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Sample records for diseases mycoses study

  1. [Superficial mycoses: comparative study between type 2 diabetic patients and a non-diabetic control group].

    PubMed

    García-Humbría, Leila; Richard-Yegres, Nicole; Pérez-Blanco, Maigualida; Yegres, Francisco; Mendoza, Mireya; Acosta, Arnaldo; Hernández, Rosaura; Zárraga, Eluz

    2005-03-01

    Superficial mycoses are considered to affect more frequently patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2), specially onychomycosis and Tinea pedis. The purpose of this study was to compare the dermatophytoses, candidiasis and Pitiriasis versicolor frequency between 40 patients with DM-2 and 40 healthy persons of either sex, 40 years old or more. Clinical, metabolic, mycologic and inmunologic studies against Candida albicans, were carried out. Both diabetics 75% (30/40) and controls 65% (26/40) presented a high frequency of superficial mycoses (no significant difference p = 0.329). Pitiriasis versicolor was not detected in diabetic patients. They presented Tinea unguium, concomitant with Tinea pedis, with a higher frequency. The predominant dermatophyte was Trichophyton rubrum 18/23 (78%) in diabetics and 8/16 (50%) in non diabetics. Candida was isolated as commensal from oral mucous: 23/40 (58%) in diabetics and 21/40 (52%) in non diabetics (serotipo A was the more frequent), and from onychomycosis: 11/40 (28%) in diabetics and 12/40 (30%) in non diabetics. The immunological response was the same in both groups: celular 100%, humoral 20%. No statistical correlation among superficial mycoses, blood glucose level, glycosylated hemoglobin values or the time suffering the disease was observed. The high susceptibility to dermatophytes and Candida sp. infection showed to be associated with age and no with the diabetic type 2 condition in those patients.

  2. A clinico-mycological study of superficial mycoses in upper Assam.

    PubMed

    Huda, M M; Chakraborty, N; Sharma Bordoloi, J N

    1995-01-01

    Clinico-mycological study of one hundred clinically diagnosed cases of superficial mycoses was conducted for one year. Overall male predominance was observed and T. rubum was the commonest isolate. PMID:20953012

  3. Mycoses and Mycotoxicoses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mold-related disease in avian species can be divided into two broad categories, namely mycoses and mycotoxicoses. Mycoses are typically defined as infection of tissue by a particular mold species. In general terms, Aspergillus, Dactylaria, and Microsporum are those molds most apt to be responsible f...

  4. [Cutaneous mycoses as a problem of the tropics. II. Subcutaneous tropical mycoses].

    PubMed

    Jeske, J

    2001-01-01

    Cutaneous mycoses are third among diseases after parasitic and infectious ones that pose problems for persons returning from the tropics. The paper presents semiotics of the following tropical subcutaneous mycoses: sporotrichosis, chromoblastomycosis, maduromycosis, pheohyphomycosis, zygomycosis and lobomycosis.

  5. Subcutaneous mycoses: an aetiological study of 15 cases in a tertiary care hospital at Dibrugarh, Assam, northeast India.

    PubMed

    Bordoloi, Pallabi; Nath, Reema; Borgohain, Mondita; Huda, M M; Barua, Shyamanta; Dutta, Debajit; Saikia, Lahari

    2015-06-01

    Subcutaneous mycoses are a group of fungal infections of dermis and subcutaneous tissue which consist of sporotrichosis, chromoblastomycosis, phaeohyphomycosis, hyalohyphomycosis, mycetoma, subcutaneous zygomycosis, rhinosporidiosis, lobomycosis and disseminated penicilliosis. A total of 46 consecutive patients with clinically suspected subcutaneous mycoses attending various departments of Assam Medical College and Hospital were included in this prospective study to know the prevalence of subcutaneous mycoses in this eastern part of Assam. Direct microscopy in 10 and 40 % KOH, histopathological examination of biopsied tissue, colony characteristics on Sabourauds dextrose agar media both at 25 and 37 °C and detailed morphology of each fungus on lactophenol cotton blue mount were the basis of identification of the fungi. Subcutaneous mycoses were confirmed in 32.6 % (n = 15) cases. Out of 15 positive cases of subcutaneous mycoses, chromoblastomycosis was detected in six cases (n = 40 %), hyalohyphomycosis in three cases (n = 20 %), and lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis, disseminated penicilliosis and mycetoma in two cases each (n = 13.3 % each). In this study, seven different species of fungus were found to be responsible for five different clinical types of subcutaneous mycosis. Cladosporium cladosporioides, Bipolaris spicifera and Curvularia lunata were responsible for chromoblastomycosis, Fusarium oxysporum and Aspergillus terreus for hyalohyphomycosis, C. lunata for mycetoma, Sporothrix schenckii for lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis and Penicillium marneffei for disseminated penicilliosis. C. cladosporioides and C. lunata were the commonest black fungi causing subcutaneous mycosis in this sub-Himalayan belt. Rare species C. cladosporioides, B. spicifera and C. lunata were found to be causing chromoblastomycosis in this study.

  6. Epidemiology of invasive mycoses in North America.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Diekema, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of invasive mycoses is increasing, especially among patients who are immunocompromised or hospitalized with serious underlying diseases. Such infections may be broken into two broad categories: opportunistic and endemic. The most important agents of the opportunistic mycoses are Candida spp., Cryptococcus neoformans, Pneumocystis jirovecii, and Aspergillus spp. (although the list of potential pathogens is ever expanding); while the most commonly encountered endemic mycoses are due to Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis/posadasii, and Blastomyces dermatitidis. This review discusses the epidemiologic profiles of these invasive mycoses in North America, as well as risk factors for infection, and the pathogens' antifungal susceptibility. PMID:20088682

  7. Respiratory and systemic mycoses: an overview.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, H S

    2000-01-01

    Respiratory and systemic mycoses are globally emerging as a problem of increasing importance in infectious diseases. This is attributed to the growing population of immunocompromised patients due to epidemic outbreak of AIDS or to other factors such as use of immunosuppressive drugs in recipients of organ transplantation. The available evidence has unequivocally established the endemic occurrence of blastomycosis, histoplasmosis and penicilliosis mameffei in India. In fact, pencilliosis marneffei has emerged as a major endemic mycosis of AIDS patients in Southeast Asia. It has manifestations simulating those of histoplasmosis capsulati, and it may spread to other regions with enlarging population of AIDS patients. Comprehensive studies are indicated in order to delineate the endemic areas of the afore-mentioned systemic mycoses. Among the other important systemic mycoses reported from India are aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, candidiasis and zygomycosis. Our current knowledge of the global distribution of systemic mycoses does not depict their true prevalence. It largely reflects the geographic distribution of medical mycologists or other investigators engaged in the study of fungal diseases and their research interests. Invasive aspergillosis has emerged as an important disease in patients with neutropenia and bone narrow transplant recipients, cryptoccosis, penicilliosis marneffei and pneumocystosis in patients with AIDS, fusariosis in patients with leukaemia receiving cytotoxic therapy, zygomycosis in diabetic patients and in patients on defroxamine therapy, and Malasseziafurfur infection in patients on total parenteral nutrition: Opportunistic systemic mycoses due to yeasts and yeast-like fungi have become commoner than those due to filamentous fungi, occupying fourth position in the list of bloodstream pathogens in some centers in USA. Also, their incidence, pattern of clinical presentations and species spectrum have significantly changed, largely due to more

  8. [Cutaneous mycoses as a problem of the tropics. I. Superficial tropical mycoses].

    PubMed

    Jeske, J

    2001-01-01

    Cutaneous mycoses are third among diseases after parasitic and infectious ones that pose problems for persons returning from the tropics. The paper presents semiotics of the following tropical superficial mycoses: tinea imbricata, infections with Scytalidium, tinea nigra, zakazenia grzybami Scytalidium, lupieZ czarny, black piedra, white piedra. Treatment, diagnostics and prophylaxis are discussed.

  9. Superficial veterinary mycoses.

    PubMed

    Bond, Ross

    2010-03-01

    Dermatophytes are significant pathogens in animal health due to their zoonotic potential, the economic consequences of infection in farm animal and fur production systems, and the distressing lesions they cause in small domestic pets. Malassezia spp are normal commensal and occasional pathogens of the skin of many veterinary species. Malassezia pachydermatis is a very common cause of otitis and pruritic dermatitis in dogs but is of less importance in other veterinary species. Dermatophytosis, and Malassezia otitis and dermatitis, represent the superficial mycoses of greatest significance in companion and farm animal health. Although the dermatophytes and Malassezia spp both exist in the stratum corneum of mammalian skin, there are important differences in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical consequences of infection. Dermatophytes are significant due to their zoonotic potential, the economic consequences of infection in farm animal and fur production systems, and the concern for owners of pets with inflammatory skin disease that is sometimes severe. Malassezia spp are normal commensals and occasional pathogens of the skin for many veterinary species, and M pachydermatis is a very common cause of otitis and pruritic dermatitis in dogs. This chapter will focus on the epidemiologic, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of dermatophytosis and Malassezia dermatitis in veterinary species. There are generally only sporadic reports of other superficial mycoses, such as candidiasis, piedra, and Rhodotorula dermatitis in veterinary medicine, and these are not included here. PMID:20347667

  10. Multicentre clinical study with tolciclate in the local treatment of skin mycoses in 1083 patients.

    PubMed

    Intini, C; Battaglia, A; Mangiarotti, A M; Picco, A M; Viaro, D; Sacchetti, G

    1980-01-01

    A multicentre clinical trial with tolciclate was carried out in Italy on 1083 patients suffering from skin mycoses (tinea corporis, tinea cruris, tinea pedis, tinea manuum and pityriasis versicolor). Both preparations (1% cream and lotion) showed a good activity evaluated weekly by clinical examinations and mycological assessments, i.e. culture for tineas and microscopy for pityriasis versicolor. Favourable clinical results ranged from 83% to 97% according to diagnoses. Cultural or microscopic conversions obtained in a mean time of about 2 weeks varied from 70% to 91%. Mycological relapses a month after the end of treatment were seen in 6.5% of cases examined. Adverse reactions were observed in 5.6% of patients but the treatment was discontinued only in 2.6%.

  11. 21-year retrospective study of the prevalence of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis in patients suspected of superficial mycoses

    PubMed Central

    Macura, Anna B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the genus Scopulariopsis, Scopulariopsis brevicaulis is the most common aetiological agent of infections in humans. It usually affects nails and is one of the commonest moulds associated with onychomycoses. Other forms of infections (skin, subcutaneous, deep tissues, and disseminated infections) have also been described. Aim To examine the prevalence of S. brevicaulis in clinical materials obtained from patients suspected of keratinized tissues mycoses. Material and methods The analysis of the prevalence of S. brevicaulis in clinical specimens was based on mycological test's results carried out for patients who were referred with a suspicion of superficial mycoses to the Department of Mycology, Chair of Microbiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College from 1992 till 2012. Results In the years 1992–2012 16,815 clinical samples (nail scrapings, nail swabs, skin scrapings, skin swabs, hair) were collected. Pathogenic fungi were detected in 7193 samples and S. brevicaulis was present in 255 (3.5%). The prevalence of S. brevicaulis in males and females was comparable. The species was most often isolated from toenails (80%), both from males and females. In the analysed period we observed a decrease in the prevalence of S. brevicaulis. In most cases (60%) S. brevicaulis occurred alone in 40% of S. brevicaulis positive cultures, other fungi were also isolated. The fungi most frequently isolated with S. brevicaulis were Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, Penicillium sp., Candida sp., and Aspergillus sp. Conclusions Scopulariopsis brevicaulis is not a common cause of superficial fungal infections of keratinized tissues, but is a typical mould associated with toenail onychomycosis. A proper identification of this species in onychomycoses is essential for the implementation of effective antifungal therapy. PMID:26161060

  12. [Epidemiology of Visceral Mycoses in Autopsy Cases in 2011].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuhko; Ohto, Hitoshi; Togano, Tomiteru; Kume, Hikaru

    2015-01-01

    To identify recent trends in the frequency of mycoses in autopsy cases, we performed an epidemiological analysis using the data reported in the "Annual Report of Autopsy Cases in Japan" from 2011. 12,339 cases were autopsied, of which 608 (4.9 %) were found to have fungal infections. Of these, 411 cases (67.6 %) were male, the median age was 67, and 353 cases were severe (58.1 %). Aspergillus spp. was the most predominant causative agent among those infected with one pathogen. These data corroborate our previous data from reports in 2007 and 2009. For the first time since 1989, we observed a case of mycoses caused by Exophiala spp. with adult T cell leukemia and lymphoma. The types of underlying disease were also typical of that in our previous analysis in 2009. These included solid cancers in 124 cases (20.4 %), leukemia in 83 cases (13.7 %), bacterial infections such as pneumonia 69 cases (11.3 %) and malignant lymphoma in 66 cases (10.9 %). In 2011, the number of mycoses following solid organ transplantation totaled 12 cases and was the most numerous since 2005. A limitation of this study may be that the epidemiology of autopsied cases includes the more severe end of the fungal infection spectrum, and selection bias could not be ruled out. Nonetheless, this epidemiological analysis of autopsied cases with fungal infection provides a strong incentive to intensify and improve efforts in diagnosing and treating visceral mycosis. PMID:26329376

  13. Epidemiology, pathology and clinical features of genital mycoses--1981 status.

    PubMed

    Senft, H H; Korte, W

    1982-01-01

    The clinical picture of candidal vaginitis was described for the first time in 1792. The connection with yeasts was already discovered in the 19th century. Not until the last 35 years, however, have the epidemiologic aspects of genital mycoses and the diagnostic and therapeutic principles been systematically developed. The rise in the incidence of the disease is due to several factors: the administration of corticosteroids, cystostatic agents, and oral contraceptives as well as socioeconomic circumstances. Two serious complications of vaginal yeast infection in pregnant women should be noted: the amniotic infection syndrome and neonatal contamination at the time of delivery. Vulvovaginitis is one of the most common genital diseases in childhood and adolescence. Mycoses can be diagnosed in daily gynecological practice by simple, reliable methods, but only culture on prepared media or by incubation of standardized plates can be depended upon to establish or rule out a mycosis. Effective antimycotics with a broad spectrum of activity have been developed in the last 15 years. We have been primarily concerned with clotrimazole because of our own investigations and impartial comparisons with other fungicidal drugs. Studies of patient compliance have shown that the diseased women accept short-term therapy most readily. However, appropriate control examinations are needed to document the results of treatment. PMID:6761085

  14. [Mycoses and zoonoses: Cryptococcus spp].

    PubMed

    Cabañes, F Javier

    2008-03-01

    The term "zoonosis" is difficult to delimit because different authors have various definitions for this term. Few mycoses are usually considered zoonoses. However, the role that animals play in the epidemiology of the main human mycoses is still not well known. Moreover, the environmental niches for these fungal agents have not yet been completely determined. This special issue of the "Revista Iberoamericana de Micología" deals with the talks and round table presented at the VIII Spanish Mycological Congress held in October 2006 in Barcelona, Spain on "Cryptococcus spp. and zoonoses".

  15. [Mycoses of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Audrey; Cornet, Muriel; Carnot, Françoise; Brasnu, Daniel; Bruneval, Patrick; Badoual, Cécile

    2005-04-01

    In recent years, mycoses have emerged as important infections in clinical practice. This phenomenon is explained by the ever growing number of immunocompromised patients and the increasing number of people travelling in areas where fungal diseases are endemic. Head and neck infections are common in disseminated mycoses and may simulate carcinoma or cause upper airway obstruction. The most frequent causative yeasts or yeast-like organisms include Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum var capsulatum, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Coccidioides immitis. Other causative fungal pathogens include Aspergillus fumigatus and less frequently, Rhizopus oryzae and Rhinosporidium seeberi. Since in most cases their pathophysiology is similar, those microorganisms share a common clinical pathological presentation. Symptoms such as dysphonia or dysphagia associated with hyperplastic and ulcerative lesions on endoscopic examination should prompt biopsies. A purulent or granulomatous inflammatory tissue reaction with pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia warrants caution since it may lead to a mistaken diagnosis of carcinoma. The pathologist must look carefully for microorganisms with Grocott and PAS stains. The causative agent can be identified if the pathologist is aware of the risk. Positive culture is needed to institute adequate treatment. PMID:16142162

  16. Current Perspectives on Ophthalmic Mycoses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Philip A.

    2003-01-01

    Fungi may infect the cornea, orbit and other ocular structures. Species of Fusarium, Aspergillus, Candida, dematiaceous fungi, and Scedosporium predominate. Diagnosis is aided by recognition of typical clinical features and by direct microscopic detection of fungi in scrapes, biopsy specimens, and other samples. Culture confirms the diagnosis. Histopathological, immunohistochemical, or DNA-based tests may also be needed. Pathogenesis involves agent (invasiveness, toxigenicity) and host factors. Specific antifungal therapy is instituted as soon as the diagnosis is made. Amphotericin B by various routes is the mainstay of treatment for life-threatening and severe ophthalmic mycoses. Topical natamycin is usually the first choice for filamentous fungal keratitis, and topical amphotericin B is the first choice for yeast keratitis. Increasingly, the triazoles itraconazole and fluconazole are being evaluated as therapeutic options in ophthalmic mycoses. Medical therapy alone does not usually suffice for invasive fungal orbital infections, scleritis, and keratitis due to Fusarium spp., Lasiodiplodia theobromae, and Pythium insidiosum. Surgical debridement is essential in orbital infections, while various surgical procedures may be required for other infections not responding to medical therapy. Corticosteroids are contraindicated in most ophthalmic mycoses; therefore, other methods are being sought to control inflammatory tissue damage. Fungal infections following ophthalmic surgical procedures, in patients with AIDS, and due to use of various ocular biomaterials are unique subsets of ophthalmic mycoses. Future research needs to focus on the development of rapid, species-specific diagnostic aids, broad-spectrum fungicidal compounds that are active by various routes, and therapeutic modalities which curtail the harmful effects of fungus- and host tissue-derived factors. PMID:14557297

  17. Opportunistic filamentous mycoses: aspergillosis, mucormycosis, phaeohyphomycosis and hyalohyphomycosis.

    PubMed

    Perusquía-Ortiz, Ana María; Vázquez-González, Denisse; Bonifaz, Alexandro

    2012-09-01

    Opportunistic filamentous mycoses are widely distributed all over the world. They are rarely observed in Europe but are common in developing countries. The most common are the aspergilloses (due to Aspergillus spp.) mostly in neutropenia and immunosuppression; the mucormycoses characterized by rapid progression in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis; the phaeohyphomycoses due to pigmented fungi causing either a mild superficial or a very serious deep disease and the hyalohyphomycoses due to hyaline filamentous fungi (Fusarium spp., Pseudallescheria spp., Scopulariopsis spp.). Cutaneous manifestations are usually secondary to dissemination from pulmonary or visceral disease; primary cases are less frequent and due to direct inoculation into the skin. We review epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic data on the four most important opportunistic filamentous mycoses: aspergillosis, mucormycosis, phaeohyphomycosis and hyalohyphomycosis.

  18. Updates on Aspergillus, Pneumocystis and other opportunistic pulmonary mycoses.

    PubMed

    Curbelo, Jose; Galván, Jose María; Aspa, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Mycoses are serious diseases with potentially fatal outcome. The introduction of immunosuppressive treatments and life support techniques has led to a growing prevalence of different degrees of immunosuppression. Compromised immune response is the primary risk factor for the development of opportunistic mycoses. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for improving prognosis. However, isolation in cultures or identification using antigen detection techniques cannot distinguish between colonization and invasive infection, and the clinical status of the patient often prevents biopsy sampling. Clinicians thus find themselves in an uncertain position, requiring them to quickly recognize clinical and radiological signs and interpret microbiological results in context. The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the profile of patients susceptible to these infections, the role of the immune system and, in more detail, the major diagnostic developments that have gained most acceptance and recognition among the scientific community.

  19. Subcutaneous mycoses: chromoblastomycosis, sporotrichosis and mycetoma.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Vázquez-González, Denisse; Perusquía-Ortiz, Ana María

    2010-08-01

    Subcutaneous mycoses are common in subtropical and tropical regions of the world. They are rarely observed in Europe. These mycoses are heterogeneous, but all are caused by penetrating trauma of the skin. Most cases in Europe are observed in returning travelers, aid workers, archaeologists and immigrants. Therefore, a careful, thorough history is essential in order to reach a proper diagnosis. We provide up-to-date epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic data on the three most important imported subcutaneous mycoses in Europe: chromoblastomycosis, sporotrichosis and mycetoma.

  20. Molecular diagnosis of endemic and invasive mycoses: advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Beatriz L

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of endemic and invasive fungal disease remains challenging. Molecular techniques for identification of fungi now play a significant and growing role in clinical mycology and offer distinct advantages as they are faster, more sensitive and more specific. The aim of this mini-review is to provide an overview of the state of the art of molecular diagnosis of endemic and invasive fungal diseases, and to emphasize the challenges and current need for standardization of the different methods. The European Aspergillus PCR Initiative (EAPCRI) has made significant progress in developing a standard for Aspergillus polymerase chain reaction (PCR), but recognizes that the process will not be finished until clinical utility has been established in formal and extensive clinical trials. Similar efforts should be implemented for the diagnosis of the other mycoses in order to fully validate the current methods or reinforce the need to design new ones. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  1. Spectrum of paranasal sinus mycoses in coastal India.

    PubMed

    Kini, Jyoti R; Shetty, Spoorthy S; Kini, Hema

    2012-06-01

    Fungal infections of the nose and paranasal sinuses are uncommon, and the disease they cause can be identified from their histopathologic appearance. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of fungal infection and histopathologic changes in specimens sent for evaluation of chronic sinusitis and correlate with culture findings wherever possible. The records of 200 consecutive cases coded as paranasal sinuses over a period of 3 years were retrieved from the Department of Pathology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India. Twenty nine out of a total of 200 specimens (14.5%) were positive for fungal elements on histopathologic examination. The most common etiologic agents in our study were Aspergillus spp (37.9%); only 1 culture (3.4%) was positive for a Candida species. Eight of 29 patients with fungal sinusitis (27.6%) had diabetes, and 1 patient was being treated for rheumatoid arthritis. Eight of the 29 patients had allergic fungal sinusitis, 8 had chronic granulomatous sinusitis, and 1 had acute fulminant invasive sinusitis. Fungi have been increasingly recognized as an important pathogen in chronic sinusitis. It is imperative for patient management not only that paranasal sinus mycoses be diagnosed but also that the specific histologic category be identified.

  2. [Superficial mycoses: casuistry of the Mycology Department of the Instituto Nacional de Higiene "Rafael Rangel", Caracas, Venezuela (2001-2014)].

    PubMed

    Capote, Ana María; Ferrara, Giuseppe; Panizo, María Mercedes; García, Nataly; Alarcón, Víctor; Reviakina, Vera; Dolande, Maribel

    2016-03-01

    The superficial mycoses are very common infectious diseases and therefore are a frequent reason for medical consultation. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic frequency of superficial mycoses in the Mycology Department of the Instituto Nacional de Higiene "Rafael Rangel" during 14 years (2001-2014). A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed to review the mycological records of patients with presumptive diagnosis of superficial mycosis. Nails, hairs and epidermal scales were the processed samples. The identification of fungi was performed by macro and microscopic observation of colonies and biochemical and physiological tests, as required of the isolated agent. For the investigation of Malassezia spp. only direct examination was performed. Of the 3 228 samples processed, 1 098 (34%) were positive and their distribution according to the etiological agent was: dermatophytes 79.5%; 10.9% yeasts; non-dermatophytes fungi 5.1% and 4.5% Malassezia spp. The most frequently isolated dermatophyte was Trichophyton rubrum Complex (70.1%), followed by T mentagrophytes complex (15.1%), Microsporum canis (9.4%) and Epidermophyton floccosum (4%). The most frequent ringworms Were: Tinea unguium (66.8%), followed by Tineapedis (16.4%) and Tinea capitis (8.1%). Candida parapsilosis complex (37.5%) was the most frequently isolated yeast and Fusarium spp. (53.6%) was the most isolated among non-dermatophyte fungi, followed by Aspergillus spp. (19.6%) and Acremonium spp. (10.7%). The identification of the etiological agent is essential to guide appropriate treatment. This study constitutes an important contribution to the knowledge of the epidemiology of superficial mycoses in our country. PMID:27382801

  3. Prominent animal mycoses from various regions of the world.

    PubMed

    Pier, A C; Cabañes, F J; Chermette, R; Ferreiro, L; Guillot, J; Jensen, H E; Santurio, J M

    2000-01-01

    The mycoses selected for presentation in this section are relatively common diseases of companion animals or livestock in certain areas of the world. Malasseziosis is arguably the most frequent mycosis of dogs (as otitis externa and dermatitis) throughout the world, although its diagnosis is often overlooked. Protothecosis is also geographically widespread, particularly in cattle where severe mastitis is a result of adventitious infection from the environment. In contrast, coccidioidomycosis and pythiosis are geographically limited in their occurrence (coccidioidomycosis by geographic region and pythiosis by climate), but within regions where they do occur, their presence in animals is not unusual. It was our intention to review recent developments in each of these diseases. PMID:11204164

  4. [Present and future in the immunodiagnosis of the animal mycoses].

    PubMed

    García, M E; Blanco, J L

    2000-03-01

    The problems that exist in the clinical, microbiological, and histopathological diagnosis of animal mycoses establish the necessity to investigate immunological methodologies in the diagnosis of these diseases. In this way, it may be possible to develop easy and fast techniques, allowing early detection of the disease, and efficient therapy. In our laboratory we have developed an indirect ELISA methodology to the diagnosis of aspergillosis in dog, cat, cow, sheep and birds, and dermatophytoses in dog and cat. Our results suggest this kind of technique may be useful not only in the diagnosis of animal mycosis, but in important fields as the elucidation of the fungal pathogenicity or the elaboration of effective vaccines, and with the possible application in human medicine.

  5. [State of the art in invasive diseases by filamentous fungi].

    PubMed

    Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections have become a major cause of morbimortality in intensive care patients, persons suffering from cancer or immune deficiencies, and other diseases with impaired immunity. Candida albicans remains the most frequent fungal pathogen, but advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of invasive candidiasis are leading to important etiological changes. Among the emerging invasive mycoses, are those caused by filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus, Lomentospora/Scedosporium, Fusarium or the Mucorales. Invasive aspergillosis is difficult to diagnose, and although there are diagnostic tools available, their use is not widespread, and their effectiveness vary depending on the group of patients. Clinical suspicion in high-risk patients, radiological diagnosis and the use of biomarkers, such as 1,3-β-D-glucan and galactomannan, can be of great help. However, diagnostic resources are limited in other mycoses, but radiology, pathological studies and the microbiological diagnosis can be useful. The high mortality of these mycoses requires early empirical antifungal treatment in many cases. Voriconazole is the first choice for treatment of the majority of aspergillosis, scedosporiasis, fusariosis and other hyalohyphomycoses. The treatment of mucormycoses, Lomentospora prolificans infections or mycoses by dematiaceous fungi are more complicated. Amphotericin B is active against many mucoralean fungi, but the combination of two or more antifungal agents could be a therapeutic alternative in many amphotericin B-refractory mycoses. Current clinical challenges include improving the diagnosis and the treatment of these mycoses, along with improving the adequate prevention in patients at high risk of suffering from them.

  6. Mycoses in the transplanted patient.

    PubMed

    Dictar, M O; Maiolo, E; Alexander, B; Jacob, N; Verón, M T

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal infection (IFI) has increased considerably over the past 20 years, and transplant recipients are at especially high risk for fungal infections owing to their overall immunosuppressed condition. Organ transplantation procedures were incorporated as a therapeutic option for many patients who lacked the normal functions of organs such as the heart, liver, kidney, lung, pancreas and small bowel. The prevalence of IFI in solid organ transplant (SOTR) patients ranges from 5 to 50% in kidney and liver transplants, respectively. In bone marrow transplant (BMT) patients, IFI are major causes of morbidity and mortality due to the protracted neutropenic period and graft-versus-host disease. Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. account for >80% of fungal episodes in both SOTR and BMT. The development of new immunosuppressive agents, new prophylaxis strategies (as pre-emptive therapy) and the improvement in surgical techniques led to increase survival of transplant recipients. In this session, a clear and concise update of the recent advances in the laboratory diagnosis of candidiasis and aspergillosis in this kind of patients was presented. However, we still need to establish more rapid, sensitive and specific methods for IFI diagnosis. Representatives of the 'Subcomision de Infecciones en el Paciente Neutropenico y Transplantado (SIPNYT)' de la Sociedad Argentina de Infectologia (SADI), presented the results of an unusual multicenter study both retrospective and descriptive studies of IFI in SOTR and BMT patients in Argentina. In addition, a study of IFI in 1,861 SOTR patients from four centers and the analysis of IFI in 2,066 BMT patients from all 12 BMT centers from Argentina was presented. From these studies it can be concluded that 'all transplant recipients are not the same' and that they should be stratified according to their different risk degrees in order to determine the best prophylaxis and treatment strategies.

  7. [Current epidemiology and laboratory diagnosis of endemic mycoses in Spain].

    PubMed

    Buitrago, María J; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Histoplasmosis and paracoccidioidomycosis are emerging infections in Spain associated with immigration and travelling. In last three decades a total of 128 cases of histoplasmosis have been reported in Spain, 59 in travellers, 63 in immigrants, three associated to drug abuse, two in laboratory workers, and one in a solid organ transplant receptor. In 1969 the first Spanish case of paracoccidioidomycosis was published and a total of 21 cases have been reported so far. Those patients suffered from the chronic form of the disease with period of latency as long as 50 years. Other endemic mycoses such as blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, lobomycosis, pythiosis and sporotrichosis have not increased in frequency. Microbiological cultures of endemic fungi must be handled in facilities which comply with international biosafety regulations and must also be taken into account for cultures from patients with suspected endemic mycosis. PMID:22130575

  8. Fungi responsible for skin mycoses in Turin (Italy).

    PubMed

    Filipello Marchisio, V; Preve, L; Tullio, V

    1996-01-01

    There has been a recent increase in the frequency of skin mycoses, coupled with changes in the epidemiology and distribution of the species responsible. Periodic epidemiological analyses of these disease are thus required to ensure their efficacious control. Hair fragments, skin scrapings, specimens from vesicles and blisters and nail parings were seeded on Petri dishes loaded with Sabouraud or Mycosel agar, supplemented with chloramphenicol and with chloramphenicol plus cycloheximide respectively. Parts of each specimen were also mounted in 10% potassium hydroxide for examination under the microscope. Yeasts prevailed over dermatophytes. Microsporum canis was the most frequent dermatophyte, followed by Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes and Epidermophyton floccosum. Tinea corporis was the most common mycosis, followed by tinea unguis, tinea capitis and tinea pedis. Men were chiefly bearers of tinea cruris and tinea pedis, women of tinea corporis, and children and teenagers of tinea capitis. Some examples of the transmission of infection through interhuman contact, via animals and from the soil are also presented.

  9. Treatment of superficial mycoses: review - part II*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes-Filho, Fred; Quaresma-Santos, Maria Victória Pinto; Amorim, Adriana Gutstein da Fonseca; Schechtman, Regina Casz; Azulay, David Rubem

    2013-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections of the hair, skin and nails are a major cause of morbidity in the world. Choosing the right treatment is not always simple because of the possibility of drug interactions and side effects. The first part of the article discusses the main treatments for superficial mycoses - keratophytoses, dermatophytosis, candidiasis, with a practical approach to the most commonly-used topical and systemic drugs , referring also to their dosage and duration of use. Promising new, antifungal therapeutic alternatives are also highlighted, as well as available options on the Brazilian and world markets. PMID:24474103

  10. Infrequent Production of Xanthomegnin by Fungal Strains Recovered from Patients with Ocular Mycoses.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Havva Gül; Kandemir, Hazal; Çürük, Akif; Ilkit, Macit; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba

    2016-04-01

    Mycotoxins are putative virulence factors of fungi that play an important role in the pathogenesis of fungal infections. Mycotoxin production has been used as a diagnostic marker for the early diagnosis of fungal diseases. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, we investigated whether the fungal strains recovered from eye tissue samples obtained from patients with ocular mycoses produced the mycotoxin xanthomegnin. We tested 62 well-characterized strains of fungi, including Aspergillus spp. (n = 14), Exophiala spp. (n = 9), Fusarium spp. (n = 15), and several molds (n = 24). All isolates were identified to the species level using PCR and DNA sequencing of rRNA genes. We detected xanthomegnin activity (0.02 µg/ml) in one of the three Aspergillus flavus strains. However, we were unable to detect xanthomegnin in any of the other 61 fungal strains. Our result suggests that xanthomegnin production was infrequent in fungal strains recovered from patients with ocular mycoses. PMID:26590579

  11. Cutaneous Mycoses: Management and Education in Universities and Their Clinics in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    In May 2015, information on the current status of mycological examinations in university clinics, and the education of students, and junior and senior residents in Japanese universities was gathered using a questionnaire, which was completed by 98 of the 117 (83.8%) professors or directors in charge of dermatology departments in Japan that were included in the survey.The questionnaire items were divided into three parts; namely, Part A, inspection methods used for diagnosis of cutaneous mycoses in each university clinic; Part B, need for a network and construction of a support system for medical care and education; and Part C, status of education of undergraduate students and residents. Some of these questions are based on a similar survey in 2007. In Part A, it was found that only 3% of university clinics performed fungal culture for all or most cases, indicating a drop from the previous study (9% in 2007). Meanwhile, responses indicating that fungal culture was almost or completely done away with accounted for about 36%. Based on type of mycoses, fungal culture for deep mycoses was performed in about 83% of the facilities. However, the percentage for superficial mycoses was very low, wherein only 39% of the facilities performed cultures even for tinea capitis. Trichophyton tonsurans infection was "often" or "sometimes" diagnosed in 22% of the facilities, with the other 78% reporting "no" or "almost no cases" of T. tonsurans infection diagnosed. In Part B, it was found that 96% of respondents (up from 89% in 2007) desired help from the university network, including aid in identifying fungal isolates, diagnosing rare fungal infections, and basic training in medical mycology of young doctors (senior residents in university hospitals). In Part C, it was found that education in direct KOH preparation for senior residents was satisfactory in about 80% of the facilities. However, about 45% of respondents reported that majority or all of the senior residents in their

  12. Endemic systemic mycoses: coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, paracoccidioidomycosis and blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Vázquez-González, Denisse; Perusquía-Ortiz, Ana María

    2011-09-01

    Endemic deep or systemic mycoses are common in specific geographical areas of the world. Coccidioidomycosis is present in semi-desert areas, histoplasmosis and paracoccidioidomycosis in tropical regions and blastomycosis belongs to temperate climates. The two former are widely distributed in the American continent and some tropical regions of the world; the third is limited to Central and South America, and the last to North America and Central and East Africa. These mycoses all have a similar pathogenesis, as the inoculum enters the host through the respiratory tract. Cutaneous manifestations are secondary to lymphatic and hematogenous dissemination. These deep mycoses are exceptional in Europe. Most cases are observed in returning travelers from endemic areas, aid workers, archaeologists, speleologist and immigrants. However, there have been some autochthonous cases of histoplasmosis due to Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum reported in European countries such as Italy and Germany. In this article, we provide up-to-date epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic data on the four most important imported systemic mycoses in Europe.

  13. [Immunodiffusion tests in gel media with the addition of polyethyleneglycol 6000 for the serodiagnosis of mycoses].

    PubMed

    Zaror, L; Robles, A M; Negroni, R

    1978-01-01

    Different immunodiffusion techniques with and without the addition of polyetilenglycol 6000 (PEG), were studied to determine its effect on the sensitivity of these reactions. One hundred thirteen sera from patients who suffered or had suffered deep mycoses (paracoccidioidomycosis: 49, histoplasmosis: 25, aspergillosis: 25, candidiasis: 8 and coccidioidomycosis: 6) were examined by the quantitative Ouchterlony's immunodiffusion procedure. Regular medium and media with 2% and 4% PEG were used. Eighty two out of the one hundred thirteen sera were positive for the regular medium and 91 for the medium containing 2% of PEG; furthermore, an increase of 1 or 2 two fold dilutions in the titers was observed in 40% of the sera, for the later media. Twenty one sera from aspergillosis cases were examined by agarose gel immunoelectrophoresis, 80% had more precipitin bands in the medium with 2% of PEG. Thirty four serum samples of patients suffering aspergillosis, paracoccidioidomycosis and histoplasmosis were studied using the agarose electroosmophoresis with the secondary immunodiffusion test. An increase in the number of the anodic bands were observed in 55% while 64% presented more catodic bands, when the PEG medium was used. This results would indicate that the addition of 2% PEG 6000 to the regular medium improves the sensitivity of the immunodiffusion tests for mycoses.

  14. Isavuconazole Treatment of Cryptococcosis and Dimorphic Mycoses

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, George R.; Rendon, Adrian; Ribeiro dos Santos, Rodrigo; Queiroz-Telles, Flavio; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Azie, Nkechi; Maher, Rochelle; Lee, Misun; Kovanda, Laura; Engelhardt, Marc; Vazquez, Jose A.; Cornely, Oliver A.; Perfect, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Invasive fungal diseases (IFD) caused by Cryptococcus and dimorphic fungi are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Isavuconazole (ISAV) is a novel, broad-spectrum, triazole antifungal agent (IV and by mouth [PO]) developed for the treatment of IFD. It displays potent activity in vitro against these pathogens and in this report we examine outcomes of patients with cryptococcosis or dimorphic fungal infections treated with ISAV. Methods. The VITAL study was an open-label nonrandomized phase 3 trial conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ISAV treatment in management of rare IFD. Patients received ISAV 200 mg 3 times daily for 2 days followed by 200 mg once-daily (IV or PO). Proven IFD and overall response at end of treatment (EOT) were determined by an independent, data-review committee. Mortality and safety were also assessed. Results. Thirty-eight patients received ISAV for IFD caused by Cryptococcus spp. (n = 9), Paracoccidioides spp. (n = 10), Coccidioides spp. (n = 9), Histoplasma spp. (n = 7) and Blastomyces spp. (n = 3). The median length of therapy was 180 days (range 2–331 days). At EOT 24/38 (63%) patients exhibited a successful overall response. Furthermore, 8 of 38 (21%) had stable IFD at the end of therapy without progression of disease, and 6 (16%) patients had progressive IFD despite this antifungal therapy. Thirty-three (87%) patients experienced adverse events. Conclusions. ISAV was well tolerated and demonstrated clinical activity against these endemic fungi with a safety profile similar to that observed in larger studies, validating its broad-spectrum in vitro activity and suggesting it may be a valuable alternative to currently available agents. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00634049. PMID:27169478

  15. Current concepts in systemic and topical therapy for superficial mycoses.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Larry E

    2010-03-01

    There presently exists a wide selection of choices in the treatment of superficial mycoses. The main categories of broad-spectrum agents are the allylamines and imidazoles, which have been tried and proven over more than 2 decades of usage with good safety. Nystatin and griseofulvin have even longer experience of about 5 decades but have niche usage for yeasts and dermatophytes, respectively. Although no new therapeutic groups have appeared, extensive development of vehicles and delivery systems has enhanced therapeutic results and increased patient compliance.

  16. Update on therapy for superficial mycoses: review article part I*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Quaresma-Santos, Maria Victória Pinto; Bernardes-Filho, Fred; Amorim, Adriana Gutstein da Fonseca; Schechtman, Regina Casz; Azulay, David Rubem

    2013-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections of the hair, skin and nails are a major cause of morbidity in the world. Choosing the right treatment is not always simple because of the possibility of drug interactions and side effects. The first part of the article discusses the main treatments for superficial mycoses - keratophytoses, dermatophytosis, candidiasis, with a practical approach to the most commonly-used topical and systemic drugs , referring also to their dosage and duration of use. Promising new, antifungal therapeutic alternatives are also highlighted, as well as available options on the Brazilian and world markets. PMID:24173183

  17. Host-parasite relationship in opportunistic mycoses.

    PubMed

    Waldorf, A R

    1986-01-01

    Aspergillosis and mucormycosis are opportunistic fungal infections that share several unique features. The etiologic agents of aspergillosis and mucormycosis are ubiquitous in the environment, but are opportunistic organisms and usually infect only patients predisposed by some underlying disease or treatment. These infections are typically characterized by hyphal tissue invasion and a predilection of the organism for blood vessel invasion with hemorrhage, necrosis, and infarction. Also, these organisms are not dimorphic, like the true pathogenic dimorphic fungi, as they grow both in the environment and within the host in hyphal forms. However, the host must contend with several forms to successfully eliminate them. Each form displays different antigenic and surface features and elicits different host responses. Finally, if germination and hyphal growth occur, the host must compete with a rapidly growing organism that is too large to be ingested by a single cell and so must be handled by extracellular defense mechanisms.

  18. Fungal diseases of horses.

    PubMed

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Figueredo, Luciana A; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-11-29

    Among diseases of horses caused by fungi (=mycoses), dermatophytosis, cryptococcosis and aspergillosis are of particular concern, due their worldwide diffusion and, for some of them, zoonotic potential. Conversely, other mycoses such as subcutaneous (i.e., pythiosis and mycetoma) or deep mycoses (i.e., blastomycosis and coccidioidomycosis) are rare, and/or limited to restricted geographical areas. Generally, subcutaneous and deep mycoses are chronic and progressive diseases; clinical signs include extensive, painful lesions (not pathognomonic), which resemble to other microbial infections. In all cases, early diagnosis is crucial in order to achieve a favorable prognosis. Knowledge of the epidemiology, clinical signs, and diagnosis of fungal diseases is essential for the establishment of effective therapeutic strategies. This article reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapeutic protocols of equine fungal infections as a support to early diagnosis and application of targeted therapeutic and control strategies. PMID:23428378

  19. Invasive fungal disease in university hospital: a PCR-based study of autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Ruangritchankul, Komkrit; Chindamporn, Ariya; Worasilchai, Navaporn; Poumsuk, Ubon; Keelawat, Somboon; Bychkov, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) has high mortality rate, especially in the growing population of immunocompromised patients. In spite of introduction of novel diagnostic approaches, the intravital recognition of IFD is challenging. Autopsy studies remain a key tool for assessment of epidemiology of visceral mycoses. We aimed to determine species distribution and trends of IFD over the last 10 years in unselected autopsy series from a large university hospital. Forty-five cases of visceral mycoses, confirmed by histopathology and panfungal PCR, were found in 587 consecutive autopsies. Major underlying diseases were diabetes mellitus (20%), hematologic malignancies (15.6%) and systemic lupus erythematosus (15.6%). There was a high risk for disseminated IFD in immunocompromised patients stayed in the hospital over 1 month with a fever longer than 3 weeks. The most common fungi were Aspergillus spp. (58%), Candida spp. (16%), Mucorales (14%) and Fusarium spp. (10%). We found significant increase in Aspergillus flavus (P = 0.04) and Mucorales (P < 0.01) infections over the last 5 years. Concordance rate between histopathology and panfungal PCR was 89.5% to the genus level. All 6 cases of fusariomycosis were misinterpreted as aspergillosis by histology alone. The precise species identification, necessary for targeted antifungal treatment, was rendered only by the molecular technique. Panfungal PCR showed high performance on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, providing important epidemiological data in retrospective autopsy series. Rapid detection of fungi by panfungal PCR assay has high potential for intravital diagnostics of IFD in surgical and biopsy specimens. PMID:26823814

  20. Invasive fungal disease in university hospital: a PCR-based study of autopsy cases

    PubMed Central

    Ruangritchankul, Komkrit; Chindamporn, Ariya; Worasilchai, Navaporn; Poumsuk, Ubon; Keelawat, Somboon; Bychkov, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) has high mortality rate, especially in the growing population of immunocompromised patients. In spite of introduction of novel diagnostic approaches, the intravital recognition of IFD is challenging. Autopsy studies remain a key tool for assessment of epidemiology of visceral mycoses. We aimed to determine species distribution and trends of IFD over the last 10 years in unselected autopsy series from a large university hospital. Forty-five cases of visceral mycoses, confirmed by histopathology and panfungal PCR, were found in 587 consecutive autopsies. Major underlying diseases were diabetes mellitus (20%), hematologic malignancies (15.6%) and systemic lupus erythematosus (15.6%). There was a high risk for disseminated IFD in immunocompromised patients stayed in the hospital over 1 month with a fever longer than 3 weeks. The most common fungi were Aspergillus spp. (58%), Candida spp. (16%), Mucorales (14%) and Fusarium spp. (10%). We found significant increase in Aspergillus flavus (P = 0.04) and Mucorales (P < 0.01) infections over the last 5 years. Concordance rate between histopathology and panfungal PCR was 89.5% to the genus level. All 6 cases of fusariomycosis were misinterpreted as aspergillosis by histology alone. The precise species identification, necessary for targeted antifungal treatment, was rendered only by the molecular technique. Panfungal PCR showed high performance on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, providing important epidemiological data in retrospective autopsy series. Rapid detection of fungi by panfungal PCR assay has high potential for intravital diagnostics of IFD in surgical and biopsy specimens. PMID:26823814

  1. A prodrug approach to the use of coumarins as potential therapeutics for superficial mycoses.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Derry K; Robertson, Jennifer; Wright, Kristine; Miller, Lorna; Smith, Shane; Stewart, Colin S; O Neil, Deborah A

    2013-01-01

    Superficial mycoses are fungal infections of the outer layers of the skin, hair and nails that affect 20-25% of the world's population, with increasing incidence. Treatment of superficial mycoses, predominantly caused by dermatophytes, is by topical and/or oral regimens. New therapeutic options with improved efficacy and/or safety profiles are desirable. There is renewed interest in natural product-based antimicrobials as alternatives to conventional treatments, including the treatment of superficial mycoses. We investigated the potential of coumarins as dermatophyte-specific antifungal agents and describe for the first time their potential utility as topical antifungals for superficial mycoses using a prodrug approach. Here we demonstrate that an inactive coumarin glycone, esculin, is hydrolysed to the antifungal coumarin aglycone, esculetin by dermatophytes. Esculin is hydrolysed to esculetin β-glucosidases. We demonstrate that β-glucosidases are produced by dermatophytes as well as members of the dermal microbiota, and that this activity is sufficient to hydrolyse esculin to esculetin with concomitant antifungal activity. A β-glucosidase inhibitor (conduritol B epoxide), inhibited antifungal activity by preventing esculin hydrolysis. Esculin demonstrates good aqueous solubility (<6 g/l) and could be readily formulated and delivered topically as an inactive prodrug in a water-based gel or cream. This work demonstrates proof-of-principle for a therapeutic application of glycosylated coumarins as inactive prodrugs that could be converted to an active antifungal in situ. It is anticipated that this approach will be applicable to other coumarin glycones.

  2. A Prodrug Approach to the Use of Coumarins as Potential Therapeutics for Superficial Mycoses

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Derry K.; Robertson, Jennifer; Wright, Kristine; Miller, Lorna; Smith, Shane; Stewart, Colin S.; O′Neil, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    Superficial mycoses are fungal infections of the outer layers of the skin, hair and nails that affect 20–25% of the world's population, with increasing incidence. Treatment of superficial mycoses, predominantly caused by dermatophytes, is by topical and/or oral regimens. New therapeutic options with improved efficacy and/or safety profiles are desirable. There is renewed interest in natural product-based antimicrobials as alternatives to conventional treatments, including the treatment of superficial mycoses. We investigated the potential of coumarins as dermatophyte-specific antifungal agents and describe for the first time their potential utility as topical antifungals for superficial mycoses using a prodrug approach. Here we demonstrate that an inactive coumarin glycone, esculin, is hydrolysed to the antifungal coumarin aglycone, esculetin by dermatophytes. Esculin is hydrolysed to esculetin β-glucosidases. We demonstrate that β-glucosidases are produced by dermatophytes as well as members of the dermal microbiota, and that this activity is sufficient to hydrolyse esculin to esculetin with concomitant antifungal activity. A β-glucosidase inhibitor (conduritol B epoxide), inhibited antifungal activity by preventing esculin hydrolysis. Esculin demonstrates good aqueous solubility (<6 g/l) and could be readily formulated and delivered topically as an inactive prodrug in a water-based gel or cream. This work demonstrates proof-of-principle for a therapeutic application of glycosylated coumarins as inactive prodrugs that could be converted to an active antifungal in situ. It is anticipated that this approach will be applicable to other coumarin glycones. PMID:24260474

  3. Acidophilic actinobacteria synthesised silver nanoparticles showed remarkable activity against fungi-causing superficial mycoses in humans.

    PubMed

    Anasane, N; Golińska, P; Wypij, M; Rathod, D; Dahm, H; Rai, M

    2016-03-01

    Superficial mycoses are limited to the most external part of the skin and hair and caused by Malassezia sp., Trichophyton sp. and Candida sp. We report extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by acidophilic actinobacteria (SF23, C9) and its in vitro antifungal activity against fungi-causing superficial mycoses. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strains SF23 and C9 showed that they are most closely related to Pilimelia columellifera subsp. pallida GU269552(T). The detection of AgNPs was confirmed by visual observation of colour changes from colourless to brown, and UV-vis spectrophotometer analysis, which showed peaks at 432 and 427 nm, respectively. These AgNPs were further characterised by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), Zeta potential, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The FTIR analysis exhibited the presence of proteins as capping agents. The TEM analysis revealed the formation of spherical and polydispersed nanoparticles in the size range of 4-36 nm and 8-60 nm, respectively. The biosynthesised AgNPs were screened against fungi-causing superficial mycoses viz., Malassezia furfur, Trichophyton rubrum, Candida albicans and C. tropicalis. The highest antifungal activity of AgNPs from SF23 and C9 against T. rubrum and the least against M. furfur and C. albicans was observed as compared to other tested fungi. The biosynthesised AgNPs were found to be potential anti-antifungal agent against fungi-causing superficial mycoses.

  4. Relevance of Candida and other mycoses for morbidity and mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock due to peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstern, Christoph; Herold, Christina; Mieth, Markus; Brenner, Thorsten; Decker, Sebastian; Busch, Cornelius J; Hofer, Stefan; Zimmermann, Stefan; Weigand, Markus A; Bernhard, Michael

    2015-07-01

    This single-centre retrospective cohort study evaluated the incidence and outcome of mycoses in critical ill patients (n = 283) with sepsis due to peritonitis. Overall mortality was 41.3%, and the 28-day mortality was 29.3%. Fungal pathogens were found in 51.9%. The common first location was the respiratory tract (66.6%), followed by the abdominal site (19.7%). Candida colonisation was found in 64.6%, and invasive Candida infection in 34.0%. Identified fungi were Candida spp. in 98.6% and Aspergillus spp. in 6.1%. Patients with fungal pathogens showed a higher rate of postoperative peritonitis, APACHE II and tracheotomy. In comparison to patients without fungal pathogens, these patients showed a longer duration on mechanical ventilation, and a higher overall mortality. Patients with Candida-positive swabs from abdominal sites had more fascia dehiscence and anastomosis leakage. Seventy-two patients (48.9%) received antifungal therapy, 26 patients were treated empirically. Antifungal therapy was not associated with a decrease in mortality. Age and renal replacement therapy were associated with mortality. In conclusion, fungi are common pathogens in critically ill patients with peritonitis, and detection of fungi is associated with an increase in overall mortality. Particularly, Candida-positive abdominal swabs are associated with an increase in morbidity. However, we were not able to demonstrate a survival benefit for antifungal therapy in peritonitis patients.

  5. [Rapid identification and susceptibility to killer toxins of yeasts isolated from non-systemic mycoses].

    PubMed

    Sangorrín, M P; Lopes, C A; Rivero, A; Caballero, A C

    2007-01-01

    Rapid identification and susceptibility to killer toxins of yeasts isolated from non-systemic mycoses. The use of quick and reliable yeast identification methods, as well as the development of new antifungal agents with more specific targets, will enable a more efficient treatment of mycoses. In the present work, a total of 53 clinical isolates obtained from non-systemic infections in Neuquén Hospitals and an ophthalmologic clinic in Buenos Aires during 2005, were identified by means of a rapid molecular method (ITS1-5.8S ADNr-ITS2 PCR-RFLP). Additionally, the killer susceptibility of the isolates was tested against reference and indigenous killer yeasts on plate tests. Eight yeast species were identified among the clinical isolates: Candida albicans (52%), Candida parapsilosis (17%), Candida tropicalis (10%), Candida krusei (5%), Candida glabrata (4%), Candida guilliermondii (4%), Kluyveromyces lactis (4%) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (4%). Sixty-nine percent of the isolates corresponding to the predominant species (C. albicans) were related to vaginal infections. On the other hand, 61% of the yeasts associated with ocular infections were identified as C. parapsilosis. Two indigenous killer isolates DVMais5 and HCMeiss5, belonging to Pichia anomala and P. kluyveri respectively, exhibited the broadest killer spectrum against clinical isolates.

  6. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of salivary gland mycoses.

    PubMed

    Raab, S S; Thomas, P A; Cohen, M B

    1994-01-01

    This report details the fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) cytomorphologic features of two cases of salivary gland mycosis. Both patients had acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and presented with parotid gland masses. The first patient had Histoplasmosis with secondary infection by Candida. Cytopathologically, the FNAB smears showed classic features of a deep-seated mycosis characterized by necrosis and scattered fungal forms. The second patient had a colonizing sialadenitis caused by either Asperigillus or Fusarium. Cytopathologically, the findings were similar to those seen in aspergillomas of the lung or paranasal sinuses with numerous hyphal forms and an absence of an inflammatory response. Because mycotic disease can induce a wide spectrum of pathogenic change, other benign or malignant, solid or cystic lesions enter into the differential diagnosis.

  7. Coccidioidomycosis and other systemic mycoses of marine mammals stranding along the central California, USA coast: 1998-2012.

    PubMed

    Huckabone, Sara E; Gulland, Frances M D; Johnson, Suzanne M; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Dodd, Erin M; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Dunkin, Robin C; Casper, David; Carlson, Erin L; Sykes, Jane E; Meyer, Weiland; Miller, Melissa A

    2015-04-01

    A wide range of systemic mycoses have been reported from captive and wild marine mammals from North America. Examples include regionally endemic pathogens such as Coccidioides and Blastomyces spp., and novel pathogens like Cryptococcus gattii, which appear may have been introduced to North America by humans. Stranding and necropsy data were analyzed from three marine mammal stranding and response facilities on the central California coast to assess the prevalence, host demographics, and lesion distribution of systemic mycoses affecting locally endemic marine mammals. Between 1 January 1998 and 30 June 2012, >7,000 stranded marine mammals were necropsied at the three facilities. Necropsy and histopathology records were reviewed to identify cases of locally invasive or systemic mycoses and determine the nature and distribution of fungal lesions. Forty-one animals (0.6%) exhibited cytological, culture- or histologically confirmed locally invasive or systemic mycoses: 36 had coccidioidomycosis, two had zygomycosis, two had cryptococcosis, and one was systemically infected with Scedosporium apiospermum (an Ascomycota). Infected animals included 18 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), 20 southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis), two Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi), one Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli), and one northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris). Coccidioidomycosis was reported from 15 sea lions, 20 sea otters, and one harbor seal, confirming that Coccidioides spp. is the most common pathogen causing systemic mycosis in marine mammals stranding along the central California coast. We also report the first confirmation of C. gattii infection in a wild marine mammal from California and the first report of coccidioidomycosis in a wild harbor seal. Awareness of these pathogenic fungi during clinical care and postmortem examination is an important part of marine mammal population health surveillance and human health protection

  8. Coccidioidomycosis and other systemic mycoses of marine mammals stranding along the central California, USA coast: 1998-2012.

    PubMed

    Huckabone, Sara E; Gulland, Frances M D; Johnson, Suzanne M; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Dodd, Erin M; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Dunkin, Robin C; Casper, David; Carlson, Erin L; Sykes, Jane E; Meyer, Weiland; Miller, Melissa A

    2015-04-01

    A wide range of systemic mycoses have been reported from captive and wild marine mammals from North America. Examples include regionally endemic pathogens such as Coccidioides and Blastomyces spp., and novel pathogens like Cryptococcus gattii, which appear may have been introduced to North America by humans. Stranding and necropsy data were analyzed from three marine mammal stranding and response facilities on the central California coast to assess the prevalence, host demographics, and lesion distribution of systemic mycoses affecting locally endemic marine mammals. Between 1 January 1998 and 30 June 2012, >7,000 stranded marine mammals were necropsied at the three facilities. Necropsy and histopathology records were reviewed to identify cases of locally invasive or systemic mycoses and determine the nature and distribution of fungal lesions. Forty-one animals (0.6%) exhibited cytological, culture- or histologically confirmed locally invasive or systemic mycoses: 36 had coccidioidomycosis, two had zygomycosis, two had cryptococcosis, and one was systemically infected with Scedosporium apiospermum (an Ascomycota). Infected animals included 18 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), 20 southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis), two Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi), one Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli), and one northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris). Coccidioidomycosis was reported from 15 sea lions, 20 sea otters, and one harbor seal, confirming that Coccidioides spp. is the most common pathogen causing systemic mycosis in marine mammals stranding along the central California coast. We also report the first confirmation of C. gattii infection in a wild marine mammal from California and the first report of coccidioidomycosis in a wild harbor seal. Awareness of these pathogenic fungi during clinical care and postmortem examination is an important part of marine mammal population health surveillance and human health protection

  9. Skin and nail mycoses in patients with diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Papini, M; Cicoletti, M; Fabrizi, V; Landucci, P

    2013-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects all socioeconomic and age groups and its incidence is rapidly increasing worldwide. The diabetic foot complication represents one of the most complex and serious complications in these patients. Fungal infections can also contribute to the severity of the diabetic foot. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of foot skin and toenail mycosis in a group of 75 patients with diabetic foot complication and in a matched control group. Diabetic patients showed onychomycosis in 53.3% and foot skin mycosis in 46.7% of the cases, with a prevalence of both fungal infections significantly higher than that observed in the control group. At least one type of these fungal infections was present in 69.3% of diabetic subjects with a highly significant difference compared to control group (P<0.001). Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton interdigitale were the most common species responsible of both nail and skin infections. Candida spp, Fusarium spp, Aspergillus spp and other moulds. were found in about 1/3 onychomycosis. Previous toe amputation was significantly associated with both skin and nail mycosis. The present study confirms that both tinea pedis and onychomycosis have a high prevalence in subjects suffering from diabetic foot complication, and that the problem of fungal infections of the foot in diabetic subjects is still highly underestimated. Consequently, there is an important clinical rationale for careful mycological examination of diabetic foot and an adequate treatment tailored for each individual patient according to the fungal species involved.

  10. A prospective feasibility study of primary prophylaxis against invasive fungal disease with voriconazole following umbilical cord blood transplantation with fludarabine-based conditioning.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shinsuke; Araoka, Hideki; Uchida, Naoyuki; Uchida, Yumiko; Kaji, Daisuke; Ota, Hikari; Nishida, Aya; Ishiwata, Kazuya; Tsuji, Masanori; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Ito, Tadaaki; Matsuno, Naofumi; Yamamoto, Go; Asano-Mori, Yuki; Hayashi, Masahiro; Izutsu, Koji; Masuoka, Kazuhiro; Wake, Atsushi; Makino, Shigeyoshi; Yoneyama, Akiko; Taniguchi, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recent introduction of a new class of anti-Aspergillus agents, no standard regimen for the prevention of invasive fungal disease (IFD) following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been shown to be superior to fluconazole. The present prospective, single-arm study investigated the feasibility of voriconazole (VOR) administration as primary prophylaxis in 52 recipients of umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT) with fludarabine-based conditioning, who had no previous IFD episodes. Proven or probable IFD was determined using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group, and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) criteria were considered as breakthrough infections. VOR was administered as prophylaxis for a total of 6884 patient-days following CBT. The mean duration of VOR administration after transplantation was 132 days (range, 1-769); 44 patients (85 %) had advanced disease, 15 (29 %) had a history of allogeneic HSCT, and 29 (56 %) received systemic corticosteroid therapy for allogeneic immune-mediated complications. Under the prophylaxis with VOR, one patient developed probable invasive aspergillosis on day 71, and the cumulative incidence of IFD was 4.5 % at day 180. None of the patients developed breakthrough candida or zygomycetes infections. Under the extensive therapeutic dose monitoring, VOR was safely administered with a calcineurin inhibitor and was well tolerated. These results suggest that VOR represents a feasible primary prophylactic agent for IFD after CBT with fludarabine-based conditioning.

  11. Skin and subcutaneous mycoses in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) caused by Fusarium oxysporum in coinfection with Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Cutuli, M. Teresa; Gibello, Alicia; Rodriguez-Bertos, Antonio; Blanco, M. Mar; Villarroel, Morris; Giraldo, Alejandra; Guarro, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous mycoses in freshwater fish are rare infections usually caused by oomycetes of the genus Saprolegnia and some filamentous fungi. To date, Fusarium infections in farmed fish have only been described in marine fish. Here, we report the presence of Fusarium oxysporum in subcutaneous lesions of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Histopathologic evaluation revealed granuloma formation with fungal structures, and the identity of the etiological agent was demonstrated by morphological and molecular analyses. Some of the animals died as a result of systemic coinfection with Aeromonashydrophila PMID:26155462

  12. Study Identifies Genetic Subtypes of Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161499.html Study Identifies Genetic Subtypes of Crohn's Disease Findings may help explain ... disease appears to have at least two distinct genetic subtypes, which could explain why the condition is ...

  13. Evaluation of fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) for the detection of fungi directly from blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected invasive mycoses.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Roberto Moreira; Da Silva Neto, João Ricardo; Santos, Carla Silvana; Frickmann, Hagen; Poppert, Sven; Cruz, Kátia Santana; Koshikene, Daniela; De Souza, João Vicente Braga

    2015-01-31

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of in-house FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridisation) procedures for the direct identification of invasive fungal infections in blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and to compare these FISH results with those obtained using traditional microbiological techniques and PCR targeting of the ITS1 region of the rRNA gene. In total, 112 CSF samples and 30 positive blood cultures were investigated by microscopic examination, culture, PCR-RFLP and FISH. The sensitivity of FISH for fungal infections in CSF proved to be slightly better than that of conventional microscopy (India ink) under the experimental conditions, detecting 48 (instead of 46) infections in 112 samples. The discriminatory powers of traditional microbiology, PCR-RFLP and FISH for fungal bloodstream infections were equivalent, with the detection of 14 fungal infections in 30 samples. However, the mean times to diagnosis after the detection of microbial growth by automated blood culture systems were 5 hours, 20 hours and 6 days for FISH, PCR-RFLP and traditional microbiology, respectively. The results demonstrate that FISH is a valuable tool for the identification of invasive mycoses that can be implemented in the diagnostic routine of hospital laboratories.

  14. Neurology Case Studies: Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad U; Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses interesting vascular neurology cases including the management of intracranial stenosis, migraine headache and stroke risk, retinal artery occlusions associated with impaired hearing, intracranial occlusive disease, a heritable cause of stroke and vascular cognitive impairment, and an interesting clinico-neuroradiologic disorder associated with eclampsia. PMID:27445238

  15. [Study methods of drugs in Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Dubois, B; Stehlé, B; Lehner, J P; Derouesné, C; Bourin, M; Lamour, Y; Blin, O; Jourdain, G; Alperovitch, A

    1996-01-01

    The availability of new drugs for Alzheimer's disease, with different pharmacological profiles, leads to a redefinition the relevant methodology for developing drugs in this indication, including the inclusion/exclusion criteria, the duration of the studies, and therefore, the relevant guidelines. This was the purpose of the Giens Round-table devoted to the new methodology for drug development in Alzheimer disease.

