a retrospective analysis of a series of 13 patients with dengue fever who had visual impairment. Investigations included Humphrey automated visual field analyzer, Amsler charting, fundus fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. Twenty-two eyes of 13 patients were affected. The mean age of patients was 31.7 years. Visual acuity varied from 20/25 to counting fingers only. Twelve patients (92.3%) noted central vision impairment. Onset of visual impairment coincided with the nadir of serum thrombocytopenia. Ophthalmologic findings include macular edema and blot hemorrhages (10), cotton wool spots (1), retinal vasculitis (4), exudative retinal detachment (2), and anterior uveitis (1). All patients recovered visual acuity to 20/30 or better with residual central scotoma by 12 weeks. These new complications suggest a widening spectrum of ophthalmic complications in dengue infection.

  8. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  9. Complications of cosmetic tattoos.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, which are better known as permanent make-up, have become popular in the last decades. This same procedure can be used to camouflage pathological skin conditions, to mask scars and to complete the aesthetic results of plastic and reconstructive surgeries. The risks and complications of tattooing procedures include infections and allergic reactions. Scarring can occur. Fanning and fading of the colorants and dissatisfaction with colour and shape are not unusual. Different lasers can offer solutions for the removal of unwanted cosmetic tattoos, but complications due to the laser treatment, such as paradoxical darkening and scarring, can arise.

  10. Medical complications following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Buzelé, R; Barbier, L; Sauvanet, A; Fantin, B

    2016-08-01

    Splenectomy is attended by medical complications, principally infectious and thromboembolic; the frequency of complications varies with the conditions that led to splenectomy (hematologic splenectomy, trauma, presence of portal hypertension). Most infectious complications are caused by encapsulated bacteria (Meningococcus, Pneumococcus, Hemophilus). These occur mainly in children and somewhat less commonly in adults within the first two years following splenectomy. Post-splenectomy infections are potentially severe with overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) and this justifies preventive measures (prophylactic antibiotics, appropriate immunizations, patient education) and demands prompt antibiotic management with third-generation cephalosporins for any post-splenectomy fever. Thromboembolic complications can involve both the caval system (deep-vein thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism) and the portal system. Portal vein thrombosis occurs more commonly in patients with myeloproliferative disease and cirrhosis. No thromboembolic prophylaxis is recommended apart from perioperative low molecular weight heparin. However, some authors choose to prescribe a short course of anti-platelet medication if the post-splenectomy patient develops significant thrombocytosis. Thrombosis of the portal or caval venous system requires prolonged warfarin anticoagulation for 3 to 6 months. Finally, some studies have suggested an increase in the long-term incidence of cancer in splenectomized patients. PMID:27289254

  11. Interpreting Dream Complications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollub, Dan

    1984-01-01

    Explains different complications, i.e., emotional behavior, speech, and symbolism, suggesting that emotional behavior in dreams is either genuine or opposite from emotional reality. Dream speech delineates boundaries between the conscious and unconscious. Symbolism in dreams presents abstract concepts visually. (BH)

  12. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  13. Complications from radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhermain, Frédéric; Barani, Igor J

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) of the brain is associated with significant stigma in the neuro-oncology community. This is primarily because of the potentially severe complications with which it may be associated. These complications, especially in subacute and latent settings, are often unpredictable, potentially progressive, and irreversible. The onset of complications may start from the first fraction of 2 Gy, continuing over several months after end of RT with persistent drowsiness and apathy. It may also extend over many years with progressive onset of neurocognitive impairments such as memory decline, and diminished focus/attention. For long-term survivors, such as young patients irradiated for a favorable low-grade glioma, quality of life can be seriously impacted by RT. It is essential, as in the pediatric field, to propose patient-specific regimens from the very outset of therapy. The use of molecular biomarkers to better predict survival, control of comorbidities along with judicious use of medications such as steroids and antiepileptics, improved targeting with the help of modern imaging and RT techniques, modulation of the dose, and fractionation aimed at limiting integral dose to the healthy brain all have the potential to minimize treatment-related complications while maintaining the therapeutic efficacy for which RT is known. Sparing "radiosensitive" areas such as hippocampi could have a modest but measurable impact with regard to cognitive preservation, an effect that can possibly be enhanced when used in conjunction with memantine and/or donepezil. PMID:26948357

  14. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  15. Complications of collagen fillers.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Patricia; Goldberg, David J

    2014-12-01

    As the skin ages, a deficiency in collagen occurs, thus injectable collagen products have become a sensible and popular option for dermal filling and volume enhancement. Several types of collagen have been developed over the years, including animal sources such as bovine and porcine collagen, as well as human-based sources derived from pieces of the patient's own skin, cadaver skin, and later cultured from human dermal fibroblasts. While collagen overall has a relatively safe, side effect profile, there are several complications, both early and late onset, that practitioners and patients should be aware of. Early complications, occurring within days of the procedure, can be divided into non-hypersensitivity and hypersensitivity reactions. The non-hypersensitive reactions include injection site reactions, discoloration, maldistribution, infection, skin necrosis, and the very rare but dreaded risk of vision loss, whereas the hypersensitivity reactions present usually as delayed type IV reactions, but can also rarely present as an immediate type I reaction. Late complications, occurring within weeks to even years after injection, include granuloma formation, foreign body reactions, and infection secondary to atypical mycobacteria or biofilms. This review will give a detailed overview of the complications secondary to cutaneous collagen injections.

  16. Treatment of complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Rita; Pfoh, Gabriele; Kotoučová, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT) of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide. PMID:22893810

  17. Complicating Methodological Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    A historical indicator of the quality, validity, and rigor of qualitative research has been the documentation and disclosure of the behind-the-scenes work of the researcher. In this paper, we use what we call "methodological data" as a tool to complicate the possibility and desirability of such transparency. Specifically, we draw on our…

  18. Neurological Complications of Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of neoplastic and nonmalignant conditions. Increasing numbers of solid organ transplantations (SOTs) add an additional population of immunosuppressed patients with multiple potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with conditioning procedure and hematopoietic cell or solid organ source, major neurological complications occur with all transplantation procedures. This 2 part review emphasizes a practical consultative approach to central and peripheral nervous system problems related to HCT or SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience with the following conditions: the diversity of manifestations of common infections such as varicella zoster virus, Aspergillus, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), drug therapy-related complications, stroke mechanisms, the spectrum of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and neurologically important syndromes of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). These complications preferentially occur at specific intervals after HCT and SOT, and neurological consultants must recognize an extensive spectrum of syndromes in order to effect timely diagnosis and expedite appropriate treatment. PMID:23983885

  19. Complications and Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... successfully cure SCD. Complications from hydroxyurea therapy and stem cell transplants are rare but can be serious or life-threatening. People with SCD and their families should ask their doctors about the benefits and risks of each. Read more about treatment ...

  20. Strategies to reduce pulmonary complications after esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Weijs, Teus J; Ruurda, Jelle P; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard AP; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Luyer, Misha DP

    2013-01-01

    Esophagectomy, the surgical removal of all or part of the esophagus, is a surgical procedure that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary complications are an especially important postoperative problem. Therefore, many perioperative strategies to prevent pulmonary complications after esophagectomy have been investigated and introduced in daily clinical practice. Here, we review these strategies, including improvement of patient performance and technical advances such as minimally invasive surgery that have been implemented in recent years. Furthermore, interventions such as methylprednisolone, neutrophil elastase inhibitor and epidural analgesia, which have been shown to reduce pulmonary complications, are discussed. Benefits of the commonly applied routine nasogastric decompression, delay of oral intake and prophylactic mechanical ventilation are unclear, and many of these strategies are also evaluated here. Finally, we will discuss recent insights and new developments aimed to improve pulmonary outcomes after esophagectomy. PMID:24151374

  1. Early postoperative complications following ostomy surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Butler, Doris L

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews early postoperative complications in adults undergoing ostomy surgery. Whether the ostomy is the result of an emergent or elective procedure, the WOC nurse and staff nurses are responsible for monitoring and ensuring quality healthcare for the patient. Nevertheless, many patients undergoing ostomy surgery experience a complication during the early postoperative period. Early postoperative complications not only influence immediate postoperative care but may also impact quality of life for the person living with an ostomy. Keen assessment skills, early recognition of signs and symptoms of a complication, and prompt interventions are crucial to maintaining a viable stoma and a successful surgical outcome.

  2. Complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Saracen, Agnieszka; Kotwica, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a minimally invasive procedure widely used for the treatment of pain due to vertebral fractures of different origins—osteoporotic, traumatic, or neoplastic. PVP is minimally invasive, but the complications are not rare; however, they are in most cases not significant clinically. The most frequent is cement leakage, which can occur onto veins, paravertebral soft tissue, into the intervertebral disk, or to the spinal canal, affecting foraminal area or epidural space. We analyzed results of treatment and complications of vertebroplasty performed with the use of polimethylomethylacrylate cement (PMMA) on 1100 vertebrae, with a special regard to the severity of complication and eventual clinical manifestation. One thousand one hundred PVP were analyzed, performed in 616 patients. There were 468 (76%) women and 148 men (24%), 24 to 94-year old, mean age 68 years. From 1100 procedures, 794 treated osteporotic and 137 fractures due to malignant disease, 69 PVP were made in traumatic fractures. One hundred patients had painful vertebral hemangiomas. Seven hundred twenty-six (66%) lesions were in thoracic, and 374 (34%) in lumbar area. Results of treatment were assessed using 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 12 hours after surgery, 7 days, 30 days, and then each 6 months, up to 3 years. Before surgery all patients had significant pain 7 to 10 in VAS scale, mean 8.9 cm. Twelve  hours after surgery 602 (97.7%) reported significant relief of pain, with mean VAS of 2,3 cm. Local complications occurred in 50% of osteoporotic, 34% of neoplastic, 16% of traumatic fractures, and 2% of vertebral hemangiomas. The most common was PMMA leakage into surrounding tissues—20%; paravertebral vein embolism—13%; intradiscal leakage—8%; and PMMA leakage into the spinal canal—0.8%. Results of treatment did not differ between patients with and without any complications. From 104 patients who had chest X-ray or CT study performed

  3. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  4. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  5. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records.

  6. Complications of vasectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Awsare, Ninaad S.; Krishnan, Jai; Boustead, Greg B.; Hanbury, Damian C.; McNicholas, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vasectomy is a common method of sterilisation. However, it is less popular than tubal ligation world-wide. It is also a frequent cause of litigation relating to its complications. This article reviews the early and late risks associated with the procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data collection was done using the internet to search Medline for obtaining evidence-based medicine reviews. Cross-references were obtained from key articles. Websites of government bodies and medical associations were searched for guidelines relating to vasectomy. DISCUSSION: Early complications include haematoma, wound and genito-urinary infections, and traumatic fistulae. Vasectomy failure occurs in 0-2% of patients. Late recanalisation causes failure in 0.2% of vasectomies. Significant chronic orchalgia may occur in up to 15% of men after vasectomy, and may require epididyectomy or vasectomy reversal. Antisperm antibodies develop in a significant proportion of men post-vasectomy, but do not increase the risk of immune-complex or atherosclerotic heart disease. Similarly, vasectomy does not enhance risk of testicular or prostate cancer. Vasectomy has a lower mortality as compared to tubal occlusion, but is still significantly high in non-industrialised countries because of infections. CONCLUSIONS: Vasectomy, though safe and relatively simple, requires a high level of expertise to minimise complications. Adequate pre-operative counselling is essential to increase patient acceptability of this method of permanent contraception. PMID:16263006

  7. Unusual complication after genioplasty.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Rafael Linard; Sá, Carlos Diego Lopes; Esses, Diego Felipe Silveira; Becker, Otávio Emmel; Soares, Eduardo Costa Studart; de Oliveira, Rogerio Belle

    2014-01-01

    Facial beauty depends on shape, proportion, and harmony between the facial thirds. The chin is one of the most important components of the inferior third and has an important role on the definition of facial aesthetic and harmony in both frontal and lateral views. There are 2 principal therapeutic approaches that one can choose to treat mental deformities, alloplastic implants, and mental basilar ostectomy, also known as genioplasty. The latest is more commonly used because of great versatility in the correction of three-dimensional deformities of the chin and smaller taxes of postoperative complications. Possible transoperative and postoperative complications of genioplasty include mental nerve lesion, bleeding, damage to tooth roots, bone resorption of the mobilized segment, mandibular fracture, ptosis of the lower lip, and failure to stabilize the ostectomized segment. The study presents 2 cases of displacement of the osteotomized segment after genioplasty associated with facial trauma during postoperative orthognathic surgery followed by rare complications with no reports in the literature. PMID:24621765

  8. Excellent Cancer Outcomes Following Patient-adapted Robotic Lung SBRT But a Case for Caution in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bahig, Houda; Filion, Edith; Vu, Toni; Roberge, David; Lambert, Louise; Bouchard, Myriam; Lavoie, Caroline; Doucet, Robert; Nadeau, Dominic Béliveau; Chalaoui, Jean; Campeau, Marie-Pierre

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to report outcomes and prognostic factors for early stage non-small cell lung cancer treated with patient-adapted Cyberknife stereotactic body radiotherapy. A retrospective analysis of 150 patients with T1-2N0 non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy was conducted. An algorithm based on tumor and patient's characteristics was used to orient patients towards soft tissue (Xsight Lung), fiducials or adjacent bone (Xsight Spine) tracking. Median biological effective dose without correction for tissue inhomogeneities was 180 Gy10 for peripheral tumors and 113 Gy10 for central tumors. Median follow-up was 22 months. Actuarial 2 years local control, overall survival and disease-specific survival were respectively 96%, 87% and 95%. Every 1 cm increase in tumor diameter was associated with a relative risk for regional or distant relapse of 2 (95%CI = 1.2-3.6, p = 0.009). With doses ≥132 Gy10 and <132 Gy10, local control was 98% vs. 82% (p = 0.07), disease-specific survival 97% vs. 78% (p = 0.02) and overall survival 93% vs. 76% (p = 0.01), respectively. Better disease-specific survival and a trend for better overall survival was observed for peripheral vs. central tumors (96% vs. 79%, p = 0.05 and 92% vs. 74%, p = 0.08, respectively). A higher Charlson comordibity score (≥4) predicted lower overall survival (79% vs. 98%, p = 0.01). Toxicities included 3 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis who developed grade 5 pneumonitis and 2 patients with grade 3 pneumonitis. We therefore report excellent local control and disease-specific survival following patient-adapted Cyberknife lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. Although toxicities were in general minimal, patients with pulmonary fibrosis might be at greater risk of severe complications. Small size, peripheral location, dose ≥ 132 Gy10 and a low Charlson co-morbidity score seem to be associated with better outcomes.

  9. Avoiding Complications in Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay Singh; Ratre, Shailendra; Kher, Yatin

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic neurosurgical techniques hold the potential for reducing morbidity. But they are also associated with limitations such as the initial learning curve, proximal blind spot, visual obscurity, difficulty in controlling bleeding, disorientation, and loss of stereoscopic image. Although some of the surgical techniques in neuroendoscopy and microsurgery are similar, endoscopy requires additional skills. A thorough understanding of endoscopic techniques and their limitations is required to get maximal benefit. Knowledge of possible complications and techniques to avoid such complications can improve results in endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). The surgeon must be able to manage complications and have a second strategy such as a cerebrospinal fluid shunt if ETV fails. It is better to abandon the procedure if there is disorientation or a higher risk of complications such as bleeding or a thick and opaque floor without any clear visualization of anatomy. Attending live workshops, practice on models and simulators, simpler case selection in the initial learning curve, and hands-on cadaveric workshops can reduce complications. Proper case selection, good surgical technique, and better postoperative care are essential for a good outcome in ETV. Although it is difficult to make a preoperative diagnosis of complex hydrocephalus (combination of communicating and obstructive), improving methods to detect the exact type of hydrocephalus before surgery could increase the success rate of ETV and avoid an unnecessary ETV procedure in such cases. PMID:26140421

  10. Complications of tube thoracostomy in trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, R

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To assess the complication rate of tube thoracostomy in trauma. To consider whether this rate is high enough to support a selective reduction in the indications for tube thoracostomy in trauma. Methods—A retrospective case series of all trauma patients who underwent tube thoracostomy during a 12 month period at a large UK teaching hospital with an accident and emergency (A&E) department seeing in excess of 125 000 new patients/year. These patients were identified using the hospital audit department computerised retrieval system supplemented by a hand search of both the data collected for the Major Trauma Outcome Study and the A&E admission unit log book. The notes were assessed with regard to the incidence of complications, which were divided into insertional, infective, and positional. Results—Fifty seven chest drains were placed in 47 patients over the 12 month period. Seven patients who died within 48 hours of drain insertion were excluded. The commonest indications for tube thoracostomy were pneumothorax (54%) and haemothorax (20%); 90% of tubes were placed as a result of blunt trauma. The overall complication rate of the procedure was 30%. There were no insertional complications and only one (2%) major complication, which was empyema thoracis. Conclusion—This study reveals no persuasive evidence to support a selective reduction in the indications for tube thoracostomy in trauma. A larger study to confirm or refute these findings must be performed before any change in established safe practice. PMID:10718232

  11. Labor and delivery complications among teenage mothers.

    PubMed

    Lopoo, Leonard M

    2011-01-01

    A broad set of academic literatures shows that childbearing is associated with a variety of negative health outcomes for teenage mothers. Many researchers question whether teenage childbearing is the causal explanation for the negative outcomes (i.e., whether there is a biological effect of teenage childbearing or whether the relationship is due to other factors correlated with health and teenage childbearing). This study investigates the relationship between teenage childbearing and labor and delivery complications using a panel of confidential birth certificate data over the period from 1994 to 2003 from the state of Texas. Findings show that compared to mothers aged 25 to 29 having their first child, teenager mothers appear to have superior health in most--but not all--labor and delivery outcomes.

  12. Development of a disease specific health related quality of life measure for adults and adolescents with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gee, L; Abbott, J; Conway, S; Etherington, C; Webb, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Health related quality of life (HRQoL) measurement is important in determining the impact of disease on daily functioning and subsequently informing interventions. In cystic fibrosis (CF) generic HRQoL measures have been employed but these may not be sufficiently specific. The aim of the current work was to develop and validate a disease specific HRQoL measure for adults and adolescents with cystic fibrosis.
METHODS—Areas of concern to adults and adolescents with CF were identified by unstructured interviews, self-administered questionnaires, consultation with multidisciplinary specialist staff, a review of the relevant literature, and examination of other HRQoL measures. Items for the questionnaire were generated on the basis of this process. Continued evaluation and development of the Cystic Fibrosis Quality of Life (CFQoL) questionnaire was undertaken by a process of statistical analysis and continued feedback from patients. The full testing and validation of the CFQoL questionnaire took place over four phases: (1) initial item generation and testing of a preliminary questionnaire, (2) testing and validation of the second version of the questionnaire, (3) test-retest reliability of a third and final version of the questionnaire, and (4) sensitivity testing of the final version of the questionnaire.
RESULTS—Nine domains of functioning were identified using principal components analysis with varimax rotation. Internal reliability of the identified domains was demonstrated using Cronbach alpha coefficients (range 0.72-0.92) and item to total domain score correlations. Concurrent validity (range r = 0.64-0.74), discriminatory ability between different levels of disease severity, sensitivity across transient changes in health (effect size range, moderate d = 0.56 to large d = 1.95), and test-retest reliability (r =0.74-0.96) were also found to be robust.
CONCLUSIONS—The CFQoL questionnaire is a fully validated disease specific measure

  13. Intraoperative anesthetic complications.

    PubMed

    Milam, S B

    1987-01-01

    Intraoperative anesthetic complications can be prevented or minimized if the anesthetist is able to anticipate such problems in the preanesthetic period. Therefore, an adequate preanesthetic medical history that includes previous anesthetic experiences and past and current drug therapy is extremely important. Furthermore, the anesthetist must be properly trained to anticipate undesirable reactions to anesthetic agents. The signs of an impending disaster are subtle and nonspecific in the anesthetized patient. Therefore, continuous vigilance of the patient's physiologic status coupled with a high index of suspicion are essential to safe anesthetic management of dental patients. PMID:3468015

  14. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis. PMID:26903190

  15. [Complications of hemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Slauf, P; Antoš, F; Marx, J

    2014-04-01

    The most common and serious complications of haemorrhoids include perianal thrombosis and incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids with subsequent thrombosis. They are characterised by severe pain in the perianal region possibly with bleeding. In a short history of the perianal thrombosis, acute surgical incision or excision is indicated, which can result in rapid relief of the painful symptoms. In incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids, emergency haemorrhoidectomy may also be indicated. Segmental haemorrhoidectomy in the most affected quadrants followed by further elective surgery for haemorrhoids in the next stage is preferred.

  16. Complicated Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harrington, David T

    2016-10-01

    More than 4 decades after the creation of the Brooke and Parkland formulas, burn practitioners still argue about which formula is the best. So it is no surprise that there is no consensus about how to resuscitate a thermally injured patient with a significant comorbidity such as heart failure or cirrhosis or how to resuscitate a patient after an electrical or inhalation injury or a patient whose resuscitation is complicated by renal failure. All of these scenarios share a common theme in that the standard rule book does not apply. All will require highly individualized resuscitations. PMID:27600129

  17. [Acute complications of abortion].

    PubMed

    Obel, E

    1976-02-01

    The complications accompanying the various methods of abortion as studied in different surveys are reported. In studies of dilation and curettage (D and C) and vaccuum aspiration (VA), lethality ranges from .5 to 2.9 deaths/100,000 cases. Metrorrhagia occurred in 2.5-6% of the D and C cases studied and in 2.9-3.5% of the VA cases. The bleeding was accompanied by infection in most cases where abortive tissue remained in the uterus, which occured in .4-.8% of the D and C cases and in .6-.9% of the VA cases studied. Postabortive bleeding occurred through the 10th day in up to 25% of the patients and was related to the length of the gestation period before abortion. Pelvic infection, mostly of the endometrium, occurred in about 1.4% of the D and C patients and in .3-1.2% of the VA patients. 1.4% of the D and C patients and .6% of the VA patients experienced a rise in body temperature as the only complication of abortion. Perforation of the uterus occurred in about .8% of the D and C patients and in .1-.6% of VA patients. Lesions of the cervix had to be sutured in .1% of the D and C group and .3% of the VA group. Saline instillation, used for abortions in the second trimest er, had a mortality rate of about 20/100,000 cases. Since the success rate of saline instillation is 90-98%, complications are more frequent, often requiring treatment with oxytocin or curettage. Extensive bleeding occurred in 2.3-4%. Curettage of the placenta was required in about 2.1-16.9% of the cases. Pelvic inflammation occurred in about 2.5% and temperature elevation in 1-3.4%. Abdominal hysterotomies had a lethality of 208/100,000. Pelvic hemorrhage occurred in 31%, inflammation in 4.7%, temperature elevation in 13%, and febrile reactions in 31% of the abdominal hysterotomies studied. It is necessary to establish international definitions of abortion complications for better documentation, and postoperative observations should be recorded more conscientiously. PMID:1251502

  18. Epigenetic regulation of OAS2 shows disease-specific DNA methylation profiles at individual CpG sites.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaolian; Boldrup, Linda; Coates, Philip J; Fahraeus, Robin; Nylander, Elisabet; Loizou, Christos; Olofsson, Katarina; Norberg-Spaak, Lena; Gärskog, Ola; Nylander, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are essential regulators of biological processes. Decreased DNA methylation of OAS2 (2'-5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase 2), encoding an antiviral protein, has been seen in psoriasis. To provide further insight into the epigenetic regulation of OAS2, we performed pyrosequencing to detect OAS2 DNA methylation status at 11 promoter and first exon located CpG sites in psoriasis (n = 12) and two common subtypes of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck: tongue (n = 12) and tonsillar (n = 11). Compared to corresponding controls, a general hypomethylation was seen in psoriasis. In tongue and tonsillar SCC, hypomethylation was found at only two CpG sites, the same two sites that were least demethylated in psoriasis. Despite differences in the specific residues targeted for methylation/demethylation, OAS2 expression was upregulated in all conditions and correlations between methylation and expression were seen in psoriasis and tongue SCC. Distinctive methylation status at four successively located CpG sites within a genomic area of 63 bp reveals a delicately integrated epigenetic program and indicates that detailed analysis of individual CpGs provides additional information into the mechanisms of epigenetic regulation in specific disease states. Methylation analyses as clinical biomarkers need to be tailored according to disease-specific sites. PMID:27572959

  19. Epigenetic regulation of OAS2 shows disease-specific DNA methylation profiles at individual CpG sites

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaolian; Boldrup, Linda; Coates, Philip J.; Fahraeus, Robin; Nylander, Elisabet; Loizou, Christos; Olofsson, Katarina; Norberg-Spaak, Lena; Gärskog, Ola; Nylander, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are essential regulators of biological processes. Decreased DNA methylation of OAS2 (2′-5′-Oligoadenylate Synthetase 2), encoding an antiviral protein, has been seen in psoriasis. To provide further insight into the epigenetic regulation of OAS2, we performed pyrosequencing to detect OAS2 DNA methylation status at 11 promoter and first exon located CpG sites in psoriasis (n = 12) and two common subtypes of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck: tongue (n = 12) and tonsillar (n = 11). Compared to corresponding controls, a general hypomethylation was seen in psoriasis. In tongue and tonsillar SCC, hypomethylation was found at only two CpG sites, the same two sites that were least demethylated in psoriasis. Despite differences in the specific residues targeted for methylation/demethylation, OAS2 expression was upregulated in all conditions and correlations between methylation and expression were seen in psoriasis and tongue SCC. Distinctive methylation status at four successively located CpG sites within a genomic area of 63 bp reveals a delicately integrated epigenetic program and indicates that detailed analysis of individual CpGs provides additional information into the mechanisms of epigenetic regulation in specific disease states. Methylation analyses as clinical biomarkers need to be tailored according to disease-specific sites. PMID:27572959

  20. Integrated analysis of numerous heterogeneous gene expression profiles for detecting robust disease-specific biomarkers and proposing drug targets.

    PubMed

    Amar, David; Hait, Tom; Izraeli, Shai; Shamir, Ron

    2015-09-18

    Genome-wide expression profiling has revolutionized biomedical research; vast amounts of expression data from numerous studies of many diseases are now available. Making the best use of this resource in order to better understand disease processes and treatment remains an open challenge. In particular, disease biomarkers detected in case-control studies suffer from low reliability and are only weakly reproducible. Here, we present a systematic integrative analysis methodology to overcome these shortcomings. We assembled and manually curated more than 14,000 expression profiles spanning 48 diseases and 18 expression platforms. We show that when studying a particular disease, judicious utilization of profiles from other diseases and information on disease hierarchy improves classification quality, avoids overoptimistic evaluation of that quality, and enhances disease-specific biomarker discovery. This approach yielded specific biomarkers for 24 of the analyzed diseases. We demonstrate how to combine these biomarkers with large-scale interaction, mutation and drug target data, forming a highly valuable disease summary that suggests novel directions in disease understanding and drug repurposing. Our analysis also estimates the number of samples required to reach a desired level of biomarker stability. This methodology can greatly improve the exploitation of the mountain of expression profiles for better disease analysis.

  1. Serum Metabolomics to Identify the Liver Disease-Specific Biomarkers for the Progression of Hepatitis to Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Rong; Cheng, Jianhua; Fan, Chunlei; Shi, Xiaofeng; Cao, Yuan; Sun, Bo; Ding, Huiguo; Hu, Chengjin; Dong, Fangting; Yan, Xianzhong

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy that has region specific etiologies. Unfortunately, 85% of cases of HCC are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Reliable biomarkers for the early diagnosis of HCC are urgently required to reduced mortality and therapeutic expenditure. We established a non-targeted gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS) metabolomics method in conjunction with Random Forests (RF) analysis based on 201 serum samples from healthy controls (NC), hepatitis B virus (HBV), liver cirrhosis (LC) and HCC patients to explore the metabolic characteristics in the progression of hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Ultimately, 15 metabolites were identified intimately associated with the process. Phenylalanine, malic acid and 5-methoxytryptamine for HBV vs. NC, palmitic acid for LC vs. HBV, and asparagine and β-glutamate for HCC vs. LC were screened as the liver disease-specific potential biomarkers with an excellent discriminant performance. All the metabolic perturbations in these liver diseases are associated with pathways for energy metabolism, macromolecular synthesis, and maintaining the redox balance to protect tumor cells from oxidative stress.

  2. Risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jihion; Choi, Jae Moon; Lee, Joonho; Kwon, Koo; Kong, Yu-Gyeong; Seo, Hyungseok; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Park, Hyung Keun; Kim, Young-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although percutaneous nephrolithotomy is minimally invasive, it is associated with several complications, including extravasation of fluid and urine, the need for a blood transfusion, and septicemia. However, little is known about pulmonary complications after this procedure. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the risk factors for and outcomes of pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. All consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy between 2001 and 2014 were identified and divided into group A (no clinically significant pulmonary complications) and group B (clinically significant pulmonary complications). Preoperative and intraoperative variables and postoperative outcomes were evaluated. Independent risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications were evaluated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. The study included 560 patients: 378 (67.5%) in group A and 182 (32.5%) in group B. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy were a higher body mass index (odds ratio = 1.062, P = 0.026), intraoperative red blood cell transfusion (odds ratio = 2.984, P = 0.012), and an intercostal surgical approach (odds ratio = 3.046, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the duration of hospital stay was significantly longer (8.4 ± 4.3 days vs 7.6 ± 3.4 days, P = 0.010) and the intensive care unit admission rate was significantly higher [13 (7.1%) vs 1 (0.3%), P < 0.001] in group B than in group A. Risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy were a higher body mass index, intraoperative red blood cell transfusion, and an intercostal surgical approach. Postoperative pulmonary complications were associated with poor outcomes. These results may provide useful information for the perioperative management of pulmonary complications after

  3. Complicated intestinal atresias.

    PubMed

    Miller, R C

    1979-05-01

    In this group of 45 intestinal atresia patients (duodenum, 16; jejunum, 24; ileum five) at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, individual hospitalizations ranged up to 245 days. Twelve patients required multiple operations, and the overall mortality rate was 22% (ten patients). While the patients with duodenal atresia had the greatest incidence of other congenital anomalies, including Down's syndrome, the patients with jejunal atresia presented with the most challenging surgical problems. Of the 24 jejunal atresia patients, only three had a single, simple area of obstruction. The remainder were complicated by other gastrointestinal lesions (five patients), by multiple areas of atresia (seven patients) including those in one surviving patient with 22 separate atretic segments, and by the Christmas tree deformity (nine patients). Intraoperative management of the complicated atresia should include: 1) grouping of multiple atresias during resection, 2) adequate resection of the dilated proximal atonic loop, 3) end-to-end anastomoses, 4) avoidance of intraluminal catheters, 5) additional resection of a segment of the distal loop in the Christmas tree deformity and 6) consideration of the shish kebab technique for multiple atretic webs. Postoperative management should involve early intravenous nutrition and repeated exploration for continued obstruction.

  4. Perioperative complications in revision hip surgery.

    PubMed

    Thomasson, E; Guingand, O; Terracher, R; Mazel, C

    2001-01-01

    Revision hip surgery now constitutes 10-30% of all joint procedures. The morbidity and associated with this demanding operation are not well established. The goal of this paper is to determine these rates and to identify some predictive factors.
    The complication rate ranges from 31,5 to more than 77% in the literature. Life threatening complications represent 1,8 to 8% of these, leading to death in about 1,6%. ASA score and age above 75 appear to be correlated with medical complications. The injection rate varies from 1 to 5,8%, and may be as high as 14% in cases with a past history of infection. Heterotopic ossification occurred in 13 to 65%, reaching severity in 3,3 to 8,3%.
    Surgical complications include dislocation and femoral injuries. Dislocations occur in almost 10%, leading to revision in1-4,2%. Age and the number of previous surgical operations appear to be significant risk factors. Femoral injuries (perforations or femoral fractures) occur in 6-37%, especially in impaction grafting technique and when uncemented implants are used. Age over 75 years and femoral defects appear to be significant risk factors for femoral fractures.
    The rate of complications in revision hip surgery continues to be high, but successful clinical outcome can be attained even in elderly patients. Attentive preoperative exams, good prevention of technical pitfalls, the experience of the surgeon and the use of specific tools may decrease these complications and make this demanding procedure safer.

  5. [Hereditary spherocytosis. Review. Part II. Symptomatology, outcome, complications, and treatment].

    PubMed

    Donato, Hugo; Crisp, Renée Leonor; Rapetti, María Cristina; García, Eliana; Attie, Myriam

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis must always be suspected in children with anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, splenomegaly or cholelithiasis, in the asymptomatic individual with an affected relative, and in the neonate with hyperbilirubinemia with no blood group incompatibility; its early detection is key to avoid kernicterus. Follow-up of these patients is based on periodical control and supply of information on the adequate management of hemolytic or aplastic crisis, and early detection of cholelithiasis. The decision to perform splenectomy is usually associated with quality of life rather than life-threatening risk, and it should result from a consensus between patient, parents and physicians. The postsplenectomy follow-up is based on control of compliance with the prophylactic antibiotic therapy and the early diagnosis of infectious disorders. PMID:25727830

  6. New challenges in hemophilia: long-term outcomes and complications.

    PubMed

    Young, Guy

    2012-01-01

    For the past 5 decades, the care for hemophilia patients has improved significantly to the point that a newborn with hemophilia living in a developed nation can expect to have a normal lifespan and a high quality of life. Despite this, there are several new challenges that the hemophilia community will face in the coming years. First, the hemophilia community will soon be challenged with adopting a variety of new agents into clinical practice. Second, the normalization of patients' lives as a result of improved treatment has led to new problem areas, including obese/overweight hemophiliacs and osteoporosis. In addition, although mortality rates are similar to those of the healthy population, morbidities such as hemophilic arthropathy still occur. Third, the cost of care continues to rise, both due to the development of expensive new therapies and to the costs of managing problems such as obesity and osteoporosis. Finally, most patients in the world with hemophilia receive little to no care and although this is an enormous challenge, it must be confronted. This review discusses some new challenges facing developing nations and their care for hemophilia patients. In summary, in hemophilia in the coming few years, several new challenges will need to be confronted.

  7. [Hereditary spherocytosis. Review. Part II. Symptomatology, outcome, complications, and treatment].

    PubMed

    Donato, Hugo; Crisp, Renée Leonor; Rapetti, María Cristina; García, Eliana; Attie, Myriam

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis must always be suspected in children with anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, splenomegaly or cholelithiasis, in the asymptomatic individual with an affected relative, and in the neonate with hyperbilirubinemia with no blood group incompatibility; its early detection is key to avoid kernicterus. Follow-up of these patients is based on periodical control and supply of information on the adequate management of hemolytic or aplastic crisis, and early detection of cholelithiasis. The decision to perform splenectomy is usually associated with quality of life rather than life-threatening risk, and it should result from a consensus between patient, parents and physicians. The postsplenectomy follow-up is based on control of compliance with the prophylactic antibiotic therapy and the early diagnosis of infectious disorders.

  8. [Neurological complications and outcomes of bacterial meningitis in children].

    PubMed

    Milovanova, O A; Mazankova, L N; Moiseenkova, D A; Soldatova, I A

    2016-01-01

    Цель исследования. Анализ неврологических осложнений и исходов бактериальных менингитов (БМ) у детей. Материал и методы. Обследованы 55 больных в возрасте от 2 мес до 12 лет с БМ. Всем пациентам были проведены: бактериологическое исследование; клинический и биохимический анализ крови и комплекс серологических и иммунологических исследований крови и цереброспинальной жидкости (ЦСЖ), а также молекулярно-генетическое исследование сыворотки крови. Кроме того, применяли нейровизуализационные методы: нейросонографию (НСГ), компьютерную (рентгеновская) томографию (КТ) и магнитно-резонансную томографию головного мозга (МРТ). Результаты и заключение. Подтверждена ведущая роль генерализованной менингококковой инфекции в возникновении БМ у детей. Ранним и грозным осложнением БМ был отек головного мозга, обнаруженный у 9% пациентов с менингококковой инфекцией, у 7,3% — с пневмококковым менингитом и у 3,6% — с гемофильным менингитом. У 80% больных структурные изменения головного мозга отсутствовали, у 20% — резидуальная стадия БМ характеризовалась церебральными деструктивно-пролиферативными или атрофическими изменениями разной степени выраженности. Выявлена диссоциация между клиническими и нейровизуализационными показателями и неблагоприятными исходами БМ (в 65,5% случаев), связанная с отягощенным преморбидным состоянием больных, сопутствующей соматической/неврологической патологией, тяжестью течения БМ, поздней лабораторной диагностикой и несвоевременным началом этиотропной антибактериальной терапии.

  9. Complications and outcomes of repeat cesarean section in adolescent women

    PubMed Central

    Kaplanoglu, Mustafa; Karateke, Atilla; Un, Burak; Akgor, Utku; Baloğlu, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The evaluation of the effect of repeat cesarean sections in adolescent pregnancies on the morbidity, obstetric and perinatal results. Materials and methods: We reviewed the patient file and hospital records of patients who underwent at least one cesarean section among adolescent age group pregnant women who gave birth at our clinic between January 2010 and May 2013. The patients were divided into two groups as the patients who underwent the second cesarean section (116 patients) and those who underwent the third cesarean section (36 patients). The demographic data, maternal data and obstetric and perinatal results of the patients were evaluated. Results: A significant difference was present between the patients in the evaluation of the total number of examinations during pregnancy (P = 0.001), total maternal weight gain during pregnancy (P = 0.006), and the first examination gestational age (P = 0.006) and all values were less favorable in the third cesarean group. The gestational week at birth (P < 0.001), birth weight (P < 0.001), and APGAR score (P < 0.001) in the group with the third cesarean section were statistically significantly lower than the second cesarean section. The third cesarean cesarean was found to cause a significant risk increase for placenta accreta risk in adolescent pregnancies (P = 0.042). Conclusion: The increasing number of cesarean sections in the adolescent group is seen to be a significant risk factor for low gestational week of birth, low birth weight and related morbidities. The most important reason for the increased morbidity with increasing cesarean sections in the adolescent age has been defined as placenta accreta. PMID:25664081

  10. Respiratory Complication in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Vijaya S; Ansari, Sikandar; Fisher, Micah

    2016-07-01

    Cirrhosis, the twelfth leading cause of death, accounts for 1.1% of all deaths in the United States. Although there are multiple pulmonary complications associated with liver disease, the most important complications that cause significant morbidity and mortality are hepatopulmonary syndrome, hepatic hydrothorax, and portopulmonary hypertension. Patients with cirrhosis who complain of dyspnea should be evaluated for these complications. This article reviews these complications. PMID:27339676

  11. Prevalence of disease-specific antinuclear antibodies in general population: estimates from annual physical examinations of residents of a small town over a 5-year period.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nobuhide; Koshiba, Masahiro; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Tomoko; Morinobu, Sahoko; Kawano, Seiji; Kumagai, Shunichi

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the types and prevalence of disease-specific antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) and their relationship to rheumatic diseases in the general Japanese population. An immunofluorescence (IF) method was used for the first screening of ANA levels in serum samples obtained from 2181 residents of a small Japanese town. Individuals positive for IF-ANA were then further tested for disease-specific ANAs using eight enzyme immunoassays. Physical status and the presence of illness were determined by means of questionnaires and medical examinations. Based on the result of the IF-ANA assay, the rates of positive samples at 1:40 and 1:160 dilutions were 26.0 and 9.5%, respectively, with females have significantly higher positivity rates than males (P < 0.0001). Among 566 IF-ANA-positive individuals, 100 individuals were found to have 114 disease-specific ANAs. Anti-SSA/Ro, anti-centromere, and anti-U1RNP antibodies were detected in 58, 30, and 11 individuals, respectively, but anti-Sm, anti-Scl-70, and anti-Jo-1 antibodies were undetectable. Questionnaires and medical examinations revealed that among 60 disease-specific ANA-positive individuals that were available for testing, six had Sjögren's syndrome (SS), five were suspected of having SS, and five had rheumatoid arthritis. Surprisingly, 34 (57%) of the disease-specific ANA-positive individuals were clinically healthy. Anti-SSA/Ro, anti-centromere, and anti-U1RNP antibodies were quite frequent among clinically healthy Japanese subjects, although anti-Sm, anti-Scl-70, and anti-Jo-1 antibodies were not. Of the 60 individuals who tested positive for disease-specific ANAs, 30% (18/60) actually manifested systemic rheumatic diseases, while 50% showed no detectable signs or symptoms of rheumatic diseases.

  12. Neurological complications of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Bhardwaj, Anish; Stevens, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplants are at risk of life-threatening neurological disorders including encephalopathy, seizures, infections and tumors of the central nervous system, stroke, central pontine myelinolysis, and neuromuscular disorders-often requiring admission to, or occurring in, the intensive care unit (ICU). Many of these complications are linked directly or indirectly to immunosuppressive therapy. However, neurological disorders may also result from graft versus host disease, or be an expression of the underlying disease which prompted transplantation, as well as injury induced during radiation, chemotherapy, surgery, and ICU stay. In rare cases, neuroinfectious pathogens may be transmitted with the transplanted tissue or organ. Diagnosis may be a challenge because clinical symptoms and findings on neuroimaging lack specificity, and a biological specimen or tissue diagnosis is often needed for definitive diagnosis. Management is centered on preventing further neurological injury, etiology-targeted therapy, and balancing the benefits and toxicities of specific immunosuppressive agents. PMID:21764765

  13. Neuromuscular complications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Grisold, W; Grisold, A; Löscher, W N

    2016-08-15

    Cancer is becoming a treatable and even often curable disease. The neuromuscular system can be affected by direct tumor invasion or metastasis, neuroendocrine, metabolic, dysimmune/inflammatory, infections and toxic as well as paraneoplastic conditions. Due to the nature of cancer treatment, which frequently is based on a DNA damaging mechanism, treatment related toxic side effects are frequent and the correct identification of the causative mechanism is necessary to initiate the proper treatment. The peripheral nervous system is conventionally divided into nerve roots, the proximal nerves and plexus, the peripheral nerves (mono- and polyneuropathies), the site of neuromuscular transmission and muscle. This review is based on the anatomic distribution of the peripheral nervous system, divided into cranial nerves (CN), motor neuron (MND), nerve roots, plexus, peripheral nerve, the neuromuscular junction and muscle. The various etiologies of neuromuscular complications - neoplastic, surgical and mechanic, toxic, metabolic, endocrine, and paraneoplastic/immune - are discussed separately for each part of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:27423586

  14. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  15. Cardiovascular complications in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Vitale, G; Pivonello, R; Lombardi, G; Colao, A

    2004-09-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are increased in acromegaly. In fact, GH and IGF-I excess induces a specific cardiomyopathy. The early stage of acromegaly is characterized by the hyperkinetic syndrome (high heart rate and increased systolic output). Frequently, concentric biventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction occur in acromegaly, leading to an impaired systolic function ending in heart failure if the disease is untreated or unsuccessfully untreated. Besides, abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and of valves have been also described in acromegaly. The coexistence of other complications, such as arterial hypertension and diabetes, aggravates the acromegalic cardiomyopathy. The suppression of GH/IGF-I following an efficacious therapy could decrease left ventricular mass and improve cardiac function. In conclusion, a careful evaluation of cardiac function, morphology and activity seems to be mandatory in acromegaly.

  16. Complications of collagenous colitis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh-James

    2008-03-21

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis. This disorder generally has an apparently benign clinical course. However, a number of gastric and intestinal complications, possibly coincidental, may develop with collagenous colitis. Distinctive inflammatory disorders of the gastric mucosa have been described, including lymphocytic gastritis and collagenous gastritis. Celiac disease and collagenous sprue (or collagenous enteritis) may occur. Colonic ulceration has been associated with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may evolve from collagenous colitis. Submucosal "dissection", colonic fractures or mucosal tears and perforation from air insufflation during colonoscopy may occur and has been hypothesized to be due to compromise of the colonic wall from submucosal collagen deposition. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressure during barium enema contrast studies. Finally, malignant disorders have also been reported, including carcinoma and lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:18350593

  17. Vascular Complications of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Joshua A; Creager, Mark A

    2016-05-27

    Over the last several decades, the global incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus has increased significantly. The raised incidence rate is projected to continue as greater numbers of persons adopt a Western lifestyle and diet. Patients with diabetes mellitus are at heightened risk of both adverse microvascular and cardiovascular events. Moreover, once cardiovascular disease develops, diabetes mellitus exacerbates progression and worsens outcomes. The medical management of patients with diabetes mellitus mandates comprehensive risk factor modification and antiplatelet therapy. Recent clinical trials of new medical therapies continue to inform the care of patients with diabetes mellitus to reduce both cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:27230641

  18. Predictive modeling of complications.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Joseph A; Scheer, Justin K; Ames, Christopher P

    2016-09-01

    Predictive analytic algorithms are designed to identify patterns in the data that allow for accurate predictions without the need for a hypothesis. Therefore, predictive modeling can provide detailed and patient-specific information that can be readily applied when discussing the risks of surgery with a patient. There are few studies using predictive modeling techniques in the adult spine surgery literature. These types of studies represent the beginning of the use of predictive analytics in spine surgery outcomes. We will discuss the advancements in the field of spine surgery with respect to predictive analytics, the controversies surrounding the technique, and the future directions.

  19. DrugLogit: logistic discrimination between drugs and nondrugs including disease-specificity by assigning probabilities based on molecular properties.

    PubMed

    García-Sosa, Alfonso T; Oja, Mare; Hetényi, Csaba; Maran, Uko

    2012-08-27

    The increasing knowledge of both structure and activity of compounds provides a good basis for enhancing the pharmacological characterization of chemical libraries. In addition, pharmacology can be seen as incorporating both advances from molecular biology as well as chemical sciences, with innovative insight provided from studying target-ligand data from a ligand molecular point of view. Predictions and profiling of libraries of drug candidates have previously focused mainly on certain cases of oral bioavailability. Inclusion of other administration routes and disease-specificity would improve the precision of drug profiling. In this work, recent data are extended, and a probability-based approach is introduced for quantitative and gradual classification of compounds into categories of drugs/nondrugs, as well as for disease- or organ-specificity. Using experimental data of over 1067 compounds and multivariate logistic regressions, the classification shows good performance in training and independent test cases. The regressions have high statistical significance in terms of the robustness of coefficients and 95% confidence intervals provided by a 1000-fold bootstrapping resampling. Besides their good predictive power, the classification functions remain chemically interpretable, containing only one to five variables in total, and the physicochemical terms involved can be easily calculated. The present approach is useful for an improved description and filtering of compound libraries. It can also be applied sequentially or in combinations of filters, as well as adapted to particular use cases. The scores and equations may be able to suggest possible routes for compound or library modification. The data is made available for reuse by others, and the equations are freely accessible at http://hermes.chem.ut.ee/~alfx/druglogit.html.

  20. Disease-specific monoclonal antibodies targeting glutamate decarboxylase impair GABAergic neurotransmission and affect motor learning and behavioral functions

    PubMed Central

    Manto, Mario; Honnorat, Jérôme; Hampe, Christiane S.; Guerra-Narbona, Rafael; López-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Delgado-García, José María; Saitow, Fumihito; Suzuki, Hidenori; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can be found in patients with type 1 diabetes and a number of neurological disorders, including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and limbic encephalitis. The detection of disease-specific autoantibody epitopes led to the hypothesis that distinct GAD autoantibodies may elicit specific neurological phenotypes. We explored the in vitro/in vivo effects of well-characterized monoclonal GAD antibodies. We found that GAD autoantibodies present in patients with stiff person syndrome (n = 7) and cerebellar ataxia (n = 15) recognized an epitope distinct from that recognized by GAD autoantibodies present in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 10) or limbic encephalitis (n = 4). We demonstrated that the administration of a monoclonal GAD antibody representing this epitope specificity; (1) disrupted in vitro the association of GAD with γ-Aminobutyric acid containing synaptic vesicles; (2) depressed the inhibitory synaptic transmission in cerebellar slices with a gradual time course and a lasting suppressive effect; (3) significantly decreased conditioned eyelid responses evoked in mice, with no modification of learning curves in the classical eyeblink-conditioning task; (4) markedly impaired the facilitatory effect exerted by the premotor cortex over the motor cortex in a paired-pulse stimulation paradigm; and (5) induced decreased exploratory behavior and impaired locomotor function in rats. These findings support the specific targeting of GAD by its autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of stiff-person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia. Therapies of these disorders based on selective removal of such GAD antibodies could be envisioned. PMID:25870548

  1. A combined biochemical, biophysical and immunological approach towards the identification of celiac disease-specific wheat antigens.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharani; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Swoboda, Ines; Constantin, Claudia; Mittermann, Irene; Pahr, Sandra; Vogelsang, Harald; Huber, Wolf-Dietrich; Valenta, Rudolf

    2013-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an inflammatory affliction of the small bowel caused by an immunological hypersensitivity to ingested wheat antigens affecting almost 1 % of the population. The gliadin fraction of wheat has been shown to contain the pathogenic antigens which react with antibodies and T cells. However, there is only limited knowledge regarding the precise nature of the wheat antigens recognized by IgA antibodies from CD patients and diagnostic tests based on the gliadin fraction have been demonstrated to give frequently false positive results. The aim of this study was the characterization of wheat antigens specifically recognized by IgA antibodies of CD patients. We developed a combined biochemical, biophysical, and immunological approach for the identification of celiac disease-specific wheat antigens. It is based on sub-fractionation of the wheat gliadin fraction using two ion exchange chromatography steps, the localization of CD-specific antigens by immunoblotting with IgA antibodies from CD patients, subsequent digestion followed by electro spray ionization-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) and N-terminal sequencing by Edman degradation. Through the sub-fractionation procedure it was possible to separate CD-specific IgA-reactive wheat antigens from other wheat antigens which were also recognized by IgA antibodies of individuals without CD or by CD patients on gluten-free diet. Analysis by LC-ESI-MS/MS and N-terminal sequencing of the sub-fractions and the proteins specifically recognized by CD patients identified certain γ-gliadins with molecular mass of 37,000 and 45,000 as CD-specific wheat antigens. The CD-specific γ-gliadins with the molecular mass of 37,000 and 45,000 should be useful to study pathomechanisms of the disease and to improve the specificity of diagnostic tests for CD.

  2. Morcellation complications: From direct trauma to inoculation.

    PubMed

    Noel, Nyia L; Isaacson, Keith B

    2016-08-01

    Morcellation is the fragmentation of tissue to facilitate removal of the specimen through small incision in minimally invasive surgery. This technique is not unique to gynecology and is used in general surgery with the goal of improved surgical outcomes including decreased pain, cost, hospital length of stay, and rapid return to normal activities and work. Gynecologic laparoscopic power morcellation (LPM) has come under increased scrutiny over the last 2 years due to widespread attention to a known but rare complication, an unanticipated dissemination of malignancy, namely occult uterine leiomyosarcoma. This chapter focuses on complications associated with gynecologic tissue morcellation from inoculation of benign or malignant tissue fragments within the peritoneal cavity and direct trauma from morcellation techniques. We also include a review of the various morcellation techniques from knife to electrical and the use of intraperitoneal specimen containment systems. PMID:26879674

  3. Treatment and Outcome of Patients with Skull Base Chordoma: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Moran; Na'ara, Shorook; Binenbaum, Yoav; Billan, Salem; Sviri, Gil; Cohen, Jacob T.; Gil, Ziv

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chordoma is a locally aggressive tumor. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of different surgical approaches and adjuvant radiation modalities used to treat these patients. Design Meta-analysis. Main Outcome Measures Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and progression-free survival (PFS). Results The 5-year OS and PFS rates of the whole cohort (n = 467) were 86% and 65.7%, respectively. The 5-year DSS for patients who underwent open surgery and endoscopic surgery was 45% and 49%, respectively (p = 0.8); PFS was 94% and 79%, respectively (p = 0.11). The 5-year OS of patients treated with surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy was 90% compared with 70% of those treated by surgery alone (p = 0.24). Patients undergoing partial resection without adjuvant radiotherapy had a 5-year OS of 41% and a DSS of 45%, significantly lower than in the total-resection group (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.01, respectively). The complication rates were similar in the open and endoscopic groups. Conclusions Patients undergoing total resection have the best outcome; adjuvant radiation therapy improves the survival of patients undergoing partial resection. In view of the advantages of minimally invasive techniques, endoscopic surgery appears an appropriate surgical approach for this disease. PMID:25452895

  4. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  5. Avoiding Failure in Hip Arthroscopy: Complications, Pearls, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Burrus, Matthew Tyrrell; Cowan, James B; Bedi, Asheesh

    2016-07-01

    Although most patients have successful outcomes after hip arthroscopy, a minority of patients experience complications that may impact their recovery and long-term benefit. As most of these complications can be minimized by appropriate surgical technique, many tips have been recommended. Additionally, the reasons behind clinical failure postoperatively have been scrutinized, which include, most commonly, incomplete correction of osseous pathomorphology, underappreciated preexisting hip osteoarthritis, and/or an incorrect preoperative diagnosis. Meticulous preoperative planning, evaluation of advanced imaging studies, and proper patient selection will help to reduce the number of postoperative failures and increase the chance of a successful outcome following hip arthroscopy.