  16. Lumpy Skin Disease in Iraq: Study of the Disease Emergence.

    PubMed

    Al-Salihi, K A; Hassan, I Q

    2015-10-01

    This study intends to report the first emergence of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in Iraq, in addition to describing its related clinical signs. In August 2013, 21 cases of four outbreaks developed clinical signs suggestive of LSD in the Nineveh (Mosul) and Baghdad Governorates, which were considered as the first infected foci of LSD in Iraq. The disease was diagnosed tentatively, on the basis of clinical signs and epidemiological features, and it was confirmed as positive by the polymerase chain reaction and histopathological features. In September 2013, eight new outbreaks of LSD also appeared in Baghdad and Nineveh. In 2014, the disease spread rapidly to the governorates of Kirkuk, Salah Al-Din, Al-Anbar, Diyala, Wasit, Babil, Karbala, Najaf, Al-Diwaniyah, Muthanna, Maysan, DhiQar and Basra. The total number of infected cows and calves reported was 7396 and 227, respectively. The apparent morbidity and mortality rates were 9.11% and 0.51%, respectively, while the apparent case-fatality rate was 5.56%. Skin nodules, anorexia, reduce in milk production and decrease in bodyweight were the common clinical signs. Moreover, myiasis and mastitis were seen as complications in some infected animals. Attempts were made to stop the distribution of the disease including quarantine and treatment, control over animal movement and arthropod control. Ring vaccination was used in a 10 km radius zone around the outbreak with live sheep pox vaccine. The highly contagious transboundary nature of the LSD, its endemic distribution in the Iraqi neighbouring countries, and the current armed conflict in the area were the possible factors for the disease being introduced into the country. LSD had spread through the Middle East and Gulf peninsula and could be a cause of danger to the rest of Asia and Europe. International precaution, cooperation and exchange of information could guarantee the prevention and further spread of the disease to the rest of Asia and Europe.

  17. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-01-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia–lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  18. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-12-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  19. Thiazolidinediones and Parkinson Disease: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Connolly, John G; Bykov, Katsiaryna; Gagne, Joshua J

    2015-12-01

    Thiazolidinediones, a class of medications indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, reduce inflammation and have been shown to provide a therapeutic benefit in animal models of Parkinson disease. We examined the association between treatment with thiazolidinediones and the onset of Parkinson disease in older individuals. We performed a cohort study of 29,397 Medicare patients enrolled in state pharmaceutical benefits programs who initiated treatment with thiazolidinediones or sulfonylureas during the years 1997 through 2005 and had no prior diagnosis of Parkinson disease. New users of thiazolidinediones were propensity score matched to new users of sulfonylureas and followed to determine whether they were diagnosed with Parkinson disease. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compare time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease in the propensity score-matched populations. To assess the association with duration of use, we performed several analyses that required longer continuous use of medications. In the primary analysis, thiazolidinedione users had a hazard ratio for a diagnosis of Parkinson disease of 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 0.71, 1.66) when compared with sulfonylurea users. Increasing the duration-of-use requirements to 10 months did not substantially change the association; the hazard ratios ranged from 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.49, 2.05) to 1.17 (95% confidence interval: 0.60, 2.25). Thiazolidinedione use was not associated with a longer time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease than was sulfonylurea use, regardless of duration of exposure.

  20. Transcending chronic liver disease: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, S P

    1997-01-01

    This study explores and describes experiences of chronic liver disease from the patient's perspective. No qualitative research studies appear to have examined the experiences of these patients. In-depth focused interviews and grounded theory data collection and data analysis methods were used. A two-stage theoretical framework (becoming ill, and not living) of the experience of transcending chronic liver disease is presented. Sociological and psychological literature on common sense models of health and illness are briefly reviewed. Several suggestions for further research are made. The way in which this qualitative research study is leading to a quantitative and qualitative appraisal of the psychological adjustment in end-stage chronic liver disease patients is outlined.

  1. Social media methods for studying rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Stringer, Kathleen A; Donohue, Janet E; Yu, Sunkyung; Shaver, Ashley; Caruthers, Regine L; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Fifer, Carlen; Goldberg, Caren; Russell, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    For pediatric rare diseases, the number of patients available to support traditional research methods is often inadequate. However, patients who have similar diseases cluster "virtually" online via social media. This study aimed to (1) determine whether patients who have the rare diseases Fontan-associated protein losing enteropathy (PLE) and plastic bronchitis (PB) would participate in online research, and (2) explore response patterns to examine social media's role in participation compared with other referral modalities. A novel, internet-based survey querying details of potential pathogenesis, course, and treatment of PLE and PB was created. The study was available online via web and Facebook portals for 1 year. Apart from 2 study-initiated posts on patient-run Facebook pages at the study initiation, all recruitment was driven by study respondents only. Response patterns and referral sources were tracked. A total of 671 respondents with a Fontan palliation completed a valid survey, including 76 who had PLE and 46 who had PB. Responses over time demonstrated periodic, marked increases as new online populations of Fontan patients were reached. Of the responses, 574 (86%) were from the United States and 97 (14%) were international. The leading referral sources were Facebook, internet forums, and traditional websites. Overall, social media outlets referred 84% of all responses, making it the dominant modality for recruiting the largest reported contemporary cohort of Fontan patients and patients who have PLE and PB. The methodology and response patterns from this study can be used to design research applications for other rare diseases.

  2. A study of Legionnaire's disease in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, M

    1986-06-01

    Legionnaire's disease has only rarely been reported in Africa. Following a case of pneumonia which was suggestive of Legionnaire's disease, a serological survey of people in the same community showed a titre of 1:256 or more in 10% of 73 sera examined by the indirect fluorescent antibody test using heat-inactivated antigen. However, on retesting using formolized yolk-sac antigen these results could not be substantiated. A further study of 105 patients with pneumonia failed to show a rising antibody titre using acute and convalescent serum.

  3. Mendelian randomization studies in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Henning; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert

    2014-08-01

    Epidemiological research over the last 50 years has discovered a plethora of biomarkers (including molecules, traits or other diseases) that associate with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. Even the strongest association detected in such observational research precludes drawing conclusions about the causality underlying the relationship between biomarker and disease. Mendelian randomization (MR) studies can shed light on the causality of associations, i.e whether, on the one hand, the biomarker contributes to the development of disease or, on the other hand, the observed association is confounded by unrecognized exogenous factors or due to reverse causation, i.e. due to the fact that prevalent disease affects the level of the biomarker. However, conclusions from a MR study are based on a number of important assumptions. A prerequisite for such studies is that the genetic variant employed affects significantly the biomarker under investigation but has no effect on other phenotypes that might confound the association between the biomarker and disease. If this biomarker is a true causal risk factor for CAD, genotypes of the variant should associate with CAD risk in the direction predicted by the association of the biomarker with CAD. Given a random distribution of exogenous factors in individuals carrying respective genotypes, groups represented by the genotypes are highly similar except for the biomarker of interest. Thus, the genetic variant converts into an unconfounded surrogate of the respective biomarker. This scenario is nicely exemplified for LDL cholesterol. Almost every genotype found to increase LDL cholesterol level by a sufficient amount has also been found to increase CAD risk. Pending a number of conditions that needed to be fulfilled by the genetic variant under investigation (e.g. no pleiotropic effects) and the experimental set-up of the study, LDL cholesterol can be assumed to act as the functional component that links genotypes and CAD risk and

  4. Topical antifungal-corticosteroid combination therapy for the treatment of superficial mycoses: conclusions of an expert panel meeting.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Martin; Friedrich, Markus; Papini, Manuela; Pujol, Ramon M; Veraldi, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Superficial fungal infections affect 20-25% of people worldwide and can cause considerable morbidity, particularly if an inflammatory component is present. As superficial fungal infections can be diverse, the treatment should be tailored to the individual needs of the patient and several factors should be taken into account when deciding on the most appropriate treatment option. These include the type, location and surface area of the infection, patient age, degree of inflammation and underlying comorbidities. Although several meta-analyses have shown that there are no significant differences between the numerous available topical antifungal agents with regard to mycological cure, agents differ in their specific intrinsic properties, which can affect their clinical use. The addition of a corticosteroid to an antifungal agent at the initiation of treatment can attenuate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection and is thought to increase patient compliance, reduce the risk of bacterial superinfection and enhance the efficacy of the antifungal agent. However, incorrect use of antifungal-corticosteroid therapy may be associated with treatment failure and adverse effects. This review summarises available treatment options for superficial fungal infections and provides general treatment recommendations based on the consensus outcomes of an Expert Panel meeting on the topical treatment of superficial mycoses. PMID:26916648

  5. Topical antifungal-corticosteroid combination therapy for the treatment of superficial mycoses: conclusions of an expert panel meeting.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Martin; Friedrich, Markus; Papini, Manuela; Pujol, Ramon M; Veraldi, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Superficial fungal infections affect 20-25% of people worldwide and can cause considerable morbidity, particularly if an inflammatory component is present. As superficial fungal infections can be diverse, the treatment should be tailored to the individual needs of the patient and several factors should be taken into account when deciding on the most appropriate treatment option. These include the type, location and surface area of the infection, patient age, degree of inflammation and underlying comorbidities. Although several meta-analyses have shown that there are no significant differences between the numerous available topical antifungal agents with regard to mycological cure, agents differ in their specific intrinsic properties, which can affect their clinical use. The addition of a corticosteroid to an antifungal agent at the initiation of treatment can attenuate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection and is thought to increase patient compliance, reduce the risk of bacterial superinfection and enhance the efficacy of the antifungal agent. However, incorrect use of antifungal-corticosteroid therapy may be associated with treatment failure and adverse effects. This review summarises available treatment options for superficial fungal infections and provides general treatment recommendations based on the consensus outcomes of an Expert Panel meeting on the topical treatment of superficial mycoses.

  6. Genomics and disease resistance studies in livestock☆

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Stephen C; Woolliams, John A

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the application of genetic and genomic techniques to disease resistance, the interpretation of data arising from such studies and the utilisation of the research outcomes to breed animals for enhanced resistance. Resistance and tolerance are defined and contrasted, factors affecting the analysis and interpretation of field data presented, and appropriate experimental designs discussed. These general principles are then applied to two detailed case studies, infectious pancreatic necrosis in Atlantic salmon and bovine tuberculosis in dairy cattle, and the lessons learnt are considered in detail. It is concluded that the rate limiting step in disease genetic studies will generally be provision of adequate phenotypic data, and its interpretation, rather than the genomic resources. Lastly, the importance of cross-disciplinary dialogue between the animal health and animal genetics communities is stressed. PMID:26339300

  7. [Carotenoids: 2. Diseases and supplementation studies].

    PubMed

    Faure, H; Fayol, V; Galabert, C; Grolier, P; Moël, G L; Stephens, J; Nabet, F

    1999-05-01

    Inverse correlations have been found in most studies on the relationship between dietary intake and plasma concentrations of carotenoids on one side and degenerative diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases on the other side. Protective effects of carotenoids have been found for pathologies of the retina and the skin. Concentrations of these molecules in blood are lower in digestive pathologies and HIV. Short- and long-term toxicity of carotenoids was found to be low. In combination with the beneficial effects found for diets rich in carotenoids, this has initiated trials with relatively high doses of carotenoid supplements. In the study in Linxian (China) in a rural population with poor nutritional status, supplementation with beta-carotene, zinc, selenium and vitamin E lowered total mortality and mortality from stomach cancer. Other studies (ATBC, Caret.) on well-fed subjects did not show beneficial effects on mortality from cancer and cardiovascular diseases. On the contrary, higher mortality and lung cancer incidence was found in supplemented subjects that were also exposed to asbestos and cigarette smoke. In these studies, doses of supplemental beta-carotene were high and varied from 20 to 50 mg/day. One still ongoing study, called Suvimax, doses subjects for eight years with a cocktail of vitamins and minerals including 6 mg per day of beta-carotene. This supplementation with physiologically seen more "normal" doses might give clarity on the question if beta-carotene is the protective factor in fruits and vegetables. PMID:10377477

  8. Spatial distribution of disease: three case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Selvin, S.; Shaw, G.; Schulman, J.; Merrill, D.W.

    1987-09-01

    Maps transformed so as to have constant density of residential population were used to analyze the spatial distribution of disease in three specific areas. Each area had received recent attention because of suspected environmental pollution. The area adjacent to the Rocky Flats Facility (CO) was examined to identify any association between possible plutonium releases and increases in lung cancer or leukemia incidence. The industrial area of northern Contra Costa County (CA) was studied to explore a relationship between petrochemical industrial emissions and histologic-specific lung cancers. Finally, a suspected increase in the risk of congenital cardiac defects possibly related to pollution of the Santa Clara County (CA) water supply was investigated. No evidence of elevated risk of disease was found to be associated with either the Rocky Flats Facility or the polluted water of Santa Clara County. An increase in lung cancer, found by other investigators in earlier years, was shown to persist in association with industrial emissions in Contra Costa County.

  9. [The connection between sports and spores. The foot, its mycoses and onychomycoses].

    PubMed

    Braham, C; Ezzine-Sebai, N; Arrese, J E; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    2001-11-01

    The epidemiological survey Achillus on over 76,000 subjects has highlighted the high prevalence of foot diseases. In particular, the risk of contracting skin and nail infections of the foot by fungi is quite important during some sport practices. The interhuman transmission is due to propagules commonly called spores. It often occurs by indirect contamination from the soil. Clinical presentations are diverse, largely depending upon the identity of the pathogen fungus. Prevention and treatment of these infections require both patience and perseverance. Boosting the transformation of spores into an active growing phase might paradoxically increase the clinical efficacy of antifungals.

  10. [Mondor's disease: study of two topographic localizations].

    PubMed

    Ortega Calvo, M; Villadiego Sánchez, J M

    2003-06-01

    Superficial thoracic wall and dorsal vein of the penis phlebitis are uncommon diseases. Both are known as Mondor's disease. Two cases have been diagnosed in a short period of time in a Southern. Spain primary care clinics. PMID:12848602

  11. Autism and Autoimmune Disease: A Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, John; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Described in a family in which the youngest boy has early infantile autism, Addison's disease, and moniliasis and two older boys have autoimmune disease with hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, moniliasis, and either alopecia totalis or diabetes mellitus, while the oldest boy and parents are symptom free. (KW)

  12. Spatial distribution of disease: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Selvin, S; Shaw, G; Schulman, J; Merrill, D W

    1987-09-01

    Maps transformed so as to have constant density of residential population were used to analyze the spatial distribution of disease in three specific areas. Each area had received recent attention because of suspected environmental pollution. The area adjacent to the Rocky Flats Facility (CO) was examined to identify any association between possible plutonium releases and increases in lung cancer or leukemia incidence. The industrial area of northern Contra Costa County (CA) was studied to explore a relationship between petrochemical industrial emissions and histologic-specific lung cancers. Finally, a suspected increase in the risk of congenital cardiac defects possibly related to pollution of the Santa Clara County (CA) water supply was investigated. No evidence of elevated risk of disease was found to be associated with either the Rocky Flats Facility or the polluted water of Santa Clara County. An increase in lung cancer, found by other investigators in earlier years, was shown to persist in association with industrial emissions in Contra Costa County. PMID:3476785

  13. On methods for studying stochastic disease dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keeling, M J; Ross, J V

    2008-02-01

    Models that deal with the individual level of populations have shown the importance of stochasticity in ecology, epidemiology and evolution. An increasingly common approach to studying these models is through stochastic (event-driven) simulation. One striking disadvantage of this approach is the need for a large number of replicates to determine the range of expected behaviour. Here, for a class of stochastic models called Markov processes, we present results that overcome this difficulty and provide valuable insights, but which have been largely ignored by applied researchers. For these models, the so-called Kolmogorov forward equation (also called the ensemble or master equation) allows one to simultaneously consider the probability of each possible state occurring. Irrespective of the complexities and nonlinearities of population dynamics, this equation is linear and has a natural matrix formulation that provides many analytical insights into the behaviour of stochastic populations and allows rapid evaluation of process dynamics. Here, using epidemiological models as a template, these ensemble equations are explored and results are compared with traditional stochastic simulations. In addition, we describe further advantages of the matrix formulation of dynamics, providing simple exact methods for evaluating expected eradication (extinction) times of diseases, for comparing expected total costs of possible control programmes and for estimation of disease parameters. PMID:17638650

  14. Effects of temperature and relative humidity on sporulation of Metarhizium anisopliae var. acridum in mycosed cadavers of Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Arthurs, S; Thomas, M B

    2001-08-01

    The effects of relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the sporulation of Metarhizium anisopliae var. acridum on mycosed cadavers of desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, were assessed in the laboratory. Quantitative assessments of conidial production over 10 days under constant conditions showed that sporulation was optimized at RH > 96% and at temperatures between 20 and 30 degrees C. Under both these conditions >10(9) conidia/cadaver were produced. At 25 degrees C, conidial yield was maximized under conditions in which cadavers remained in contact with damp substrate. Relatively little sporulation occurred at 15 degrees C (< 3 x 10(7) conidia/cadaver) and 40 degrees C (< 4 x 10(6) conidia/cadaver) and no sporulation occurred at 10 or 45 degrees C. Following incubation, conidial yield was closely related to the water content of locust cadavers. In separate tests, locust cadavers were incubated for 10 days under diurnally fluctuating temperature and RH that comprised favorable (25 degrees C/100% RH) alternating with unfavorable (40 degrees C/80% RH) conditions for sporulation. In this case, fewer conidia were produced compared with cadavers that were incubated under the favorable conditions for an equal period cumulatively but were not periodically exposed to unfavorable conditions. However, this reduced sporulation observed with the fluctuating condition was not observed when cadavers were similarly incubated under favorable/unfavorable conditions of temperature but were not periodically exposed to the low RH condition. This result implies that sporulation is a dynamic process, dependent not only on periodic exposure to favorable RH but also on the interrelation of this with low RH. Associated tests and the monitoring of changes in cadaver weights imply that the mechanism driving the reduced sporulation under fluctuating RH is the net water balance of cadavers, i.e. the cumulative ability of the fungus/cadaver to adsorb water necessary for sporulation at high

  15. Epidemiologic Studies of Exercise and Cardiovascular Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoye, Henry J.

    1977-01-01

    A physically more active life, while not being related to atherosclerosis, could enable some individuals to live longer with atherosclerosis before dying from or showing symptoms of coronary heart disease. (MJB)

  16. A retrospective study of disease in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Garner, M M

    2013-05-01

    This report reviews diseases of 1546 elasmobranchs representing at least 60 species submitted to Northwest ZooPath from 1994 to 2010. Cownose rays (Rhinoptera bonasus) (78), southern rays (Dasyatis americana) (75), dusky smooth-hounds (Mustelus canis) (74), bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo) (66), and bamboo sharks (Hemiscylliidae) (56) were the most commonly submitted species. Infectious/inflammatory disease was most common (33.5%) followed by nutritional (11.9%, mostly emaciation), traumatic (11.3%), cardiovascular (5.5%, mostly shock), and toxin-associated disease (3.7%). Bacterial infections (518/1546, 15%) included sepsis (136/518, 26%), dermatitis (7%), branchitis (6%), and enteritis (4%). Fungal infections (10/1546, 0.6%) included dermatitis (30%), hepatitis (30%), and branchitis (20%). Viral or suspected viral infections or disease processes (15/1546, 1%) included papillomatosis (47%), herpesvirus (20%), and adenovirus (7%). Parasitic infections (137/1546, 9%) included nematodiasis (36/137, 26%), ciliate infections (23%), trematodiasis (20%), coccidiosis (6%), myxozoanosis (5%), amoebiasis (4%), cestodiasis (1%), and flagellate infections (1%). Inflammation of unknown cause (401/1546, 26%) included enteritis (55/401, 14%), branchitis (9%), encephalitis (9%), and dermatitis (7%). Traumatic diseases (174/1546, 11.3%) included skin trauma (103/174, 60%), stress/maladaptation (9%), and gut trauma (7%). Toxicoses (57/1546, 4%) included toxic gill disease (16/57, 26%), gas bubble disease (19%), fenbendazole (7%), ammonia (7%), chlorine (5%), and chloramine (3%). Species trends included visceral nematodiasis in black-nosed sharks (Carcharhinus acronotus) (55%); sepsis in dusky smooth-hounds (41%), blue-spotted stingrays (36%), southern rays (36%), and wobeggong sharks (Orectolobus spp) (69%); emaciation in bamboo (33%) and bonnethead (32%) sharks and freshwater stingrays (Potamotrygon motoro) (32%); and trauma in bonnethead sharks (30%). PMID:23528944

  17. Une spondylodiscite tuberculeuse chez une transplantée rénale compliquée d’une mycose systémique

    PubMed Central

    Haddiya, Intissar; El Housni, Siham; El Harraqui, Ryme; Rhou, Hakima; Benamar, Loubna; Eziatouni, Fatima; Ouzeddoun, Naima; Bayahia, Rabia

    2014-01-01

    En transplantation, les complications infectieuses sont fréquentes et de diagnostic souvent délicat. Elles peuvent coexister chez le transplanté rénal rendant leur diagnostic encore plus difficile. Le but de ce cas clinique est de discuter les difficultés diagnostiques et de surveillance de deux types de pathologies assez fréquentes chez le transplanté rénal, qui sont la tuberculose et la mycose, à travers l’observation clinique d’une patiente de 24 ans transplantée rénale qui présente une spondylodiscite tuberculeuse et qui développe secondairement une septicémie à Candida non albicans à point de départ urinaire dont le seul point d’appel est la fièvre post opératoire. PMID:25667684

  18. Mechanistic and therapeutic insights gained from studying rare skeletal diseases.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Laura L; Warman, Matthew L

    2015-07-01

    Rare bone diseases account for 5% of all birth defects and can cause significant morbidity throughout patients' lives. Significant progress is being made to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these diseases. This paper summarizes presentation highlights of a workshop on Rare Skeletal Diseases convened to explore how the study of rare diseases has influenced the field's understanding of bone anabolism and catabolism and directed the search for new therapies benefiting patients with rare conditions as well as patients with common skeletal disorders.

  19. Genetic studies of Unverricht-Luendborg disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lafreniere, R.G.; Dube, M.P.; Rouleau, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    Unverricht-Luendborg disease (ULD) is a progressive myoclonus epilepsy with an age of onset between 6 and 13 years, myoclonic jerks that progressively worsen, and mental deterioration. ULD shows an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The ULD gene has been genetically linked to 21q22.3, and more recently estimated to lie within 0.3 cM of the markers PFKL, D21S25, and D21S154, based on linkage disequilibrium. We have previously identified eight families affected with ULD and shown linkage to 21q22.3. In our efforts to identify the metabolic basis of the disease, we have identified several other families with ULD and are testing them for linkage to 21q22.3 We are also constructing a cosmid and YAC contig of the candidate EPM1 region in 21q22.3 and are in the process of identifying candidate genes therefrom.

  20. Mindfulness meditation, anxiety reduction, and heart disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tacón, Anna M; McComb, Jacalyn; Caldera, Yvonne; Randolph, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death among Americans each year, yet the misperception still exists that cardiovascular disease is not a serious health problem for women. Evidence indicates that anxiety contributes to the development of heart disease. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of Kabat-Zinn's mindfulness-based stress reduction program to reduce anxiety in women with heart disease. Anxiety, emotional control, coping styles, and health locus of control were compared in a treatment and control group of women with heart disease. Post-intervention analyses provide initial support for beneficial effects of this program.

  1. Patterns of skin disease in a sample of the federal prison population: a retrospective chart review

    PubMed Central

    Gavigan, Geneviève; McEvoy, Alana; Walker, James

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dermatology in vulnerable populations is under-researched. Our objective was to analyze the most commonly referred skin diseases affecting the Correctional Service Canada inmates in Ontario. Methods: An observational, cross-sectional, retrospective chart review of inmate patients seen from 2008 until 2013 was performed. Two groups of patients were included in the analysis: those assessed in-person, and those evaluated by e-consult. Results: In the in-person patient group, the 3 most common diagnoses were acne, psoriasis and other superficial mycoses. For the e-consult group, the 3 most frequent diagnoses were acne, psoriasis and rosacea. There was a clear bias toward more inmates being seen in-person where the service was provided (Collins Bay Institution) than from other correctional institutions in Eastern Ontario. Interpretation: Most of the skin diseases that affected the incarcerated population studied were common afflictions, similar to those affecting the general population, which is in agreement with other studies. Future studies investigating skin diseases in male and female inmates across Canada would bestow more generalizable data. PMID:27398381

  2. Prader-Willi Disease: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbus, William R., III

    A case study focuses on the characteristics and physical management of a 15-year-old with Prader-Willi Syndrome, a birth defect associated with hypotonia, insatiable appetite, hypogonadism, central nervous system dysfunction, and abnormal growth and development . A literature review addresses studies dealing with behavior modification of obesity…

  3. Biological Containment Facility for Studying Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuehne, Ralph W.

    1973-01-01

    To effectively characterize newly recognized viruses (Marburg, Lassa, etc.) and to study other highly virulent infections for which no effective prophylaxis or therapy exists, special containment facilities must be utilized and conventional techniques modified to minimize risk to laboratory personnel. This paper describes a laboratory suite for such studies, contained within a larger research facility; two separate biological safety cabinet systems, animal rooms support laboratories, change room facilities, shower, air lock, and other safety features are contained in the area. Details of design, construction, airflows, and equipment are described in addition to a discussion of operation, techniques, and modification of laboratory equipment utilized in actual studies. Images PMID:4751785

  4. Generating Transgenic Mouse Models for Studying Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Ju, Josephine M; Marietta, Eric V; Murray, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of current animal models for studying celiac disease, with a focus on generating HLA transgenic mouse models. Human Leukocyte Antigen class II molecules have been a particular target for transgenic mice due to their tight association with celiac disease, and a number of murine models have been developed which had the endogenous MHC class II genes replaced with insertions of disease susceptible HLA class II alleles DQ2 or DQ8. Additionally, transgenic mice that overexpress interleukin-15 (IL-15), a key player in the inflammatory cascade that leads to celiac disease, have also been generated to model a state of chronic inflammation. To explore the contribution of specific bacteria in gluten-sensitive enteropathy, the nude mouse and rat models have been studied in germ-free facilities. These reductionist mouse models allow us to address single factors thought to have crucial roles in celiac disease. No single model has incorporated all of the multiple factors that make up celiac disease. Rather, these mouse models can allow the functional interrogation of specific components of the many stages of, and contributions to, the pathogenic mechanisms that will lead to gluten-dependent enteropathy. Overall, the tools for animal studies in celiac disease are many and varied, and provide ample space for further creativity as well as to characterize the complete and complex pathogenesis of celiac disease.

  5. Cajal's contributions to the study of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    García-Marín, Virginia; García-López, Pablo; Freire, Miguel

    2007-09-01

    Last year 2006, we commemorated two important events in the history of Neuroscience. One hundred years ago, on November 3, Alois Alzheimer (1864-1915) presented the first case of a patient with symptoms of a disease that later would be called Alzheimer's disease. One month later, on December 10, Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934) and Camilo Golgi (1843-1926) received the Nobel Prize "in recognition of their work on the structure of the Nervous System". These facts seem not to be related, but working in the Museum Cajal we found 37 histological preparations of material from patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, revealing that Cajal also studied this disease. This paper deals with Cajal's contribution to the study of Alzheimer's disease and it is fully illustrated by original pictures of Cajal's slides preserved in the Cajal Museum, Madrid.

  6. Disability Weights Measurement for 228 Causes of Disease in the Korean Burden of Disease Study 2012

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Disability weight for each disease plays a key role in combining years lived with disability and years of life lost in disability adjusted life year. For the Korean Burden of Disease 2012 study, we have conducted a re-estimation of disability weights for causes of disease by adapting the methodology of a recent Global Burden of Disease study. Our study was conducted through a self-administered web-based survey using a paired comparison (PC) as the main valuation method. A total of 496 physicians and medical college students who were attending in third or fourth grade of a regular course conducted the survey. We applied a probit regression on the PC data and computed the predicted probabilities of each cause of disease from the coefficient estimates of the probit regression. We used 'being dead (1)' and 'full health (0)' as anchor points to rescale the predicted probability of each cause of disease on a scale of 0 to 1. By this method, disability weights for a total of 228 causes of disease were estimated. There was a fairly high correlation between the disability weights of overlapping causes of disease from this study and a previous South Korean study despite the differences in valuation methods and time periods. In conclusion, we have shown that disability weights can be estimated based on a PC by including 'full health' and 'being dead' as anchor points without resorting to a person trade-off. Through developments in the methodology of disability weights estimation from this study, disability weights can be easily estimated and continuously revised. PMID:27775250

  7. Genome-wide association studies and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Bowcock, Anne M

    2010-01-01

    The identification of genetic variants predisposing to complex diseases and phenotypes represent a challenge for geneticists in the early part of the 21st century. These are not simple Mendelian disorders caused by single mutations, such as cystic fibrosis or Huntington's disease, but common diseases that are usually polygenic in origin. The predisposing genes can be susceptibility factors or protective factors. One example of such a complex disease is the inflammatory skin disease psoriasis. However, another example could be protection from an infectious disease. Both of these phenotypes are due in part to the presence of low-risk variants in the host. Moreover, all of these complex phenotypes require environmental triggers as well and, in the case of infectious diseases, these are pathogens. In the case of other common diseases such as cardiovascular disease the triggers are often lifestyle-related issues such as diet or exercise. Genome-wide association studies are now identifying some of these genetic susceptibility factors. PMID:20370638

  8. Ten-Year Study of a Wilson's Disease Dysarthric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Linda Susan; Parnell, Martha M.

    1987-01-01

    The 10-year longitudinal case study describes the history, speech therapy program, and treatment results for an adult male with Wilson's disease, a genetically based metabolic progressive neurological disorder which includes severe speech problems. (DB)

  9. Functional Analysis of the Human Genome:. Study of Genetic Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-04-01

    I will divide my remarks into 3 parts. First, I will give a brief summary of the Human Genome Project. Second, I will describe our work on human chromosome 7 to illustrate how we could contribute to the Project and disease research. Third, I would like to bring across the argument that study of genetic disease is an integral component of the Human Genome Project. In particular, I will use cystic fibrosis as an example to elaborate why I consider disease study is a part of functional genomics.

  10. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDIES OF RENAL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Latta, Harrison

    1960-01-01

    The nephrotic syndrome, glomerulonephritis, disseminated lupus erythematosus and the Fanconi syndrome show characteristic changes with electron microscopy. Experimental studies of animals were carried out to determine the significance of such changes by observing reactions that occur under carefully controlled conditions. A lesion with collagen deposition that was found in the centrolobular region of glomeruli sheds new light on the function of this region. This evidence must be considered in developing an understanding of how the production of urine is controlled. Fluid-filled compartments and various bodies associated with the ultrastructure of tubule cells can be produced under conditions which suggest that these structures play a role in tubular resorption. ImagesFigure 1, 2.Figure 3.Figure 4, 5.Figure 6, 7.Figure 8, 9.Figure 10.Figure 11, 12.Figure 13, 14.Figure 15, 16.Figure 17. PMID:13759386

  11. Coronary artery disease in patients with cerebrovascular disease: a prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Rokey, R.; Rolak, L.A.; Harati, Y.; Kutka, N.; Verani, M.S.

    1984-07-01

    Coronary artery disease is the cause of death in most patients who have transient ischemic attacks or stroke. Evaluation for this condition is not routinely performed in such patients, and no prospective studies have been reported. We prospectively examined 50 consecutive patients with transient ischemic attacks or mild stroke to determine the prevalence and importance of coronary artery disease. All patients were examined by a cardiologist and underwent both exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and exercise radionuclide ventriculography. Sixteen patients were suspected to have coronary artery disease on the basis of clinical evaluation. In 15 of these the was confirmed by the nuclear scans. The remaining 34 patients had no clinical evidence of heart disease, yet 14 had abnormal cardiac scans. Twenty of 22 patients with abnormal scans who underwent cardiac catheterization had significant coronary artery disease or a cardiomyopathy. The discovery of heart disease altered clinical management in 13 patients. Overall, 29 of 50 patients had significant coronary artery disease, compared with a 7% prevalence of the condition in other patients of similar age at the same institution.

  12. A Comprehensive Prospective Clinical Study of Hydatid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Ankit; Hussain, Akhlak

    2014-01-01

    The actual prevalence of hydatid disease in northern part of India is found more than usually interpreted. The present study has been done on 25 patients suffering from hydatid disease of various sites and treated during June 2009 to November 2011 at JLN Medical College and Hospital, Ajmer, with the aim of studying the clinical manifestations of hydatid disease of different sites and/or organ system and of analysing the morbidity and mortality of hydatid disease. The age, sex, h/o dog contact, duration of hospital stay, clinical presentation, treatment advised, findings and difficulties encountered during operation, and postoperative management of patients as well as morbidity and mortality were recorded and analysed. We observed that the mean age was 40 years. The sex incidence revealed female preponderance in the study (M : F: 1 : 2). Duration of illness in the present study varied from 1 month to 6 years in case of liver hydatid disease. Majority of patients were from rural areas (21) and the remaining (4) from urban areas. Swelling was the most common presenting feature. Incidence of hydatid disease at unusual sites in India is higher than in other parts of the world. PMID:24734188

  13. Insights into kidney diseases from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have considerably improved our understanding of the genetic basis of kidney function and disease. Population-based studies, used to investigate traits that define chronic kidney disease (CKD), have identified >50 genomic regions in which common genetic variants associate with estimated glomerular filtration rate or urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Case-control studies, used to study specific CKD aetiologies, have yielded risk loci for specific kidney diseases such as IgA nephropathy and membranous nephropathy. In this Review, we summarize important findings from GWAS and clinical and experimental follow-up studies. We also compare risk allele frequency, effect sizes, and specificity in GWAS of CKD-defining traits and GWAS of specific CKD aetiologies and the implications for study design. Genomic regions identified in GWAS of CKD-defining traits can contain causal genes for monogenic kidney diseases. Population-based research on kidney function traits can therefore generate insights into more severe forms of kidney diseases. Experimental follow-up studies have begun to identify causal genes and variants, which are potential therapeutic targets, and suggest mechanisms underlying the high allele frequency of causal variants. GWAS are thus a useful approach to advance knowledge in nephrology.

  14. Study of Hepatic Osteodystrophy in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karoli, Yogesh; Fatima, Jalees; Manhar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic Liver Disease (CLD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It involves haemodynamic and metabolic complications. Hepatic Osteodystrophy is a metabolic bone disease that may occur in individuals with chronic liver disease. It can significantly affect morbidity and quality of life of these patients. Fractures are also associated with an excess mortality. It has been an under recognized and inadequately studied complication among Indian population. An early diagnosis is essential to correct reversible risk factors which predispose to bone mass loss. Aim To assess the prevalence of metabolic bone disease and identify the risk factors associated with hepatic osteodystrophy in patients with cirrhosis. Materials and Methods This was an observational, cross-sectional, hospital based study conducted at a medical college hospital. All patients more than 20-year-old, diagnosed with chronic liver disease/Cirrhosis were enrolled. They were subjected to haematological, biochemical investigations, evaluation of Vitamin D and other hormonal parameters. Bone Mineral Density (BMD) was estimated by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA). Results A total of 72 patients with mean age 50.04±11.24 years were included in the study. Amongst causes of chronic liver disease were alcoholic liver disease 22 (30.6%), CLD due to hepatitis B 24 (33.3%) and chronic hepatitis C 26 (36.1%). Twenty one (29.2%) patients had normal BMD while 51 (70.8%) had a low BMD. Out of these 51 patients, 36 (70.6%) were diagnosed of osteopenia and 15 (29.4%) others were found to have osteoporosis. Vitamin D levels and severity of liver disease had correlation with low BMD. Conclusion Low BMD is highly prevalent in patients with chronic liver disease of variable aetiologies. We advocate more randomised and prospective studies to be conducted on homogeneous groups with chronic liver disease in its various stages. In view of numerous therapeutic options available both for liver

  15. The study of parasite sharing for surveillance of zoonotic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Maxwell J.; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Davies, T. Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    Determining the factors that influence the transmission of parasites among hosts is important for directing surveillance of animal parasites before they successfully emerge in humans, and increasing the efficacy of programs for the control and management of zoonotic diseases. Here we present a review of recent advances in the study of parasite sharing, wildlife ecology, and epidemiology that could be extended and incorporated into proactive surveillance frameworks for multi-host infectious diseases. These methods reflect emerging interdisciplinary techniques with significant promise for the identification of future zoonotic parasites and unknown reservoirs of current zoonoses, strategies for the reduction of parasite prevalence and transmission among hosts, and decreasing the burden of infectious diseases.

  16. Study on Assessment of Renal Function in Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nupur; Paria, Baishakhi; Sarkar, Sujoy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Renal dysfunction is common in chronic liver disease. The cause of this renal dysfunction is either multi-organ involvement in acute conditions or secondary to advanced liver disease. Objectives: The study was undertaken to assess the renal function in chronic liver diseases and find out the association of alteration of renal function with gradation of liver disease. (assessed by child-pugh criteria) and to find out the association of alteration of renal function among the cases of chronic liver disease of different aetiology. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, observational study was undertaken in Department of General Medicine, Calcutta National Medical College & Hospital, Kolkata during March 2012 to July 2013 with 50 admitted patients of chronic liver disease after considering the exclusion criteria. The patients were interviewed with a pre-designed and pre-tested schedule, examined clinically, followed by some laboratory investigations relevant to diagnose the aetiology of chronic liver disease, and to assess the severity of liver and renal dysfunction. Data was analysed by standard statistical method. Results: Eighty six percent of the patients were male and the mean age of study population was 43.58 y, 68% patients suffered from alcoholic liver disease, followed by 14% patients had chronic Hepatitis-B, 10% patients developed acute kidney injury, 20% had hepato renal syndrome and 14% had IgA deposition. The distribution of serum urea and creatinine across the categories of Child Pugh classification tested by Mann-Whitney test and the distribution was statistically significant. Conclusion: The present study has found significant association between severity of liver dysfunction and certain parameters of renal dysfunction. PMID:25954647

  17. 1H-MRSI applied to study Huntington's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, A. O.

    2000-10-01

    In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectrocopy (MRS) was applied to study Huntington's disease. Two solvent-suppressed and single-voxel MRS methods were used: PRESS and STEAM. We applied these popular MRS sequences to Huntington's disease patients (HD) and healthy volunteers (HV). We also compared our spectra between HD and HV as well the these two modalities. Spectra results are reported for HD and HV for both MRS schemes.

  18. Particulate matter and heart disease: Evidence from epidemiological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Annette . E-mail: peters@gsf.de

    2005-09-01

    The association between particulate matter and heart disease was noted in the mid-nineties of last century when the epidemiological evidence for an association between air pollution and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular disease accumulated and first hypotheses regarding the pathomechanism were formulated. Nowadays, epidemiological studies have demonstrated coherent associations between daily changes in concentrations of ambient particles and cardiovascular disease mortality, hospital admission, disease exacerbation in patients with cardiovascular disease and early physiological responses in healthy individuals consistent with a risk factor profile deterioration. In addition, evidence was found that annual average PM{sub 2.5} exposures are associated with increased risks for mortality caused by ischemic heart disease and dysrhythmia. Thereby, evidence is suggesting not only a short-term exacerbation of cardiovascular disease by ambient particle concentrations but also a potential role of particles in defining patients' vulnerability to acute coronary events. While this concept is consistent with the current understanding of the factors defining patients' vulnerability, the mechanisms and the time-scales on which the particle-induced vulnerability might operate are unknown.

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease Is Often Unrecognized among Patients with Coronary Heart Disease: The REGARDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, William M.; Newsome, Britt B.; McClure, Leslie A.; Cushman, Mary; Howard, George; Audhya, Paul; Abramson, Jerome L.; Warnock, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with kidney disease are at increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and CHD is associated with an increased prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Awareness of CKD may potentially influence diagnostic decisions, life-style changes and pharmacologic interventions targeted at modifiable CHD risk factors. We describe here the degree to which persons with CHD are aware of their CKD. Methods The Reasons for Geographical and Racial Difference in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study, a population-based sample of US residents aged 45 and older. We included in our analyses 28,112 REGARDS participants recruited as of June 2007. We estimated GFR (eGFR) using the MDRD equation, defined CKD as a GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and ascertained awareness of chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease through self-report. We used the odds ratio to compare the association between awareness of kidney disease, as measured by GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, among individuals with and without self-reported CHD by both the presence of CKD and the severity of impaired kidney function. Results Coronary heart disease was reported by 3,803 (14.1%) of subjects, and 11.3% of subjects had CKD by eGFR. Among all individuals with a GFR <60 ml/min/ 1.73 m2, 9.6% reported having been told by a physician that they had kidney disease. Among those with CHD and CKD, 5.0% were aware of their CKD compared to 2.0% in those without CHD [OR (95% CI) = 2.57 (2.08, 3.28)]. This difference persisted after controlling for the level of kidney function [aOR (95% CI) = 1.87 (1.43, 2.41)]. Conclusion There was a high prevalence of CKD and a low prevalence of awareness of kidney disease among older adults in the US population with or without coronary heart disease. These findings support recent recommendations that patients with cardiovascular disease be systematically screened for and educated about CKD. PMID:18663284

  20. Experiences of Being Heterozygous for Fabry Disease: a Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    von der Lippe, Charlotte; Frich, Jan C; Harris, Anna; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the experiences of women with Fabry disease. The aim of this study was to explore women's experiences of being heterozygous for Fabry disease. We used an explorative qualitative study design and selected ten Norwegian women who were known heterozygous for Fabry disease to participate. We conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews and analyzed the interviews using inductive thematic analysis. We found that learning about one's heterozygous status may be devastating for some. However, for most of the participants, heterozygous status, as well as doctors' acceptance of symptoms in women heterozygous for Fabry disease, provided an explanation and relief. Although many women did not consider themselves ill, they wished to be acknowledged as more than "just carriers." The participants were grateful for enzyme replacement therapy, although it had its burdens regarding time, planning, and absences from school or work. Women with Fabry disease felt that the lack of knowledge among healthcare professionals about Fabry disease was frustrating and worrisome. These findings suggest that healthcare professionals should acknowledge the different ways women react to their diagnosis, and be aware of the personal costs of receiving treatment. PMID:26948256

  1. Experiences of Being Heterozygous for Fabry Disease: a Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    von der Lippe, Charlotte; Frich, Jan C; Harris, Anna; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the experiences of women with Fabry disease. The aim of this study was to explore women's experiences of being heterozygous for Fabry disease. We used an explorative qualitative study design and selected ten Norwegian women who were known heterozygous for Fabry disease to participate. We conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews and analyzed the interviews using inductive thematic analysis. We found that learning about one's heterozygous status may be devastating for some. However, for most of the participants, heterozygous status, as well as doctors' acceptance of symptoms in women heterozygous for Fabry disease, provided an explanation and relief. Although many women did not consider themselves ill, they wished to be acknowledged as more than "just carriers." The participants were grateful for enzyme replacement therapy, although it had its burdens regarding time, planning, and absences from school or work. Women with Fabry disease felt that the lack of knowledge among healthcare professionals about Fabry disease was frustrating and worrisome. These findings suggest that healthcare professionals should acknowledge the different ways women react to their diagnosis, and be aware of the personal costs of receiving treatment.

  2. Chronic liver disease in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Kudva, M V; Zawawi, M M

    1990-08-01

    This study was undertaken to analyse the clinical spectrum of chronic liver disease (cirrhosis, and others with portal hypertension) in Kuala Lumpur. Eighty patients were diagnosed over a 6-year period. Twenty-two had biopsy proven cirrhosis while 58 others had portal hypertension with clinical and biochemical evidence of chronic liver disease. The commonest aetiology was alcohol (36%), followed by the idiopathic variety and hepatitis B. The male to female ratio was 4.4:1. Indians had a high prevalence of alcohol-associated chronic liver disease. Overall, ascites was the commonest presentation. Eight patients presented with hepatocellular carcinoma. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis was diagnosed in 13% of patients undergoing abdominal paracentesis. Gallstones were detected in 37% of patients who underwent ultrasonography. Diabetes mellitus and peptic ulcer disease were noted in 22% and 31% of patients respectively.

  3. [Sexually transmitted diseases in adolescence: study of risk factors].

    PubMed

    Taquette, Stella R; de Vilhena, Marília Mello; de Paula, Mariana Campos

    2004-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are frequent in adolescence and facilitates HIV contamination. The early age limit of the first sexual intercourse, the diversity of partners, the habit of not using condoms and illicit drug abuse are pointed out as risk factors for sexual transmitted disease. We interviewed 356 adolescents who sought medical attendance at the Adolescent Health Study Center of The State University of Rio de Janeiro between August/2001 and July/2002 regarding their sexuality and to identify risk behaviors. Periodical analysis and chi-square tests were performed on the collected data. We observed statistically significant correlations between Sexual transmitted diseases and the variables of: slow learning, alcohol, tobacco and drug abuse, sexual abuse and the habit of not using condoms during sexual intercourse. The results indicate multiple Sexually transmitted disease risk behaviors in adolescence, and the failure to use condoms is the factor which is most possibly influenced by programs run by health workers.

  4. Wilson's disease studied with FDG and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, R.A.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1987-11-01

    Four patients with Wilson's disease and eight normal controls were studied with 2-deoxy-2-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET). The patients had diffusely reduced glucose metabolism in all brain regions evaluated compared with controls, with the exception of the thalamus. The ratio of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in the lenticular nuclei to hemispheres declined from 1.23 (+/- 0.14 SD) in controls to 1.03 (+/- 0.06) (p less than 0.025) in Wilson's disease patients. Compared with Huntington's disease, the PET FDG results in Wilson's disease indicate relatively less focal involvement of the caudate nucleus, more severe focal changes in the lenticular nuclei, and more significant global changes in glucose metabolism.

  5. Cognitive Dysfunction Survey of the Japanese Patients with Moyamoya Disease (COSMO-JAPAN Study): study protocol.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yasushi; Miyamoto, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a cerebrovascular occlusive disease characterized by progressive stenosis or by occlusion at the terminal portion of the bilateral internal carotid arteries. The unusual vascular network (moyamoya vessels) at the base of the brain with this disease as collateral channels is developed in this disease. Social independence because of cognitive impairment has recently been recognized as an important unsolved social issue with adult moyamoya disease. The patients with cognitive impairment have difficulty in proving their status because the standard neuroradiological and neuropsychological methods to define cognitive impairment with moyamoya disease are not determined. These patients with cognitive impairment should be supported by social welfare as psychologically handicapped persons. Thus Cognitive Dysfunction Survey of the Japanese Patients with Moyamoya Disease (COSMO-JAPAN study) is planned. In this study, we want to establish a standard finding of the cognitive impairment in patients with moyamoya disease.

  6. Genome-wide association studies in Alzheimer's disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Tosto, Giuseppe; Reitz, Christiane

    2013-10-01

    Over the past decade, research aiming to disentangle the genetic underpinnings of late-onset Alzheimer's disease has mostly focused on the identification of common variants through genome-wide association studies. The identification of several new susceptibility genes through these efforts has reinforced the importance of amyloid precursor protein and tau metabolism in the cause of the disease and has implicated immune response, inflammation, lipid metabolism, endocytosis/intracellular trafficking, and cell migration in the cause of the disease. Ongoing and future large-scale genome-wide association studies, translational studies, and next-generation whole genome or whole exome sequencing efforts, hold the promise to map the specific causative variants in these genes, to identify several additional risk variants, including rare and structural variants, and to identify novel targets for genetic testing, prevention, and treatment.

  7. A genetic study of Wilson's disease in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Alison J; Durkie, Miranda; Hague, Stephen; McLay, Kirsten; Emmerson, Jennifer; Lo, Christine; Klaffke, Stefanie; Joyce, Christopher J; Dhawan, Anil; Hadzic, Nedim; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Kirk, Richard; Elizabeth Allen, K; Nicholl, David; Wong, Siew; Griffiths, William; Smithson, Sarah; Giffin, Nicola; Taha, Ali; Connolly, Sally; Gillett, Godfrey T; Tanner, Stuart; Bonham, Jim; Sharrack, Basil; Palotie, Aarno; Rattray, Magnus; Dalton, Ann; Bandmann, Oliver

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies have failed to identify mutations in the Wilson's disease gene ATP7B in a significant number of clinically diagnosed cases. This has led to concerns about genetic heterogeneity for this condition but also suggested the presence of unusual mutational mechanisms. We now present our findings in 181 patients from the United Kingdom with clinically and biochemically confirmed Wilson's disease. A total of 116 different ATP7B mutations were detected, 32 of which are novel. The overall mutation detection frequency was 98%. The likelihood of mutations in genes other than ATP7B causing a Wilson's disease phenotype is therefore very low. We report the first cases with Wilson's disease due to segmental uniparental isodisomy as well as three patients with three ATP7B mutations and three families with Wilson's disease in two consecutive generations. We determined the genetic prevalence of Wilson's disease in the United Kingdom by sequencing the entire coding region and adjacent splice sites of ATP7B in 1000 control subjects. The frequency of all single nucleotide variants with in silico evidence of pathogenicity (Class 1 variant) was 0.056 or 0.040 if only those single nucleotide variants that had previously been reported as mutations in patients with Wilson's disease were included in the analysis (Class 2 variant). The frequency of heterozygote, putative or definite disease-associated ATP7B mutations was therefore considerably higher than the previously reported occurrence of 1:90 (or 0.011) for heterozygote ATP7B mutation carriers in the general population (P < 2.2 × 10(-16) for Class 1 variants or P < 5 × 10(-11) for Class 2 variants only). Subsequent exclusion of four Class 2 variants without additional in silico evidence of pathogenicity led to a further reduction of the mutation frequency to 0.024. Using this most conservative approach, the calculated frequency of individuals predicted to carry two mutant pathogenic ATP7B alleles is 1:7026 and thus still

  8. [Morphological study of bile in the diagnosis of biliary diseases].

    PubMed

    Potekhina, Iu P

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study principles of bile structurization in healthy people and patients with various biliary diseases. 160 patients with different biliary diseases and other diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone were examined. Samples of gallbladder bile were taken from corpses of young men, who did not have any diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone. Their diagnoses were confirmed by an ultrasound morphological study. Bile was studied by the cuneate dehydration and viscosimetric methods. The structure of facies of gallbladder bile under conditions of absence of diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone was shown. The facies have a wide convex peripheral zone (a cushion) without any well-defined border. The central part of the facies is amorphous or fine-grained, sometimes with occasional inclusions of larger crystals. Markers of exacerbation of chronic cholecystitis (dendrites in the central zone of bile facies) as well as signs of the presence of a malignant neoplasm touching the bile (large diamond-shaped crystals in the central zone of bile facies where dendrites begin) were discovered. PMID:14556555

  9. Parabiosis for the study of age-related chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Eggel, Alexander; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Summary Modern medicine wields the power to treat large numbers of diseases and injuries most of us would have died from just a hundred years ago. In view of this tremendous achievement, it can seem as if progress has slowed, and we have been unable to impact the most devastating diseases of our time. Chronic diseases of age such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, or Alzheimer’s disease turn out to be of a complexity that may require transformative ideas and paradigms to understand and treat them. Parabiosis, which mimics aspects of the naturally occurring shared blood supply in conjoined twins in humans and certain animals, may just have the power to be such a transformative experimental paradigm. Forgotten and now shunned in many countries, it has contributed to major breakthroughs in tumor biology, endocrinology, and transplantation research in the past century, and a set of new studies in the US and Britain report stunning advances in stem cell biology and tissue regeneration using parabiosis between young and old mice. We review here briefly the history of parabiosis and discuss its utility to study physiological and pathophysiological processes. We argue that parabiosis is a technique that should enjoy wider acceptance and application, and that policies should be revisited especially if one is to study complex age-related, chronic disorders. PMID:24496774

  10. A PubMed-Wide Associational Study of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sintchenko, Vitali; Anthony, Stephen; Phan, Xuan-Hieu; Lin, Frank; Coiera, Enrico W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Computational discovery is playing an ever-greater role in supporting the processes of knowledge synthesis. A significant proportion of the more than 18 million manuscripts indexed in the PubMed database describe infectious disease syndromes and various infectious agents. This study is the first attempt to integrate online repositories of text-based publications and microbial genome databases in order to explore the dynamics of relationships between pathogens and infectious diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein we demonstrate how the knowledge space of infectious diseases can be computationally represented and quantified, and tracked over time. The knowledge space is explored by mapping of the infectious disease literature, looking at dynamics of literature deposition, zooming in from pathogen to genome level and searching for new associations. Syndromic signatures for different pathogens can be created to enable a new and clinically focussed reclassification of the microbial world. Examples of syndrome and pathogen networks illustrate how multilevel network representations of the relationships between infectious syndromes, pathogens and pathogen genomes can illuminate unexpected biological similarities in disease pathogenesis and epidemiology. Conclusions/Significance This new approach based on text and data mining can support the discovery of previously hidden associations between diseases and microbial pathogens, clinically relevant reclassification of pathogenic microorganisms and accelerate the translational research enterprise. PMID:20224767

  11. A Metabolic Study of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalliolia, Eirini; Ottolenghi, Chris; Hindmarsh, Peter; Hill, Nathan R.; Costelloe, Seán J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Positano, Vincenzo; Watt, Hilary C.; Frost, Chris; Björkqvist, Maria; Warner, Thomas T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Huntington’s disease patients have a number of peripheral manifestations suggestive of metabolic and endocrine abnormalities. We, therefore, investigated a number of metabolic factors in a 24-hour study of Huntington’s disease gene carriers (premanifest and moderate stage II/III) and controls. Methods Control (n = 15), premanifest (n = 14) and stage II/III (n = 13) participants were studied with blood sampling over a 24-hour period. A battery of clinical tests including neurological rating and function scales were performed. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose distribution was measured using magnetic resonance imaging. We quantified fasting baseline concentrations of glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoprotein (a), fatty acids, amino acids, lactate and osteokines. Leptin and ghrelin were quantified in fasting samples and after a standardised meal. We assessed glucose, insulin, growth hormone and cortisol concentrations during a prolonged oral glucose tolerance test. Results We found no highly significant differences in carbohydrate, protein or lipid metabolism markers between healthy controls, premanifest and stage II/III Huntington’s disease subjects. For some markers (osteoprotegerin, tyrosine, lysine, phenylalanine and arginine) there is a suggestion (p values between 0.02 and 0.05) that levels are higher in patients with premanifest HD, but not moderate HD. However, given the large number of statistical tests performed interpretation of these findings must be cautious. Conclusions Contrary to previous studies that showed altered levels of metabolic markers in patients with Huntington’s disease, our study did not demonstrate convincing evidence of abnormalities in any of the markers examined. Our analyses were restricted to Huntington’s disease patients not taking neuroleptics, anti-depressants or other medication affecting metabolic pathways. Even with the modest sample sizes studied, the lack of highly significant results

  12. Neuroimaging studies of striatum in cognition part II: Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanganu, Alexandru; Provost, Jean-Sebastien; Monchi, Oury

    2015-01-01

    In recent years a gradual shift in the definition of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been established, from a classical akinetic-rigid movement disorder to a multi-system neurodegenerative disease. While the pathophysiology of PD is complex and goes much beyond the nigro-striatal degeneration, the striatum has been shown to be responsible for many cognitive functions. Patients with PD develop impairments in multiple cognitive domains and the PD model is probably the most extensively studied regarding striatum dysfunction and its influence on cognition. Up to 40% of PD patients present cognitive impairment even in the early stages of disease development. Thus, understanding the key patterns of striatum and connecting regions' influence on cognition will help develop more specific approaches to alleviate cognitive impairment and slow down its decline. This review focuses on the contribution of neuroimaging studies in understanding how striatum impairment affects cognition in PD. PMID:26500512

  13. Microbiological studies of the enterocolitis of Hirschsprung's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Storey, D; Scobie, W G; McGenity, K G

    1990-01-01

    The results of a prospective study of 20 cases of newly diagnosed Hirschsprung's disease (nine of whom developed enterocolitis) and 10 normal controls showed no variations in the bacterial flora (including Clostridium difficile) in the stools of the groups studied. Viral studies showed that rotavirus was present in the stools of seven of the nine cases of enterocolitis during the episode. We suggest that Hirschsprung's enterocolitis may have a complex infective aetiology and that rotavirus plays a part. PMID:2176779

  14. Studying infrared light therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiyan; Zeng, Yuhui; Meng, Qingqiang; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an extensive neurodegenerative disease. It is generally believed that there are some connections between AD and amyloid protein plaques in the brain. AD is a chronic disease that usually starts slowly and gets worse over time. The typical symptoms are memory loss, language disorders, mood swings and behavioral issues. Gradual losses of somatic functions eventually lead patients to death. Currently, the main therapeutic method is pharmacotherapy, which may temporarily reduce symptoms, but has many side effects. No current treatment can reverse AD's deterioration. Infrared (IR) light therapy has been studied in a range of single and multiple irradiation protocols in previous studies and was found beneficial for neuropathology. In our research, we have verified the effect of infrared light on AD through Alzheimer's disease mouse model. This transgenic mouse model is made by co-injecting two vectors encoding mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and mutant presenilin-1 (PSEN1). We designed an experimental apparatus for treating mice, which primarily includes a therapeutic box and a LED array, which emits infrared light. After the treatment, we assessed the effects of infrared light by testing cognitive performance of the mice in Morris water maze. Our results show that infra-red therapy is able to improve cognitive performance in the mouse model. It might provide a novel and safe way to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Prospective study of ultrasonography in chronic pancreatic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, W R; Vallon, A G; Denyer, M E; Vahl, S P; Cotton, P B

    1979-01-01

    Grey-scale ultrasonography was used in 212 unselected patients in whom the presence or absence of pancreatic disease was subsequently confirmed by other means. Ultrasonographic criteria were established in the first 92 patients and by reference to previous experience. The remaining 120 patients were studied prospectively. The accuracy and clinical impact of the ultrasonographic diagnosis were judged alongside a standard clinical assessment. Clinical diagnoses were tentative and inaccurate. Ultrasound failed in three cases; otherwise it detected all the 33 patients with chronic pancreatic disease and correctly distinguished cancer from chronic pancreatitis. The ultrasonographic diagnosis of a normal pancreas was always correct, but four false-positive diagnoses were made in patients subsequently judged to have no pancreatic disease. Ultrasonography gave more accurate or more confident and accurate information than the clinical assessment in 57 of the 98 patients studied as problems in diagnosis. With this degree of accuracy ultrasonography should be the first imaging investigation in patients suspected of suffering from pancreatic disease. In our gastrointestinal unit the combination of grey-scale ultrasonography with techniques designed to outline the duct systems (such as endoscopic pancreatography) provides precise diagnosis and documentation of pancreatic disease. PMID:420999

  16. Transcriptomics study of neurodegenerative disease: emphasis on synaptic dysfunction mechanism in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Karim, Sajjad; Mirza, Zeenat; Ansari, Shakeel A; Rasool, Mahmood; Iqbal, Zafar; Sohrab, Sayed S; Kamal, Mohammad A; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder primarily affecting memory and thinking ability; caused by progressive degeneration and death of nerve cells. In this study, we integrated multiple dataset retrieved from the National Center for Biotechnology Information's Gene Expression Omnibus database, and took a systems-biology approach to compare and distinguish the molecular network based synaptic dysregulation associated with AD in particular and neurodegenerative diseases in general. We first identified 832 differentially expressed genes using cut off P value <0.5 and fold change > 2, followed by gene ontology study to identify genes associated with synapse (n=95) [membrane associated guanylate kinase, 2, amyloid beta precursor protein, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2], synapse part [γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor, γ1], synaptic vesicle [glutamate receptor, ionotropic, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5- methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor 2, synaptoporin], pre- and post-synaptic density [neuronal calcium sensor 1, glutamate receptor, metabotropic 3]. We integrated these data with known pathways using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool and found following synapse associated pathways to be most affected; γ-aminobutyric acid receptor signaling, synaptic long term potentiation/depression, nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2-mediated oxidative stress response, huntington's disease signaling and Reelin signaling in neurons. In conclusion, synaptic dysfunction is tightly associated with the development and progression of neurodegenerative diseases like AD. PMID:25230228

  17. Drosophila tools and assays for the study of human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ugur, Berrak; Chen, Kuchuan; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many of the internal organ systems of Drosophila melanogaster are functionally analogous to those in vertebrates, including humans. Although humans and flies differ greatly in terms of their gross morphological and cellular features, many of the molecular mechanisms that govern development and drive cellular and physiological processes are conserved between both organisms. The morphological differences are deceiving and have led researchers to undervalue the study of invertebrate organs in unraveling pathogenic mechanisms of diseases. In this review and accompanying poster, we highlight the physiological and molecular parallels between fly and human organs that validate the use of Drosophila to study the molecular pathogenesis underlying human diseases. We discuss assays that have been developed in flies to study the function of specific genes in the central nervous system, heart, liver and kidney, and provide examples of the use of these assays to address questions related to human diseases. These assays provide us with simple yet powerful tools to study the pathogenic mechanisms associated with human disease-causing genes. PMID:26935102

  18. Familial Scheuermann disease: a genetic and linkage study.

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, L; Sillence, D

    1992-01-01

    Scheuermann juvenile kyphosis or Scheuermann disease is the most frequent cause of kyphosis in adolescence. However, the natural history and genetic basis is still unknown. Reports of identical radiological changes in monozygotic twins, sib recurrence, and transmission over three generations suggest underlying heritability. In this study, 12 probands were referred to us. Upon radiological examination of the proband's parents and sibs, seven were shown to have familial Scheuermann disease with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Of the remaining five probands, four had chromosomal anomalies. The three largest pedigrees were subjected to linkage analysis with three candidate genes: Duffy, COL1A1, and COL1A2. Linkage of Scheuermann disease was excluded with Duffy (lod score = -2.195 at theta = 0.10) and COL1A2 (lod score = -2.750 at theta = 0.05) in these families. Images PMID:1552543

  19. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  20. Issues affecting minority participation in research studies of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Kathleen A; Ballard, Edna; Nash, Florence; Raiford, Kate; Harrell, Lindy

    1994-01-01

    Despite the need for minority subjects in research studies of Alzheimer disease (AD), the successful involvement of minority patients in such studies has been difficult. This report discusses the many societal, economic, logistical, and attitudinal barriers that have inhibited the participation of minority patients and their families in medical research programs of AD. Special consideration is given to the unique cultural issues that arise when conducting studies involving African-American elderly subjects. Methods are considered for overcoming the barriers to participation gleaned from the national study CERAD (Consortium to Establish a Registry of Alzheimer Disease) and other investigations of AD. Recommendations are made for future research programs targeted on the specific health care needs and concerns of the minority segments of our population.

  1. [Clinical and microbiological study of adult periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Nogueira Moreira, A; Fernández Canigia, L; Furman, C; Chiappe, V; Marcantoni, M; Bianchini, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a microbiological evaluation of sites with and without clinical evidence of moderate and severe periodontitis and their correlation with clinical parameters. A total of 52 disease sites and 10 healthy sites were selected according to clinical criteria. The following clinical indexes were measured for all the sites: plaque index, gingival index, blood on probing, depth on probing and insertion level. Samples of subgingival plaque were collected for culture and for differential counts of microbial morphotypes. In disease sites the most frequently isolated were: Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens (65%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (23%), Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (23%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (10%) and Peptostreptococcus sp. (31%). The aerobic gram-positive microflora was predominant in healthy sites. Significant differences were observed in microbial morphotypes between healthy and disease sites: cocci 18.71% and 78.90%, motile rods 46.12% and 16.70%, total spirochetes 26.48% and 2.80%, respectively. The presence of motile rods, spirochetes and P. intermedia/nigrescens were the parameters with most sensitivity to suspect periodontal disease. There were significant differences in the subgingival microflora between healthy and disease sites in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis. PMID:11594003

  2. [Clinical and microbiological study of adult periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Nogueira Moreira, A; Fernández Canigia, L; Furman, C; Chiappe, V; Marcantoni, M; Bianchini, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a microbiological evaluation of sites with and without clinical evidence of moderate and severe periodontitis and their correlation with clinical parameters. A total of 52 disease sites and 10 healthy sites were selected according to clinical criteria. The following clinical indexes were measured for all the sites: plaque index, gingival index, blood on probing, depth on probing and insertion level. Samples of subgingival plaque were collected for culture and for differential counts of microbial morphotypes. In disease sites the most frequently isolated were: Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens (65%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (23%), Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (23%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (10%) and Peptostreptococcus sp. (31%). The aerobic gram-positive microflora was predominant in healthy sites. Significant differences were observed in microbial morphotypes between healthy and disease sites: cocci 18.71% and 78.90%, motile rods 46.12% and 16.70%, total spirochetes 26.48% and 2.80%, respectively. The presence of motile rods, spirochetes and P. intermedia/nigrescens were the parameters with most sensitivity to suspect periodontal disease. There were significant differences in the subgingival microflora between healthy and disease sites in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis.