  6. Avoiding Failure in Hip Arthroscopy: Complications, Pearls, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Burrus, Matthew Tyrrell; Cowan, James B; Bedi, Asheesh

    2016-07-01

    Although most patients have successful outcomes after hip arthroscopy, a minority of patients experience complications that may impact their recovery and long-term benefit. As most of these complications can be minimized by appropriate surgical technique, many tips have been recommended. Additionally, the reasons behind clinical failure postoperatively have been scrutinized, which include, most commonly, incomplete correction of osseous pathomorphology, underappreciated preexisting hip osteoarthritis, and/or an incorrect preoperative diagnosis. Meticulous preoperative planning, evaluation of advanced imaging studies, and proper patient selection will help to reduce the number of postoperative failures and increase the chance of a successful outcome following hip arthroscopy. PMID:27343398

  7. First Trimester complications in pregnancy with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Bishwajit

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes is the most prevalent medical condition complicating pregnancy in the world. It carries both acute and long-term health consequences for the mother and her offspring. Both preexisting (type 1 and type 2) and gestational diabetes are a high-risk state for miscarriage, stillbirths and congenital malformations in early pregnancy. Like normal pregnancy, vaginal bleeding, urinary tract infection, abdominopelvic pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms in early pregnancy with preexisting and gestational diabetes. Early diagnosis and appropriate management of the condition is important for improving pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27582160

  8. Interventional Management of Nonvascular Renal Transplant Complications.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Kanti Pallav; LaBerge, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    Nonvascular complications represent a significant source of morbidity following renal transplantation and can be seen in up to 20% of patients. Postoperative problems include urinary tract obstruction or leakage and the development of peritransplant fluid collections. Interventional radiologists play a key role in the management of these patients. Image-guided interventions are used to identify the underlying anatomical problem, relieve immediate symptoms, and allow planning for long-term resolution. In this article, we review the urinary tract anatomy relevant to renal transplantation, procedural techniques for image-guided urinary tract interventions and interventions on peritransplant fluid collections, and expected outcomes following image-guided interventions. PMID:27641456

  9. Dealing with surgical left ventricular assist device complications

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Arman; Acker, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) will undoubtedly have an increasing role due to the aging population, anticipated concomitant increase in the prevalence of end-stage heart failure, and improvements in LVAD technology and outcomes. As with any surgical procedure, LVAD implantation is associated with an adverse event profile. Such complications of LVAD therapy include bleeding, infection, pump thrombosis, right heart failure, device malfunction, and stroke. Although each has a unique management, early recognition and diagnosis of these complications is uniformly paramount. In this review, we provide an overview of managing surgical complications of LVADs. PMID:26793336

  10. Serious Vascular Complications after Nonsurgical Rhinoplasty: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiqing; Liu, Yu; Fan, Dongliang

    2016-04-01

    There has been an increased global demand for dermal filler injections in recent years. Although hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers generally have a good safety profile, serious vascular complications have been reported. Here we present a typical case of skin necrosis following a nonsurgical rhinoplasty using hyaluronic acid filler. Despite various rescuing managements, unsightly superficial scars were left. It is critical for plastic surgeons and dermatologists to be familiar with the vascular anatomy and the staging of vascular complications. Any patients suspected to experience a vascular complication should receive early management under close monitoring. Meanwhile, the potentially devastating outcome caused by illegal practice calls for stricter regulations and law enforcement. PMID:27200245

  11. Improving Depression Care in Patients with Diabetes and Multiple Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kinder, Leslie S; Katon, Wayne J; Ludman, Evette; Russo, Joan; Simon, Greg; Lin, Elizabeth HB; Ciechanowski, Paul; Von Korff, Michael; Young, Bessie

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Depression is common in patients with diabetes, but it is often inadequately treated within primary care. Competing clinical demands and treatment resistance may make it especially difficult to improve depressive symptoms in patients with diabetes who have multiple complications. OBJECTIVE To determine whether a collaborative care intervention for depression would be as effective in patients with diabetes who had 2 or more complications as in patients with diabetes who had fewer complications. DESIGN The Pathways Study was a randomized control trial comparing collaborative care case management for depression and usual primary care. This secondary analysis compared outcomes in patients with 2 or more complications to patients with fewer complications. PATIENTS Three hundred and twenty-nine patients with diabetes and comorbid depression were recruited through primary care clinics of a large prepaid health plan. MEASUREMENTS Depression was assessed at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months with the 20-item depression scale from the Hopkins Symptom Checklist. Diabetes complications were determined from automated patient records. RESULTS The Pathways collaborative care intervention was significantly more successful at reducing depressive symptoms than usual primary care in patients with diabetes who had 2 or more complications. Patients with fewer than 2 complications experienced similar reductions in depressive symptoms in both intervention and usual care. CONCLUSION Patients with depression and diabetes who have multiple complications may benefit most from collaborative care for depression. These findings suggest that with appropriate intervention depression can be successfully treated in patients with diabetes who have the highest severity of medical problems. PMID:16836628

  12. Pediatric hydrocephalus outcomes: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of pediatric hydrocephalus, including surgical complications, neurological sequelae and academic achievement, has been the matter of many studies. However, much uncertainty remains, regarding the very long-term and social outcome, and the determinants of complications and clinical outcome. In this paper, we review the different facets of outcome, including surgical outcome (shunt failure, infection and independence, and complications of endoscopy), clinical outcome (neurological, sensory, cognitive sequels, epilepsy), schooling and social integration. We then provide a brief review of the English-language literature and highlighting selected studies that provide information on the outcome and sequelae of pediatric hydrocephalus, and the impact of predictive variables on outcome. Mortality caused by hydrocephalus and its treatments is between 0 and 3%, depending on the duration of follow-up. Shunt event-free survival (EFS) is about 70% at one year and 40% at ten years. The EFS after endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) appears better but likely benefits from selection bias and long-term figures are not available. Shunt infection affects between 5 and 8% of surgeries, and 15 to 30% of patients according to the duration of follow-up. Shunt independence can be achieved in 3 to 9% of patients, but the definition of this varies. Broad variations in the prevalence of cognitive sequelae, affecting 12 to 50% of children, and difficulties at school, affecting between 20 and 60%, attest of disparities among studies in their clinical evaluation. Epilepsy, affecting 6 to 30% of patients, has a serious impact on outcome. In adulthood, social integration is poor in a substantial number of patients but data are sparse. Few controlled prospective studies exist regarding hydrocephalus outcomes; in their absence, largely retrospective studies must be used to evaluate the long-term consequences of hydrocephalus and its treatments. This review aims to help to establish

  13. Patients with Risk Factors for Complications Do Not Require Longer Antimicrobial Therapy for Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infection.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Rishi; Allen, Casey J; Sawyer, Robert G; Mazuski, John; Duane, Therese M; Askari, Reza; Banton, Kaysie L; Claridge, Jeffrey A; Coimbra, Raul; Cuschieri, Joseph; Dellinger, E Patchen; Evans, Heather L; Guidry, Christopher A; Miller, Preston R; O'Neill, Patrick J; Rotstein, Ori D; West, Michaela A; Popovsky, Kimberley; Namias, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    A prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial found that four days of antibiotics for source-controlled complicated intra-abdominal infection resulted in similar outcomes when compared with a longer duration. We hypothesized that patients with specific risk factors for complications also had similar outcomes. Short-course patients with obesity, diabetes, or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II ≥15 from the STOP-IT trial were compared with longer duration patients. Outcomes included incidence of and days to infectious complications, mortality, and length of stay. Obese and diabetic patients had similar incidences of and days to surgical site infection, recurrent intra-abdominal infection, extra-abdominal infection, and Clostridium difficile infection. Short- and long-course patients had similar incidences of complications among patients with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II ≥15. However, there were fewer days to the diagnosis of surgical site infection (9.5 ± 3.4 vs 21.6 ± 6.2, P = 0.010) and extra-abdominal infection (12.4 ± 6.9 vs 21.8 ± 6.1, P = 0.029) in the short-course group. Mortality and length of stay was similar for all groups. A short course of antibiotics in complicated intra-abdominal infection with source control seems to have similar outcomes to a longer course in patients with diabetes, obesity, or increased severity of illness.

  14. Patients with Risk Factors for Complications Do Not Require Longer Antimicrobial Therapy for Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infection.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Rishi; Allen, Casey J; Sawyer, Robert G; Mazuski, John; Duane, Therese M; Askari, Reza; Banton, Kaysie L; Claridge, Jeffrey A; Coimbra, Raul; Cuschieri, Joseph; Dellinger, E Patchen; Evans, Heather L; Guidry, Christopher A; Miller, Preston R; O'Neill, Patrick J; Rotstein, Ori D; West, Michaela A; Popovsky, Kimberley; Namias, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    A prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial found that four days of antibiotics for source-controlled complicated intra-abdominal infection resulted in similar outcomes when compared with a longer duration. We hypothesized that patients with specific risk factors for complications also had similar outcomes. Short-course patients with obesity, diabetes, or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II ≥15 from the STOP-IT trial were compared with longer duration patients. Outcomes included incidence of and days to infectious complications, mortality, and length of stay. Obese and diabetic patients had similar incidences of and days to surgical site infection, recurrent intra-abdominal infection, extra-abdominal infection, and Clostridium difficile infection. Short- and long-course patients had similar incidences of complications among patients with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II ≥15. However, there were fewer days to the diagnosis of surgical site infection (9.5 ± 3.4 vs 21.6 ± 6.2, P = 0.010) and extra-abdominal infection (12.4 ± 6.9 vs 21.8 ± 6.1, P = 0.029) in the short-course group. Mortality and length of stay was similar for all groups. A short course of antibiotics in complicated intra-abdominal infection with source control seems to have similar outcomes to a longer course in patients with diabetes, obesity, or increased severity of illness. PMID:27670577

  15. Step-by-step guideline for disease-specific costing studies in low- and middle-income countries: a mixed methodology

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Marleen E.; Kundu, Piyali; Boers, Alexander C.; Bolarinwa, Oladimeji A.; te Pas, Mark J.; Akande, Tanimola M.; Agbede, Kayode; Gomez, Gabriella B.; Redekop, William K.; Schultsz, Constance; Tan, Siok Swan

    2014-01-01

    Background Disease-specific costing studies can be used as input into cost-effectiveness analyses and provide important information for efficient resource allocation. However, limited data availability and limited expertise constrain such studies in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Objective To describe a step-by-step guideline for conducting disease-specific costing studies in LMICs where data availability is limited and to illustrate how the guideline was applied in a costing study of cardiovascular disease prevention care in rural Nigeria. Design The step-by-step guideline provides practical recommendations on methods and data requirements for six sequential steps: 1) definition of the study perspective, 2) characterization of the unit of analysis, 3) identification of cost items, 4) measurement of cost items, 5) valuation of cost items, and 6) uncertainty analyses. Results We discuss the necessary tradeoffs between the accuracy of estimates and data availability constraints at each step and illustrate how a mixed methodology of accurate bottom-up micro-costing and more feasible approaches can be used to make optimal use of all available data. An illustrative example from Nigeria is provided. Conclusions An innovative, user-friendly guideline for disease-specific costing in LMICs is presented, using a mixed methodology to account for limited data availability. The illustrative example showed that the step-by-step guideline can be used by healthcare professionals in LMICs to conduct feasible and accurate disease-specific cost analyses. PMID:24685170

  16. Neonatal management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Khan, Shareen; Baki, Md Abdul; Zabeen, Bedowra; Azad, Kiswhar

    2016-09-01

    Women with diabetes in pregnancy, either pre-gestational Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 & Type 2) or Gestational Diabetes, are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm labour and increased foetal mortality rate. Adequate glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is crucial for improving foetal and perinatal outcomes in these babies. Perinatal and neonatal morbidities and mortality rates have declined since the development of specialized maternal, foetal, and neonatal care for women with diabetes and their offspring. However, infants of diabetic mothers are at risk for developing complications as macrosomia, hypoglycaemia, perinatal asphyxia, cardiac and respiratory problems, birth injuries and congenital malformations. In this review article we describe the neonatal management of the offspring of diabetic mothers.

  17. Neonatal management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Khan, Shareen; Baki, Md Abdul; Zabeen, Bedowra; Azad, Kiswhar

    2016-09-01

    Women with diabetes in pregnancy, either pre-gestational Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 & Type 2) or Gestational Diabetes, are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm labour and increased foetal mortality rate. Adequate glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is crucial for improving foetal and perinatal outcomes in these babies. Perinatal and neonatal morbidities and mortality rates have declined since the development of specialized maternal, foetal, and neonatal care for women with diabetes and their offspring. However, infants of diabetic mothers are at risk for developing complications as macrosomia, hypoglycaemia, perinatal asphyxia, cardiac and respiratory problems, birth injuries and congenital malformations. In this review article we describe the neonatal management of the offspring of diabetic mothers. PMID:27582162

  18. Complications of Lower Body Lift Surgery in Postbariatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Martine M.; Klein, Steven; Hoogbergen, Maarten M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an exponential rise of patients with massive weight loss because of bariatric surgery or lifestyle changes. The result is an increase of patients with folds of redundant skin that may cause physical and psychological problems. The lower body lift is a procedure to correct deformities in the abdomen, mons, flanks, lateral thighs, and buttocks. Complication rates are quite high and could negatively affect the positive outcomes. The purpose of this study is to assess complication rates and to identify predictors of complications to optimize outcomes for patients after lower body lift surgery. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 100 patients who underwent a lower body lift procedure was performed. The patients were reviewed for complications, demographic data, comorbidities, smoking, highest lifetime body mass index, body mass index before lower body lift surgery, percentage of excess weight loss, and amount of tissue excised. Results: The overall complication rate was 78%. Twenty-two percent of the patients had major complications and 56% had minor complications. There is a linear relationship between body mass index before lower body lift surgery and complications (P = 0.03). The percentage of excess weight loss (odds ratio [OR] 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.92–1.00), highest lifetime body mass index (OR 1.08; 95% CI 1.01–1.15), body mass index before lower body lift surgery (OR 1.17; 95% CI 1.02–1.33), and smoking (OR 7.74; CI 0.98–61.16) are significantly associated with the development of complications. Conclusions: This study emphasizes the importance of a good weight status before surgery and cessation of smoking to minimize the risk of complications. PMID:27757346

  19. Study on the development of an infectious disease-specific health literacy scale in the Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiangyang; Di, Zeqing; Cheng, Yulan; Ren, Xuefeng; Chai, Yan; Ding, Fan; Chen, Jibin; Southerland, Jodi L; Cui, Zengwei; Hu, Xiuqiong; Xu, Jingdong; Xu, Shuiyang; Qian, Guohong; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To develop a scale to assess infectious disease-specific health literacy (IDSHL) in China and test its initial psychometric properties. Methods Item pooling, reduction and assessment of psychometric properties were conducted. The scale was divided into 2 subscales; subscale 1 assessed an individual's skills to prevent/treat infectious diseases and subscale 2 assessed cognitive ability. In 2014, 9000 people aged 15–69 years were randomly sampled from 3 provinces and asked to complete the IDSHL questionnaire. Cronbach's α was calculated to assess reliability. Exploratory factor analysis, t-test, correlations, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and logistic regression were used to examine validity. Results Each of the 22 items in subscale 1 had a content validity index >0.8. In total, 8858 people completed the scale. The principal components factor analysis suggested a 5-factor solution. All factor loadings were >0.40 (p<0.05). The IDSHL score was 22.07±7.91 (mean±SD; total score=38.62). Significant differences were observed across age (r=−0.276), sex (males: 21.65±8.03; females: 22.47±7.78), education (14.16±8.19 to 26.55±6.26), 2-week morbidity (present: 20.62±8.17, absent: 22.35±7.83; p<0.001) and health literacy of the highest and lowest 27% score groups (all p<0.05). The ROC curve indicated that 76.2% of respondents were adequate in IDSHL. Binary logistic regression analysis revealed 12 predictors of IDSHL adequacy (p<0.05). Among the 22 remaining items, Corrected Item-Total Correlation ranged from 0.316 to 0.504 and Cronbach's α values ranged from 0.754 to 0.810 if the items were deleted. The overall α value was 0.839 and the difficulty coefficient ranged from 1.19 to 4.08. For subscale 2, there were statistically significant differences between the mean scores of those with a correct/incorrect answer (all p<0.001). Conclusions The newly developed 28-item scale provides an efficient, psychometrically sound and user

  20. [Clinical Practice after Bariatric Surgery: Problems and Complications].

    PubMed

    Gebhart, Martina

    2015-12-01

    The number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery because of morbid obesity is increasing rapidly. Therefore, it is an important issue to be aware of outcome and complications after bariatric surgery. This mini-review presents a compilation of important gastrointestinal symptoms, as pain, diarrhea and dumping, and includes treatment options. It characterizes possible micronutrient deficiencies, gives instructions concerning the adaptation of drugs and illustrates possible adverse outcomes, such as excessive weight loss, insufficient weight loss and weight gain after bariatric surgery. PMID:26649955

  1. Validation of the Disease-Specific Components of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-36 (KDQOL-36) in Chinese Patients Undergoing Maintenance Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity, reliability and sensitivity of the disease-specific items of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-36 (KDQOL-36) in Chinese patients undergoing maintenance dialysis. Methods The content validity was assessed by content validity index (CVI) in ten subjects. 356 subjects were recruited for pilot psychometric testing. The internal construct validity was assessed by corrected item-subscale total correlation. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to confirm the factor structure. The convergent validity was assessed by Pearson’s correlation test between the disease specific subscale scores and SF-12 version 2 Health Survey (SF-12 v2) scores. The reliability was assessed by the internal consistency (Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient) and 2-week test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)). The sensitivity was determined by performing known group comparisons by independent t-test. Results The CVI on clarity and relevance was ≥ 0.9 for all items. Corrected item- total correlation scores were ≥0.4 for all, except an item related to problems with access site. CFA confirmed the 3-factor structure of the disease-specific component of the KDQOL-36. The correlation coefficients between the disease-specific domain scores and the SF-12 v2 physical and mental component summary scores ranged from 0.328 to 0.492. The reliability was good (Cronbach’s alpha coefficients ranged from 0.810 to 0.931, ICC ranged from 0.792 to 0.924). Only the effect subscale was sensitive in detecting differences in HRQOL between haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients, with effect size = 0.68. Conclusion The disease-specific items of the KDQOL-36 are a valid, reliable and sensitive measure to assess the health-related quality of life of Chinese patients on maintenance dialysis. PMID:27148742

  2. A joint frailty model to estimate the recurrence process and the disease-specific mortality process without needing the cause of death.

    PubMed

    Belot, Aurélien; Rondeau, Virginie; Remontet, Laurent; Giorgi, Roch

    2014-08-15

    In chronic diseases, such as cancer, recurrent events (such as relapses) are commonly observed; these could be interrupted by death. With such data, a joint analysis of recurrence and mortality processes is usually conducted with a frailty parameter shared by both processes. We examined a joint modeling of these processes considering death under two aspects: 'death due to the disease under study' and 'death due to other causes', which enables estimating the disease-specific mortality hazard. The excess hazard model was used to overcome the difficulties in determining the causes of deaths (unavailability or unreliability); this model allows estimating the disease-specific mortality hazard without needing the cause of death but using the mortality hazards observed in the general population. We propose an approach to model jointly recurrence and disease-specific mortality processes within a parametric framework. A correlation between the two processes is taken into account through a shared frailty parameter. This approach allows estimating unbiased covariate effects on the hazards of recurrence and disease-specific mortality. The performance of the approach was evaluated by simulations with different scenarios. The method is illustrated by an analysis of a population-based dataset on colon cancer with observations of colon cancer recurrences and deaths. The benefits of the new approach are highlighted by comparison with the 'classical' joint model of recurrence and overall mortality. Moreover, we assessed the goodness of fit of the proposed model. Comparisons between the conditional hazard and the marginal hazard of the disease-specific mortality are shown, and differences in interpretation are discussed.

  3. Postoperative Complications, In-Hospital Mortality and 5-Year Survival After Surgical Resection for Patients with a Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jilesen, Anneke P J; van Eijck, Casper H J; in't Hof, K H; van Dieren, S; Gouma, Dirk J; van Dijkum, Els J M Nieveen

    2016-03-01

    Studies on postoperative complications and survival in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are sparse and randomized controlled trials are not available. We reviewed all studies on postoperative complications and survival after resection of pNET. A systematic search was performed in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE from 2000-2013. Inclusion criteria were studies of resected pNET, which described postoperative complications separately for each surgical procedure and/or 5-year survival after resection. Prospective and retrospective studies were pooled separately and overall pooled if heterogeneity was below 75%. The random-effect model was used. Overall, 2643 studies were identified and after full-text analysis 62 studies were included. Pancreatic fistula (PF) rate of the prospective studies after tumor enucleation was 45%; PF-rates after distal pancreatectomy, pancreatoduodenectomy, or central pancreatectomy were, respectively, 14-14-58%. Delayed gastric emptying rates were, respectively, 5-5-18-16%. Postoperative hemorrhage rates were, respectively, 6-1-7-4%. In-hospital mortality rates were, respectively, 3-4-6-4%. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) of resected pNET without synchronous resected liver metastases were, respectively, 85-93%. Heterogeneity between included studies on 5-year OS in patients with synchronous resected liver metastases was too high to pool all studies. The 5-year DSS in patients with liver metastases was 80%. Morbidity after pancreatic resection for pNET was mainly caused by PF. Liver resection in patients with liver metastases seems to have a positive effect on DSS. To reduce heterogeneity, ISGPS criteria and uniform patient groups should be used in the analysis of postoperative outcome and survival.

  4. Infantile hemangiomas, complications and treatments.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Carol Erin; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2016-03-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common vascular tumors of infancy. While the majority regress without the need for intervention, approximately 10%, often site dependent, can cause serious complications and require treatment. IH complications can be categorized as life threatening, obstructive, ulcerative or disfiguring. Life threatening complications include airway and hepatic IHs. Functional complications obstructing vital structures or impairing function include periocular, nasal, labial, parotid, auricular, and breast IHs. Local complications arise from ulceration or those in cosmetically sensitive areas. Therapeutic options for complicated IHs include pharmacologic (topical or systemic), surgical, or laser interventions. Topical agents are best employed for small, superficial, and localized IHs; while systemic therapy is reserved for larger IHs and those with more aggressive growth characteristics with propranolol as first-line therapy. PMID:27607318

  5. Complications of hyaluronic acid fillers.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Michael J; Solish, Nowell

    2009-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid filler use, user groups, and indications have expanded significantly in the past several years. This group of fillers is extremely safe in experienced hands. Complications are infrequent but can be devastating. There can be no substitution for recognized and specific training. Prompt recognition and proper treatment of serious complication can moderate and even prevent serious sequelae. This article describes the most frequent and serious complications, their prevention, and treatment.

  6. Ileoanal anastomosis with reservoirs: complications and long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Belliveau, Paul; Trudel, Judith; Vasilevsky, Carol-Ann; Stein, Barry; Gordon, Philip H.

    Objective To determine the rate of complications of ileoanal pouch anastomosis, their treatment and their influence on a successful outcome. Design A computerized database and chart review. Setting Three academic tertiary care health centres. Patients All 239 patients admitted for surgery between 1981 and 1994 with a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatosis coli. Interventions Sphincter-saving total proctocolectomy and construction of either S-type or J-type ileoanal reservoir. Outcome measures Indications, early and late complications, incidence of pouch excision. Results Of the 239 patients, 228 (95.4%) were operated on for ulcerative colitis and 11 (4.6%) for familial polyposis coli. One patient in each group was found to have a carcinoma not previously diagnosed. Twenty-eight patients had poor results: in 17 (7.1%) the ileostomy was never closed or was re-established because of pelvic sepsis or complex fistulas, sclerosing cholangitis or severe diarrhea; 11 (4.6%) patients required excision of the pouch because of anal stenosis, perirectal abscess-fistula or rectovaginal fistula. Three patients died — of suicide, and complications of liver transplantation and HIV infection. Thus, 208 patients maintained a functioning pouch. The early complication rate (within 30 days of operation) was 57.7% (138 patients) and the late complication rate was 52.3% (125 patients). Pouchitis alone did not lead to failure or pouch excision. Emptying difficulties in 25 patients with anal stenosis were helped in 2 by resorting to intermittent catheterization. Patients with indeterminate colitis had a higher rate of anorectal septic complications, and all patients having Crohn’s disease after pouch construction had complicated courses. Conclusions The complication rate associated with ileoanal pouch anastomosis continues to be relatively high despite increasing experience with this technique. Overall, however, a satisfactory outcome was obtained in 87% of patients

  7. [Primary radial head arthroplasty in trauma : Complications].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Horlohé, K; Buschbeck, S; Wincheringer, D; Weißenberger, M; Hoffmann, R

    2016-10-01

    Radial head fractures are common injuries in elbow trauma. Non-displaced fractures are best treated conservatively. Simple but displaced fractures require anatomic reduction and fixation, typically using screws. The treatment course for complex fractures with multiple fragments is still being debated, as results are less predictable. Radial head resection is not advised if concomitant injuries of the coronoid process or the collateral ligaments with instability are present. Favorable outcomes following open reduction and fixation using plates were reported recently. However, complication rates are very high. Radial head replacement is a valuable tool in treating complex fractures of the radial head with predominantly good and excellent results. Patients who suffer radial head fractures are typically of a younger age, resulting in high functional demands. Certainly, unspecific and specific complications related to radial head arthroplasty were reported in up to 40 % of cases in an acute fracture setting. This article highlights common complications in radial head arthroplasty and aims to present strategies to avoid them. PMID:27600571

  8. Diabetic foot complications: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Giurini, John M; Lyons, Thomas E

    2005-09-01

    Foot complications in patients with diabetes mellitus are a challenge to the health care industry. A great deal of expenditure is due to the management of diabetic foot complications. This places a great burden on the health care industry. It also places a great burden on those diabetic patients with foot complications and their families. Therefore, their effective management in an efficient manner is crucial to our patients. To deal with these problems, a dedicated, knowledgeable, and experienced multidisciplinary team is key. Intervention at the earliest possible time yields the best outcome. Prevention is the focus for those with no ulcerations. For those with ulcerations, prompt recognition and treatment is key. The importance of classifying ulcerations according to size, depth, presence or absence of infection, and vascular status can not be overstated. Proper offloading is vital for those with neuropathic lesions. Recognition of patients with a component of ischemia and vascular intervention to increase perfusion will aid in wound healing. Of course deep infection requires immediate drainage. All efforts of those in the multidisciplinary team are directed at the restoration and maintenance of an ulcer-free foot which is important in enabling our patients to maintain their ambulatory status.

  9. Group Composition and Group Therapy for Complicated Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, William E.; Ogrodniczuk, John S.; Joyce, Anthony S.; Weideman, Rene; Rosie, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This prospective study investigated the impact of group composition on the outcome of 2 forms of time-limited, short-term group therapy (interpretive, supportive) with 110 outpatients from 18 therapy groups, who presented with complicated grief. The composition variable was based on the patient's level of quality of object relations. The higher…

  10. Varicella complicated by scarlet fever.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Taner; Parlak, Ali Haydar; Kocabay, Kenan

    2003-10-01

    We report a 3-year-old boy with varicella complicated by cellulitis and scarlet fever. He developed a typical rash of scarlet fever following the onset of varicella. Streptococcus pyogenes was isolated from the ulcers due to varicella. The present case suggests that scarlet fever may rarely develop following varicella and should be considered in children with complicated varicella.

  11. [Complications caused by intravenous therapy].

    PubMed

    Quirós Luque, José María; Gago Fornells, Manuel

    2005-11-01

    Nursing professionals must know everything related to complications caused by intravenous therapy including the ways to prevent and solve these complications. We need not forget that nurses are the ones mainly responsible for the insertion, manipulation, removal and care of catheters.

  12. Complications of Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Mariña Naveiro; Naveiro Rilo, José Cesáreo; Paredes, Aida González; Aguilar Romero, María Teresa; Parra, Jorge Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To analyze the frequency of complications during laparoscopic gynecologic surgery and identify associated risk factors. Methods: A descriptive observational study was performed between January 2000 and December 2012 and included all gynecologic laparoscopies performed at our center. Variables were recorded for patient characteristics, indication for surgery, length of hospital stay (in days), major and minor complications, and conversions to laparotomy. To identify risk factors and variables associated with complications, crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated with unconditional logistic regression. Results: Of all 2888 laparoscopies included, most were procedures of moderate difficulty (adnexal surgery) (54.2%). The overall frequency of major complications was 1.93%, and that of minor complications was 4.29%. The level of technical difficulty and existence of prior abdominal surgery were associated with a higher risk of major complications and conversions to laparotomy. Conclusion: Laparoscopic gynecologic surgery is associated with a low frequency of complications but is a procedure that is not without risk. Greater technical difficulty and prior surgery were factors associated with a higher frequency of complications. PMID:25392659

  13. Biliary Complications After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Sanjay; Kalloo, Anthony N.

    2002-04-01

    The incidence of biliary complications after liver transplant is estimated to be 8% to 20%. Post-liver transplant biliary complications may lead to acute and chronic liver injury. The early recognition and prompt treatment of such complications improves the long-term survival of the patient and graft. An understanding of the type of biliary reconstruction, the rationale for creating a particular anastomosis, and the technical difficulties in reconstructing the biliary tract are important in assessing and managing complications after liver transplant. Because the clinical presentation of these patients may be subtle, the physician must be aggressive and thoughtful in ordering and interpreting the diagnostic tests. Important points to remember are 1) that noninvasive examinations may fail to detect small obstructions or leaks, 2) a liver biopsy often is performed prior to cholangiography to exclude rejection and ischemia, and 3) the liver biopsy can miss an extrahepatic obstruction by misinterpreting portal inflammation as rejection. Biliary leaks and strictures are the most common biliary complications following liver transplant. Less common complications include ampullary dysfunction and stone/sludge formation. The effective management of biliary complications following a liver transplant depends on understanding the natural history, the prognosis, and the available therapeutic options for each type of complication.