  3. Acute arthropathy in patients with rash diseases: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Solange Artimos; Bastos Camacho, Luiz Antonio; Fernandes Bruno, Letícia; de Gusmão, Rodrigo Coimbra; de Medeiros Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Coca Velarde, Luis Guillermo; Mendonça Siqueira, Marilda

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association of acute arthropathy and selected clinical features in patients with acute rash diseases. Serum samples from 1,554 patients were tested for anti-measles, dengue, human parvovirus B19, and rubella virus IgM using enzyme immunoassay. Sera from children, in whom these infections were excluded, were studied for anti-human herpesvirus type 6 IgG antibodies using an indirect immunofluorescence test. Joint complaints occurred in 31.2% of the 862 patients with an etiologic diagnosis and were more frequently seen in adults than in children (OR 8.5). Among the adults, arthropathy prevailed in women compared to men (OR 1.8). Arthropathy was most frequently reported in rubella (41.2%) and in dengue fever cases (41.1%) than in the other rash diseases studied (p < 0.0001). Joint complaints were more frequently seen in patients with fever (OR 1.6) and with five or more days of onset of the disease (OR 1.6), regardless of serological diagnosis. Arthropathy appeared as a frequent condition in rash diseases, typically with low severity and no specific pattern of joint involvement.

  4. CHROMOBLASTOMYCOSIS: A NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    QUEIROZ-TELLES, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromoblastomycosis (CMB) is a chronic fungal infection of the skin and the subcutaneous tissue caused by a transcutaneous traumatic inoculation of a specific group of dematiaceous fungi occurring mainly in tropical and subtropical zones worldwide. If not diagnosed at early stages, patients with CBM require long term therapy with systemic antifungals, sometimes associated with physical methods. Unlike other neglected endemic mycoses, comparative clinical trials have not been performed for this disease. Nowadays, therapy is based on a few open trials and on expert opinion. Itraconazole either as monotherapy or associated with other drugs, or with physical methods, is widely used. Recently, photodynamic therapy has been successfully employed in combination with antifungals in patients presenting with CBM. In the present revision the most used therapeutic options against CBM are reviewed as well as the several factors that may have impact on the patient's outcome. PMID:26465369

  5. CHROMOBLASTOMYCOSIS: A NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Queiroz-Telles, Flavio

    2015-09-01

    Chromoblastomycosis (CMB) is a chronic fungal infection of the skin and the subcutaneous tissue caused by a transcutaneous traumatic inoculation of a specific group of dematiaceous fungi occurring mainly in tropical and subtropical zones worldwide. If not diagnosed at early stages, patients with CBM require long term therapy with systemic antifungals, sometimes associated with physical methods. Unlike other neglected endemic mycoses, comparative clinical trials have not been performed for this disease. Nowadays, therapy is based on a few open trials and on expert opinion. Itraconazole either as monotherapy or associated with other drugs, or with physical methods, is widely used. Recently, photodynamic therapy has been successfully employed in combination with antifungals in patients presenting with CBM. In the present revision the most used therapeutic options against CBM are reviewed as well as the several factors that may have impact on the patient's outcome.

  6. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort Studies in Korea: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Won; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, You Sun; Kim, Joo Sung; Han, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is defined as a chronic and relapsing inflammatory disorder of the intestine. Intestinal inflammation in IBD has been proposed to be attributable to the interplay between microbial, genetic, environmental, and immunological factors. The incidence and prevalence rates of IBD are rapidly increasing apparently in other parts of the world, with dramatic increases especially in East Asia. Generally, cohort studies are useful for estimating the incidence, prevalence, natural course, prognosis, and risk factors of diseases. In particular, cohort studies performed in Western countries have well described the prevalence, risk factors, and natural course of IBD and investigated its genetic pathophysiology. However, the outcomes of IBD cohort studies performed in Korea are not as persuasive as those of Western studies because of the relatively low prevalence of IBD and short follow-up periods of the cohorts in Korea. Despite this critical limitation, members of the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases have demonstrated outstanding results. Some unique features of IBD patients in Korea are well demonstrated, such as thiopurine-induced leukopenia or risks of opportunistic tuberculosis infection in patients receiving tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors. In this review, the present authors summarized the key points of the results of the cohort studies performed in Korea and explored future perspectives. PMID:26130995

  7. Putaminal Diffusivity Correlates With Disease Progression in Parkinson's Disease: Prospective 6-Year Study.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ling-Ling; Ng, Kia-Min; Yeoh, Chooi-Sum; Rumpel, H; Li, Hui-Hua; Tan, Eng-King

    2016-02-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an increasingly used noninvasive imaging tool. However its long-term clinical utility is unclear. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease.We prospectively examined a cohort of 46 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the brain at baseline and 6 years later on a 1.5 Tesla scanner using a standardized protocol. DTI parameters of mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotrophy (FA) were extracted using regions-of-interest (ROIs) analysis from various brain regions.Compared to the baseline scan, MD increased in all brain regions (P < 0.0001). FA increased in the substantia nigra and posterior putamen, but decreased in the frontal white matter (P < 0.0001). Linear regression analysis demonstrated that the MD in the anterior putamen increased 11.6 units (95% CI = [4.71, 18.43]) (P = 0.0003) for every unit increase of United PD Rating Scale (UPDRS).Our 6-year prospective longitudinal study demonstrated increased diffusivity in all brain regions and that in the anterior putamen correlated with disease progression. Serial diffusion data may be useful as an additional objective in vivo biomarker for motor progression in PD.

  8. [Clinical study on development of nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease].

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Atsuyuki

    2004-12-01

    problem, most are still unidentified. STUDY OF MAC LUNG DISEASE TREATMENT: It was known that Mycobacterium kansasii lung disease is healed with a chemotherapy like analog of anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy, already in those days. However, the results of MAC lung disease chemotherapy were extremely poor. We tried to express a physicians experience quantitatively as follows, in 1987. The results of 8 weeks sputum culture on Ogawa egg medium were converted semi-quantitatively to CFU numbers based on "Japanese standard guideline of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inspection". We exhibit the ratio of post-treatment consecutive 6 months culture yield to pre-treatment culture yield as response rate, about 110 pulmonary MAC cases. Through this study, we clarify the followings. The results of chemotherapy do not correlate susceptibility test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Multidrug regimen is more useful. Small extent of lesion is more responsive. Combination with aminoglycoside chemotherapy is more effective. These conclusions were almost same as the ATS guideline of 1990. New drugs such as, new macrolides and new quinolones appeared for pulmonary MAC treatment through the feedback from systemic MAC complicated AIDS treatments from the latter half of 90's. We measured the sensitive strain ratio at 2 mcg/ml of OFLX, CPFX, LVFX about 990 clinical isolates and could expect availability for M. kansasii or M. fortuitum, but these new quinolones are not enough effective for MAC. Also we examined MIC for various antimycobacterial agent by 50 MAC clinical isolates, and we could expect a certain availability of SPFX, GFLX, CPFX, CAM for MAC. The availability of clarithromycin (CAM) has been established through many randomized clinical trials for disseminated MAC complicated AIDS, but for pulmonary MAC, complete cure is still difficult if we use CAM including regimen. We performed surgical treatment for relatively young patients with localized lesions. We carry out the adaptation reference such

  9. Plasma metabolomics in human pulmonary tuberculosis disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Frediani, Jennifer K; Jones, Dean P; Tukvadze, Nestan; Uppal, Karan; Sanikidze, Eka; Kipiani, Maia; Tran, ViLinh T; Hebbar, Gautam; Walker, Douglas I; Kempker, Russell R; Kurani, Shaheen S; Colas, Romain A; Dalli, Jesmond; Tangpricha, Vin; Serhan, Charles N; Blumberg, Henry M; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to characterize metabolites during tuberculosis (TB) disease and identify new pathophysiologic pathways involved in infection as well as biomarkers of TB onset, progression and resolution. Such data may inform development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. Plasma samples from adults with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB disease and their matched, asymptomatic, sputum culture-negative household contacts were analyzed using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to identify metabolites. Statistical and bioinformatics methods were used to select accurate mass/charge (m/z) ions that were significantly different between the two groups at a false discovery rate (FDR) of q<0.05. Two-way hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to identify clusters of ions contributing to separation of cases and controls, and metabolomics databases were used to match these ions to known metabolites. Identity of specific D-series resolvins, glutamate and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-derived trehalose-6-mycolate was confirmed using LC-MS/MS analysis. Over 23,000 metabolites were detected in untargeted metabolomic analysis and 61 metabolites were significantly different between the two groups. HCA revealed 8 metabolite clusters containing metabolites largely upregulated in patients with TB disease, including anti-TB drugs, glutamate, choline derivatives, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived cell wall glycolipids (trehalose-6-mycolate and phosphatidylinositol) and pro-resolving lipid mediators of inflammation, known to stimulate resolution, efferocytosis and microbial killing. The resolvins were confirmed to be RvD1, aspirin-triggered RvD1, and RvD2. This study shows that high-resolution metabolomic analysis can differentiate patients with active TB disease from their asymptomatic household contacts. Specific metabolites upregulated in the plasma of patients with active TB disease, including Mtb-derived glycolipids and resolvins, have potential as biomarkers

  10. Clinicopathological Study of Non-Infectious Erythaematous Papulosquamous Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Muktha; Philipose, Thoppil Reba; Nayarmoole, Umaru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Papulosquamous diseases are characterized by scaly papules and plaques with similar clinical picture which amounts to confusion and hence, a definitive histopathological diagnosis goes a long way in treatment of such diseases. Aim The aim of the study was to study the histomorphology of non-infectious, erythaematous, papulosquamous lesions of skin with clinicopathological correlation. Materials and Methods Skin biopsies from 150 clinically diagnosed/suspected non-infectious erythaematous, papulosquamous skin diseases were received in the Department of Pathology. The specimens obtained were subjected to formalin fixation and paraffin embedding, stained with haematoxylin and eosin and studied. The lesions were classified as psoriasis, lichen planus, lichen nitidus, lichen striatus, pityriasis rosea and pityriasis rubra pilaris and clinicopathological correlation was done. Results Papulosquamous lesions were common in the elderly. Males were commonly affected except in pityriasis rosea. Among the 150 cases studied, 72 cases (48%) were histopathologically confirmed to be papulosquamous lesions. Psoriasis was the most common lesion. Conclusion Key histopathological features and clinicopathological correlation gives a conclusive diagnosis. The importance of specific histomorphological diagnosis lies in distinguishing these lesions as the treatment and prognosis varies widely. PMID:27504295

  11. Circulatory disease mortality in the Massachusetts tuberculosis fluoroscopy cohort study.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark P; Zablotska, Lydia B; Brenner, Alina V; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2016-03-01

    High-dose ionizing radiation is associated with circulatory disease. Risks from lower-dose fractionated exposures, such as from diagnostic radiation procedures, remain unclear. In this study we aimed to ascertain the relationship between fractionated low-to-medium dose radiation exposure and circulatory disease mortality in a cohort of 13,568 tuberculosis patients in Massachusetts, some with fluoroscopy screenings, between 1916 and 1961 and follow-up until the end of 2002. Analysis of mortality was in relation to cumulative thyroid (cerebrovascular) or lung (all other circulatory disease) radiation dose via Poisson regression. Over the full dose range, there was no overall radiation-related excess risk of death from circulatory disease (n = 3221; excess relative risk/Gy -0.023; 95% CI -0.067, 0.028; p = 0.3574). Risk was somewhat elevated in hypertensive heart disease (n = 89; excess relative risk/Gy 0.357; 95% CI -0.043, 1.030, p = 0.0907) and slightly decreased in ischemic heart disease (n = 1950; excess relative risk/Gy -0.077; 95% CI -0.130, -0.012; p = 0.0211). However, under 0.5 Gy, there was a borderline significant increasing trend for all circulatory disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.345; 95% CI -0.032, 0.764; p = 0.0743) and for ischemic heart disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.465; 95% CI, -0.032, 1.034, p = 0.0682). Pneumolobectomy increased radiation-associated risk (excess relative risk/Gy 0.252; 95% CI 0.024, 0.579). Fractionation of dose did not modify excess risk. In summary, we found no evidence of radiation-associated excess circulatory death risk overall, but there are indications of excess circulatory death risk at lower doses (<0.5 Gy). Although consistent with other radiation-exposed groups, the indications of higher risk at lower doses are unusual and should be confirmed against other data. PMID:26255039

  12. Parkinson's disease and forced exercise: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Qutubuddin, Abu; Reis, Timothy; Alramadhani, Raed; Cifu, David X; Towne, Alan; Carne, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The concept of forced exercise has drawn attention for the treatment of Parkinson's disease symptoms with anecdotal reports of success. This study sought to ascertain any significant effect of forced exercise using a motorized stationary bicycle when compared to controls on Parkinson's disease symptoms in a blinded, randomized, and controlled setting. Setting. Parkinson's disease outpatient clinic, Veterans Administration Medical Center. Method. We assessed 23 patients (13 experimental and 10 controls) on a number of standard Parkinson's measures at baseline, after participation in eight weeks of twice weekly forced exercise or eight weeks of conventional clinic care, and then after a three-month period had elapsed. Dependent measures were UPDRS-III, Berg Balance Scale, finger taping test, and the PDQ-39. Results. Results did not demonstrate any main effect differences between the exercise and control groups on any measure at any point in time. A within subjects effect was demonstrated for the forced exercise group on overall UPDRS-III scores at the three-month end point. No other within group effects were noted. Results suggest that early enthusiasm for forced exercise may need tempering. Limitations of the study are discussed as well as numerous logistical challenges to this type of study.

  13. Homoarginine and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: Results from the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease Study

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Christiane; Kollerits, Barbara; Meinitzer, Andreas; März, Winfried; Ritz, Eberhard; König, Paul; Neyer, Ulrich; Pilz, Stefan; Wanner, Christoph; Kronenberg, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Background Homoarginine is an amino acid derivative mainly synthesized in the kidney. It is suggested to increase nitric oxide availability, enhance endothelial function and to protect against cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate the relation between homoarginine, kidney function and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods We measured plasma homoarginine concentrations in baseline samples of the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease (MMKD) Study, a prospective cohort study of 227 patients with CKD in Europe. Homoarginine concentrations were available in 182 of the baseline samples and in 139 of the prospectively-followed patients. We correlated homoarginine concentrations to parameters of kidney function. The association between homoarginine and progression of CKD was assessed during a follow-up of up to seven years (median 4.45 years, interquartile range 2.54–5.19) using Cox regression analysis. Progression of CKD was defined as doubling of baseline serum creatinine and/or end-stage renal disease. Results Study participants were at baseline on average 47±13 years old and 65% were male. Mean±standard deviation of homoarginine concentrations were 2.5±1.1 µmol/L and concentrations were incrementally lower at lower levels of GFR with mean concentrations of 2.90±1.02 µmol/L (GFR>90 ml/min), 2.64±1.06 µmol/L (GFR 60–90 ml/min), 2.52±1.24 µmol/L (GFR 30–60 ml/min) and 2.05±0.78 µmol/L (GFR<30 ml/min), respectively (p = 0.002). The age- and sex-adjusted risk to reach the renal endpoint was significantly higher by 62% with each decrease by one standard deviation (1.1 µmol/L) of homoarginine (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.16–2.27, p = 0.005). This association was independent of proteinuria (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.11–2.20, p = 0.01), and was slightly attenuated when adjusting for GFR (HR 1.40 (95% CI 0.98–1.98, p = 0.06). Conclusions Homoarginine concentrations are directly correlated with kidney function and are significantly

  14. International Biological Engagement Programs Facilitate Newcastle Disease Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Patti J.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Peterson, Melanie P.; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J.; Swayne, David E.; Suarez, David L.; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2015-01-01

    Infections of poultry species with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), one of the most economically significant and devastating diseases for poultry producers worldwide. Biological engagement programs between the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) of the United States Department of Agriculture and laboratories from Russia, Pakistan, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Indonesia collectively have produced a better understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of the viruses responsible for ND, which is crucial for the control of the disease. The data from Kazakhstan, Russia, and Ukraine identified possible migratory routes for birds that may carry both virulent NDV (vNDV) and NDV of low virulence into Europe. In addition, related NDV strains were isolated from wild birds in Ukraine and Nigeria, and from birds in continental USA, Alaska, Russia, and Japan, identifying wild birds as a possible mechanism of intercontinental spread of NDV of low virulence. More recently, the detection of new sub-genotypes of vNDV suggests that a new, fifth, panzootic of ND has already originated in Southeast Asia, extended to the Middle East, and is now entering into Eastern Europe. Despite expected challenges when multiple independent laboratories interact, many scientists from the collaborating countries have successfully been trained by SEPRL on molecular diagnostics, best laboratory practices, and critical biosecurity protocols, providing our partners the capacity to further train other employes and to identify locally the viruses that cause this OIE listed disease. These and other collaborations with partners in Mexico, Bulgaria, Israel, and Tanzania have allowed SEPRL scientists to engage in field studies, to elucidate more aspects of ND epidemiology in endemic countries, and to understand the challenges that the scientists and field veterinarians in these countries face on a daily basis. Finally, new viral characterization tools

  15. International Biological Engagement Programs Facilitate Newcastle Disease Epidemiological Studies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patti J; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Peterson, Melanie P; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Swayne, David E; Suarez, David L; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-01-01

    Infections of poultry species with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), one of the most economically significant and devastating diseases for poultry producers worldwide. Biological engagement programs between the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) of the United States Department of Agriculture and laboratories from Russia, Pakistan, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Indonesia collectively have produced a better understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of the viruses responsible for ND, which is crucial for the control of the disease. The data from Kazakhstan, Russia, and Ukraine identified possible migratory routes for birds that may carry both virulent NDV (vNDV) and NDV of low virulence into Europe. In addition, related NDV strains were isolated from wild birds in Ukraine and Nigeria, and from birds in continental USA, Alaska, Russia, and Japan, identifying wild birds as a possible mechanism of intercontinental spread of NDV of low virulence. More recently, the detection of new sub-genotypes of vNDV suggests that a new, fifth, panzootic of ND has already originated in Southeast Asia, extended to the Middle East, and is now entering into Eastern Europe. Despite expected challenges when multiple independent laboratories interact, many scientists from the collaborating countries have successfully been trained by SEPRL on molecular diagnostics, best laboratory practices, and critical biosecurity protocols, providing our partners the capacity to further train other employes and to identify locally the viruses that cause this OIE listed disease. These and other collaborations with partners in Mexico, Bulgaria, Israel, and Tanzania have allowed SEPRL scientists to engage in field studies, to elucidate more aspects of ND epidemiology in endemic countries, and to understand the challenges that the scientists and field veterinarians in these countries face on a daily basis. Finally, new viral characterization tools

  16. Cardiovascular disease and use of oral contraceptives. WHO Collaborative Study.

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Considerable evidence from the United Kingdom and North America has shown that oral contraceptive use is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, since little is known about the link between the two in other parts of the world, WHO initiated a hospital-based case-control study in three centres in Mexico, Hong Kong, and the German Democratic Republic. Both cases and controls were asked about their past and current use of contraception as well as details on a number of potential confounding factors. Three main diagnostic categories were studied: venous thromboembolism (VTE) and pulmonary embolism (PE), ischaemic heart disease (IHD), and stroke. An overall relative risk of 2.9 (95% confidence limits, 1.4-6.1) for VTE/PE was found among recent or current users of oral contraceptives. Although this elevated risk is consistent with the results of other studies, the possibility of detection bias cannot be ruled out. The small number of cases (8) of IHD identified in the course of this study greatly limited the conclusions that could be drawn for this disease. Similarly with stroke, the small number of cases limited the conclusions that could be drawn, particularly since it was not possible to distinguish between thrombotic and haemorrhagic stroke. In addition to suggesting an increased risk of VTE/PE, the study pointed out the importance of ensuring an adequate sample size based on newly-diagnosed cases, the need for a coordinating centre to monitor the study closely in each centre and to provide a central review of each case, and the necessity of more specific diagnoses for meaningful interpretation of the data. PMID:2805219

  17. Cold-agglutinin hemolytic diseases, a rheo-optical study.

    PubMed

    Plá, Laura Verónica; Stoltz, Jean François; Valverde, Juana R; Riquelme, Bibiana D

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the strength of red blood cells agglutination, induced by autoantibodies in patients with Cold-Agglutinin Hemolytic Disease (CAHD), and the hemorheological profile (deformability and osmotic fragility) by the utilization of rheo-optical techniques. The strength of the antigen-antibody reaction was approached by the work required to dissociate mechanically red blood cells agglutinates. It is focused on the evaluation of the qualitative adhesiveness of cell approached by the dissociation kinetics carried out in a Couette flow (erythroaggregameter). The analysis was performed by recording the increase of the reflectivity signal as the agglutinates are dissociated by shear into smaller ones. A total of eight patients aged <54 years with recent diagnostic of CAHD detected by positive Direct Anti-globulin Test (DAT) and very low RBC counts at 20 degrees C, were studied. Two parametric values were interesting: the dimensionless energy parameter and the characteristic dissociation time, which showed good correlation with hematological parameters. In conclusion, the dissociation method provides a powerful tool for estimating the qualitative adhesiveness of red blood cells agglutinated by autoantibodies in patients suffering of cold-agglutinin hemolytic disease and it would be very interesting to evaluate the severity of the disease. PMID:18198409

  18. Relevance of serologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Vernier, Gwenola; Sendid, Boualem; Poulain, Daniel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2004-12-01

    The serologic panel for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is rapidly expanding. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannan antibodies (ASCA) have remained the most widely studied markers, but immune reactivity against a new group of bacterial antigens such as I2, OmpC (outer membrane porin C), and flagellin, has been described in Crohn's disease. Several clinical avenues have been explored, such as the usefulness of serologic markers as screening tools for IBD and in accelerating a diagnosis in patients with indeterminate colitis. Another area of interest is disease stratification. Emerging data suggest there is a diversity of qualitative and quantitative responses to environmental antigens that differs among groups of IBD patients and may be associated with different clinical behaviors. As a result, it may be possible to tailor therapy on the basis of serologic responses. Prospective studies are needed before translating this concept into clinical practice. Clustering of IBD patients into more homogeneous subgroups based on antibody responses may help to unravel the pathophysiology of subsets of IBD. PMID:15527678

  19. Rhinorrhea in Parkinson's disease: a consecutive multicenter study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kano, Osamu; Yoshioka, Masayuki; Nagayama, Hiroshi; Hamada, Shinsuke; Maeda, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Kadowaki, Taro; Sengoku, Renpei; Terashi, Hiroo; Hatano, Taku; Nomoto, Nobuatsu; Inoue, Manabu; Shimura, Hideki; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Kaneko, Satoshi; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Baba, Yasuhiko; Kubo, Shin-Ichiro

    2014-08-15

    Recent reports suggest that rhinorrhea, defined as the presence of a runny nose unrelated to respiratory infections, allergies, or sinus problems, occurs more frequently among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) than among healthy controls. We conducted a questionnaire survey in a multicenter study throughout Japan and compared the frequency of rhinorrhea between 231 PD and 187 normal control (NC) subjects. After excluding patients with rhinitis or paranasal sinusitis, a total of 159 PD and 59 NC subjects were included in our analysis. Rhinorrhea occurred more frequently in PD patients than NC subjects (33.3% vs. 11.9%; P=0.01). Among PD patients, rhinorrhea was more common in men than women (P=0.005). Rhinorrhea was not correlated with disease duration, modified Hoehn and Yahr score, disease type (akinesia rigidity vs. tremor dominant), or cardiac sympathetic function (evaluated by (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake). To our knowledge, this is the first multicenter study on the frequency of PD-related rhinorrhea in Asian countries. PMID:24932941

  20. A Polysomnographic Study of Parkinson's Disease Sleep Architecture.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; De Jesus, Sol; Walz, Roger; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Peng-Chen, Zhongxing; Okun, Michael S; Alatriste-Booth, Vanessa; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common nonmotor phenomenon in Parkinson's disease (PD) affecting patient's quality of life. In this study, we examined the association between clinical characteristics with sleep disorders and sleep architecture patterns in a PD cohort. Patients underwent a standardized polysomnography study (PSG) in their "on medication" state. We observed that male gender and disease duration were independently associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Only lower levodopa equivalent dose (LED) was associated with periodic limb movement disorders (PLMD). REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) was more common among older patients, with higher MDS-UPDRS III scores, and LED. None of the investigated variables were associated with the awakenings/arousals (A/A). Sleep efficiency was predicted by amantadine usage and age, while sleep stage 1 was predicted by dopamine agonists and Hoehn & Yahr severity. The use of MAO-B inhibitors and MDS-UPDRS part III were predictors of sleep stages 2 and 3. Age was the only predictor of REM sleep stage and gender for total sleep time. We conclude that sleep disorders and architecture are poorly predictable by clinical PD characteristics and other disease related factors must also be contributing to these sleep disturbances. PMID:26504612

  1. Quantitative thermophoretic study of disease-related protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Wolff , Manuel; Mittag, Judith J.; Herling, Therese W.; Genst, Erwin De; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Braun, Dieter; Buell, Alexander K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. A detailed understanding of the physico-chemical properties of the different aggregated forms of proteins, and of their interactions with other compounds of diagnostic or therapeutic interest, is crucial for devising effective strategies against such diseases. Protein aggregates are situated at the boundary between soluble and insoluble structures, and are challenging to study because classical biophysical techniques, such as scattering, spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, are not well adapted for their study. Here we present a detailed characterization of the thermophoretic behavior of different forms of the protein α-synuclein, whose aggregation is associated with Parkinson’s disease. Thermophoresis is the directed net diffusional flux of molecules and colloidal particles in a temperature gradient. Because of their low volume requirements and rapidity, analytical methods based on this effect have considerable potential for high throughput screening for drug discovery. In this paper we rationalize and describe in quantitative terms the thermophoretic behavior of monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-synuclein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microscale thermophoresis (MST) is a valuable method for screening for ligands and binding partners of even such highly challenging samples as supramolecular protein aggregates. PMID:26984748

  2. A Polysomnographic Study of Parkinson's Disease Sleep Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; De Jesus, Sol; Walz, Roger; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Peng-Chen, Zhongxing; Okun, Michael S.; Alatriste-Booth, Vanessa; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common nonmotor phenomenon in Parkinson's disease (PD) affecting patient's quality of life. In this study, we examined the association between clinical characteristics with sleep disorders and sleep architecture patterns in a PD cohort. Patients underwent a standardized polysomnography study (PSG) in their “on medication” state. We observed that male gender and disease duration were independently associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Only lower levodopa equivalent dose (LED) was associated with periodic limb movement disorders (PLMD). REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) was more common among older patients, with higher MDS-UPDRS III scores, and LED. None of the investigated variables were associated with the awakenings/arousals (A/A). Sleep efficiency was predicted by amantadine usage and age, while sleep stage 1 was predicted by dopamine agonists and Hoehn & Yahr severity. The use of MAO-B inhibitors and MDS-UPDRS part III were predictors of sleep stages 2 and 3. Age was the only predictor of REM sleep stage and gender for total sleep time. We conclude that sleep disorders and architecture are poorly predictable by clinical PD characteristics and other disease related factors must also be contributing to these sleep disturbances. PMID:26504612

  3. Genetic studies in chronic kidney disease: basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Nordfors, Louise; Luttropp, Karin; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Witasp, Anna; Stenvinkel, Peter; Lindholm, Bengt; Schalling, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In spite of extensive research resulting in major advances in renal care including technological improvements of dialysis, the poor outcome of chronic kidney disease patients has only marginally been improved since the 1980s. It has thus become clear that new strategies are needed to move forward. There are now great expectations that increased knowledge about genetic characteristics combined with other biological markers will identify pathophysiological pathways involved in the initiation and progression of renal damage and that this in turn will help define tools for early disease intervention and personalized treatment strategies. Already, new methodologies have made it possible to study the heritable component of many kidney diseases, and it is probable that DNA-based diagnostics will be performed on a regular basis for many conditions in the near future. This article discusses basic genetic concepts and highlights some of the novel approaches available for genome-wide genetic analyses. We hope that it may serve as an introduction to the research field of what we call "nephrogenetics." A second article in this series will focus on the interpretation and evaluation of genetic association studies and how to make use of this information to improve patient care and outcomes.

  4. Optimal Trend Tests for Genetic Association Studies of Heterogeneous Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Chung

    2016-06-09

    The Cochran-Armitage trend test is a standard procedure in genetic association studies. It is a directed test with high power to detect genetic effects that follow the gene-dosage model. In this paper, the author proposes optimal trend tests for genetic association studies of heterogeneous diseases. Monte-Carlo simulations show that the power gain of the optimal trend tests over the conventional Cochran-Armitage trend test is striking when the genetic effects are heterogeneous. The easy-to-use R 3.1.2 software (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria) code is provided. The optimal trend tests are recommended for routine use.

  5. Advances in studies of disease-navigating webs: Sarcoptes scabiei as a case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The discipline of epidemiology is the study of the patterns, causes and effects of health and disease conditions in defined anima populations. It is the key to evidence-based medicine, which is one of the cornerstones of public health. One of the important facets of epidemiology is disease-navigating webs (disease-NW) through which zoonotic and multi-host parasites in general move from one host to another. Epidemiology in this context includes (i) classical epidemiological approaches based on the statistical analysis of disease prevalence and distribution and, more recently, (ii) genetic approaches with approximations of disease-agent population genetics. Both approaches, classical epidemiology and population genetics, are useful for studying disease-NW. However, both have strengths and weaknesses when applied separately, which, unfortunately, is too often current practice. In this paper, we use Sarcoptes scabiei mite epidemiology as a case study to show how important an integrated approach can be in understanding disease-NW and subsequent disease control. PMID:24406101

  6. Genome-wide association studies in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jayanta; Kanetsky, Peter A; Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Schaefer, Franz; Wong, Craig S

    2016-08-01

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) has become an established scientific method that provides an unbiased screen for genetic loci potentially associated with phenotypes of clinical interest, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Thus, GWAS provides opportunities to gain new perspectives regarding the genetic architecture of CKD progression by identifying new candidate genes and targets for intervention. As such, it has become an important arm of translational science providing a complementary line of investigation to identify novel therapeutics to treat CKD. In this review, we describe the method and the challenges of performing GWAS in the pediatric CKD population. We also provide an overview of successful GWAS for kidney disease, and we discuss the established pediatric CKD cohorts in North America and Europe that are poised to identify genetic risk variants associated with CKD progression.

  7. Motor Neuron Diseases Accompanying Spinal Stenosis: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Shin, HyeonJu; Park, Sun Kyung; HaeJin, Suh; Choi, Yun Suk

    2016-03-01

    A 75-year-old man, who was healthy, visited the hospital because of shooting pain and numbness in both lower limbs (right > left). The patient had an L4/5 moderate right foraminal stenosis and right subarticular disc protrusion and received a lumbar epidural block. The patient experienced severe weakness in the right lower limb after 2 days. Lumbar and cervical magnetic resonance images were taken and electromyography and a nerve conduction study were performed to arrive at the diagnosis of a motor neuron disease. The patient expired 4 months later with respiratory failure due to motor neuron disease. This case suggests that any abnormal neurological symptoms that occur after an epidural block should be examined thoroughly via testing and consultations to identify the cause of the symptoms. PMID:27008301

  8. Motor Neuron Diseases Accompanying Spinal Stenosis: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Shin, HyeonJu; Park, Sun Kyung; HaeJin, Suh; Choi, Yun Suk

    2016-03-01

    A 75-year-old man, who was healthy, visited the hospital because of shooting pain and numbness in both lower limbs (right > left). The patient had an L4/5 moderate right foraminal stenosis and right subarticular disc protrusion and received a lumbar epidural block. The patient experienced severe weakness in the right lower limb after 2 days. Lumbar and cervical magnetic resonance images were taken and electromyography and a nerve conduction study were performed to arrive at the diagnosis of a motor neuron disease. The patient expired 4 months later with respiratory failure due to motor neuron disease. This case suggests that any abnormal neurological symptoms that occur after an epidural block should be examined thoroughly via testing and consultations to identify the cause of the symptoms.

  9. Secondary autoimmune diseases occurring after HSCT for an autoimmune disease: a retrospective study of the EBMT Autoimmune Disease Working Party.

    PubMed

    Daikeler, Thomas; Labopin, Myriam; Di Gioia, Massimo; Abinun, Mario; Alexander, Tobias; Miniati, Irene; Gualandi, Francesca; Fassas, Athanasios; Martin, Thierry; Schwarze, Carl Philipp; Wulffraat, Nico; Buch, Maya; Sampol, Antonia; Carreras, Enric; Dubois, Benedicte; Gruhn, Bernd; Güngör, Tayfun; Pohlreich, David; Schuerwegh, Annemie; Snarski, Emilian; Snowden, John; Veys, Paul; Fasth, Anders; Lenhoff, Stig; Messina, Chiara; Voswinkel, Jan; Badoglio, Manuela; Henes, Jörg; Launay, David; Tyndall, Alan; Gluckman, Eliane; Farge, Dominique

    2011-08-11

    To specify the incidence and risk factors for secondary autoimmune diseases (ADs) after HSCT for a primary AD, we retrospectively analyzed AD patients treated by HSCT reported to EBMT from 1995 to 2009 with at least 1 secondary AD (cases) and those without (controls). After autologous HSCT, 29 of 347 patients developed at least 1 secondary AD within 21.9 (0.6-49) months and after allogeneic HSCT, 3 of 16 patients. The observed secondary ADs included: autoimmune hemolytic anemia (n = 3), acquired hemophilia (n = 3), autoimmune thrombocytopenia (n = 3), antiphospholipid syndrome (n = 2), thyroiditis (n = 12), blocking thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (n = 1), Graves disease (n = 2), myasthenia gravis (n = 1), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 2), sarcoidosis (n = 2), vasculitis (n = 1), psoriasis (n = 1), and psoriatic arthritis (n = 1). After autologous HSCT for primary AD, the cumulative incidence of secondary AD was 9.8% ± 2% at 5 years. Lupus erythematosus as primary AD, and antithymocyte globulin use plus CD34(+) graft selection were important risk factors for secondary AD by multivariate analysis. With a median follow-up of 6.2 (0.54-11) years after autologous HSCT, 26 of 29 patients with secondary AD were alive, 2 died during their secondary AD (antiphospholipid syndrome, hemophilia), and 1 death was HSCT-related. This European multicenter study underlines the need for careful management and follow-up for secondary AD after HSCT.

  10. Aortic PWV in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Wimmer, Neil J.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew; Perumal, Kalyani; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Rafey, Mohammed; Rahman, Mahboob; Sheridan, Angela; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Robinson, Nancy A.; Joffe, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Background Aortic PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and has proved useful in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, including the healthy elderly, hypertensives and those with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Little data exist characterizing aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis, and in particular the effect of reduced kidney function on aortic PWV. Methods We performed measurements of aortic PWV in a cross-sectional cohort of participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study to determine factors which predict increased aortic PWV in chronic kidney disease. Results PWV measurements were obtained in 2564 participants. The tertiles of aortic PWV (adjusted for waist circumference) were < 7.7 m/sec, 7.7–10.2 m/sec and > 10.2 m/sec with an overall mean (± S.D.) value of 9.48 ± 3.03 m/sec [95% CI = 9.35–9.61 m/sec]. Multivariable regression identified significant independent positive associations of age, blood glucose concentrations, race, waist circumference, mean arterial blood pressure, gender, and presence of diabetes with aortic PWV and a significant negative association with the level of kidney function. Conclusions The large size of this unique cohort, and the targeted enrollment of chronic kidney disease participants provides an ideal situation to study the role of reduced kidney function as a determinant of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may be a significant component of the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with kidney failure. PMID:20019670

  11. Cohort profile: the Finnish Medication and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) study

    PubMed Central

    Tolppanen, Anna-Maija; Taipale, Heidi; Koponen, Marjaana; Lavikainen, Piia; Tanskanen, Antti; Tiihonen, Jari; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the Medicine use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) study is to investigate the changes in medication and healthcare service use among persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of medications in this group. This is important, because the number of persons with AD is rapidly growing and even though they are a particularly vulnerable patient group, the number of representative, large-scale studies with adequate follow-up time is limited. Participants MEDALZ contains all residents of Finland who received a clinically verified diagnosis of AD between 2005 and 2011 and were community-dwelling at the time of diagnosis (N=70 719). The diagnosis is based on the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCS-ADRDA) and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for Alzheimer's disease. The cohort contains socioeconomic data (education, occupational status and taxable income, 1972–2012) and causes of death (2005–2012), data from the prescription register (1995–2012), the special reimbursement register (1972–2012) and the hospital discharge register (1972–2012). Future updates are planned. The average age was 80.1 years (range 34.5–104.6 years). The majority of cohort (65.2%) was women. Currently, the average length of follow-up after AD diagnosis is 3.1 years and altogether 26 045 (36.8%) persons have died during the follow-up. Findings Altogether 53% of the cohort had used psychotropic drugs within 1 year after AD diagnoses. The initiation rate of for example, benzodiazepines and related drugs and antidepressants began to increase already before AD diagnosis. Future plans We are currently assessing if these, and other commonly used medications are related to adverse events such as death, hip fractures, head injuries and pneumonia. PMID:27412109

  12. Study Provides Insights into Diagnosis, Treatment of Rare Immune Disease: Autoimmmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related Links​ ALPS Unit, Laboratory of Immunology Autoimmune Diseases Immune System Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases National Library of ... Study Provides Insights Into Diagnosis, Treatment of Rare Immune Disease NIH Scientists Report Findings From 20 Years of ...

  13. Insects as models to study the epigenetic basis of disease.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Twyman, Richard M; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetic inheritance refers to changes in gene expression that are heritable across generations but are not caused by changes in the DNA sequence. Many environmental factors are now known to cause epigenetic changes, including the presence of pathogens, parasites, harmful chemicals and other stress factors. There is increasing evidence that transcriptional reprogramming caused by epigenetic modifications can be passed from parents to offspring. Indeed, diseases such as cancer can occur in the offspring due to epigenetically-inherited gene expression profiles induced by stress experienced by the parent. Empirical studies to investigate the role of epigenetics in trans-generational gene regulation and disease require appropriate model organisms. In this review, we argue that selected insects can be used as models for human diseases with an epigenetic component because the underlying molecular mechanisms (DNA methylation, histone acetylation and the expression of microRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved. Insects offer a number of advantages over mammalian models including ethical acceptability, short generation times and the potential to investigate complex interacting parameters such as fecundity, longevity, gender ratio, and resistance to pathogens, parasites and environmental stress.

  14. A controlled, longitudinal study of dementia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Biggins, C A; Boyd, J L; Harrop, F M; Madeley, P; Mindham, R H; Randall, J I; Spokes, E G

    1992-01-01

    Serial assessments of cognition, mood, and disability were carried out at nine month intervals over a 54 month period on a cohort of 87 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and a matched cohort of 50 control subjects. Dementia was diagnosed from data by rigorously applying DSM-III-R criteria. Initially, 6% (5/87) PD patients were demented, compared with none of the 50 control subjects. A further 10 PD patients met the dementia criteria during the follow up period; this was equivalent, with survival analysis, to a cumulative incidence of 19%. With the number of person years of observation as the denominator, the incidence was 47.6/1000 person years of observation. None of the control subjects fulfilled dementia criteria during the follow up period. The patients with PD who became demented during follow up were older at onset of Parkinson's disease than patients who did not become demented, had a longer duration of Parkinson's disease, and were older at inclusion to the study. PMID:1640232

  15. A Cross-Study Transcriptional Analysis of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chalk, Alistair M.; Anderson, Matthew J.; Silburn, Peter A.; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Wells, Christine A.; Mellick, George D.

    2009-01-01

    The study of Parkinson's disease (PD), like other complex neurodegenerative disorders, is limited by access to brain tissue from patients with a confirmed diagnosis. Alternatively the study of peripheral tissues may offer some insight into the molecular basis of disease susceptibility and progression, but this approach still relies on brain tissue to benchmark relevant molecular changes against. Several studies have reported whole-genome expression profiling in post-mortem brain but reported concordance between these analyses is lacking. Here we apply a standardised pathway analysis to seven independent case-control studies, and demonstrate increased concordance between data sets. Moreover data convergence increased when the analysis was limited to the five substantia nigra (SN) data sets; this highlighted the down regulation of dopamine receptor signaling and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling pathways. We also show that case-control comparisons of affected post mortem brain tissue are more likely to reflect terminal cytoarchitectural differences rather than primary pathogenic mechanisms. The implementation of a correction factor for dopaminergic neuronal loss predictably resulted in the loss of significance of the dopamine signaling pathway while axon guidance pathways increased in significance. Interestingly the IGF1 signaling pathway was also over-represented when data from non-SN areas, unaffected or only terminally affected in PD, were considered. Our findings suggest that there is greater concordance in PD whole-genome expression profiling when standardised pathway membership rather than ranked gene list is used for comparison. PMID:19305504

  16. The use of proteomics to study infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    List, E O; Berryman, D E; Bower, B; Sackmann-Sala, L; Gosney, E; Ding, J; Okada, S; Kopchick, J J

    2008-03-01

    Technology surrounding genomics, or the study of an organism's genome and its gene use, has advanced rapidly resulting in an abundance of readily available genomic data. Although genomics is extremely valuable, proteins are ultimately responsible for controlling most aspects of cellular function. The field of proteomics, or the study of the full array of proteins produced by an organism, has become the premier arena for the identification and characterization of proteins. Yet the task of characterizing a proteomic profile is more complex, in part because many unique proteins can be produced by the same gene product and because proteins have more diverse chemical structures making sequencing and identification more difficult. Proteomic profiles of a particular organism, tissue or cell are influenced by a variety of environmental stimuli, including those brought on by infectious disease. The intent of this review is to highlight applications of proteomics used in the study of pathogenesis, etiology and pathology of infectious disorders. While many infectious agents have been the target of proteomic studies, this review will focus on those infectious diseases which rank among the highest in worldwide mortalities, such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, measles, and hepatitis. PMID:18473905

  17. Diarrheal diseases of infancy in Cali, Colombia: study design and summary report on isolated disease agents.

    PubMed

    Newell, K W; Dover, A S; Clemmer, D I; D'Alessandro, A; Duenas, A; Gracián, M; LeBlanc, D R

    1976-01-01

    For public health reasons, it is important that the etiologic agents of early childhood diarrhea be isolated and identified, and that their routes of transmission be defined. This is especially true in tropical and subtropical developing countries, where childhood patterns of exposure to diarrheal disease agents usually differ from those in developed countries, and where diarrheal illness is a frequent harbinger of death among children under five years of age. This artical describes a study designed to identify diarrheal disease agents and transmission patterns in Cali, a large city of western Colombia's fertile Cauca River Valley. The study area, composed of five working-class districts with a total population of some 40,000, appeared to provide an environment fairly similar to those of many other "average" working-class communities in Latin America. Beginning in July 1962, a cohort of 296 children being born in these districts was studied, the period of investigation starting with the date of birth and continuing until each child's second birthday or its premature withdrawal from the study. Weekly home visits were made to establish defecation patterns, feeding practices, and anthropometry. The resulting data were then analyzed in terms of defecation frequencies, occurrence of liquid stools, and the presence of blood, mucus, or pus in the stools. Differences were noted in male and female defecation patterns and in the defecation frequencies of different age groups. Stool specimens for bacteriologic, virologic, and parasitologic examination were collected monthly on a regular basis and weekly when diarrhea occurred. Numerically, viruses were isolated and identified more often than other agents. The most commonly isolated parasite species and viral and bacterial serotypes were G. lamblia (from 222 subjects), echovirus 11 (from 166 subjects), and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli 026:B6 (from 138 subjects). Compared with the findings of several studies in other

  18. Using Genomics to Study Human Biology and Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Ricard M.

    2005-04-06

    The Human Genome Project culminated in April 2003 with the finished DNA sequence of all of the human chromosomes. This book of information, particularly in conjunction with the genome sequences of many other organisms, has already begun to revolutionize the way that biomedical scientists study our species. The identification of essentially all of our genes has provided a template upon which researchers can discover basic processes that govern cells, organs, and the whole organism, and to understand the fundamental causes of the diseases that occur when something goes wrong with a gene or a set of genes. The Genome Project has already made it possible to identify the genes that are defective in more than 1,000 rare inherited diseases, and these discoveries have helped to understand the mechanisms of the more common forms of these disorders. This understanding of primary defects in diseases - which is translated as mutations in genes that encode proteins that serve specific functions - is transforming the way that biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies identify drug targets, and a few notable cases have already had a striking impact on specific diseases. In addition, it has become clear that the differential response to drugs in human populations is heavily influenced by genes, and a whole field called pharmacogenetics has begun to identify these genetic factors. Such knowledge will allow physicians to prescribe drugs targeted to each individual, with the potential to increase efficacy and decrease side-effects. Determining the DNA sequence of the human genome and identifying the genes has been an exciting endeavor, but we are only just beginning to understand the treasures present in all of our DNA. My presentation will briefly describe the road we took to get the sequence, as well as the tools that we are developing to unlock its secrets.

  19. Immunochemical studies in four cases of alpha chain disease

    PubMed Central

    Seligmann, Maxime; Mihaesco, Edith; Hurez, Daniel; Mihaesco, Constantin; Preud'homme, Jean-Louis; Rambaud, Jean-Claude

    1969-01-01

    Studies of a number of properties of the pathological γA-proteins in the first four cases of the recently recognized alpha-chain disease demonstrate that, as in γ-heavy-chain disease, the abnormal protein is devoid of light chains and represents a portion of the α-heavy chain related to the Fc-fragment. In two patients, serum electrophoresis showed a broad abnormal band, whereas in the two others the pathological protein was not noticeable on the electrophoretic pattern. The diagnosis of α-chain disease can be established without purification of the protein by immuno-electrophoresis and gel diffusion experiments using selected antisera to γA and a reference α-chain disease protein. All four proteins belonged to the α1-subclass, displayed electrophoretic heterogeneity, and showed a strong tendency to polymerize. The polymers occurred in vivo and were held together both by disulfide bonds and by strong noncovalent forces. Two of the three purified proteins had a very high carbohydrate content. The abnormal protein was always found in concentrated urines in variable but generally low amounts. It was not detected in parotid saliva but was present in significant amounts in jejunal fluid of all four patients. The α-chain disease protein was shown to be associated with the secretory piece in external secretions of two patients. The clinicopathological features were strikingly similar in the four patients. All patients were affected with a neoplastic and mostly plasmacytic proliferation involving primarily the whole length of the small intestine and the mesenteric nodes and all exhibited a severe malabsorption syndrome. While Israeli authors have emphasized the frequency of this type of abdominal lymphoma in young Arabs and non-Ashkenazi Jews, two of our patients were Kabyles, one a Syrian Arab, and one an Eurasian. Cellular studies showed that the pathological protein was synthesized by the proliferating cells in the lymphoid tissue of the digestive tract and in

  20. The Non-Communicable Disease Burden in Korea: Findings from the 2012 Korean Burden of Disease Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In recognition of Korea's rising burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), we investigated the nation's NCD status and extracted detailed information from the 2012 Korean Burden of Disease study. Consistent with that study, we used disability-adjusted life year (DALY) as a metric. Using national data sources and disability weights specific to the Korean population, we analyzed 116 disaggregated NCDs from the study's four-level disease and injury hierarchy for both sexes and nine age groups. Per 100,000 population, 21,019 DALYs were lost to 116 NCDs. Of those, 13.97% were due to premature death (death prior to the standard life expectancy for a subject's age) and 86.03% to non-fatal health outcomes. Based on traditional statistics, the main causes of health loss were mortality of neoplasms; cardiovascular and circulatory diseases; diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases; and chronic respiratory diseases. When combined with analyses of premature death and non-fatal outcomes, however, a substantially different view emerged: the main causes of health loss were diabetes mellitus, low back pain, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, cirrhosis of the liver, osteoarthritis, asthma, gastritis and duodenitis, and periodontal disease (in that order), collectively causing 49.20% of DALYs. Thus, burden of disease data using DALYs rather than traditional statistics brings a new perspective to characterization of the population's health that provides practical information useful for developing and targeting national NCD control programs to better meet national needs. PMID:27775253

  1. Comparative study of antibodies that are associated with disease progression in HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Tóth, F D; Süsal, C; Ujhelyi, E; Bánhegyi, D; Kiss, J; Daniel, V; Nagy, I; Opelz, G; Füst, G

    1994-06-01

    Two types of antibodies which previously were found to be inversely associated with CD4+ cell counts and which may contribute to the progression of HIV disease were measured in parallel in 55 serum samples of 7 longitudinally tested HIV-infected patients (4 homosexual men, 3 haemophilic men) and in 15 serum samples from 15 patients with advanced AIDS. HIV-infection enhancing antibodies were determined in the presence of near-physiologic human complement concentration using a complement receptor type 2 (CR2) carrying HIV-target cell line. IgG and IgA class autoantibodies directed against human IgG-Fab fragments were measured in specific ELISA assays. In agreement with our previous studies obtained in HIV-seropositive haemophilic patients, significant negative correlations were found between CD4+ cell counts and IgG anti-Fab and IgA anti-Fab antibodies (Spearman correlation coefficient r = -0.587, P < 0.0001; and r = -0.269, P = 0.024, respectively). A significant positive correlation was observed between complement-dependent enhancing antibodies and IgA anti-Fab antibodies (r = 0.408, P = 0.003), whereas the correlation with IgG anti-Fab antibodies was only weak (r = 0.288, P = 0.034). Serum samples with high titres of complement-dependent enhancing antibodies had almost 3 times higher IgA anti-Fab autoantibody activity than sera with low titres (P = 0.0038). Our findings indicate that the two disease markers in HIV disease, enhancing antibodies and autoantibodies directed against the Fab moiety of IgG, are not identical. However, anti-Fab antibodies may contribute to complement-dependent HIV infection enhancement. PMID:7959901

  2. Dry Eye Disease Incidence Associated with Chronic Graft-Host Disease: Nonconcurrent Cohort Study (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Mian, Shahzad I.; De la Parra-Colín, Paola; De Melo-Franco, Rafael; Johnson, Christopher; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with stable or progressive dry eye disease and to determine the true incidence in patients with no prior history of dry eye disease. Methods: A nonconcurrent cohort study at a single institution with 136 patients who had no previous history of dry eye disease before HSCT. Survival analysis was used to estimate dry eye disease incidence. The incidence rate was calculated using life tables as the number of observed dry eye disease cases divided by the person-time at risk accumulated by the cohort. Transition probabilities were calculated from time of transplant to time of diagnosis, and then to last recorded visit. Results: Incidence rate was 0.8 cases of dry eye disease per person-year, and half of the population at risk developed dry eye disease during the first 10 months post transplant. Time to develop dry eye disease was 2.5 months for mild dry eye disease, 9.6 months for moderate dry eye disease, and 13.2 months for severe dry eye disease. In terms of cumulative incidence, 73% of subjects developed dry eye disease (50% mild, 16% moderate, and 7% severe) at the time of diagnosis. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that dry eye disease associated with cGVHD is an extremely frequent event and shows a wide spectrum of severity, with a mild form presenting early and a moderate to severe form presenting later after HSCT. These findings need to be studied further to elucidate if these are two different pathophysiological entities or just different expressions of the same pathology. PMID:27507907

  3. Lithium-induced renal disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Jorkasky, D K; Amsterdam, J D; Oler, J; Braden, G; Alvis, R; Geheb, M; Cox, M

    1988-12-01

    Considerable controversy exists as to whether lithium maintenance therapy is associated with the development of renal insufficiency. In 1980 we initiated a prospective study of renal function in manic-depressive patients beginning lithium therapy. None of the patients had evidence of pre-existing renal disease. Sixty-five patients were entered, and 51 and 18 patients completed 1 and 3 years of follow-up, respectively. Lithium doses were titrated to the lowest level consistent with control of psychiatric symptoms; there were no episodes of overt lithium intoxication. Serum creatinine levels in all patients, and endogenous creatinine clearance in women, remained stable over the course of the study. In contrast, creatinine clearances (mean +/- SEM, ml/min/1.73 m2) in men significantly decreased over both 1 year (110 +/- 4 to 95 +/- 5, n = 21, p = 0.0126) and 3 years (107 +/- 4 to 80 +/- 11, n = 8, p = 0.0385) of evaluation. Although all patients demonstrated a mild reduction in renal concentrating ability after initiation of lithium, the decrease was not progressive over the course of the study. Quantitative urinary protein excretion did not change, and repeated urinalyses did not reveal any evidence of renal disease. Thus, lithium therapy appears to result in modestly reduced rates of glomerular filtration, as measured by endogenous creatinine clearance, in men receiving lithium maintenance therapy for manic-depressive illness. Whether this reduction is progressive and leads to clinically significant renal insufficiency requires further investigation. PMID:3243040

  4. [Orphan diseases and orphan medicines: a Belgian and European study].

    PubMed

    Denis, Alain; Mergaert, Lut; Fostier, Christel; Cleemput, Irina; Simoens, Steven

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze policies concerning orphan medicines, used to treat patients suffering from a rare disease. The decisions about orphan designation and marketing authorization of orphan medicines are taken at European level, but each Member State is responsible for decisions regarding reimbursement. The European measures to encourage the development of orphan medicines, such as market exclusivity for a period of ten years, seem to be successful. However, this market exclusivity should be revised once the profitability of such medicines has clearly been demonstrated. Our study recommends the implementation of patient registries at the European level in order to describe the natural evolution of rare diseases and the efficacy of orphan medicines, the majority of which are relatively expensive. In 2008, Belgian social security services reimbursed orphan medicines for an amount of 66 million euro, accounting for more than 5% of the hospital pharmaceutical budget. The reimbursement of an orphan medicine to an individual patient is subject to multiple conditions. Our study recommends that a unique counter within the NIHDI is created which centralizes all reimbursement requests. The reimbursement of an orphan medicine must be linked to the provision of standardized information needed for a patient register. The NIHDI administration could then, in collaboration with external experts, evaluate reimbursement requests and ensure a coherent application of reimbursement criteria. PMID:20183989

  5. Farmers' loss due to Guinea worm disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brieger, W R; Guyer, J

    1990-04-01

    Guinea worm disease has been blamed for much disability and loss of productivity among farmers in Africa and South Asia. Many studies have tried to equate days lost in illness to monetary values. These attempts often overlook the process of disability in relation to farming patterns. This pilot effort uses a qualitative case study approach to learn about how Guinea worm can cause loss to farmers. Twenty in-depth interviews with affected farmers showed that their losses are related to the time of year they are affected by Guinea worm. Some crops with flexible planting times, e.g. cassava, may not be as affected. Duration of disability is another determining factor. Insights from this pilot study can be used to design more appropriate large-scale survey instruments and guide development of longitudinal research.

  6. Genetic studies in chronic kidney disease: interpretation and clinical applicability.

    PubMed

    Witasp, Anna; Nordfors, Louise; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Luttropp, Karin; Lindholm, Bengt; Schalling, Martin; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The tools of modern molecular biology are evolving rapidly, resulting in vastly more efficient approaches to illuminating human genetic variations and their effects on common multifactorial disorders such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, candidate gene association studies and genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have generated novel genetic variants in previously unrecognized biological pathways, highlighting disease mechanisms with a potential role in CKD etiology, morbidity and mortality. Nephrologists now need to find ways to make use of these advancements and meet the increasingly stringent requirements for valid study design, data handling and interpretation of genetic studies. Adding to our prior article in this journal, which introduced the basics of genotype-phenotype association studies in CKD, this second article focuses on how to ascertain robust and reproducible findings by applying adequate methodological and statistical approaches to genotype-phenotype studies in CKD populations. Moreover, this review will briefly discuss genotype-based risk prediction, pharmacotherapy, drug target identification and individualized treatment solutions, specifically highlighting potentially important findings in CKD patients. This increased knowledge will hopefully facilitate the exciting transition from conventional clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. However, before this can be accomplished, unsolved issues regarding the complex human genetic architecture as well technical and clinically oriented obstacles will have to be overcome. Additionally, new policies and standardized risk evaluations for genetic testing in the clinical setting will have to be established to guarantee that CKD patients are provided with high-quality genotype-guided counseling that will help to improve their poor outcomes.

  7. The Australian Burden of Disease Study: measuring the loss of health from diseases, injuries and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mathers, C D; Vos, E T; Stevenson, C E; Begg, S J

    2000-06-19

    This is an overview of the first burden of disease and injury studies carried out in Australia. Methods developed for the World Bank and World Health Organization Global Burden of Disease Study were adapted and applied to Australian population health data. Depression was found to be the top-ranking cause of non-fatal disease burden in Australia, causing 8% of the total years lost due to disability in 1996. Mental disorders overall were responsible for nearly 30% of the non-fatal disease burden. The leading causes of total disease burden (disability-adjusted life years [DALYs]) were ischaemic heart disease and stroke, together causing nearly 18% of the total disease burden. Depression was the fourth leading cause of disease burden, accounting for 3.7% of the total burden. Of the 10 major risk factors to which the disease burden can be attributed, tobacco smoking causes an estimated 10% of the total disease burden in Australia, followed by physical inactivity (7%).

  8. Synergistic Effects of Six Chronic Disease Pairs on Decreased Physical Activity: The SMILE Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Dörenkamp, Sarah; Mesters, Ilse; Vos, Rein; Schepers, Jan; van den Akker, Marjan; Teijink, Joep; de Bie, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about whether and how two chronic diseases interact with each other in modifying the risk of physical inactivity. The aim of the present study is to identify chronic disease pairs that are associated with compliance or noncompliance with the Dutch PA guideline recommendation and to study whether specific chronic disease pairs indicate an extra effect on top of the effects of the diseases individually. Cross-sectional data from 3,386 participants of cohort study SMILE were used and logistic regression analysis was performed to study the joint effect of the two diseases of each chronic disease pair for compliance with the Dutch PA guideline. For six chronic disease pairs, patients suffering from both diseases belonging to these disease pairs in question show a higher probability of noncompliance to the Dutch PA guideline, compared to what one would expect based on the effects of each of the two diseases alone. These six chronic disease pairs were chronic respiratory disease and severe back problems; migraine and inflammatory joint disease; chronic respiratory disease and severe kidney disease; chronic respiratory disease and inflammatory joint disease; inflammatory joint disease and rheumatoid arthritis; and rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis of the knees, hips, and hands. PMID:27274994

  9. Longitudinal study of circulating protein biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Viennois, Emilie; Baker, Mark T.; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Lixin; Laroui, Hamed; Merlin, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic and progressive inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. In IBD, protein serological biomarkers could be relevant tools for assessing disease activity, performing early-stage diagnosis and managing the treatment. Using the interleukin-10 knockout (IL-10−/−) mouse, a model that develops a time-dependent IBD-like disorder that predominates in the colon; we performed longitudinal studies of circulating protein biomarkers in IBD. Circulating protein profiles in serum samples collected from 30-, 93-, and 135-day-old IL-10−/− mice were investigated using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and MALDI TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 15 different proteins were identified and confirmed by ELISA and Western blot to be differentially accumulated in serum samples from mid- to late-stage IL-10−/− mice compared to early non-inflamed IL-10−/− mice. The use of another model of colitis and an extra-intestinal inflammation model validated this biomarker panel and demonstrated that comprised some global inflammatory markers, some intestinal inflammation-specific markers and some chronic intestinal inflammation markers. Statistical analyses using misclassification error rate charts validated the use of these identified proteins as powerful biomarkers of colitis. Unlike standard biomarker screening studies, our analyses identified a panel of proteins that allowed the definition of protein signatures that reflect colitis status. PMID:25230104

  10. Zebrafish as a disease model for studying human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Ho, Yi-Jung; Yang, Yi-Ju; Liao, Heng-An; Ciou, Shih-Ci; Lin, Liang-In; Ou, Da-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of the world’s most common cancers and the second leading cause of cancer deaths. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a primary hepatic cancer, accounts for 90%-95% of liver cancer cases. The pathogenesis of HCC consists of a stepwise process of liver damage that extends over decades, due to hepatitis, fatty liver, fibrosis, and cirrhosis before developing fully into HCC. Multiple risk factors are highly correlated with HCC, including infection with the hepatitis B or C viruses, alcohol abuse, aflatoxin exposure, and metabolic diseases. Over the last decade, genetic alterations, which include the regulation of multiple oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes and the activation of tumorigenesis-related pathways, have also been identified as important factors in HCC. Recently, zebrafish have become an important living vertebrate model organism, especially for translational medical research. In studies focusing on the biology of cancer, carcinogen induced tumors in zebrafish were found to have many similarities to human tumors. Several zebrafish models have therefore been developed to provide insight into the pathogenesis of liver cancer and the related drug discovery and toxicology, and to enable the evaluation of novel small-molecule inhibitors. This review will focus on illustrative examples involving the application of zebrafish models to the study of human liver disease and HCC, through transgenesis, genome editing technology, xenografts, drug discovery, and drug-induced toxic liver injury. PMID:26576090

  11. Mitochondria in metabolic disease: getting clues from proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Peinado, Juan R; Diaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Frühbeck, Gema; Malagon, Maria M

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria play a key role as major regulators of cellular energy homeostasis, but in the context of mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondria may generate reactive oxidative species and induce cellular apoptosis. Indeed, altered mitochondrial status has been linked to the pathogenesis of several metabolic disorders and specially disorders related to insulin resistance, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other comorbidities comprising the metabolic syndrome. In the present review, we summarize information from various mitochondrial proteomic studies of insulin-sensitive tissues under different metabolic states. To that end, we first focus our attention on the pancreas, as mitochondrial malfunction has been shown to contribute to beta cell failure and impaired insulin release. Furthermore, proteomic studies of mitochondria obtained from liver, muscle, and adipose tissue are summarized, as these tissues constitute the primary insulin target metabolic tissues. Since recent advances in proteomic techniques have exposed the importance of PTMs in the development of metabolic disease, we also present information on specific PTMs that may directly affect mitochondria during the pathogenesis of metabolic disease. Specifically, mitochondrial protein acetylation, phosphorylation, and other PTMs related to oxidative damage, such as nitrosylation and carbonylation, are discussed.

  12. Coronary heart disease in Indians: implications of the INTERHEART study.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Vamadevan S; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2010-11-01

    Coronary heart diseases (CHD) have reached epidemic proportions among Indians. The recently concluded INTERHEART study emphasizes the role of behavioural and conventional risk factors in the prediction of CHD risk among Indians. These findings have implication for the health care providers and policy makers in the country due to the fact that all these conventional risk factors are potentially modifiable and are good starting points for prevention. The policy measures by means of legislation and regulatory approaches on agriculture and food industry or tobacco or physical activity will have large impact on CHD risk factor reduction in the population. In addition, the health system needs to focus on: (i) providing information for increasing awareness and an enabling environment for adoption of healthy living habits by the community; (ii) early detection of persons with risk factors and cost-effective interventions for reducing risk; and (iii) early detection of persons with clinical disease and cost-effective secondary prevention measures to prevent complications. The evidence from INTERHEART provides rationale for developing treatment algorithms and treatment guidelines for CHD at various levels of health care. In addition, INTERHEART provides answer for the quest for a single reliable biomarker, Apo B/ApoA 1 ratio that can predict the future CHD risk among individuals. Further to this, the INTERHEART study also opens up several unanswered questions on the pathobiology of the premature onset of myocardial infarction among Indians and calls for the need to developing capacity in clinical research in CHD in India.

  13. SPECT study of regional cerebral blood flow in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bonte, F.J.; Ross, E.D.; Chehabi, H.H.; Devous, M.D. Sr.

    1986-07-01

    A common cause of dementia in late midlife and old age is Alzheimer disease (AD), which affects more than one in 20 individuals over the age of 65. Past studies of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with AD here suggested blood flow abnormalities, but findings have differed. We have studied 37 patients diagnosed as having AD with inhalation and washout of /sup 133/Xe and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), obtaining evidence of abnormal rCBF patterns in 19. Flow reductions were most common in the temporoparietal regions and were occasionally found in the frontal areas. Investigators using positron-emission tomography (PET) have identified similar findings with respect to rCBF and regional oxygen, glucose, and protein metabolism. The SPECT determination of rCBF, which gives information similar to that provided by PET, may assume importance in the diagnosis of AD and in the differential diagnosis of the dementias.

  14. Handwriting Rehabilitation in Parkinson Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ziliotto, Adriana; Micheli, Federico E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the utility of handwriting rehabilitation (HR) in Parkinson disease (PD) patients who experienced difficulties with handwriting and signing. Methods Sixty PD patients were prospectively studied with graphological evaluations. Thirty PD patients were assigned to HR for 9 weeks. At the end of this training, all patients were evaluated again and results of basal vs. final evaluations were compared. Results At final evaluation, the group assigned to HR showed significantly larger amplitude of the first 'e' in the phrase, larger signature surface area, and superior margin. A trend of increase in letter size was also observed. Handwriting with progressively decreasing size of letters and ascending direction with respect to the horizontal were prominent findings in both groups of patients and they did not change after HR. Conclusion Rehabilitation programs for handwriting problems in PD patients are likely to be helpful. Larger randomized studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:26361595

  15. Action fluency in Parkinson's disease: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Matteo; Volpato, Chiara

    2006-04-01

    The impairment in action fluency task present in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients has been previously interpreted as an indicator of conversion from PD to PD with dementia or as a grammatical deficit for verbs and ascribed to a frontostriatal loop pathophysiology. In the present study, 20 patients with PD without dementia were longitudinally tested with overall cognitive decline scales and semantic, letter, and action fluency tasks in a 24-month follow-up study. In comparison with healthy age-matched controls, PD patients showed a stable and consistent impairment on action fluency without any sign of cognitive decline. Our findings suggest that action fluency task may be an early sign of impairment of frontostriatal circuits in PD and it cannot be considered an indicator of conversion from PD to PD with dementia.

  16. Microsporidia and Its Relation to Crohn's Disease. A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Andreu-Ballester, Juan C.; Garcia-Ballesteros, Carlos; Amigo, Victoria; Ballester, Ferran; Gil-Borrás, Rafael; Catalán-Serra, Ignacio; Magnet, Angela; Fenoy, Soledad; del Aguila, Carmen; Ferrando-Marco, Jose; Cuéllar, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Background The cause of Crohn's Disease (CD) remains unknown. Recently a decrease in the global lymphocyte population in the peripheral blood of CD patients has been reported. This decrease was more evident in γδ T lymphocytes, especially γδ CD8+T subsets. Furthermore, a decrease of IL-7 was also observed in these patients. We propose the hypothesis that microsporidia, an obligate intracellular opportunistic parasite recently related to fungi, in CD patients can take advantage of the lymphocytes and IL-7 deficits to proliferate and to contribute to the pathophysiology of this disease. Methods and Findings In this case-control study, serum samples were collected from 36 CD patients and from 36 healthy individuals (controls), IgE and IgG anti-Encephalitozoon antibodies were determined by ELISA; and forty-four intestinal tissue samples were analyzed through real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), twenty CD patients, nine with others diseases and 15 healthy subjects. We observed that IgE anti-Encephalitozoon levels were significantly higher in patients with CD: 0.386(±0.256) vs control group, 0.201(±0.147), P<0.001. However, IgG anti-Encephalitozoon values were significantly lower in CD patients: 0.361(±0.256) vs control group, 0.876(±0.380), P<0.001. In the group of CD patients, 6/20 (30%) were positive by real time PCR for microsporidia and, all the patients of the control group were negative by real time PCR. Conclusions These results suggest that CD patients are a group at risk for microsporidiasis and, moreover that microsporidia may be involved as a possible etiologic factor of CD. PMID:23637975

  17. Ethnicity and Onset of Cardiovascular Disease: A CALIBER Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-11

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease; Sudden Cardiac Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest

  18. Cervical Castleman disease: CT study with angiographic correlation.

    PubMed

    Koslin, D B; Berland, L L; Sekar, B C

    1986-07-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance, angiographic appearance, and clinical features of a patient with cervical Castleman disease, an uncommon disease of benign lymph node hyperplasia, are reported. CT scans showed a densely enhancing cervical mass. On external carotid angiography, the mass was seen as hypervascular with a capillary blush. Differential diagnosis included carotid body chemodectoma, vagal neuroma, tumor of the salivary gland, tuberculous adenitis and other granulomatous diseases, inflammatory lymph nodes, metastatic disease, and lymphoma.

  19. A Lyme Disease Case Study and Individualized Healthcare Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavendish, Roberta

    2003-01-01

    The Atlantic and Pacific coasts are the boundaries of Lyme disease with the Northeastern and Midwestern regions of the United States continuing to report the majority of cases. New reported cases of Lyme disease doubled from 1991 to 2001 according to statistics published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2002). Within that…

  20. Noninvasive biophotonic imaging for studies of infectious disease

    PubMed Central

    Andreu, Nuria; Zelmer, Andrea; Wiles, Siouxsie

    2011-01-01

    According to World Health Organization estimates, infectious organisms are responsible for approximately one in four deaths worldwide. Animal models play an essential role in the development of vaccines and therapeutic agents but large numbers of animals are required to obtain quantitative microbiological data by tissue sampling. Biophotonic imaging (BPI) is a highly sensitive, nontoxic technique based on the detection of visible light, produced by luciferase-catalysed reactions (bioluminescence) or by excitation of fluorescent molecules, using sensitive photon detectors. The development of bioluminescent/fluorescent microorganisms therefore allows the real-time noninvasive detection of microorganisms within intact living animals. Multiple imaging of the same animal throughout an experiment allows disease progression to be followed with extreme accuracy, reducing the number of animals required to yield statistically meaningful data. In the study of infectious disease, the use of BPI is becoming widespread due to the novel insights it can provide into established models, as well as the impact of the technique on two of the guiding principles of using animals in research, namely reduction and refinement. Here, we review the technology of BPI, from the instrumentation through to the generation of a photonic signal, and illustrate how the technique is shedding light on infection dynamics in vivo. PMID:20955395

  1. Heavy metals and neurodegenerative diseases: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Giacoppo, Sabrina; Galuppo, Maria; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; D'Aleo, Giangaetano; Marra, Angela; Sessa, Edoardo; Bua, Daniel Giuseppe; Potortì, Angela Giorgia; Dugo, Giacomo; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the levels of some of the most investigated metals (Cu, Se, Zn, Pb, and Hg) in the blood of patients affected by the most common chronic neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD) and multiple sclerosis (MS), in order to better clarify their involvement. For the first time, we investigated a Sicilian population living in an area exposed to a potentially contaminated environment from dust and fumes of volcano Etna and consumer of a considerable quantity of fish in their diet, so that this represents a good cohort to demonstrate a possible link between metals levels and development of neurodegenerative disorders. More specifically, 15 patients affected by AD, 41 patients affected by MS, 23 healthy controls, and 10 healthy elderly controls were recruited and subjected to a venous blood sampling. Quantification of heavy metals was performed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). This technique has allowed us to establish that there is a concomitance of heavy metal unbalance associated with AD more than in other neurodegenerative pathologies, such as MS. Also, we can assess that the concentration of these elements is independent from the diet, especially from occasional or habitual consumption of fruits and vegetables, prevalence in the diet of meat or fish, possible exposure to contaminated environment due both to the occupation and place of residence.

  2. Chemical approaches to the study of environmental diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, N.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cause-and-effect relationships are difficult to establish in chronic diseases which take years to develop. Awareness of the health hazards posed by long-term, low-level exposure to toxins has focused attention on causative environmental agents. Studies discussed here identified chemical factors potentially involved in the induction of chronic diseases. The novel spiroketal mycotoxins talaromycins A and B (C/sub 12/H/sub 22/O/sub 4/) were isolated from Talaromyces stipitatus, a fungus associated with fermenting silage. /sup 1/H NMR 2D COSY spectroscopy was used to distinguish isolated spin systems in the diastereomeric mixture and to facilitate the complete proton assignments of the pure isomers. Dipolar couplings between protons on different rings of the bicyclic system, observed by NOE difference and 2D Exchange spectroscopy, established the relative configuration of the ketal center. Extracts of the fungus Fusarium equiseti isolated from the home of genetically unrelated leukemia patients showed toxicity to mammals and immunosuppressive activity. Chronic byssinosis may result from accumulation of toxins in the lungs of long-term cotton mill workers.

  3. Computational Study of Ventilation and Disease Spread in Poultry Houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimbala, John; Pawar, Sourabh; Wheeler, Eileen; Lindberg, Darla

    2006-11-01

    The air flow in and around poultry houses has been studied numerically with the goal of determining disease spread characteristics and comparing ventilation schemes. A typical manure-belt layer egg production facility is considered. The continuity, momentum, and energy equations are solved for flow both inside and outside poultry houses using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Both simplified two-dimensional and fully three-dimensional geometries are modeled. The spread of virus particles is considered to be analogous to diffusion of a tracer contaminant gas, in this case ammonia. The effect of thermal plumes produced by the hens in the poultry house is also considered. Two ventilation schemes with opposite flow directions are compared. Contours of temperature and ammonia mass fraction for both cases are obtained and compared. The analysis shows that ventilation and air quality characteristics are much better for the case in which the air flow is from bottom to top (enhancing the thermal plume) instead of from top to bottom (fighting the thermal plume) as in most poultry houses. This has implications in air quality control in the event of epidemic outbreaks of avian flu or other infectious diseases.

  4. Poverty and Racial Disparities in Kidney Disease: The REGARDS Study

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, William M.; Newsome, Britt B.; McClure, Leslie A.; Howard, George; Volkova, Nataliya; Audhya, Paul; Warnock, David G.

    2010-01-01

    There are pronounced disparities among black compared to white Americans for risk of end-stage renal disease. This study examines whether similar relationships exist between poverty and racial disparities in chronic kidney disease (CKD) prevalence. Methods We studied 22,538 participants in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study. We defined individual poverty as family income below USD 15,000 and a neighborhood as poor if 25% or more of the households were below the federal poverty level. Results As the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) declined from 50–59 to 10–19 ml/min/ 1.73 m2, the black:white odds ratio (OR) for impaired kidney function increased from 0.74 (95% CI 0.66, 0.84) to 2.96 (95% CI 1.96, 5.57). Controlling for individual income below poverty, community poverty, demographic and comorbid characteristics attenuated the black:white prevalence to an OR of 0.65 (95% CI 0.57, 0.74) among individuals with a GFR of 59–50 ml/min/1.73 m2 and an OR of 2.21 (95% CI 1.25, 3.93) among individuals with a GFR between 10 and 19 ml/min/ 1.73 m2. Conclusion Household, but not community poverty, was independently associated with CKD and attenuated but did not fully account for differences in CKD prevalence between whites and blacks. PMID:20516678

  5. Therapeutic efficacy of cyclic home elemental enteral alimentation in Crohn's disease: Japanese cooperative Crohn's disease study.

    PubMed

    Matsueda, K; Shoda, R; Takazoe, M; Hiwatashi, N; Bamba, T; Kobayashi, K; Saito, T; Terano, A; Yao, T

    1995-11-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) often flares up and requires frequent hospitalization and/or surgery. Cyclic home elemental enteral alimentation (C-HEEA) was developed to prevent flare-up of CD and to minimize patient hospitalization. However, its therapeutic efficacy has not been studied in a large patient population. Therefore, questionnaires were sent to members of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Research Group of Japan to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of C-HEEA and to define the factors that may affect the efficacy of the treatment. Data for 410 patients (C-HEEA-treated n = 322; drug-treated n = 88) were collected from 29 institutions and analysis showed the following results. The cumulative remission and non-hospitalization rates of the C-HEEA treated group were significantly higher than the rates of the drug-treated group in all patients and in those with ileitis and ileo-colitis (P < 0.0001, P < 0.001, and P < 0.01, respectively), but no significant difference was noted in patients with colitis. Cumulative remission and non-hospitalization rates were also influenced by the daily calorie content of the elemental diet (ED); more than 1200 kcal of the ED per day was found to be more effective than lower amounts to maintain remission and to prevent hospitalization. The therapeutic efficacy of C-HEEA was shown to be superior to that of drug treatment in patients with CD with ileal involvement, and it is suggested that more than 1200kcal per day should be supplied by the ED to enhance its therapeutic efficacy.

  6. Indexing Disease Progression at Study Entry with Individuals At-Risk for Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Long, Jeffrey D.; Mills, James A.; Warner, John H.; Lu, Wenjing; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of clinical and biological markers of disease in persons at risk for Huntington Disease (HD) has increased in efforts to better quantify and characterize the epoch of prodrome prior to clinical diagnosis. Such efforts are critical in the design and implementation of clinical trials for HD so that interventions can occur at a time most likely to increase neuronal survival and maximize daily functioning. A prime consideration in the examination of prodromal individuals is their proximity to diagnosis. It is necessary to quantify proximity so that individual differences in key marker variables can be properly interpreted. We take a data-driven approach to develop an index that can be viewed as a proxy for time to HD diagnosis known as the CAG-Age Product Scaled or CAPS. CAPS is an observed utility variable computed for all genetically at-risk individuals based on age at study entry and CAG repeat length. Results of a longitudinal receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that CAPS had a relatively strong ability to predict individuals who became diagnosed, especially in the first 2 years. Bootstrap validation provided evidence that CAPS computed on a new sample from the same population could have similar discriminatory power. Cutoffs for the empirical CAPS distribution can be used to create a classification for mutation-positive individuals (Low-Med-High) that is useful for comparison with the naturally occurring mutation-negative Control group. The classification is an improvement over the one currently in use as it is based on observed data rather than model-based estimated values. PMID:21858921

  7. Ferritin Diversity: Mechanistic Studies, Disease Implications, and Materials Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Robert J.

    2011-07-01

    The study of ferritin includes a rich history of discoveries and scientific progress. Initially, the composition of ferritin was determined. Soon, it was shown that ferritin is a spherical, hollow protein. Eventually, over several decades of research, the structure and some function of this interesting protein was elucidated. However, the ferritin field was not completely satisfied. Today, for example, researchers are interested in refining the details of ferritin function, in discovering the role of ferritin in a variety of diseases, and in using ferritin for materials chemistry applications. The work presented in this dissertation highlights the progress that we have made in each of these three areas: (1) Mechanistic studies: The buffer used during horse spleen ferritin iron loading significantly influences the mineralization process and the quantity of iron deposited in ferritin. The ferrihydrite core of ferritin is crystalline and ordered when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of imidazole buffer. On the other hand, when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of MOPS buffer, the ferrihydrite core is less crystalline and less ordered, and a smaller amount of total iron is loaded in ferritin. We also show that iron can be released from the ferritin core in a non-reductive manner. The rate of Fe3+ release from horse spleen ferritin was measured using the Fe3+-specific chelator desferoxamine. We show that iron release occurs by three kinetic events. (2) Disease studies: In order to better understand iron disruption during disease states, we performed in vitro assays that mimicked chronic kidney disease. We tested the hypothesis that elevated levels of serum phosphate interrupted normal iron binding by transferrin and ferritin. Results show that phosphate competes for iron, forming an iron(III)-phosphate complex that is inaccessible to either transferrin or ferritin. Ferritin samples separated from the iron(III)-phosphate complex shows that as the

  8. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Studying Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. PMID:26387641

  9. Facial expression recognition in Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Torres, Bianca; Santos, Raquel Luiza; Sousa, Maria Fernanda Barroso de; Simões Neto, José Pedro; Nogueira, Marcela Moreira Lima; Belfort, Tatiana T; Dias, Rachel; Dourado, Marcia Cristina Nascimento

    2015-05-01

    Facial recognition is one of the most important aspects of social cognition. In this study, we investigate the patterns of change and the factors involved in the ability to recognize emotion in mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Through a longitudinal design, we assessed 30 people with AD. We used an experimental task that includes matching expressions with picture stimuli, labelling emotions and emotionally recognizing a stimulus situation. We observed a significant difference in the situational recognition task (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and the second evaluation. The linear regression showed that cognition is a predictor of emotion recognition impairment (p ≤ 0.05). The ability to perceive emotions from facial expressions was impaired, particularly when the emotions presented were relatively subtle. Cognition is recruited to comprehend emotional situations in cases of mild dementia.

  10. Facial expression recognition in Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Torres, Bianca; Santos, Raquel Luiza; Sousa, Maria Fernanda Barroso de; Simões Neto, José Pedro; Nogueira, Marcela Moreira Lima; Belfort, Tatiana T; Dias, Rachel; Dourado, Marcia Cristina Nascimento

    2015-05-01

    Facial recognition is one of the most important aspects of social cognition. In this study, we investigate the patterns of change and the factors involved in the ability to recognize emotion in mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Through a longitudinal design, we assessed 30 people with AD. We used an experimental task that includes matching expressions with picture stimuli, labelling emotions and emotionally recognizing a stimulus situation. We observed a significant difference in the situational recognition task (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and the second evaluation. The linear regression showed that cognition is a predictor of emotion recognition impairment (p ≤ 0.05). The ability to perceive emotions from facial expressions was impaired, particularly when the emotions presented were relatively subtle. Cognition is recruited to comprehend emotional situations in cases of mild dementia. PMID:26017202

  11. Comparative study of calcified changes in aortic valvular diseases.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Mayuko; Tamura, Koichi; Masuda, Yukinari; Fukuda, Yuh

    2008-06-01

    Calcification of the aortic valve leads to stenosis or regurgitation or both. To clarify the mechanism of heart valve calcification, comparative studies using histological and ultrastructural examinations were performed of calcified aortic valves. These valves were obtained at valve replacement surgery from 11 patients with rheumatic aortic valvular disease (RAVD), 10 patients with degenerative aortic valve disease (DAVD), and 10 patients with congenitally bicuspid aortic valves (CBAV). For electron microscopic study, 5 cases were selected from each group. In RAVD, histological examination revealed calcification in a degenerated amorphous area at the center of fibrous thickened regions and in laminar fibrous thickened areas near the valve surface. In DAVD, calcification was observed mainly in the fibrosa near the valve ring. In CBAV, basic pathological changes were similar to those in DAVD; however, additional severe calcification of the raphe was observed, if the raphe was present. Ultrastructural examinations showed deposition of electron-dense materials in two patterns in all three groups; one pattern was observed in the interfibrillar spaces of collagen fibrils, and the other pattern was widespread macular deposition unrelated to the preexisting structure. In RAVD, microfibril-like fibrillar structures were found in the areas of deposition of electron-dense materials. These findings suggest that newly formed connective tissue degraded and became necrotic because of nutritional deprivation, especially in the thickened central area, causing calcium deposition. In DAVD and CBAV, numerous lipid vacuoles were found in the electron-dense deposition areas similar to lipid deposition in aortic atherosclerosis. Localized calcium deposition in the fibrosa suggests that the stress of valvular motion and pressure load induces sclerotic changes with the degeneration of collagen fibers, providing a core for calcification. In CBAV, the raphe was the main location of

  12. Retinal emboli and cardiovascular disease: the Beaver Dam Eye Study.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Moss, Scot E; Meuer, Stacy M

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the 10-year incidence of retinal emboli, the associated risk factors, and the relationship of retinal emboli to stroke and ischemic heart disease mortality. METHODS: The Beaver Dam Eye Study (n = 4,926) is a population-based study of persons 43 to 86 years of age. Retinal emboli were detected at baseline (1988-1990) and at a 5-year (1993-1995) and a 10-year (1998-2000) follow-up by grading of stereoscopic 30 degrees color fundus photographs using standardized protocols. Cause-specific mortality was determined from death certificates. RESULTS: The 10-year cumulative incidence of retinal emboli was 1.5%. While adjusting for age and sex, the incidence of retinal emboli was associated with increased pulse pressure (odds ratio [OR] 4th versus 1st quartile range, 2.42; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.98-5.97; P test of trend = .03), higher serum total cholesterol (OR, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.06-7.23; P = .03), higher leukocyte count (OR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.04-4.96; P = .05), smoking status (OR current versus never smoker, 4.60: 95% CI, 2.08-10.16; P < .001), and a history of coronary artery bypass surgery (OR, 7.17; 95% CI, 3.18-16.18; P < .001) at baseline. While controlling for age, sex, and systemic factors, a significantly higher hazard of dying with a mention of stroke on the death certificate was found in people with retinal emboli (hazard ratio, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.16-4.99) compared with those without. CONCLUSIONS: The data show an association of smoking and cardiovascular disease with the incidence of retinal emboli. Also, persons with retinal emboli are at increased risk of stroke-related death. PMID:14971575

  13. Utility of imaging for nutritional intervention studies in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    de Wilde, Martijn C; Kamphuis, Patrick J G H; Sijben, John W C; Scheltens, Phillip

    2011-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multi-factorial neurodegenerative disorder and the leading cause of dementia, wherein synapse loss is the strongest structural correlate with cognitive impairment. Basic research has shown that dietary supply of precursors and co-factors for synthesis of neuronal membranes enhances the formation of synapses. Daily intake of a medical food containing a mix of these nutrients for 12 weeks in humans improved memory, measured as immediate and delayed verbal recall by the Wechsler Memory Scale-revised, in patients with very mild AD (MMSE 24-26). An improvement of immediate verbal recall was noted following 24 weeks of intervention in an exploratory extension of the study. These data suggest that the intervention may improve synaptic formation and function in early AD. Here we review emerging technologies that help identify changes in pathological hallmarks in AD, including synaptic function and loss of connectivity in the early stages of AD, before cognitive and behavioural symptoms are observable. These techniques include the detection of specific biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid, as well as imaging procedures such as fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), amyloid PET, structural/functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG). Such techniques can provide new insights into the functional and structural changes in the brain over time, and may therefore help to develop more effective AD therapies. In particular, nutritional intervention studies that target synapse formation and function may benefit from these techniques, especially FDG-PET and EEG/MEG employed in the preclinical or early stages of the disease. PMID:21816137

  14. Study designs for identification of rare disease variants in complex diseases: the utility of family-based designs.

    PubMed

    Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Ottman, Ruth

    2011-11-01

    The recent progress in sequencing technologies makes possible large-scale medical sequencing efforts to assess the importance of rare variants in complex diseases. The results of such efforts depend heavily on the use of efficient study designs and analytical methods. We introduce here a unified framework for association testing of rare variants in family-based designs or designs based on unselected affected individuals. This framework allows us to quantify the enrichment in rare disease variants in families containing multiple affected individuals and to investigate the optimal design of studies aiming to identify rare disease variants in complex traits. We show that for many complex diseases with small values for the overall sibling recurrence risk ratio, such as Alzheimer's disease and most cancers, sequencing affected individuals with a positive family history of the disease can be extremely advantageous for identifying rare disease variants. In contrast, for complex diseases with large values of the sibling recurrence risk ratio, sequencing unselected affected individuals may be preferable.

  15. Longitudinal studies of blood lymphocyte capacity in Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerkholm, M.; Wedelin, C.; Holm, G.; Johansson, B.; Mellstedt, H.

    1981-11-01

    Blood lymphocyte functional capacity and serum immunoglobulins were studied in 40 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) admitted to Radiumhemmet, Stockholm, before treatment and in complete remission 2-56 months following termination of radiotherapy (total nodal irradiation (TNI); n . 29) or chemotherapy (MOPP; n . 11). Lymphocyte studies included determination of total lymphocyte and T-cell counts and evaluation of spontaneous DNA synthesis during the first day of culture and mitogen-(concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen) and antigen (purified protein derivative, PPD)-induced activation on the third day. Blood lymphocyte and T-cell counts decreased dramatically following TNI. A slow restitution was seen, but pretreatment levels were not reached even four years following therapy. The responses to ConA and PPD but not PWM were significantly reduced shortly after TNI. The mitogen response did not increase with time as did the PPD response. Lymphocyte counts and lymphocyte stimulation, which were severely depressed before treatment of patients in the chemotherapy group, remained unchanged 2-36 months after termination of therapy. A significant reduction of IgM levels was observed regardless of the mode of treatment. Splenectomy prevented the profound reduction of blood lymphocyte and T-cell counts following therapy but did not influence the other immunologic variables under study.

  16. Swallowing in patients with Parkinson's disease: a surface electromyography study.

    PubMed

    Ws Coriolano, Maria das Graças; R Belo, Luciana; Carneiro, Danielle; G Asano, Amdore; Al Oliveira, Paulo José; da Silva, Douglas Monteiro; G Lins, Otávio

    2012-12-01

    Our goal was to study deglutition of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and normal controls (NC) using surface electromyography (sEMG). The study included 15 patients with idiopathic PD and 15 age-matched normal controls. Surface electromyography was collected over the suprahyoid muscle group. Conditions were the following: swallow at once 10 and 20 ml of water and 5 and 10 ml of yogurt of firm consistency, and freely drink 100 ml of water. During swallowing, durations of sEMG were significantly longer in PD patients than in normal controls but no significant differences of amplitudes were found. Eighty percent of the PD patients and 20 % of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 20 ml of water, while 70 % of the PD patients and none of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 5 ml of yogurt. PD patients took significantly more time and needed significantly more swallows to drink 100 ml of water than normal controls. We conclude that sEMG might be a simple and useful tool to study and monitor deglutition in PD patients.

  17. [Fungal diseases of vulva and vagina caused by Candida species].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2010-09-01

    Fungal diseases of vulva and vagina attributed to Candida species (vulvovaginal candidosis) are the most frequent mycoses of women. They show acute or chronic courses and different disease patterns which can strongly affect the quality of life of the women who are concerned. In general, the most common cause of acute vulvovaginal candidosis is Candida albicans, followed by C. glabrata. In chronic recurrent vulvovaginal candidosis, C. albicans and C. glabrata are often equally distributed. In several cases, treatment requires an antimycotic therapy which refers to the severity and main form of disease as well as to the aetiological agent. Most vulvovaginal candidoses are accessible to the treatment with local and systemic antimycotic agents. Generally, in Germany azoles such as clotrimazole, fluconazole and itraconazole, the polyens nystatin and Amphotericin B and the hydroxypyridone derivative ciclopirox are available for antimycotic therapy of vulvovaginal candidoses. Significance of non-conventional and adjuvant therapeutic approaches is considered to be generally low.

  18. Studies on the Protein Defect in Tangier Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Samuel E.; Levy, Robert I.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Fredrickson, Donald S.

    1972-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (d 1.063-1.210 g/ml) were isolated from the plasma of normal individuals (HDL) and seven homozygous patients with Tangier disease (HDLt). In Tangier patients, the concentration of protein in the high density region (HDLt) was only 0.5-4.5% of normal. Immunochemical studies, including mixing experiments conducted in vivo and in vitro, indicated that HDLt was different from HDL. HDLt was the only high density lipoprotein detectable in the plasma of Tangier homozygotes. In heterozygotes both HDL and HDLt were present. HDLt was not detected in the plasma of over 300 normal persons and 10 patients with secondary high density lipoprotein deficiency and appeared to be a unique marker for Tangier disease. ApoHDL contained two major apoproteins designated apoLp-Gln-I and apoLp-Gln-II; together they comprised 85-90% of the total protein content. Both of the major HDL apoproteins were present in apoHDLt; but apoLp-Gln-I was disproportionately decreased with respect to apoLp-Gln-II, the ratio of their concentrations being 1: 12 in apoHDLt as compared with 3: 1 in apoHDL. Several minor apoprotein components which together comprise 5-15% of apoHDL were present in approximately normal proportions in apoHDLt. In the HDL of Tangier patients it was estimated that, compared with normal individuals, the concentration of apoLp-Gln-I was decreased about 600-fold and the concentration of apoLp-Gln-II about 17-fold. The decrease in these apoproteins was not due to preferential segregation with the lipoprotein fractions of d < 1.063 g/ml or with the plasma proteins of d > 1.21 g/ml. Tangier apoLp-Gln-I and apoLp-Gln-II appeared to be immunochemically identical with their normal counterparts, and no differences between the two sets of apoproteins were detected on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 9.4 or 2.9. These results are most compatible with the hypothesis that the hereditary defect in Tangier disease is a mutation in an allele-regulating synthesis of

  19. Fabry's disease: An ultrastructural study of nerve biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gayathri, N.; Yasha, T. C.; Kanjalkar, Makarand; Agarwal, Santosh; Sagar, B. K. Chandrashekar; Santosh, Vani; Shankar, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    Fabry's disease, an X linked recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of α-galactosidase A (α-gal A), leads to progressive accumulation of glycosphingolipids. We report this rare disease in a 19-year-old boy who presented with angiokeratomas, paresthesia and corneal opacities, and nerve biopsy revealed by electron microscopy lamellated inclusions in the smooth muscle, perineurial and endothelial cells characteristic of Fabry's disease. PMID:19893666

  20. X-ray imaging in advanced studies of ophthalmic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angelica M. V.; Barros, Paulo S. M.; Morelhao, Sergio L.

    2006-07-15

    Microscopic characterization of pathological tissues has one major intrinsic limitation, the small sampling areas with respect to the extension of the tissues. Mapping possible changes on vast tissues and correlating them with large ensembles of clinical cases is not a feasible procedure for studying most diseases, as for instance vision loss related diseases and, in particular, the cataract. Although intraocular lens implants are successful treatments, cataract still is a leading public-health issue that grows in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. In this work we have exploited the radiation-tissue interaction properties of hard x-rays--very low absorption and scattering--to map distinct lesions on entire eye lenses. At the used synchrotron x-ray photon energy of 20 keV (wavelength {lambda}=0.062 nm), scattering and refraction are angular resolved effects. It allows the employed x-ray image technique to efficiently characterize two types of lesions in eye lenses under cataractogenesis: distributions of tiny scattering centers and extended areas of fiber cell compaction. The data collection procedure is relatively fast; allowing dozens of samples to be totally imaged (scattering, refraction, and mass absorption images) in a single day of synchrotron beam time. More than 60 cases of canine cataract, not correlated to specific causes, were investigated in this first application of x-rays to image entire lenses. Cortical opacity cases, or partial opacity, could be related to the presence of calcificated tissues at the cortical areas, clearly visible in the images, whose elemental contents were verified by micro x-ray fluorescence as very rich in calcium. Calcificated tissues were also observed at nuclear areas in some cases of hypermature cataract. Total opacity cases without distinguishable amount of scattering centers consist in 70% of the analyzed cases, where remarkable fissure marks owing to extended areas of fiber

  1. X-ray imaging in advanced studies of ophthalmic diseases.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angélica M V; Barros, Paulo S M; Morelhão, Sérgio L

    2006-07-01

    Microscopic characterization of pathological tissues has one major intrinsic limitation, the small sampling areas with respect to the extension of the tissues. Mapping possible changes on vast tissues and correlating them with large ensembles of clinical cases is not a feasible procedure for studying most diseases, as for instance vision loss related diseases and, in particular, the cataract. Although intraocular lens implants are successful treatments, cataract still is a leading public-health issue that grows in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. In this work we have exploited the radiation-tissue interaction properties of hard x-rays--very low absorption and scattering--to map distinct lesions on entire eye lenses. At the used synchrotron x-ray photon energy of 20 keV (wavelength lambda=0.062 nm), scattering and refraction are angular resolved effects. It allows the employed x-ray image technique to efficiently characterize two types of lesions in eye lenses under cataractogenesis: distributions of tiny scattering centers and extended areas of fiber cell compaction. The data collection procedure is relatively fast; allowing dozens of samples to be totally imaged (scattering, refraction, and mass absorption images) in a single day of synchrotron beam time. More than 60 cases of canine cataract, not correlated to specific causes, were investigated in this first application of x-rays to image entire lenses. Cortical opacity cases, or partial opacity, could be related to the presence of calcificated tissues at the cortical areas, clearly visible in the images, whose elemental contents were verified by micro x-ray fluorescence as very rich in calcium. Calcificated tissues were also observed at nuclear areas in some cases of hypermature cataract. Total opacity cases without distinguishable amount of scattering centers consist in 70% of the analyzed cases, where remarkable fissure marks owing to extended areas of fiber

  2. Hypnosis in the treatment of Morgellons disease: a case study.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Ashley M; Dolan, Sara L; Stanford, Matthew S; Elkins, Gary R

    2011-04-01

    Morgellons Disease is a condition involving painful skin lesions, fibrous growths protruding from the skin, and subcutaneous stinging and burning sensations, along with symptoms of anxiety, depression, fatigue, and memory and attention deficits. The etiological and physiological bases of these symptoms are unclear, making the diagnosis controversial and challenging to treat. There are currently no established treatments for Morgellons Disease. The following case example depicts treatment of a woman with Morgellons Disease using hypnotherapy. Data from this case example suggest that hypnotherapy is a promising intervention for the physical and psychological symptoms associated with Morgellons Disease. PMID:21390982

  3. Hypnosis in the treatment of Morgellons disease: a case study.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Ashley M; Dolan, Sara L; Stanford, Matthew S; Elkins, Gary R

    2011-04-01

    Morgellons Disease is a condition involving painful skin lesions, fibrous growths protruding from the skin, and subcutaneous stinging and burning sensations, along with symptoms of anxiety, depression, fatigue, and memory and attention deficits. The etiological and physiological bases of these symptoms are unclear, making the diagnosis controversial and challenging to treat. There are currently no established treatments for Morgellons Disease. The following case example depicts treatment of a woman with Morgellons Disease using hypnotherapy. Data from this case example suggest that hypnotherapy is a promising intervention for the physical and psychological symptoms associated with Morgellons Disease.

  4. Association studies in late onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goate, A.M.; Lendon, C.; Talbot, C.

    1994-09-01

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is characterized by an adult onset progressive dementia and the presence of numerous plaques and tangles within the brain at autopsy. The senile plaques are composed of a proteinaceous core surrounded by dystrophic neurites. The major protein component of the core is {beta}-amyloid but antibodies to many other proteins bind to senile plaques, e.g., antibodies to apolioprotein E (ApoE) and to {alpha}1-antichymotrypsin (AACT). Genetic studies have implicated mutations within the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene as the cause of AD in a small number of early onset AD families. More recently, assocition studies in late onset AD have demonstrated a positive association between ApoE-{epsilon}4 and AD. We report evidence for a negative association between ApoE-{epsilon}2 and AD in a large sample of sporadic late onset AD cases and matched controls supporting the role of ApoE in the etiology of AD. Ninety-three patients with sporadic AD (average age = 75 years, s.d. 8 yrs.) and 67 normal controls from the same ethnic background (age = 77 yrs., s.d. 10 yrs.) were recruited through the patient registry of the Washington University Alzheimer`s Disease Research Center. We found a statistically significant increase in ApoE-{epsilon}4 allele frequency in patients compared with controls ({chi}{sup 2}=7.75, 1 d.f., one tailed p=0.0027) and a significant decrease in {epsilon}2 allele frequency (Fisher`s exact test, one tailed p=0.0048), whereas the decreased frequency of {epsilon}3 in the patient groups was not statistically significant. Allele {epsilon}2 conferred a strong protective effect in our sample, with the odds ratio for AD for subjects possessing this allele being 0.08 (85% confidence interval 0.01-0.69). Similar studies using a polymorphism within the AACT gene showed no association with alleles at this locus in the entire AD sample or in AD cases homozygous for ApoE-{epsilon}3.

  5. Ovarian Carcinoma Subtypes Are Different Diseases: Implications for Biomarker Studies

    PubMed Central

    Köbel, Martin; Kalloger, Steve E; Boyd, Niki; McKinney, Steven; Mehl, Erika; Palmer, Chana; Leung, Samuel; Bowen, Nathan J; Ionescu, Diana N; Rajput, Ashish; Prentice, Leah M; Miller, Dianne; Santos, Jennifer; Swenerton, Kenneth; Gilks, C. Blake; Huntsman, David

    2008-01-01

    Background Although it has long been appreciated that ovarian carcinoma subtypes (serous, clear cell, endometrioid, and mucinous) are associated with different natural histories, most ovarian carcinoma biomarker studies and current treatment protocols for women with this disease are not subtype specific. With the emergence of high-throughput molecular techniques, distinct pathogenetic pathways have been identified in these subtypes. We examined variation in biomarker expression rates between subtypes, and how this influences correlations between biomarker expression and stage at diagnosis or prognosis. Methods and Findings In this retrospective study we assessed the protein expression of 21 candidate tissue-based biomarkers (CA125, CRABP-II, EpCam, ER, F-Spondin, HE4, IGF2, K-Cadherin, Ki-67, KISS1, Matriptase, Mesothelin, MIF, MMP7, p21, p53, PAX8, PR, SLPI, TROP2, WT1) in a population-based cohort of 500 ovarian carcinomas that was collected over the period from 1984 to 2000. The expression of 20 of the 21 biomarkers differs significantly between subtypes, but does not vary across stage within each subtype. Survival analyses show that nine of the 21 biomarkers are prognostic indicators in the entire cohort but when analyzed by subtype only three remain prognostic indicators in the high-grade serous and none in the clear cell subtype. For example, tumor proliferation, as assessed by Ki-67 staining, varies markedly between different subtypes and is an unfavourable prognostic marker in the entire cohort (risk ratio [RR] 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2%–2.4%) but is not of prognostic significance within any subtype. Prognostic associations can even show an inverse correlation within the entire cohort, when compared to a specific subtype. For example, WT1 is more frequently expressed in high-grade serous carcinomas, an aggressive subtype, and is an unfavourable prognostic marker within the entire cohort of ovarian carcinomas (RR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2%–2.3%), but

  6. Ensemble transcript interaction networks: a case study on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Armañanzas, Rubén; Larrañaga, Pedro; Bielza, Concha

    2012-10-01

    Systems biology techniques are a topic of recent interest within the neurological field. Computational intelligence (CI) addresses this holistic perspective by means of consensus or ensemble techniques ultimately capable of uncovering new and relevant findings. In this paper, we propose the application of a CI approach based on ensemble Bayesian network classifiers and multivariate feature subset selection to induce probabilistic dependences that could match or unveil biological relationships. The research focuses on the analysis of high-throughput Alzheimer's disease (AD) transcript profiling. The analysis is conducted from two perspectives. First, we compare the expression profiles of hippocampus subregion entorhinal cortex (EC) samples of AD patients and controls. Second, we use the ensemble approach to study four types of samples: EC and dentate gyrus (DG) samples from both patients and controls. Results disclose transcript interaction networks with remarkable structures and genes not directly related to AD by previous studies. The ensemble is able to identify a variety of transcripts that play key roles in other neurological pathologies. Classical statistical assessment by means of non-parametric tests confirms the relevance of the majority of the transcripts. The ensemble approach pinpoints key metabolic mechanisms that could lead to new findings in the pathogenesis and development of AD.

  7. Ensemble transcript interaction networks: a case study on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Armañanzas, Rubén; Larrañaga, Pedro; Bielza, Concha

    2012-10-01

    Systems biology techniques are a topic of recent interest within the neurological field. Computational intelligence (CI) addresses this holistic perspective by means of consensus or ensemble techniques ultimately capable of uncovering new and relevant findings. In this paper, we propose the application of a CI approach based on ensemble Bayesian network classifiers and multivariate feature subset selection to induce probabilistic dependences that could match or unveil biological relationships. The research focuses on the analysis of high-throughput Alzheimer's disease (AD) transcript profiling. The analysis is conducted from two perspectives. First, we compare the expression profiles of hippocampus subregion entorhinal cortex (EC) samples of AD patients and controls. Second, we use the ensemble approach to study four types of samples: EC and dentate gyrus (DG) samples from both patients and controls. Results disclose transcript interaction networks with remarkable structures and genes not directly related to AD by previous studies. The ensemble is able to identify a variety of transcripts that play key roles in other neurological pathologies. Classical statistical assessment by means of non-parametric tests confirms the relevance of the majority of the transcripts. The ensemble approach pinpoints key metabolic mechanisms that could lead to new findings in the pathogenesis and development of AD. PMID:22281045

  8. [Chronic disease impact on partners. An explorative study].

    PubMed

    Pacini, G; Sarmiento, I

    2008-01-01

    In the last years there has been a growing interest of researchers for themes dealing with chronic illness and issues related to that condition. Several authors have studied the difficulties caregivers have to cope with, especially when the patient's partner has this role. That condition would have both physical and psychological consequences, but its real effects seem to depend on a complex set of interacting elements. On the basis of these researches, in the current study we aimed to explore the influence of adult attachment and marital satisfaction on the impact that chronic illness can have on patient's partner and on his/her health-related quality of life. The sample is composed of 40 chronic renal failure patients' partner-caregivers. Each caregiver filled in a battery of tests for finding out the characteristics of adult attachment and marital satisfaction, health-related quality of life and the association between these variables and the impact of chronic illness on partners. Descriptive statistics, correlations and one-sample t test analysis have been performed. Results show a significant correlation between attachment style and caregiving burden; there are no gender differences in disease impact on caregiver. Moreover caregivers seem to have a worse quality of life in comparison to general population. Understanding caregiving can lead, at a future time, to planning specific interventions for both patients and partners, using a global and integrated approach that respects individuals and couples in their biologic, psychological and relational dimensions. PMID:19288778

  9. Trend of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases in Iran: Results of the Global Burden of Disease Study, 2010.

    PubMed

    Sepanlou, Sadaf Ghajarieh; Malekzadeh, Fatemeh; Naghavi, Mohsen; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Hossein; Shahraz, Saeid; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Malekzadeh, Reza; Poustchi, Hossein

    2015-07-01

    BACKGROUND The general pattern of epidemiologic transition from communicable to noncommunicable diseases is also observed for gastrointestinal and liver diseases (GILD), which constitute a heterogeneous array of causes of death and disability. We aimed to describe the trend of GILD in Iran based on the global burden of disease (GBD2010) study from 1990 to 2010. METHODS The trend of number of deaths, disability, adjusted life years (DALYs) and their age-standardized rates caused by 5 major GILD have been reported. The change in the rankings of major causes of death and DALY has been described as well. RESULTS The age standardized rates of death and DALYs in both sexes have decreased from 1990 to 2010 for most GILD. The most prominent decreases in death rates are observed for diarrheal diseases, gastritis and duodenitis, and peptic ulcer disease. Positive trends are observed for liver cancer, pancreatic cancer, and gall bladder cancer. Diarrheal diseases have retained their 1st rank among children under 5. Among adults, decreased ranks are observed for diarrheal diseases, appendicitis, gastritis and duodenitis, gall bladder diseases, pancreatitis, and all types of cirrhosis. The trends in age standardized rates of DALYs, deaths, and YLLs are negative for almost all GILD, and especially for diarrheal diseases. However, there is no upward or downward trend in rates of years lost due to disability (YLDs) for most diseases. Total numbers of DALYs and deaths due to acute hepatitis C, stomach cancer, and liver cancers are rising. The total DALYs due to overall digestive diseases except cirrhosis and DALYs due to cirrhosis are both somehow stable. No data has been reported for GILD that are mainly diagnosed in outpatient settings, including gastroesophageal reflux disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. CONCLUSION The results of GBD 2010 demonstrate that the rates of most GILD are decreasing in Iran but total DALYs are somehow stable

  10. Trend of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases in Iran: Results of the Global Burden of Disease Study, 2010.

    PubMed

    Sepanlou, Sadaf Ghajarieh; Malekzadeh, Fatemeh; Naghavi, Mohsen; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Hossein; Shahraz, Saeid; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Malekzadeh, Reza; Poustchi, Hossein

    2015-07-01

    BACKGROUND The general pattern of epidemiologic transition from communicable to noncommunicable diseases is also observed for gastrointestinal and liver diseases (GILD), which constitute a heterogeneous array of causes of death and disability. We aimed to describe the trend of GILD in Iran based on the global burden of disease (GBD2010) study from 1990 to 2010. METHODS The trend of number of deaths, disability, adjusted life years (DALYs) and their age-standardized rates caused by 5 major GILD have been reported. The change in the rankings of major causes of death and DALY has been described as well. RESULTS The age standardized rates of death and DALYs in both sexes have decreased from 1990 to 2010 for most GILD. The most prominent decreases in death rates are observed for diarrheal diseases, gastritis and duodenitis, and peptic ulcer disease. Positive trends are observed for liver cancer, pancreatic cancer, and gall bladder cancer. Diarrheal diseases have retained their 1st rank among children under 5. Among adults, decreased ranks are observed for diarrheal diseases, appendicitis, gastritis and duodenitis, gall bladder diseases, pancreatitis, and all types of cirrhosis. The trends in age standardized rates of DALYs, deaths, and YLLs are negative for almost all GILD, and especially for diarrheal diseases. However, there is no upward or downward trend in rates of years lost due to disability (YLDs) for most diseases. Total numbers of DALYs and deaths due to acute hepatitis C, stomach cancer, and liver cancers are rising. The total DALYs due to overall digestive diseases except cirrhosis and DALYs due to cirrhosis are both somehow stable. No data has been reported for GILD that are mainly diagnosed in outpatient settings, including gastroesophageal reflux disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. CONCLUSION The results of GBD 2010 demonstrate that the rates of most GILD are decreasing in Iran but total DALYs are somehow stable

  11. Epigenetic studies in Alzheimer's disease: current findings, caveats, and considerations for future studies.

    PubMed

    Lunnon, Katie; Mill, Jonathan

    2013-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a sporadic, chronic neurodegenerative disease, usually occurring late in life. The last decade has witnessed tremendous advances in our understanding about the genetic basis of AD, but a large amount of the variance in disease risk remains to be explained. Epigenetic mechanisms, which developmentally regulate gene expression via modifications to DNA, histone proteins, and chromatin, have been hypothesized to play a role in other complex neurobiological diseases, and studies to identify genome-wide epigenetic changes in AD are currently under way. However, the simple brute-force approach that has been successfully employed in genome-wide association studies is unlikely to be successful in epigenome-wide association studies of neurodegeneration. A more academic approach to understanding the role of epigenetic variation in AD is required, with careful consideration of study design, methodological approaches, tissue-specificity, and causal inference. In this article, we review the empirical literature supporting a role for epigenetic processes in AD, and discuss important considerations and future directions for this new and emerging field of research.

  12. Clear Speech Variants: An Acoustic Study in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated how different variants of clear speech affect segmental and suprasegmental acoustic measures of speech in speakers with Parkinson's disease and a healthy control group. Method: A total of 14 participants with Parkinson's disease and 14 control participants served as speakers. Each speaker produced 18 different…

  13. Reductions in (/sup 3/H)nicotinic acetylcholine binding in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease: an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, P.J.; Martino, A.M.; Wagster, M.V.; Price, D.L.; Mayeux, R.; Atack, J.R.; Kellar, K.J.

    1988-05-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), dysfunction in the basal forebrain cholinergic system is accompanied by a consistent loss of presynaptic cholinergic markers in cortex, but changes in cholinergic receptor binding sites are poorly understood. In the present study, we used receptor autoradiography to map the distribution of nicotinic (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites in cortices of individuals with AD and PD and matched control subjects. In both diseases, a profound loss of nicotinic receptors occurs in all cortical layers, particularly the deepest layers.

  14. [A case-control study of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K

    1994-01-01

    Lifestyles and risk factors liable to idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) were evaluated in a case-control study. 95 cases were studied along with their matched (1:2) controls. Cases were diagnosed at the Department of Neurology, Hokkaido University. Each given case was matched to two resident controls according to sex, age (+/- 1 year) and location (residents in the Sapporo area). 218 questions about preclinical life events (diet; exercise and physique; alcohol and smoking; personal relations; personality etc.) were asked in a one-to-one interview conducted by 3 staff members. Univariate results: 1) Diet: From infancy to 40, there were deficient intakes of meat, fruit, milk and dairy products, particularly prior to pubescence. Dietary behaviors after 40 showed no association. 2) Alcohol and smoking: Cases tended to smoke and drink less. 3) Exercise and Physique: Cases were inclined to dislike sports/exercise, to be physically slow, to have poor athletic ability, to have poor flexibility in adolescence and to have fair skin. 4) Personal relations: Cases had a tendency not to read books/newspapers, write letters, use the telephone and visit friends/relatives. Cases also refused leadership roles. 5) Personality: Cases were apt to be unsociable, taciturn, unobliging, and to have slow speech. Multivariate models: In order to study the joint effects and the combined effects of the major variables identified in univariate results, unconditional logistic regression analysis was carried out. The 9 variables were screened using stepwise procedure. From these variables, 4 independent variables were selected: deficient intake of fruit from middle school to 19 years old, fair skin, poor letter-writing ability and unsociability. The 4 independent variables were applied to one model, and resulted in a combined odds ratio figure. When the cases have none of the 4 independent variables, the combined odds ratio figure is 1. If the cases have all of them, then the combined odds

  15. Quantifying multi-ethnic representation in genetic studies of high mortality diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Dudley, Joel T; Ruau, David; Butte, Atul J

    2012-01-01

    Most GWASs were performed using study populations with Caucasian ethnicity or ancestry, and findings from one ethnic subpopulation might not always translate to another. We curated 4,573 genetic studies on 763 human diseases and identified 3,461 disease-susceptible SNPs with genome-wide significance; only 10% of these had been validated in at least two different ethnic populations. SNPs for autoimmune diseases demonstrated the lowest percentage of cross-ethnicity validation. We used the mortality data from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and identified 19 diseases killing over 10,000 Americans per year that were still lacking publications of even a single cross-ethnic SNP. Fifteen of these diseases had never been studied in large GWAS in non-Caucasian populations, including chronic liver diseases and cirrhosis, leukemia, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Our results demonstrate that diseases killing most Americans are still lacking genetic studies across ethnicities.

  16. Baseline predictors of renal disease progression in the African American Study of Hypertension and Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Norris, Keith C; Greene, Tom; Kopple, Joel; Lea, Janice; Lewis, Julia; Lipkowitz, Mike; Miller, Pete; Richardson, Annie; Rostand, Stephen; Wang, Xuelei; Appel, Lawrence J

    2006-10-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased risk for progression to ESRD. The purpose of this study was to examine factors that predict increased risk for adverse renal outcomes. Cox regression was performed to assess the potential of 38 baseline risk factors to predict the clinical renal composite outcome of 50% or 25-ml/min per 1.73 m(2) GFR decline or ESRD among 1094 black patients with hypertensive nephrosclerosis (GFR 20 to 65 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)). Patients were trial participants who had been randomly assigned to one of two BP goals and to one of three antihypertensive regimens and followed for a range of 3 to 6.4 yr. In unadjusted and adjusted analyses, baseline proteinuria was consistently associated with an increased risk for adverse renal outcomes, even at low levels of proteinuria. The relationship of proteinuria with adverse renal outcomes also was evident in analyses that were stratified by level of GFR, which itself was associated with adverse renal outcomes but only at levels <40 ml/min. Other factors that were significantly associated with increased renal events after adjustment for baseline GFR, age, and gender, both with and without adjustment for baseline proteinuria, included serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, and phosphorus. In black patients with hypertensive nephrosclerosis, increased proteinuria, reduced GFR, and elevated levels of serum creatinine, urea nitrogen and phosphorus were directly associated with adverse clinical renal events. These findings identify a subset of this high-risk population that might benefit from even more aggressive treatment.

  17. Impact of the revised (2008) EORTC/MSG definitions for invasive fungal disease on the rates of diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Tsitsikas, Dimitris A; Morin, Amelie; Araf, Shamzah; Murtagh, Bernadine; Johnson, Gemma; Vinnicombe, Sarah; Ellis, Stephen; Suaris, Tamara; Wilks, Mark; Doffman, Sarah; Agrawal, Samir G

    2012-07-01

    Diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA) remains a challenge as the clinical manifestations are not specific, and a histological diagnosis is often unfeasible. The 2002 European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (MSG) criteria for classification of cases into possible, probable or proven were revised in 2008. Our objective was to analyze the impact of these revisions on the diagnosis of IA. A retrospective analysis of 589 high risk patient-episodes revealed that 125 of 155 'possible' (81%) and 12 of 16 'probable' (75%) cases of IA should be changed to 'non-classifiable' when the new criteria were applied. We concluded, as expected, that the 2008 EORTC/MSG revised definitions reduced the number of cases classified as 'possible' IA, but additionally, there has been a dramatic reduction in 'probable' cases. These changes have significant implications on the interpretation of clinical trial data based on EORTC/MSG classifications.

  18. Molecular studies of ceruloplasmin deficiency in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Czaja, M J; Weiner, F R; Schwarzenberg, S J; Sternlieb, I; Scheinberg, I H; Van Thiel, D H; LaRusso, N F; Giambrone, M A; Kirschner, R; Koschinsky, M L

    1987-10-01

    Deficiency of serum ceruloplasmin is a characteristic biochemical abnormality of Wilson's disease, although the mechanism of this finding is unknown. Ceruloplasmin messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were therefore examined in five patients with Wilson's disease and five controls with other types of hepatic disease. Northern and dot blot hybridizations showed that detectable ceruloplasmin mRNA was present in all of the patients with Wilson's disease, including one patient with no detectable serum ceruloplasmin. However, the ceruloplasmin mRNA levels in the Wilson's disease patients were only 33% that of controls (P less than 0.001). In contrast, albumin mRNA levels in the Wilson's disease patients averaged 161% that of controls. In an attempt to better delineate the level of gene expression responsible for this decrease in ceruloplasmin mRNA, the nuclear run-on assay was used to analyze transcriptional rates. The amount of ceruloplasmin gene transcription in four Wilson's patients was decreased to 44% that of three controls. These results indicate that the diminished serum ceruloplasmin levels in patients with Wilson's disease are due at least in part to a decrease in ceruloplasmin gene transcription.

  19. Segmentation and quantification for Alzheimer's disease (AD): a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Tianhu; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Zhuge, Ying; Moonis, Gul; Clark, Christopher

    2003-05-01

    Alzheimer's is a progressive brain disease and is clinically characterized by cognitive symptoms that, in combination with behavioral disturbances, significantly interfere with activities of daily living. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of developing volumetric measures of the structural damage and atrophy of brain derived from multiprotocol MR imaging. Our approach first applies intensity inhomogeneity correction and intensity standardization to PD and T2 weighted MR images to create base images for quantitative image analysis. Then, vectorial scale-based fuzzy connectedness segmentation (VSFCS) and morphological operations are applied to the base images to extract masks of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), grey matter (GM), and white matter (WM), and further to create a clean and accurate intracranial (IC) mask. After separating CSF from brain parenchyma (BP), VSFCS is applied to BP (PD and T2) images to generate pure GM and WM masks, and then subtracting these pure from the BP mask to detect AD lesions. This method was applied to a set of conventional PD and T2 weighted MR images that were obtained from 5 patients with probable AD and 5 healthy normal control subjects. The segmented images of individual brain tissue regions (CSF, GM, WM, and AD lesion) are consistent with a Neuroradiologist's examination. The quantitative analysis shows that patients with AD have more atrophy. The mean value of the volume of brain parenchyma of patients with AD is about 10% less than that of healthy controls.

  20. Genetic study of neurexin and neuroligin genes in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Mir, Amalia; González-Pérez, Antonio; Gayán, Javier; Antúnez, Carmen; Marín, Juan; Boada, Mercé; Lopez-Arrieta, Jesús María; Fernández, Evaristo; Ramírez-Lorca, Reposo; Sáez, María Eugenia; Ruiz, Agustín; Scholl, Francisco G; Real, Luis Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between neurexins and neuroligins promotes the formation of functional synaptic structures. Recently, it has been reported that neurexins and neuroligins are proteolytically processed by presenilins at synapses. Based on this interaction and the role of presenilins in familial Alzheimer's disease (AD), we hypothesized that dysfunction of the neuroligin-neurexin pathway might be associated with AD. To explore this hypothesis, we carried out a meta-analysis of five genome-wide association studies (GWAS) comprising 1, 256 SNPs in the NRXN1, NRXN2, NRXN3, and NLGN1 genes (3,009 cases and 3,006 control individuals). We identified a marker in the NRXN3 gene (rs17757879) that showed a consistent protective effect in all GWAS, however, the statistical significance obtained did not resist multiple testing corrections (OR = 0.851, p = 0.002). Nonetheless, gender analysis revealed that this effect was restricted to males. A combined meta-analysis of the former five GWAS together with a replication Spanish sample consisting of 1,785 cases and 1,634 controls confirmed this observation (rs17757879, OR = 0.742, 95% CI = 0.632-0.872, p = 0.00028, final meta-analysis). We conclude that NRXN3 might have a role in susceptibility to AD in males.

  1. Levodopa and executive performance in Parkinson's disease: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Sedano, Berta; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Barbanoj, Manel; García-Sánchez, Carmen; Campolongo, Antonia; Gironell, Alexandre; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Gich, Ignasi

    2008-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients may experience fluctuations in executive performance after oral levodopa (LD). Their relationship with the pharmacokinetic profile of LD and with distinct cognitive processes associated with frontal-basal ganglia circuits is not well understood. In this randomized, double-blind, crossover study we plotted acute cognitive changes in 14 PD patients challenged with faster (immediate-release, IR) versus slower (controlled-release, CR) increases in LD plasma concentrations. We monitored motor status, LD plasma levels, and performance on four tasks of executive function (Wisconsin Card Sorting Test-WCST, Sternberg test, Stroop and Tower of Hanoi), 1 hr before and over +6 hr after IR and CR-LD dose. Analysis of variance demonstrated significant but divergent changes in the Sternberg (6-digit but not 2- and 4-digit) test: improvement after CR-LD and worsening after IR-LD. Marginal improvement (p = .085) was observed with CR-LD in the WCST, while no significant differences were seen for the Stroop or Tower of Hanoi tests. Executive-related performance after LD challenge may differ depending on the LD time-to-peak plasma concentration and specific task demands. A slower rise in LD levels appears to have a more favorable impact on more difficult working memory tests. These results require replication to determine their generalization. PMID:18764978

  2. A phase II study of laquinimod in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    D'Haens, Geert; Sandborn, William J; Colombel, Jean Frederic; Rutgeerts, Paul; Brown, Kurt; Barkay, Hadas; Sakov, Anat; Haviv, Asi; Feagan, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Objective Laquinimod is an oral therapeutic agent under investigation for the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD), Huntington's disease, lupus nephritis and multiple sclerosis. This dose escalation study evaluated the safety and efficacy of laquinimod as induction therapy in patients with active moderate–severe CD. Design Multicentre, double-blind, sequential-cohort, randomised controlled trial with laquinimod doses of 0.5, 1, 1.5 or 2 mg/day or placebo (n=45 per cohort randomised in a 2:1 ratio) for 8 weeks with 4-week follow-up. Stable concomittant therapies and prior use of anti-tumour necrosis factor agents were permitted. Comprehensive safety assessments were performed and efficacy analyses included the proportions of patients in clinical remission (CD Activity Index (CDAI) <150 and no treatment failure (TF)), and with a clinical response (70 or 100 point CDAI reduction from baseline or remission and no TF). Results 117 patients received laquinimod and 63 patients received placebo. The overall incidence of adverse events (AEs) in the laquinimod group was similar to the pooled placebo group (86.2%–96.7% vs 82.5%) and most AEs were mild to moderate in severity. Treatment with laquinimod 0.5 mg showed consistent effects on remission (48.3% (CI 31% to 66%) vs 15.9% (CI 9% to 27%)), response 100 (55.2% (CI 37% to 71%) vs 31.7% (CI 22% to 44%)) and response 70 (62.1% (CI 44% to 77%) vs 34.9% (CI 24% to 47%)) versus placebo. Laquinimod 1.0 mg showed less benefit (26.7% remission (CI 14% to 44%) and 53.3% response 70 (CI 36% to 70%)), and no effect was noted on remission/response at higher doses. Conclusions Laquinimod was safe and well tolerated, and the effects on remission and response of the 0.5 mg dose suggest a treatment benefit in patients with CD. Trial registration number NCT00737932. PMID:25281416

  3. The olive knot disease as a model to study the role of interspecies bacterial communities in plant disease

    PubMed Central

    Buonaurio, Roberto; Moretti, Chiaraluce; da Silva, Daniel Passos; Cortese, Chiara; Ramos, Cayo; Venturi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in studying interspecies bacterial interactions in diseases of animals and plants as it is believed that the great majority of bacteria found in nature live in complex communities. Plant pathologists have thus far mainly focused on studies involving single species or on their interactions with antagonistic competitors. A bacterial disease used as model to study multispecies interactions is the olive knot disease, caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi (Psv). Knots caused by Psv in branches and other aerial parts of the olive trees are an ideal niche not only for the pathogen but also for many other plant-associated bacterial species, mainly belonging to the genera Pantoea, Pectobacterium, Erwinia, and Curtobacterium. The non-pathogenic bacterial species Erwinia toletana, Pantoea agglomerans, and Erwinia oleae, which are frequently isolated inside the olive knots, cooperate with Psv in modulating the disease severity. Co-inoculations of these species with Psv result in bigger knots and better bacterial colonization when compared to single inoculations. Moreover, harmless bacteria co-localize with the pathogen inside the knots, indicating the formation of stable bacterial consortia that may facilitate the exchange of quorum sensing signals and metabolites. Here we discuss the possible role of bacterial communities in the establishment and development of olive knot disease, which we believe could be taking place in many other bacterial plant diseases. PMID:26113855

  4. The olive knot disease as a model to study the role of interspecies bacterial communities in plant disease.

    PubMed

    Buonaurio, Roberto; Moretti, Chiaraluce; da Silva, Daniel Passos; Cortese, Chiara; Ramos, Cayo; Venturi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in studying interspecies bacterial interactions in diseases of animals and plants as it is believed that the great majority of bacteria found in nature live in complex communities. Plant pathologists have thus far mainly focused on studies involving single species or on their interactions with antagonistic competitors. A bacterial disease used as model to study multispecies interactions is the olive knot disease, caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi (Psv). Knots caused by Psv in branches and other aerial parts of the olive trees are an ideal niche not only for the pathogen but also for many other plant-associated bacterial species, mainly belonging to the genera Pantoea, Pectobacterium, Erwinia, and Curtobacterium. The non-pathogenic bacterial species Erwinia toletana, Pantoea agglomerans, and Erwinia oleae, which are frequently isolated inside the olive knots, cooperate with Psv in modulating the disease severity. Co-inoculations of these species with Psv result in bigger knots and better bacterial colonization when compared to single inoculations. Moreover, harmless bacteria co-localize with the pathogen inside the knots, indicating the formation of stable bacterial consortia that may facilitate the exchange of quorum sensing signals and metabolites. Here we discuss the possible role of bacterial communities in the establishment and development of olive knot disease, which we believe could be taking place in many other bacterial plant diseases. PMID:26113855

  5. Social intentions in Parkinson's disease patients: A kinematic study.

    PubMed

    Straulino, Elisa; Scaravilli, Tomaso; Castiello, Umberto

    2015-09-01

    Dysfunction of the dopaminergic system leads to motor, cognitive and motivational symptoms in brain disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Moreover, the dopaminergic system plays an important role in social interactions. The dopaminergic input to the basal ganglia (BG) thought to integrate social cues during the planning and execution of voluntary movements remains, however, largely unexplored. Since PD provides a model to assess this function in humans, our study aimed to investigate the effects of social intentions on actions in non-demented PDpatients receiving dopamine replacement therapy (Levodopa = l-Dopa) and in neurologically healthy control participants. Patients' ability to modulate motor patterning depending on the intention motivating the action to be performed was evaluated both in "on" (with l-Dopa) and "off" (without l-Dopa) states. Participants were instructed to reach for and to grasp an object; they were then told to hand it to another person (social condition) or to place it on a concave frame (individual condition). A 'passive-observer' condition, which was similar to the 'individual' condition except for the presence of an onlooker who simply observed the scene, was also assessed to exclude the possibility that differences might be due to the presence of another person. Movement kinematics were recorded using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Study results demonstrated that the controls and the PD patients in an 'on' state adopted different kinematic patterning for the 'social' and the 'individual' conditions; the PD patients in the 'off' state, instead, were unable to kinematically differentiate between the two conditions. These results suggest that l-Dopa treatment has positive effects on translating social intentions into specific motor patterns in PD patients.

  6. Hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    de Maindreville, Anne Doé; Fénelon, Gilles; Mahieux, Florence

    2005-02-01

    To study prevalence of hallucinations in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) during a 1-year period, and identify factors predictive of the onset of hallucinations in patients who were hallucination-free at baseline, 141 unselected outpatients with PD were evaluated prospectively for a set of demographic, clinical, and therapeutic variables and the presence of hallucinations during the previous 3 months. Patient groups were compared with nonparametric tests, and logistic regression was applied to significant data. Follow-up data were available for 127 patients. The hallucination prevalence rates (%) at the first and second evaluation were, respectively, 41.7 and 49.6 for hallucinations of all types (NS), 29.1 and 40.2 for minor hallucinations (i.e., presence or passage hallucinations, and illusions) (P = 0.02), 22.8 and 21.2 for formed visual hallucinations (NS), and 8.7 and 8.7 for auditory hallucinations (NS). Hallucinations rarely started or ceased during the study. The most labile forms were minor hallucinations, which developed in 20% of patients and ceased in 9%. During follow-up, 15% of patients started to hallucinate. Three factors, all present at the first evaluation, independently predicted the onset of hallucinations in patients previously free of hallucinations at baseline (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval): severe sleep disturbances (14.3; 2.5-80.9), ocular disorders (9.1; 1.6-52.0), and a high axial motor score (5.7; 1.2-27.4). Hallucinations have a chronic course in most parkinsonian patients. Factors predicting the onset of hallucinations point to a role of extranigral brainstem involvement and a nonspecific, facilitating role of ocular disorders.