  14. Third Trimester foetal complications in pregnancy with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Vidushi; Agarwal, Nutan

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes in pregnancy starts affecting the foetus even in the pre-conception period. The complications encountered in third trimester are foetal macrosomia and intrauterine foetal demise; birth of a macrosomic baby further leads to shoulder dystocia, birth trauma, brachial plexus injury. Additionally, pregnancies with overt/pregestational diabetes may be complicated with foetal growth restriction, congenital abnormalities diagnosed in third trimester and foetal hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Even minor degrees of hyperglycaemia is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Optimizing maternal glycaemic control and foetal surveillance is crucial for optimizing the perinatal outcome and minimizing aforesaid complications. The management of macrosomia is controversial regarding timing and mode of delivery, but most authorities agree for primary caesarean if estimated foetal weight at the end of pregnancy is 4500 gram or more. PMID:27640989

  15. [Urinary complications after anorectal surgery].

    PubMed

    Iusuf, T; Sârbu, V; Cristache, C; Popescu, R; Botea, F; Panait, L

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence of urinary complications after various anorectal operations was studied in a group of 273 patients. The overall prevalence of urinary complications was 26.7%; most of these complications affected men between 41 and 50, mainly after hemorrhoidectomy. In 10.6% of patients, bladder catheterization was needed. These urinary complications result from nervous reflexes originating from the anus and determined by the operative trauma and/or rectal distinction. In the treatment of these urinary complications, the role of the muses is essential for reassuring the patients. Parasympathomimetic drugs are often efficient. Urinary catheterization must be delayed until the 18th hour. Fluid restriction may be useful to prevent urinary retention. PMID:14870531

  16. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  17. Complications of the Latarjet procedure.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Delaney, Ruth; Petkin, Kalojan; Lafosse, Laurent

    2015-03-01

    The Latarjet procedure is an operation performed either arthroscopically or open for recurrent anterior shoulder instability, in the setting of glenoid bone loss; with good to excellent functional results. Despite excellent clinical results, the complication rates are reported between 15 and 30 %. Intraoperative complications such as graft malpositioning, neurovascular injury, and graft fracture can all be mitigated with meticulous surgical technique and understanding of the local anatomy. Nonunion and screw breakage are intermediate-term complications that occur in less than 5 % of patients. The long-term complications such as graft osteolysis are still an unsolved problem, and future research is required to understand the etiology and best treatment option. Recurrent instability after the Latarjet procedure can be managed with iliac crest bone graft reconstruction of the anterior glenoid. Shoulder arthritis is another complication reported after the Latarjet procedure, which poses additional challenges to both the surgeon and patient.

  18. Pulmonary Hypertension Complicating Fibrosing Mediastinitis

    PubMed Central

    Seferian, Andrei; Steriade, Alexandru; Jaïs, Xavier; Planché, Olivier; Savale, Laurent; Parent, Florence; Amar, David; Jovan, Roland; Fadel, Elie; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fibrosing mediastinitis is caused by a proliferation of fibrous tissue in the mediastinum with encasement of mediastinal viscera and compression of mediastinal bronchovascular structures. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of fibrosing mediastinitis caused by extrinsic compression of the pulmonary arteries and/or veins. We have conducted a retrospective observational study reviewing clinical, functional, hemodynamic, radiological characteristics, and outcome of 27 consecutive cases of PH associated with fibrosing mediastinitis diagnosed between 2003 and 2014 at the French Referral Centre for PH. Fourteen men and 13 women with a median age of 60 years (range 18–84) had PH confirmed on right heart catheterization. The causes of fibrosing mediastinitis were sarcoidosis (n = 13), tuberculosis-infection confirmed or suspected (n = 9), mediastinal irradiation (n = 2), and idiopathic (n = 3). Sixteen patients (59%) were in NYHA functional class III and IV. Right heart catheterization confirmed moderate to severe PH with a median mean pulmonary artery pressure of 42 mm Hg (range 27–90) and a median cardiac index of 2.8 L/min/m2 (range 1.6–4.3). Precapillary PH was found in 22 patients, postcapillary PH in 2, and combined postcapillary and precapillary PH in 3. Severe extrinsic compression of pulmonary arteries (>60% reduction in diameter) was evidenced in 2, 8, and 12 patients at the main, lobar, or segmental levels, respectively. Fourteen patients had at least one severe pulmonary venous compression with associated pleural effusion in 6 of them. PAH therapy was initiated in 7 patients and corticosteroid therapy (0.5–1 mg/kg/day) was initiated in 3 patients with sarcoidosis, with 9 other being already on low-dose corticosteroids. At 1-year follow-up, 3 patients had died and among the 21 patients evaluated, 3 deteriorated, 14 were stable, and only 4 patients with sarcoidosis improved (4 receiving corticosteroids and 1

  19. Nutrition in the management of cirrhosis and its neurological complications.

    PubMed

    Bémeur, Chantal; Butterworth, Roger F

    2014-06-01

    Malnutrition is a common feature of chronic liver diseases that is often associated with a poor prognosis including worsening of clinical outcome, neuropsychiatric complications as well as outcome following liver transplantation. Nutritional assessment in patients with cirrhosis is challenging owing to confounding factors related to liver failure. The objectives of nutritional intervention in cirrhotic patients are the support of liver regeneration, the prevention or correction of specific nutritional deficiencies and the prevention and/or treatment of the complications of liver disease per se and of liver transplantation. Nutritional recommendations target the optimal supply of adequate substrates related to requirements linked to energy, protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Some issues relating to malnutrition in chronic liver disease remain to be addressed including the development of an appropriate well-validated nutritional assessment tool, the identification of mechanistic targets or therapy for sarcopenia, the development of nutritional recommendations for obese cirrhotic patients and liver-transplant recipients and the elucidation of the roles of vitamin A hepatotoxicity, as well as the impact of deficiencies in riboflavin and zinc on clinical outcomes. Early identification and treatment of malnutrition in chronic liver disease has the potential to lead to better disease outcome as well as prevention of the complications of chronic liver disease and improved transplant outcomes.

  20. Transoral laser surgery for recurrent glottic cancer after radiotherapy: oncologic and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Del Bon, F; Piazza, C; Mangili, S; Redaelli De Zinis, L O; Nicolai, P; Peretti, G

    2012-08-01

    Primary radiotherapy (RT) has been successfully employed for treatment of early glottic cancer for the past half century. However, local recurrences still occur in 5-35% of patients. Salvage options for persistent/recurrent glottic cancer include total laryngectomy, open neck partial laryngectomies (ONPLs) and transoral laser surgery (TLS). We performed a retrospective chart review of 35 patients with glottic squamous cell carcinoma previously submitted to RT and managed by TLS at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery of the University of Brescia, Italy, from 1995 to 2009. Oncologic outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and separately calculated for the entire cohort of patients (n = 35) and for patients with true persistent/recurrent disease (n = 30), thus excluding the second primary tumours (n = 5). Hospitalization time and complications were obtained by chart review. Functional outcomes of a subgroup of 10 patients in terms of speech and swallowing were analyzed by the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), GRBAS scale, Multi Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP), M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) questionnaire, videoendoscopy (VEES), and videofluoroscopy (VFS) of swallowing (both graded according to Donzelli's scale), and compared to a cohort of 10 patients matched for age, gender and pT category, treated by the same team of surgeons by TLS as a primary treatment. The types of resection used were: 18 Type III, 1 Type IV, and 16 Type V cordectomies. Postoperative staging was 16 rpT1a, 17 rpT2, and 2 rpT3. The 5-year overall survival for the entire series was 91%. Five-year disease-specific survival, local control with laser alone, and organ preservation rates were 94%, 84% and 87%, respectively. Among the variables tested by univariate analysis, for the entire cohort of patients the pT category had a statistically significant impact on local control with laser alone. Anterior transcommissural extension had a borderline

  1. Cardiovascular and pulmonary complications of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Nicolas; Rabinstein, Alejandro

    2011-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary complications after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage negatively affect overall morbidity and mortality. An electronic literature search was performed for English-language articles focused on cardiopulmonary complications with subarachnoid hemorrhage published through October 2010. A total of 278 citations were identified, including 72 clinical studies. In most cases, study quality was low or very low. Cardiac injury, evidenced by an elevation in troponin levels, is reported in about one-third of patients after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Arrhythmias also occur in about one-third of patients after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The incidence of pulmonary complications, especially neurogenic pulmonary edema, is more difficult to establish from available literature. Cardiopulmonary complications have been linked to worsened clinical outcome, suggesting a role for cardiac monitoring and interventions. PMID:21761273

  2. Systemic complications of status epilepticus--An update.

    PubMed

    Hocker, Sara

    2015-08-01

    Systemic complications occur at every stage of status epilepticus, involve every organ system, and may worsen outcome. Initially, there is a massive catecholamine release and hyperadrenergic state that may result in neurocardiogenic, pulmonary, and, sometimes, musculoskeletal or renal injury. Further medical complications accompany the various treatments used to abort the seizures including the use of nonanesthetic antiseizure drugs and high-dose anesthetic infusions. Later, sequelae of prolonged immobility and critical illness occur and add to the cumulative morbidity of these patients. Clinicians should follow a protocol to guide screening for early markers of systemic injury, complications of specific pharmacologic and adjunctive treatments, and periodic surveillance for complications related to prolonged immobility. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus".

  3. Pancreatic surgery: indications, complications, and implications for nutrition intervention.

    PubMed

    Berry, Amy J

    2013-06-01

    Pancreatic surgery is a complicated procedure leaving postoperative patients with an altered gastrointestinal (GI) anatomy and a potential for further surgical complications such as leaks and fistulas. Beyond surgical complications, these patients are prone to delayed gastric emptying, fat malabsorption, and hyperglycemia, with early satiety and poor appetite further compromising nutrition status. Many of these patients are malnourished prior to this major surgical procedure, and significant weight loss is common postoperatively. Does this affect their outcome? There seems to be a lack of consensus in this patient population regarding how to optimize nutrition and limit potential deleterious effects of this surgery. It is important to first understand the underlying disease condition and the effects to the gland, different forms of surgery with subsequent GI alterations, and common surgical and digestive complications. Once this is reviewed, existing nutrition support literature will be explored in attempts to determine the best nutrition management in this patient population.

  4. Pancreatic surgery: indications, complications, and implications for nutrition intervention.

    PubMed

    Berry, Amy J

    2013-06-01

    Pancreatic surgery is a complicated procedure leaving postoperative patients with an altered gastrointestinal (GI) anatomy and a potential for further surgical complications such as leaks and fistulas. Beyond surgical complications, these patients are prone to delayed gastric emptying, fat malabsorption, and hyperglycemia, with early satiety and poor appetite further compromising nutrition status. Many of these patients are malnourished prior to this major surgical procedure, and significant weight loss is common postoperatively. Does this affect their outcome? There seems to be a lack of consensus in this patient population regarding how to optimize nutrition and limit potential deleterious effects of this surgery. It is important to first understand the underlying disease condition and the effects to the gland, different forms of surgery with subsequent GI alterations, and common surgical and digestive complications. Once this is reviewed, existing nutrition support literature will be explored in attempts to determine the best nutrition management in this patient population. PMID:23609476

  5. Complications of pneumoconiosis: radiologic overview.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jae Sup; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Hyo Rim; Ahn, Myeong Im; Han, Dae Hee; Ko, Jeong Min; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Arakawa, Hiroaki; Koo, Jung-Wan

    2013-10-01

    A wide spectrum of pulmonary complications occurs in patients with pneumoconiosis. Those complications include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hemoptysis, pneumothorax, pleural disease, tuberculosis, autoimmune disease, anthracofibrosis, chronic interstitial pneumonia, and malignancy. Generally, imaging workup starts with plain chest radiography. However, sometimes, plain radiography has limited role in the diagnosis of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis because of overlapping pneumoconiotic infiltration. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are potentially helpful for the detection of pulmonary complications in patients with pneumoconiosis. CT, with its excellent contrast resolution, is more sensitive and specific method than plain radiograph in the evaluation of pulmonary abnormalities. CT is useful in detecting lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by infection, anthracofibrosis, and chronic interstitial pneumonia. Also, CT is valuable in distinguishing localized pneumothorax from bullae and aiding the identification of multiloculated effusions. US can be used in detection of complicated pleural effusions and guidance of the thoracentesis procedure. MRI is useful for differentiating between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. Radiologists need to be familiar with the radiologic and clinical manifestations of, as well as diagnostic approaches to, complications associated with pneumoconiosis. Knowledge of the various imaging features of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis can enhance early diagnosis and improve the chance to cure.

  6. Complications of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostić-Milosavljević, Mirjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Krstić, Miodrag

    2011-01-01

    There are four major complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD): bleeding, perforation, penetration, and obstruction. Complications can occur in patients with peptic ulcer of any etiology. Despite improvements in the medical management and the lower overall incidence of PUD, there are conflicting data about the incidence of potentially life-threatening ulcer complications. There are important time trends embedded within this stable overall rate of complications: the dramatic decline in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (comparing the cohort born from 1900 to 1920 to cohorts born after 1940); an increased use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and an increased rate of ulcer complications related to such drug use, especially in the elderly. As a result of these trends, ulcer complications are on the rise in older patients but on the decline in younger individuals. Hemorrhage is the most frequent PUD complication and its incidence is increasing in comparison to perforation and stenosis. Therapeutic endoscopy is considered the treatment of choice for bleeding ulcers, reducing the need for emergent surgical procedures to 10-20% of the cases. In recent years, besides the success of angiographic embolization, the containment of massive hemorrhage must also be taken into account. Transcatheter arterial embolization is also an effective and safe treatment in patients with duodenal ulcers re-bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy or surgery.

  7. Management and complications of stomas.

    PubMed

    Bafford, Andrea C; Irani, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Stomas are created for a wide range of indications such as temporary protection of a high-risk anastomosis, diversion of sepsis, or permanent relief of obstructed defecation or incontinence. Yet this seemingly benign procedure is associated with an overall complication rate of up to 70%. Therefore, surgeons caring for patients with gastrointestinal diseases must be proficient not only with stoma creation but also with managing postoperative stoma-related complications. This article reviews the common complications associated with ostomy creation and strategies for their management.

  8. [Rare complication after stapled hemorrhoidectomy].

    PubMed

    Šuchá, R; Duchoň, R; Pinďák, D; Dolník, J

    2013-09-01

    Statistics show that more than half of the population suffers from hemorrhoids at different clinical stages. Only a small percentage of them (5 to 10%) require surgical treatment. The gold standard is open hemorrhoidectomy (most commonly Milligan-Morgan operation). Circular stapled hemorrhoidopexy by Longo is an alternative to conventional hemorrhoidectomy. The main advantages of this procedure are: less postoperative pain, earlier return to work and to social life. The complication rate is similar to open hemorrhoidectomy. This method, however, also brings new kinds of complications, some of them potentially life-threatening. Our case report presents one of these rare complications.

  9. PEG tubes: dealing with complications.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Hardip; Thompson, Rosie

    A percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube can be used to deliver nutrition, hydration and medicines directly into the patient's stomach. Patients will require a tube if they are unable to swallow safely, putting them at risk of aspiration of food, drink and medicines into their lungs. It is vital that nurses are aware of the complications that may arise when caring for a patient with a PEG tube. It is equally important that nurses know how to deal with these complications or from where tc seek advice. This article provides a quick troubleshooting guide to help nurses deal with complications that can arise with PEG feeding.

  10. Psychological complications of pediatric obesity.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Mitchell, Elisha R

    2011-12-01

    Psychological complications associated with pediatric obesity include low self-esteem, depression, body dissatisfaction, loss-of-control eating, unhealthy and extreme weight control behaviors, impaired social relationships, obesity stigma, and decreased health-related quality of life. Bioecological models offer a framework for understanding the interaction between pediatric obesity and psychological complications and illustrate system-level approaches for prevention and intervention. As the medical setting is often the first point of contact for families, pediatricians are instrumental in the identification and referral of children with psychological complications. Motivational interviewing, patient talking points, brief screening measures, and referral resources are important tools in this process. PMID:22093858

  11. Oncologic Outcomes After Transoral Robotic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, J. Scott; Smith, Richard V.; Moore, Eric; Lawson, Georges; Remacle, Marc; Ganly, Ian; Kraus, Dennis H.; Teng, Marita S.; Miles, Brett A.; White, Hilliary; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Ferris, Robert L.; Mehta, Vikas; Kiyosaki, Krista; Damrose, Edward J.; Wang, Steven J.; Kupferman, Michael E.; Koh, Yoon Woo; Genden, Eric M.; Holsinger, F. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Large patient cohorts are necessary to validate the efficacy of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) in the management of head and neck cancer. OBJECTIVES To review oncologic outcomes of TORS from a large multi-institutional collaboration and to identify predictors of disease recurrence and disease-specific mortality. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective review of records from 410 patients undergoing TORS for laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers from January 1, 2007, through December 31, 2012, was performed. Pertinent data were obtained from 11 participating medical institutions. INTERVENTIONS Select patients received radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy before or after TORS. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Locoregional control, disease-specific survival, and overall survival were calculated. We used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with log-rank testing to evaluate individual variable association with these outcomes, followed by multivariate analysis with Cox proportional hazards regression modeling to identify independent predictors. RESULTS Of the 410 patients treated with TORS in this study, 364 (88.8%) had oropharyngeal cancer. Of these 364 patients, information about post-operative adjuvant therapy was known about 338: 106 (31.3) received radiation therapy alone, and 72 (21.3%) received radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. Neck dissection was performed in 323 patients (78.8%). Mean follow-up time was 20 months. Local, regional, and distant recurrence occurred in 18 (4.4%), 15 (3.7%), and 10 (2.4%) of 410 patients, respectively. Seventeen (4.1%) died of disease, and 13 (3.2%) died of other causes. The 2-year locoregional control rate was 91.8% (95% CI, 87.6%-94.7%), disease-specific survival 94.5% (95% CI, 90.6%-96.8%), and overall survival 91% (95% CI, 86.5%-94.0%). Multivariate analysis identified improved survival among women (P = .05) and for patients with tumors arising in tonsil (P = .01). Smoking was associated with worse overall

  12. Liver Transplant: Complications/Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... can develop a complication requiring return to the operating room for repair or other procedures to open up the new connections. Rejection: Your immune system helps fight infections. It does this by recognizing ...

  13. Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... two complications of diabetes: nerve damage (neuropathy) and poor circulation. Neuropathy causes loss of feeling in your ... you may not detect an injury or irritation. Poor circulation in your feet reduces your ability to ...

  14. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, E; Sharma, S; Lal, S; Allan, P J

    2016-05-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder with potential life-threatening medical sequelae. This article reviews the principal medical complications associated with anorexia nervosa, highlights associated diagnostic pitfalls and emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to management. PMID:27166107

  15. Long term complications of diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000327.htm Long term complications of diabetes To use the sharing ... sores and infections. If it goes on too long, your toes, foot, or leg may need to ...

  16. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, E; Sharma, S; Lal, S; Allan, P J

    2016-05-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder with potential life-threatening medical sequelae. This article reviews the principal medical complications associated with anorexia nervosa, highlights associated diagnostic pitfalls and emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to management.

  17. The Role of Self-Efficacy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Management: Preliminary Validation of a Disease-Specific Measure

    PubMed Central

    Keefer, Laurie; Kiebles, Jennifer L.; Taft, Tiffany H.

    2010-01-01

    IBDs require self-management skills that may be influenced by self-efficacy (SE). Self Efficacy represents an individual’s perception of his or her ability to organize and execute the behaviors necessary to manage disease. The goal of this study was to develop a valid and reliable measure of IBD-specific SE that can be used in clinical and research contexts. 122 adults with a verified IBD diagnosis participated in the study. Data were pooled from two sources: patients from an outpatient university gastroenterology clinic (n = 42) and a sample of online respondents (n = 80). All participants (N = 122) completed the IBD-Self-Efficacy Scale (IBD-SES) and the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire. Additionally, online participants completed the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale; while the clinic sample completed the Perceived Health Competence Scale, Perceived Stress Questionnaire, and Short Form Version 2 Health Survey. The IBD-SES was initially constructed to identify 4 distinct theoretical domains of self-efficacy: a) managing stress and emotions, b) managing medical care, c) managing symptoms and disease, and d) maintaining remission. The 29-item IBD-SES has high internal consistency (r = 0.96), high test-retest reliability (r = 0.90), and demonstrates strong construct and concurrent validity with established measures. The IBD-SES is a critical first step towards addressing an important psychological construct that could influence treatment outcomes in IBD. PMID:20848516

  18. A case of complicated otomastoiditis.

    PubMed

    Atzeni, Mario; Iozzi, Chiara; Pinna, Monica; Benetti, Gian Luca; Scazzeri, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a child who, at her first episode of clinically evident acute otitis media, has developed a bilateral mastoiditis, though with unilateral simptomatology. The mastoiditis was complicated by the spontaneous drainage of the postauricular abscess in the subcutaneous tissue. According to the literature, we believe that the temporal bone computed tomography scan is the fundamental examination to properly define an anusual case of mastoiditis, plan adequate therapy (medical o surgical), and rule out other possible complications. PMID:26714780

  19. Pneumothorax complicating isolated clavicle fracture.

    PubMed

    Hani, Redouane; Ennaciri, Badr; Jeddi, Idriss; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Isolated clavicle fractures are among the commonest of traumatic fractures in the emergency department. Complications of isolated clavicle fractures are rare. Pneumothorax has been described as a complication of a fractured clavicle only rarely in English literature. In all the reported cases, the pneumothorax was treated by a thoracostomy and the clavicle fracture was treated conservatively. In our case, the pneumothorax required a chest drain insertion and the clavicle fracture was treated surgically with good result.

  20. Unusual complications of quinalphos poisoning.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia.

  1. Unusual Complications of Quinalphos Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:23762661

  2. The genetics of diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Emma; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Groop, Leif C; McCarthy, Mark I

    2015-05-01

    The rising global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is accompanied by an increasing burden of morbidity and mortality that is attributable to the complications of chronic hyperglycaemia. These complications include blindness, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Current therapeutic options for chronic hyperglycaemia reduce, but do not eradicate, the risk of these complications. Success in defining new preventative and therapeutic strategies hinges on an improved understanding of the molecular processes involved in the development of these complications. This Review explores the role of human genetics in delivering such insights, and describes progress in characterizing the sequence variants that influence individual predisposition to diabetic kidney disease, retinopathy, neuropathy and accelerated cardiovascular disease. Numerous risk variants for microvascular complications of diabetes have been reported, but very few have shown robust replication. Furthermore, only limited evidence exists of a difference in the repertoire of risk variants influencing macrovascular disease between those with and those without diabetes. Here, we outline the challenges associated with the genetic analysis of diabetic complications and highlight ongoing efforts to deliver biological insights that can drive translational benefits.