  7. Cardiovascular physiology in premotor Parkinson's disease: a neuroepidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Samay; Ton, Thanh G; Perera, Subashan; Zheng, Yan; Stein, Phyllis K; Thacker, Evan; Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Newman, Anne B; Longstreth, Will T

    2012-07-01

    Changes in cardiovascular physiology in Parkinson's disease (PD) are common and may occur prior to diagnostic parkinsonian motor signs. We investigated associations of electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities, orthostasis, heart rate variability, and carotid stenosis with the risk of PD diagnosis in the Cardiovascular Health Study, a community-based cohort of older adults. ECG abnormality, orthostasis (symptomatic or asymptomatic), heart rate variability (24-hour Holter monitoring), and any carotid stenosis (≥1%) by ultrasound were modeled as primary predictors of incident PD diagnosis using multivariable logistic regression. Incident PD cases were identified by at least 1 of the following: self-report, antiparkinsonian medication use, and ICD-9. If unadjusted models were significant, they were adjusted or stratified by age, sex, and smoking status, and those in which predictors were still significant (P ≤ .05) were also adjusted for race, diabetes, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, blood pressure, body mass index, physical activity, education level, stroke, and C-reactive protein. Of 5888 participants, 154 incident PD cases were identified over 14 years of follow-up. After adjusting models with all covariates, those with any ECG abnormality (odds ratio [OR], 1.45; 95% CI, 1.02-2.07; P = .04) or any carotid stenosis (OR, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.40-4.09; P = .001) at baseline had a higher risk of incident PD diagnosis. Orthostasis and heart rate variability were not significant predictors. This exploratory study suggests that carotid stenosis and ECG abnormalities occur prior to motor signs in PD, thus serving as potential premotor features or risk factors for PD diagnosis. Replication is needed in a population with more thorough ascertainment of PD onset.

  8. ECOLOGIC STUDY OF MESOSCALE ENVIRONMENTS WITH EXCESS DISEASE PREVALENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work employs an ecologic epidemiological approach to assess the relationship between environmental stressors and excess disease prevalence in small communities. Specifically, the childhood leukemia cluster in Fallon Nevada is used as an example; heavy metals (tungsten and c...

  9. Retinopathy and the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study).

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Juan E; Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker-Ostroff, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Lo, Joan C; Townsend, Raymond R; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W; Xie, Dawei

    2015-11-15

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience other diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess whether retinopathy predicts future CVD events in a subgroup of the participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. In this ancillary investigation, 2,605 participants of the CRIC study were invited to participate, and nonmydriatic fundus photographs were obtained in 1,936 subjects. Using standard protocols, presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive, or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed at a central photograph reading center by trained graders masked to study participant's information. Patients with a self-reported history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. Incident CVD events were adjudicated using medical records. Kidney function measurements, traditional and nontraditional risk factors, for CVD were obtained. Presence and severity of retinopathy were associated with increased risk of development of any CVD in this population of CKD patients, and these associations persisted after adjustment for traditional risk factors for CVD. We also found a direct relation between increased venular diameter and risk of development of CVD; however, the relation was not statistically significant after adjustment for traditional risk factors. In conclusion, the presence of retinopathy was associated with future CVD events, suggesting that retinovascular pathology may be indicative of macrovascular disease even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. Assessment of retinal morphology may be valuable in assessing risk of CVD in patients with CKD, both clinically and in research settings.

  10. Pulmonary Hypoplasia Associated with Congenital Heart Diseases: A Fetal Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruchonnet-Metrailler, Isabelle; Bessieres, Bettina; Bonnet, Damien; Vibhushan, Shamila; Delacourt, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormalities of the fetal pulmonary vasculature may affect lung morphogenesis. Postnatal studies have suggested that pulmonary hypoplasia (PH) may be associated with congenital heart diseases (CHDs). Objective To determine the prevalence of PH associated with CHDs, and to evaluate whether CHDs with right outflow obstruction were associated with the highest risk of lung growth impairment. Methods Between January 2006 and December 2010, fetuses with CHD obtained following the termination of pregnancies due to fetal abnormalities were examined in a prospective manner for the detection of heart and lung defects. CHDs were classified into five pathophysiological groups. Lung weight (LW), body weight (BW), and LW/BW ratio were analyzed for each case. The expression of CD31 and VEGF in the lung was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results Fetuses with CHDs and right outflow obstruction had significantly lower LW for a given BW, and significantly lower LW/BW ratios for a given gestational age. When defining PH as a fetal LW/BW ratio <0.015 before 28 weeks, and <0.012 after 28 weeks, PH was detected in 15 of the 119 fetuses analyzed (13%). It was significantly associated with CHD with right outflow obstruction, independently of chromosomal abnormalities and associated extracardiac abnormalities (p<0.03). Right outflow obstruction was detected in 60% of the fetuses with CHD and PH, but in only 32% of those with CHD but no PH. In fetuses with right outflow obstruction, no difference was observed between those with PH and those without PH, in terms of the ratio of pulmonary artery diameter to aortic diameter, lung CD31 expression, or lung VEGF expression. Conclusion CHDs with right outflow obstruction are a significant risk factor for prenatally acquired PH. The occurrence of fetal PH is not correlated with abnormalities of the pulmonary vasculature, suggesting the involvement of perfusion-independent mechanisms. PMID:24699523

  11. Innovative research methods for studying treatments for rare diseases: methodological review

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Lauren; O’Keefe, Kelly; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine methods for generating evidence on health outcomes in patients with rare diseases. Design Methodological review of existing literature. Setting PubMed, Embase, and Academic Search Premier searched for articles describing innovative approaches to randomized trial design and analysis methods and methods for conducting observational research in patients with rare diseases. Main outcome measures We assessed information related to the proposed methods, the specific rare disease being studied, and outcomes from the application of the methods. We summarize methods with respect to their advantages in studying health outcomes in rare diseases and provide examples of their application. Results We identified 46 articles that proposed or described methods for studying patient health outcomes in rare diseases. Articles covered a wide range of rare diseases and most (72%) were published in 2008 or later. We identified 16 research strategies for studying rare disease. Innovative clinical trial methods minimize sample size requirements (n=4) and maximize the proportion of patients who receive active treatment (n=2), strategies crucial to studying small populations of patients with limited treatment choices. No studies describing unique methods for conducting observational studies in patients with rare diseases were identified. Conclusions Though numerous studies apply unique clinical trial designs and considerations to assess patient health outcomes in rare diseases, less attention has been paid to innovative methods for studying rare diseases using observational data. PMID:25422272

  12. Pandemic Diseases and the Aviation Network SARS, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufnagel, Lars; Brockmann, Dirk; Geisel, Theo

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the mechanisms of the worldwide spread of infectious diseases in a modern world in which humans travel on all scales. We introduce a probabilistic model which accounts for the worldwide spread of infectious diseases on the global aviation network. The analysis indicates that a forecast of the geographical spread of an epidemic is indeed possible, provided that local dynamical parameters of the disease such as the basic reproduction number are known. The model consists of local stochastic infection dynamics and stochastic transport of individuals on the worldwide aviation network which takes into account over 95% of the entire the national and international civil aviation traffic. Our simulations of the SARS outbreak are in surprisingly good agreement with published case reports. Despite the fact that the system is stochastic with a high number of degrees of freedom the outcome of a single simulation exhibits only a small magnitude of variability. We show that this is due to the strong heterogeneity of the network ranging from a few two over 25,000 passengers between nodes of the network. Thus, we propose that our model can be employed to predict the worldwide spread of future pandemic diseases and to identify endangered regions in advance. Based on the connectivity of the aviation network we evaluate the performance of different control strategies and show that a quick and focused reaction is essential to inhibit the global spread of infectious diseases.

  13. The storage lipids in Tangier disease. A physical chemical study.

    PubMed

    Katz, S S; Small, D M; Brook, J G; Lees, R S

    1977-06-01

    The physical states and phase behavior of the lipids of the spleen, liver, and splenic artery from a 38-yr-old man with Tangier disease were studied. Many intracellular lipid droplets in the smectic liquid crystalline state were identified by polarizing microscopy in macrophages in both the spleen and liver, but not in the splenic artery. The droplets within individual cells melted sharply over a narrow temperature range, indicating a uniform lipid composition of the droplets of each cell. However different cells melted over a wide range, 20-53 degrees C indicating heterogeneity of lipid droplet composition between cells. Furthermore, most of the cells (81%) had droplets in the liquid crystalline state at 37 degrees C. X-ray diffraction studies of splenic tissue at 37 degrees C revealed a diffraction pattern typical of cholesterol esters in the smectic liquid crystalline state. Differential scanning calorimetry of spleen showed a broad reversible transition from 29-52 degrees C, with a maximum mean transition temperature at 42 degrees C, correlating closely with the polarizing microscopy observations. The enthalpy of the transition, 0.86+/-0.07 cal/g of cholesterol ester, was quantitatively similar to that of the liquid crystalline to liquid transition of pure cholesterol esters indicating that nearly all of the cholesterol esters in the tissue were free to undergo the smectic-isotropic phase transition. Lipid compositions of spleen and liver were determined, and when plotted on the cholesterol-phospholipid-cholesterol ester phase diagram, fell within the two phase zone. The two phases, cholesterol ester droplets and phospholipid bilayers were isolated by ultracentrifugation of tissue homogenates. Lipid compositions of the separated phases approximated those predicted by the phase diagram. Extracted lipids from the spleen, when dispersed in water and ultracentrifuged, underwent phase separation in a similar way. Thus (a) most of the storage lipids in the liver and

  14. The storage lipids in Tangier disease. A physical chemical study.

    PubMed

    Katz, S S; Small, D M; Brook, J G; Lees, R S

    1977-06-01

    The physical states and phase behavior of the lipids of the spleen, liver, and splenic artery from a 38-yr-old man with Tangier disease were studied. Many intracellular lipid droplets in the smectic liquid crystalline state were identified by polarizing microscopy in macrophages in both the spleen and liver, but not in the splenic artery. The droplets within individual cells melted sharply over a narrow temperature range, indicating a uniform lipid composition of the droplets of each cell. However different cells melted over a wide range, 20-53 degrees C indicating heterogeneity of lipid droplet composition between cells. Furthermore, most of the cells (81%) had droplets in the liquid crystalline state at 37 degrees C. X-ray diffraction studies of splenic tissue at 37 degrees C revealed a diffraction pattern typical of cholesterol esters in the smectic liquid crystalline state. Differential scanning calorimetry of spleen showed a broad reversible transition from 29-52 degrees C, with a maximum mean transition temperature at 42 degrees C, correlating closely with the polarizing microscopy observations. The enthalpy of the transition, 0.86+/-0.07 cal/g of cholesterol ester, was quantitatively similar to that of the liquid crystalline to liquid transition of pure cholesterol esters indicating that nearly all of the cholesterol esters in the tissue were free to undergo the smectic-isotropic phase transition. Lipid compositions of spleen and liver were determined, and when plotted on the cholesterol-phospholipid-cholesterol ester phase diagram, fell within the two phase zone. The two phases, cholesterol ester droplets and phospholipid bilayers were isolated by ultracentrifugation of tissue homogenates. Lipid compositions of the separated phases approximated those predicted by the phase diagram. Extracted lipids from the spleen, when dispersed in water and ultracentrifuged, underwent phase separation in a similar way. Thus (a) most of the storage lipids in the liver and

  15. Clinical experiences with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Szucs, Anna; Várallyay, Péter; Osztie, Eva; Papp, Erzsébet; Sólyom, András; Finta, Lehel; Varga, Dániel; Barcs, Gábor; Holló, András; Kamondi, Anita

    2012-11-30

    The clinical picture, electroencephalographic, imaging and cerebrospinal fluid parameters as well as the molecular background of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have been well explored. The diagnostic criteria, offering clinicians a fair chance to identify these patients in vivo, have recently been updated. However, the diagnosis is still a challenge in everyday neurological routine. We report on three of our Creutzfeldt-Jakob patients for calling attention to the classical and the recently defined features of the disease. We conclude that based on the rapidly progressing neuropsychiatric syndrome Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease may be suspected; follow-up EEG may reveal the typical (pseudo)-periodic pattern with progressive deterioration of the background activity. In addition, diffusion-weighted brain MRI imaging (DWI) has high diagnostic value. Detection of 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid supports the in vivo diagnosis.

  16. The hypotonic infant: case study of central core disease.

    PubMed

    Castrodale, Val

    2003-01-01

    Causes of hypotonia in the newborn can be broadly categorized into two classifications. Hypotonia with a supraspinal origin may be seen with systemic disease, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, cerebral malformations, syndromes (for example: Down, Prader-Willi, Lowe, Zellweger, Smith-Lemli-Opitz), and c-spine injury. Disorders of the motor unit that present with hypotonia in the newborn period include SMA, congenital myotonic dystrophy, congenital myasthenia gravis, and congenital myopathies. Central core disease is one of the classic congenital myopathies that can be differentiated based on characteristic histologic findings. Muscle fiber samples from patients with central core disease possess distinct morphology that can be diagnostic. Many infants may not exhibit muscle weakness in the newborn period, although there have been rare cases of profound hypotonia and respiratory failure. Clearly, muscle biopsy is the gold standard and is indicated for any infant with marked hypotonia that is not thought to be supraspinal in origin. PMID:12597091

  17. Clinical features and predictors for disease natural progression in adults with Pompe disease: a nationwide prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Due partly to physicians’ unawareness, many adults with Pompe disease are diagnosed with great delay. Besides, it is not well known which factors influence the rate of disease progression, and thus disease outcome. We delineated the specific clinical features of Pompe disease in adults, and mapped out the distribution and severity of muscle weakness, and the sequence of involvement of the individual muscle groups. Furthermore, we defined the natural disease course and identified prognostic factors for disease progression. Methods We conducted a single-center, prospective, observational study. Muscle strength (manual muscle testing, and hand-held dynamometry), muscle function (quick motor function test), and pulmonary function (forced vital capacity in sitting and supine positions) were assessed every 3–6 months and analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA. Results Between October 2004 and August 2009, 94 patients aged between 25 and 75 years were included in the study. Although skeletal muscle weakness was typically distributed in a limb-girdle pattern, many patients had unfamiliar features such as ptosis (23%), bulbar weakness (28%), and scapular winging (33%). During follow-up (average 1.6 years, range 0.5-4.2 years), skeletal muscle strength deteriorated significantly (mean declines of −1.3% point/year for manual muscle testing and of −2.6% points/year for hand-held dynamometry; both p<0.001). Longer disease duration (>15 years) and pulmonary involvement (forced vital capacity in sitting position <80%) at study entry predicted faster decline. On average, forced vital capacity in supine position deteriorated by 1.3% points per year (p=0.02). Decline in pulmonary function was consistent across subgroups. Ten percent of patients declined unexpectedly fast. Conclusions Recognizing patterns of common and less familiar characteristics in adults with Pompe disease facilitates timely diagnosis. Longer disease duration and reduced pulmonary function

  18. Factitious disease: clinical lessons from case studies at Baylor University Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Adria C.; Fordtran, John S.

    2006-01-01

    Factitious disease is defined as the intentional production (or feigning) of disease in oneself to relieve emotional distress by assuming the role of a sick person. Although the self-induction of disease is a conscious act, the underlying motivation is usually unconscious. It has been estimated that 3% to 5% of physician-patient encounters involve factitious disease. This article presents 6 case studies from Baylor University Medical Center that highlight various clinical aspects of factitious disease. Patients with factitious diseases are extremely difficult to recognize because they do not appear different from patients with authentic causes of similar symptoms, because their psychiatric abnormalities are not appreciated, and because doctors and nurses have alowindex of suspicion. Since patients with factitious disease present a false medicalhistory, their physicians prescribe unnecessary procedures and therapies that may result in iatrogenic disease. In many cases, damage to these patients from doctors' actions exceeds the harm resulting from the patients' self-induced illness. The clues that should suggest factitious disease, the diagnostic roles of the clinician and a consulting psychiatrist, and the ethical conflicts that confront doctors taking care of such patients are discussed. To help keep factitious disease in clinical perspective, one of the case studies involves the antithesis of factitious disease, where a patient was mistakenly diagnosed as having psychogenic pain when in fact the symptoms were caused by an overlooked physical disease. Better knowledge of the clinical features of factitious disease might have prevented the disastrous outcome. PMID:17252033

  19. Cardiopulmonary Disease in Newborns: A Study in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Armin D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A film describing tachypea as an early manifestation of congenital heart disease was shown to physicians and nurses at 27 hospitals during regular continuing medical education activities. Findings from pre-test and post-test data show that need-oriented educational programs can measurably improve the quality of patient care. (Author/LBH)

  20. Underestimation and undertreatment of pain in HIV disease: multicentre study.

    PubMed Central

    Larue, F.; Fontaine, A.; Colleau, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the prevalence, severity, and impact of pain on quality of life for HIV patients; to identify factors associated with undertreatment of pain. DESIGN: Multicentre cross sectional survey. SETTINGS: 34 HIV treatment facilities, including inpatient hospital wards, day hospitals, and ambulatory care clinics, in 13 cities throughout France. SUBJECTS: 315 HIV patients at different stages of the disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients: recorded presence and severity of pain and rated quality of life. Doctors: reported disease status, estimate of pain severity, and analgesic treatment ordered. RESULTS: From 30% (17/56) of outpatients to 62% (73/118) of inpatients reported pain due to HIV disease. Pain severity significantly decreased patients' quality of life. Doctors underestimated pain severity in 52% (70/135) of HIV patients reporting pain. Underestimation of pain severity was more likely for patients who reported moderate (odds ratio 24) or severe pain (165) and less likely for patients whose pain source was identified or who were perceived as more depressed. Of the patients reporting moderate or severe pain, 57% (61/107) did not receive any analgesic treatment; only 22% (23/107) received at least weak opioids. Likelihood of analgesic prescription increased when doctors estimated pain to be more severe and regarded patients as sicker. CONCLUSIONS: Pain is a common and debilitating symptom of HIV disease which is gravely underestimated and undertreated. PMID:9001475

  1. Aspirin and coronary heart disease: findings of a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, E C; Garfinkel, L

    1975-01-01

    Over 1 000 000 men and women answered a confidential questionnaire and were traced for up to six years afterwards. Among other questions each person was asked how often he or she took aspirin-"never", "seldom," or "often." Coronary heart disease death rates were no lower among people who took aspirin often than among those who did not do so. PMID:1131582

  2. Emotional processing needs further study in major psychiatric diseases

    PubMed Central

    Thibaut, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Emotions are largely affected in many psychiatric diseases. A better understanding of the neural networks involved in emotion processing is an important way to be able to improve dysfunctions in emotion recognition, as well as expression, associated with major psychiatric disorders. PMID:26869837

  3. A pedigree study of perinatally lethal renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bankier, A; de Campo, M; Newell, R; Rogers, J G; Danks, D M

    1985-01-01

    A family study of perinatally lethal renal disease (PLRD) was undertaken in the State of Victoria, Australia, for the years 1961 to 1980. A total of 221 cases was ascertained through hospital and necropsy records and confirmed by necropsy findings. There were 134 cases of bilateral renal agenesis (BRA), 34 cases of unilateral agenesis with dysplasia of the other kidney (URA/RD), 42 cases of bilateral renal dysplasia (BRD), and 11 cases of renal aplasia. Parents of 131 babies were interviewed and 153 parents from 82 families had a renal ultrasound examination. In the period of best ascertainment (1975 to 1980) the frequency of PLRD was 0.27 per 1000 and of BRA 0.16 per 1000. There were 10 cases of sirenomelia, a frequency of 0.008 per 1000. For all families of PLRD, 15 of 423 (3.6%) sibs and three of 1579 (0.2%) first cousins were affected. One family had three sibs with BRA and four had two sibs with BRA. One pair of sibs and two first cousins had BRA in one and URA/RD in the other affected. One baby had BRD with an affected first cousin. The nature of the renal lesion was not established. When the index case had BRA, 14 in 283 (5.6%) sibs had PLRD. Where the index case had BRA and urogenital defects, but no birth defects in other organs, 12 of 148 sibs (8%) were affected. None of the sibs had BRA when the index case had BRA as part of a multiple malformation complex. In the multiple malformation group, however, five of 40 (12.5%) sibs had similar patterns of malformations. Renal ultrasound abnormalities were no more frequent in parents of two affected babies (one of 18) than in the other parents (nine of 135). Our findings confirm that BRA and URA are genetically related. There are a number of conclusions which are important for genetic counselling. There is a high likelihood of recurrence (8%) in sibs when the index case has BRA and urogenital abnormalities alone. When BRA is part of a multiple malformation complex, the risk of recurrence of multiple

  4. Use of Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to study Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Adanna G.; Marfil, Vanessa; Li, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Advances in research and technology has increased our quality of life, allowed us to combat diseases, and achieve increased longevity. Unfortunately, increased longevity is accompanied by a rise in the incidences of age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is the sixth leading cause of death, and one of the leading causes of dementia amongst the aged population in the USA. It is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by the prevalence of extracellular Aβ plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, derived from the proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau, respectively. Despite years of extensive research, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathology of AD remain unclear. Model organisms, such as the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, present a complementary approach to addressing these questions. C. elegans has many advantages as a model system to study AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Like their mammalian counterparts, they have complex biochemical pathways, most of which are conserved. Genes in which mutations are correlated with AD have counterparts in C. elegans, including an APP-related gene, apl-1, a tau homolog, ptl-1, and presenilin homologs, such as sel-12 and hop-1. Since the neuronal connectivity in C. elegans has already been established, C. elegans is also advantageous in modeling learning and memory impairments seen during AD. This article addresses the insights C. elegans provide in studying AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, we explore the advantages and drawbacks associated with using this model. PMID:25250042

  5. Epilepsy in adults with mitochondrial disease: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Helen E.; Gorman, Grainne S.; Schaefer, Andrew M.; Horvath, Rita; Ng, Yi; Nesbitt, Victoria; Lax, Nichola Z.; McFarland, Robert; Cunningham, Mark O.; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Douglass M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to determine the prevalence and progression of epilepsy in adult patients with mitochondrial disease. Methods We prospectively recruited a cohort of 182 consecutive adult patients attending a specialized mitochondrial disease clinic in Newcastle upon Tyne between January 1, 2005 and January 1, 2008. We then followed this cohort over a 7‐year period, recording primary outcome measures of occurrence of first seizure, status epilepticus, stroke‐like episode, and death. Results Overall prevalence of epilepsy in the cohort was 23.1%. Mean age of epilepsy onset was 29.4 years. Prevalence varied widely between genotypes, with several genotypes having no cases of epilepsy, a prevalence of 34.9% in the most common genotype (m.3243A>G mutation), and 92.3% in the m.8344A>G mutation. Among the cohort as a whole, focal seizures, with or without progression to bilateral convulsive seizures, was the most common seizure type. Conversely, all of the patients with the m.8344A>G mutation and epilepsy experienced myoclonic seizures. Patients with the m.3243A>G mutation remain at high risk of developing stroke‐like episodes (1.16% per year). However, although the standardized mortality ratio for the entire cohort was high (2.86), this ratio did not differ significantly between patients with epilepsy (2.96) and those without (2.83). Interpretation Epilepsy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease. It develops early in the disease and, in the case of the m.3243A>G mutation, often presents in the context of a stroke‐like episode or status epilepticus. However, epilepsy does not itself appear to contribute to the increased mortality in mitochondrial disease. Ann Neurol 2015;78:949–957 PMID:26381753

  6. Women, men, and rheumatoid arthritis: analyses of disease activity, disease characteristics, and treatments in the QUEST-RA Study

    PubMed Central

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Toloza, Sergio; Cutolo, Maurizio; Kautiainen, Hannu; Makinen, Heidi; Gogus, Feride; Skakic, Vlado; Badsha, Humeira; Peets, Tõnu; Baranauskaite, Asta; Géher, Pál; Újfalussy, Ilona; Skopouli, Fotini N; Mavrommati, Maria; Alten, Rieke; Pohl, Christof; Sibilia, Jean; Stancati, Andrea; Salaffi, Fausto; Romanowski, Wojciech; Zarowny-Wierzbinska, Danuta; Henrohn, Dan; Bresnihan, Barry; Minnock, Patricia; Knudsen, Lene Surland; Jacobs, Johannes WG; Calvo-Alen, Jaime; Lazovskis, Juris; Pinheiro, Geraldo da Rocha Castelar; Karateev, Dmitry; Andersone, Daina; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Yazici, Yusuf; Pincus, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Gender as a predictor of outcomes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has evoked considerable interest over the decades. Historically, there is no consensus whether RA is worse in females or males. Recent reports suggest that females are less likely than males to achieve remission. Therefore, we aimed to study possible associations of gender and disease activity, disease characteristics, and treatments of RA in a large multinational cross-sectional cohort of patients with RA called Quantitative Standard Monitoring of Patients with RA (QUEST-RA). Methods The cohort includes clinical and questionnaire data from patients who were seen in usual care, including 6,004 patients at 70 sites in 25 countries as of April 2008. Gender differences were analyzed for American College of Rheumatology Core Data Set measures of disease activity, DAS28 (disease activity score using 28 joint counts), fatigue, the presence of rheumatoid factor, nodules and erosions, and the current use of prednisone, methotrexate, and biologic agents. Results Women had poorer scores than men in all Core Data Set measures. The mean values for females and males were swollen joint count-28 (SJC28) of 4.5 versus 3.8, tender joint count-28 of 6.9 versus 5.4, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 30 versus 26, Health Assessment Questionnaire of 1.1 versus 0.8, visual analog scales for physician global estimate of 3.0 versus 2.5, pain of 4.3 versus 3.6, patient global status of 4.2 versus 3.7, DAS28 of 4.3 versus 3.8, and fatigue of 4.6 versus 3.7 (P < 0.001). However, effect sizes were small-medium and smallest (0.13) for SJC28. Among patients who had no or minimal disease activity (0 to 1) on SJC28, women had statistically significantly higher mean values compared with men in all other disease activity measures (P < 0.001) and met DAS28 remission less often than men. Rheumatoid factor was equally prevalent among genders. Men had nodules more often than women. Women had erosions more often than men, but

  7. Recommended minimum data to be collected in research studies on Alzheimer's disease. The MRC (UK) Alzheimer's Disease Workshop Steering Committee.

    PubMed Central

    Wilcock, G K; Hope, R A; Brooks, D N; Lantos, P L; Oppenheimer, C; Reynolds, G P; Rossor, M N; Davies, M B

    1989-01-01

    In order to be able to compare the results of research work carried out in different centres on Alzheimer's disease and dementia, it is necessary for there to be standardised assessment methods. The Medical Research Council organised a workshop in order to see whether workers in Britain in the field of dementia research could agree on such standardised assessment methods. The workshop agreed guidelines for the minimum data which should be collected, in clinical and pathological studies, on patients with presumed Alzheimer's disease and dementia. These recommendations are compared with other approaches based on research diagnostic criteria. PMID:2664087

  8. Nanoscale studies link amyloid maturity with polyglutamine diseases onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, F. S.; Vieweg, S.; Cendrowska, U.; Longo, G.; Chiki, A.; Lashuel, H. A.; Dietler, G.

    2016-08-01

    The presence of expanded poly-glutamine (polyQ) repeats in proteins is directly linked to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington’s disease. However, the molecular and structural basis underlying the increased toxicity of aggregates formed by proteins containing expanded polyQ repeats remain poorly understood, in part due to the size and morphological heterogeneity of the aggregates they form in vitro. To address this knowledge gap and technical limitations, we investigated the structural, mechanical and morphological properties of fibrillar aggregates at the single molecule and nanometer scale using the first exon of the Huntingtin protein as a model system (Exon1). Our findings demonstrate a direct correlation of the morphological and mechanical properties of Exon1 aggregates with their structural organization at the single aggregate and nanometric scale and provide novel insights into the molecular and structural basis of Huntingtin Exon1 aggregation and toxicity.

  9. Nanoscale studies link amyloid maturity with polyglutamine diseases onset.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, F S; Vieweg, S; Cendrowska, U; Longo, G; Chiki, A; Lashuel, H A; Dietler, G

    2016-01-01

    The presence of expanded poly-glutamine (polyQ) repeats in proteins is directly linked to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease. However, the molecular and structural basis underlying the increased toxicity of aggregates formed by proteins containing expanded polyQ repeats remain poorly understood, in part due to the size and morphological heterogeneity of the aggregates they form in vitro. To address this knowledge gap and technical limitations, we investigated the structural, mechanical and morphological properties of fibrillar aggregates at the single molecule and nanometer scale using the first exon of the Huntingtin protein as a model system (Exon1). Our findings demonstrate a direct correlation of the morphological and mechanical properties of Exon1 aggregates with their structural organization at the single aggregate and nanometric scale and provide novel insights into the molecular and structural basis of Huntingtin Exon1 aggregation and toxicity. PMID:27499269

  10. High-resolution PET studies in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.; Haxby, J.V.; Wagner, E.; Salerno, J.A.; Friedland, R.P.; Rapoport, S.I. )

    1991-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with probable dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) and 30 healthy age-matched controls were scanned using (18F)-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose on a Scanditronix PC 1024-7B tomograph (inplane resolution = 6 mm, axial resolution = 10 mm). Patients and controls were scanned in the resting state with their eyes patched and ears occluded. The regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMRglc) in most major neocortical and subcortical gray matter regions, and certain metabolic ratios (rCMRglc/ calcarine rCMRglc), quantitatively discriminated even the mildly demented patients from healthy controls. The association neocortices showed metabolic abnormalities that were more severe than those in the sensorimotor and calcarine regions. All demented groups showed significant neuropsychological disturbances when compared to healthy controls. These data demonstrated widespread metabolic disturbances, particularly in the association areas, relatively early in Alzheimer's disease, and more profound involvement with disease progression.

  11. Nanoscale studies link amyloid maturity with polyglutamine diseases onset

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, F. S.; Vieweg, S.; Cendrowska, U.; Longo, G.; Chiki, A.; Lashuel, H. A.; Dietler, G.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of expanded poly-glutamine (polyQ) repeats in proteins is directly linked to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington’s disease. However, the molecular and structural basis underlying the increased toxicity of aggregates formed by proteins containing expanded polyQ repeats remain poorly understood, in part due to the size and morphological heterogeneity of the aggregates they form in vitro. To address this knowledge gap and technical limitations, we investigated the structural, mechanical and morphological properties of fibrillar aggregates at the single molecule and nanometer scale using the first exon of the Huntingtin protein as a model system (Exon1). Our findings demonstrate a direct correlation of the morphological and mechanical properties of Exon1 aggregates with their structural organization at the single aggregate and nanometric scale and provide novel insights into the molecular and structural basis of Huntingtin Exon1 aggregation and toxicity. PMID:27499269

  12. Use of proteomics in the study of microbial diseases of small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Katsafadou, A I; Tsangaris, G Th; Billinis, C; Fthenakis, G C

    2015-12-14

    Objective of the paper is to review potential applications of proteomics methodologies in the study of microbial diseases of small ruminants. Proteomics has been employed for the elucidation of pathogenesis of various diseases, i.e., in the study of determinants of microbial agents and the study of host-pathogen interactions, as well as in improved disease diagnosis by the identification of biomarkers. Extensive uses of proteomics in sheep and goat diseases have been applied primarily in mastitis, in reproductive infections, in paratuberculosis, in respiratory infections and in scrapie. Mining deeper into the various proteomes and application of new methodological strategies in clinical studies will provide information about disease processes. Improvement of diagnostic techniques, development of vaccines against diseases and establishment of tools for optimum animal production are key-areas for targeted research.

  13. [Studies on the mode of progression of alcoholic liver disease].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, N; Hatori, T; Ueno, Y; Shibata, M; Sadamoto, T; Yamamuro, W; Sumino, Y; Nonaka, H; Sugimoto, M; Abei, T

    1991-12-01

    In order to elucidate the mode of progression of alcoholic liver disease, relationships among the drinking style, laboratory data, anti-HCV antibody and histological changes were investigated on 36 patients in whom the liver biopsy was repeatedly done. Following results were obtained (1) In the group of continuous drinking over 100g ethanol per day, histological progression was found in 11 of 13 patients (85%) regardless of positive anti-HCV. On the other hand, in the group of abstinence or temperance less than 60g daily alcohol intake, histological improvement was found in 6 of 11 patients (55%). (2) Histological improvement was predominantly seen by abstinence or temperance in the cases with lower levels of serum IgA and adenosine deaminase (ADA) on hospitalization and those with rapid decrease in serum gamma-GTP after hospitalization. In conclusion, the amount of ethanol was considered to be the most important factor to affect on a progression of alcoholic liver diseases. Assessment of laboratory data such as IgA and ADA on hospitalization and change in gamma-GTP after hospitalization were also thought to be useful in foreseeing the prognosis of alcoholic liver disease.

  14. Automated semantic annotation of rare disease cases: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Taboada, Maria; Rodríguez, Hadriana; Martínez, Diego; Pardo, María; Sobrido, María Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: As the number of clinical reports in the peer-reviewed medical literature keeps growing, there is an increasing need for online search tools to find and analyze publications on patients with similar clinical characteristics. This problem is especially critical and challenging for rare diseases, where publications of large series are scarce. Through an applied example, we illustrate how to automatically identify new relevant cases and semantically annotate the relevant literature about patient case reports to capture the phenotype of a rare disease named cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis. Results: Our results confirm that it is possible to automatically identify new relevant case reports with a high precision and to annotate them with a satisfactory quality (74% F-measure). Automated annotation with an emphasis to entirely describe all phenotypic abnormalities found in a disease may facilitate curation efforts by supplying phenotype retrieval and assessment of their frequency. Availability and Supplementary information: http://www.usc.es/keam/Phenotype Annotation/. Database URL: http://www.usc.es/keam/PhenotypeAnnotation/ PMID:24903515

  15. Vulval Crohn's disease: a clinical study of 22 patients.

    PubMed

    Laftah, Zainab; Bailey, Clare; Zaheri, Shirin; Setterfield, Jane; Fuller, Lucinda Claire; Lewis, Fiona

    2015-04-01

    Vulval Crohn's disease [VCD] is a challenging condition that can occur without gastrointestinal Crohn's disease [GCD]. We reviewed the clinical features and effects of therapy in a cohort of 22 patients with VCD to determine whether the presence of GCD affected the clinical presentation and treatment response. Of these, 64% had GCD and 65% of these presented with GCD prior to VCD. Fissuring, ulceration, and scarring were more common in those with VCD alone. Potent and ultra-potent topical steroids showed benefit in most patients. There was no clear evidence of sustained remission with metronidazole. Azathioprine was the most commonly used oral immunosuppressive agent, with an efficacy of 57%. Patients with both VCD and GCD had a better clinical response compared with those with VCD alone [70% and 25%, respectively]. Infliximab and adalimumab were effective in 56% and 71% of patients, respectively. Excision of redundant tissue was helpful in four patients. The absence of GCD may delay the diagnosis in women who present with vulval symptoms alone. The more active clinical features in those with VCD alone may represent a more aggressive condition, or the severity of the cutaneous disease may have been reduced by immunosuppression taken for GCD. Several patients obtained sustained remission in their GCD with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha [anti-TNFα] agents while the VCD remained active.

  16. A clinical and immunological study of adrenocortical insufficiency (Addison's disease)

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, W. J.; Stewart, A. G.; Scarth, Laura

    1967-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with adrenocortical insufficiency were subdivided into three groups according to the nature of their adrenal disease; twelve patients with idiopathic, twenty-three patients with probable idiopathic and sixteen patients with tuberculous adrenal insufficiency. The importance of objective confirmation of a clinical diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency is stressed and the difficulties of classification of many patients with adult onset adrenal insufficiency are discussed. Idiopathic and probable idiopathic adrenal insufficiency had a sex ratio that was predominantly female (2·5:1) with a mean age of onset of 33 years. Antibodies to adrenal cortex were detected by the methods of immunofluorescence and complement fixation. They were detected in the serum of 80% (20:25) of the females with idiopathic or probable idiopathic adrenal insufficiency and in only 10% (1:10) of the males. The titre of the adrenal antibody was low (≤32) as tested either by immunofluorescence or complement fixation. The serum of only one patient with tuberculous adrenal insufficiency reacted with adrenal tissue in the complement fixation test but the immunofluorescence method showed that this serum reacted with the vascular endothelium and not the secretory cells. No correlation was observed between the duration of the clinical illness and the presence, or absence, or titre of the adrenal antibody. Adrenal antibody was not detected in the sera of fifty-one control subjects matched for age and sex. Four of sixty-nine patients with lymphadenoid goitre, one out of ninety-three patients with diabetes mellitus and none of 230 patients with thyrotoxicosis, primary hypothyroidism or pernicious anaemia had antibody in the serum specific for adrenocortical secretory cells. There is a clinical and immunological overlap between idiopathic adrenal insufficiency and other diseases associated with autoimmune phenomena— thyroid disease, atrophic gastritis and hypoparathyroidism. It is

  17. Physical activity in people with asbestos related pleural disease and dust-related interstitial lung disease: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Dale, Marita T; McKeough, Zoe J; Munoz, Phillip A; Corte, Peter; Bye, Peter T P; Alison, Jennifer A

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to measure the levels of physical activity (PA) in people with dust-related pleural and interstitial lung diseases and to compare these levels of PA to a healthy population. There is limited data on PA in this patient population and no previous studies have compared PA in people with dust-related respiratory diseases to a healthy control group. Participants with a diagnosis of a dust-related respiratory disease including asbestosis and asbestos related pleural disease (ARPD) and a healthy age- and gender-matched population wore the SenseWear(®) Pro3 armband for 9 days. Six-minute walk distance, Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form health survey and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were also measured. Fifty participants were recruited and 46 completed the study; 22 with ARPD, 10 with dust-related interstitial lung disease (ILD) and 14 healthy age-matched participants. The mean (standard deviation) steps/day were 6097 (1939) steps/day for dust-related ILD, 9150 (3392) steps/day for ARPD and 10,630 (3465) steps/day for healthy participants. Compared with the healthy participants, dust-related ILD participants were significantly less active as measured by steps/day ((mean difference 4533 steps/day (95% confidence interval (CI): 1888-7178)) and energy expenditure, ((mean difference 512 calories (95% CI: 196-827)) and spent significantly less time engaging in moderate, vigorous or very vigorous activities (i.e. >3 metabolic equivalents; mean difference 1.2 hours/day (95% CI: 0.4-2.0)). There were no differences in levels of PA between healthy participants and those with ARPD. PA was reduced in people with dust-related ILD but not those with ARPD when compared with healthy age and gender-matched individuals.

  18. Expression study of the Norrie disease (NDP) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.Y.; Battinelli, E.M.; Breakefield, X.O.

    1994-09-01

    Norrie disease is a severe X-linked recessive neurological disorder of unknown pathogenesis. Typically, Norrie disease is characterized by congenital blindness with progressive loss of hearing; over half of Norrie patients also manifest different degrees of mental retardation. The gene for Norrie disease (NDP) comprises three exons, with the first exon being untranslated. The open reading frame is confined within exons 2 and 3. The mouse NDP gene has essentially the same structure as the human. In order to determine the expression pattern of the NDP gene, RT-PCR was performed on mRNAs isolated from brain, retina, cochlea, and liver tissues of mice at different developmental stages. Transcripts were detected in all tissues at all times. This result, however, is different from the results we obtained from human tissue in which all tissues examined showed expression of the NDP gene with the exception of liver. We further analyzed the transcription initiation sites of the mouse NDP gene by random amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The results showed that there are multiple transcription initiation sites associated with the expression of the NDP gene. The transcription start sites are utilized differentially in the tissues at different developmental stages. By using different intronic genomic fragments, we detected a possible second transcript which does not include the untranslated first exon. Northern analysis also revealed that there are at least two abundant transcripts associated with the NDP gene in brain. The results suggest that both multiple transcription initiation sites and different promoters may contribute to the expression of the NDP gene in different tissues during development.

  19. Prospective observational cohort studies for studying rare diseases: the European PedNet Haemophilia Registry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, K; Ljung, R; Platokouki, H; Liesner, R; Claeyssens, S; Smink, E; van den Berg, H M

    2014-07-01

    Haemophilia is a rare disease. To improve knowledge, prospective studies of large numbers of subjects are needed. To establish a large well-documented birth cohort of patients with haemophilia enabling studies on early presentation, side effects and outcome of treatment. Twenty-one haemophilia treatment centres have been collecting data on all children with haemophilia with FVIII/IX levels up to 25% born from 2000 onwards. Another eight centres collected data on severe haemophilia A only. At baseline, details on delivery and diagnosis, gene mutation, family history of haemophilia and inhibitors are collected. For the first 75 exposure days, date, reason, dose and product are recorded for each infusion. Clinically relevant inhibitors are defined as follows: at least two positive inhibitor titres and a FVIII/IX recovery <66% of expected. For inhibitor patients, results of all inhibitor- and recovery tests are collected. For continued treatment, data on bleeding, surgery, prophylaxis and clotting factor consumption are collected annually. Data are downloaded for analysis annually. In May 2013, a total of 1094 patients were included: 701 with severe, 146 with moderate and 247 with mild haemophilia. Gene defect data were available for 87.6% of patients with severe haemophilia A. The first analysis, performed in May 2011, lead to two landmark publications. The outcome of this large collaborative research confirms its value for the improvement of haemophilia care. High-quality prospective observational cohorts form an ideal source to study natural history and treatment in rare diseases such as haemophilia.

  20. Oligodendrocyte ablation as a tool to study demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Pajoohesh-Ganji, Ahdeah; Miller, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune mediated neurodegenerative disease characterized by demyelination and oligodendrocyte (OL) loss in the central nervous system and accompanied by local inflammation and infiltration of peripheral immune cells. Although many risk factors and symptoms have been identified in MS, the pathology is complicated and the cause remains unknown. It is also unclear whether OL apoptosis precedes the inflammation or whether the local inflammation is the cause of OL death and demyelination. This review briefly discusses several models that have been developed to specifically ablate oligodendrocytes in an effort to separate the effects of demyelination from inflammation. PMID:27482202

  1. Studying cellular processes and detecting disease with protein microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.; Bollinger, Nikki

    2005-10-31

    Protein microarrays are a rapidly developing analytic tool with diverse applications in biomedical research. These applications include profiling of disease markers or autoimmune responses, understanding molecular pathways, protein modifications and protein activities. One factor that is driving this expanding usage is the wide variety of experimental formats that protein microarrays can take. In this review, we provide a short, conceptual overview of the different approaches for protein microarray. We then examine some of the most significant applications of these microarrays to date, with an emphasis on how global protein analyses can be used to facilitate biomedical research.

  2. Forecasting and Analyzing the Disease Burden of Aged Population in China, Based on the 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Chengzhen; Mayila, Mamat; Ye, Zhenhua; Wang, Jianbing; Jin, Mingjuan; He, Wenjiong; Chen, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Forecasting the disease burden of the elderly will contribute to make a comprehensive assessment about physical and mental status of the elderly in China and provide a basis for reducing the negative consequences of aging society to a minimum. Methods: This study collected data from a public database online provided by Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. Grey model GM (1, 1) was used to forecast all-cause and disease-specific rates of disability adjusted life years (DALYs) in 2015 and 2020. Results: After cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis, we found that non-communicable diseases (NCDs) were still the greatest threats in the elderly, followed by injuries. As for 136 predicted causes, more than half of NCDs increased obviously with age, less than a quarter of communicable, material, neonatal, and nutritional disorders or injuries had uptrend. Conclusions: The findings display the health condition of the Chinese elderly in the future, which will provide critical information for scientific and sociological researches on preventing and reducing the risks of aging society. PMID:26121188

  3. Rare Disease Patient Registry & Natural History Study - Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Rare Disorders; Undiagnosed Disorders; Disorders of Unknown Prevalence; Cornelia De Lange Syndrome; Prenatal Benign Hypophosphatasia; Perinatal Lethal Hypophosphatasia; Odontohypophosphatasia; Adult Hypophosphatasia; Childhood-onset Hypophosphatasia; Infantile Hypophosphatasia; Hypophosphatasia; Kabuki Syndrome; Bohring-Opitz Syndrome; Narcolepsy Without Cataplexy; Narcolepsy-cataplexy; Hypersomnolence Disorder; Idiopathic Hypersomnia Without Long Sleep Time; Idiopathic Hypersomnia With Long Sleep Time; Idiopathic Hypersomnia; Kleine-Levin Syndrome; Kawasaki Disease; Leiomyosarcoma; Leiomyosarcoma of the Corpus Uteri; Leiomyosarcoma of the Cervix Uteri; Leiomyosarcoma of Small Intestine; Acquired Myasthenia Gravis; Addison Disease; Hyperacusis (Hyperacousis); Juvenile Myasthenia Gravis; Transient Neonatal Myasthenia Gravis; Williams Syndrome; Lyme Disease; Myasthenia Gravis; Marinesco Sjogren Syndrome(Marinesco-Sjogren Syndrome); Isolated Klippel-Feil Syndrome; Frasier Syndrome; Denys-Drash Syndrome; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome; Emanuel Syndrome; Isolated Aniridia; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to Paternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 11; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to Imprinting Defect of 11p15; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Translocation/Inversion; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microduplication; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microdeletion; Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome; Aniridia-intellectual Disability Syndrome; Aniridia - Renal Agenesis - Psychomotor Retardation; Aniridia - Ptosis - Intellectual Disability - Familial Obesity; Aniridia - Cerebellar Ataxia - Intellectual Disability; Aniridia - Absent Patella; Aniridia; Peters Anomaly - Cataract; Peters Anomaly; Potocki-Shaffer Syndrome; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to Maternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 11; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to Imprinting Defect of 11p15; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microduplication; Syndromic Aniridia; WAGR Syndrome; Wolf

  4. A critical review of epidemiologic studies on black-foot disease.

    PubMed

    Ko, Y C

    1986-09-01

    An endemic disease in Taiwan named "Black-foot Disease", which has been researched since 1958 and about which many papers have been published, was considered caused by arsenic poisoning from artesian well water. In the beginning some information related to the disease before 1958 is introduced and then, reviews of the six papers titled "Epidemiologic Studies" on "Black-foot Disease" are made without referring to any findings from other papers. The data related to the incidence and severity of the disease from the papers are reevaluated, paying special attention to the fact that the incidence of the disease increased after the installation of pipe system water-supply to replace the artesian wells. With the above-mentioned result the theory which considers arsenic poisoning as the cause of the disease, is disproved.

  5. Chaperonomics, a new tool to study ageing and associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Brocchieri, Luciano; Conway de Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J L

    2007-01-01

    The participation of molecular chaperones in the process of senescence and in the mechanisms of age-related diseases is currently under investigation in many laboratories. However, accurate, complete information about the number and diversity of chaperone genes in any given genome is scarce. Consequently, the results of efforts aimed at elucidating the role of chaperones in ageing and disease are often confusing and contradictory. To remedy this situation, we have developed chaperonomics, including means to identify and characterize chaperone genes and their families applicable to humans and model organisms. The problem is difficult because in eukaryotic organisms chaperones have evolved into complex multi-gene families. For instance, the occurrence of multiple paralogs in a single genome makes it difficult to interpret results if consideration is not given to the fact that similar but distinct chaperone genes can be differentially expressed in separate cellular compartments, tissues, and developmental stages. The availability of complete genome sequences allows implementation of chaperonomics with the purpose of understanding the composition of chaperone families in all cell compartments, their evolutionary and functional relations and, ultimately, their role in pathogenesis. Here, we present a series of concatenated, complementary procedures for identifying, characterizing, and classifying chaperone genes in genomes and for elucidating evolutionary relations and structural features useful in predicting functional properties. We illustrate the procedures with applications to the complex family of hsp70 genes and show that the kind of data obtained can provide a solid basis for future research.

  6. A family study of the biochemical defects in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Soothill, J F; Blainey, J D; Neale, F C; Fischer-Williams, M; Melnick, S C

    1961-05-01

    Estimations of serum copper, serum ceruloplasmin (immunochemical), and urinary amino-acids excretion (quantitative and chromatographic) in 44 healthy relatives of patients with Wilson's disease (39 from one family) are reported. Each technique revealed some abnormal individuals. Good agreement was obtained between the serum copper and serum ceruloplasmin estimations and between the quantitative and chromatographic estimations of amino-acid excretion. Some individuals were abnormal to one or other of the pairs of tests only. These results cast doubt on the hypothesis that the symptoms of Wilson's disease are secondary to a quantitative (or qualitative) abnormality of ceruloplasmin. They also suggest that the mode of inheritance of the biochemical defects may be more complicated than that of a simple recessive mutant gene. Two of the relatives (one pregnant and one immediately post-partum) had a high serum copper level, as is expected in pregnancy, but normal serum ceruloplasmin. This suggests that the mechanism of control of the serum ceruloplasmin concentration may, normally, depend on the serum copper concentration.

  7. Mammary and extramammary Paget's disease. An immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolati, G.; Pich, A.

    1975-01-01

    The localization and distribution of human casein has been investigated in 20 patients with Paget's disease (16 with the mammary and 4 with the extramammary form) by means of immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase techniques. This milk protein has been detected in neoplastic cells in intraductal carcinomas of the nipple and in intraepidermal cells identifiable as Paget cells. The degree of the staining varied in different cells of the same case and in different cases. Some casein-containing intraepidermal cells, as revealed by immunofluorescence, could not be recognized after retaining of the sections as Paget cells: they could not morphologically be distinguished from other basally located epidermal cells. This finding raises the question of the existence of "pre-Paget" cells. The results obtained are discussed in relation to theories on the origin and nature of Paget cells. The immunocytochemical methods for casein detection might also be find possible application in the diagnosis of Paget's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:168778

  8. A review of advances in the study of diseases of fish: 1954-1964

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Post, G.

    1965-01-01

    STUDY OF DISEASE IN ANIMALS, INCLUDING MAN, has progressed rapidly in the past decade. Looking back, we find amazing success in the study of man's diseases and possibly only a little less success in studies of diseases of domesticated homeothermic animals. We who are interested in the poikilothermic animals may feel at times that we have not advanced so rapidly in our field. The reason for this may be closely associated with economics. The market for drugs and therapeutic agents is greater for domestic livestock than for cultured fishes. A larger income is derived from rearing domestic livestock. Therefore, more public funds are available for study of diseases of man and domestic livestock, while such funds are limited for the study of diseases of fish. The Federal and State fish-cultural systems, as well as colleges and universities, have been most active in research on fish disease and probably will continue to be so.

  9. Current problems concerning parasitology and mycology with regard to diseases of the skin and its appendages.

    PubMed

    Błaszkowska, Joanna; Wójcik, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Current issues concerning Parasitology and Mycology with regard to diseases of the skin and its appendages are presented. Aspects of diagnostics, clinical picture and therapy of skin and nail mycoses, as well as difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of both native parasitoses (toxoplasmosis) and imported human tropical parasitoses (malaria, filariosis) have been emphasised. The clinical importance of environmental mould fungi in nosocomial infections and fungal meningitis, as well as selected properties of fungi isolated from patients with head and neck neoplasms treated by radiotherapy are discussed. Other mycological topics include the characteristics of newly-synthesized thiosemicarbazides and thiadiazoles as potential drugs against toxoplasmosis and their biological activity against Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, selected molecular mechanisms of resistance to azoles, Candida albicans strains and a new tool (barcoding DNA) for describing the biodiversity of potential allergenic molds. The importance of environmental factors in pathogenesis of mycoses and parasitoses is noted. The characteristics of pathogenic fungi isolated from natural ponds in Bialystok and potentially pathogenic yeast-like fungi isolated from children's recreation areas in Lodz are presented. The ongoing problem of anthropozoonoses is considered, as are the roles of stray cats and dogs in contaminating soil with the developing forms of intestinal parasites. The characteristics of the human microbiome, including population composition, activity and their importance in normal human physiology, are presented, as are the major goals of the Human Microbiome Project initiated by National Institutes of Health (NIH). PMID:23444796

  10. Current problems concerning parasitology and mycology with regard to diseases of the skin and its appendages.

    PubMed

    Błaszkowska, Joanna; Wójcik, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Current issues concerning Parasitology and Mycology with regard to diseases of the skin and its appendages are presented. Aspects of diagnostics, clinical picture and therapy of skin and nail mycoses, as well as difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of both native parasitoses (toxoplasmosis) and imported human tropical parasitoses (malaria, filariosis) have been emphasised. The clinical importance of environmental mould fungi in nosocomial infections and fungal meningitis, as well as selected properties of fungi isolated from patients with head and neck neoplasms treated by radiotherapy are discussed. Other mycological topics include the characteristics of newly-synthesized thiosemicarbazides and thiadiazoles as potential drugs against toxoplasmosis and their biological activity against Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, selected molecular mechanisms of resistance to azoles, Candida albicans strains and a new tool (barcoding DNA) for describing the biodiversity of potential allergenic molds. The importance of environmental factors in pathogenesis of mycoses and parasitoses is noted. The characteristics of pathogenic fungi isolated from natural ponds in Bialystok and potentially pathogenic yeast-like fungi isolated from children's recreation areas in Lodz are presented. The ongoing problem of anthropozoonoses is considered, as are the roles of stray cats and dogs in contaminating soil with the developing forms of intestinal parasites. The characteristics of the human microbiome, including population composition, activity and their importance in normal human physiology, are presented, as are the major goals of the Human Microbiome Project initiated by National Institutes of Health (NIH).

  11. National Burden of Eye Diseases in Iran, 1990–2010; Findings from the Global Burden of Diseases Study 2010

    PubMed Central

    Hatef, Elham; Mohammadi, Seyed-Farzad; Alinia, Cyrus; Ashrafi, Elham; Mohammadi, S-Mehrdad; Lashay, Alireza; Sadeghi-Tari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) lost due to eye diseases and trends in DALYs in Iran has not been previously reported. The object of this study is to report the burden of eye diseases in Iran and to compare changes from 1990 to 2010 based on age and gender. Methods: Data from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010) are used to report DALYs for cataract, refraction/accommodation (functional) disorders, macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Results: Cataract, refraction/accommodation (functional) disorders, macular degeneration, and glaucoma were the 84th, 87th, 138th, and 151st causes of DALY in 1990 and the 89th, 72nd, 99th, and 137th in 2010, respectively. Cataract accounted for 0.085% of national DALY in 1990 and 0.09% in 2010, refraction/accommodation (functional) disorders accounted for 0.42% in 1990 and 0.47% in 2010, macular degeneration accounted for 0.017% in 1990 and 0.071% in 2010 and glaucoma accounted for 0.0099% in 1990 and 0.025% in 2010. There was a steady increase in DALY with age for each eye disease for both genders and dichotomized for males and females from 1990 to 2010. Conclusions: Epidemiologic transition is reflected in major ophthalmic and blinding diseases in the GBD data for Iran. The burden of macular degeneration is rising, followed by glaucoma. The burden of presbyopia affected individuals past their middle age. The burden of cataract manifested as a slower increase that could be attributable to better access to treatment. PMID:26957846

  12. Histopathological retrospective study of canine renal disease in Korea, 2003~2008

    PubMed Central

    Yhee, Ji-Young; Yu, Chi-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hyuk; Im, Keum-Soon; Chon, Seung-Ki

    2010-01-01

    Renal disease includes conditions affecting the glomeruli, tubules, interstitium, pelvis, and vasculature. Diseases of the kidney include glomerular diseases, diseases of the tubules and interstitium, diseases of renal pelvis, and developmental abnormalities. Renal tissue samples (n = 70) submitted to the Department of Veterinary Pathology of Konkuk University from 2003 to 2008 were included in this study. Tissue histopathology was performed using light microscopy with hematoxylin and eosin stains. Masson's trichrome, Congo Red, and Warthin starry silver staining were applied in several individual cases. Glomerular diseases (22.9%), tubulointerstitial diseases (8.6%), neoplastic diseases (8.6%), conditions secondary to urinary obstruction (24.3%), and other diseases (35.7%) were identified. Glomerulonephritis (GN) cases were classified as acute proliferative GN (5.7%), membranous GN (4.3%), membranoproliferative GN (4.3%), focal segmental GN (2.9%), and other GN (4.2%). The proportion of canine GN cases presently identified was not as high as the proportions identified in human studies. Conversely, urinary obstruction and end-stage renal disease cases were relatively higher in dogs than in human populations. PMID:21113095

  13. Neuroimmunology of Huntington's Disease: Revisiting Evidence from Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Fabiola M.; Furr-Stimming, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective loss of neurons in the striatum and cortex, which leads to progressive motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disorders. Although the cause of HD is well described—HD is a genetic disorder caused by a trinucleotide (CAG) repeat expansion in the gene encoding for huntingtin (HTT) on chromosome 4p16.3—the ultimate cause of neuronal death is still uncertain. Apart from impairment in systems for handling abnormal proteins, other metabolic pathways and mechanisms might contribute to neurodegeneration and progression of HD. Among these, inflammation seems to play a role in HD pathogenesis. The current review summarizes the available evidence about immune and/or inflammatory changes in HD. HD is associated with increased inflammatory mediators in both the central nervous system and periphery. Accordingly, there have been some attempts to slow HD progression targeting the immune system. PMID:27578922

  14. Neuroimmunology of Huntington's Disease: Revisiting Evidence from Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Natalia P; Ribeiro, Fabiola M; Furr-Stimming, Erin; Teixeira, Antonio L

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective loss of neurons in the striatum and cortex, which leads to progressive motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disorders. Although the cause of HD is well described-HD is a genetic disorder caused by a trinucleotide (CAG) repeat expansion in the gene encoding for huntingtin (HTT) on chromosome 4p16.3-the ultimate cause of neuronal death is still uncertain. Apart from impairment in systems for handling abnormal proteins, other metabolic pathways and mechanisms might contribute to neurodegeneration and progression of HD. Among these, inflammation seems to play a role in HD pathogenesis. The current review summarizes the available evidence about immune and/or inflammatory changes in HD. HD is associated with increased inflammatory mediators in both the central nervous system and periphery. Accordingly, there have been some attempts to slow HD progression targeting the immune system. PMID:27578922

  15. Blastomycosis and Pregnancy: An Unusual Postpartum Disease Course.

    PubMed

    Surprenant, David; Kaniszewska, Monika; Hutchens, Kelli; Go, Christine; O'Keefe, Paul; Swan, James; Tung, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis is responsible for systemic mycoses. It is predominantly caused by inhalation of spores and often manifests as pneumonia, which can potentially disseminate; however, direct cutaneous inoculation may also occur. Blastomycosis in the perigravid period is exceedingly rare. The partial immunosuppressive state induced by pregnancy can engender more severe infections and is associated with a risk of vertical transmission. Published cases describe postpartum symptomatic improvement accompanying immune reconstitution, even in the absence of treatment. We present a 31-year-old gravid female with multifocal cutaneous blastomycosis. After delivering a healthy full-term infant with no evidence of congenital infection, the patient's cutaneous lesions continued to worsen. At 6 weeks postpartum she was treated with oral itraconazole and demonstrated clinical improvement after 5 months of therapy. This case highlights the importance of prompt disease recognition, understanding of risk factors and initiation of appropriate antifungal therapy of blastomycotic infection occurring in the unique setting of pregnancy. PMID:26120305

  16. Baseline and longitudinal grey matter changes in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: ICICLE-PD study.

    PubMed

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; Firbank, Michael J; Lawson, Rachael A; Yarnall, Alison J; Duncan, Gordon W; Owen, Adrian M; Khoo, Tien K; Brooks, David J; Rowe, James B; Barker, Roger A; Burn, David J; O'Brien, John T

    2015-10-01

    converters showed bilateral temporal cortex thinning relative to the Parkinson's disease with no cognitive impairment stable subjects. Although loss of both cortical and subcortical volume occurs in non-demented Parkinson's disease, our longitudinal analyses revealed that Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment shows more extensive atrophy and greater percentage of cortical thinning compared to Parkinson's disease with no cognitive impairment. In particular, an extension of cortical thinning in the temporo-parietal regions in addition to frontal atrophy could be a biomarker in therapeutic studies of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease for progression towards dementia.

  17. Inherited determinants of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes: a genetic association study

    PubMed Central

    Cleynen, Isabelle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Jostins, Luke; Schumm, L Philip; Zeissig, Sebastian; Ahmad, Tariq; Andersen, Vibeke; Andrews, Jane M; Annese, Vito; Brand, Stephan; Brant, Steven R; Cho, Judy H; Daly, Mark J; Dubinsky, Marla; Duerr, Richard H; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Franke, Andre; Gearry, Richard B; Goyette, Philippe; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hov, Johannes R; Huang, Hailang; Kennedy, Nicholas A; Kupcinskas, Limas; Lawrance, Ian C; Lee, James C; Satsangi, Jack; Schreiber, Stephan; Théâtre, Emilie; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Weersma, Rinse K; Wilson, David C; Parkes, Miles; Vermeire, Severine; Rioux, John D; Mansfield, John; Silverberg, Mark S; Radford-Smith, Graham; McGovern, Dermot P B; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lees, Charlie W

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease; treatment strategies have historically been determined by this binary categorisation. Genetic studies have identified 163 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease, mostly shared between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. We undertook the largest genotype association study, to date, in widely used clinical subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease with the goal of further understanding the biological relations between diseases. Methods This study included patients from 49 centres in 16 countries in Europe, North America, and Australasia. We applied the Montreal classification system of inflammatory bowel disease subphenotypes to 34 819 patients (19 713 with Crohn's disease, 14 683 with ulcerative colitis) genotyped on the Immunochip array. We tested for genotype–phenotype associations across 156 154 genetic variants. We generated genetic risk scores by combining information from all known inflammatory bowel disease associations to summarise the total load of genetic risk for a particular phenotype. We used these risk scores to test the hypothesis that colonic Crohn's disease, ileal Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis are all genetically distinct from each other, and to attempt to identify patients with a mismatch between clinical diagnosis and genetic risk profile. Findings After quality control, the primary analysis included 29 838 patients (16 902 with Crohn's disease, 12 597 with ulcerative colitis). Three loci (NOD2, MHC, and MST1 3p21) were associated with subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease, mainly disease location (essentially fixed over time; median follow-up of 10·5 years). Little or no genetic association with disease behaviour (which changed dramatically over time) remained after conditioning on disease location and age at onset. The genetic risk score representing all known risk alleles for

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to study renal development and disease: sexy cilia.

    PubMed

    Barr, Maureen M

    2005-02-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has no kidney per se, yet "the worm" has proved to be an excellent model to study renal-related issues, including tubulogenesis of the excretory canal, membrane transport and ion channel function, and human genetic diseases including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The goal of this review is to explain how C. elegans has provided insight into cilia development, cilia function, and human cystic kidney diseases.

  19. [The application of genetic risk score in genetic studies of complex human diseases].

    PubMed

    Dayan, Niu; Weili, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Complex diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, essential hypertension, asthma, obesity and cancer have spread across the globe and become the predominant cause of death. There are growing concerns over the role of genetic susceptibility in pathogenesis of complex diseases. However, the related susceptibility genes and sequence variations are still unknown. To elucidate the genetic basis of complex diseases, researchers have identified a large number of genetic variants associated with complex diseases through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene studies recently. The identification of these causal and/or associated variants promotes the development of approaches for complex diseases prediction and prevention. Genetic risk score (GRS), an emerging method for exploring correlation between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and clinical phenotypes of complex diseases, integrates weak effects of multiple SNPs and dramatically enhances predictability of complex diseases by gene polymorphisms. This method has been applied successfully in genetic studies of many complex diseases. Here we focus on the introduction of the computational methods and evaluation criteria of GRS, enumerate a series of achievements through GRS application, discuss some limitations during application, and finally prospect the future of GRS.