  3. Outcome measures for traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Dhaval; Devi, B Indira; Agrawal, Amit

    2011-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health problem resulting in death and disabilities of young and productive people. Though the mortality of TBI has decreased substantially in recent years the disability due to TBI has not appreciably reduced. Various outcome scales have been proposed and used to assess disability after TBI. A few, commonly used are Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) with or without extended scores, Disability Rating Scale (DRS), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ), and the Functional Status Examination (FSE). These scales assess disability resulting from physical and cognitive impairments. For patients with good physical recovery a cognitive and neuropsychological outcome measure is required. Such measures include Neurobehavioural Function Inventory and specific neuropsychological tests like Rey Complex Figure for visuoconstruction and memory, Controlled Oral Word Association for verbal fluency, Symbol Digit Modalities (verbal) for sustained attention and Grooved Pegboard for fine motor dexterity. A more holistic and complete outcome measure is Quality of Life (QOL). Disease specific QOL measure for TBI, Quality of Life after Brain Injury (QOLIBRI) has also been recently proposed. The problems with outcome measures include poor operational definitions, lack of sensitivity or low ceiling effects, inability to evaluate patients who cannot report, lack of integration of morbidity and mortality categories, and limited domains of functioning assessed. GOSE-E satisfies most of the criteria of good outcome scale and in combination with neuropsychological tests is a near complete instrument for assessment of outcome after TBI. PMID:21440363

  4. Emergency surgical revascularisation for coronary angioplasty complications.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, J A; Davies, S W; Balcon, R; Layton, C; Magee, P; Rothman, M T; Timmis, A D; Wright, J E; Walesby, R K

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate trends in referrals for emergency operations after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) complications; to analyse morbidity and mortality and assess the influence of PTCA backup on elective surgery. DESIGN--A retrospective analysis of patients requiring emergency surgical revascularisation within 24 hours of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. PATIENTS--Between January 1980 and December 1990, 75 patients requiring emergency surgery within 24 hours of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. SETTING--A tertiary referral centre and postgraduate teaching hospital. RESULTS--57 patients (76%) were men, the mean age was 55 (range 29-73) years, and 30 (40%) had had a previous myocardial infarction. Before PTCA, 68 (91%) had severe angina, 59 (79%) had multivessel disease, and six (8%) had a left ventricular ejection fraction of less than 40%. A mean of 2.1 grafts (range one to five) were performed; the internal mammary artery was used in only one patient. The operative mortality was 9% and inhospital mortality was 17%. There was a need for cardiac massage until bypass was established in 19 patients (25%): this was the most important outcome determinant (P = 0.0051) and was more common in those patients with multivessel disease (P = 0.0449) and in women (P = 0.0388). In 10 of the 19 cases a vacant operating theatre was unavailable, the operation being performed in the catheter laboratory or anaesthetic room. These 19 patients had an operative mortality of 32% and inhospital mortality of 47%, compared with 2% and 7% respectively for the 56 patients who awaited the next available operating theatre. Complications included myocardial infarction, 19 patients (25%); arrhythmias, 10 patients (3%); and gross neurological event, two patients (3%). The mean intensive care unit stay was 2.6 days (range 1 to 33 days) and the mean duration of hospital admission was 13 days (range 5-40 days). CONCLUSIONS--Patients undergoing

  5. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the disease specific questionnaire OQLQ in Serbian patients with malocclusions

    PubMed Central

    Vucic, Ljiljana; Glisic, Branislav; Kisic-Tepavcevic, Darija; Vucic, Uros; Drulovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Dentofacial disorders may potentially significantly affect the quality of life. Objectives of this study were to validate translated and culturally adapted Orthognatic Quality of Life Questionnaire (OQLQ) on a cohort of Serbian patients with malocclusions. Methods The questionnaire was validated in 111 consecutive patients with malocclusions, seen between December 2014 and February 2015 at the Clinic of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Belgrade. Clinical validity was assessed comparing the mean scores for the four subscales of the OQLQ and mean PAR pre-treatment score. In order to assess whether the allocation of items in the subscales corresponds to their distribution in the original questionnaire, an exploratory factor analysis (principal component analysis with varimax rotation) was conducted. Results The results of the internal consistency analysis demonstrated good relationships between the items; Cronbach’s alpha coefficients for the four subscales were highly significant (p<0.001) (0.88-0.91). All items were significantly correlated between baseline and the retest (6 weeks after). The correlations between the PAR and all four domains of the OQLQ were all significant (p<0.01). The loading weights obtained in the exploratory factor analysis showed that this model revealed four factors with eigenvalue greater than 1, explaining the 64.0% of the cumulative variance. The majority of the items (86.4%) in the Serbian version of the OQLQ presented the highest loading weight in the subscales assigned by the OQLQ developer. Conclusions The psychometric properties of the OQLQ (Serbian version) have exceptional internal consistency and reproducibility as an instrument for evaluation of dental malocclusions. Additionally, this questionnaire may be useful as a supplementary outcome measure in persons with malocclusions. PMID:27703535

  6. Major vascular injuries complicating knee arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancu, Serban; Muresan, Mircea; Sala, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Starting with a case report, we made a detailed review of the literature, with the purpose of identifying and analyzing the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion following knee arthroscopy and the method of vascular repair. A PubMed literature search was undertaken to locate all reported cases of major vascular iatrogenic injuries during arthroscopic knee procedures. We identified 39 papers which report a total of 62 cases of major iatrogenic popliteal lesions after knee arthroscopy, between 1985 and 2014. The type of arthroscopic intervention performed, the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion encountered, the time passed until its discovery and treatment, the method of vascular reconstruction, and the postoperative course are presented. Postarthroscopy vascular complications are infrequent but potentially disastrous for the condition of the affected inferior limb. An early diagnosis and reintervention are mandatory for a good postoperative outcome. PMID:26240627

  7. Childhood type 2 diabetes: Risks and complications

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ying; Gao, Min; Gao, Yiqing

    2016-01-01

    The universal endocrine pathological state affecting young individuals and adults is type 2 diabetes mellitus, which has seen a significant increase in the last 30 years, particularly in children. Genetic and evnironmental factors are the causative agents for this pathological state in children. This rapid and wide spread of the disease can be controlled by enforcing amendments in environmental factors such as diet, physical activities and obesity. In young infants breastfeeding may be a key modulator of the disease. Associated disorders co-observed in the patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus include renal failure, heart problems and circulatory dysfunctionalities, such as cardiac failure and vision disability. These associated disorders become more pronounced in young patients when they reach puberty. To overcome the lethal outcomes of the disease, early screening of the disease is crucial. The present review focused on the latest updates in the field, as well as plausible risks and complications of this pathological state. PMID:27703500

  8. Preventing, identifying, and managing cosmetic procedure complications, part 2: lasers and chemical peels.

    PubMed

    Brown, Megan

    2016-08-01

    Part 1 of this series highlighted some of the potential complications that have been associated with soft tissue augmentation and botulinum toxin injections. In part 2, tips for how dermatology residents may prevent, identify, and manage complications from lasers and chemical peels for optimal patient outcomes are provided. PMID:27622266

  9. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ2 or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104–3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03–2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365–7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78–3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. PMID:23845841

  10. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  11. Early Complications Following Cemented Modular Hip Hemiarthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Niall P.T; Hughes, Andrew W; Halliday, Ruth L; Ward, Abigail L; Chesser, Tim J.S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Hemiarthroplasty is the recommended treatment for displaced, intracapsular, femoral neck fractures. This study aimed to evaluate the early complications following insertion of the JRI Furlong cemented hemiarthroplasty, a contemporary, modular, double tapered, polished prosthesis. Method : A series of 459 consecutive patients (May 2006 - June 2009) treated with a JRI hemiarthroplasty with a minimum of one-year (1-4years) follow-up were evaluated. Data collected retrospectively from clinical records and hospital databases included patient demographics, mortality, deep infection, dislocation, periprosthetic fracture, and any requirement for revision or complications related to the prosthesis. Results : Full data were available for 429 of 459 (93%), partial data for 30 (7%). Average age was 83 years (52-100), 76% were female. One-year mortality was 24%. Intraoperative fractures occurred in 17 patients (3.7%). There were two intraoperative deaths. There were nine early deep wound infections (2%). There were two revisions to total hip replacement (THR), four patients required conversion to THR and one underwent an excision arthroplasty procedure. Discussion : Early surgical outcomes for the JRI hemiarthroplasty prosthesis are equivalent or superior to other major hemiarthroplasty prostheses previously reported however, there was a high intraoperative fracture rate of 3.7%. We recommend using a stem one size smaller than the final broach in fragile, osteoporotic bone. No patients re-presented with aseptic loosening or stem failure. PMID:25685248

  12. Major postoperative complications and survival for colon cancer elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased life expectancy has led to elevating the mean age of the patients at the time of diagnosis of colon cancer and subsequent treatment. Differences in complication rates and outcome between elderly and younger patients have been investigated. Methods We retrospectively analysed a database containing the information of patients who underwent surgery for stage I-III colorectal cancer from January 2004 to January 2012 at our institution and compared demographic, cancer-related, and outcomes data of 235 elderly patients with 211 patients ≤65 years old. Results Intraoperative complications did not differ between young and old patients whereas some differences have been found in postoperative and late complications: elderly patients suffered more by ileus (P = 0.024), peritonitis or septic shock (P = 0.017), pelvic abscess (P = 0.028), wound infection (P = 0.031), and incisional/port herniation (P = 0.012) compared with younger patients. Moreover, elderly patients suffered by systemic complications such as cardiovascular (4.7% vs. 1.4%, P = 0.049), renal (4.7% vs. 0.5%, P = 0.006), and respiratory (10.6% vs. 5.2%, P = 0.036). The multivariate analysis assessing the odds of having a complication revealed that older age (Odd Ratio [OR] 2.75, 95% Confidential Interval [CI]: 1.67-4.52) and open surgery (OR 1.63, 95% CI: 1.01-2.62) are significantly and independently associated with having a complication. Conclusions In our series, elderly patients have presented a slight higher incidence of comorbidities that may affect the incidence rates of postoperative complications. These results have implications in increasing the hospital stay as well as a higher rate of death. PMID:23173563

  13. Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes ... Volunteer Center American Diabetes Month® American Diabetes Association Alert Day® Become a Member Advocacy Home Take Action ...

  14. Complications of soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Ranella J; Stier, Meghan

    2008-09-01

    The wide variety of dermal fillers presently available has revolutionized treatment options for patients seeking a refreshed appearance. Soft tissue fillers include both bovine and human collagens, the hyaluronans, calcium hydroxyapatite, poly-L-lactic acid, and synthetic polymers. However, soft tissue augmentation is never risk-free, and as these procedures have increased in prevalence, complications have been more frequently reported. This article describes a range of complications resulting from dermal filler injections, reviews key case studies, and discusses possible treatment options for adverse effects. While biodegradable fillers offer the least risk for the patient, location, allergic reactions, granulomas, necrosis, and infection are all serious complications that must be considered before performing soft tissue augmentation with any approved dermal filler.

  15. [Complications of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, G J; David, R D; Fuchs, A M

    1989-01-01

    The authors reviewed treatments performed worldwide using extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy since its introduction in West Germany in 1980 to determine the efficacy of this treatment modality and its potential risks. The prevention of complications related to patients or shock wave energy are discussed, as well as the cardiovascular complications related to immersion, prevention of lesions to nearby organs, treatment of ESWL-induced bleeding, treatment of post-ESWL ureteral obstruction, prevention and treatment of infection, and long-term biological effects. Currently, less than 5% of patients are excluded from treatment with ESWL due to technical reasons or increased risk of periprocedural complications. Patients with cardiac pacemakers have been treated safely. Calcifications of the ipsilateral renal artery or aorta are considered only relative contraindications. However, certain technical limitations exist; i.e., the Dornier HM-3 cannot support patients weighing more than 135 kg., and patient height is also a limiting factor. There is an impressively low incidence of complications related to the energy of the shock wave. The severity and extent of damage are dose- and pressure-dependent. The potential for induction of cardiac arrhythmias secondary to the shock wave exists; however, effective prevention is achieved by coupling the shock wave discharge to the electrocardiogram. Complications of immersion are also extremely rare and can be avoided by careful preoperative evaluation. Damage to nearby organs such as pulmonary, gastric, duodenal or colonic contusions, constitute a very infrequent complication. Elevations of liver enzymes have also been noted post-lithotripsy. However, all these changes were transient and had no significant clinical consequences. Management of post-ESWL ureteral obstruction is by endourological procedures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Microvasular and macrovascular complications in diabetes mellitus: Distinct or continuum?

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Aastha; Chawla, Rajeev; Jaggi, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and related complications are associated with long-term damage and failure of various organ systems. The line of demarcation between the pathogenic mechanisms of microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes and differing responses to therapeutic interventions is blurred. Diabetes induces changes in the microvasculature, causing extracellular matrix protein synthesis, and capillary basement membrane thickening which are the pathognomic features of diabetic microangiopathy. These changes in conjunction with advanced glycation end products, oxidative stress, low grade inflammation, and neovascularization of vasa vasorum can lead to macrovascular complications. Hyperglycemia is the principal cause of microvasculopathy but also appears to play an important role in causation of macrovasculopathy. There is thought to be an intersection between micro and macro vascular complications, but the two disorders seem to be strongly interconnected, with micro vascular diseases promoting atherosclerosis through processes such as hypoxia and changes in vasa vasorum. It is thus imperative to understand whether microvascular complications distinctly precede macrovascular complications or do both of them progress simultaneously as a continuum. This will allow re-focusing on the clinical issues with a unifying perspective which can improve type 2 diabetes mellitus outcomes. PMID:27366724

  17. Complications of Hair Restoration Surgery: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Eswari; Sarvajnamurthy, Sacchidanand; Gorur, Divya; Suresh, Deepak Hurkudli; Siddaraju, Maheshwari Nallur; Narasimhan, Revathi Thimmanhalli

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hair restoration surgery (HRS) is a very promising and sought after aesthetic procedure with very few complications. Complications may occur in the donor or the recipient area, and it may be due to surgical or idiopathic causes. Aim: The aim was to analyze the complications in male patients who underwent HRS for androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of male patients who underwent HRS for AGA from December 2010 to August 2014. Data were collected from the registers, telephonic enquiry and electronic mails. All complications during and after surgery, and their subjective feeling about hair growth was recorded. Results: Seventy-three patients were included in the analysis. A total of 65 patients had undergone follicular unit transplant, 7 patients underwent FUE, and one patient had body hair transplantation. Postoperative edema was found in 42.47% of patients, followed by sterile folliculitis in 23.29% of patients, wide donor scar in 15.07% of patients, bacterial folliculitis and numbness/paresthesia in 10.96% of patients. Other complications such as raised scar, hiccups, pruritus, excessive bleeding were found in isolated cases. Conclusion: Thorough preoperative evaluation, skillful surgical techniques, good communication and postoperative follow-up go a long way in giving satisfactory outcome with fewer complications in HRS. PMID:25368473

  18. Surgical complications of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Beyga, Z T; Kahan, B D

    1998-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, kidney transplantation has evolved tremendously, from an experimental procedure with barely 50% allograft acceptance to a highly refined management program with a success rate of 80-90%. Not only has the overall rate of complications decreased to less than 5%, due to more secure technical approaches, but also advances in immunosuppressive regimens have reduced the morbidity associated with the procedure. This contribution, addressing all stages of the transplant process (donor nephrectomy, benchwork preparation, and implantation) assesses potential pitfalls and technical misadventures that must be avoided in order to assure the patient of a complication-free course.

  19. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  20. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  1. Complications of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul J; Steinberg, John S

    2013-12-01

    The diabetic foot is at high risk for complications because of its role in ambulation. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can lead to chronic foot ulcers, which are at high risk for infection, in part attributable to areas of high pressure caused by lack of tolerance of the soft tissue and bone and joint deformity. If left untreated, infection and ischemia lead to tissue death, culminating in amputation. Treatment strategies include antibiosis, topical therapies, offloading, debridement, and surgery. A multidisciplinary team approach is necessary in the prevention and treatment of complications of the diabetic foot.

  2. Risk Factors for Complications of Traumatic Injuries.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Júnior, Wagner; Saleh, Carmen Mohamad Rida; Whitaker, Iveth Yamaguchi

    2016-01-01

    Complications in hospitalized trauma patients are major causes of morbidity and mortality. The aims of this study were to identify the in-hospital trauma patients' complications and identify the risk factors for complications in this population. A retrospective analysis was conducted in a sample from a Brazilian hospital. The sample consisted of 407 patients, 194 (47.66%) of whom had records of complications. The most common complications were infections (41.80%). The risk factors related to the complications were age, length of hospital stay, external causes, and injury severity. The complications were frequent in this sample, and the risk for complications was characterized by multiple factors. PMID:27618375

  3. Assessment of Health-Related Quality of Life after TBI: Comparison of a Disease-Specific (QOLIBRI) with a Generic (SF-36) Instrument.

    PubMed

    von Steinbuechel, Nicole; Covic, Amra; Polinder, Suzanne; Kohlmann, Thomas; Cepulyte, Ugne; Poinstingl, Herbert; Backhaus, Joy; Bakx, Wilbert; Bullinger, Monika; Christensen, Anne-Lise; Formisano, Rita; Gibbons, Henning; Höfer, Stefan; Koskinen, Sanna; Maas, Andrew; Neugebauer, Edmund; Powell, Jane; Sarajuuri, Jaana; Sasse, Nadine; Schmidt, Silke; Mühlan, Holger; von Wild, Klaus; Zitnay, George; Truelle, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Psychosocial, emotional, and physical problems can emerge after traumatic brain injury (TBI), potentially impacting health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Until now, however, neither the discriminatory power of disease-specific (QOLIBRI) and generic (SF-36) HRQoL nor their correlates have been compared in detail. These aspects as well as some psychometric item characteristics were studied in a sample of 795 TBI survivors. The Shannon H (') index absolute informativity, as an indicator of an instrument's power to differentiate between individuals within a specific group or health state, was investigated. Psychometric performance of the two instruments was predominantly good, generally higher, and more homogenous for the QOLIBRI than for the SF-36 subscales. Notably, the SF-36 "Role Physical," "Role Emotional," and "Social Functioning" subscales showed less satisfactory discriminatory power than all other dimensions or the sum scores of both instruments. The absolute informativity of disease-specific as well as generic HRQoL instruments concerning the different groups defined by different correlates differed significantly. When the focus is on how a certain subscale or sum score differentiates between individuals in one specific dimension/health state, the QOLIBRI can be recommended as the preferable instrument.

  4. Assessment of Health-Related Quality of Life after TBI: Comparison of a Disease-Specific (QOLIBRI) with a Generic (SF-36) Instrument.

    PubMed

    von Steinbuechel, Nicole; Covic, Amra; Polinder, Suzanne; Kohlmann, Thomas; Cepulyte, Ugne; Poinstingl, Herbert; Backhaus, Joy; Bakx, Wilbert; Bullinger, Monika; Christensen, Anne-Lise; Formisano, Rita; Gibbons, Henning; Höfer, Stefan; Koskinen, Sanna; Maas, Andrew; Neugebauer, Edmund; Powell, Jane; Sarajuuri, Jaana; Sasse, Nadine; Schmidt, Silke; Mühlan, Holger; von Wild, Klaus; Zitnay, George; Truelle, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Psychosocial, emotional, and physical problems can emerge after traumatic brain injury (TBI), potentially impacting health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Until now, however, neither the discriminatory power of disease-specific (QOLIBRI) and generic (SF-36) HRQoL nor their correlates have been compared in detail. These aspects as well as some psychometric item characteristics were studied in a sample of 795 TBI survivors. The Shannon H (') index absolute informativity, as an indicator of an instrument's power to differentiate between individuals within a specific group or health state, was investigated. Psychometric performance of the two instruments was predominantly good, generally higher, and more homogenous for the QOLIBRI than for the SF-36 subscales. Notably, the SF-36 "Role Physical," "Role Emotional," and "Social Functioning" subscales showed less satisfactory discriminatory power than all other dimensions or the sum scores of both instruments. The absolute informativity of disease-specific as well as generic HRQoL instruments concerning the different groups defined by different correlates differed significantly. When the focus is on how a certain subscale or sum score differentiates between individuals in one specific dimension/health state, the QOLIBRI can be recommended as the preferable instrument. PMID:27022207

  5. Obesity and diabetes: A recipe for obstetric complications.

    PubMed

    Rosenn, Barak

    2008-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity has been increasing worldwide and has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, where well over 20% of the population have a body mass index (BMI) within the obese range. Obesity is associated with a wide spectrum of obstetric and perinatal complications, including increased risks of fetal mortality and morbidity, congenital malformations, maternal hypertensive disorders, gestational diabetes, excessive fetal growth and cesarean delivery. The odds ratios for these risks increase in direct correlation with the severity of obesity, and are significant even among women who are overweight without meeting criteria for obesity. Although obesity is closely associated with diabetes which, in itself, is associated with similar perinatal complications, diabetes and obesity are independent risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcome. Moreover, improving glycemic control in the pregnant woman with diabetes may mitigate the additive adverse effects of diabetes and obesity on pregnancy outcome.

  6. Alternative methods for management of the complicated gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A B; Fink, A S

    1998-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the procedure of choice for symptomatic cholelithiasis. However, in the presence of acute cholecystitis, 10% to 15% of patients face conversion to laparotomy. Alternatives to conventional therapy may therefore help to improve the clinical outcome of patients with complicated gallbladder disease. In selecting patients for alternative therapies, preoperative and intraoperative factors must be considered. Preoperative factors include the severity of biliary disease and preexisting medical risk factors; whereas intraoperative factors include conditions at the time of surgery that make dissection difficult or unsafe. Alternative therapies provide the least invasive management to safely temporize or definitively treat the acute condition. These alternatives include percutaneous cholecystostomy alone or followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy, laparoscopic cholecystostomy followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy, laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cannulation of the gallbladder, and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. By appropriate selection of the initial therapeutic approach, the surgeon may ultimately improve the clinical outcome in these complicated patients.

  7. Thinking About Clinical Outcomes in Medicaid

    PubMed Central

    Weimar, Dawn; Gray, Jeffrey; Davies, Bud

    2016-01-01

    As Medicaid expands in scope and influence, it is evolving toward being a “purchaser” of quality health care. This commentary discusses measurement and incentivization of clinical outcomes in Medicaid. Advantages and disadvantages of outcome versus process measures are discussed. Distinctions are drawn between the roles of Medicare and Medicaid, including the implications of the growth in Medicaid managed care. Medicaid's influence is particularly notable for obstetric, pediatric, newborn, and long-term care. We provide data on 3 Medicaid outcomes: potentially preventable hospital admissions, readmissions, and complications. The commentary concludes with suggestions for choosing and implementing outcome-oriented value-based purchasing initiatives in Medicaid. PMID:26945295

  8. Thinking About Clinical Outcomes in Medicaid.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Kevin; Weimar, Dawn; Gray, Jeffrey; Davies, Bud

    2016-01-01

    As Medicaid expands in scope and influence, it is evolving toward being a "purchaser" of quality health care. This commentary discusses measurement and incentivization of clinical outcomes in Medicaid. Advantages and disadvantages of outcome versus process measures are discussed. Distinctions are drawn between the roles of Medicare and Medicaid, including the implications of the growth in Medicaid managed care. Medicaid's influence is particularly notable for obstetric, pediatric, newborn, and long-term care. We provide data on 3 Medicaid outcomes: potentially preventable hospital admissions, readmissions, and complications. The commentary concludes with suggestions for choosing and implementing outcome-oriented value-based purchasing initiatives in Medicaid.

  9. Complicating the Concept of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Levitt, Kathryn M.

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues against a simple, reified view of culture as a set of ideas and norms belonging to a group or nation, and considers the implications of a more complicated concept for discussion of world culture and the global/local nexus. Most anthropologists define culture as the making of meaning, with an emphasis on the process itself as…

  10. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  11. Inflammatory duodenal necrosis complicating gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Dina; Lee, Geraint J.; Upadhyaya, Manasvi; Drake, David

    2016-01-01

    Babies with gastroschisis have an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that can lead to short bowel syndrome, a long-term parenteral nutrition requirement, and its associated complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent duodenal ischemia and necrosis associated with gastroschisis in the absence of NEC totalis. PMID:27695214

  12. The complication of pneumatic retinopexy.

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, G F; Tornambe, P E; Brinton, D A; Flood, T P; Green, S; Grizzard, W S; Hammer, M E; Leff, S R; Mascuilli, L; Morgan, C M

    1990-01-01

    There have been 26 published series with a total of 1274 detachments operated with pneumatic retinopexy. Eighty percent were reattached with a single procedure and 98% with reoperations. New breaks occurred in 13% and PVR in 4%. The complications published in 101 papers on pneumatic retinopexy in the last 5 years are analyzed as to frequency, prevention, management, and results. PMID:2095021

  13. Complications of occipital bone pneumatization.

    PubMed

    Moss, Mary; Biggs, Michael; Fagan, Paul; Forer, Martin; Davis, Martin; Roche, Jim

    2004-06-01

    Four cases of occipital bone pneumatization and subsequent complications are described, which include a pathological fracture of C1 and the occipital bone, spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema and pneumatocele formation. Reviews of the published literature and possible aetiological factors have been discussed. PMID:15230770

  14. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... may begin with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain. Neurological complications most often occur in the second stage ... such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. Other problems, which ...

  15. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteremia and sepsis are blood infections. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumococcus bacteria causes up to half of middle ear infections (otitis media). Symptoms include: Ear pain A red, swollen ear drum Fever Sleepiness  Top of Page Complications Some pneumococcal ...

  16. Facial filler and neurotoxin complications.

    PubMed

    Nettar, Kartik; Maas, Corey

    2012-06-01

    Botulinum neuromodulators and injectable dermal fillers have become part of the armamentarium in the treatment of facial aging. Their successful use requires a fundamental knowledge of anatomy and physiology and a sound understanding of their risks and complications. Although neuromodulators and fillers continue to demonstrate a strong record of safety, several notable risks exist.

  17. Teaching Energy Geography? It's Complicated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The premise of this essay is that energy geographies are complicated, and this in itself presents some pedagogical difficulties. As someone who wants students to critically examine and confront the complexity of energy systems, it can be frustrating when students react to demonstrate frustration, apathy, or even confusion. In what follows, I will…

  18. Inflammatory duodenal necrosis complicating gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Dina; Lee, Geraint J.; Upadhyaya, Manasvi; Drake, David

    2016-01-01

    Babies with gastroschisis have an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that can lead to short bowel syndrome, a long-term parenteral nutrition requirement, and its associated complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent duodenal ischemia and necrosis associated with gastroschisis in the absence of NEC totalis.

  19. Not to Complicate Matters, but ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Russell

    2008-01-01

    The writer discusses the current academic enthrallment with complicating seemingly every aspect of every event or phenomenon, arguing that the fashion elevates confusion from a transitional stage into an end goal. Rather than scholarly clarification, says Jacoby, people celebrate the fact that everything can be "problematized," rejoicing in…

  20. Does regional anaesthesia improve outcome?

    PubMed

    Hopkins, P M

    2015-12-01

    This review examines the recent evidence of an impact of regional anaesthesia on important clinical outcomes. Evidence was obtained from a variety of studies, with increasing numbers of analyses of large databases being prominent. The benefits and limitations of these approaches are considered in order to provide a context for interpretation of the data they generate. There should be little argument that correctly performed and appropriately used regional anaesthetic techniques can provide the most effective postoperative analgesia for the duration of the block, but the majority of studies suggest that this does not translate into improved longer-term surgical outcomes. The evidence for reduced incidence of major complications when regional anaesthesia is compared with, or added to, general anaesthesia is mixed. There appears to be a small effect in reducing blood loss during major joint arthroplasty. Some, but not all, studies demonstrate a reduced incidence of respiratory and infective complications with regional anaesthesia, but the effect on cardiovascular complications is variable. There are even some data consistent with a hypothesis that general anaesthesia may be protective against postoperative cognitive dysfunction. In conclusion, there is probably no generally applicable benefit in long-term outcomes with regional anaesthesia. More likely is an interaction between patient factors, the surgical procedure, and the relative capability of the anaesthetist to manage different types of anaesthesia.

  1. Serious Vascular Complications after Nonsurgical Rhinoplasty: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiqing; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Summary There has been an increased global demand for dermal filler injections in recent years. Although hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers generally have a good safety profile, serious vascular complications have been reported. Here we present a typical case of skin necrosis following a nonsurgical rhinoplasty using hyaluronic acid filler. Despite various rescuing managements, unsightly superficial scars were left. It is critical for plastic surgeons and dermatologists to be familiar with the vascular anatomy and the staging of vascular complications. Any patients suspected to experience a vascular complication should receive early management under close monitoring. Meanwhile, the potentially devastating outcome caused by illegal practice calls for stricter regulations and law enforcement. PMID:27200245

  2. Thoracostomy tubes: A comprehensive review of complications and related topics

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatt, Michael; Tarbox, Abigail; Seamon, Mark J.; Swaroop, Mamta; Cipolla, James; Allen, Charles; Hallenbeck, Stacinoel; Davido, H. Tracy; Lindsey, David E.; Doraiswamy, Vijay A.; Galwankar, Sagar; Tulman, David; Latchana, Nicholas; Papadimos, Thomas J.; Cook, Charles H.; Stawicki, Stanislaw P.

    2014-01-01

    Tube thoracostomy (TT) placement belongs among the most commonly performed procedures. Despite many benefits of TT drainage, potential for significant morbidity and mortality exists. Abdominal or thoracic injury, fistula formation and vascular trauma are among the most serious, but more common complications such as recurrent pneumothorax, insertion site infection and nonfunctioning or malpositioned TT also represent a significant source of morbidity and treatment cost. Awareness of potential complications and familiarity with associated preventive, diagnostic and treatment strategies are fundamental to satisfactory patient outcomes. This review focuses on chest tube complications and related topics, with emphasis on prevention and problem-oriented approaches to diagnosis and treatment. The authors hope that this manuscript will serve as a valuable foundation for those who wish to become adept at the management of chest tubes. PMID:25024942

  3. Social and cultural efficacies of medicines: complications for antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    van der Geest, Sjaak; Hardon, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Using ethnographic examples of medicine use, prescription, distribution and production, the authors argue that social and cultural effects of pharmaceuticals should be taken into account. Non-medical effects deeply influence the medical outcome of medicine use. Complications around the advent of anti-AIDS medicines in poor countries are taken as a point in case. The authors are medical anthropologists specialised in the social and cultural analysis of pharmaceuticals.

  4. How to minimize complications in acromioclavicular joint and clavicle surgery.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Stephanie H; Ahmad, Christopher S; Henry, Patrick D G; McKee, Michael D; Levine, William N

    2012-01-01

    Up to 50% of all athletic shoulder injuries are acromioclavicular joint separations. The ideal treatment for type III injuries remains controversial. Current reconstruction techniques include anatomic coracoclavicular reconstructions and newly developed arthroscopic techniques. Clavicle fractures have traditionally been treated nonsurgically based largely on early reports of surgical complications, but there has been a dramatic surge in the surgical treatment of clavicle fractures over the past 5 years because of recent reports of poorer outcomes with nonsurgical management.