  20. Psychosocial factors in adults with chronic kidney disease: characteristics of pilot participants in the Tasmanian Chronic Kidney Disease study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychosocial factors including depression, anxiety and lower social support are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However the influence of these potentially modifiable risk factors on morbidity and mortality in this renal population is unknown. The Tasmanian Chronic Kidney Disease study is a prospective cohort study which aims to examine the influence of both biomedical and psychosocial factors on disease progression, decision making and length and quality of life in adults with severe CKD, prior to kidney replacement therapy (KRT). This paper describes the recruitment, baseline characteristics and initial follow-up of pilot participants. Methods Adults aged > 18 years with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15–29 mls/min/1.73 m2) and not receiving dialysis were recruited via treating physicians. Measures included depression (9-item Patient Health Questionnaire), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory) and social support (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support). Primary outcomes were kidney disease progression, use of KRT and health-related quality of life (Kidney Disease and Quality of Life Short Form and the EQ-5D). Results Of those invited (n = 105), 49 provided consent and completed baseline assessment. There were no significant differences between responders and non-responders in age, gender and socio-economic status (all p > 0.05). Participants were predominantly male (63.3%) with a mean age of 72.6 ± 10.2 years. Mean serum creatinine was 241 ± 62 μmol/L with mean eGFR 22 ± 5 mls/min/1.73 m2. Prevalence of major depression and moderate to severe anxiety was 10% and 9% respectively. Less severe depression and fewer anxiety symptoms were associated with higher health-related quality of life. Follow-up at 10-months showed CKD progression in 34% of participants (use of KRT in 16%, stage 5 CKD without KRT in 18%), one death, with the remainder stable at CKD stage 3 or 4. Conclusions Results indicate that a

  1. Burden of ischemic heart diseases in Iran, 1990-2010: Findings from the Global Burden of Disease study 2010

    PubMed Central

    Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Isfahani, Motahareh Tabar; Kelishadi, Roya; Ghasemian, Anoosheh; Sharifi, Farshad; Shabani, Reihaneh; Djalalinia, Shirin; Majidi, Somayye; Ansari, Hossein; Asayesh, Hamid; Qorbani, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases are viewed worldwide as one of the main causes of death. This study aims to report the burden of ischemic heart diseases (IHDs) in Iran by using data of the global burden of disease (GBD) study, 1990-2010. Materials and Methods: The GBD study 2010 was a systematic effort to provide comprehensive data to calculate disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for diseases and injuries in the world. Years of life lost (YLLs) due to premature mortality were computed on the basis of cause-of-death estimates, using Cause of Death Ensemble model (CODEm). Years lived with disability (YLDs) were assessed by the multiplication of prevalence, the disability weight for a sequel, and the duration of symptoms. A systematic review of published and unpublished data was performed to evaluate the distribution of diseases, and consequently prevalence estimates were calculated with a Bayesian meta-regression method (DisMod-MR). Data from population-based surveys were used for producing disability weights. Uncertainty from all inputs into the calculations of DALYs was disseminated by Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Results: The age-standardized IHDs DALY specified rate decreased 31.25% over 20 years from 1990 to 2010 [from 4720 (95% uncertainty interval (UI): 4,341-5,099) to 3,245 (95% UI: 2,810-3,529) person-years per 100,000]. The decrease were 38.14% among women and 26.87% among men. The age-standardized IHDs death specefied rate decreased by 21.17% [from 222) 95% UI: 207-243 (to 175 (95% UI:152-190) person-years per 100,000] in both the sexes. The age-standardized YLL and YLD rates decreased 32.05% and 4.28%, respectively, in the above period. Conclusion: Despite decreasing age-standardized IHD of mortality, YLL, YLD, and DALY rates from 1990 to 2010, population growth and aging increased the global burden of IHD. YLL has decreased more than IHD deaths and YLD since 1990 but IHD mortality remains the greatest contributor to disease burden. PMID

  2. Birth Weights in Sickle Cell Disease Pregnancies: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Susan E.; Macleod, David

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) has been linked with an increased incidence of adverse foetal outcomes when compared to women without haemoglobinopathies (HbAA). There’s a paucity of data into foetal outcomes for infants born to women with SCD. Customised growth charts have been demonstrated to be better than population-based growth charts at identifying unhealthy small babies. We analysed the mean birth weight and customised birth weight centiles of infants born to mothers with SCD versus mothers with HbAA genotype, to quantify the risk of having a smaller baby. Birth weight and birth weight centiles were analysed for 88 women with SCD (50 HbSS; 38 HbSC) and 176 controls (HbAA). Statistically significant differences were seen in the mean birth weight (P value = 0.004) and the mean birth weight centiles (P value = 0.016). We conclude that SCD is a risk factor for having a smaller baby. PMID:27776167

  3. Chronic venous disease in an ethnically diverse population: the San Diego Population Study.

    PubMed

    Criqui, Michael H; Jamosmos, Maritess; Fronek, Arnost; Denenberg, Julie O; Langer, Robert D; Bergan, John; Golomb, Beatrice A

    2003-09-01

    In a 1994-1998 cross-sectional study of a multiethnic sample of 2,211 men and women in San Diego, California, the authors estimated prevalence of the major manifestations of chronic venous disease: spider veins, varicose veins, trophic changes, and edema by visual inspection; superficial and deep functional disease (reflux or obstruction) by duplex ultrasonography; and venous thrombotic events based on history. Venous disease increased with age, and, compared with Hispanics, African Americans, and Asians, non-Hispanic Whites had more disease. Spider veins, varicose veins, superficial functional disease, and superficial thrombotic events were more common in women than men (odds ratio (OR) = 5.4, OR = 2.2, OR = 1.9, and OR = 1.9, respectively; p < 0.05), but trophic changes and deep functional disease were less common in women (OR = 0.7 for both; p < 0.05). Visible (varicose veins or trophic changes) and functional (superficial or deep) disease were closely linked; 92.0% of legs were concordant and 8.0% discordant. For legs evidencing both trophic changes and deep functional disease, the age-adjusted prevalences of edema, superficial events, and deep events were 48.2%, 11.3%, and 24.6%, respectively, compared with 1.7%, 0.6%, and 1.3% for legs visibly and functionally normal. However, visible disease did not invariably predict functional disease, or vice versa, and venous thrombotic events occurred in the absence of either.

  4. A controlled study of cognitive deficits in children with chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Tager, F A; Fallon, B A; Keilp, J; Rissenberg, M; Jones, C R; Liebowitz, M R

    2001-01-01

    Although neurologic Lyme disease is known to cause cognitive dysfunction in adults, little is known about its long-term sequelae in children. Twenty children with a history of new-onset cognitive complaints after Lyme disease were compared with 20 matched healthy control subjects. Each child was assessed with measures of cognition and psychopathology. Children with Lyme disease had significantly more cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. Cognitive deficits were still found after controlling for anxiety, depression, and fatigue. Lyme disease in children may be accompanied by long-term neuropsychiatric disturbances, resulting in psychosocial and academic impairments. Areas for further study are discussed.

  5. Genome-wide association study for Crohn's disease in the Quebec Founder Population identifies multiple validated disease loci

    PubMed Central

    Raelson, John V.; Little, Randall D.; Ruether, Andreas; Fournier, Hélène; Paquin, Bruno; Van Eerdewegh, Paul; Bradley, W. E. C.; Croteau, Pascal; Nguyen-Huu, Quynh; Segal, Jonathan; Debrus, Sophie; Allard, René; Rosenstiel, Philip; Franke, Andre; Jacobs, Gunnar; Nikolaus, Susanna; Vidal, Jean-Michel; Szego, Peter; Laplante, Nathalie; Clark, Hilary F.; Paulussen, René J.; Hooper, John W.; Keith, Tim P.; Belouchi, Abdelmajid; Schreiber, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies offer a powerful unbiased method for the identification of multiple susceptibility genes for complex diseases. Here we report the results of a GWA study for Crohn's disease (CD) using family trios from the Quebec Founder Population (QFP). Haplotype-based association analyses identified multiple regions associated with the disease that met the criteria for genome-wide significance, with many containing a gene whose function appears relevant to CD. A proportion of these were replicated in two independent German Caucasian samples, including the established CD loci NOD2 and IBD5. The recently described IL23R locus was also identified and replicated. For this region, multiple individuals with all major haplotypes in the QFP were sequenced and extensive fine mapping performed to identify risk and protective alleles. Several additional loci, including a region on 3p21 containing several plausible candidate genes, a region near JAKMIP1 on 4p16.1, and two larger regions on chromosome 17 were replicated. Together with previously published loci, the spectrum of CD genes identified to date involves biochemical networks that affect epithelial defense mechanisms, innate and adaptive immune response, and the repair or remodeling of tissue. PMID:17804789

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid biochemical studies in patients with Parkinson's disease: toward a potential search for biomarkers for this disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J.; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A. G.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier supplies brain tissues with nutrients and filters certain compounds from the brain back to the bloodstream. In several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), there are disruptions of the blood-brain barrier. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been widely investigated in PD and in other parkinsonian syndromes with the aim of establishing useful biomarkers for an accurate differential diagnosis among these syndromes. This review article summarizes the studies reported on CSF levels of many potential biomarkers of PD. The most consistent findings are: (a) the possible role of CSF urate on the progression of the disease; (b) the possible relations of CSF total tau and phosphotau protein with the progression of PD and with the preservation of cognitive function in PD patients; (c) the possible value of CSF beta-amyloid 1-42 as a useful marker of further cognitive decline in PD patients, and (d) the potential usefulness of CSF neurofilament (NFL) protein levels in the differential diagnosis between PD and other parkinsonian syndromes. Future multicentric, longitudinal, prospective studies with long-term follow-up and neuropathological confirmation would be useful in establishing appropriate biomarkers for PD. PMID:25426023

  7. Milk production and distribution in low-dose counties for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmel, J.G. . Social and Economic Sciences Research Center); Beck, D.M. )

    1992-06-01

    This report identifies sources of milk consumed by residents of Ferry, Okanogan, and Stevens Counties. This information will be used by the Hanford thyroid Disease Study to determine whether thyroid disease has been increased among people exposed to past iodine--131 emissions from Hanford Site Facilities.

  8. Leptospira Exposure and Patients with Liver Diseases: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar; Margarita Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra; Alberto Guido-Arreola, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in patients suffering from liver disease has been poorly studied. Information about risk factors associated with infection in liver disease patients may help in the optimal planning of preventive measures. We sought to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence and patients with liver diseases, and to determine the characteristics of the patients with Leptospira exposure. We performed a case-control study of 75 patients suffering from liver diseases and 150 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Diagnoses of liver disease included liver cirrhosis, steatosis, chronic hepatitis, acute hepatitis, and amoebic liver abscess. Sera of participants were analyzed for the presence of anti- Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 17 (22.7%) of 75 patients and in 15 (10.0%) of 150 control subjects (OR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.09-4.94; P=0.03). This is the first age- and gender-matched case control study about Leptospira seroprevalence in patients with liver diseases. Results indicate that Leptospira infection is associated with chronic and acute liver diseases. Results warrants for additional studies on the role of Leptospira exposure in chronic liver disease. PMID:27493589

  9. An Acoustic Study of the Relationships among Neurologic Disease, Dysarthria Type, and Severity of Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yunjung; Kent, Raymond D.; Weismer, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined acoustic predictors of speech intelligibility in speakers with several types of dysarthria secondary to different diseases and conducted classification analysis solely by acoustic measures according to 3 variables (disease, speech severity, and dysarthria type). Method: Speech recordings from 107 speakers with…

  10. Distance Caregivers of People with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementia: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Megan

    2010-01-01

    The population of distance caregivers of people with dementia/Alzheimer's disease has not been extensively researched. This research study focused on exploring the lived experience of people caring for someone with dementia/Alzheimer's disease from a distance (defined as 2 or more hours away) to help shed light on this caregiving population. Ten…

  11. Leptospira Exposure and Patients with Liver Diseases: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar; Margarita Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra; Alberto Guido-Arreola, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in patients suffering from liver disease has been poorly studied. Information about risk factors associated with infection in liver disease patients may help in the optimal planning of preventive measures. We sought to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence and patients with liver diseases, and to determine the characteristics of the patients with Leptospira exposure. We performed a case-control study of 75 patients suffering from liver diseases and 150 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Diagnoses of liver disease included liver cirrhosis, steatosis, chronic hepatitis, acute hepatitis, and amoebic liver abscess. Sera of participants were analyzed for the presence of anti- Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 17 (22.7%) of 75 patients and in 15 (10.0%) of 150 control subjects (OR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.09-4.94; P=0.03). This is the first age- and gender-matched case control study about Leptospira seroprevalence in patients with liver diseases. Results indicate that Leptospira infection is associated with chronic and acute liver diseases. Results warrants for additional studies on the role of Leptospira exposure in chronic liver disease. PMID:27493589

  12. Evaluating a New Online Course in the Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases by Studying Student Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, James W.; Cox, James R.

    2008-01-01

    At RMIT University, students may now elect to study infectious diseases through a course called Outbreak--The Detection and Control of Infectious Disease. Outbreak was designed to simulate in an online class the effective teamwork required to bring resolution to outbreak crises and enable frameworks for future prevention. The appropriateness of…

  13. Clinical and epidemiological study of chronic heart involvment in Chagas' disease*

    PubMed Central

    Puigbó, J. J.; Rhode, J. R. Nava; Barrios, H. García; Suárez, J. A.; Yépez, C. Gil

    1966-01-01

    It has been estimated that, in vast areas of the American continent, there is a high prevalence of human infection by Trypanosoma cruzi. Such infection can lead to a variety of heart diseases, predominantly with involvement of the myocardium. The aim of the present work was to determine the prevalence of heart disease in two rural areas of Venezuela with a high endemicity of Chagas' disease and to try to determine the natural history of the disease. It is shown that a form of chronic myocardial disease in patients with positive specific serology and good functional capacity is highly prevalent. Electrocardiographic patterns typical of the initial and developing stages of the disease, as well as early abnormalities of the cardiac rhythm, are described and illustrated. The present work forms part of a longitudinal study still in progress. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 3FIG. 5FIG. 4 PMID:4957485

  14. Inverse Association of Parkinson Disease With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Nationwide Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Te-Yu; Shen, Chih-Hao; Chou, Yu-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-11-01

    The effects of the inflammatory mediators involved in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) on subsequent Parkinson disease have been reported, but no relevant studies have focused on the association between the 2 diseases. This nationwide population-based study evaluated the risk of Parkinson disease in patients with SLE.We identified 12,817 patients in the Taiwan National Health Insurance database diagnosed with SLE between 2000 and 2010 and compared the incidence rate of Parkinson disease among these patients with that among 51,268 randomly selected age and sex-matched non-SLE patients. A Cox multivariable proportional-hazards model was used to evaluate the risk factors of Parkinson disease in the SLE cohort.We observed an inverse association between a diagnosis of SLE and the risk of subsequent Parkinson disease, with the crude hazard ratio (HR) being 0.60 (95% confidence interval 0.45-0.79) and adjusted HR being 0.68 (95% confidence interval 0.51-0.90). The cumulative incidence of Parkinson disease was 0.83% lower in the SLE cohort than in the non-SLE cohort. The adjusted HR of Parkinson disease decreased as the follow-up duration increased and was decreased among older lupus patients with comorbidity.We determined that patients with SLE had a decreased risk of subsequent Parkinson disease. Further research is required to elucidate the underlying mechanism.

  15. Disease Combinations Associated with Physical Activity Identified: The SMILE Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Dörenkamp, Sarah; Mesters, Ilse; Schepers, Jan; Vos, Rein; van den Akker, Marjan; Teijink, Joep; de Bie, Rob

    2016-01-01

    In the search of predictors of inadequate physical activity, an investigation was conducted into the association between multimorbidity and physical activity (PA). So far the sum of diseases used as a measure of multimorbidity reveals an inverse association. How specific combinations of chronic diseases are associated with PA remains unclear. The objective of this study is to identify clusters of multimorbidity that are associated with PA. Cross-sectional data of 3,386 patients from the 2003 wave of the Dutch cohort study SMILE were used. Ward's agglomerative hierarchical clustering was executed to establish multimorbidity clusters. Chi-square statistics were used to assess the association between clusters of chronic diseases and PA, measured in compliance with the Dutch PA guideline. The highest rate of PA guideline compliance was found in patients the majority of whom suffer from liver disease, back problems, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and inflammatory joint disease (62.4%). The lowest rate of PA guideline compliance was reported in patients with heart disease, respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus (55.8%). Within the group of people with multimorbidity, those suffering from heart disease, respiratory disease, and/or diabetes mellitus may constitute a priority population as PA has proven to be effective in the prevention and cure of all three disorders. PMID:26881231

  16. Gender differences in the association between metabolic syndrome and periodontal disease: the Hisayama Study

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Michiko; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Takeshita, Toru; Shibata, Yukie; Akifusa, Sumio; Eshima, Nobuoki; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Mukai, Naoko; Nagata, Masaharu; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome (MS) are more prevalent in males than in females. However, whether there is a gender difference in the association between these health conditions has not yet been investigated. This study examined the gender difference in this association, considering the definition of periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: We recruited 1040 males and 1330 females, aged ≥40 years, with at least ten teeth from subjects of the 2007 Hisayama health examination. We performed a logistic regression analysis with various definitions of periodontal disease the dependent variable and MS as the independent variable. Following the analysis, the data were reanalysed with the structural equations model. Results: The logistic regression analysis suggested a stronger association between periodontal disease and MS in females than that in males when periodontal disease was more severely defined. When we constructed the structural equations model in each gender, the model showed a good fit to the data of females, suggesting the association between periodontal disease and MS in females, but not in males. Conclusions: Gender differences seem to exist in the association between periodontal disease and MS; MS might show a stronger association with periodontal disease in females than in males. Furuta M, Shimazaki Y, Takeshita T, Shibata Y, Akifusa S, Eshima N, Kiyohara Y, Ninomiya T, Hirakawa Y, Mukai N, Nagata M, Yamashita Y. Gender differences in the association between metabolic syndrome and periodontal disease: the Hisayama Study. J Clin Periodontol 2013; 40: 743–752. doi: 10.1111/jcpe.12119. PMID:23829196

  17. Chronic kidney disease and the severity of coronary artery disease and retinal microvasculature changes: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Au, Cheryl; Mitchell, Paul; Liew, Gerald; Plant, Adam J. H.; Wang, Sarah B.; Chiha, Joseph; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Burlutsky, George; Gopinath, Bamini

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior studies have suggested the association between incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and poor glomerular filtration function. However to the best of our knowledge, few studies have specifically assessed this relationship based on the severity of CAD as quantified using Extent and Gensini scores. Methods Between June 2009 and January 2012, data were collected from 1,680 participants as part of the Australian Heart Eye Study (AHES) cohort. Coronary angiograms were scored according to Gensini (severity) and Extent scores. Retinal vessel calibres were measured using validated semi-automated software. Potential confounders were adjusted for using multivariate analysis. Results There were no significant associations found between CKD status with Extent and Gensini scores for CAD severity, both unadjusted and when adjusted for confounding factors. In unadjusted analyses, a significant association between CKD and narrower retinal arteriolar diameter was observed (P=0.0072). After multivariate adjustment, the association between CKD and retinal arteriolar diameter was attenuated and was no longer significant (P=0.1466). No associations were observed between retinal venular calibre and prevalent CKD. Conclusions The present study demonstrated no independent associations between CKD and CAD severity. These results warrant validation by future large, prospective longitudinal studies. PMID:27621866

  18. Case-only exome sequencing and complex disease susceptibility gene discovery: study design considerations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lang; Schaid, Daniel J; Sicotte, Hugues; Wieben, Eric D; Li, Hu; Petersen, Gloria M

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify the potential aetiological role of rare functional variants in human complex diseases. Large-scale collaborations have generated germline WES data on patients with a number of diseases, especially cancer, but less often on healthy controls under the same sequencing procedures. These data can be a valuable resource for identifying new disease susceptibility loci if study designs are appropriately applied. This review describes suggested strategies and technical considerations when focusing on case-only study designs that use WES data in complex disease scenarios. These include variant filtering based on frequency and functionality, gene prioritisation, interrogation of different data types and targeted sequencing validation. We propose that if case-only WES designs were applied in an appropriate manner, new susceptibility genes containing rare variants for human complex diseases can be detected.

  19. Rodent models of cardiopulmonary disease: their potential applicability in studies of air pollutant susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Kodavanti, U P; Costa, D L; Bromberg, P A

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms by which increased mortality and morbidity occur in individuals with preexistent cardiopulmonary disease following acute episodes of air pollution are unknown. Studies involving air pollution effects on animal models of human cardiopulmonary diseases are both infrequent and difficult to interpret. Such models are, however, extensively used in studies of disease pathogenesis. Primarily they comprise those developed by genetic, pharmacologic, or surgical manipulations of the cardiopulmonary system. This review attempts a comprehensive description of rodent cardiopulmonary disease models in the context of their potential application to susceptibility studies of air pollutants regardless of whether the models have been previously used for such studies. The pulmonary disease models include bronchitis, emphysema, asthma/allergy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial fibrosis, and infection. The models of systemic hypertension and congestive heart failure include: those derived by genetics (spontaneously hypertensive, Dahl S. renin transgenic, and other rodent models); congestive heart failure models derived by surgical manipulations; viral myocarditis; and cardiomyopathy induced by adriamycin. The characteristic pathogenic features critical to understanding the susceptibility to inhaled toxicants are described. It is anticipated that this review will provide a ready reference for the selection of appropriate rodent models of cardiopulmonary diseases and identify not only their pathobiologic similarities and/or differences to humans but also their potential usefulness in susceptibility studies. Images Figure 2 PMID:9539009

  20. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is associated with risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Nationwide Case-Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chung-Yu; Liao, Kuang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) share common risk factors. However, there is limited information about COPD and CKD. This is case-cohort study was carried out using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database to evaluate the correlation between COPD and CKD. We identified cases aged older than 40 years who had an inpatient hospitalization with a first-time COPD diagnosis between 1998 and 2008. Control were selected from hospitalized patients without COPD or CKD and were matched according to age, gender, and year of admission at a 2:1 ratio. Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the association of CKD and COPD. The overall incidence of CKD was higher in the COPD group (470.9 per 104 person-years) than in the non-COPD group (287.52 per 104 person-years). The adjusted hazard ratio of case was 1.61 (P < 0.0001) times that of control. COPD was found to be associated with kidney disease from our follow-up. To detect CKD early, early diagnosis of CKD in patients with COPD and prompt initiation of monitoring and treatment are imperative. PMID:27166152

  1. Celiac Disease Genomic, Environmental, Microbiome, and Metabolomic (CDGEMM) Study Design: Approach to the Future of Personalized Prevention of Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Maureen M.; Camhi, Stephanie; Huedo-Medina, Tania B.; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    In the past it was believed that genetic predisposition and exposure to gluten were necessary and sufficient to develop celiac disease (CD). Recent studies however suggest that loss of gluten tolerance can occur at any time in life as a consequence of other environmental stimuli. Many environmental factors known to influence the composition of the intestinal microbiota are also suggested to play a role in the development of CD. These include birthing delivery mode, infant feeding, and antibiotic use. To date no large-scale longitudinal studies have defined if and how gut microbiota composition and metabolomic profiles may influence the loss of gluten tolerance and subsequent onset of CD in genetically-susceptible individuals. Here we describe a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal study of infants at risk for CD which will employ a blend of basic and applied studies to yield fundamental insights into the role of the gut microbiome as an additional factor that may play a key role in early steps involved in the onset of autoimmune disease. PMID:26569299

  2. Celiac Disease Genomic, Environmental, Microbiome, and Metabolomic (CDGEMM) Study Design: Approach to the Future of Personalized Prevention of Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Maureen M; Camhi, Stephanie; Huedo-Medina, Tania B; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-11-11

    In the past it was believed that genetic predisposition and exposure to gluten were necessary and sufficient to develop celiac disease (CD). Recent studies however suggest that loss of gluten tolerance can occur at any time in life as a consequence of other environmental stimuli. Many environmental factors known to influence the composition of the intestinal microbiota are also suggested to play a role in the development of CD. These include birthing delivery mode, infant feeding, and antibiotic use. To date no large-scale longitudinal studies have defined if and how gut microbiota composition and metabolomic profiles may influence the loss of gluten tolerance and subsequent onset of CD in genetically-susceptible individuals. Here we describe a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal study of infants at risk for CD which will employ a blend of basic and applied studies to yield fundamental insights into the role of the gut microbiome as an additional factor that may play a key role in early steps involved in the onset of autoimmune disease.

  3. Clinical Factors and Disease Course Related to Diagnostic Delay in Korean Crohn's Disease Patients: Results from the CONNECT Study.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chang Mo; Jung, Sung-Ae; Kim, Seong-Eun; Song, Hyun Joo; Jung, Yunho; Ye, Byong Duk; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, You Sun; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, Joo Sung; Han, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic delay frequently occurs in Crohn's disease (CD) patients because of diagnostic limitations. However, diagnostic delay and its related factors remain poorly defined. Therefore, we aimed to identify the predictors associated with diagnostic delay and to evaluate the impact of diagnostic delay on clinical course in a Korean CD patient cohort. We performed a multicenter retrospective analysis of 1,047 CD patients registered in the Crohn's Disease Clinical Network and Cohort study in Korea. The mean interval of diagnostic delay was 16.0 ± 33.1 months. Multivariate analysis showed that older age at diagnosis (≥40 years) (p = 0.014), concomitant upper gastrointestinal (UGI) disease (p = 0.012) and penetrating disease behavior at diagnosis (p = 0.001) were positively associated with long diagnostic delay (≥18 months). During the longitudinal follow-up, long diagnostic delay was independently predictive of further development of intestinal stenosis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.93; p = 0.017), internal fistulas (HR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.12-2.33; p = 0.011), and perianal fistulas (HR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.06-1.80; p = 0.016). However, as for the risk of abscess formation, bowel perforation, and CD-related abdominal surgery, no significant association with diagnostic delay was observed. Older age at diagnosis, UGI involvement, and penetrating behavior are associated with long diagnostic delay in Korean CD patients. Moreover, diagnostic delay is associated with an increased risk of CD-related complications such as intestinal stenosis, internal fistulas, and perianal fistulas.

  4. Comparative study on the National Renal Disease Registry in America, England and Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Askarianzadeh, Mahdi; Saghaeiannejad-Isfahani, Sakineh; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Ehteshami, Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Context: A disease registry is a database that includes information about people diagnosed with specific types of diseases. The registry collects information that can be used for capturing, managing, and organizing specific information for patients. Aims: The aim of this study was to identify and compare the National Renal Disease Registry (NRDR) in selected countries including the United States, United Kingdom, and Iran. Settings and Design: Retrieval of data of the NRDR performed through scholars responsible in related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and Renal Disease charity, and data registries in the United States, United Kingdom, and Iran. Materials and Methods: This research was an applied and descriptive, comparative study. The study population consisted of the National Renal Disease Registry of the selected countries including the United States, United Kingdom, and Iran, from which data were collected using forms that were designed according to the study objectives. Sources of data were researchers, scholars responsible in related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and Renal Disease charity, data registries, articles, books, journals, databases, websites, and related documents. Data were gathered through phone, e-mail, study, observation, and interview. Statistical Analysis Used: The researchers collected data for each country based on the study objectives and then put them in comparative tables. Data were analyzed by descriptive, comparative, and theoretical methods. Results: There is no NRDR in Iran to report the short- and long-term results of renal disease. Most of the renal transplant teams report their own results as single-center experiences. America and Britain have pre-eminent national registry of renal disease, compared to other countries. Conclusions: The Iranian Society of Nephrology should be actively involved to create a National Renal Registry in Iran. The registry should have

  5. Therapeutic Applications of Incretin Mimetics for Metabolic Diseases: Preclinical Studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exenatide (exendin-4) is an incretin mimetic peptide that shares several glucoregulatory actions with the endogenous incretin GLP-1. In addition to its actions on glucose control, exenatide produces effects to reduce food intake and body weight in all species studied. GLP-1 and exenatide have also b...

  6. DHA supplementation for late onset Stargardt disease: NAT-3 study

    PubMed Central

    Querques, Giuseppe; Benlian, Pascale; Chanu, Bernard; Leveziel, Nicolas; Coscas, Gabriel; Soubrane, Gisele; Souied, Eric H

    2010-01-01

    Background: We analyzed the effects of a docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation in patients affected with late onset Stargardt disease (STGD). Methods: DHA (840 mg/day) was given to 20 STGD patients for six months. A complete ophthalmologic examination, including best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG), was performed at inclusion day 0 (D0) and at month 6 (M6). Results: Overall, no statistical differences have been observed at M6 vs D0 as regards BCVA and mfERG (P > 0.05). Mild Improvement of BCVA and improvement of mfERG was noted in seven/40 eyes of four/20 patients. In the first patient, the peak of the a wave increased from 66 nV/deg2 to 75.4 nV/deg2 in the right eye (RE) and 24.5 nV/deg2 to 49.1 nV/deg2 in the left eye (LE). The peak of the b wave improved from 122 nV/deg2 to 157 nV/deg2 in the RE, and 102 nV/deg2 to 149 nV/deg2 in the LE. In the second patient peaks of the a and b waves respectively increased from 11.8 nV/deg2 to 72.1 nV/deg2 and 53 nV/deg2 to 185 nV/deg2 in the RE. In the third patient the peak of the a wave increased from 37 nV/deg2 to 43 nV/deg2 in the RE, and from 31 nV/deg2 to 45 nV/deg2 in the LE; the peak of the b wave improved from 70 nV/deg2 to 89 nV/deg2 in the RE, and from 101 nV/deg2 to 108 nV/deg2 in the LE. In the fourth patient, the peak of the a wave increased from 39 nV/deg2 to 42 nV/deg2 in the RE, and from 40 nV/deg2 to 43 nV/deg2 in the LE; the peak of the b wave improved from 86 nV/deg2 to 94 nV/deg2 in the RE, and from 87 nV/deg2 to 107 nV/deg2 in the LE. Conclusion: DHA seems to influence some functional parameters in patients affected with STGD. However, no short-term benefit should be expected from DHA supplementation. PMID:20668719

  7. PRELIMINARY REPORT ON NATIONWIDE STUDY OF DRINKING WATER AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to further investigate the association(s) of cardiovascular diseases and drinking water constituents. A sample of 4200 adults were randomly selected from 35 geographic areas to represent the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the contiguous United...

  8. Asbestos-related disease in Bangladeshi ship breakers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Courtice, Midori N; Demers, Paul A; Takaro, Tim K; Vedal, Sverre; Ahmad, S K Ahktar; Davies, Hugh W; Siddique, Zakia

    2011-01-01

    A pilot study tested the feasibility of conducting occupational health research in Bangladesh while examining prevalence of asbestos-related diseases including asbestosis, work-related respiratory symptoms, and attitudes to occupational health and safety among a group of internal migrant ship breakers. Data was collected on clinical and work history, respiratory symptoms, and occupational health and safety practices in Bengali. A B-reader read all postero-anterior chest x-rays. In the 104 male ship breakers studied, prevalence of asbestos-related disease was 12%, of which asbestosis accounted for 6%. Knowledge of asbestos and occupational health and safety measures were almost nonexistent. The prevalence of asbestos-related diseases is low compared to studies in shipbuilders and repairers, but a risk underestimate could have resulted from challenges identified during study design and implementation including: industry noncooperation and a culture of corruption; technological and language barriers; and a regional lack of physician knowledge and research on occupational diseases.

  9. A Refined Study of FCRL Genes from a Genome-Wide Association Study for Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Shao-Ying; Xue, Li-Qiong; Pan, Chun-Ming; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Liu, Bing-Li; Wang, Hai-Ning; Liang, Liming; Liang, Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Yuan, Guo-Yue; Li, Chang-Gui; Chen, Ming-Dao; Chen, Jia-Lun; Gao, Guan-Qi; Song, Huai-Dong

    2013-01-01

    To pinpoint the exact location of the etiological variant/s present at 1q21.1 harboring FCRL1-5 and CD5L genes, we carried out a refined association study in the entire FCRL region in 1,536 patients with Graves’ disease (GD) and 1,516 sex-matched controls by imputation analysis, logistic regression, and cis-eQTL analysis. Among 516 SNPs with P<0.05 in the initial GWAS scan, the strongest signals associated with GD and correlated to FCRL3 expression were located at a cluster of SNPs including rs7528684 and rs3761959. And the allele-specific effects for rs3761959 and rs7528684 on FCRL3 expression level revealed that the risk alleles A of rs3761959 and C of rs7528684 were correlated with the elevated expression level of FCRL3 whether in PBMCs or its subsets, especially in CD19+ B cells and CD8+ T subsets. Next, the combined analysis with 5,300 GD cases and 4,916 control individuals confirmed FCRL3 was a susceptibility gene of GD in Chinese Han populations, and rs3761959 and rs7528684 met the genome-wide association significance level (Pcombined = 2.27×10−12 and 7.11×10−13, respectively). Moreover, the haplotypes with the risk allele A of rs3761959 and risk allele C of rs7528684 were associated with GD risk. Finally, our epigenetic analysis suggested the disease-associated C allele of rs7528684 increased affinity for NF-KB transcription factor. Above data indicated that FCRL3 gene and its proxy SNP rs7528684 may be involved in the pathogenesis of GD by excessive inhibiting B cell receptor signaling and the impairment of suppressing function of Tregs. PMID:23505439

  10. Celiac disease in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a prevalence study in western Sicily (Italy).

    PubMed

    Greco, Domenico; Pisciotta, Maria; Gambina, Francesco; Maggio, Filippo

    2013-02-01

    The association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus is well known. Up to now, celiac disease prevalence in children and adults with type 1 diabetes in Sicily has not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who come from a defined geographical area in western Sicily and to investigate the clinical features of these subjects. The records of 492 consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus referred in a period of 5 years were analyzed. During the period of the survey, out of 492 patients with type 1 diabetes, 22 (4.5 %) had a previous diagnosis of celiac disease. There were 14 females and 8 males; these patients showed a mean age of 13 years at diabetes onset. Diagnosis of celiac disease was often simultaneous or subsequent to that of diabetes. Autoimmune thyroiditis was coexisting in 8 patients (36 %). Our data confirm, in a Sicilian population, the not unusual association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes, although prevalence rate is lower than in others Italian studies. Autoimmune thyroiditis is present with high prevalence in these patients. Celiac disease diagnosis often followed onset of type 1 diabetes, particularly in female subjects with a young age at diabetes onset; therefore, in these subjects, an active search for the presence of celiac disease is warranted for many years after appearance of diabetes.

  11. Celiac disease in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a prevalence study in western Sicily (Italy).

    PubMed

    Greco, Domenico; Pisciotta, Maria; Gambina, Francesco; Maggio, Filippo

    2013-02-01

    The association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus is well known. Up to now, celiac disease prevalence in children and adults with type 1 diabetes in Sicily has not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who come from a defined geographical area in western Sicily and to investigate the clinical features of these subjects. The records of 492 consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus referred in a period of 5 years were analyzed. During the period of the survey, out of 492 patients with type 1 diabetes, 22 (4.5 %) had a previous diagnosis of celiac disease. There were 14 females and 8 males; these patients showed a mean age of 13 years at diabetes onset. Diagnosis of celiac disease was often simultaneous or subsequent to that of diabetes. Autoimmune thyroiditis was coexisting in 8 patients (36 %). Our data confirm, in a Sicilian population, the not unusual association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes, although prevalence rate is lower than in others Italian studies. Autoimmune thyroiditis is present with high prevalence in these patients. Celiac disease diagnosis often followed onset of type 1 diabetes, particularly in female subjects with a young age at diabetes onset; therefore, in these subjects, an active search for the presence of celiac disease is warranted for many years after appearance of diabetes. PMID:22707396

  12. [Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The first case with histopathological study in Panama].

    PubMed

    Gracia, F; Díaz, R; Larreátegui, M; Castillo, L

    1992-05-01

    We studied the clinical and histopathology findings of the first proved case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in Panama. A sixty-five-years-old female patient referred from Santiago de Veraguas was admitted to Santo Tomás Hospital with a progressive clinical picture of dementia, incoordination and generalized myoclonia. The electroencephalogram showed periodic paroxysmal activity. The patient died eight months after initiated the disease. The cerebral histopathologic study was characteristic of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: status spongiform, neuronal loss and non-inflammatory gliosis was found.

  13. Knowledge and experiences of Chagas disease in Bolivian women living in Spain: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Blasco-Hernández, Teresa; Miguel, Lucía García-San; Navaza, Bárbara; Navarro, Miriam; Benito, Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Background In Europe, Spain has the highest number of people with Chagas disease (CD). Bolivian migrants account for 81% of the reported cases. One of the priorities in controlling the disease is prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Despite under-diagnosis in Spain being estimated at 90%, there are currently few studies that explore the social and cultural dimensions of this disease. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the knowledge and experiences of Bolivian women with CD, in order to generate a useful understanding for the design and implementation of public health initiatives. Design Qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews, triangular groups, and field notes. Participants Fourteen Bolivian women with CD living in Madrid. Results The participants were aware that the disease was transmitted through the vector, that it could be asymptomatic, and that it could also be associated with sudden death by heart failure. They opined that the treatment as such could not cure the disease but only slow it down. There was a sense of indifference along with a lack of understanding of the risk of contracting the disease. Participants who presented with symptoms, or those with relatives suffering from the disease, were concerned about fatalities, cardiac problems, and possible vertical transmission. There was also a fear of being rejected by others. The disease was described as something that affected a large number of people but only showed up in a few cases and that too after many years. There was a widespread assumption that it was better not to know because doing so, allows the disease to take hold. Conclusions Disease risk perception was very low in Bolivian women living in Madrid. This factor, together with the fear of being screened, may be contributing to the current rate of under-diagnosis. PMID:26976265

  14. Using Twitter to Measure Public Discussion of Diseases: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, H Andrew; Hill, Shawndra; Merchant, Raina M; Arango, Catalina; Ungar, Lyle

    2015-01-01

    Background Twitter is increasingly used to estimate disease prevalence, but such measurements can be biased, due to both biased sampling and inherent ambiguity of natural language. Objective We characterized the extent of these biases and how they vary with disease. Methods We correlated self-reported prevalence rates for 22 diseases from Experian’s Simmons National Consumer Study (n=12,305) with the number of times these diseases were mentioned on Twitter during the same period (2012). We also identified and corrected for two types of bias present in Twitter data: (1) demographic variance between US Twitter users and the general US population; and (2) natural language ambiguity, which creates the possibility that mention of a disease name may not actually refer to the disease (eg, “heart attack” on Twitter often does not refer to myocardial infarction). We measured the correlation between disease prevalence and Twitter disease mentions both with and without bias correction. This allowed us to quantify each disease’s overrepresentation or underrepresentation on Twitter, relative to its prevalence. Results Our sample included 80,680,449 tweets. Adjusting disease prevalence to correct for Twitter demographics more than doubles the correlation between Twitter disease mentions and disease prevalence in the general population (from .113 to .258, P <.001). In addition, diseases varied widely in how often mentions of their names on Twitter actually referred to the diseases, from 14.89% (3827/25,704) of instances (for stroke) to 99.92% (5044/5048) of instances (for arthritis). Applying ambiguity correction to our Twitter corpus achieves a correlation between disease mentions and prevalence of .208 ( P <.001). Simultaneously applying correction for both demographics and ambiguity more than triples the baseline correlation to .366 ( P <.001). Compared with prevalence rates, cancer appeared most overrepresented in Twitter, whereas high cholesterol appeared most

  15. Workplace exposure to passive smoking and risk of cardiovascular disease: summary of epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Kawachi, I; Colditz, G A

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed the published epidemiologic studies addressing the relationship between workplace exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and cardiovascular disease risk in three case-control studies and three cohort studies. Although the point estimates of risk for cardiovascular disease exceeded 1.0 in five of six studies, none of the relative risks was statistically significant because of the small number of cardiovascular end points occurring in individual studies. In common with most epidemiologic investigations of the health risks of ETS, none of the workplace studies included independent biochemical validation of ETS exposure. In contrast to the evidence on increased cardiovascular disease risk from exposure to spousal ETS, studies of ETS exposure in the workplace are still sparse and inconclusive. Conversely, there is no biologically plausible reason to believe that the hazards of ETS exposure that have been demonstrated in the home should not also apply to the workplace. PMID:10592141

  16. Association between randomised trial evidence and global burden of disease: cross sectional study (Epidemiological Study of Randomized Trials—ESORT)

    PubMed Central

    Odutayo, Ayodele; Hsiao, Allan J; Shakir, Mubeen; Hopewell, Sally; Rahimi, Kazem; Altman, Douglas G

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether an association exists between the number of published randomised controlled trials and the global burden of disease, whether certain diseases are under-investigated relative to their burden, and whether the relation between the output of randomised trials and global burden of disease can be explained by the relative disease burden in high and low income regions. Design Cross sectional investigation. Study sample All primary reports of randomised trials published in December 2012 and indexed in PubMed by 17 November 2013. Main outcome measures Number of trials conducted and number of participants randomised for each of 239 different diseases or injuries; variation in each outcome explainable by total disability adjusted life years (a measure of the overall burden of each disease) and the ratio of disability adjusted life years in low income to high income regions (a measure of whether a disease is more likely to affect people living in high income regions) quantified using multivariable regression. Results 4190 abstracts were reviewed and 1351 primary randomised trials identified, of which 1097 could be classified using the global burden of disease taxonomy. Total disability adjusted life years was poorly associated with number of randomised trials and number of participants randomised in univariable analysis (Spearman’s r=0.35 and 0.33, respectively), although it was a significant predictor in the univariable and multivariable models (P<0.001). Diseases for which the burden was predominantly located in low income regions had sevenfold fewer trials per million disability adjusted life years than diseases predominantly located in high income regions. However, only 26% of the variation in number of trials among diseases could be explained by total disability adjusted life years and the ratio of disability adjusted life years in low income regions to high income regions. Many high income type diseases (for example, neck pain

  17. Disease mapping and risk assessment in veterinary parasitology: some case studies.

    PubMed

    Cringoli, G; Rinaldi, L; Veneziano, V; Musella, V

    2005-03-01

    Disease mapping and risk assessment are important tasks in the area of medical and veterinary epidemiology. The development of methods for mapping diseases has progressed considerably in recent years. Geographical Information Systems (GIS), Remote Sensing (RS), and Spatial Analysis represent new tools for the study of epidemiology, and their application to parasitology has become more and more advanced, in particular to study the spatial and temporal patterns of diseases. The present review highlights the usefulness of GIS and RS in veterinary parasitology in order to better know the epidemiology of parasite organisms, causing either snail/arthropod borne diseases or direct transmissible diseases, mostly in small areas with a strong impact by man. It demonstrates the potential of these technologies to serve as effective tools for: data capture, mapping and analysis for the development of descriptive parasitological maps; studying the environmental features that influence the distribution of parasites; predicting parasite occurrence/seasonality based on their environmental requirements and as decision support for disease intervention; and surveillance and monitoring of animal diseases.

  18. Transgenic mice expressing human glucocerebrosidase variants: utility for the study of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Angela; Hemmelgarn, Harmony; Melrose, Heather L; Hein, Leanne; Fuller, Maria; Clarke, Lorne A

    2013-08-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessively inherited storage disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase, acid β-glucosidase. The disease manifestations seen in Gaucher patients are highly heterogeneous as is the responsiveness to therapy. The elucidation of the precise factors responsible for this heterogeneity has been challenging as the development of clinically relevant animal models of Gaucher disease has been problematic. Although numerous murine models for Gaucher disease have been described each has limitations in their specific utility. We describe here, transgenic murine models of Gaucher disease that will be particularly useful for the study of pharmacological chaperones. We have produced stable transgenic mouse strains that individually express wild type, N370S and L444P containing human acid β-glucosidase and show that each of these transgenic lines rescues the lethal phenotype characteristic of acid β-glucosidase null mice. Both the N370S and L444P transgenic models show early and progressive elevations of tissue sphingolipids with L444P mice developing progressive splenic Gaucher cell infiltration. We demonstrate the potential utility of these new transgenic models for the study of Gaucher disease pathogenesis. In addition, since these mice produce only human enzyme, they are particularly relevant for the study of pharmacological chaperones that are specifically targeted to human acid β-glucosidase and the common mutations underlying Gaucher disease. PMID:23642305

  19. Skeletal involvement in Gaucher disease: An observational multicenter study of prognostic factors in the Argentine Gaucher disease patients.

    PubMed

    Drelichman, Guillermo; Fernández Escobar, Nicolás; Basack, Nora; Aversa, Luis; Larroude, María Silvia; Aguilar, Gabriela; Szlago, Marina; Schenone, Andrea; Fynn, Alcyra; Cuello, María Fernanda; Aznar, Marcela; Fernández, Ramiro; Ruiz, Alba; Reichel, Paola; Guelbert, Norberto; Robledo, Hugo; Watman, Nora; Bolesina, Moira; Elena, Graciela; Veber, S Ernesto; Pujal, Graciela; Galván, Graciela; Chain, Juan José; Arizo, Adriana; Bietti, Julieta; Bar, Daniel; Dragosky, Marta; Marquez, Marisa; Feldman, Leonardo; Muller, Katja; Zirone, Sandra; Buchovsky, Greogorio; Lanza, Victoria; Sanabria, Alba; Fernández, Ignacio; Jaureguiberry, Rossana; Contte, Marcelo; Barbieri María, Angie; Maro, Alejandra; Zárate, Graciela; Fernández, Gabriel; Rapetti, María Cristina; Donato, Hugo; Degano, Adriana; Kantor, Gustavo; Albina, Roberto; Á Lvarez Bollea, María; Brun, María; Bacciedoni, Viviana; Del Río, Francis; Soberón, Bárbara; Boido, Nazario; Schweri, Maya; Borchichi, Sandra; Welsh, Victoria; Corrales, Marcela; Cedola, Alejandra; Carvani, Analía; Diez, Blanca; Richard, Lucía; Baduel, Ccecilia; Nuñez, Gabriela; Colimodio, Rubén; Barazzutti, Lucía; Medici, Hugo; Meschengieser, Susana; Damiani, Germán; Nucifora, María; Girardi, Beatriz; Gómez, Sergio; Papucci, Maura; Verón, David; Quiroga, Luis; Carro, Gustavo; De Ambrosio, Patricia; Ferro, José; Pujol, Marcelo; Castella, Cristina Cabral; Franco, Liliana; Nisnovich, Gisela; Veloso, María; Pacheco, Isabel; Savarino, Mario; Marino, Andrés; Saavedra, José Luis

    2016-10-01

    Patients with Gaucher type 1 (GD1) throughout Argentina were enrolled in the Argentine bone project to evaluate bone disease and its determinants. We focused on presence and predictors of bone lesions (BL) and their relationship to therapeutic goals (TG) with timing and dose of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). A total of 124 patients on ERT were enrolled in a multi-center study. All six TG were achieved by 82% of patients: 70.1% for bone pain and 91.1% for bone crisis. However, despite the fact that bone TGs were achieved, residual bone disease was present in 108 patients on ERT (87%) at time 0. 16% of patients showed new irreversible BL (bone infarcts and avascular osteonecrosis) despite ERT, suggesting that they appeared during ERT or were not detected at the moment of diagnosis. We observed 5 prognostic factors that predicted a higher probability of being free of bone disease: optimal ERT compliance; early diagnosis; timely initiation of therapy; ERT initiation dose ≥45 UI/kg/EOW; and the absence of history of splenectomy. Skeletal involvement was classified into 4 major phenotypic groups according to BL: group 1 (12.9%) without BL; group 2 (28.2%) with reversible BL; group 3 (41.9%) with reversible BL and irreversible chronic BL; and group 4 (16.9%) with acute irreversible BL. Our study identifies prognostic factors for achieving best therapeutic outcomes, introduces new risk stratification for patients and suggests the need for a redefinition of bone TG. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E448-E453, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Skeletal involvement in Gaucher disease: An observational multicenter study of prognostic factors in the Argentine Gaucher disease patients.

    PubMed

    Drelichman, Guillermo; Fernández Escobar, Nicolás; Basack, Nora; Aversa, Luis; Larroude, María Silvia; Aguilar, Gabriela; Szlago, Marina; Schenone, Andrea; Fynn, Alcyra; Cuello, María Fernanda; Aznar, Marcela; Fernández, Ramiro; Ruiz, Alba; Reichel, Paola; Guelbert, Norberto; Robledo, Hugo; Watman, Nora; Bolesina, Moira; Elena, Graciela; Veber, S Ernesto; Pujal, Graciela; Galván, Graciela; Chain, Juan José; Arizo, Adriana; Bietti, Julieta; Bar, Daniel; Dragosky, Marta; Marquez, Marisa; Feldman, Leonardo; Muller, Katja; Zirone, Sandra; Buchovsky, Greogorio; Lanza, Victoria; Sanabria, Alba; Fernández, Ignacio; Jaureguiberry, Rossana; Contte, Marcelo; Barbieri María, Angie; Maro, Alejandra; Zárate, Graciela; Fernández, Gabriel; Rapetti, María Cristina; Donato, Hugo; Degano, Adriana; Kantor, Gustavo; Albina, Roberto; Á Lvarez Bollea, María; Brun, María; Bacciedoni, Viviana; Del Río, Francis; Soberón, Bárbara; Boido, Nazario; Schweri, Maya; Borchichi, Sandra; Welsh, Victoria; Corrales, Marcela; Cedola, Alejandra; Carvani, Analía; Diez, Blanca; Richard, Lucía; Baduel, Ccecilia; Nuñez, Gabriela; Colimodio, Rubén; Barazzutti, Lucía; Medici, Hugo; Meschengieser, Susana; Damiani, Germán; Nucifora, María; Girardi, Beatriz; Gómez, Sergio; Papucci, Maura; Verón, David; Quiroga, Luis; Carro, Gustavo; De Ambrosio, Patricia; Ferro, José; Pujol, Marcelo; Castella, Cristina Cabral; Franco, Liliana; Nisnovich, Gisela; Veloso, María; Pacheco, Isabel; Savarino, Mario; Marino, Andrés; Saavedra, José Luis

    2016-10-01

    Patients with Gaucher type 1 (GD1) throughout Argentina were enrolled in the Argentine bone project to evaluate bone disease and its determinants. We focused on presence and predictors of bone lesions (BL) and their relationship to therapeutic goals (TG) with timing and dose of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). A total of 124 patients on ERT were enrolled in a multi-center study. All six TG were achieved by 82% of patients: 70.1% for bone pain and 91.1% for bone crisis. However, despite the fact that bone TGs were achieved, residual bone disease was present in 108 patients on ERT (87%) at time 0. 16% of patients showed new irreversible BL (bone infarcts and avascular osteonecrosis) despite ERT, suggesting that they appeared during ERT or were not detected at the moment of diagnosis. We observed 5 prognostic factors that predicted a higher probability of being free of bone disease: optimal ERT compliance; early diagnosis; timely initiation of therapy; ERT initiation dose ≥45 UI/kg/EOW; and the absence of history of splenectomy. Skeletal involvement was classified into 4 major phenotypic groups according to BL: group 1 (12.9%) without BL; group 2 (28.2%) with reversible BL; group 3 (41.9%) with reversible BL and irreversible chronic BL; and group 4 (16.9%) with acute irreversible BL. Our study identifies prognostic factors for achieving best therapeutic outcomes, introduces new risk stratification for patients and suggests the need for a redefinition of bone TG. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E448-E453, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27420181

  1. Rheumatic heart disease in childhood: comparative study between Japan and Thailand.

    PubMed

    Mori, C; Okuda, R; Nishioka, K; Ueda, C; Phornphvtkul, C

    1979-05-01

    This report showed the comparative study of the rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Japan and Thailand. At first, there is remarkable difference about the incidence of the rheumatic heart disease. The incidence of the rheumatic heart disease in Thailand was one hundred times that in Japan. Secondly, there is particular difference about the course of mitral stenosis in childhood. In Japan common pattern of rheumatic heart disease was slight mitral insufficiency and mitral stenosis was seldom. In Thailand mitral stenosis was observed in 5% on rheumatic heart disease, and mitral stenosis developed early following an attack of rheumatic fever. These differences were supposed due to the socio-economic state in each country.

  2. A retrospective study of disease in captive kangaroos from Oklahoma State University, 1995-2009.

    PubMed

    Stern, Adam W

    2010-03-01

    The antemortem biopsy records (5 cases) and necropsy records (34 cases) were reviewed from 39 kangaroo case submissions during a 14-year period to the Oklahoma State University and the Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory. The most common types of diseases in the kangaroos, based on necropsy examination, was disease of the alimentary tract (12 cases), pneumonia (6 cases), and disseminated toxoplasmosis (5 cases). The cause of disease was not determined in 6 case submissions. Based on histopathologic findings, clostridial enteritis/colitis was suspected in 2 kangaroos. Coccidian parasites were identified within histologic sections of the small intestine in 1 kangaroo. Pasteurella sp. (1 case) and Bacteroides sp. (1 case) were isolated from the lung in 2 cases of pneumonia. Most (77.3%) of disease in this study in the kangaroos with known ages occurred in animals older than 1 year. Two neoplasms were detected in the antemortem biopsy samples from 1 case.

  3. The Framingham Heart Study and the Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Diseases: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Syed S.; Levy, Daniel; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary On October 11, 2013, the Framingham Heart Study will celebrate 65 years since the examination of its first participant in 1948. During this period, the study has provided substantial insight into the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease and its risk factors. The origin of the study is closely linked to the cardiovascular health of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his premature death from hypertensive heart disease and stroke in 1945. The present article describes the events leading to the founding of the Framingham Heart Study, and provides a brief historical overview of selected contributions from the study. PMID:24084292

  4. Clinical study of bladder diseases using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagainova, Elena; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Strelzova, O.; Sumin, A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Iksanov, Rashid R.

    2000-11-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), a new optical bioimaging technique was used to evaluate the state of mucosa in the urinary bladder. The state of mucosa of the bladder was evaluated in patients with prostatic adenoma (11 male patients) during the course of prostatectomy operation via a resection cytoscope. An OCT probe was inserted into the biopsy channel of a cystoscope. The sites to be imaged by OCT were determined visually and, after OCT study, underwent excisional biopsy and subsequent histological examination. Children (9 girls) were examined during diagnostic cystoscopy. Our analysis of diagnostic capabilities of OCT in urology relies on the comparison of OCT information on normal and morphologically altered tissues. OCT is able to provide objective data concerning the structure of mucosa of the bladder due to the difference in optical properties of different layers in tissue. The epithelium and the layers of connective tissue, both in norm and pathology, are clearly visualized in the tomograms. Our OCT study of healthy mucosa of the urinary bladder has demonstrated that the epithelium appears in the tomograms as an upper highly backscattering layer. An underlying optically less transparent layer, much greater in size than the previous one, corresponds to the connective tissue of the mucosa. Inside this layer, elongated poorly backscattering formations with clear contours are seen; they do not alter the longitudinal structure of the submucosal layer. These formations are blood vessels. Optical patterns characteristic of chronic inflammation are obtained. They correspond, as confirmed histologically, to liquid accumulation, cellular infiltration of mucosal layers, hypervascularization, and fibrosis. OCT information on proliferative processes, such as papillomatosis of the urinary bladder and squamous cell carcinoma, is analyzed. It is shown that OCT can reliably reveal edema of the mucous membrane of the bladder and identify the character of appearing

  5. Chronic kidney disease in older people with intellectual disability: results of the HA-ID study.

    PubMed

    de Winter, C F; Echteld, M A; Evenhuis, H M

    2014-03-01

    With increasing longevity and cardiovascular events, chronic kidney disease may also become a significant problem in older people with intellectual disability (ID). We studied prevalence and associations of chronic kidney disease as part of the Healthy Ageing and Intellectual Disability (HA-ID) study, a large Dutch cross-sectional study among people with ID aged 50 years and over, using creatinine and cystatin-C measurement in plasma. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations. Equations based on creatinine (as the MDRD equation) may underestimate kidney dysfunction in people with sarcopenia, because low muscle mass leads to a low creatinine production. Therefore, also prevalence of chronic kidney disease was studied in the sarcopenic group, using different GFR equations. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease, among 635 participants, was 15.3%, which equals prevalence in the general Dutch population. In the group of participants with sarcopenia (n=82), the CKD-EPI equation based on creatinine and cystatin-C gave a higher prevalence of chronic kidney disease than did the MDRD equation, but confidence intervals were very wide. Chronic kidney disease was associated with higher age, Down syndrome, obesity, hypercholesterolemia and hypothyroid disease. GFR should be measured in all older people with ID and polypharmacy, and in older people with ID and Down syndrome as part of the regular health checks. Moreover, if sarcopenia is present and information on GFR is required, this should not be measured based on creatinine only, but additional measures, such as cystatin-C, should be taken into account.

  6. Structural brain MRI studies in eye diseases: are they clinically relevant? A review of current findings.

    PubMed

    Prins, Doety; Hanekamp, Sandra; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2016-03-01

    Many eye diseases reduce visual acuity or are associated with visual field defects. Because of the well-defined retinotopic organization of the connections of the visual pathways, this may affect specific parts of the visual pathways and cortex, as a result of either deprivation or transsynaptic degeneration. For this reason, over the past several years, numerous structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have examined the association of eye diseases with pathway and brain changes. Here, we review structural MRI studies performed in human patients with the eye diseases albinism, amblyopia, hereditary retinal dystrophies, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma. We focus on two main questions. First, what have these studies revealed? Second, what is the potential clinical relevance of their findings? We find that all the aforementioned eye diseases are indeed associated with structural changes in the visual pathways and brain. As such changes have been described in very different eye diseases, in our view the most parsimonious explanation is that these are caused by the loss of visual input and the subsequent deprivation of the visual pathways and brain regions, rather than by transsynaptic degeneration. Moreover, and of clinical relevance, for some of the diseases - in particular glaucoma and AMD - present results are compatible with the view that the eye disease is part of a more general neurological or neurodegenerative disorder that also affects the brain. Finally, establishing structural changes of the visual pathways has been relevant in the context of new therapeutic strategies to restore retinal function: it implies that restoring retinal function may not suffice to also effectively restore vision. Future structural MRI studies can contribute to (i) further establish relationships between ocular and neurological neurodegenerative disorders, (ii) investigate whether brain degeneration in eye diseases is reversible, (iii) evaluate the use

  7. Rheumatic Disease among Oklahoma Tribal Populations: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaddy, Jasmine R.; Vista, Evan S.; Robertson, Julie M.; Dedeke, Amy B.; Roberts, Virginia C.; Klein, Wendy S.; Levin, Jeremy H.; Mota, Fabio H.; Cooper, Tina M.; Grim, Gloria A.; Khan, Sohail; James, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatic diseases cause significant morbidity within American Indian populations. Clinical disease presentations, as well as historically associated autoantibodies, are not always useful in making a rapid diagnosis or assessing prognosis. The purpose of this study is to identify autoantibody associations among Oklahoma tribal populations with rheumatic disease. Methods Oklahoma tribal members (110 rheumatic disease patients and 110 controls) were enrolled at tribal-based clinics. Rheumatic disease patients (suspected or confirmed diagnosis) were assessed by a rheumatologist for clinical features, disease criteria, and activity measures. Blood samples were collected and tested for common rheumatic disease autoantibodies (ANA, anti-CCP, anti-RF, anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-Sm, anti-nRNP, anti-Ribosomal P, anti-dsDNA, and anti-cardiolipins). Results In patients with suspected systemic rheumatic diseases, 72% satisfied ACR classification: 40 (36%) rheumatoid arthritis, 16 (15%) systemic lupus erythematosus, 8 (7%) scleroderma, 8 (7%) osteoarthritis, 4 (4%) fibromyalgia, 2 (2%) seronegative spondyloarthropathy, 1 Sjogrens syndrome, and 1 sarcoidosis. When compared to controls, RA patient sera were more likely to contain anti-CCP (55% vs 2%, p<0.001) or anti-RF IgM antibodies (57% vs 10%, p<0.001); however, the difference was greater for anti-CCP. Anti-CCP positivity conferred higher disease activity scores (DAS28 5.6 vs 4.45, p=0.021) while anti-RF positivity did not (DAS28 5.36 vs 4.64, p=0.15). Anticardiolipin antibodies (25% or rheumatic disease paitents vs 10% of contros,; p=0.0022) and ANA (63% vs 21%, p<0.0001) were more common in rheumatic disease patients. Conclusion Anti-CCP may serve as a better RA biomarker in AI patients, while the clinical significance of increased frequency of aCLs needs further evaluation. PMID:22896022

  8. The burden of mental disorders: a comparison of methods between the Australian burden of disease studies and the Global Burden of Disease study.

    PubMed Central

    Vos, T.; Mathers, C. D.

    2000-01-01

    The national and Victorian burden of disease studies in Australia set out to examine critically the methods used in the Global Burden of Disease study to estimate the burden of mental disorders. The main differences include the use of a different set of disability weights allowing estimates in greater detail by level of severity, adjustments for comorbidity between mental disorders, a greater number of mental disorders measured, and modelling of substance use disorders, anxiety disorders and bipolar disorder as chronic conditions. Uniform age-weighting in the Australian studies produces considerably lower estimates of the burden due to mental disorders in comparison with age-weighted disability-adjusted life years. A lack of follow-up data on people with mental disorders who are identified in cross-sectional surveys poses the greatest challenge in determining the burden of mental disorders more accurately. PMID:10885161

  9. A 4-year follow-up study of a rural community with endemic Chagas' disease*

    PubMed Central

    Puigbó, J. J.; Rhode, J. R. Nava; Barrios, H. García; Yépez, C. Gil

    1968-01-01

    The paper reports on a 4-year follow-up study that represents the continuation of a previous cross-sectional study on Chagas' disease carried out in a rural community (Belén) in Venezuela. The earlier study included 1210 persons all over 5 years of age out of a total of 1656 inhabitants and demonstrated a high prevalence of Chagas' infection (47.3%) and a high rate of Chagas' disease seropositivity among those with chronic myocardial heart disease (84.8%); heart disease was found in 17.3% of persons studied. The follow-up study was based on 812 persons and established that in the sample the frequency of Chagas' infection was 16.3% and that of heart disease 2.2%. Clinical, electrocardiographic and radiological analyses were made on patients with previous heart disease as well as on new patients. Different evolutive electrocardiographic patterns have been found, including variations ranging from normal to definitively abnormal. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4974002

  10. Applications of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Studying the Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Wenbin; Cao, Lan; Kalionis, Bill; Xia, Shijin; Tai, Xiantao

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is the umbrella term for the progressive loss of structure or function of neurons. Incurable neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) show dramatic rising trends particularly in the advanced age groups. However, the underlying mechanisms are not yet fully elucidated, and to date there are no biomarkers for early detection or effective treatments for the underlying causes of these diseases. Furthermore, due to species variation and differences between animal models (e.g., mouse transgenic and knockout models) of neurodegenerative diseases, substantial debate focuses on whether animal and cell culture disease models can correctly model the condition in human patients. In 2006, Yamanaka of Kyoto University first demonstrated a novel approach for the preparation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which displayed similar pluripotency potential to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Currently, iPSCs studies are permeating many sectors of disease research. Patient sample-derived iPSCs can be used to construct patient-specific disease models to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of disease development and to test new therapeutic strategies. Accordingly, the present review will focus on recent progress in iPSC research in the modeling of neurodegenerative disorders and in the development of novel therapeutic options. PMID:26240571

  11. Oral Piercing and Oral Diseases: A Short Time Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Inchingolo, Francesco; Tatullo, Marco; Abenavoli, Fabio M.; Marrelli, Massimo; Inchingolo, Alessio D.; Palladino, Antonio; Inchingolo, Angelo M.; Dipalma, Gianna

    2011-01-01

    Body piercing indicates the puncturing of a part of the body in which jewelry may be worn. In recent years, oral piercing is increasingly popular especially among young people. Body piercing has to be considered as a surgical procedure to all intents and purposes and, as such, has to be performed only by qualified personnel able to assure high standards of professionalism in facilities subject to sanitary inspections. The aim of the present work is to verify what risks patients may be exposed to and what complications may occur after a healthcare professional performs oral piercing. Our retrospective study includes 108 patients (74 males and 34 females) aged between 14 and 39 years, who had oral piercing done 12±4 months earlier. All the patients underwent clinical examination to reveal the possible presence of late complications. After piercing, none of the 108 patients developed widespread complications. Although all patients said they had followed the piercers' instructions, 96% of them reported postoperative local complications such as bleeding within 12 hours of piercing (90%), perilesional edema for 3±2 days after piercing surgery (80%), and persistent mucosal atrophy (70%). PMID:22135610

  12. Respiratory diseases and the impact of cough in Taiwan: Results from the APBORD observational study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Cho, Sang-Heon; Ghoshal, Aloke Gopal; Muttalif, Abdul Razak Bin Abdul; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Bagga, Shalini; Faruqi, Rab; Sajjan, Shiva; Cahill, Camilla L; Hamrosi, Kim K; Wang, De Yun

    2016-07-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis (AR), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and rhinosinusitis are becoming increasingly prevalent in the Asia-Pacific region. The Asia-Pacific Burden of Respiratory Diseases (APBORD) study was a cross-sectional, observational study which examined the disease and economic burden of AR, asthma, COPD, and rhinosinusitis across Asia-Pacific using 1 standard protocol. Here we report symptoms, healthcare resource use (HCRU), work impairment, and associated cost in Taiwan.Consecutive participants aged ≥ 18 years presenting to a physician with symptoms meeting the diagnostic criteria for a primary diagnosis of asthma, AR, COPD, or rhinosinusitis were enrolled. Participants and their treating physician completed surveys detailing respiratory symptoms, HCRU, work productivity, and activity impairment. Costs including direct medical costs and indirect costs associated with lost work productivity were calculated.The study enrolled 1001 patients. AR was the most frequent primary diagnosis (31.2%). A quarter of patients presented with a combination of respiratory diseases, with AR and asthma being the most frequent combination (14.1%). Cough or coughing up phlegm was the primary reason for the medical visit for patients with asthma and COPD, whereas nasal symptoms (watery runny nose, blocked nose, and congestion) were the primary reasons for AR and rhinosinusitis. Specialists were the most frequently used healthcare resource by patients with AR (26.1%), asthma (26.4%), COPD (26.6%), and rhinosinusitis (47.3%). The mean annual cost per patient with a respiratory disease was US$4511 (SD 5395). The cost was almost double for employed patients (US$8047, SD 6175), with the majority attributable to lost productivity.Respiratory diseases have a significant impact on disease burden in Taiwan. Treatment strategies that prevent lost work productivity could greatly reduce the economic burden of these diseases.