  5. Microvascular complications and diabetic retinopathy: recent advances and future implications.

    PubMed

    Barot, Megha; Gokulgandhi, Mitan R; Patel, Sulabh; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-03-01

    Retinal microvascular alterations have been observed during diabetic retinopathy (DR) due to the retinal susceptibility towards subtle pathological alterations. Therefore, retinal microvascular pathology is essential to understand the nature of retinal degenerations during DR. In this review, the role of retinal microvasculature complications during progression of DR, along with recent efforts to normalize such alterations for better therapeutic outcome, will be underlined. In addition, current therapeutics and future directions for advancement of standard treatment for DR patients will be discussed. PMID:23464520

  6. Social and cultural efficacies of medicines: Complications for antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    van der Geest, Sjaak; Hardon, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Using ethnographic examples of medicine use, prescription, distribution and production, the authors argue that social and cultural effects of pharmaceuticals should be taken into account. Non-medical effects deeply influence the medical outcome of medicine use. Complications around the advent of anti-AIDS medicines in poor countries are taken as a point in case. The authors are medical anthropologists specialised in the social and cultural analysis of pharmaceuticals. PMID:17090322

  7. The Pathobiology of Diabetes Mellitus in Bone Metabolism, Fracture Healing, and Complications.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Johan M; Archdeacon, Michael T

    2015-10-01

    Complications and inferior outcomes of fractures in the setting of diabetes mellitus (DM) are well documented. The incidence of DM is increasing rapidly, particularly in an aging and obese population. Thus, the combination of DM and fracture is becoming a serious health problem worldwide. As many fractures are relatively uncomplicated in the healthy patient population, a concerted effort to improve outcomes of fractures in patients with DM is warranted. In this article, we review relevant studies and examine the pathobiological mechanisms influencing fracture outcomes, including complications related to bone and soft-tissue healing, and infection. PMID:26447406

  8. Protocol for the prevention and management of complications related to ADM implant-based breast reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Citron, Isabelle; Dower, Rory; Ho-Asjoe, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Acellular dermal matrix (ADM) implant-based reconstructions have transformed direct-to-implant breast reconstruction (DTI). But like all surgery, it is not deplete of complications such as seroma, infections and wound healing problems. These are cited with varying frequencies in the literature. With increased experience and through a series of measures instituted to minimize complications, we have been able to improve outcomes for our patients. We report our technical refinements for prevention of ADM reconstruction associated complications including patient selection, implant selection, drains, dressing and our post operative antibiotic regime. We also outline our protocol for the management of ADM associated complications including seroma, simple and complex infection and red breast syndrome, such that the sequelae of complications are minimized and patients achieve a better long-term outcome. PMID:26816672

  9. Protocol for the prevention and management of complications related to ADM implant-based breast reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Citron, Isabelle; Dower, Rory; Ho-Asjoe, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Acellular dermal matrix (ADM) implant-based reconstructions have transformed direct-to-implant breast reconstruction (DTI). But like all surgery, it is not deplete of complications such as seroma, infections and wound healing problems. These are cited with varying frequencies in the literature. With increased experience and through a series of measures instituted to minimize complications, we have been able to improve outcomes for our patients. We report our technical refinements for prevention of ADM reconstruction associated complications including patient selection, implant selection, drains, dressing and our post operative antibiotic regime. We also outline our protocol for the management of ADM associated complications including seroma, simple and complex infection and red breast syndrome, such that the sequelae of complications are minimized and patients achieve a better long-term outcome. PMID:26816672

  10. Failure to rescue patients from early critical complications of oesophagogastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weledji, Elroy P.; Verla, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    ‘Failure to rescue’ is a significant cause of mortality in gastrointestinal surgery. Differences in mortality between high and low-volume hospitals are not associated with large difference in complication rates but to the ability of the hospital to effectively rescue patients from the complications. We reviewed the critical complications following surgery for oesophageal and gastric cancer, their prevention and reasons for failure to rescue. Strategies focussing on perioperative optimization, the timely recognition and management of complications may be essential to improving outcome in low-volume hospitals. PMID:27054032

  11. [Neurological complications following anesthesia--part I. Perioperative stroke, postoperative visual loss, anticholinergic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Adam, Christian; Quabach, Ralf; Standl, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Neurological complications following anesthesia deteriorate patients' outcome, and increase hospital costs because of prolonged hospitalization and supplemental medical care. Moreover, patients' satisfaction is negatively influenced by neurological sequelae after anesthesia. Improving anesthesiologic management based on consequent prevention measures can help to reduce the incidence of neurological complications after anesthesia. In case of neurological complications in the perioperative phase an interdisciplinary approach in immediate diagnosis and treatment may prevent patients from permanent damage. The present review article gives an overview over incidences, diagnostic and therapeutic issues of neurologic complications in operative patients, such as perioperative stroke, postoperative visual loss and the anticholinergic syndrome. PMID:20665352

  12. Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Pleşca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burlănescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicolăescu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer – group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer

  13. [Infectious complications in necrotizing pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Werner, J; Büchler, M W

    2007-10-01

    Patients with CT evidence of more than 50 % necrosis, or an increased CRP or procalcitonin are at risk of developing severe pancreatitis and septic complications and should be monitored in an intensive care unit. ERCP and sphincterotomy are indicated in patients with biliary pancreatitis and impacted gall stones, biliary sepsis, or obstructive jaundice. In septic patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, a FNA should be performed for differentiation of sterile and infected pancreatic necrosis. Adequate volume resuscitation and analgesic treatment are the most important treatment of acute pancreatitis. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces septic complications in severe necrotizing pancreatitis and should be started early. Surgical therapy is indicated in patients with infected pancreatic necrosis. The surgical technique of choice is open necrosectomy with postoperative closed lavage of the lesser sac.

  14. Complications of splenic tissue reimplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Tzoracoleftherakis, E.; Alivizatos, V.; Kalfarentzos, F.; Androulakis, J.

    1991-01-01

    Splenic tissue reimplantation employing the omental implantation technique was applied in 23 patients undergoing splenectomy for traumatic or iatrogenic splenic injury. Four complications were encountered after autotransplantation (17.4%). Two of these consisted of small bowel obstruction due to postoperative adhesions and were successfully managed by lysis of the adhesions. The other two complications were aseptic necrosis of the splenic transplants and were treated with ablation of the autolysed transplants. A case of abnormal splenic tissue reimplantation in a male patient with unsuspected myelofibrosis is also discussed. He underwent an emergency laparotomy for rupture of a subcapsular splenic haematoma. It is concluded that splenic tissue implantation in the greater omentum is associated with important early morbidity and this should be taken into account whenever application of the method is considered. Images Figure 1 PMID:2018325

  15. Hepatic abscess complicating ulceroglandular tularemia.

    PubMed

    Gourdeau, M; Lamothe, F; Ishak, M; Côté, J; Breton, G; Villeneuve, J P; D'Amico, P

    1983-12-15

    In a patient with the clinical features of classic ulceroglandular tularemia a solitary hepatic abscess was found during an ultrasound examination. Hepatic tularemia has rarely been reported since the advent of specific therapy, which prevents the disease from reaching the disseminated state. This case, however, shows that the liver can be involved early in the course of tularemia. Increased serum levels of hepatic enzymes may be the only sign of such a complication.

  16. Permanent makeup: indications and complications.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2008-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, simulating makeup, have become very popular in the last decades; the technique of micropigmentation consists of implantation of pigment into the skin using a tattoo pen. The procedure can also be used to camouflage vitiligo, to mask scars, and as an adjunct to reconstructive surgery. Risks and complications include infections, allergic reactions, scarring, fanning, fading, and dissatisfaction about color and shape. Lasers offer the best cosmetic result for removal of unwanted tattoos.

  17. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  18. Post-heart transplant complications.

    PubMed

    Birati, Edo Y; Rame, J Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    Managing patients after heart transplantation is challenging, since these patients have unique clinical complications (associated with the immunosuppressive therapy and cardiac allograft rejection) together with atypical clinical presentations for infection and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Survival rates have improved substantially with the use of new immunosuppressive drugs. High vigilance, early diagnosis, and appropriate intervention for allograft-related and non-allograft-related syndromes with significant morbidity and mortality are the keys to long-term survival of patients after transplantation. PMID:24996612

  19. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  20. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-07-14

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  1. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  2. Laparoscopic surgery complications: Postoperative peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Drăghici, L; Drăghici, I; Ungureanu, A; Copăescu, C; Popescu, M; Dragomirescu, C

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Complications within laparoscopic surgery, similar to classic surgery are inevitable and require immediate actions both to diminish intraoperative risks and to choose the appropriate therapeutic attitude. Peritonitis and hemorrhagic incidents are both part of the complications aspect of laparoscopic surgery. Fortunately, the incidence is limited, thus excluding the rejection of celioscopic methods. Patient’s risks and benefits are to be analyzed carefully prior recommending laparoscopic surgery. Materials and methods: This study presents a statistical analysis of peritonitis consecutive to laparoscopic surgery, experience of „Sf. Ioan” Emergency Hospital, Bucharest, and Department of Surgery (2000-2010). Results:There were 180 (0,96%) complicated situations requiring reinterventions, from a total of 18676 laparoscopic procedures. 106 cases (0,56%) represented different grades of postoperative peritonitis. Most frequently, there were consecutive laparoscopic appendicectomia and colecistectomia. During the last decade, few severe cases of peritonitis followed laparoscopic bariatric surgical procedures. Conclusions: This study reflects the possibility of unfavorable evolution of postoperative peritonitis comparing with hemorrhagic incidents within laparoscopic surgery. PMID:23049630

  3. The Cardiac Complications of Methamphetamines.

    PubMed

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Cunningham, Neil J; MacIsaac, Andrew I

    2016-04-01

    Methamphetamines are increasingly popular drugs of abuse in Australia, and are rising in purity. The rising popularity and purity of methamphetamines has notably increased demands upon Australian medical services. Methamphetamines are sympathomimetic amines with a range of adverse effects upon multiple organ systems. Cardiovascular complications are the second leading cause of death in methamphetamine abusers, and there appears to be a high prevalence of cardiac pathology. Cardiovascular pathology frequently seen in methamphetamine abusers includes hypertension, aortic dissection, acute coronary syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension and methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy. The rising prevalence of methamphetamine abuse is likely to increase the burden of cardiovascular pathology in Australians. A National Parliamentary Enquiry was opened in March 2015 to address concerns regarding the medical and social impacts of methamphetamine abuse. From April 2015, a National 'Ice Taskforce' was also created in parallel. Reversal of cardiac pathology appears to be achievable with abstinence from methamphetamines and initiation of appropriate treatment. It is key to appreciate that the pathogenesis of methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications arises as a result of the specific toxic effects of methamphetamines. Clinical management is hence individualised; suggested management approaches for methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications are detailed within this article.

  4. Factors Associated With Gastroschisis Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Overcash, Rachael T.; DeUgarte, Daniel A.; Stephenson, Megan L.; Gutkin, Rachel M.; Norton, Mary E.; Parmar, Sima; Porto, Manuel; Poulain, Francis R.; Schrimmer, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify perinatal variables associated with adverse outcomes in infants prenatally diagnosed with gastroschisis. Methods A retrospective review was conducted of all inborn pregnancies complicated by gastroschisis within the five institutions of the University of California Fetal Consortium from 2007 to 2012. The primary outcome was a composite adverse neonatal outcome comprising death, re-operation, gastrostomy, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Variables collected included antenatal ultrasound findings, maternal smoking or drug use, gestational age at delivery, preterm labor, elective delivery, mode of delivery, and birth weight. Univariate and multivariate analysis was utilized to assess factors associated with adverse outcomes. We also evaluated the e association of preterm delivery with neonatal outcomes such as total parenteral nutrition (TPN) cholestasis and length of stay. Results There were 191 infants born with gastroschisis in University of California Fetal Consortium institutions at a mean gestational age of 36 3/7 ± 1.8 weeks. Within the cohort, 27 (14%) had one or more major adverse outcomes including three deaths (1.6%). Early gestational age at delivery was the only variable identified as a significant predictor of adverse outcomes on both univariate and multivariate analysis (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1-1.8 for each earlier week of gestation). TPN cholestasis was significantly more common in infants delivered < 37 weeks of gestational age (38/115 (33%) compared with 11/76 (15%); p<0.001). Conclusions In this contemporary cohort, earlier gestational age at delivery is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes in infants with gastroschisis. Other variables such as antenatal ultrasound findings and mode of delivery did not predict adverse neonatal outcomes. PMID:25162255

  5. [Complications and reoperations following laparoscopic antireflux surgery].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Örs Péter; Varga, Gábor; Biró, Zsanett; Papp, András; Bognár, Laura; Vereczkei, András

    2016-09-01

    Laparoscopic antireflux surgery is an effective treatment for patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease, when it is refractory to conservative management. In experienced centers the procedure is safe, although complications may develop either during surgery or in the early or late postoperative period, which may necessitate revisional surgery. Between 1998 and 2015 a total of 407 patients underwent laparoscopic antireflux surgery at the Department of Surgery, University of Pécs. This interval was divided into two periods. In the first one, between 1998 and 2006, we operated on 241 patients who were all enrolled in a prospective study. All the diagnostic examinations were carried out at our institution. In the second period 166 patients were treated with minimal invasive surgery and the data were analyzed retrospectively. The 407 patients comprised 161 men and 246 women with a median age of 53,1 years. Hiatoplasty was reinforced with teres ligament in 27 cases, a prosthetic mesh was used in 28 cases and fascia lata in a four cases, when hiatal closures were not considered reliable. In 16 cases (4%) the operation was converted to open procedure, and our mortality rate was 0,5%. Revisional surgery was performed laparoscopically in 39 patients, and thoraco-laparotomy was done in six cases (12%). 5 additional reoperations were performed in patients, who had their primary antireflux surgery in another institution. Our 4% conversion, 12% reoperation and 0,5% mortality rates correspond to the figures published in the literature. In conclusion, this study confirms that laparoscopic antireflux surgery is a safe procedure with very good clinical outcomes. Late complications, such as recurrent reflux disease and reherniation, as well as revisional surgery occured almost exclusively after surgical treatment of the large hiatal hernias. PMID:27644924

  6. From phenotype to gene: detecting disease-specific gene functional modules via a text-based human disease phenotype network construction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Shi-Hua; Wu, Chao; Li, Xia; Chen, Xi; Jiang, Wei; Gong, Bin-Sheng; Li, Jiang; Yan, Yu-Qing

    2010-08-20

    Currently, some efforts have been devoted to the text analysis of disease phenotype data, and their results indicated that similar disease phenotypes arise from functionally related genes. These related genes work together, as a functional module, to perform a desired cellular function. We constructed a text-based human disease phenotype network and detected 82 disease-specific gene functional modules, each corresponding to a different phenotype cluster, by means of graph-based clustering and mapping from disease phenotype to gene. Since genes in such gene functional modules are functionally related and cause clinically similar diseases, they may share common genetic origin of their associated disease phenotypes. We believe the investigation may facilitate the ultimate understanding of the common pathophysiologic basis of associated diseases.

  7. Research on recurrent pregnancy complications: a clinician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Smulian, John C

    2007-07-01

    Research on recurrent pregnancy complications is essential to help clinicians provide appropriate counselling and guide the management of patients with a history of adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, recurrence research is complex, in both its execution and interpretation. The paucity of appropriate data sets accessible for study of recurrent pregnancy outcomes presents significant challenges in performing recurrence research. This is further compounded by the different perspectives on recurrence between epidemiologists and clinicians. The interpretation of risk, whether it is absolute risk, relative risk or population-attributable fraction, underlies the often opposing perspectives of researchers and clinicians. Because clinicians acutely feel the need to provide appropriate counselling and management strategies when there has been a previous pregnancy complication, it is necessary that all those involved in research and care for these women work together to address gaps in our knowledge for recurrent pregnancy outcomes. In this way, we can develop a better understanding of disease processes, counsel patients better, design management plans and, ultimately, achieve better outcomes for our patients.

  8. Impact of Preoperative Radiotherapy on General and Disease-Specific Health Status of Rectal Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thong, Melissa S.Y.; Mols, Floortje; Lemmens, Valery E.P.P.; Rutten, Harm J.T.; Roukema, Jan A.; Martijn, Hendrik; Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To date, few studies have evaluated the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (pRT) on long-term health status of rectal cancer survivors. Using a population-based sample, we assessed the impact of pRT on general and disease-specific health status of rectal cancer survivors up to 10 years postdiagnosis. The health status of older ({>=}75 years old at diagnosis) pRT survivors was also compared with that of younger survivors. Methods and Materials: Survivors identified from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry treated with surgery only (SU) or with pRT between 1998 and 2007 were included. Survivors completed the Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Colorectal 38 (EORTC QLQ-CR38) questionnaire. The SF-36 and EORTC QLQ-CR38 (sexuality subscale) scores of the survivors were compared to an age- and sex-matched Dutch normal population. Results: A total of 340 survivors (response, 85%; pRT survivors, 71%) were analyzed. Overall, survivors had similar general health status. Both short-term (<5 years) and long-term ({>=}5 years) pRT survivors had significantly poorer body image and more problems with gastrointestinal function, male sexual dysfunction, and defecation than SU survivors. Survivors had comparable general health status but greater sexual dysfunction than the normal population. Older pRT survivors had general and disease-specific health status comparable to that of younger pRT survivors. Conclusions: For better survivorship care, rectal cancer survivors could benefit from increased clinical and psychological focus on the possible long-term morbidity of treatment and its effects on health status.

  9. Urological complications after renal transplantation – a single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Dembowski, Janusz; Kołodziej, Anna; Małkiewicz, Bartosz; Tupikowski, Krzysztof; Matuszewski, Michał; Chudoba, Paweł; Boratyńska, Maria; Klinger, Marian; Zdrojowy, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urological complications after renal transplantation occur in between 2.5% and 30% of all graft recipients. The aim of the study was to present 7 years of experience in urological treatment of patients with a transplanted kidney. We aimed to identify retrospectively late urological complications in renal transplant recipients at a single center and analyze the treatment modalities and their outcome. Material and methods Between January 2008 and December 2014, a total of 58 patients after KTX were treated in the Department of Urology because of post-transplant urological complications that occurred during follow-up at the Transplant Outpatient Department. Retrieved data were analysed in retrospectively. Results In the group of 38 patients with ureteral stenosis (Clavien grade III), 29 patients underwent endoscopy, 8 open surgical procedures and one both endoscopic and open operation. Ten patients were admitted with symptomatic lymphocoele (Clavien III), of which 9 were successfully treated with drainage and one with surgical marsupialization. Because of urolithiasis in the grafted kidney (Clavien grade III), 4 patients were treated with ureterorenoscopic lithotripsy (URSL) and one only with the extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) procedure. Five urethral strictures plasties and one graftectomy because of purulent pyelonephritis were also conducted. The average age in the group of recipients who experienced urologic complications was similar (46.1 vs. 47.8) to those without complications. There was no vesicoureteral reflux or ureteral necrosis requiring surgical intervention, no graft loss and death related to urological complication and treatment. Conclusions Most complications could be successfully treated with endourological procedures. The kidney function improved in the majority of patients. PMID:27730001

  10. Surgical complications and their impact on patients’ psychosocial well-being: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Anna; Faiz, Omar; Davis, Rachel; Almoudaris, Alex; Vincent, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Objective Surgical complications may affect patients psychologically due to challenges such as prolonged recovery or long-lasting disability. Psychological distress could further delay patients’ recovery as stress delays wound healing and compromises immunity. This review investigates whether surgical complications adversely affect patients’ postoperative well-being and the duration of this impact. Methods The primary data sources were ‘PsychINFO’, ‘EMBASE’ and ‘MEDLINE’ through OvidSP (year 2000 to May 2012). The reference lists of eligible articles were also reviewed. Studies were eligible if they measured the association of complications after major surgery from 4 surgical specialties (ie, cardiac, thoracic, gastrointestinal and vascular) with adult patients’ postoperative psychosocial outcomes using validated tools or psychological assessment. 13 605 articles were identified. 2 researchers independently extracted information from the included articles on study aims, participants’ characteristics, study design, surgical procedures, surgical complications, psychosocial outcomes and findings. The studies were synthesised narratively (ie, using text). Supplementary meta-analyses of the impact of surgical complications on psychosocial outcomes were also conducted. Results 50 studies were included in the narrative synthesis. Two-thirds of the studies found that patients who suffered surgical complications had significantly worse postoperative psychosocial outcomes even after controlling for preoperative psychosocial outcomes, clinical and demographic factors. Half of the studies with significant findings reported significant adverse effects of complications on patient psychosocial outcomes at 12 months (or more) postsurgery. 3 supplementary meta-analyses were completed, 1 on anxiety (including 2 studies) and 2 on physical and mental quality of life (including 3 studies). The latter indicated statistically significantly lower physical and

  11. Perioperative Complications in Patients with Inflammatory Arthropathy Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Schnaser, Erik A; Browne, James A; Padgett, Douglas E; Figgie, Mark P; D'Apuzzo, Michele R

    2015-09-01

    Little data exists comparing acute post-operative outcomes in patients with different types of inflammatory arthritis (IA) after undergoing a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Our objectives were to compare perioperative complications and determine the most common complications between the different IA subtypes compared with patients with osteoarthritis undergoing primary TKA. We found significant differences when comparing complications within the different subtypes of IA. RA patients, despite having a greater number of comorbidities had a reduced rate of medical complications postoperatively compared to the OA cohort. All of the inflammatory subtypes had a higher rate of orthopedic complications postoperatively compared to the OA group except for patients with AS. However, ankylosing spondylitis had the highest mortality rate as well as medical complication rate among the subtypes. PMID:26111792

  12. [Neurological complications in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Hundsberger, Thomas; Roth, Patrick; Roelcke, Ulrich

    2014-08-20

    Neurological symptoms in cancer patients have a great impact on quality of life and need an interdisciplinary approach. They lead to significant impairment in activities of daily living (gait disorders, dizziness), a loss of patients independency (vegetative disturbances, wheel-chair dependency) and interfere with social activities (ban of driving in case of epilepsy). In this article we describe three main and serious neurological problems in the context of oncological patients. These are chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy, malignant spinal cord compression and epileptic seizures. Our aim is to increase the awareness of neurological complications in cancer patients to improve patients care.

  13. Strabismus complications from local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Guyton, David L

    2008-01-01

    Strabismus developing after retrobulbar or peribulbar anesthesia for both anterior and posterior segment eye surgery may be due to myotoxicity to an extraocular muscle from the local anesthetic agent. Initial paresis often causes diplopia immediately after surgery, but later progressive segmental fibrosis occurs, and/or hypertrophy of the muscle, producing diplopia in the opposite direction from the direction of the initial diplopia. The inferior rectus muscle is most commonly affected. Usually a large recession on an adjustable suture of the involved muscle(s) yields good alignment. Using topical anesthesia or sub-Tenon's anesthesia can avoid this complication.

  14. Neonatal meningitis complicating with pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anita; Agrawal, Satish C

    2014-01-01

    Pneumocephalus is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas within the cranial cavity. This gas may arise either from a trauma, a tumor, a surgical, or a diagnostic procedure or occasionally from an infection. Pneumocephalus as a complication of bacterial meningitis, in absence of trauma or a procedure, is extremely rare, particularly in a newborn. A case of pneumocephalus occurring in a baby, suffering from neonatal meningitis, acquired probably through unsafe cutting and tying of the cord, is reported here. Cutting, tying, and care of the umbilical cord is of utmost importance to prevent neonatal infection as the same is a potential cause of serious anaerobic infections, besides tetanus. PMID:24741257

  15. Neurological complication of dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Murthy, J M K

    2010-01-01

    Dengue infection is endemic in more than 100 countries, mostly in the developing world. Recent observations indicate that the clinical profile of dengue is changing, and that neurological manifestations are being reported more frequently. The exact incidence of various neurological complications is uncertain. The pathogenesis of neurological manifestations is multiple and includes: neurotrophic effect of the dengue virus, related to the systemic effects of dengue infection, and immune mediated. In countries endemic to dengue, it will be prudent to investigate for dengue infection in patients with fever and acute neurological manifestations. There is need for understanding of the pathogenesis of various neurological manifestations.

  16. Celiac disease and obstetric complications: a systematic review and metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    Saccone, Gabriele; Berghella, Vincenzo; Sarno, Laura; Maruotti, Giuseppe M; Cetin, Irene; Greco, Luigi; Khashan, Ali S; McCarthy, Fergus; Martinelli, Domenico; Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Pasquale

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this metaanalysis was to evaluate the risk of the development of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease. We searched electronic databases from their inception until February 2015. We included all cohort studies that reported the incidence of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease compared with women without celiac disease (ie, control group). Studies without a control group and case-control studies were excluded. The primary outcome was defined a priori and was the incidence of a composite of obstetric complications that included intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, low birthweight, preeclampsia and preterm birth. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, stillbirth, preeclampsia, small for gestational age, and low birthweight. The review was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015017263) before data extraction. All authors were contacted to obtain the original databases and perform individual participant data metaanalysis. Primary and secondary outcomes were assessed in the aggregate data analysis and in the individual participant data metaanalysis. We included 10 cohort studies (4,844,555 women) in this metaanalysis. Four authors provided the entire databases for the individual participant data analysis. Because none of the included studies stratified data for the primary outcome (ie, composite outcome), the assessment of this outcome for the aggregate analysis was not feasible. Aggregate data analysis showed that, compared with women in the control group, women with celiac disease (both treated and untreated) had a significantly higher risk of the development of preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.66), intrauterine growth restriction (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-4.67), stillbirth (odds ratio, 4.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-21.75), low birthweight (odds ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1

  17. Gynaecologic cancer complicating pregnancy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Amant, Frédéric; Brepoels, Lieselot; Halaska, Michael J; Gziri, Mina Mhallem; Calsteren, Kristel Van

    2010-02-01

    Cancer complicating pregnancy endangers two lives. Any approach should look at both maternal and foetal safety. Maternal prognosis will not improve by terminating the pregnancy. Imaging for staging purposes is possible, and sonar and magnetic resonance imaging are the preferred examinations. Abdominopelvic computed tomography exposes the foetus to the highest doses radiation and should be avoided. Provided a thorough maternal monitoring to ensure a stable uteroplacental blood flow and foetal oxygenation, surgical techniques that are used in non-pregnant patients are also safe for pregnant patients. Radiotherapy of the upper part of the body is possible during pregnancy, but during the third trimester the close distance may put the foetus at risk. Chemotherapy during the second or third trimester can be administered without increasing the incidence of congenital malformations. A systematic analysis, especially on the long-term outcome of the offspring after cancer treatment during pregnancy is still lacking. Here, we present a summary of issues related to the diagnosis and treatment of gynaecological malignancies during pregnancy. Firstly, we describe general diagnostic and cancer-treatment-related problems. In the second part, organ pathology including breast, cervical, ovarian, endometrial and vulvar cancer is discussed.