  13. Respiratory diseases and the impact of cough in Taiwan: Results from the APBORD observational study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Cho, Sang-Heon; Ghoshal, Aloke Gopal; Muttalif, Abdul Razak Bin Abdul; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Bagga, Shalini; Faruqi, Rab; Sajjan, Shiva; Cahill, Camilla L; Hamrosi, Kim K; Wang, De Yun

    2016-07-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis (AR), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and rhinosinusitis are becoming increasingly prevalent in the Asia-Pacific region. The Asia-Pacific Burden of Respiratory Diseases (APBORD) study was a cross-sectional, observational study which examined the disease and economic burden of AR, asthma, COPD, and rhinosinusitis across Asia-Pacific using 1 standard protocol. Here we report symptoms, healthcare resource use (HCRU), work impairment, and associated cost in Taiwan.Consecutive participants aged ≥ 18 years presenting to a physician with symptoms meeting the diagnostic criteria for a primary diagnosis of asthma, AR, COPD, or rhinosinusitis were enrolled. Participants and their treating physician completed surveys detailing respiratory symptoms, HCRU, work productivity, and activity impairment. Costs including direct medical costs and indirect costs associated with lost work productivity were calculated.The study enrolled 1001 patients. AR was the most frequent primary diagnosis (31.2%). A quarter of patients presented with a combination of respiratory diseases, with AR and asthma being the most frequent combination (14.1%). Cough or coughing up phlegm was the primary reason for the medical visit for patients with asthma and COPD, whereas nasal symptoms (watery runny nose, blocked nose, and congestion) were the primary reasons for AR and rhinosinusitis. Specialists were the most frequently used healthcare resource by patients with AR (26.1%), asthma (26.4%), COPD (26.6%), and rhinosinusitis (47.3%). The mean annual cost per patient with a respiratory disease was US$4511 (SD 5395). The cost was almost double for employed patients (US$8047, SD 6175), with the majority attributable to lost productivity.Respiratory diseases have a significant impact on disease burden in Taiwan. Treatment strategies that prevent lost work productivity could greatly reduce the economic burden of these diseases. PMID

  14. Alterations of Myelin Content in Parkinson’s Disease: A Cross-Sectional Neuroimaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Sojkova, Jitka; Hurley, Samuel; Kecskemeti, Steven; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Theisen, Frances; Johnson, Sterling C.; Alexander, Andrew L.; Gallagher, Catherine L.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations to myelin may be a core pathological feature of neurodegenerative diseases. Although white matter microstructural differences have been described in Parkinson's disease (PD), it is unknown whether such differences include alterations of the brain’s myelin content. Thus, the objective of the current study is to measure and compare brain myelin content between PD patients and age-matched controls. In this cross-sectional study, 63 participants from the Longitudinal MRI in Parkinson's Disease study underwent brain MRI, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scoring, and cognitive asessments. Subjects were imaged with the mcDEPSOT (multi-component driven equilibrium single pulse observation of T1 and T2), a multicomponent relaxometry technique that quantifies longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates (R1 and R2, respectively) and the myelin water fraction (VFM), a surrogate for myelin content. A voxel-wise approach was used to compare R1, R2, and VFM measures between PD and control groups, and to evaluate relationships with age as well as disease duration, UPDRS scores, and daily levodopa equivalent dose. PD subjects had higher VFM than controls in frontal and temporal white matter and bilateral thalamus. Greater age was strongly associated with lower VFM in both groups, while an age-by-group interaction suggested a slower rate of VFM decline in the left putamen with aging in PD. Within the PD group, measures of disease severity, including UPDRS, daily levodopa equivalent dose, and disease duration, were observed to be related with myelin content in diffuse brain regions. The age-by-group interaction suggests that either PD or dopaminergic therapies allay observed age-related myelin changes. The relationships between VFM and disease severity measures suggests that VFM may provide a surrogate marker for microstructural changes related to Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27706215

  15. The Association Between Periodontal Disease and Kidney Function Decline in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Grubbs, Vanessa; Vittinghoff, Eric; Beck, James D.; Kshirsagar, Abhijit V.; Wang, Wei; Griswold, Michael E.; Powe, Neil R.; Correa, Adolfo; Young, Bessie

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains a prevalent public health problem that disproportionately affects African Americans, despite intense efforts targeting traditional risk factors. Periodontal disease, a chronic bacterial infection of the oral cavity, is both common and modifiable and has been implicated as a novel potential CKD risk factor. We sought to examine to what extent periodontal disease is associated with kidney function decline. Methods Retrospective cohort study of 699 African American participants with preserved kidney function defined by an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >60ml/min/1.73m2 at baseline who underwent complete dental examinations as part of the Dental-Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study (1996–1998) and subsequently enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (2000–2004). Using multivariable Poisson regression we examined the association of periodontal disease (severe vs. non-severe) with incident CKD defined as incident eGFR<60ml/min/1.73m2 and rapid (5% annualized) eGFR decline at follow-up among those with preserved eGFR at baseline. Results Mean age at baseline was 65.4 years (SD 5.2) and 16.3% (n=114) had severe periodontal disease. There were 21 cases (3.0%) of incident CKD after a mean follow-up of 4.8 (SD 0.6) years. Compared to participants with non-severe periodontal disease, those with severe periodontal disease had a 4-fold greater rate of incident CKD [adjusted incidence rate ratio 4.18, 95% CI (1.68 – 10.39), p=0.002]. Conclusion Severe periodontal disease is prevalent among a population at high-risk for CKD and is associated with clinically significant kidney function decline. Further research is needed to determine if periodontal disease treatment alters the trajectory of renal deterioration. PMID:26110451

  16. Aspergillus and aspergilloses in wild and domestic animals: a global health concern with parallels to human disease.

    PubMed

    Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Guillot, Jacques; Arné, Pascal; de Hoog, G Sybren; Mouton, Johan W; Melchers, Willem J G; Verweij, Paul E

    2015-11-01

    The importance of aspergillosis in humans and various animal species has increased over the last decades. Aspergillus species are found worldwide in humans and in almost all domestic animals and birds as well as in many wild species, causing a wide range of diseases from localized infections to fatal disseminated diseases, as well as allergic responses to inhaled conidia. Some prevalent forms of animal aspergillosis are invasive fatal infections in sea fan corals, stonebrood mummification in honey bees, pulmonary and air sac infection in birds, mycotic abortion and mammary gland infections in cattle, guttural pouch mycoses in horses, sinonasal infections in dogs and cats, and invasive pulmonary and cerebral infections in marine mammals and nonhuman primates. This article represents a comprehensive overview of the most common infections reported by Aspergillus species and the corresponding diseases in various types of animals.

  17. Systematic review of genetic association studies involving histologically confirmed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kayleigh L; Miller, Michael H; Dillon, John F

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has an increasing prevalence in Western countries, affecting up to 20% of the population. Objective The aim of this project was to systematically review and summarise the genetic association studies that investigate possible genetic influences that confer susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Design The MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases were searched to identify candidate gene studies on histologically diagnosed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Results A total of 85 articles have been summarised and categorised on the basis of the general pathway each candidate gene is involved in, including lipid metabolism, lipoprotein processing, cholesterol synthesis, glucose homoeostasis, inflammatory response, protection against oxidative stress and whole body metabolism. Conclusions The main findings demonstrate a small but consistent association of PNPLA3 with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Genetic association studies have investigated general disease susceptibility, histological characteristics, severity and progression. However, further study is required to better elucidate the genetic factors influencing fatty liver disease. PMID:26462272

  18. Effectiveness of Chronic Disease Self-management Program in Japan: preliminary report of a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Keiko; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Yonekura, Yuki; Togari, Taisuke; Abbott, Fusae K; Homma, Mieko; Park, Minjeong; Kagawa, Yumi

    2010-12-01

    This is the preliminary report of a study to evaluate the effectiveness of the Chronic Disease Self-management Program in Japan by comparing changes in health outcomes at the baseline and 3-month and 6-month follow-ups. The program is a patient-centered educational program for the self-management of chronic conditions. The study's participants were recruited from among the attendees of the program workshops. During the study period (August 2006 to May 2007), 18 workshops were held and 128 attendees agreed to participate in the study. The health outcomes that were measured included health status, self-management behaviors, utilization of health services, self-efficacy, satisfaction with daily living, and clinical indicators. These indicators were further analyzed by disease type: diabetes, rheumatic disease, and cardiovascular disease/dyslipidemia. The findings indicated statistically significant positive changes in health distress, coping with symptoms, stretching exercises, communication with the physician, and satisfaction with daily living. The positive changes were especially remarkable among the groups with diabetes and rheumatic disease. These findings suggest that the Chronic Disease Self-management Program can be effective for Japanese people with chronic conditions.

  19. Studies of generalized elemental imbalances in neurological disease patients using INAA (instrumental neutron activation analysis)

    SciTech Connect

    Ehmann, W.D.; Vance, D.E.; Khare, S.S.; Kasarskis, E.J.; Markesbery, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    Evidence has been presented in the literature to implicate trace elements in the etiology of several age-related neurological diseases. Most of these studies are based on brain analyses. Using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), we have observed trace element imbalances in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Picks's disease. The most prevalent elemental imbalances found in the brain were for bromine, mercury, and the alkali metals. In this study the authors report INAA studies of trace elements in nonneural tissues from Alzheimer's disease and ALS patients. Samples from household relatives were collected for use as controls wherever possible. Hair samples were washed according to the International Atomic Energy Agency recommended procedure. Fingernail samples were scraped with a quartz knife prior to washing by the same procedure. For ALS patients, blood samples were also collected. These data indicate that elemental imbalances in Alzheimer's disease and ALS are not restricted to the brain. Many elements perturbed in the brain are also altered in the several nonneural tissues examined to date. The imbalances in different tissues, however, are not always in the same direction. The changes observed may represent causes, effects, or simply epiphenomena. Longitudinal studies of nonneural tissues and blood, as well as tissue microprobe analyses at the cellular and subcellular level, will be required in order to better assess the role of trace elements in the etiology of these diseases.

  20. Microglial activation in regions related to cognitive function predicts disease onset in Huntington's disease: a multimodal imaging study.

    PubMed

    Politis, Marios; Pavese, Nicola; Tai, Yen F; Kiferle, Lorenzo; Mason, Sarah L; Brooks, David J; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Barker, Roger A; Piccini, Paola

    2011-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder associated with motor, cognitive and psychiatric deficits. This study, using a multimodal imaging approach, aims to assess in vivo the functional and structural integrity of regions and regional networks linked with motor, cognitive and psychiatric function. Predicting disease onset in at risk individuals is problematic and thus we sought to investigate this by computing the 5-year probability of HD onset (p5 HD) and relating it to imaging parameters. Using MRI, (11)C-PK11195 and (11)C-raclopride PET, we have investigated volumes, levels of microglial activation and D2/D3 receptor binding in CAG repeat-matched groups of premanifest and symptomatic HD gene carriers. Findings were correlated with disease-burden and UHDRS scores. Atrophy was detected in sensorimotor striatum (SMST), substantia nigra, orbitofrontal and anterior prefrontal cortex in the premanifest HD. D2/D3 receptor binding was reduced and microglial activation increased in SMST and associative striatum (AST), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the amygdala and the hypothalamus. In symptomatic HD cases this extended to involve atrophy in globus pallidus, limbic striatum, the red nuclei, anterior cingulate cortex, and insula. D2/D3 receptor binding was additionally reduced in substantia nigra, globus pallidus, limbic striatum, anterior cingulate cortex and insula, and microglial activation increased in globus pallidus, limbic striatum and anterior prefrontal cortex. In premanifest HD, increased levels of microglial activation in the AST and in the regional network associated with cognitive function correlated with p5 HD onset. These data suggest that pathologically activated microglia in AST and other areas related to cognitive function, maybe better predictors of clinical onset and stresses the importance of early cognitive assessment in HD.

  1. Computer-Based Visualization System for the Study of Deep Brain Structures Involved in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Juanes, Juan A; Ruisoto, Pablo; Obeso, José A; Prats, Alberto; San-Molina, Joan

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's Disease is characterized by alterations in deep brain structures and pathways involved in movement control. However, the understanding of neuroanatomy and spatial relationships of deep brain structures remains a challenge for medical students. Recent developments in information technology may help provide new instructional material that addresses this problem. This paper aims to develop an interactive and digital tool to enhance the study of the anatomical and functional neurological basis involved in Parkinson's Disease. This tool allows the organization and exploration of complex neuroanatomical contents related with Parkinson's Disease in an attractive and interactive way. Educational implications of this tool are analyzed. PMID:26370536

  2. The chronic disease self-management program--A pilot study in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Slesnick, Nate; Pienkos, Shawn; Sun, Sumi; Doss-McQuitty, Sheila; Schiller, Brigitte

    2015-04-01

    A strong emphasis on self-management for health maintenance in a variety of chronic diseases has been shown to benefit patients' outcomes and quality of life. However, little has been published on such programs in patients with chronic kidney disease. We studied the feasibility and effectiveness of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) in 14 patients with ESRD undergoing conventional hemodialysis. This program is designed to enhance skills in the areas of medical, emotional, and role management. Outcome measures in health status, self-management behaviors, self-efficacy, and health care utilization were evaluated through use of questionnaires at baseline and after six months. PMID:26263750

  3. Extrastriatal monoamine neuron function in Parkinson's disease: an 18F-dopa PET study.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert Y; Whone, Alan L; Brooks, David J

    2008-03-01

    The early motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) reflect degeneration of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons projecting to the caudal putamen. However, extrastriatal dopamine and other monoamine systems are also involved, particularly in later disease. We used (18)F-dopa PET in a cross-sectional study to characterize extrastriatal monoamine neuronal dysfunction in PD. 16 Controls and 41 patients underwent investigation. We found that (18)F-dopa uptake was decreased in cortical motor areas, particularly the motor cortex, even in early disease. Frontal association areas were also affected in later disease but limbic areas were spared except for hypothalamus. The substantia nigra, midbrain raphe and locus coeruleus showed normal or increased (18)F-dopa uptake until PD was advanced, indicating compensatory responses in intact monoamine neuron perikarya. The red nucleus, subthalamus, ventral thalamus and pineal gland were also eventually involved. These findings provide a further basis for understanding the complex pathophysiology of PD in vivo and complement pathological studies.

  4. Epigenome-wide Association Studies and the Interpretation of Disease -Omics.

    PubMed

    Birney, Ewan; Smith, George Davey; Greally, John M

    2016-06-01

    Epigenome-wide association studies represent one means of applying genome-wide assays to identify molecular events that could be associated with human phenotypes. The epigenome is especially intriguing as a target for study, as epigenetic regulatory processes are, by definition, heritable from parent to daughter cells and are found to have transcriptional regulatory properties. As such, the epigenome is an attractive candidate for mediating long-term responses to cellular stimuli, such as environmental effects modifying disease risk. Such epigenomic studies represent a broader category of disease -omics, which suffer from multiple problems in design and execution that severely limit their interpretability. Here we define many of the problems with current epigenomic studies and propose solutions that can be applied to allow this and other disease -omics studies to achieve their potential for generating valuable insights. PMID:27336614

  5. Epigenome-wide Association Studies and the Interpretation of Disease -Omics

    PubMed Central

    Birney, Ewan; Smith, George Davey

    2016-01-01

    Epigenome-wide association studies represent one means of applying genome-wide assays to identify molecular events that could be associated with human phenotypes. The epigenome is especially intriguing as a target for study, as epigenetic regulatory processes are, by definition, heritable from parent to daughter cells and are found to have transcriptional regulatory properties. As such, the epigenome is an attractive candidate for mediating long-term responses to cellular stimuli, such as environmental effects modifying disease risk. Such epigenomic studies represent a broader category of disease -omics, which suffer from multiple problems in design and execution that severely limit their interpretability. Here we define many of the problems with current epigenomic studies and propose solutions that can be applied to allow this and other disease -omics studies to achieve their potential for generating valuable insights. PMID:27336614

  6. A study of human leukocyte D locus related antigens in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Farid, N R; Sampson, L; Noel, E P; Barnard, J M; Mandeville, R; Larsen, B; Marshall, W H; Carter, N D

    1979-01-01

    An association between Graves' disease and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system has previously been reported. The disease was more strongly associated with the HLA D locus antigen Dw3 than with HLA B8. Products of the HLA D locus are determined by the interaction of test cells with standard typing lymphocytes, a technically difficult procedure. Recently, it has been possible to type serologically for D locus related (DRw) specificities on peripheral bone marrow-derived (B) lymphocytes. Blood B lymphocytes from 50 unrelated controls and 41 patients with Graves' disease were typed for seven HLA DRw specificities. 28 patients with Graves' disease (68%) were positive for DRw3, in contrast to 14 controls (28%); whereas only 21 patients (50%) were HLA B8 positive, compared with 13 (26%) controls. Thus, positivity for DRw3 afforded a relative risk for Graves' disease of 5.5, whereas that for HLA B8 amounted to 3.0. Additionally, a family with multiple cases of Graves' disease in which the disease was previously shown to be inherited with the haplotype, was linked to DRw2, which suggests that the susceptibility to the disease was inherited in association with that antigen. Two HLA B/glyoxalase recombination events were observed in this family; in both instances HLA DRw followed HLA B. This study thus demonstrates that the disease susceptibility gene for Graves' disease is in strong linkage disequilibrium with DRw3; however, it may be associated with other DRw specificities and inherited within family units in association with them.

  7. Systematic review of foodborne burden of disease studies: quality assessment of data and methodology.

    PubMed

    Haagsma, Juanita A; Polinder, Suzanne; Stein, Claudia E; Havelaar, Arie H

    2013-08-16

    Burden of disease (BoD) studies aim to identify the public health impact of different health problems and risk factors. To assess BoD, detailed knowledge is needed on epidemiology, disability and mortality in the population under study. This is particularly challenging for foodborne disease, because of the multitude of causative agents and their health effects. The purpose of this study is to systematically review the methodology of foodborne BoD studies. Three key questions were addressed: 1) which data sources and approaches were used to assess mortality, morbidity and disability?, 2) which methodological choices were made to calculate Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY), and 3) were uncertainty analyses performed and if so, how? Studies (1990-June 2012) in international peer-reviewed journals and grey literature were identified with main inclusion criteria being that the study assessed disability adjusted life years related to foodborne disease. Twenty-four studies met our inclusion criteria. To assess incidence or prevalence of foodborne disease in the population, four approaches could be distinguished, each using a different data source as a starting point, namely 1) laboratory-confirmed cases, 2) cohort or cross-sectional data, 3) syndrome surveillance data and 4) exposure data. Considerable variation existed in BoD methodology (e.g. disability weights, discounting, age-weighting). Almost all studies analyzed the effect of uncertainty as a result of possible imprecision in the parameter values. Awareness of epidemiological and methodological rigor between foodborne BoD studies using the DALY approach is a critical priority for advancing burden of disease studies. Harmonization of methodology that is used and of modeling techniques and high quality data can enlarge the detection of real variation in DALY outcomes between pathogens, between populations or over time. This harmonization can be achieved by identifying substantial data gaps and uncertainty and

  8. Experiences of patients identifying with chronic Lyme disease in the healthcare system: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic Lyme disease is a term that describes a constellation of persistent symptoms in patients with or without evidence of previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Patients labeled as having chronic Lyme disease have a substantial clinical burden. Little is known about chronic Lyme disease patient experiences in the healthcare system and their relationships with healthcare providers. The purpose of this study was to gather insights about the experiences of patients who carry a diagnosis of chronic Lyme disease in the United States healthcare system. Methods Qualitative, phenomenological study in 12 adult participants who identified themselves as having chronic Lyme disease. Semi-structured face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted, 60–90 minutes in length, focusing on perceptions of disease burden and of their healthcare providers, using the dimensions of the Health Belief Model. Transcribed interviews were analyzed for emergent topics and themes in the categories of beliefs/understanding, personal history/narrative, consequences/limitations, management, and influences on care. Results Enrollment continued until theoretical saturation was obtained. Four major themes emerged from participants’ descriptions of their experiences and perceptions: 1) changes in health status and the social impact of chronic Lyme disease, 2) doubts about recovery and the future, 3) contrasting doctor-patient relationships, 4) and the use of unconventional therapies to treat chronic Lyme disease. Conclusions Participants reported a significant decline in health status associated with chronic Lyme disease and were often unsatisfied with care in conventional settings. Negative experiences were associated with reports of dismissive, patronizing, and condescending attitudes. Positive experiences were associated with providers who were reported to be attentive, optimistic, and supportive. Consultations with CAM practitioners and use of CAM therapies were common. Actively

  9. Prevalence of celiac disease in Germany: A prospective follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Kratzer, Wolfgang; Kibele, Monika; Akinli, Atilla; Porzner, Marc; Boehm, Bernhard O; Koenig, Wolfgang; Oeztuerk, Suemeyra; Mason, Richard A; Mao, Ren; Haenle, Mark H

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in a randomly selected population sample. METHODS: A total of 2157 subjects (1036 males; 1121 females) participating in a population-based cross-sectional study underwent laboratory testing for tissue transglutaminase and antibodies to immunoglobulin A, endomysium and antigliadin. In a second step, all subjects who had been examined serologically were surveyed using a questionnaire that included questions specific to celiac disease. Subjects with positive antibody titers and those with histories positive for celiac disease then underwent biopsy. At the first follow up, antibody titers were again determined in these subjects and subjects were questioned regarding symptoms specific for celiac disease and disorders associated with celiac disease. The second follow up consisted of a telephone interview with subjects positive for celiac disease. RESULTS: Antibody tests consistent with celiac disease were reported in eight subjects, corresponding to an overall prevalence of 1:270 (8/2157). The prevalence among women was 1:224 and 1:518 in men. Classical symptoms were observed in 62.5% of subjects. Atypical celiac disease was present in 25.0%, and transient celiac disease in 12.5%. False-negative test results were returned in three subjects. This yields a sensitivity and specificity of 62.5% and 50.0%, respectively, for tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin-A antibody; of 62.5% and 71.4% respectively, for endomysium antibody; and of 62.5% and 71.4%, respectively, for antigliadin antibody. CONCLUSION: The prevalence rate in our collective lies within the middle tertile of comparable studies in Europe. The use of a single antibody test for screening purposes must be called into question. PMID:23674868

  10. Environmental risk factors in paediatric inflammatory bowel diseases: a population based case control study

    PubMed Central

    Baron, S; Turck, D; Leplat, C; Merle, V; Gower-Rousseau, C; Marti, R; Yzet, T; Lerebours, E; Dupas, J-L; Debeugny, S; Salomez, J-L; Cortot, A; Colombel, J-F

    2005-01-01

    Background: Environmental exposures in early life have been implicated in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease. Objective: To examine environmental risk factors prior to the development of inflammatory bowel disease in a paediatric population based case control study. Methods: A total of 222 incident cases of Crohn’s disease and 60 incident cases of ulcerative colitis occurring before 17 years of age between January 1988 and December 1997 were matched with one control subject by sex, age, and geographical location. We recorded 140 study variables in a questionnaire that covered familial history of inflammatory bowel disease, events during the perinatal period, infant and child diet, vaccinations and childhood diseases, household amenities, and the family’s socioeconomic status. Results: In a multivariate model, familial history of inflammatory bowel disease (odds ratio (OR) 4.3 (95% confidence interval 2.3–8)), breast feeding (OR 2.1 (1.3–3.4)), bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccination (OR 3.6 (1.1–11.9)), and history of eczema (OR 2.1 (1–4.5)) were significant risk factors for Crohn’s disease whereas regular drinking of tap water was a protective factor (OR 0.56 (0.3–1)). Familial history of inflammatory bowel disease (OR 12.5 (2.2–71.4)), disease during pregnancy (OR 8.9 (1.5–52)), and bedroom sharing (OR 7.1 (1.9–27.4)) were risk factors for ulcerative colitis whereas appendicectomy was a protective factor (OR 0.06 (0.01–0.36)). Conclusions: While family history and appendicectomy are known risk factors, changes in risk based on domestic promiscuity, certain vaccinations, and dietary factors may provide new aetiological clues. PMID:15710983

  11. Multiple sclerosis risk loci and disease severity in 7,125 individuals from 10 studies

    PubMed Central

    George, Michaela F.; Briggs, Farren B.S.; Shao, Xiaorong; Gianfrancesco, Milena A.; Kockum, Ingrid; Harbo, Hanne F.; Celius, Elisabeth G.; Bos, Steffan D.; Hedström, Anna; Shen, Ling; Bernstein, Allan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hillert, Jan; Olsson, Tomas; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; De Jager, Philip L.; Oturai, Annette B.; Søndergaard, Helle B.; Sellebjerg, Finn; Sorensen, Per S.; Gomez, Refujia; Caillier, Stacy J.; Cree, Bruce A.C.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Hauser, Stephen L.; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Leone, Maurizio A.; Boneschi, Filippo Martinelli; Sorosina, Melissa; van der Mei, Ingrid; Taylor, Bruce V.; Zhou, Yuan; Schaefer, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the association between 52 risk variants identified through genome-wide association studies and disease severity in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Ten unique MS case data sets were analyzed. The Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS) was calculated using the Expanded Disability Status Scale at study entry and disease duration. MSSS was considered as a continuous variable and as 2 dichotomous variables (median and extreme ends; MSSS of ≤5 vs >5 and MSSS of <2.5 vs ≥7.5, respectively). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were examined individually and as both combined weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) and unweighted genetic risk score (GRS) for association with disease severity. Random-effects meta-analyses were conducted and adjusted for cohort, sex, age at onset, and HLA-DRB1*15:01. Results: A total of 7,125 MS cases were analyzed. The wGRS and GRS were not strongly associated with disease severity after accounting for cohort, sex, age at onset, and HLA-DRB1*15:01. After restricting analyses to cases with disease duration ≥10 years, associations were null (p value ≥0.05). No SNP was associated with disease severity after adjusting for multiple testing. Conclusions: The largest meta-analysis of established MS genetic risk variants and disease severity, to date, was performed. Results suggest that the investigated MS genetic risk variants are not associated with MSSS, even after controlling for potential confounders. Further research in large cohorts is needed to identify genetic determinants of disease severity using sensitive clinical and MRI measures, which are critical to understanding disease mechanisms and guiding development of effective treatments. PMID:27540591

  12. Interaction Studies of Withania Somnifera's Key Metabolite Withaferin A with Different Receptors Assoociated with Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Rekha; Sharma, Nitika; Roy, Sujata; Thakur, Ashoke R; Ganesh, Subhadra; Kumar, Sriram; Devi, Jamuna; Rajkumar, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Withania somnifera commonly known as Ashwagandha in India is used in many herbal formulations to treat various cardiovascular diseases. The key metabolite of this plant, Withaferin A was analyzed for its molecular mechanism through docking studies on different targets of cardiovascular disease. Six receptor proteins associated with cardiovascular disease were selected and interaction studies were performed with Withaferin A using AutoDock Vina. CORINA was used to model the small molecules and HBAT to compute the hydrogen bonding. Among the six targets, β1- adrenergic receptors, HMG-CoA and Angiotensinogen-converting enzyme showed significant interaction with Withaferin A. Pharmacophore modeling was done using PharmaGist to understand the pharmacophoric potential of Withaferin A. Clustering of Withaferin A with different existing drug molecules for cardiovascular disease was performed with ChemMine based on structural similarity and physicochemical properties. The ability of natural active component, Withaferin A to interact with different receptors associated with cardiovascular disease was elucidated with various modeling techniques. These studies conclusively revealed Withaferin A as a potent lead compound against multiple targets associated with cardiovascular disease.

  13. Preliminary studies: differences in microRNA expression in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Pająk, Aneta; Górski, Paweł; Kuna, Piotr; Szemraj, Janusz; Goździńska-Nielepkowicz, Agnieszka; Pietras, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The asthma- and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-related morbidity has been increasing during the recent years. Both asthma and COPD are diseases of inflammatory etiology. The increasing interest in the pathomechanisms involved in the development of obstructive pulmonary diseases seems to be fully justified. Recent research has attempted to determine the associations of microRNA with the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases. Aim To assess the expression of microRNA in the blood sera of patients diagnosed with bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in comparison with healthy subjects. Material and methods In our study, at the preliminary stage, we compared the expression of miRNA in the groups of patients with asthma and COPD versus the control group of healthy subjects. Results A significant difference in hsa-miRNA-224, hsa-miRNA-339-5p, hsa-miRNA-382 in patients with asthma and COPD as compared with the controls was noted. Conclusions With such difference of expression of specific micro-RNA in serum of patient with asthma and COPD, those small non-coding RNA has to play a significant role in those diseases pathway. Therefore we expect to increase the size and differentation of the study groups in next studies. PMID:27605898

  14. Studying the role of dystrophin-associated proteins in influencing Becker muscular dystrophy disease severity.

    PubMed

    van den Bergen, J C; Wokke, B H A; Hulsker, M A; Verschuuren, J J G M; Aartsma-Rus, A M

    2015-03-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy is characterized by a variable disease course. Many factors have been implicated to contribute to this diversity, among which the expression of several components of the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex. Together with dystrophin, most of these proteins anchor the muscle fiber cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix, thus protecting the muscle from contraction induced injury, while nNOS is primarily involved in inducing vasodilation during muscle contraction, enabling adequate muscle oxygenation. In the current study, we investigated the role of three components of the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex (beta-dystroglycan, gamma-sarcoglycan and nNOS) and the dystrophin homologue utrophin on disease severity in Becker patients. Strength measurements, data about disease course and fresh muscle biopsies of the anterior tibial muscle were obtained from 24 Becker patients aged 19 to 66. The designation of Becker muscular dystrophy in this study was based on the mutation and not on the clinical severity. Contrary to previous studies, we were unable to find a relationship between expression of nNOS, beta-dystroglycan and gamma-sarcoglycan at the sarcolemma and disease severity, as measured by muscle strength in five muscle groups and age at reaching several disease milestones. Unexpectedly, we found an inverse correlation between utrophin expression at the sarcolemma and age at reaching disease milestones.

  15. The Space From Heart Disease Intervention for People With Cardiovascular Disease and Distress: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Abigail; Lee, Geraldine; Norman, Ian J; O'Callaghan, David; Tierney, Karen; Richards, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor self-management of symptoms and psychological distress leads to worse outcomes and excess health service use in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Online-delivered therapy is effective, but generic interventions lack relevance for people with specific long-term conditions, such as cardiovascular disease. Objective To develop a comprehensive online CVD-specific intervention to improve both self-management and well-being, and to test acceptability and feasibility. Methods Informed by the Medical Research Council (MRC) guidance for the development of complex interventions, we adapted an existing evidence-based generic intervention for depression and anxiety for people with CVD. Content was informed by a literature review of existing resources and trial evidence, and the findings of a focus group study. Think-aloud usability testing was conducted to identify improvements to design and content. Acceptability and feasibility were tested in a cross-sectional study. Results Focus group participants (n=10) agreed that no existing resource met all their needs. Improvements such as "collapse and expand" features were added based on findings that participants’ information needs varied, and specific information, such as detecting heart attacks and when to seek help, was added. Think-aloud testing (n=2) led to changes in font size and design changes around navigation. All participants of the cross-sectional study (10/10, 100%) were able to access and use the intervention. Reported satisfaction was good, although the intervention was perceived to lack relevance for people without comorbid psychological distress. Conclusions We have developed an evidence-based, theory-informed, user-led online intervention for improving self-management and well-being in CVD. The use of multiple evaluation tests informed improvements to content and usability. Preliminary acceptability and feasibility has been demonstrated. The Space from Heart Disease intervention is now ready to be

  16. Methods for determining disease burden and calibrating national surveillance data in the United Kingdom: the second study of infectious intestinal disease in the community (IID2 study)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Infectious intestinal disease (IID), usually presenting as diarrhoea and vomiting, is frequently preventable. Though often mild and self-limiting, its commonness makes IID an important public health problem. In the mid 1990s around 1 in 5 people in England suffered from IID a year, costing around £0.75 billion. No routine information source describes the UK's current community burden of IID. We present here the methods for a study to determine rates and aetiology of IID in the community, presenting to primary care and recorded in national surveillance statistics. We will also outline methods to determine whether or not incidence has declined since the mid-1990s. Methods/design The Second Study of Infectious Intestinal Disease in the Community (IID2 Study) comprises several separate but related studies. We use two methods to describe IID burden in the community - a retrospective telephone survey of self-reported illness and a prospective, all-age, population-based cohort study with weekly follow-up over a calendar year. Results from the two methods will be compared. To determine IID burden presenting to primary care we perform a prospective study of people presenting to their General Practitioner with symptoms of IID, in which we intervene in clinical and laboratory practice, and an audit of routine clinical and laboratory practice in primary care. We determine aetiology of IID using molecular methods for a wide range of gastrointestinal pathogens, in addition to conventional diagnostic microbiological techniques, and characterise isolates further through reference typing. Finally, we combine all our results to calibrate national surveillance data. Discussion Researchers disagree about the best method(s) to ascertain disease burden. Our study will allow an evaluation of methods to determine the community burden of IID by comparing the different approaches to estimate IID incidence in its linked components. PMID:20444246

  17. Converging approaches to understanding early onset familial Alzheimer disease: A First Nation study

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Laura Y; Beattie, B Lynn; Dwosh, Emily; Illes, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In 2007, a novel pathogenic genetic mutation associated with early onset familial Alzheimer disease was identified in a large First Nation family living in communities across British Columbia, Canada. Building on a community-based participatory study with members of the Nation, we sought to explore the impact and interplay of medicalization with the Nation’s knowledge and approaches to wellness in relation to early onset familial Alzheimer disease. Methods: We performed a secondary content analysis of focus group discussions and interviews with 48 members of the Nation between 2012 and 2013. The analysis focused specifically on geneticization, medicalization, and traditional knowledge of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, as these themes were prominent in the primary analysis. Results: We found that while biomedical explanations of disease permeate the knowledge and understanding of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, traditional concepts about wellness are upheld simultaneously. Conclusion: The analysis brings the theoretical framework of “two-eyed seeing” to the case of early onset familial Alzheimer disease for which the contributions of different ways of knowing are embraced, and in which traditional and western ways complement each other on the path of maintaining wellness in the face of progressive neurologic disease. PMID:27092264

  18. A STUDY OF THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SELENIUM AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN LAMPUNG, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Mutakin; Rivai, Ida F; Setiawan, Andi; Abdulah, Rizky; Kobayashi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Nakazawa, Minato; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Selenium deficient areas have been associated with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease in some countries. In this study, we investigated the correlation between cardiovascular disease prevalence and selenium concentration in paddy soil and rice grains, the main staple food in Lampung, Indonesia. Paddy soil and rice samples (n(s) = 35) from eight regencies (n(d) = 8) in Lampung were analyzed for selenium content. The prevalences of heart disease, stroke, and hypertension in those regencies were obtained from the Ministry of Health of Indonesia. The Shapiro-Wilk's test was used to examine the data distribution. The Pearson's correlation was used to examine the correlation between cardiovascular disease prevalence and selenium concentration in the paddy soil and rice grains. Heart disease prevalence was negatively correlated with the selenium concentration in the paddy soil (r = -0.77, p = 0.02) and rice grain (r = -0.71, p = 0.05). A negative correlation was seen for stroke prevalence and selenium concentration in paddy soil (r = -0.76, p = 0.02). Hypertension prevalence was negatively correlated with the selenium concentration in the rice grains (r = -0.83, p = 0.01). These findings suggest that the selenium concentration in paddy soil and rice grains in the Lampung area may play a role in the fact the area has the lowest cardiovascular disease prevalence in Indonesia. Keywords: selenium, cardiovascular diseases, paddy soil, rice grain, Indonesia PMID:27244968

  19. A STUDY OF THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SELENIUM AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN LAMPUNG, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Mutakin; Rivai, Ida F; Setiawan, Andi; Abdulah, Rizky; Kobayashi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Nakazawa, Minato; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Selenium deficient areas have been associated with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease in some countries. In this study, we investigated the correlation between cardiovascular disease prevalence and selenium concentration in paddy soil and rice grains, the main staple food in Lampung, Indonesia. Paddy soil and rice samples (n(s) = 35) from eight regencies (n(d) = 8) in Lampung were analyzed for selenium content. The prevalences of heart disease, stroke, and hypertension in those regencies were obtained from the Ministry of Health of Indonesia. The Shapiro-Wilk's test was used to examine the data distribution. The Pearson's correlation was used to examine the correlation between cardiovascular disease prevalence and selenium concentration in the paddy soil and rice grains. Heart disease prevalence was negatively correlated with the selenium concentration in the paddy soil (r = -0.77, p = 0.02) and rice grain (r = -0.71, p = 0.05). A negative correlation was seen for stroke prevalence and selenium concentration in paddy soil (r = -0.76, p = 0.02). Hypertension prevalence was negatively correlated with the selenium concentration in the rice grains (r = -0.83, p = 0.01). These findings suggest that the selenium concentration in paddy soil and rice grains in the Lampung area may play a role in the fact the area has the lowest cardiovascular disease prevalence in Indonesia. Keywords: selenium, cardiovascular diseases, paddy soil, rice grain, Indonesia

  20. Global mortality, disability, and the contribution of risk factors: Global Burden of Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Murray, C J; Lopez, A D

    1997-05-17

    The Global Burden of Disease Study used the disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) to compare death and disability from various disorders in developing and developed countries. In 1990, developing countries carried almost 90% of the global disease burden yet were recipients of only 10% of global health care funding. The highest disease burdens were in sub-Saharan Africa (21.4% of global total) and India (20.9%). Communicable, maternal, perinatal, and nutritional disorders (group 1 causes) predominated in sub-Saharan Africa (65.9% of burden), while noncommunicable diseases (group 2 causes) accounted for 80% of the burden in established market economies; injuries (group 3) did not differ substantially across regions. The ratio of group 2 to group 1 disorders can be used as a measure of the epidemiologic transition. Group 2 disorders already surpass group 1 disorders in China, Latin America, and the Caribbean. On a global level, group 1, 2, and 3 causes accounted for 43.9%, 40.9%, and 15.1%, respectively, of DALYs. Overall, the top 3 causes of DALYs in 1990 were lower respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, and perinatal disorders (low birth weight and birth asphyxia or birth trauma). In developed countries, these causes were ischemic heart disease, unipolar major depression, and cerebrovascular diseases. Malnutrition was the risk factor responsible for the greatest loss of DALYs (15.9%), followed by poor water supply, sanitation, and personal hygiene (6.8%). PMID:9164317

  1. The expanding phenotypic spectra of kidney diseases: insights from genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Stokman, Marijn F; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Giles, Rachel H; Schaefer, Franz; Knoers, Nine V A M; van Eerde, Albertien M

    2016-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has led to the identification of previously unrecognized phenotypes associated with classic kidney disease genes. In addition to improving diagnostics for genetically heterogeneous diseases and enabling a faster rate of gene discovery, NGS has enabled an expansion and redefinition of nephrogenetic disease categories. Findings from these studies raise the question of whether disease diagnoses should be made on clinical grounds, on genetic evidence or a combination thereof. Here, we discuss the major kidney disease-associated genes and gene categories for which NGS has expanded the phenotypic spectrum. For example, COL4A3-5 genes, which are classically associated with Alport syndrome, are now understood to also be involved in the aetiology of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. DGKE, which is associated with nephrotic syndrome, is also mutated in patients with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. We examine how a shared genetic background between diverse clinical phenotypes can provide insight into the function of genes and novel links with essential pathophysiological mechanisms. In addition, we consider genetic and epigenetic factors that contribute to the observed phenotypic heterogeneity of kidney diseases and discuss the challenges in the interpretation of genetic data. Finally, we discuss the implications of the expanding phenotypic spectra associated with kidney disease genes for clinical practice, genetic counselling and personalized care, and present our recommendations for the use of NGS-based tests in routine nephrology practice.

  2. [Illnesses and diseases in history: usefulness of their study for contemporary medicine and public health].

    PubMed

    Coste, Joël

    2015-03-01

    History of illnesses and diseases contributes to the study of pathological phenomena, for it provides data on their dynamics, their emergence and spread, and their relationships with the physical and human environment. It also shed light on how states or conditions have been labeled as "diseases", and questions the universality of pathological categories used by medicine. Like cross-cultural studies, research on ancient medical writings allows to identify consistent as well as variable expressions of illnesses ; this may in turn allow to discriminate whether pathogenesis is based mainly on a biological nature or on a socio-cultural nature. We will describe case studies from the eighteenth-century in France to illustrate the usefulness of studying history of illnesses and diseases for contemporary medicine and public health. PMID:25855287

  3. A Case Study Examination of Structure and Function in a State Health Department Chronic Disease Unit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. I explored the structural and operational practices of the chronic disease prevention and control unit of a state health department and proposed a conceptual model of structure, function, and effectiveness for future study. Methods. My exploratory case study examined 7 elements of organizational structure and practice. My interviews with staff and external stakeholders of a single chronic disease unit yielded quantitative and qualitative data that I coded by perspective, process, relationship, and activity. I analyzed these for patterns and emerging themes. Results. Chi-square analysis revealed significant correlations among collaboration with goal ambiguity, political support, and responsiveness, and evidence-based decisions with goal ambiguity and responsiveness. Conclusions. Although my study design did not permit conclusions about causality, my findings suggested that some elements of the model might facilitate effectiveness for chronic disease units and should be studied further. My findings might have important implications for identifying levers around which capacity can be built that may strengthen effectiveness. PMID:25689211

  4. Family burden in long-term diseases: a comparative study in schizophrenia vs. physical disorders.

    PubMed

    Magliano, Lorenza; Fiorillo, Andrea; De Rosa, Corrado; Malangone, Claudio; Maj, Mario

    2005-07-01

    This study explored burden and social networks in families of patients with schizophrenia or a long-term physical disease. It was carried out in 169 specialised units (mental health department, and units for the treatment of chronic heart, brain, diabetes, kidney, lung diseases) recruited in 30 randomly selected geographic areas of Italy. The study sample consisted of 709 key relatives of patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia and 646 key relatives of patients with physical diseases. Each relative was asked to fill in the Family Problems Questionnaire (FPQ) and the Social Network Questionnaire (SNQ). In all selected pathologies, the consequences of caregiving most frequently reported as always present in the past 2 months were constraints in social activities, negative effects on family life, and a feeling of loss. Objective burden was higher in brain diseases, and subjective burden was higher in schizophrenia and brain diseases than in the other groups. Social support and help in emergencies concerning the patient were dramatically lower among relatives of patients with schizophrenia than among those of patients with physical diseases. In the schizophrenia group, both objective and subjective burden were significantly higher among relatives who reported lower support from their social network and professionals. The results of this study highlight the need to provide the families of those with long-term diseases with supportive interventions, including: (a) the management of relatives' psychological reactions to patient's illness; (b) the provision of information on the nature, course and outcome of patient's disease; (c) training for the relatives in the management of the patient's symptoms; and (d) the reinforcement of relatives' social networks, especially in the case of schizophrenia.

  5. Burden of respiratory disease in Thailand: Results from the APBORD observational study.

    PubMed

    Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Cho, Sang-Heon; Ghoshal, Aloke Gopal; Muttalif, Abdul Razak Bin Abdul; Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Pothirat, Chaicharn; Chuaychoo, Benjamas; Aeumjaturapat, Songklot; Bagga, Shalini; Faruqi, Rab; Sajjan, Shiva; Baidya, Santwona; Wang, De Yun

    2016-07-01

    Asia-Pacific Burden of Respiratory Diseases (APBORD) was a cross-sectional, observational study examining the burden of respiratory disease in adults across 6 Asia-Pacific countries.This article reports symptoms, healthcare resource utilization (HCRU), work impairment and cost burden associated with allergic rhinitis (AR), asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and rhinosinusitis in Thailand.Consecutive participants aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of AR, asthma, COPD, or rhinosinusitis were enrolled at 4 hospitals in Thailand during October 2012 and October 2013. Participants completed a survey detailing respiratory symptoms, HCRU, work productivity, and activity impairment. Locally sourced unit costs were used in the calculation of total costs.The study enrolled 1000 patients. The most frequent primary diagnosis was AR (44.2%), followed by rhinosinusitis (24.1%), asthma (23.7%), and COPD (8.0%). Overall, 316 (31.6%) of patients were diagnosed with some combination of the 4 diseases. Blocked nose or congestion (17%) and cough or coughing up phlegm (16%) were the main reasons for the current medical visit. The mean annual cost for patients with a respiratory disease was US$1495 (SD 3133) per patient. Costs associated with work productivity loss were the principal contributor for AR and rhinosinusitis patients while medication costs were the highest contributor for asthma and COPD patients.The study findings highlight the burden associated with 4 prevalent respiratory diseases in Thailand. Thorough investigation of concomitant conditions and improved disease management may help to reduce the burden of these respiratory diseases.

  6. Burden of respiratory disease in Thailand: Results from the APBORD observational study

    PubMed Central

    Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Cho, Sang-Heon; Ghoshal, Aloke Gopal; Muttalif, Abdul Razak Bin Abdul; Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Pothirat, Chaicharn; Chuaychoo, Benjamas; Aeumjaturapat, Songklot; Bagga, Shalini; Faruqi, Rab; Sajjan, Shiva; Baidya, Santwona; Wang, De Yun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Asia-Pacific Burden of Respiratory Diseases (APBORD) was a cross-sectional, observational study examining the burden of respiratory disease in adults across 6 Asia-Pacific countries. This article reports symptoms, healthcare resource utilization (HCRU), work impairment and cost burden associated with allergic rhinitis (AR), asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and rhinosinusitis in Thailand. Consecutive participants aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of AR, asthma, COPD, or rhinosinusitis were enrolled at 4 hospitals in Thailand during October 2012 and October 2013. Participants completed a survey detailing respiratory symptoms, HCRU, work productivity, and activity impairment. Locally sourced unit costs were used in the calculation of total costs. The study enrolled 1000 patients. The most frequent primary diagnosis was AR (44.2%), followed by rhinosinusitis (24.1%), asthma (23.7%), and COPD (8.0%). Overall, 316 (31.6%) of patients were diagnosed with some combination of the 4 diseases. Blocked nose or congestion (17%) and cough or coughing up phlegm (16%) were the main reasons for the current medical visit. The mean annual cost for patients with a respiratory disease was US$1495 (SD 3133) per patient. Costs associated with work productivity loss were the principal contributor for AR and rhinosinusitis patients while medication costs were the highest contributor for asthma and COPD patients. The study findings highlight the burden associated with 4 prevalent respiratory diseases in Thailand. Thorough investigation of concomitant conditions and improved disease management may help to reduce the burden of these respiratory diseases. PMID:27428193

  7. Oral health and oromotor function in rare diseases--a database study.

    PubMed

    Sjögreen, Lotta; Andersson-Norinder, Jan; Bratel, John

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to study oral health and oromotor function in individuals with rare diseases. A disease is defined as rare when it affects no more than 100 individuals per million population and leads to a marked degree of disability. An affected nervous or musculoskeletal system, cognitive impairment, neuropsychiatric disorders and craniofacial malformations are common in rare diseases and may all be risk factors for oral health and oromotor function. In 1996-2008, 1,703 individuals with 169 rare diseases, aged 3-67 years, answered a questionnaire about general health, oral health and orofacial function and 1,614 participated in a clinical examination. A control group of 135 healthy children, aged 3-14 years, was also included in the study. Oral health was examined by a dentist and oromotor function by a speech-language pathologist. The participants with rare diseases were recruited via family programmes, referrals to the clinic and research projects, while the controls were randomly selected from a Swedish municipality. In the diagnosis group, 40% had moderate or severe problems coping with dental treatment, 43% were receiving specialised dental care. Difficulties related to tooth brushing were common compared with the controls. Approximately two thirds of the study group and the control group were caries free. Frontal open bite, long face and high palate were common in individuals with rare diseases compared with controls. Oromotor impairment was a frequent finding (43%) and was absent among the controls. There was a significant correlation between oromotor impairment and certain structural deviations and oral-health issues. Compared with healthy controls, individuals with rare diseases often have difficulty coping with dental treatment and managing tooth brushing. Dysmorphology and oromotor dysfunction are frequent findings in this population and they often require extra prophylactic dental care and access to specialised dental care in order to prevent oral disease.

  8. Oral health and oromotor function in rare diseases--a database study.

    PubMed

    Sjögreen, Lotta; Andersson-Norinder, Jan; Bratel, John

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to study oral health and oromotor function in individuals with rare diseases. A disease is defined as rare when it affects no more than 100 individuals per million population and leads to a marked degree of disability. An affected nervous or musculoskeletal system, cognitive impairment, neuropsychiatric disorders and craniofacial malformations are common in rare diseases and may all be risk factors for oral health and oromotor function. In 1996-2008, 1,703 individuals with 169 rare diseases, aged 3-67 years, answered a questionnaire about general health, oral health and orofacial function and 1,614 participated in a clinical examination. A control group of 135 healthy children, aged 3-14 years, was also included in the study. Oral health was examined by a dentist and oromotor function by a speech-language pathologist. The participants with rare diseases were recruited via family programmes, referrals to the clinic and research projects, while the controls were randomly selected from a Swedish municipality. In the diagnosis group, 40% had moderate or severe problems coping with dental treatment, 43% were receiving specialised dental care. Difficulties related to tooth brushing were common compared with the controls. Approximately two thirds of the study group and the control group were caries free. Frontal open bite, long face and high palate were common in individuals with rare diseases compared with controls. Oromotor impairment was a frequent finding (43%) and was absent among the controls. There was a significant correlation between oromotor impairment and certain structural deviations and oral-health issues. Compared with healthy controls, individuals with rare diseases often have difficulty coping with dental treatment and managing tooth brushing. Dysmorphology and oromotor dysfunction are frequent findings in this population and they often require extra prophylactic dental care and access to specialised dental care in order to prevent oral disease

  9. A Novel Lung Disease Phenotype Adjusted for Mortality Attrition for Cystic Fibrosis Genetic Modifier Studies

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Chelsea; Commander, Clayton W.; Collaco, Joseph M.; Strug, Lisa J.; Li, Weili; Wright, Fred A.; Webel, Aaron D.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R.; Naughton, Kathleen; Dorfman, Ruslan; Sandford, Andrew; Blackman, Scott M.; Berthiaume, Yves; Paré, Peter; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Zielenski, Julian; Durie, Peter; Cutting, Garry R.; Knowles, Michael R.; Corey, Mary

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Genetic studies of lung disease in Cystic Fibrosis are hampered by the lack of a severity measure that accounts for chronic disease progression and mortality attrition. Further, combining analyses across studies requires common phenotypes that are robust to study design and patient ascertainment. Using data from the North American Cystic Fibrosis Modifier Consortium (Canadian Consortium for CF Genetic Studies, Johns Hopkins University CF Twin and Sibling Study, and University of North Carolina/Case Western Reserve University Gene Modifier Study), the authors calculated age-specific CF percentile values of FEV1 which were adjusted for CF age-specific mortality data. The phenotype was computed for 2061 patients representing the Canadian CF population, 1137 extreme phenotype patients in the UNC/Case Western study, and 1323 patients from multiple CF sib families in the CF Twin and Sibling Study. Despite differences in ascertainment and median age, our phenotype score was distributed in all three samples in a manner consistent with ascertainment differences, reflecting the lung disease severity of each individual in the underlying population. The new phenotype score was highly correlated with the previously recommended complex phenotype, but the new phenotype is more robust for shorter follow-up and for extreme ages. A disease progression and mortality adjusted phenotype reduces the need for stratification or additional covariates, increasing statistical power and avoiding possible distortions. This approach will facilitate large scale genetic and environmental epidemiological studies which will provide targeted therapeutic pathways for the clinical benefit of patients with CF. PMID:21462361

  10. Clinical Performance of Aspergillus PCR for Testing Serum and Plasma: a Study by the European Aspergillus PCR Initiative.

    PubMed

    White, P Lewis; Barnes, Rosemary A; Springer, Jan; Klingspor, Lena; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Morton, C Oliver; Lagrou, Katrien; Bretagne, Stéphane; Melchers, Willem J G; Mengoli, Carlo; Donnelly, J Peter; Heinz, Werner J; Loeffler, Juergen

    2015-09-01

    Aspergillus PCR testing of serum provides technical simplicity but with potentially reduced sensitivity compared to whole-blood testing. With diseases for which screening to exclude disease represents an optimal strategy, sensitivity is paramount. The associated analytical study confirmed that DNA concentrations were greater in plasma than those in serum. The aim of the current investigation was to confirm analytical findings by comparing the performance of Aspergillus PCR testing of plasma and serum in the clinical setting. Standardized Aspergillus PCR was performed on plasma and serum samples concurrently obtained from hematology patients in a multicenter retrospective anonymous case-control study, with cases diagnosed according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) consensus definitions (19 proven/probable cases and 42 controls). Clinical performance and clinical utility (time to positivity) were calculated for both kinds of samples. The sensitivity and specificity for Aspergillus PCR when testing serum were 68.4% and 76.2%, respectively, and for plasma, they were 94.7% and 83.3%, respectively. Eighty-five percent of serum and plasma PCR results were concordant. On average, plasma PCR was positive 16.8 days before diagnosis and was the earliest indicator of infection in 13 cases, combined with other biomarkers in five cases. On average, serum PCR was positive 10.8 days before diagnosis and was the earliest indicator of infection in six cases, combined with other biomarkers in three cases. These results confirm the analytical finding that the sensitivity of Aspergillus PCR using plasma is superior to that using serum. PCR positivity occurs earlier when testing plasma and provides sufficient sensitivity for the screening of invasive aspergillosis while maintaining methodological simplicity.

  11. Comparative assessment of the prevalence of periodontal disease in subjects with and without systemic autoimmune diseases: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh Kumar, S. G.; Aswath Narayanan, M. B.; Jayanthi, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Immune mechanism shares a common pathway both for systemic autoimmune diseases and periodontal diseases. Scientific exploration of literature revealed limited studies on the association between systemic autoimmune diseases and periodontal diseases in India. Aim: The aim of the study is to find whether the presence of systemic autoimmune diseases in an individual is a risk factor for the development of periodontal disease. Settings and Design: This was a hospital-based case–control study. Materials and Methods: A sample of 253 patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, attending the Rheumatology Department of Government General Hospital, Chennai-3, and 262 patients without systemic autoimmune diseases, attending the outpatient department of the Tamil Nadu Government Dental College and Hospital, Chennai-3, constituted the case and control groups, respectively. Age, gender, and oral hygiene status matching was done. Oral hygiene status was assessed using oral hygiene index (OHI) and periodontal status was assessed using community periodontal index (CPI) and loss of attachment (LOA) index. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 15 (SPSS Inc, 2006, Chicago). Results: Results showed 99.2% and 73.9% prevalence of gingivitis and periodontitis, respectively, in the case group as compared to 85.5% and 14.9%, respectively, in the control group. There is no linear relationship between OHI scores and prevalence of periodontitis (CPI and LOA scores) in the case group. Patients suffering from systemic autoimmune diseases showed more prevalence of periodontal diseases irrespective of oral hygiene scores. Conclusion: It is postulated that the presence of systemic autoimmune diseases may pose a risk for the development of periodontal diseases. PMID:27307662

  12. Environmental risk factors for Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism: the Geoparkinson study

    PubMed Central

    Dick, F D; De Palma, G; Ahmadi, A; Scott, N W; Prescott, G J; Bennett, J; Semple, S; Dick, S; Counsell, C; Mozzoni, P; Haites, N; Wettinger, S Bezzina; Mutti, A; Otelea, M; Seaton, A; Söderkvist, P; Felice, A

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the associations between Parkinson's disease and other degenerative parkinsonian syndromes and environmental factors in five European countries. Methods A case–control study of 959 prevalent cases of parkinsonism (767 with Parkinson's disease) and 1989 controls in Scotland, Italy, Sweden, Romania and Malta was carried out. Cases were defined using the United Kingdom Parkinson's Disease Society Brain Bank criteria, and those with drug‐induced or vascular parkinsonism or dementia were excluded. Subjects completed an interviewer‐administered questionnaire about lifetime occupational and hobby exposure to solvents, pesticides, iron, copper and manganese. Lifetime and average annual exposures were estimated blind to disease status using a job‐exposure matrix modified by subjective exposure modelling. Results were analysed using multiple logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, country, tobacco use, ever knocked unconscious and family history of Parkinson's disease. Results Adjusted logistic regression analyses showed significantly increased odds ratios for Parkinson's disease/parkinsonism with an exposure–response relationship for pesticides (low vs no exposure, odds ratio (OR) = 1.13, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.57, high vs no exposure, OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.88) and ever knocked unconscious (once vs never, OR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.68, more than once vs never, OR = 2.53, 95% CI 1.78 to 3.59). Hypnotic, anxiolytic or antidepressant drug use for more than 1 year and a family history of Parkinson's disease showed significantly increased odds ratios. Tobacco use was protective (OR = 0.50, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.60). Analyses confined to subjects with Parkinson's disease gave similar results. Conclusions The association of pesticide exposure with Parkinson's disease suggests a causative role. Repeated traumatic loss of consciousness is associated with increased risk. PMID:17332139

  13. Generation of a conditional knockout of murine glucocerebrosidase: utility for the study of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Graham B; Jevon, Gareth; Colobong, Karen E; Randall, Derrick R; Choy, Francis Y M; Clarke, Lorne A

    2007-02-01

    Gaucher disease is a disorder of sphingolipid metabolism resulting from an inherited deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase. Affected individuals present with a spectrum of clinical symptoms ranging from hepatosplenomegaly, haematological abnormalities, and bone pain in type 1 disease, to severe neurodegeneration and premature death in types 2 and 3 disease. Although the basic biochemical defect is well characterized, there remains a poor understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of disease. In vitro studies suggest that macrophage glucocerebroside storage leads to tissue dysfunction through complex mechanisms involving altered intracellular calcium homeostasis and apoptosis. In order to study the pathogenic roles of these complex interactions, a viable animal model for Gaucher disease is needed. The complexity of this single gene disorder has been emphasized by the varied results of previous murine Gaucher models, ranging from perinatal lethality to phenotypically and biochemically asymptomatic animals. Recognizing the need to modulate the biochemical phenotype in mice to produce a relevant model, we have created a murine strain with key exons of the glucocerebrosidase gene flanked by loxP sites. We show that expression of Cre-recombinase in cells of hematopoietic and endothelial origin results in deficiency of glucocerebrosidase in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and peripheral white cells. Glucocerebroside storage in this model leads to progressive splenomegaly with Gaucher cell infiltration and modest storage in the liver by 26 weeks of age. These results indicate the utility of this loxP GBA targeted murine strain for understanding the complex pathophysiology of Gaucher disease.

  14. [T lymphocyte populations of the intestinal mucosa in celiac disease in children. Immunohistochemical study].

    PubMed

    Olives, J P; Voigt, J J; al Saati, T; Nonnenmacher, L; Brousset, P; Delsol, G; Ghisolfi, J

    1990-01-01

    In order to study the distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations in a pathologic intestinal mucosa, the authors, instead of using the classic method by counting the number of lymphocytes, present an original method permitting the exploitation of quantified data from labelled surface cells by texture analyser coupled with a computerized system. We investigated 25 children presenting with chronic diarrhea and villous atrophy and 5 control subjects. Fifteen of the 25 children had celiac disease (10 active with total villous atrophy and 5, celiac disease in remission with healing mucosa), 5 cow's milk protein intolerance with total or partial villous atrophy and 5, chronic diarrhea with partial villous atrophy. Immunohistochemical study with monoclonal antibodies was carried out on frozen sections using a three-step immunoperoxidase technique. Compared with the 5 controls, patients with food intolerance (celiac disease and cow's milk protein intolerance) showed a significant increase of T suppressor lymphocytes (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.05) in the epithelium, whereas there were more T helper lymphocytes in the lamina propria (p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.01). Non-treated celiac disease was distinguished from treated celiac disease by a marked increase in intra-epithelial T cytotoxic-suppressors. These results suggest that T cytotoxic-suppressors may be the mediators of the lesions observed in celiac disease. PMID:2179007

  15. Risk of coronary heart disease among HIV-infected patients: a multicenter study in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sandra C; Alencastro, Paulo R; Ikeda, Maria Letícia R; Barcellos, Nêmora T; Wolff, Fernando H; Brandão, Ajácio B M; Ximenes, Ricardo A A; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito de B; Lacerda, Heloísa Ramos; de Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima P M; Montarroyos, Ulisses Ramos; Nery, Max W; Turchi, Marilia D

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease has emerged as a crescent problem among HIV-infected population. This study aimed to determine the 10-year risk of coronary heart disease using the Framingham risk score among HIV-infected patients from three regions of Brazil. This is a pooled analysis of three cohort studies, which enrolled 3,829 individuals, 59% were men, 66% had white skin color, and mean age 39.0 ± 9.9 years. Comparisons among regions showed that there were marked differences in demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, and HIV-related characteristics. Prevalence of Framingham score ≥10 was 4.5% in the Southern, 4.2% in the Midwest, and 3.9% in the Northeast of Brazil. The Framingham score ≥10 was similar between regions for males, patients aged ≥60 years, with obesity, central obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Women were three times more likely to have coronary heart disease in 10 years than men. Hypertension and diabetes increased more than four times the risk of coronary heart disease, followed by central obesity, obesity, and prehypertension. The use of antiretroviral agents and time since HIV diagnosis were not risk factors for coronary artery disease in 10 years. In conclusion, hypertension and diabetes are the strongest independent predictors of 10-year risk of coronary heart disease among HIV-infected population.

  16. Characteristics of Pediatric Crohn's Disease in Saudi Children: A Multicenter National Study

    PubMed Central

    Saadah, Omar I.; El Mouzan, Mohammad; Al Mofarreh, Mohammad; Al Mehaidib, Ali; Al Edreesi, Mohammad; Hasosah, Mohammed; Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; AlSaleem, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Crohn's disease (CD) is an evolving disease in KSA. Little is known about its characteristics in the Saudi population. The aims of this study were to describe the characteristics of Saudi children with CD and to determine whether the characteristics of CD in KSA are different from those seen in Western countries. Methods. In this study, children younger than eighteen years of age diagnosed with CD between January 2003 and December 2012 were included. Results. Of 330 patients identified, 186 (56.4%) were males. The median age at diagnosis was 15.8 years. A positive family history for IBD in first-degree relatives occurred in 13.6% of patients. The most common symptoms were abdominal pain (84.2%), weight loss (75.2%), and diarrhea (71.8%). The main disease location was ileocolonic (42.1%) and the main disease behavior was nonstricturing and nonpenetrating (63.6%). Perianal involvement was seen in 60 (18.2%) patients. Laboratory findings revealed anemia in 57.9% of patients, low albumin in 34.5%, and high CRP in 39.4%. Conclusions. Saudi children with CD have lower frequency of first-degree relatives with IBD, lower prevalence of early onset disease, longer diagnostic delay, higher prevalence of growth failure, and greater frequency of stricturing and penetrating disease behavior compared to Western patients. PMID:26858752

  17. Life orientation in Finnish family caregivers' of persons with Alzheimer's disease: a diary study.

    PubMed

    Välimäki, Tarja; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Koivisto, Anne

    2012-12-01

    Family caregivers provide the majority of home care of people with Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we discuss family caregivers' life orientation and changes in life orientation during the first year after the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Family caregivers' unstructured diaries (n = 83), of the first six months after diagnosis (years 2002-2004), were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Two core themes emerged from the data analysis: the meaning of the onset of Alzheimer's disease for the lives of family caregivers, and restructuring life in its entirety. Family caregivers face challenges in their life orientation after the onset of their family members' Alzheimer's disease. Their personal milieu, familial cohesion, and conception of the future consequentially change. They face multiple challenges in the process of becoming caregivers. In this study, it was revealed that the process starts before the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and has an impact on their future. We conclude that family caregivers' well-being should be assessed at the time of the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23186523

  18. Central Pulse Pressure in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew A.; Sozio, Stephen M.; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Go, Alan S.; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Rafey, Mohammed; Wright, Jackson T.; Duckworth, Mark J.; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Joffe, Marshall P.