  18. Risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A retrospective observational analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jihion; Choi, Jae Moon; Lee, Joonho; Kwon, Koo; Kong, Yu-Gyeong; Seo, Hyungseok; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Park, Hyung Keun; Kim, Young-Kug

    2016-08-01

    Although percutaneous nephrolithotomy is minimally invasive, it is associated with several complications, including extravasation of fluid and urine, the need for a blood transfusion, and septicemia. However, little is known about pulmonary complications after this procedure. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the risk factors for and outcomes of pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy.All consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy between 2001 and 2014 were identified and divided into group A (no clinically significant pulmonary complications) and group B (clinically significant pulmonary complications). Preoperative and intraoperative variables and postoperative outcomes were evaluated. Independent risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications were evaluated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses.The study included 560 patients: 378 (67.5%) in group A and 182 (32.5%) in group B. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy were a higher body mass index (odds ratio = 1.062, P = 0.026), intraoperative red blood cell transfusion (odds ratio = 2.984, P = 0.012), and an intercostal surgical approach (odds ratio = 3.046, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the duration of hospital stay was significantly longer (8.4 ± 4.3 days vs 7.6 ± 3.4 days, P = 0.010) and the intensive care unit admission rate was significantly higher [13 (7.1%) vs 1 (0.3%), P < 0.001] in group B than in group A.Risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy were a higher body mass index, intraoperative red blood cell transfusion, and an intercostal surgical approach. Postoperative pulmonary complications were associated with poor outcomes. These results may provide useful information for the perioperative management of pulmonary complications after percutaneous

  19. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Catherine HY; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig’s angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk. PMID:21358880

  20. Infectious Complications After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Maria Del Pilar; Martin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the standard of care for patients with decompensated cirrhosis and for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. More than 6000 liver transplants are performed annually in the United States. High patient and graft survival rates have been achieved in great part due to the availability of potent immunosuppressive agents. Systemic immunosuppression has rendered the liver recipient susceptible to de novo infections as well as reactivation of preexisting latent infections. Infections occurring during the first month post-OLT are usually nosocomial, donor-derived, or the result of a perioperative complication. The development of opportunistic infections (OIs) such as Aspergillus and the reactivation of latent infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis are more frequent 1 to 6 months posttransplant, when the net state of immunosuppression is the highest. Immunosuppressive therapy is tapered 6 to 12 months post-OLT; therefore, infections occurring during that time period and afterward generally resemble those of the general population. Screening strategies applied to determine the risk of an infection after transplantation and the use of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy have reduced the incidence of OIs after OLT. This article will review the various causes of infection post-OLT and the therapies used to manage complications. PMID:27134589

  1. Complications of rigid internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Chris A; Lin, Kant Y

    2009-03-01

    Over the past 20 years, there have been many advances in the development of bone fixation systems used in the practice of craniomaxillofacial surgery. As surgical practices have evolved, the complications of each technologic advance have changed accordingly. Interfragmentary instability of interosseous wiring has been replaced by the risk of exposure, infection, and palpability of plate and screw fixation systems. The improved rigidity of plate fixation requires anatomic alignment of fracture fragments. Failure to obtain proper alignment has led to the phenomenon known as "open internal fixation" of fracture fragments without proper reduction. The size of the plates has decreased to minimize palpability and exposure. However limitations in their application have been encountered due to the physiologic forces of the muscles of mastication and bone healing. In the pediatric population, the long-standing presence of plates in the cranial vault resulted in reports of transcranial migration and growth restriction. These findings led to the development of resorbable plating systems, which are associated with self-limited plate palpability and soft tissue inflammatory reactions. Any rigid system including these produces growth restriction in varying amounts. In this discussion, we review the reported complication rates of miniplating and microplating systems as well as absorptive plating systems in elective and traumatic craniofacial surgery.

  2. Hemorrhagic complications of severe pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Stroud, W H; Cullom, J W; Anderson, M C

    1981-10-01

    Massive hemorrhage associated with pancreatitis is a rare but frequently lethal complication. Fifteen patients with this complication are presented. Bleeding occurred in four patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, in three patients with pancreatic abscesses, in seven patients with pseudocysts, and in one patient with chronic relapsing pancreatitis following longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy. The initial presentation of hemorrhage was gastrointestinal in eight patients and retroperitoneal or intraperitoneal in seven. Abdominal pain with associated nausea and vomiting was present in all patients on admission. Duration of symptoms prior to hospitalization averaged 6 days. During hospitalization the 15 patients received a total of 512 units of blood for transfusions ranging from 8 to 177 units. Admission amylase values were of no benefit in assessing severity of the disease, but application of Ranson's criteria accurately predicted both severity and prognosis. The common denominator in all cases of bleeding appeared to be the presence of an overwhelming or continuing inflammatory process with necrosis and erosion of adjacent vascular and visceral structures. The overall mortality rate in the series was 53.3%. Those patients with hemorrhage associated with pseudocyst formation had the highest survival rates, whereas those with necrotizing pancreatitis and hemorrhage had an extremely poor response to aggressive medical and/or surgical management.

  3. Can administrative data be used to ascertain clinically significant postoperative complications?

    PubMed

    Romano, Patrick S; Schembri, Michael E; Rainwater, Julie A

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess whether postoperative complications can be ascertained using administrative data. We randomly sampled 991 adults who underwent elective open diskectomies at 30 nonfederal acute care hospitals in California. Postoperative complications were specified by reviewing medical literature and by consulting clinical experts. We compared hospital-reported ICD-9-CM data and independently recoded ICD-9-CM data with complications abstracted by clinicians using detailed criteria. Recoded ICD-9-CM data were more likely than hospital-reported ICD-9-CM data to capture true complications, when they occurred, but they also mislabeled more patients who never experienced clinically significant complications. This finding was most evident for mild or ambiguous complications, such as atelectasis, posthemorrhagic anemia, and hypotension. Overall, recoded ICD-9-CM data captured 47% and 56% of all mild and severe complications, respectively, whereas hospital-reported ICD-9-CM data captured only 37% and 44%, respectively, of all mild and severe complications. These findings raise questions about the validity of using administrative data to ascertain postoperative complications, even if coders are carefully hired, trained, and supervised. ICD-9-CM complication codes are more promising as a tool to help providers identify their own adverse outcomes than as a tool for comparing performance.

  4. Advanced paternal age and reproductive outcome

    PubMed Central

    Wiener-Megnazi, Zofnat; Auslender, Ron; Dirnfeld, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Women have been increasingly delaying the start of motherhood in recent decades. The same trend is seen also for men. The influence of maternal age on fertility, chromosomal anomalies, pregnancy complications, and impaired perinatal and post-natal outcome of offspring, has been thoroughly investigated, and these aspects are clinically applied during fertility and pregestational counseling. Male aging and reproductive outcome has gained relatively less attention. The purpose of this review is to evaluate updated and relevant literature on the effect of paternal age on reproductive outcome. PMID:22157982

  5. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Stroke More Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention Updated:Apr 27,2016 Complications The possibility of ... problems that did not show up right away. Prevention There is no known prevention for Kawasaki disease. ...

  6. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  7. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within 'post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy' on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  8. Sleep Apnea Tied to Complications After Angioplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159391.html Sleep Apnea Tied to Complications After Angioplasty Nightly breathing ... 15, 2016 WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea may increase the risk of serious complications ...

  9. Complications in Musculoskeletal Intervention: Important Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David T.; Dubois, Melissa; Tutton, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) intervention has proliferated in recent years among various subspecialties in medicine. Despite advancements in image guidance and percutaneous technique, the risk of complication has not been fully eliminated. Overall, complications in MSK interventions are rare, with bleeding and infection the most common encountered. Other complications are even rarer. This article reviews various complications unique to musculoskeletal interventions, assists the reader in understanding where pitfalls lie, and highlights ways to avoid them. PMID:26038623

  10. Common complications of pediatric neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Skalsky, Andrew J; Dalal, Pritha B

    2015-02-01

    Children with pediatric neuromuscular disorders experience common complications, primarily due to immobility and weakness. Musculoskeletal complications include hip dysplasia with associated hip subluxation or dislocation, neuromuscular scoliosis, and osteoporosis and resulting fractures. Constipation, gastroesophageal reflux, and obesity and malnutrition are commonly experienced gastrointestinal complications. Disordered sleep also is frequently observed, which affects both patients and caregivers. PMID:25479776

  11. COMPLICATIONS REQUIRING HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    WRZESINSKI, Aline; CORRÊA, Jéssica Moraes; FERNANDES, Tainiely Müller Barbosa; MONTEIRO, Letícia Fernandes; TREVISOL, Fabiana Schuelter; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The actual gold standard technique for obesity treatment is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. However, complications may occur and the surgeon must be prepared for them. Aim: To evaluate retrospectively the complications occurrence and associated factors in patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Methods: In this study, 469 medical charts were considered, from patients and from data collected during outpatient consultations. The variables considered were gender, age, height, pre-operatory BMI, pre-operatory weight, pre-operatory comorbidities, time of hospital stay, postoperative complications that demanded re-admission to the hospital and the time elapsed between the procedure and the complication. The patients' follow up was, at least, one year. Results: The incidence of postoperative complications that demanded a hospital care was 24,09%. The main comorbidity presented in this sample was hepatic steatosis. The comorbidity that was associated with the postoperative period was type 2 diabetes. There was a tendency for the female gender be related to the complications. The cholecystectomy was the most frequent complication. Complications occurred during the first year in 57,35%. Conclusion: The most frequent complication was the need to perform a cholecystectomy, where the most frequent comorbidity was hepatic steatosis. Over half the complications occurred during the first year postoperatively. Type 2 diabetes was associated with the occurrence of postoperative complications; women had the highest incidence; body mass index was not associated with the occurrence of complications. PMID:26537263

  12. Preoperative teaching and hysterectomy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Oetker-Black, Sharon L; Jones, Susan; Estok, Patricia; Ryan, Marian; Gale, Nancy; Parker, Carla

    2003-06-01

    This study used a theoretical model to determine whether an efficacy-enhancing teaching protocol was effective in improving immediate postoperative behaviors and selected short- and long-term health outcomes in women who underwent abdominal hysterectomies. The model used was the self-efficacy theory of Albert Bandura, PhD. One hundred eight patients in a 486-bed teaching hospital in the Midwest who underwent hysterectomies participated. The participation rate was 85%, and the attrition rate was 17% during the six-month study. The major finding was that participants in the efficacy-enhancing teaching group ambulated significantly longer than participants in the usual care group. This is an important finding because the most prevalent postoperative complications after hysterectomy are atelectasis, pneumonia, paralytic ileus, and deep vein thrombosis, and postoperative ambulation has been shown to decrease or prevent all of these complications. This finding could affect the overall health status of women undergoing hysterectomies.

  13. Preoperative teaching and hysterectomy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Oetker-Black, Sharon L; Jones, Susan; Estok, Patricia; Ryan, Marian; Gale, Nancy; Parker, Carla

    2003-06-01

    This study used a theoretical model to determine whether an efficacy-enhancing teaching protocol was effective in improving immediate postoperative behaviors and selected short- and long-term health outcomes in women who underwent abdominal hysterectomies. The model used was the self-efficacy theory of Albert Bandura, PhD. One hundred eight patients in a 486-bed teaching hospital in the Midwest who underwent hysterectomies participated. The participation rate was 85%, and the attrition rate was 17% during the six-month study. The major finding was that participants in the efficacy-enhancing teaching group ambulated significantly longer than participants in the usual care group. This is an important finding because the most prevalent postoperative complications after hysterectomy are atelectasis, pneumonia, paralytic ileus, and deep vein thrombosis, and postoperative ambulation has been shown to decrease or prevent all of these complications. This finding could affect the overall health status of women undergoing hysterectomies. PMID:12817743

  14. Infantile haemangioma: a complicated disease.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Mingke; Qi, Xianqin; Dai, Yuxin; Wang, Shuqing; Quan, Zhiwei; Liu, Yingbin; Ou, Jingmin

    2015-06-01

    Infantile haemangiomas (IH) are common benign vascular tumors of childhood. They are characterised by rapid growth during the first year of life and slow regression that is usually completed by 7-10 years of age. The underlying mechanism of action of IH is aberrant angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, and involves the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and vascular endothelial growth factor pathway. IH become a challenge if they are part of a syndrome, are located in certain areas of the body, or if complications develop. The beta-adrenergic receptor blocker propranolol is a promising new candidate for first-line systemic therapy. This review focuses on the clinical characteristics, pathogenesis and management of IH.

  15. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    PubMed

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications.

  16. Neurologic complications of cardiac tumors.

    PubMed

    Roeltgen, David; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are an uncommon cause for neurologic disease, but if undiagnosed can be associated with devastating neurologic consequences. Primary cardiac tumors, both benign and neoplastic, and metastatic tumors occur. Primary cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with neurologic embolic complications. Metastatic cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with valvular distraction, arrhythmia, diminished cardiac output and indirect neurological dysfunction. Primary and metastatic cardiac tumors may result in cerebral metastatic disease. Atrial myxoma, a benign primary cardiac tumor, is the most common cardiac tumor associated with neurologic disease, and most commonly causes cerebral embolization and stroke. The use of thrombolytic therapy for these strokes is controversial. Additionally, delayed manifestations, including aneurysm formation and intracranial hemorrhage, are possible. Aneurysm formation has been described as occurring after removal of the primary tumor. The availability of noninvasive cardiac imaging has significantly helped decrease the neurologic morbidity of cardiac tumors and has led to frequent successful intervention. PMID:24365298

  17. Skeletal Complications of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Abigail A.; Gordon, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness with profound medical consequences. Among the many adverse physical sequelae of AN, bone health is impacted by starvation and can be permanently impaired over the course of the illness. In this review of skeletal complications associated with eating disorders, we discuss the epidemiology, neuroendocrine changes, adolescent vs. adult skeletal considerations, orthopedic concerns, assessment of bone health, and treatment options for individuals with AN. The focus of the review is the skeletal sequelae associated with anorexia nervosa, but we also briefly consider other eating disorders that may afflict adolescents and young adults. The review presents updates to the field of bone health in AN, and also suggests knowledge gaps and areas for future investigation. PMID:26166318

  18. Neurologic complications of scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Newton, H B

    2001-06-01

    Recreational scuba diving has become a popular sport in the United States, with almost 9 million certified divers. When severe diving injury occurs, the nervous system is frequently involved. In dive-related barotrauma, compressed or expanding gas within the ears, sinuses and lungs causes various forms of neurologic injury. Otic barotrauma often induces pain, vertigo and hearing loss. In pulmonary barotrauma of ascent, lung damage can precipitate arterial gas embolism, causing blockage of cerebral blood vessels and alterations of consciousness, seizures and focal neurologic deficits. In patients with decompression sickness, the vestibular system, spinal cord and brain are affected by the formation of nitrogen bubbles. Common signs and symptoms include vertigo, thoracic myelopathy with leg weakness, confusion, headache and hemiparesis. Other diving-related neurologic complications include headache and oxygen toxicity.

  19. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    PubMed

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications. PMID:18160357

  20. ORTHOPEDIC COMPLICATIONS IN HIV PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ana Lúcia Lei Munhoz; Godoy, Alexandre Leme; Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba Domingos; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; de Almeida Silva, Camila; Martino, Patricia Bernardelli; Gutierrez, Eliana Bataggia; Gianna, Maria Clara; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    The considerable increase of the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients in the age of highly-powerful antiretroviral treatment results in important metabolic and bone-joint changes resulting from a long-lasting viral infection time and from this treatment. The most common orthopaedic complications are bone mineralization changes, osteonecrosis, carpal tunnel syndrome and gleno-humeral adhesive capsulitis, with different clinical presentation features, natural disease progression and therapeutic response compared to the overall population. Literature reports are initial, and the experience of the multidisciplinary service of the University of Sao Paulo's Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology enables us a more indepth knowledge about the various pathologies involved and the development of treatment protocols that are appropriate to these diagnoses. PMID:27004170

  1. [Infection complicated with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Ken-ichi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus are believed to be suspected to be immunocompromized hosts. Many reports have pointed out that diabetic patients are susceptible to certain infections such as surgical site infections, malignant otitis externa, mucormycosis, and necrotizing fasciitis. But their etiology seems to be non-uniform, heterogenous and individualized. Above all, obesity-related infections are also increasing accompanied with the recent rising incidence of obesity. Further studies should be addressed about the relationships between infections and diabetes which include the factors of body mass index, life style, degree of diabetes complications, and poor glycemic control duration. They could live a normal life the same as healthy subjects if good glycemic control is achieved without hypoglycemia. PMID:26666157

  2. Rate of intraoperative complications during cataract surgery following intravitreal injections.

    PubMed

    Hahn, P; Jiramongkolchai, K; Stinnett, S; Daluvoy, M; Kim, T

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo investigate the effect of prior intravitreal injections on intraoperative and postoperative complication rates associated with cataract surgery.MethodsA retrospective cohort analysis reviewed 10 105 cataract surgery procedures performed by experienced surgeons at the Duke Eye Center from 1 January 2005 to 10 December 2012. A group of 197 eyes with prior intravitreal injections was compared with an equal number of matched control eyes without prior injection using the Fisher's exact test of difference in proportions and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test of difference in means. Outcomes analyzed included baseline demographic information, preoperative clinical characteristics, prevalence of intraoperative complications, and postoperative intraocular pressure, glaucoma surgery, and glaucoma medication requirement through 1 year following cataract surgery.ResultsAn increased rate of intraoperative complications was identified during cataract surgery in eyes with prior intravitreal injections compared with control eyes (3 vs 0%, P=0.030). Injection eyes required more glaucoma medications at 1 year, but no difference was identified if steroid injections were excluded. No difference in postoperative IOP or glaucoma surgery was identified. No cases of endophthalmitis were reported.ConclusionsA history of intravitreal injections may be a risk factor for cataract surgery-related intraoperative complications. We hypothesize this may be due to unidentified iatrogenic lens trauma during intravitreal injections. Particular attention to the posterior capsule during preoperative assessment and intraoperatively is recommended in eyes undergoing cataract surgery with a prior history of intravitreal injections.

  3. Bariatric surgery and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sabrina; le Roux, Carel W; Docherty, Neil G

    2014-11-01

    Metabolic dysregulation is the defining characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and can give rise to microvascular complications, specifically retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Pharmacological targeting of risk factors for microvascular complications can yield therapeutic gains, particularly in relation to retinopathy and nephropathy. Bariatric surgery is superior to intensified pharmacotherapy in relation to glycaemic control and can remediate dyslipidaemia and hypertension. Consequently, evidence of the effect of bariatric surgery on microvascular complications is now emerging in the literature. Examination of the recent published evidence base (covering the period 2011-2014) on the effects of bariatric surgery on microvascular complications reveals further evidence supportive of the efficacy of bariatric surgery in preventing the incidence and progression of albuminuria and arresting renal functional decline. Data on retinopathy are more ambivalent potentially representing the potential in some cases for a degree of surgery associated reactive hypoglycaemia to detract from the benefits of amelioration of hyperglycaemia. A significant gap in the literature remains in relation to the effects of surgery on diabetic neuropathy. Overall, there is a pressing need for prospective randomised controlled trials examining long-term microvascular outcomes following bariatric surgery in patients with T2DM.

  4. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M. Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Gissler, H. Martin; Schwarz, Michael; Forsting, Michael; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%). Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of {>=}70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS.

  5. Convergent Validity of Three Methods for Measuring Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Bradley A.; Escallier, Krisztina E.; Abdallah, Arbi Ben; Oberhaus, Jordan; Becker, Jennifer; Geczi, Kristin; McKinnon, Sherry; Helsten, Dan L.; Sharma, Anshuman; Wildes, Troy S.; Avidan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anesthesiologists need tools to accurately track postoperative outcomes. The accuracy of patient report in identifying a wide variety of postoperative complications after diverse surgical procedures has not previously been investigated. Methods In this cohort study, 1,578 adult surgical patients completed a survey at least 30 days after their procedure asking if they had experienced any of 18 complications while in the hospital after surgery. Patient responses were compared to the results of an automated electronic chart review and (for a random subset of 750 patients) to a manual chart review. Results from automated chart review were also compared to those from manual chart review. Forty-two randomly selected patients were contacted by telephone to explore reasons for discrepancies between patient report and manual chart review. Results Comparisons between patient report, automated chart review, and manual chart review demonstrated poor-to-moderate positive agreement (range, 0 to 58%) and excellent negative agreement (range, 82 to 100%). Discordance between patient report and manual chart review was frequently explicable by patients reporting events that happened outside the time period of interest. Conclusions Patient report can provide information about subjective experiences or events that happen after hospital discharge, but often yields different results from chart review for specific in-hospital complications. Effective in-hospital communication with patients and thoughtful survey design may increase the quality of patient-reported complication data. PMID:27028469

  6. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-karim, Abdul-rahman R.; Main, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome.

  7. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-karim, Abdul-rahman R.; Main, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome. PMID:27668097

  8. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Karim, Abdul-Rahman R; Vo, Minh; Main, Michael L; Grantham, J Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome. PMID:27668097

  9. Periodic clustering of human disease-specific mortality distributions by shape and time position, and a new integer-based law of mortality.

    PubMed

    Juckett, D A; Rosenberg, B

    1990-09-01

    Human mortality distributions were analyzed for 29 disease-specific causes-of-death in male and female, White (U.S.A.), Black (U.S.A.) and Japanese (Japan) populations, constituting a total of 162 separate cohorts. For each cohort distribution, the curve moments and the parameter values for fits to model equations were determined. The differences between cohort distributions were characterized by two degrees of freedom, related to distribution position and shape, respectively. A form of the Weibull function was shown to contain two parameters that mapped to these two degrees of freedom. Parametric analysis on 136 best-fitting cohorts yielded periodic clustering in the set of values for both Weibull parameters as quantitated using a Fourier transform method and an independent statistical method. This periodicity was unlikely to have occurred by chance (P less than 0.01). We have combined these results into a Law of Mortality, based on a Weibull function containing only integer parameters and constants, which is valid for all human age-related disease mortality. We show that the life expectancy differences between races and sexes is completely described by this formalism. We conclude that human mortality is controlled by discrete events, which are manifested in the appearance of only allowed mortality curve shapes and positions.

  10. Biliary complications in right lobe living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chok, Kenneth S H; Lo, Chung Mau

    2016-07-01

    Living donor liver transplantation is an alternative to deceased donor liver transplantation in the face of insufficient deceased donor liver grafts. Unfortunately, the incidence of biliary complication after living donor liver transplantation is significantly higher than that after deceased donor liver transplantation using grafts from non-cardiac-death donations. The two most common biliary complications after living donor liver transplantation are bile leakage and biliary anastomotic stricture. Early treatment with endoscopic and interventional radiological approaches can achieve satisfactory outcomes. If treatment with these approaches fails, the salvage measure for prompt rectification will be surgical revision, which is now seldom performed. This paper also discusses risk factors in donor biliary anatomy that can affect recipients. PMID:26932842

  11. Life-threatening complications of deep neck space infections.

    PubMed

    Dalla Torre, Daniel; Brunold, Silvia; Kisielewsky, Irene; Kloss, Frank R; Burtscher, Doris

    2013-11-01

    Odontogenic infections represented a challenge for every craniomaxillofacial surgeon in the pre-antibiotic era, not least due to the frequent association with septic complications and lethal consequences. Nowadays, the incidences of serious infection-related complications are less frequent thanks to the medical progress. Nevertheless, the development of severe infections is still hard to foresee. The following analysis provides an overview of four patients with severe, life-threatening odontogenic deep neck space infections treated at the University Clinic for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Innsbruck and describes the etiology, therapy, and outcome for each patient while analyzing differences between the single cases. Crucial aspects in origin, progression, and treatment of DNIs are highlighted, comparing the results with the international literature.

  12. [Prognosis of complications after reconstructive surgeries on the aorto-iliac segment].

    PubMed

    Poliantsev, A A; Mozgovoĭ, P V; Frolov, D V; Shcherbakov, M V

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of efficacy of neuronet technologies for prognosis of specific complications after reconstructive surgeries on aorto-iliac segment was made. A learning sample consisted of 500 reconstructive surgeries, a test one - 161. High efficacy of analog neuron nets was revealed. Prognosis of early thrombosis, postoperative bleeding and also of lethal outcome demonstrated better results, mistake of prognosis was 3.7, 1.2 and 4.6%, respectively. Prognosis of infectious complications and long-term outcomes demonstrated worse results, mistake of prognosis was 7.0 and 10.5%, respectively.

  13. A Lethal Complication of Endoscopic Therapy: Duodenal Intramural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Calhan, Turan; Kahraman, Resul; Soydaş, Barış; Tosun, Ali; Cebeci, Egemen

    2015-01-01

    Duodenal intramural hematoma (DIH) usually occurs in childhood and young adults following blunt abdominal trauma. It may also develop in the presence of coagulation disorders and may rarely be an iatrogenic outcome of endoscopic procedures. Management of DIH is usually a conservative approach. A case of intramural duodenal hematoma that developed following endoscopic epinephrine sclerotherapy and/or argon plasma coagulation and that was nonresponsive to conservative therapy in a patient with chronic renal failure who died from sepsis is being discussed in this report. Clinicians should be aware of such possible complications after endoscopic hemostasis in patients with coagulation disorders. PMID:26697240

  14. Spinal Surgery Complications and Failures in Patients with Parkinsons Disease.

    PubMed

    Sapkas, George S; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papastathis, Elias; Tsiavos, Kostas; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Galanopoulos, Ioannis; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Elias C; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system affecting the substantia nigra in the midbrain. It accounts for 1.5% of the population in Europe over 60 years of age. Recent advances in the medical treatment of Parkinson's disease have improved the quality of life and life expectancy of the patients. However, it remains a debilitating disease. Spinal disorders are frequent in these patients, and as the population ages, more patients with Parkinson's disease are expected to require spinal surgery. Spinal surgery in patients with Parkinson's disease has been associated with an exceptionally high rate of complications; failures and reoperations are common, and patient outcomes are dismal.

  15. Problems, obstacles, and complications of metatarsal lengthening for the treatment of brachymetatarsia.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Bradley M; Gourdine-Shaw, Monique C

    2010-10-01

    Metatarsal lengthening by distraction osteogenesis is a challenging procedure that is associated with various adverse results. This article presents and classifies adverse results arising from metatarsal lengthening. Our premise of classification is that not all adverse results that occur secondary to distraction osteogenesis of the metatarsal are true complications that affect the final outcome, but rather are problems and obstacles that present hurdles to completion of treatment. Our classification differentiates among problems, obstacles, and complications during metatarsal lengthening with external fixation. The cause of each adverse result is also discussed and clinical and surgical pearls to avoid these problems, obstacles, and complications are presented. PMID:20934105

  16. Endometriosis-associated Maternal Pregnancy Complications – Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Petresin, J.; Wolf, J.; Emir, S.; Müller, A.; Boosz, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of endometriosis is increasing. Particularly during pregnancy and labour, clinicians should be alert to possible endometriosis-associated complications or complications of previous endometriosis treatment, despite a low relative risk. In addition to an increased rate of early miscarriage, complications such as spontaneous bowel perforation, rupture of ovarian cysts, uterine rupture and intraabdominal bleeding from decidualised endometriosis lesions or previous surgery are described in the literature. Unfavourable neonatal outcomes have also been discussed. We report on an irreducible ovarian torsion in the 16th week of pregnancy following extensive endometriosis surgery, and an intraabdominal haemorrhage due to endometriosis of the bowel in the 29th week of pregnancy. PMID:27570252

  17. Socioeconomic Disparities in the Presentation of Acute Bacterial Sinusitis Complications in the Pediatric Population.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Viraj J; Ling, Jeanie D; Mawn, Louise A

    2016-01-01

    Acute bacterial sinusitis is a common disease in the pediatric population that typically resolves without significant complications. Children who do suffer from complications involving the orbit or the brain often experience significant morbidity and potential mortality, typically requiring hospitalization for management. Numerous studies have demonstrated that children from low-income families with public or no insurance are less likely to receive adequate preventative care, are more likely to present with later disease stages, and ultimately endure worse health outcomes. We review the literature to examine if there are socioeconomic disparities in the presentation of complications of acute bacterial sinusitis in the pediatric population.

  18. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of a Small Renal Mass Complicated by Appendiceal Perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Judith; Bex, Axel; Prevoo, Warner

    2012-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has gained wide acceptance as nephron-sparing therapy for small renal masses in select patients. Generally, it is a safe procedure with minor morbidity and acceptable short-term oncologic outcome. However, as a result of the close proximity of vital structures, such as the bowel, ureter, and large vessels, to the ablative field, complications regarding these structures may occur. This is the first article describing appendiceal perforation as a complication of computed tomography-guided RFA despite hydrodissection. When performing this innovative and promising procedure one should be aware of the possibility of particular minor and even major complications.

  19. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lodders, Johannes N.; Parmar, Satyesh; Stienen, Niki LM.; Martin, Timothy J.; Karagozoglu, K. Hakki; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nandra, Baljeet

    2015-01-01

    Background The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. Material and Methods Desired data was retrieved from a computer database at the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Queen Elisabeth hospital Birmingham, United Kingdom, between June 2007 and October 2012. Logistic regression was used to study relationships between preoperative variables and postoperative outcomes. Results The study population consisted 184 patients, comprising 189 composite resections with reconstruction. Complications developed in 40.2% of the patients. Three patients (1.6%) died, 11.1% returned to the operating room, 5.3% developed donor site complications and 6.9% flap complications of which 3.2% total flap failure. In the multivariable analysis systemic complications were associated with anaesthesia time and hospital stay with red cell transfusion. Conclusions A significant proportion of the patients with primary free flap reconstructions after oral cancer surgery develops postoperative complications. Prolonged anaesthesia time and red cell transfusion are possible predictors for systemic complications and hospital stay respectively. Preoperative screening for risk factors is advocated for patient selection and to have realistic information and expectations. Key words:Free flap, complications, oral cancer, risk factors, reconstruction. PMID:26116846

  20. Periodontal disease and systemic complications.

    PubMed

    Oppermann, Rui Vicente; Weidlich, Patricia; Musskopf, Marta Liliana

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal diseases comprise a number of infectious and inflammatory conditions brought about by the interaction between supragingival and subgingival biofilms and the host inflammatory response. Periodontal diseases should be considered systemic conditions. This means that they are both modulated by the body's systems and play a role as a risk factor for systemic derangements. The current evidence supports some of these interactions, such as smoking as a risk factor for periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, as both influenced by and influencing inflammatory changes in the periodontal tissue. Other potential associations are still being researched, such as obesity, hormonal changes, cardiovascular disease, and adverse outcomes in pregnancy. These, and others, still require further investigation before the repercussions of periodontal disease can be fully elucidated. Nevertheless, at the present time, the treatment of periodontal diseases-and, most importantly, their prevention-enables adequate intervention as a means of ensuring periodontal health. PMID:23318743

  1. Thermal stress and diabetic complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko

    1995-06-01

    Activities of erythrocyte aldose reductase were compared in 34 normal subjects, 45 diabetic patients, and nine young men following immersion in water at 25, 39, and 42° C. Mean basal enzyme activity was 1.11 (SEM 0.12) U/g Hb and 2.07 (SEM 0.14) U/g Hb in normal controls and diabetic patients, respectively ( P<0.0001). Activities of the enzyme showed a good correlation with hemaglobin A1 (HbA1) concentrations ( P<0.01) but not with fasting plasma glucose concentrations. After immersion at 42° C for 10 min, enzyme activity was increased by 37.6% ( P<0.01); however, the activity decreased by 52.2% ( P<0.005) after immersion for 10 min at 39° C and by 47.0% ( P<0.05) at 25° C. These changes suggest that heat stress might aggravate diabetic complications, and body exposure to hot environmental conditions is not recommended for diabetic patients.

  2. Cardiac complications in thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Auger, Dominique; Pennell, Dudley J

    2016-03-01

    The myocardium is particularly susceptible to complications from iron loading in thalassemia major. In the first years of life, severe anemia leads to high-output cardiac failure and death if not treated. The necessary supportive blood transfusions create loading of iron that cannot be naturally excreted, and this iron accumulates within tissues, including the heart. Free unbound iron catalyzes the formation of toxic hydroxyl radicals, which damage cells and cause cardiac dysfunction. Significant cardiac siderosis may present by the age of 10 and may lead to acute clinical heart failure, which must be treated urgently. Atrial fibrillation is the most frequently encountered iron-related arrhythmia. Iron chelation is effective at removing iron from the myocardium, at the expense of side effects that hamper compliance to therapy. Monitoring of myocardial iron content is mandatory for clinical management of cardiac risk. T2* cardiac magnetic resonance measures myocardial iron and is the strongest biomarker for prediction of heart failure and arrhythmic events. It has been calibrated to human myocardial tissue iron concentration and is highly reproducible across all magnetic resonance scanner vendors. As survival and patient age increases, endothelial dysfunction and diabetes may become new factors in the cardiovascular health of thalassemia patients. Promising new imaging technology and therapies could ameliorate the long-term prognosis.

  3. Zebrafish sex: a complicated affair

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Woei Chang

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we provide a detailed overview of studies on the elusive sex determination (SD) and gonad differentiation mechanisms of zebrafish (Danio rerio). We show that the data obtained from most studies are compatible with polygenic sex determination (PSD), where the decision is made by the allelic combinations of several loci. These loci are typically dispersed throughout the genome, but in some teleost species a few of them might be located on a preferential pair of (sex) chromosomes. The PSD system has a much higher level of variation of SD genotypes both at the level of gametes and the sexual genotype of individuals, than that of the chromosomal sex determination systems. The early sexual development of zebrafish males is a complicated process, as they first develop a ‘juvenile ovary’, that later undergoes a transformation to give way to a testis. To date, three major developmental pathways were shown to be involved with gonad differentiation through the modulation of programmed cell death. In our opinion, there are more pathways participating in the regulation of zebrafish gonad differentiation/transformation. Introduction of additional powerful large-scale genomic approaches into the analysis of zebrafish reproduction will result in further deepening of our knowledge as well as identification of additional pathways and genes associated with these processes in the near future. PMID:24148942

  4. Cardiovascular complications of respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Susmita; Crook, Errol D; Taylor, Herman A; Badr, M Safwan

    2007-11-01

    A major burden of morbidity and mortality due to respiratory diseases can be directly related to the cardiovascular (CV) complications of these disorders. Evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies link reduced lung function and cardiovascular diseases. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. Hypoxia-induced increased sympathetic activity, blood viscosity, or inflammation, among other factors, may mediate the underlying pathogenesis. In addition, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been implicated by association in multiple CV diseases including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke. However, the exact contribution of SDB, including obstructive and central sleep apneas, to the development of cardiovascular diseases is not fully understood. In this context, the contribution of the new large, prospective, Jackson Heart Study could be significant in that it is designed to answer several of these questions, specifically in the African American population. This review examines the current evidence that links both reduced lung function and SDB to CV diseases. PMID:18004091

  5. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akkuş, Selami; Uğurlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  6. Disease-specific IgG Fc N-glycosylation as personalized biomarkers to differentiate gastric cancer from benign gastric diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan; Chen, Bingchao; Wang, Yanmin; Xia, Peng; He, Chengyan; Liu, Yujie; Zhang, Ruiqing; Zhang, Mo; Li, Zhili

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the pathophysiological role of IgG fragment crystallizable (Fc) N-linked glycosylation arose from changes in humoral immune responses. In this study, circulating disease-specific IgG (DSIgG) derived from serum immunoinflammation-related protein complexes was isolated from 846 serum samples of 443 patients with benign gastric diseases (BGDs) and 403 patients with gastric cancer (GC), and DSIgG glycopeptides attached to IgG Fc region at the site of Asn297 were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization- Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICR MS). A total of 22 glycopeptides were detected. Statistical analysis indicated that DSIgG1 G1S, DSIgG2 G0F, G1, G2F, and G2FS as well as DSIgG2 galactosylation and sialylation are significantly associated with sex in BGD patients and that the age-specific glycoforms and glycosylation features from DSIgG between BGD patients and GC patients have similar change trends. In addition, significant changes in galactosylation, sialylation, and bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) from DSIgG were also observed between two pathophysiological states. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that the G2FN/G1FN (from DSIgG2) ratio has an excellent capability to distinguish female BGD patients from female GC patients over the age range of 20–79 years, with the sensitivity of 82.6%, the specificity of 82.6%, and the area under curve (AUC) of 0.872. PMID:27173519

  7. Validation and reliability of a disease-specific quality of life measure (the TranQol) in adults and children with thalassaemia major.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Robert J; Barrowman, Nicholas; Merelles-Pulcini, Manuela; Vichinsky, Elliott P; Sweeters, Nancy; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Neufeld, Ellis J; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Wu, John; Vickars, Linda; Blanchette, Victor S; Forgie, Melissa; Yamashita, Robert; Wong-Rieger, Durhane; Young, Nancy L

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate the validity, reliability and responsiveness of a new disease-specific quality of life (QoL) questionnaire for children and adults with thalassaemia major, the Transfusion-dependent QoL questionnaire (TranQol). 106 participants (51 adults and 55 children) were recruited from six North American thalassaemia treatment centres with a mean age of 20·7 years (standard deviation [SD] 9, range 7-51 years). The mean total TranQol score was 71 (SD 17, 32-97) on a scale of 0-100. Patients with co-morbidities had significantly lower scores (63 vs. 75, P = 0·001). TranQol scores showed substantial agreement (P < 0·001) with the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (all patients, r = 0·65), the Pediatric QoL (children, r = 0·77) and the Short Form (36) physical (adults, r = 0·69) and mental summary scores (r = 0·76). In the subgroup who rated their QoL as better, there was a 4·0 point (SD 9·0) improvement in TranQol scores, from baseline of 67·1-71·1 one week later (P = 0·008). Test-retest reliability was excellent (intra-class correlation coefficient, 0·93). The TranQol was valid, with acceptable correlation for all administered measures and was reliable and responsive to change. The TranQol can be incorporated into future studies of thalassaemia major.

  8. Disease-Specific as Well as Generic Quality of Life Is Widely Impacted in Autoimmune Hypothyroidism and Improves during the First Six Months of Levothyroxine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Cramon, Per; Watt, Torquil; Bjorner, Jakob Bue; Ekholm, Ola; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Groenvold, Mogens; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothyroidism is often diagnosed, and subsequently treated, due to health-related quality of life (HRQL) issues. However, HRQL following treatment has never previously been assessed in longitudinal descriptive studies using validated instruments. Objective To investigate disease-specific (ThyPRO) and generic (SF-36) HRQL, following levothyroxine therapy in patients with hypothyroidism due to autoimmune thyroiditis. Methods This prospective cohort study was set at endocrine outpatient clinics at two Danish university hospitals. Seventy-eight consecutive patients were enrolled and completed HRQL questionnaires before, six weeks, and six months after initiation of levothyroxine therapy. Normative ThyPRO (n = 739) and SF-36 (n = 6,638) data were available for comparison and changes in HRQL following treatment were estimated and quantified. Results Prior to treatment, all ThyPRO scales were significantly impacted (p<0.0001), compared to the general population sample. The same was observed for seven of eight SF-36 scales, the exception being Bodily Pain. Tiredness (ThyPRO) and Vitality (SF-36) were the most markedly impacted scales. After six weeks of treatment, nine of thirteen ThyPRO scales had significantly improved. ThyPRO improvements were consistent at six months, where five of eight SF-36 scales had also significantly improved, but deficits persisted for a subset of both ThyPRO and SF-36 scales. Conclusions In this population of hypothyroid patients, HRQL was widely affected before treatment, with tiredness as the cardinal impairment according to both ThyPRO and SF-36. Many aspects of HRQL improved during the first six months of LT4 therapy, but full recovery was not obtained. Our results may help clinicians inform patients about expected clinical treatment effects. PMID:27257805

  9. The disease-specific phenotype in cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells of two long QT syndrome type 3 patients.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Azra; Kaifeng, Shao; Dittmann, Sven; Xu, Guoxing; Gupta, Manoj K; Linke, Matthias; Zechner, Ulrich; Nguemo, Filomain; Milting, Hendrik; Farr, Martin; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sarić, Tomo

    2013-01-01

    Long QT syndromes (LQTS) are heritable diseases characterized by prolongation of the QT interval on an electrocardiogram, which often leads to syncope and sudden cardiac death. Here we report the generation of induced pluripotent stems (iPS) cells from two patients with LQTS type 3 carrying a different point mutation in a sodium channel Nav1.5 (p.V240M and p.R535Q) and functional characterization of cardiomyocytes (CM) derived from them. The iPS cells exhibited all characteristic properties of pluripotent stem cells, maintained the disease-specific mutation and readily differentiated to CM. The duration of action potentials at 50% and 90% repolarization was longer in LQTS-3 CM as compared to control CM but this difference did not reach statistical significance due to high variations among cells. Sodium current recordings demonstrated longer time to peak and longer time to 90% of inactivation of the Na(+) channel in the LQTS-3 CM. This hints at a defective Na(+) channel caused by deficiency in open-state inactivation of the Na(+) channel that is characteristic of LQTS-3. These analyses suggest that the effect of channel mutation in the diseased CM is demonstrated in vitro and that the iPS cell-derived CM can serve as a model system for studying the pathophysiology of LQTS-3, toxicity testing and design of novel therapeutics. However, further improvements in the model are still required to reduce cell-to-cell and cell line-to-cell line variability. PMID:24349418

  10. Validation of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Nomogram to Predict Disease-Specific Survival after R0 Resection in a Chinese Gastric Cancer Population

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Maoxing; Cui, Ming; Liu, Yiqiang; Wang, Zaozao; Chen, Lei; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Chenghai; Yao, Zhendan; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Jiafu; Qu, Hong; Su, Xiangqian

    2013-01-01

    Background Prediction of disease-specific survival (DSS) for individual patient with gastric cancer after R0 resection remains a clinical concern. Since the clinicopathologic characteristics of gastric cancer vary widely between China and western countries, this study is to evaluate a nomogram from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) for predicting the probability of DSS in patients with gastric cancer from a Chinese cohort. Methods From 1998 to 2007, clinical data of 979 patients with gastric cancer who underwent R0 resection were retrospectively collected from Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute and used for external validation. The performance of the MSKCC nomogram in our population was assessed using concordance index (C-index) and calibration plot. Results The C-index for the MSKCC predictive nomogram was 0.74 in the Chinese cohort, compared with 0.69 for American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system (P<0.0001). This suggests that the discriminating value of MSKCC nomogram is superior to AJCC staging system for prognostic prediction in the Chinese population. Calibration plots showed that the actual survival of Chinese patients corresponded closely to the MSKCC nonogram-predicted survival probabilities. Moreover, MSKCC nomogram predictions demonstrated the heterogeneity of survival in stage IIA/IIB/IIIA/IIIB disease of the Chinese patients. Conclusion In this study, we externally validated MSKCC nomogram for predicting the probability of 5- and 9-year DSS after R0 resection for gastric cancer in a Chinese population. The MSKCC nomogram performed well with good discrimination and calibration. The MSKCC nomogram improved individualized predictions of survival, and may assist Chinese clinicians and patients in individual follow-up scheduling, and decision making with regard to various treatment options. PMID:24146811

  11. Disease-specificity of autoantibodies to cytosolic 5’-nucleotidase 1A in sporadic inclusion body myositis versus known autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Megan K; Stammen-Vogelzangs, Judith; Verbeek, Marcel M; Rietveld, Anke; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Chinoy, Hector; Lamb, Janine A; Cooper, Robert G; Roberts, Mark; Badrising, Umesh A; De Bleecker, Jan L; Machado, Pedro M; Hanna, Michael G; Plestilova, Lenka; Vencovsky, Jiri; van Engelen, Baziel G; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The diagnosis of inclusion body myositis (IBM) can be challenging as it can be difficult to clinically distinguish from other forms of myositis, particularly polymyositis (PM). Recent studies have shown frequent presence of autoantibodies directed against cytosolic 5’-nucleotidase 1A (cN-1A) in patients with IBM. We therefore, examined the autoantigenicity and disease-specificity of major epitopes of cN-1A in patients with sporadic IBM compared with healthy and disease controls. Methods Serum samples obtained from patients with IBM (n=238), polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM) (n=185), other autoimmune diseases (n=246), other neuromuscular diseases (n=93) and healthy controls (n=35) were analysed for the presence of autoantibodies using immunodominant cN-1A peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Results Autoantibodies directed against major epitopes of cN-1A were frequent in IBM patients (37%) but not in PM, DM or non-autoimmune neuromuscular diseases (<5%). Anti-cN-1A reactivity was also observed in some other autoimmune diseases, particularly Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS; 36%) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; 20%). Conclusions In summary, we found frequent anti-cN-1A autoantibodies in sera from IBM patients. Heterogeneity in reactivity with the three immunodominant epitopes indicates that serological assays should not be limited to a distinct epitope region. The similar reactivities observed for SjS and SLE demonstrate the need to further investigate whether distinct IBM-specific epitopes exist. PMID:25714931

  12. Cortex mapping reveals regionally specific patterns of genetic and disease-specific gray-matter deficits in twins discordant for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Tyrone D; Thompson, Paul M; van Erp, Theo G M; Toga, Arthur W; Poutanen, Veli-Pekka; Huttunen, Matti; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Standerskjold-Nordenstam, Carl-Gustav; Narr, Katherine L; Khaledy, Mohammad; Zoumalan, Chris I; Dail, Rajneesh; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2002-03-01

    The symptoms of schizophrenia imply disruption to brain systems supporting higher-order cognitive activity, but whether these systems are impacted differentially against a background of diffuse cortical gray-matter deficit remains ambiguous. Some unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenics also manifest cortical gray-matter deficits, but it is unclear whether these changes are isomorphic with those in patients, and the answer is critical to understanding the neurobiological conditions necessary for disease expression given a predisposing genotype. Here we report three-dimensional cortical surface maps (probabilistic atlases matching subjects' anatomy point by point throughout cortex) in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins discordant for chronic schizophrenia along with demographically matched control twins. A map encoding the average differences between schizophrenia patients and their unaffected MZ co-twins revealed deficits primarily in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, superior temporal gyrus, and superior parietal lobule. A map encoding variation associated with genetic proximity to a patient (MZ co-twins > DZ co-twins > control twins) isolated deficits primarily in polar and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In each case, the statistical significance was confirmed through analysis of 10,000 Monte Carlo permutations, and the remaining cortex was shown to be significantly less affected by contrast analysis. The disease-related deficits in gray matter were correlated with measures of symptom severity and cognitive dysfunction but not with duration of illness or antipsychotic drug treatment. Genetic and disease-specific influences thus affect gray matter in partially nonoverlapping areas of predominantly heteromodal association cortex, changes that may act synergistically in producing overt behavioral features of the disorder. PMID:11867725

  13. Cigarette smoking adversely affects disease activity and disease-specific quality of life in patients with Crohn’s disease at a tertiary referral center

    PubMed Central

    Quezada, Sandra M; Langenberg, Patricia; Cross, Raymond K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Smoking has a negative impact on disease activity in Crohn’s disease (CD). Smoking may also affect the quality of life, but this has not been evaluated using validated measures over time. We assessed the relationship between smoking and disease-specific quality of life over time in a tertiary referral inflammatory bowel disease cohort. Patients and methods Retrospective cohort study from July 2004 to July 2009 in patients with CD identified from the University of Maryland, Baltimore, Institutional Review Board-approved University of Maryland School of Medicine Inflammatory Bowel Disease Program database. Smoking status was classified as current, former, and never. Age was categorized as <40 years, 40–59 years, and ≥60 years. Index visit disease activity and quality of life was measured with the Harvey–Bradshaw index, and the Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (SIBDQ). Repeated measures linear regression was used to assess the association between smoking and quality of life over time after adjustment for confounding variables. Results A total of 608 patients were included, of whom 42% were male; 80% were Caucasian; 22% were current smokers; 24% were former smokers; and 54% were never smokers. Over time, adjusted Harvey–Bradshaw index scores declined in all patients, but current smokers had consistently higher scores. After adjustment for sex, age, and disease duration, never smokers had higher mean SIBDQ scores at index visit compared to former and current smokers (P<0.0001); all increased over time but SIBDQ scores for never smokers remained consistently highest. Conclusion Smoking has a negative impact on disease activity and quality of life in patients with CD. Prospects of improved disease activity and quality of life should be proposed as an additional incentive to encourage smoking cessation in patients with CD. PMID:27703391

  14. Disease specific modules and hub genes for intervention strategies: A co-expression network based approach for Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Boopathi, Pon Arunachalam; Pandey, Isha; Kaur, Ramandeep; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2015-10-01

    Systems biology approaches that are based on gene expression and bioinformatics analysis have been successful in predicting the functions of many genes in Plasmodium falciparum, a protozoan parasite responsible for most of the deaths due to malaria. However, approaches that can provide information about the biological processes that are active in this parasite in vivo during complicated malaria conditions have been scarcely deployed. Here we report the analysis of a weighted gene co-expression based network for P. falciparum, from non-cerebral clinical complications. Gene expression profiles of 20 P. falciparum clinical isolates were utilized to construct the same. A total of 20 highly interacting modules were identified post network creation. In 12 of these modules, at least 10% of the member genes, were found to be differentially regulated in parasites from patient isolates showing complications, when compared with those from patients with uncomplicated disease. Enrichment analysis helped identify biological processes like oxidation-reduction, electron transport chain, protein synthesis, ubiquitin dependent catabolic processes, RNA binding and purine nucleotide metabolic processes as associated with these modules. Additionally, for each module, highly connected hub genes were identified. Detailed functional analysis of many of these, which have known annotated functions underline their importance in parasite development and survival. This suggests, that other hub genes with unknown functions may also be playing crucial roles in parasite biology, and, are potential candidates for intervention strategies.

  15. Buried bumper syndrome: A complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Cyrany, Jiri; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kopacova, Marcela; Bures, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a widely used method of nutrition delivery for patients with long-term insufficiency of oral intake. The PEG complication rate varies from 0.4% to 22.5% of cases, with minor complications being three times more frequent. Buried bumper syndrome (BBS) is a severe complication of this method, in which the internal fixation device migrates alongside the tract of the stoma outside the stomach. Excessive compression of tissue between the external and internal fixation device of the gastrostomy tube is considered the main etiological factor leading to BBS. Incidence of BBS is estimated at around 1% (0.3%-2.4%). Inability to insert, loss of patency and leakage around the PEG tube are considered to be a typical symptomatic triad. Gastroscopy is indicated in all cases in which BBS is suspected. The depth of disc migration in relation to the lamina muscularis propria of the stomach is critical for further therapy and can be estimated by endoscopic or transabdominal ultrasound. BBS can be complicated by gastrointestinal bleeding, perforation, peritonitis, intra-abdominal and abdominal wall abscesses, or phlegmon, and these complications can lead to fatal outcomes. The most important preventive measure is adequate positioning of the external bolster. A conservative approach should be applied only in patients with high operative risk and dismal prognosis. Choice of the method of release is based on the type of the PEG set and depth of disc migration. A disc retained inside the stomach and completely covered by the overgrowing tissue can be released using some type of endoscopic dissection technique (needle knife, argon plasma coagulation, or papillotome through the cannula). Proper patient selection and dissection of the overgrowing tissue are the major determinants for successful endoscopic therapy. A disc localized out of the stomach (lamina muscularis propria) should be treated by a surgeon. PMID:26811611

  16. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  17. The complement system and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Regal, Jean F; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Burwick, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the fetal allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child.

  18. Chemotherapy: Does Neoadjuvant or Adjuvant Therapy Improve Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Canter, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    Since preoperative chemotherapy has been clearly shown to improve outcomes for patients with Ewing sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and osteosarcoma, practitioners have attempted to extend the use of adjuvant/neoadjuvant chemotherapy to other types of adult soft tissue sarcoma. Given the high risk of distant recurrence and disease-specific death for patients with soft tissue sarcoma tumors larger than 10 cm, these patients should be considered candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy as well as investigational therapies. Yet, potential toxicity from cytotoxic chemotherapy is substantial, and there remains little consensus and wide variation regarding the indications for use of chemotherapy in the adjuvant/neoadjuvant setting. PMID:27591503

  19. Is the Complete Resection of Craniopharyngiomas in Adults Feasible Considering Both the Oncologic and Functional Outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jung; Cho, Young Hyun; Hong, Seok Ho; Kim, Jeong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of the complete resection of craniopharyngioma (CP) in adults on oncologic and functional outcomes. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 82 patients with CP who were surgically treated by the same neurosurgeon at our institution between January 1994 and December 2012. Results Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 71 patients (86.6%), near total resection (NTR) in 7 patients (8.5%), and subtotal resection (STR) in 3 patients (3.7%). The disease-specific overall survival rate was 100% with the exclusion of 2 surgery-related mortalities. The overall recurrence rate was 12.2% (10 of 82 patients), however the recurrence rate according to extent of resection (EOR) was 9.9% (7 of 71 patients) after GTR, 14.3% (1 of 7 patients) after NTR, and 66.7% (2 of 3 patients) after STR. The overall recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates at 5 and 10 years were 87.0% and 76.8%, respectively. Postoperatively, most patients (86.3%) needed hormone replacement for at least 1 hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Vision improved in 56.4% of the patients with preoperative abnormal vision, but deteriorated in 27.4% of patients. Hypothalamic dysfunction developed in 32.9% of patients. There were no significant differences in the risks of pituitary dysfunction, visual deterioration, or hypothalamic dysfunction between the groups with complete vs. incomplete removal. The overall rate of postoperative complications was 22.0%, which did not differ between groups (p=0.053). Conclusion The complete removal of a CP at first surgery can provide a chance for a cure with acceptable morbidity and mortality risks. PMID:26713143

  20. Perioperative complications of a modular stem fixed-bearing total ankle replacement with intramedullary guidance.

    PubMed

    Bleazey, Scott T; Brigido, Stephen A; Protzman, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    Despite improved total ankle replacement outcomes, investigators have demonstrated that the incidence of complications after total ankle replacement is a function of the surgeon's experience with the technique. We hypothesized that the use of an intramedullary guide during a modular stem fixed-bearing total ankle replacement would decrease the incidence of perioperative complications and produce a similar incidence of complications across time. Because all patients were mobilized early, we also evaluated the influence of early mobilization on wound development. The medical records were reviewed to identify complications, and the radiographs were evaluated to determine the component alignment of the initial 58 consecutive ankles. Major wound complications were defined as complications requiring soft tissue coverage by a plastic surgeon. Minor wound complications were defined as those that could be treated without a return to the operating room. The procedures were separated into 2 groups: the initial 29 procedures (group A) and latter 29 procedures (group B). Eight ankles (14%) had wound complications. The incidence of complications was similar across time [r(s) (56) = -0.06, p = .64]. The incidence of complications and component misalignment was similar for groups A and B (p ≥ .19). All wounds were diagnosed within 15 days of surgery. None of the ankles developed wounds after physical therapy began. These results have demonstrated that the modular stem fixed-bearing total ankle replacement with intramedullary guidance can produce a similar incidence of complications over time, regardless of surgeon experience. Additionally, early mobilization did not appear to influence the incidence of wound complications and should be advocated, when appropriate.