    2010-01-01

    Central pulse pressure can be non-invasively derived using the radial artery tonometric methods. Knowledge of central pressure profiles has predicted cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, particularly those with known coronary artery disease and those receiving dialysis. Few data exist characterizing central pressure profiles in patients with mild-moderate chronic kidney disease who are not on dialysis. We measured central pulse pressure cross-sectionally in 2531 participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study to determine correlates of the magnitude of central pulse pressure in the setting of chronic kidney disease. Tertiles of central pulse pressure (CPP) were < 36 mmHg, 36–51 mmHg and > 51 mmHg with an overall mean (± S.D.) of 46 ± 19 mmHg. Multivariable regression identified the following independent correlates of central pulse pressure: age, gender, diabetes mellitus, heart rate (negatively correlated), glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin, glucose and PTH concentrations. Additional adjustment for brachial mean arterial pressure and brachial pulse pressure showed associations for age, gender, diabetes, weight and heart rate. Discrete intervals of brachial pulse pressure stratification showed substantial overlap within the associated central pulse pressure values. The large size of this unique chronic kidney disease cohort provides an ideal situation to study the role of brachial and central pressure measurements in kidney disease progression and cardiovascular disease incidence. PMID:20660819

  19. Red blood cell MUFAs and risk of coronary artery disease in the Physicians’ Health Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have reported beneficial effects of a Mediterranean diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) on coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. However, these findings remain inconsistent because some experimental studies have suggested atherogenic and lipotoxicity effects of long-chain...

  20. Variability in Fundamental Frequency during Speech in Prodromal and Incipient Parkinson's Disease: A Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harel, Brian; Cannizzaro, Michael; Snyder, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Nearly two centuries ago, Parkinson (1817) first observed that a particular pattern of speech changes occur in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Numerous studies have documented these changes using a wide variety of acoustic measures, and yet few studies have attempted to quantify any such changes longitudinally, through the early…

  1. Cognition and Incident Coronary Heart Disease in Late Midlife: The Whitehall II Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh-Manoux, Archana; Sabia, Severine; Kivimaki, Mika; Shipley, Martin J.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Marmot, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cognitive function in midlife predicts incident coronary heart disease (CHD), followed up over 6 years. Data on 5292 (28% women, mean age 55) individuals free from CHD at baseline were drawn from the British Whitehall II study. We used Cox regression to model the association between cognition…

  2. Dietary patterns are associated with disease risk among participants in the women's health initiative observational study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in women. A nested case-control study tested whether dietary patterns predicted CHD events among 1224 participants in the Women’s Health Initiative-Observational Study (WHI-OS) with centrally confirmed CHD, fatal or nonfatal myocardial infar...

  3. Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study Using Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeney, Farah; Egan, Sarah; Gasson, Natalie

    2005-01-01

    Depression and anxiety affect up to 50% of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) (Marsh, 2000; Murray, 1996), however, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological treatment. This study examined the effectiveness of group cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in treating depression and anxiety in PD. Four participants, aged between 56…

  4. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation and Dysarthria in Parkinson's Disease: A PET Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Serge; Thobois, Stephane; Costes, Nicolas; Le Bars, Didier; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Pollak, Pierre; Gentil, Michele

    2004-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, functional imaging studies during limb motor tasks reveal cerebral activation abnormalities that can be reversed by subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation. The effect of STN stimulation on parkinsonian dysarthria has not, however, been investigated using PET. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of STN…

  5. SHPPS 2006: School Health Policies and Programs Study--Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. This brief reports study results in the area of sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention, covering the following topics (1) Health Education; and…

  6. Comparative study of aural microflora in healthy cats, allergic cats and cats with systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Pressanti, Charline; Drouet, Clémence; Cadiergues, Marie-Christine

    2014-12-01

    Twenty healthy cats (group 1) with clinically normal ears, 15 cats with systemic disease (group 2) and 15 allergic cats (group 3) were included in a prospective study. The experimental unit was the ear. A clinical score was established for each ear canal after otoscopic examination. Microbial population was assessed on cytological examination of smears performed with the cotton-tipped applicator smear technique. Fungal population was significantly more prominent in allergic cats (P <0.001) and in diseased cats compared with healthy cats (P <0.02). Bacterial population was significantly higher in allergic cats than in healthy cats (P <0.001) and cats suffering from systemic disease (P <0.001). Bacterial overgrowth was also higher in cats with systemic disease than healthy cats. In cats from group 2, only fungal overgrowth was associated with otitis severity. In group 3, only bacterial overgrowth was associated with otitis severity.

  7. Preventive study in subjects at risk of fatal familial insomnia: Innovative approach to rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    Forloni, Gianluigi; Tettamanti, Mauro; Lucca, Ugo; Albanese, Yasmin; Quaglio, Elena; Chiesa, Roberto; Erbetta, Alessandra; Villani, Flavio; Redaelli, Veronica; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Artuso, Vladimiro; Roiter, Ignazio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The text describes a preventive clinical trial with drug treatment in a very rare neurodegenerative disease (Fatal familial Insomnia, FFI) designed with the help of individuals at genetic risk of developing the disease, asymptomatic carriers, who have agreed to be exposed over a 10-year period to doxycycline, an antibiotic with anti-prion activity. At least 10 carriers of the FFI mutation over 42 y old will be treated with doxycycline (100 mg/die) and the incidence of the disease will be compared to that of an historical dataset. For ethical reasons a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was not feasible, however the study design and the statistical analysis ensure the scientific value of the results. This approach might represent an important breakthrough in terms of potential therapy and knowledge of rare diseases that could give some hopes to these neglected patients. PMID:25996399

  8. Diseases of the pericardium: morphologic study of surgical specimens from 35 patients.

    PubMed

    Mambo, N C

    1981-11-01

    The gross and microscopic features of 35 pericardial surgical specimens are described. Nineteen specimens were associated with pericardial effusion, and microscopic study showed nonspecific fibrous changes in eight, tuberculous granulomatous inflammation in four, purulent inflammation in four, neoplastic involvement in four, and siderosis of the pericardium in one. Twelve of these were clinically associated with constriction. Calcification of the pericardium was the predominant feature in eight of the specimens. None of these eight specimens showed features of tuberculous infection. Of the remaining four, two showed chronic fibrinous changes and the other two showed granulomatous inflammation of presumed tuberculous origin. Four pericardial cysts were seen. Pericardial disease was an incidental finding in 13 instances (37 per cent), suggesting the frequent underdiagnosis and asymptomatic nature of disease of the pericardium. The associations of infections, trauma, hemopericardium, and collagen diseases and pericardial diseases are discussed.

  9. Study of fractal dimension in chest images using normal and interstitial lung disease cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Douglas M.; Correa, Jose L.; Souto, Miguel; Malagari, Katerina S.

    1993-09-01

    A quantitative computerized method which provides accurate discrimination between chest radiographs with positive findings of interstitial disease patterns and normal chest radiographs may increase the efficacy of radiologic screening of the chest and the utility of digital radiographic systems. This report is a comparison of fractal dimension measured in normal chest radiographs and in radiographs with abnormal lungs having reticular, nodular, reticulonodular and linear patterns of interstitial disease. Six regions of interest (ROI's) from each of 33 normal chest radiographs and 33 radiographs with positive findings of interstitial disease were studied. Results indicate that there is a statistically significant difference between the distribution of the fractal dimension in normal radiographs and radiographs where disease is present.

  10. Comparative study of aural microflora in healthy cats, allergic cats and cats with systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Pressanti, Charline; Drouet, Clémence; Cadiergues, Marie-Christine

    2014-12-01

    Twenty healthy cats (group 1) with clinically normal ears, 15 cats with systemic disease (group 2) and 15 allergic cats (group 3) were included in a prospective study. The experimental unit was the ear. A clinical score was established for each ear canal after otoscopic examination. Microbial population was assessed on cytological examination of smears performed with the cotton-tipped applicator smear technique. Fungal population was significantly more prominent in allergic cats (P <0.001) and in diseased cats compared with healthy cats (P <0.02). Bacterial population was significantly higher in allergic cats than in healthy cats (P <0.001) and cats suffering from systemic disease (P <0.001). Bacterial overgrowth was also higher in cats with systemic disease than healthy cats. In cats from group 2, only fungal overgrowth was associated with otitis severity. In group 3, only bacterial overgrowth was associated with otitis severity. PMID:24509255

  11. Electronic disease surveillance for sensitive population groups - the diabetics case study.

    PubMed

    Botsis, Taxiarchis; Hejlesen, Ole; Bellika, Johan Gustav; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    Diabetics are quite susceptible to infectious diseases and can easily spread them under certain circumstances. Their blood glucose levels are increased after infection and this can cause a hyperglycemic crisis. Our study indicates that this increase results in glucosylated hemoglobin elevation, even when a diabetic is monitored closely and his/her blood glucose is under tight control. Thus, it is important to detect infections at the very early stages of disease progression in order to aid the patient. For this purpose, an electronic Disease Surveillance System could be developed to collect and analyze blood glucose data. Generally, we could extend the use of blood glucose data to the implementation of disease surveillance systems for the general population.

  12. Crohn's disease management: conclusions of a comparative study between UK and Romania.

    PubMed

    Buruiana, F E; Angelescu, N; Skipper, D

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition, which may affect any portion of the digestive tract from the mouth to the anus. It is a chronic medical condition which requires surgery when medical treatment fails or complications such as strictures, sepsis or fistulation develop (1,2,3). We retrospectively studied a group of 19 patients with Crohn's disease from "Coltea" Hospital, Bucharest, Romania, and another group of 16 patients with Crohn's disease from Bedford Hospital UK, all of them having undergone surgery; we compared their preoperative and postoperative treatments, including follow up.It was concluded that the implementation of clinical guidelines and protocols for the management of patients with Crohn's disease is needed in Romania.

  13. Preventive study in subjects at risk of fatal familial insomnia: Innovative approach to rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Forloni, Gianluigi; Tettamanti, Mauro; Lucca, Ugo; Albanese, Yasmin; Quaglio, Elena; Chiesa, Roberto; Erbetta, Alessandra; Villani, Flavio; Redaelli, Veronica; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Artuso, Vladimiro; Roiter, Ignazio

    2015-01-01

    The text describes a preventive clinical trial with drug treatment in a very rare neurodegenerative disease (Fatal familial Insomnia, FFI) designed with the help of individuals at genetic risk of developing the disease, asymptomatic carriers, who have agreed to be exposed over a 10-year period to doxycycline, an antibiotic with anti-prion activity. At least 10 carriers of the FFI mutation over 42 y old will be treated with doxycycline (100 mg/die) and the incidence of the disease will be compared to that of an historical dataset. For ethical reasons a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was not feasible, however the study design and the statistical analysis ensure the scientific value of the results. This approach might represent an important breakthrough in terms of potential therapy and knowledge of rare diseases that could give some hopes to these neglected patients.

  14. The draft genome sequence of the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) facilitates study of human respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinxia; Alföldi, Jessica; Gori, Kevin; Eisfeld, Amie J; Tyler, Scott R; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Brawand, David; Law, G Lynn; Skunca, Nives; Hatta, Masato; Gasper, David J; Kelly, Sara M; Chang, Jean; Thomas, Matthew J; Johnson, Jeremy; Berlin, Aaron M; Lara, Marcia; Russell, Pamela; Swofford, Ross; Turner-Maier, Jason; Young, Sarah; Hourlier, Thibaut; Aken, Bronwen; Searle, Steve; Sun, Xingshen; Yi, Yaling; Suresh, M; Tumpey, Terrence M; Siepel, Adam; Wisely, Samantha M; Dessimoz, Christophe; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Birren, Bruce W; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Di Palma, Federica; Engelhardt, John F; Palermo, Robert E; Katze, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) is an important animal model for multiple human respiratory diseases. It is considered the 'gold standard' for modeling human influenza virus infection and transmission. Here we describe the 2.41 Gb draft genome assembly of the domestic ferret, constituting 2.28 Gb of sequence plus gaps. We annotated 19,910 protein-coding genes on this assembly using RNA-seq data from 21 ferret tissues. We characterized the ferret host response to two influenza virus infections by RNA-seq analysis of 42 ferret samples from influenza time-course data and showed distinct signatures in ferret trachea and lung tissues specific to 1918 or 2009 human pandemic influenza virus infections. Using microarray data from 16 ferret samples reflecting cystic fibrosis disease progression, we showed that transcriptional changes in the CFTR-knockout ferret lung reflect pathways of early disease that cannot be readily studied in human infants with cystic fibrosis disease.

  15. [A birth cohort study on allergic diseases among toddlers in Northwest Germany].

    PubMed

    Pohlabeln, H; Jacobs, S; Böhmann, J

    2012-06-01

    In the late 1990s, a birth cohort study was conducted in the cities of Delmenhorst, Wilhelmshaven and Leer, where more than 3,000 newborn children were recruited in five hospitals. The baseline survey in the clinics was followed by three follow-up surveys 6, 12 and 24 months later. The prime concern of the study was to estimate prevalences and to conduct analyses concerning the association between breastfeeding as well as exposure to pets and the occurrence of allergy symptoms. Children living together with a dog in the same household were at higher risk of disease only if a familial predisposition of allergic diseases was present - without such a familial predisposition a dog in the same household seems to reduce the risk for atopic diseases during the first 2 years of life. A protective effect due to long breastfeeding could be observed in our study in particular in case of a paternal history of allergic diseases, whereas an exclusive maternal history of allergic diseases seems to increase the risk. The concept of the study has proved itself. Contacting mothers in obstetrical departments in hospitals as well as in medical offices of self-employed pediatricians has proven to be very practicable. With comparatively little effort a relatively large cohort was recruited, which allowed us to analyze longitudinal data, adequately taking into account several confounders as well as effect-modifying factors. PMID:22736168

  16. Integration of Spatial and Social Network Analysis in Disease Transmission Studies

    PubMed Central

    Root, Elisabeth D; Giebultowicz, Sophia; Ali, Mohammad; Perez-Heydrich, Carolina; Yunus, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a case study of how social network and spatial analytical methods can be used simultaneously for disease transmission modeling. The paper first reviews strategies employed in previous studies and then offers the example of transmission of two bacterial diarrheal diseases in rural Bangladesh. The goal is to understand how diseases vary socially above and beyond the effects of the local neighborhood context. Patterns of cholera and shigellosis incidence are analyzed in space and within kinship-based social networks in Matlab, Bangladesh. Data include a spatially referenced longitudinal demographic database which consists of approximately 200,000 people and laboratory-confirmed cholera and shigellosis cases from 1983 to 2003. Matrices are created of kinship ties between households using a complete network design and distance matrices are also created to model spatial relationships. Moran's I statistics are calculated to measure clustering within both social and spatial matrices. Combined spatial effects-spatial disturbance models are built to simultaneously analyze spatial and social effects while controlling for local environmental context. Results indicate that cholera and shigellosis always clusters in space and only sometimes within social networks. This suggests that the local environment is most important for understanding transmission of both diseases however kinship-based social networks also influence their transmission. Simultaneous spatial and social network analysis can help us better understand disease transmission and this study has offered several strategies on how. PMID:24163443

  17. Stroke in Children With Cardiac Disease: Report From the International Pediatric Stroke Study Group Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Adriane J.; Fox, Christine K.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Almond, Christopher S.; Bernard, Timothy J.; Beslow, Lauren A.; Chan, Anthony K.C.; Cheung, Michael; deVeber, Gabrielle; Dowling, Michael M.; Friedman, Neil; Giglia, Therese M.; Guilliams, Kristin P.; Humpl, Tilman; Licht, Daniel J.; Mackay, Mark T.; Jordan, Lori C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac disease is a leading cause of stroke in children, yet limited data support the current stroke prevention and treatment recommendations. A multidisciplinary panel of clinicians was convened in February 2014 by the International Pediatric Stroke Study group to identify knowledge gaps and prioritize clinical research efforts for children with cardiac disease and stroke. RESULTS Significant knowledge gaps exist, including a lack of data on stroke incidence, predictors, primary and secondary stroke prevention, hyperacute treatment, and outcome in children with cardiac disease. Commonly used diagnostic techniques including brain computed tomography and ultrasound have low rates of stroke detection, and diagnosis is frequently delayed. The challenges of research studies in this population include epidemiologic barriers to research such as small patient numbers, heterogeneity of cardiac disease, and coexistence of multiple risk factors. Based on stroke burden and study feasibility, studies involving mechanical circulatory support, single ventricle patients, early stroke detection strategies, and understanding secondary stroke risk factors and prevention are the highest research priorities over the next 5-10 years. The development of large-scale multicenter and multispecialty collaborative research is a critical next step. The designation of centers of expertise will assist in clinical care and research. CONCLUSIONS There is an urgent need for additional research to improve the quality of evidence in guideline recommendations for cardiogenic stroke in children. Although significant barriers to clinical research exist, multicenter and multispecialty collaboration is an important step toward advancing clinical care and research for children with cardiac disease and stroke. PMID:25532775

  18. HepatoProteomics: Applying Proteomic Technologies to the Study of Liver Function and Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Deborah L.; Proll, Sean; Jacobs, Jon M.; Chan, Eric Y.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2006-08-01

    The wealth of human genome sequence information now available, coupled with technological advances in robotics, nanotechnology, mass spectrometry, and information systems, has given rise to a method of scientific inquiry known as functional genomics. By using these technologies to survey gene expression and protein production on a near global scale, the goal of functional genomics is to assign biological function to genes with currently unknown roles in physiology. This approach carries particular appeal in disease research, where it can uncover the function of previously unknown genes and molecular pathways that are directly involved in disease progression. With this knowledge may come improved diagnostic techniques, prognostic capabilities, and novel therapeutic approaches. In this regard, the continuing evolution of proteomic technologies has resulted in an increasingly greater impact of proteome studies in many areas of research and hepatology is no exception. Our laboratory has been extremely active in this area, applying both genomic and proteomic technologies to the analysis of virus-host interactions in several systems, including the study of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and HCV-associated liver disease. Since proteomic technologies are foreign to many hepatologists (and to almost everyone else), this article will provide an overview of proteomic methods and technologies and describe how they're being used to study liver function and disease. We use our studies of HCV infection and HCV-associated liver disease to present an operational framework for performing high throughput proteome analysis and extracting biologically meaningful information.

  19. Liver cirrhosis in selected autoimmune diseases: a nationwide cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chien-Hsueh; Lai, Ning-Seng; Lu, Ming-Chi; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-02-01

    The association between autoimmune diseases and liver cirrhosis has rarely been explored in Asian populations, an endemic area of viral hepatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the comparative risk of liver cirrhosis among a group of selective autoimmune diseases in Taiwanese patients and to identify groups of high risk. This retrospective study was a nationwide, population-based study and used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 29,856 patients with definite diagnosis of selected autoimmune diseases (Registry of Taiwan Catastrophic Illness Database, ACR classification) at the starting time point of January 1, 2005, were enrolled in this study. After tracked for a 5-year period, the endpoints were diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (in accordance with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, ICD-9-CM codes 571). The control group was composed of other patients in the same database and consisted of randomly selected 753,495 sex- and age-matched non-autoimmune disease patients. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to calculate the risk of liver cirrhosis after adjusting for certain variables such as comorbidity, living area, and socioeconomic status. Among the patients with selected autoimmune diseases, 1987 liver cirrhosis were observed. Patients with psoriasis had a significantly increased risk of liver cirrhosis (HR 1.87, 95 % CI 1.25-2.81) than control group without psoriasis. The risk of liver cirrhosis was significantly lower in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (HR 0.29, 95 % CI 0.19-0.44). There is a gradient of risk of liver cirrhosis among the autoimmune diseases; the specific risks need to be investigated on the basis of hypotheses. Conventional immunosuppressive drug administration should be carefully implemented by regular monitoring of liver condition in order to avoid causing an adverse effect of chronic liver fibrosis.

  20. Liver cirrhosis in selected autoimmune diseases: a nationwide cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chien-Hsueh; Lai, Ning-Seng; Lu, Ming-Chi; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-02-01

    The association between autoimmune diseases and liver cirrhosis has rarely been explored in Asian populations, an endemic area of viral hepatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the comparative risk of liver cirrhosis among a group of selective autoimmune diseases in Taiwanese patients and to identify groups of high risk. This retrospective study was a nationwide, population-based study and used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 29,856 patients with definite diagnosis of selected autoimmune diseases (Registry of Taiwan Catastrophic Illness Database, ACR classification) at the starting time point of January 1, 2005, were enrolled in this study. After tracked for a 5-year period, the endpoints were diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (in accordance with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, ICD-9-CM codes 571). The control group was composed of other patients in the same database and consisted of randomly selected 753,495 sex- and age-matched non-autoimmune disease patients. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to calculate the risk of liver cirrhosis after adjusting for certain variables such as comorbidity, living area, and socioeconomic status. Among the patients with selected autoimmune diseases, 1987 liver cirrhosis were observed. Patients with psoriasis had a significantly increased risk of liver cirrhosis (HR 1.87, 95 % CI 1.25-2.81) than control group without psoriasis. The risk of liver cirrhosis was significantly lower in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (HR 0.29, 95 % CI 0.19-0.44). There is a gradient of risk of liver cirrhosis among the autoimmune diseases; the specific risks need to be investigated on the basis of hypotheses. Conventional immunosuppressive drug administration should be carefully implemented by regular monitoring of liver condition in order to avoid causing an adverse effect of chronic liver fibrosis. PMID:26408009

  1. Well-Being and Chronic Disease Incidence: The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Okely, Judith A.; Gale, Catharine R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Previous research suggests that greater well-being may protect against onset of chronic disease. However, it is unclear whether this association is similar across different types of disease. Method We used Cox proportional hazards regression to examine the prospective relationship between well-being (measured using the CASP-19 quality of life questionnaire) and incidence of arthritis, cancer, stroke, diabetes, myocardial infarction, and chronic lung disease over 8 years. The sample consisted of 8182 participants 50 years or older from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Results After adjustments for established risk factors, a standard deviation increase in CASP-19 score was associated with a decrease in arthritis risk (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.83–0.96) and, in those younger than 65 years, a decrease in diabetes risk (HR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.70–0.95) and chronic lung disease risk (HR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.66–0.97). Higher CASP-19 scores were associated with reduced risk for stroke and myocardial infarction; however, these associations were no longer significant after adjustments for established risk factors. No association was observed for cancer incidence. An age interaction was observed for diabetes, myocardial infarction, and chronic lung disease, with a stronger association between CASP-19 score and disease incidence at younger ages. Conclusions The extent of association between well-being and incident disease risk is not consistent across different chronic diseases. Future studies should examine the cause of this variation. PMID:26569542

  2. Central Pain Processing in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease: A Laser Pain fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Petschow, Christine; Scheef, Lukas; Paus, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Nadine; Schild, Hans H.; Klockgether, Thomas; Boecker, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Background & Objective Pain is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson’s disease. As dopaminergic dysfunction is suggested to affect intrinsic nociceptive processing, this study was designed to characterize laser-induced pain processing in early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients in the dopaminergic OFF state, using a multimodal experimental approach at behavioral, autonomic, imaging levels. Methods 13 right-handed early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients without cognitive or sensory impairment were investigated OFF medication, along with 13 age-matched healthy control subjects. Measurements included warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, and central pain processing with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (erfMRI) during laser-induced pain stimulation at lower (E = 440 mJ) and higher (E = 640 mJ) target energies. Additionally, electrodermal activity was characterized during delivery of 60 randomized pain stimuli ranging from 440 mJ to 640 mJ, along with evaluation of subjective pain ratings on a visual analogue scale. Results No significant differences in warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, electrodermal activity and subjective pain ratings were found between Parkinson’s disease patients and controls, and erfMRI revealed a generally comparable activation pattern induced by laser-pain stimuli in brain areas belonging to the central pain matrix. However, relatively reduced deactivation was found in Parkinson’s disease patients in posterior regions of the default mode network, notably the precuneus and the posterior cingulate cortex. Conclusion Our data during pain processing extend previous findings suggesting default mode network dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease. On the other hand, they argue against a genuine pain-specific processing abnormality in early-stage Parkinson’s disease. Future studies are now required using similar multimodal experimental designs to examine pain processing in more advanced

  3. [Goal and task of integrated Chinese and Western medicine study on infectious disease].

    PubMed

    Nie, Guang

    2006-09-01

    It is suggested in this paper that the integrated Chinese and Western medicine (ICWM) study on infectious disease should be emphasized on fields of viral hepatitis, AIDS, bacillary phthisis and newly discovered infectious diseases, etc. clinically and theoretically, to unfold the studies of immune regulation on infectious diseases, treatment on bacteria and drug-resistant virus strain, and to promote functional and histological recovery, etc. in patients. Focusing on the weak links and shortages of modern medicine, the valuable experiences and theoretical advantages of TCM in clinical trials and mechanism studies should be brought to light so as to bring Chinese medicine into the frame of modern medicine and to contribute to the world medicine.

  4. Burden of obstructive lung disease study in Tehran: Prevalence and risk factors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Hooman; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Emami, Habib; Ghanei, Mostafa; Eslaminejad, Alireza; Radmand, Golnar; Buist, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was ranked the sixth-most common cause of death worldwide in 1990, but now it is the third-most common cause. The goal of the present study was to assess the prevalence and determine the causes and risk factors of COPD in Tehran. Materials and Methods: This study followed a stratified cluster sampling strategy with proportional allocation within strata. The target population was all non-institutionalized inhabitants, aged 18 to 40 in one group and over 40 in another who resided in Tehran in 2013. The core questionnaire was developed from pre-existing validated questionnaires that had already been used in multi-national studies. The single most important outcome measure obtained as part of this protocol was spirometry before and after the administration of 200 mg (two puffs) of salbutamol. Results: The most commonly reported respiratory symptoms were: sputum production in 291 patients (16.2%) [95% confidence interval (CI): 14.5-17.9%], chronic cough in 171 (9.5%) (95% CI: 8.2-10.9%), wheezing in 377 (21.0%) (95%CI: 19.1-22.9%) and dyspnea in 388 patients (21.6%) (95% CI: 19.7-23.5%). The overall COPD prevalence defined by the post-bronchodilator spirometric functional criteria was 9.2%. This value in men (10.1%) was higher than in women (8.5%); the prevalence was significantly higher in subjects aged over 55 years (P ≤ 0.002). The prevalence of COPD was strongly dependent on smoking status, especially in ex-smokers, and increased considerably with age. 69% of patients with COPD were non-smoker. Conclusion: The high prevalence of verified COPD, a great deal of which was undiagnosed before by a physician, highlights the necessity of raising awareness of this disease among health professionals, and use of spirometry in the primary care setting. A future cross-sectional and prospective cohort study should be performed to explore all risk factors and their impact on decline in lung function and worsening of

  5. The association between dental and periodontal diseases and sickle cell disease. A pilot case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alawi, Haidar; Al-Jawad, Abdulfatah; Al-Shayeb, Mahdi; Al-Ali, Ali; Al-Khalifa, Khalifa

    2014-01-01

    Objective This is a pilot case-control study conducted to investigate the prevalence of dental caries and periodontal disease and examine the possible association between oral health deterioration and SCD severity in a sample of Saudi SCD patients residing in the city of Al-Qatif, Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. Materials and methods Dental examination to determine the Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth index (DMFT), Community Periodontal Index (CPI), and plaque index system were recorded for 33 SCD patients and 33 age and sex-matched controls in the Al-Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia. Self-administered surveys used to assess socio-economic status; oral health behaviors for both SCD patients and controls were recorded. In addition, the disease severity index was established for all patients with SCD. SPSS data analysis software package version 18.0 was used for statistical analysis. Numerical variables were described as mean with a standard deviation. Results Decayed teeth were significantly more in individuals with ages ranging from 18 to 38 years with SCD compared to the control group (p = 0.036) due to oral hygiene negligence. The mean number of filled teeth was significantly lower in individuals with SCD when compared to the control group (p = 0.015) due to the lack of appropriate and timely treatment reflected in the survey responses of SCD patients as 15.2% only taking oral care during hospitalization. There were differences between the cases and controls in the known caries risk factors such as income level, flossing, and brushing habit. The DMFT, CPI, and plaque index systems did not differ significantly between the SCD patients and the control group. Conclusion Data suggest that patients with SCD have increased susceptibility to dental caries, with a higher prevalence of tooth decay and lower prevalence of filled teeth. Known caries risk factors influenced oral health more markedly than did factors related to SCD. PMID:25544813

  6. Occupational risk factors and Alzheimer's disease: a case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Shalat, S.L.; Seltzer, B.; Baker, E.L. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    A case-control study was conducted to assess occupational exposure to organic solvents and lead as risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. All case subjects were diagnosed at a Veterans Administration Hospital in Bedford, Massachusetts. Control subjects were selected from Massachusetts voter registration lists and matched by sex, year of birth, and town of residence. Information on occupational history was assessed by mailed questionnaire sent to the spouse or next of kin of the study subject. A total of 98 case and 162 control subjects were included in the matched analysis. No apparent association of increased risk of Alzheimer's disease was observed for ever having occupational exposure to organic solvents or lead.

  7. Biochemical and structural studies of fish lymphocystis disease virions isolated from skin tumours of Pleuronectes.

    PubMed

    Samalecos, C

    1986-06-01

    Fish lymphocystis disease viruses (FLDV) were isolated directly from lymphocystis disease lesions of various flatfish species and further purified. Subunits could be identified only after the purified virus was disrupted. In combination with different types of treatment, Nonidet-P40, dithiothreitol, proteases digestion and after ultrasonication and ultracentrifugation, the inner region of FLDV was studied. The purified virus was used for isolation of the virus nucleoid and for further study of the viral genome. Contour length measurements of 20 DNA molecules gave an average length of 40.44 +/- 3.2 micron. Lines of precipitation between isolated nucleoid material and FLDV-antibodies were shown by immunoelectrophoresis. PMID:3734014

  8. Pregnancy in Sickle Cell Disease Is a Very High-Risk Situation: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Elenga, Narcisse; Adeline, Aurélie; Balcaen, John; Vaz, Tania; Calvez, Mélanie; Terraz, Anne; Accrombessi, Laetitia; Carles, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a serious genetic disorder affecting 1/235 births in French Guiana. This study aimed to describe the follow-up of pregnancies among sickle cell disease patients in Cayenne Hospital, in order to highlight the most reported complications. 62 records of pregnancies were analyzed among 44 females with sickle cell disease, between 2007 and 2013. Our results were compared to those of studies conducted in Brazil and Guadeloupe. There were 61 monofetal pregnancies and 2 twin pregnancies, 27 pregnancies among women with SS phenotype, 30 SC pregnancies, and five S-beta pregnancies. The study showed that the follow-up of patients was variable, but no maternal death was found. We also noted that the main maternofetal complications of pregnancies were anemia (36.5%), infection (31.7%), vasoocclusive crisis (20.6%), preeclampsia (17.5%), premature birth (11.1%), intrauterine growth retardation (15.9%), abnormal fetal heart rate (14.3%), and intrauterine fetal death (4.8%). Pregnancies were more at risk among women with SS phenotype. Pregnancy in sickle cell disease patients requires a supported multidisciplinary team including the primary care physician, the obstetrician, and the Integrated Center for Sickle Cell Disease. PMID:27403164

  9. A content validity study of signs, symptoms and diseases/health problems expressed in LIBRAS1

    PubMed Central

    Aragão, Jamilly da Silva; de França, Inacia Sátiro Xavier; Coura, Alexsandro Silva; de Sousa, Francisco Stélio; Batista, Joana D'arc Lyra; Magalhães, Isabella Medeiros de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to validate the content of signs, symptoms and diseases/health problems expressed in LIBRAS for people with deafness Method: methodological development study, which involved 36 people with deafness and three LIBRAS specialists. The study was conducted in three stages: investigation of the signs, symptoms and diseases/health problems, referred to by people with deafness, reported in a questionnaire; video recordings of how people with deafness express, through LIBRA, the signs, symptoms and diseases/health problems; and validation of the contents of the recordings of the expressions by LIBRAS specialists. Data were processed in a spreadsheet and analyzed using univariate tables, with absolute frequencies and percentages. The validation results were analyzed using the Content Validity Index (CVI). Results: 33 expressions in LIBRAS, of signs, symptoms and diseases/health problems were evaluated, and 28 expressions obtained a satisfactory CVI (1.00). Conclusions: the signs, symptoms and diseases/health problems expressed in LIBRAS presented validity, in the study region, for health professionals, especially nurses, for use in the clinical anamnesis of the nursing consultation for people with deafness. PMID:26625991

  10. Pregnancy in Sickle Cell Disease Is a Very High-Risk Situation: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Elenga, Narcisse; Adeline, Aurélie; Balcaen, John; Vaz, Tania; Calvez, Mélanie; Terraz, Anne; Accrombessi, Laetitia; Carles, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a serious genetic disorder affecting 1/235 births in French Guiana. This study aimed to describe the follow-up of pregnancies among sickle cell disease patients in Cayenne Hospital, in order to highlight the most reported complications. 62 records of pregnancies were analyzed among 44 females with sickle cell disease, between 2007 and 2013. Our results were compared to those of studies conducted in Brazil and Guadeloupe. There were 61 monofetal pregnancies and 2 twin pregnancies, 27 pregnancies among women with SS phenotype, 30 SC pregnancies, and five S-beta pregnancies. The study showed that the follow-up of patients was variable, but no maternal death was found. We also noted that the main maternofetal complications of pregnancies were anemia (36.5%), infection (31.7%), vasoocclusive crisis (20.6%), preeclampsia (17.5%), premature birth (11.1%), intrauterine growth retardation (15.9%), abnormal fetal heart rate (14.3%), and intrauterine fetal death (4.8%). Pregnancies were more at risk among women with SS phenotype. Pregnancy in sickle cell disease patients requires a supported multidisciplinary team including the primary care physician, the obstetrician, and the Integrated Center for Sickle Cell Disease. PMID:27403164

  11. Does study partner type impact the rate of Alzheimer's disease progression?

    PubMed

    Grill, Joshua D; Zhou, Yan; Karlawish, Jason; Elashoff, David

    2014-01-01

    Most patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) do not have a spouse. Despite this, the majority of AD research participants enroll with a spouse study partner. It remains unclear if differences between AD patients who do and do not have a spouse may bias study results. In this study, we examined whether AD patients with different study partner types (spouse versus adult child) demonstrate different rates of disease progression over two years on three outcome measures commonly used in AD research, including clinical trials. We used data from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center Uniform Data Set to examine disease progression in participants age 55-90 with probable AD dementia. We examined disease progression as measured by the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale-Sum of the Boxes score, the Mini Mental Status Examination, and the Functional Assessment Questionnaire. Analyses were performed on data for all available eligible participants from the NACC UDS and after performing a propensity-matching model to better account for inherent differences between the populations of interest. Propensity matching was successful only when models did not include age and gender. For both propensity-matched analyses and those of all available data, we did not observe any differences between the study partner populations for any outcome measure. These results suggest that if investigators can improve in recruiting AD patients with adult child caregivers to research, the implications to study results may be minimal.

  12. Ethical and social issues in presymptomatic testing for Huntington's disease: a European Community collaborative study. European Community Huntington's Disease Collaborative Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of social and ethical aspects of presymptomatic testing for Huntington's disease has been carried out, based on data on linked DNA markers, from four major testing centres in different European Community countries (Belgium, Italy, Netherlands, and United Kingdom). Information was available on 603 applicants, with 213 final results given, of which 32% gave an increased risk. A series of specific issues and problems were documented systematically for all applicants, results being given on frequency of occurrence and illustrated by individual case histories. The principal issues could be grouped as problems of inappropriate referral, problems involving relatives, and problems relating to disclosure of results. At least one important problem was encountered in 46% of applicants, emphasising the importance of expert counselling, preparation, and support of applicants, and of close liaison between clinical, counselling, and laboratory staff. The extensive and detailed information available for Huntington's disease from this and other studies will be of considerable value in relation to genetic testing for other late onset genetic disorders and will be even more relevant to Huntington's disease now that specific mutation analysis is possible for this disorder. PMID:8133502

  13. Quels agents incriminés dans les mycoses du pied ? Enquête auprès des diabétiques consultant au CHU Mohammed VI de Marrakech

    PubMed Central

    Chegour, Hakima; El Ansari, Nawal; El Mghari, Ghizlane; Tali, Abdelali; Zoughaghi, Laila; Sebbani, Majda; Amine, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Les infections mycosiques du pied constituent un motif fréquent de consultation chez les diabétiques, le diabète constituant à la fois un facteur favorisant et aggravant les lésions cutanéomuqueuses. L'objectif de ce travail était d'identifier la flore mycologique locale responsable des lésions du pied chez le diabétique et déterminer les facteurs favorisant la survenue de mycoses. Il s'agissait d'une étude transversale intéressant des diabétiques suivis en consultation; un prélèvement mycologique, avec examen direct et culture, a été réalisé devant toute suspicion clinique de lésion mycosique. Quatre-vingt-deux patients ont été inclus. L'hémoglobine glycosylée moyenne a été de9,2% ± 2,23. Un intertrigo inter orteil a été noté dans 90,2% des cas; l'examen mycologique était positif dans 64,8% des cas, avec 18 cas de Trichophyton rubrum et 11 cas de Candida albicans. Une atteinte unguéale a été suspectée chez 65,9% patients; la culture a mis en évidence un Trichosporon pathogène chez sept patients, un Candida albicansdans six cas, un Trichophyton rubrum dans quatre cas, avec trois cas de Trichophyton mentagrophytes et deux cas de Scytalidium dimidiatum. L’étude analytique, après confirmation mycologique, en fonction des principales caractéristiques des patients a montré que l'atteinte mycosique du pied est significativement corrélée au déséquilibre glycémique. Ce travail a montré la prédominance du Trichophyton rubrum dans les lésions d'intertrigo inter orteil et du Trichosporon dans les onychomycoses, avec une prédominance globale plus globale plus élevée du TR. PMID:25170372

  14. European Non-Communicable Respiratory Disease Research, 2002-13: Bibliometric Study of Outputs and Funding

    PubMed Central

    Wright, John S. F.; Pallari, Elena; Sullivan, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to map European research in chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs). It was intended to assist the European Commission and other research funders to identify gaps and overlaps in their portfolios, and to suggest ways in which they could improve the effectiveness of their support and increase the impact of the research on patient care and on the reduction of the incidence of the CRDs. Articles and reviews were identified in the Web of Science on research in six non-communicable respiratory diseases that were published in 2002–13 from 31 European countries. They represented only 0.8% of biomedical research output but these diseases accounted for 4.7% of the European disease burden, as measured by Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), so the sub-field is seriously under-researched. Europe is prominent in the sub-field and published 56% of the world total, with the UK the most productive and publishing more than France and Italy, the next two countries, combined. Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) were the diseases with the most publications and the highest citation rates. They also received the most funding, with around two acknowledgments per paper (in 2009–13), whereas cystic fibrosis and emphysema averaged only one. Just over 37% of papers had no specific funding and depended on institutional support from universities and hospitals. PMID:27111670

  15. Disrupted brain network topology in Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Olde Dubbelink, Kim T E; Hillebrand, Arjan; Stoffers, Diederick; Deijen, Jan Berend; Twisk, Jos W R; Stam, Cornelis J; Berendse, Henk W

    2014-01-01

    Although alterations in resting-state functional connectivity between brain regions have previously been reported in Parkinson's disease, the spatial organization of these changes remains largely unknown. Here, we longitudinally studied brain network topology in Parkinson's disease in relation to clinical measures of disease progression, using magnetoencephalography and concepts from graph theory. We characterized whole-brain functional networks by means of a standard graph analysis approach, measuring clustering coefficient and shortest path length, as well as the construction of a minimum spanning tree, a novel approach that allows a unique and unbiased characterization of brain networks. We observed that brain networks in early stage untreated patients displayed lower local clustering with preserved path length in the delta frequency band in comparison to controls. Longitudinal analysis over a 4-year period in a larger group of patients showed a progressive decrease in local clustering in multiple frequency bands together with a decrease in path length in the alpha2 frequency band. In addition, minimum spanning tree analysis revealed a decentralized and less integrated network configuration in early stage, untreated Parkinson's disease that also progressed over time. Moreover, the longitudinal changes in network topology identified with both techniques were associated with deteriorating motor function and cognitive performance. Our results indicate that impaired local efficiency and network decentralization are very early features of Parkinson's disease that continue to progress over time, together with reductions in global efficiency. As these network changes appear to reflect clinically relevant phenomena, they hold promise as markers of disease progression.

  16. Effects of passive smoking on ischemic heart disease mortality of nonsmokers. A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, C.; Barrett-Connor, E.; Suarez, L.; Criqui, M.H.; Wingard, D.L.

    1985-05-01

    The mortality attributable to ischemic heart disease as a result of cigarette smoking is greater of a community of older adults in southern California, the authors tested the hypothesis that nonsmoking women exposed to their husband's cigarette smoke would have an elevated risk of fatal ischemic heart disease. Married women aged 50-79 years who had never smoked cigarettes (n = 695) were classified according to the husband's self-reported smoking status at entry into the study: never, former, or current smoker. After 10 years, nonsmoking wives of current or former cigarette smokers had a higher total (p less than or equal to 0.05) and age-adjusted (p less than or equal to 0.10) death rate from ischemic heart disease than women whose husbands never smoked. After adjustment for differences in risk factors for heart disease, the relative risk for death from ischemic heart disease in nonsmoking women married to current or former cigarette smokers was 14.9 (p less than or equal to 0.10). These data are compatible with the hypothesis that passive cigarette smoking carries an excess risk of fatal ischemic heart disease.

  17. European Non-Communicable Respiratory Disease Research, 2002-13: Bibliometric Study of Outputs and Funding.

    PubMed

    Begum, Mursheda; Lewison, Grant; Wright, John S F; Pallari, Elena; Sullivan, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to map European research in chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs). It was intended to assist the European Commission and other research funders to identify gaps and overlaps in their portfolios, and to suggest ways in which they could improve the effectiveness of their support and increase the impact of the research on patient care and on the reduction of the incidence of the CRDs. Articles and reviews were identified in the Web of Science on research in six non-communicable respiratory diseases that were published in 2002-13 from 31 European countries. They represented only 0.8% of biomedical research output but these diseases accounted for 4.7% of the European disease burden, as measured by Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), so the sub-field is seriously under-researched. Europe is prominent in the sub-field and published 56% of the world total, with the UK the most productive and publishing more than France and Italy, the next two countries, combined. Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) were the diseases with the most publications and the highest citation rates. They also received the most funding, with around two acknowledgments per paper (in 2009-13), whereas cystic fibrosis and emphysema averaged only one. Just over 37% of papers had no specific funding and depended on institutional support from universities and hospitals. PMID:27111670

  18. Treatment of anal human papillomavirus-associated disease: a long term outcome study.

    PubMed

    Nathan, M; Hickey, N; Mayuranathan, L; Vowler, S L; Singh, N

    2008-07-01

    Treatment for human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anal canal disease has been unsatisfactory. The objective of our study was to determine the treatment outcome in our cohort with anal HPV disease. Overall, 181 patients were evaluated over a median period of 19.1 months (range = 2.8-125.5). Eighty-eight patients (48.6%) with high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and 82 patients (45.3%) with low-grade AIN underwent treatment. One hundred and forty-one patients (77.9%) received laser ablative treatment as an outpatient procedure. The treatment yielded cure, defined as a disease-free state at 12 months after treatment, in 63.0% (114/181). Median time to cure for the cohort was 31.5 months (95% confidence interval: 23.0-40.0). Treatment outcome showed no evidence of being affected by age, sexual preference, history of smoking or presence of high-grade disease. Median time to cure was significantly affected by a positive HIV status (P = 0.02) and the extent (volume) of the disease (P = 0.01). Contrary to the current view that treatment of HPV-related anal disease is difficult, unrewarding due to recurrences and may lead to substantial morbidity, we demonstrate that effective treatment is possible for both low- and high-grade AIN. These findings should help with the general desire to introduce screening for AIN for at-risk groups. PMID:18574114

  19. Risk of cardiovascular disease? A qualitative study of risk interpretation among patients with high cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown the importance of paying attention to lay peoples’ interpretations of risk of disease, in order to explain health-related behavior. However, risk interpretations interplay with social context in complex ways. The objective was to explore how asymptomatic patients with high cholesterol interpret risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods Fourteen patients with high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease were interviewed, and patterns across patient accounts were identified and analysed from an ethnographic approach. Results Information from the general practitioner about high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease was reinterpreted in everyday social life. The risk associated with fatty foods was weighed against the pleasures of social and cultural events in which this type of food was common and cherished. A positive mindset was applied as a strategy to lower the risk of having high cholesterol, but knowledge about risk was viewed as a cause of anxiety and self-absorption, and this anxiety made the body susceptible to disease, hampering the chances for healthy life. Conclusion Interpretations of high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease are embedded in social relations and everyday life concerns. This should be addressed in general practice in preference-sensitive cases about risk-reducing medication. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01187056 PMID:24040920

  20. Association of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis and Periodontal Disease: A Double-Blind Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Juluri, Ravichandra; Prashanth, Evuru; Gopalakrishnan, D; Kathariya, Rahul; Devanoorkar, Archana; Viswanathan, Vidya; Romanos, Georgios E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Both osteoporosis (OP) and periodontitis are chronic inflammatory diseases associated with bone loss mediated by local and systemic factors. The two diseases share common risk factors. Previous studies have suggested that OP in itself is a predisposing factor for periodontal tissue destruction in postmenopausal women. However, only a moderate correlation has been shown between the two conditions. In this study, we compared the severity of periodontal disease in postmenopausal osteoporotic women and postmenopausal women without OP. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 100 postmenopausal women in the age group of 50-65 years: Group 1 (50 osteoporotic) and Group 2 (50 non-osteoporotic women). Periodontal parameters included sulcus bleeding index, oral hygiene index simplified, probing pocket depth (PPD), and clinical attachment loss (CAL), interproximal alveolar bone loss (ABL), and number of missing teeth. The correlation of periodontal disease status with systemic bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results: The results indicated that osteoporotic (Group 1) women had a significantly greater PPD, CAL, and ABL when compared with the non-osteoporotic Group 2 (P < 0.0001). There was no significant correlation between BMD and various parameters between the groups. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the present study it was noted that postmenopausal OP is associated with an increased incidence and severity of periodontal disease. Educating postmenopausal osteoporotic women regarding the importance of good oral care should be part of their management regime. Hence, it could be inferred a possibility of a probable relationship between OP and periodontal disease, but long-term prospective studies are warranted in the future in order to provide definitive evidence. PMID:26435630

  1. Blackfoot disease in Taiwan: a 30-year follow-up study

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, W.P.

    1989-06-01

    Blackfoot disease is an endemic peripheral vascular disease found among the inhabitants of a limited area on the southwest coast of Taiwan, where artesian well water with a high concentration of arsenic has been used for more than eighty years. The natural history of blackfoot disease, based on a prospective study of 1,300 patients, is presented. The overall male/female ratio was 1.5:1. Although the clinical onset was usually insidious, it may be quite sudden and almost always begins with numbness or coldness in one or more extremities, usually the feet. Ultimately, rest pain develops and progresses to gangrene. In this series, 68% of the patients underwent spontaneous or operative amputation, and the reamputation rate was 23.3%. Lower extremity involvement in blackfoot disease was observed in 97.7% of the cases. The average annual rate for major amputation was 3.81 per 100 patient-years. The factors influencing the prognosis, such as amputation in relation to age and disease onset, are analyzed. The case fatality rate was 66.5% during thirty years; 44% of these were cardiovascular deaths. The annual death rate was 4.84 per 100 patient-years. Other reported case fatality rates for vascular insufficiency are reviewed. A dose-response relationship between blackfoot disease and the duration of water intake was also noted. The survival rates after the onset of blackfoot disease were: five years, 76.0%; ten years, 59.5%; twenty years, 38.2%; thirty years, 28.6%. The 50% survival point was 13.5 years after onset of the disease.

  2. A Study on Oral Mucosal Lesions in 3500 Patients with Dermatological Diseases in South India

    PubMed Central

    Babu, RS Arvind; Chandrashekar, P; Kumar, K Kiran; Reddy, G Sridhar; Chandra, K Lalith Prakash; Rao, V; Reddy, BVR

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral mucosal lesions that are observed in the dermatological diseases are categorized under mucocutaneous conditions. The oral lesions in dermatological diseases may be the early aspects of the disease manifestation or the most significant clinical appearance or the only sign/and or symptom of such dermatological diseases and occasionally lesions occur simultaneously in the skin as well as mucous membrane. Aim: This present study attempts to find out the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in patients with dermatological diseases. Subjects and Methods: The study includes 3500 patients who attended out-patient Department of Dermatology. Patients with oral manifestation were subjected for clinical examination in the Department of Oral Pathology. Diagnostic procedures were performed to confirm the clinical oral diagnosis. The results of the study were analyzed by SPSS software version 19.0 (Armonk, NY) and presented as descriptive statistics. Correlation of oral manifestions with their respective dermatological disease was statistically analysed by Pearson's correlation test.(P < 0.05 were considered as statistically significant) Results: The prevalence rate of oral mucosal lesions in the present study was 1.8% (65/3500). The most frequent lesions observed were psoriasis 32.3% (21/65), lichen planus 18.4% (12/65), Stevens Johnson Syndrome 18.4% (12/65), pemphigus 10.7% (7/65), toxic epidermal necrolysis 4.6% (3/65), systemic lupus erythematosus 3% (2/65), discoid lupus erythematosus 1.5% (1/65), pemphigoid 1.5% (1/65). Gender distribution in the study population was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Employed and unemployed individuals in the study population were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Pearson's correlation analysis of oral manifestations with their respective dermatological disease showed r = 0.466 and signifies a positive correlation and is statistically significant at the 0.01 level (two-tailed). Conclusion: The prevalence rate of

  3. The spectrum of the liver disease in the general population: lesson from the Dionysos Study.

    PubMed

    Tiribelli, Claudio

    2002-01-01

    Differently for what happened for the heart and the cardiovascular diseases, no data were available on the prevalence of the liver disorders in the general population. Based on these considerations we started planning a cohort study aimed to obtain data on how frequent liver disease was in the general population. Two comparable town in Northern Italy (Campogalliano, Modena, and Cormons, Gorizia) were selected on the basis of number of inhabitants, census and socio-economic background, and 6.917 were screened with an overall compliance of 70%, a percentage adequate to validate this type of study. In each patient a semi-quantitative, color-illustrated, food questionnaire including detailed questions on the use of alcoholic beverages was obtained in addition to a detailed physical examination to detect liver and the biliary diseases. Blood sample for ALT, AST, GGT, MCV and platelet count, and HBV and HCV markers were also taken.

  4. The social context of cardiovascular disease: challenges and opportunities for the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Williams, David R; Leavell, Jacinta

    2012-01-01

    African Americans have higher rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than Whites and the racial gap in heart disease is widening over time. There are especially striking patterns of the earlier onset of disease, greater severity of illness and large racial differences in CVD even when Blacks and Whites are compared at the same level of economic status. This paper outlines critical research opportunities for the Jackson Heart Study to advance the science base for understanding and effectively addressing racial disparities in CVD. These include: 1) the study of CVD by using a life course perspective; 2) comprehensively characterizing social stressors; 3) expanding our analysis of how racism affects health; 4) explicating variation in the levels and impact of risk factors; 5) advancing our understanding of the contribution of genetics to CVD; 6) understanding resilience and its effects on CVD; and 7) identifying how economic crises can shape CVD risk.

  5. The social context of cardiovascular disease: challenges and opportunities for the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Williams, David R; Leavell, Jacinta

    2012-01-01

    African Americans have higher rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than Whites and the racial gap in heart disease is widening over time. There are especially striking patterns of the earlier onset of disease, greater severity of illness and large racial differences in CVD even when Blacks and Whites are compared at the same level of economic status. This paper outlines critical research opportunities for the Jackson Heart Study to advance the science base for understanding and effectively addressing racial disparities in CVD. These include: 1) the study of CVD by using a life course perspective; 2) comprehensively characterizing social stressors; 3) expanding our analysis of how racism affects health; 4) explicating variation in the levels and impact of risk factors; 5) advancing our understanding of the contribution of genetics to CVD; 6) understanding resilience and its effects on CVD; and 7) identifying how economic crises can shape CVD risk. PMID:23156834

  6. Transmission of enteric disease associated with wastewater irrigation: A prospective epidemiological study

    SciTech Connect

    Shuval, H.I.; Wax, Y.; Yekutiel, P.; Fattal, B.

    1989-01-01

    A prospective epidemiological study of possible enteric disease transmission by aerosolized pathogens from sprinkler irrigation of partially treated waste water in 20 kibbutzim (collective agricultural settlements) in Israel between March 1981 and February 1982 was conducted. Medical data were collected from the patients' files and daily logs of physicians and nurses at each kibbutzim clinic (total population 10,231). Episodes of enteric disease were similar in the kibbutzim most exposed to wastewater aerosols (11.6 per 100 person-year) and the kibbutzim not exposed to wastewater in any form (11.0 per 100 person-year). No excess of enteric disease was seen among waste water contract workers or their families as compared with the unexposed. No negative health effects were detected in the study which involved a large population, including many young children exposed to treated waste water aerosols generated at distances of 300-600 miles.

  7. Arsenic exposure from drinking water and mortality from cardiovascular disease in Bangladesh: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Joseph H; Parvez, Faruque; Liu, Mengling; Slavkovich, Vesna; Kalra, Tara; Argos, Maria; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Hasan, Rabiul; Sarwar, Golam; Levy, Diane; van Geen, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between arsenic exposure and mortality from cardiovascular disease and to assess whether cigarette smoking influences the association. Design Prospective cohort study with arsenic exposure measured in drinking water from wells and urine. Setting General population in Araihazar, Bangladesh. Participants 11 746 men and women who provided urine samples in 2000 and were followed up for an average of 6.6 years. Main outcome measure Death from cardiovascular disease. Results 198 people died from diseases of circulatory system, accounting for 43% of total mortality in the population. The mortality rate for cardiovascular disease was 214.3 per 100 000 person years in people drinking water containing <12.0 µg/L arsenic, compared with 271.1 per 100 000 person years in people drinking water with ≥12.0 µg/L arsenic. There was a dose-response relation between exposure to arsenic in well water assessed at baseline and mortality from ischaemic heart disease and other heart disease; the hazard ratios in increasing quarters of arsenic concentration in well water (0.1-12.0, 12.1-62.0, 62.1-148.0, and 148.1-864.0 µg/L) were 1.00 (reference), 1.22 (0.65 to 2.32), 1.35 (0.71 to 2.57), and 1.92 (1.07 to 3.43) (P=0.0019 for trend), respectively, after adjustment for potential confounders including age, sex, smoking status, educational attainment, body mass index (BMI), and changes in urinary arsenic concentration since baseline. Similar associations were observed when baseline total urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable and for mortality from ischaemic heart disease specifically. The data indicate a significant synergistic interaction between arsenic exposure and cigarette smoking in mortality from ischaemic heart disease and other heart disease. In particular, the hazard ratio for the joint effect of a moderate level of arsenic exposure (middle third of well arsenic concentration 25.3-114.0 µg/L, mean 63.5 µg/L) and

  8. A case-control study between interleukin-10 gene variants and periodontal disease in dogs.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Carlos; Morinha, Francisco; Requicha, João; Dias, Isabel; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; Viegas, Carlos; Bastos, Estela

    2014-04-10

    Periodontal disease (PD) refers to a group of inflammatory diseases that affect the periodontium, the organ which surrounds and supports the teeth. PD is a highly prevalent disease with a multifactorial etiology and, in humans the individual susceptibility is known to be strongly determined by genetic factors. Several candidate genes have been studied, namely genes related with molecules involved in the inflammatory response. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a cytokine with important anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory roles, and several studies indicate an association between IL10 polymorphisms and PD. In dogs, an important animal model in periodontology, PD is also a highly prevalent naturally occurring disease, and only now are emerging the first studies evaluating the genetic predisposition. In this case-control study, a population of 90 dogs (40 dogs with PD and 50 healthy dogs) was used to study the IL10 gene, and seven new genetic variations in this gene were identified. No statistically significant differences were detected in genotype and allele frequencies of these variations between the PD cases and control groups. Nevertheless, one of the variations (IL10/2_g.285G>A) leads to an amino acid change (glycine to arginine) in the putative signal peptide, being predicted a potential influence on IL-10 protein functionality. Further investigations are important to clarify the biological importance of these new findings. The knowledge of these genetic determinants can help to understand properly the complex causal pathways of PD, with important clinical implications. PMID:24487092

  9. Risk factors associated with asbestos-related diseases: a community-based case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Asbestos is a first level carcinogen. However, few epidemiological studies analyse the risk and protective factors associated with asbestos-related diseases and follow up these conditions in the general population. Pleural mesothelioma, caused by inhalation of asbestos fibres at work, at home or in the environment, is the most representative asbestos-related disease. The objectives of this study are to analyse the risk and protective factors associated with asbestos-related diseases and to investigate the incidence of new clinical manifestations in patients already diagnosed with some form of ARD. Methods/Design We have designed a matched case–control study with follow up of both cohorts from a population of a health district of the Barcelona province that has been exposed to asbestos for a period of 90 years. Discussion A better understanding of asbestos-related diseases should improve i) the clinical and epidemiological follow up of patients with this condition; ii) the design of new treatment strategies; iii) and the development of preventive activities. At the end of the study, the two cohorts created in this study (affected cases and healthy controls) will constitute the basis for future research. PMID:23915043

  10. Early infections are associated with increased risk for celiac disease: an incident case-referent study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is defined as a ‘chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy precipitated by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals’. Sweden has experienced an “epidemic” of celiac disease in children below two years of age. Celiac disease etiology is considered multifactorial; however, little is known regarding potential risk- or protecting factors. We present data on the possible association between early infectious episodes and celiac disease, including their possible contribution to the Swedish celiac disease epidemic. Methods A population-based incident case-referent study (475 cases, 950 referents) with exposure information obtained via a questionnaire (including family characteristics, infant feeding, and the child’s general health) was performed. Celiac disease cases were diagnosed before two years of age, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. Referents were randomly selected from the national population register after fulfilling matching criteria. The final analyses included 954 children, 373 (79%) cases and 581 (61%) referents, with complete information on main variables of interest in a matched set of one case with one or two referents. Results Having three or more parental-reported infectious episodes, regardless of type of infection, during the first six months of life was associated with a significantly increased risk for later celiac disease, and this remained after adjusting for infant feeding and socioeconomic status (odds ratio [OR] 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.0; P=0.014). The celiac disease risk increased synergistically if, in addition to having several infectious episodes, infants were introduced to dietary gluten in large amounts, compared to small or medium amounts, after breastfeeding was discontinued (OR 5.6; 95% CI, 3.1-10; P<0.001). Conclusion This study suggests that having repeated

  11. [Hyperhomocysteinemia in coronary artery diseases. Apropos of a study on 102 patients].

    PubMed

    Blacher, J; Montalescot, G; Ankri, A; Chadefaux-Vekemans, B; Benzidia, R; Grosgogeat, Y; Kamoun, P; Thomas, D

    1996-10-01

    Homocystein is at the crossroads of the metabolic pathways of sulphuric amino acids. Homocystinuria is a congenital autosomal recessive disease, usually related to cystathionine beta-synthetase deficiency. Children with homozygotic forms of the disease have early vascular complications which represent the main cause of death. Moderately elevated serum homocystein levels are related to two major genetic factors (heterozygotic cystathionine beta-synthetase deficiency and mutation of the 5-10 methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase) and several minor, genetic and non-genetic factors (folic acid, vitamins B6 and B12 and betain deficiencies). Previous studies have suggested that hyperhomocysteinaemia could be a cardiovascular risk factor. This study was based on 222 subjects including 102 consecutive patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease and 120 control subjects without vascular disease. No relationship was observed between serum homocystein concentrations and the classical cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary patients had higher average homocystein concentrations than control subjects (11.27 +/- 0.52 vs 8.77 +/- 0.31 mumol/l); p < 0.0001): moreover, the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinaemia (> 15.67 mumol/l) was higher in the coronary group (15.7%) than in the controls (2.5%). A significant relationship was also observed between homocystein concentrations and the severity of the coronary disease (defined by a coronary score) and the number of diseased vascular territories. These results underline the relationship between homocystein and vascular risk, especially that of coronary artery disease. The treatment of hyperhomocysteinaemia by folic acid supplements is effective in correcting plasma levels, without side effects and at a relatively low cost. PMID:8952820

  12. Risk factors for peripheral venous disease resemble those for venous thrombosis: the San Diego Population Study

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, M; Callas, PW; Denenberg, JO; Bovill, EG; Criqui, MH

    2010-01-01

    Background Clinically silent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is common and may cause chronic venous disease that resembles post-thrombotic syndrome. Objective We evaluated whether peripheral venous disease in a general population shares risk factors with DVT. Methods In an established cohort of 2,404 men and women, the San Diego Population Study, peripheral venous disease was evaluated using physical exam, symptom assessment, and venous ultrasound. We performed a case control study including 308 cases in 4 hierarchical groups by severity, and 346 controls without venous abnormalities, frequency matched to cases by 10-year age group, race and sex. Cases and controls had no prior history of venous thrombosis. Hemostatic risk factors were measured in cases and controls. Results Accounting for age, obesity and family history of leg ulcer, ORs for elevated factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, D-dimer, and for factor V Leiden were 1.4 (95% CI 0.9–2.1), 1.5 (CI 1.0–2.3), 1.7 (CI 1.1–2.8), and 1.1 (CI 0.5–2.4), respectively. These associations were larger in the two most severe case groups; ORs 2.0 (CI 1.0–3.8), 1.7 (CI 0.9–3.3), 2.7 (CI 1.2–6.1) and 2.3 (CI 0.8–7.1). Each hemostatic factor was also associated with severity of venous disease, for example elevated D-dimer was associated with a 2.2-fold increased odds of being in one higher severity group. Prothrombin 20210A was not associated with venous disease. Conclusions DVT risk factors are associated with presence and severity of peripheral venous disease. Results support a hypothesis that peripheral venous disease may sometimes be post-thrombotic syndrome due to previous unrecognized DVT. PMID:20492466

  13. Ageing, Chronic Disease and Injury: A Study in Western Victoria (Australia)

    PubMed Central

    Sajjad, M. Amber; Holloway, Kara L.; Kotowicz, Mark A.; Livingston, Patricia M.; Khasraw, Mustafa; Hakkennes, Sharon; Dunning, Trisha L.; Brumby, Susan; Page, Richard S.; Pedler, Daryl; Sutherland, Alasdair; Venkatesh, Svetha; Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L.; Williams, Lana J.; Pasco, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: An increasing burden of chronic disease and associated health service delivery is expected due to the ageing Australian population. Injuries also affect health and wellbeing and have a long-term impact on health service utilisation. There is a lack of comprehensive data on disease and injury in rural and regional areas of Australia. The aim of the Ageing, Chronic Disease and Injury study is to compile data from various sources to better describe the patterns of chronic disease and injury across western Victoria. Design: Ecological study. Methods: Information on demographics, socioeconomic indicators and lifestyle factors are obtained from health surveys and government departments. Data concerning chronic diseases and injuries will be sourced from various registers, health and emergency services, local community health centres and administrative databases and compiled to generate profiles for the study region and for sub-populations within the region. Expected impact for public health: This information is vital to establish current and projected population needs to inform policy and improve targeted health services delivery, care transition needs and infrastructure development. This study provides a model that can be replicated in other geographical settings. Significance for public health The pattern of chronic disease and injury and its relationship with age, sex and location has not been described for the region. This study will collect new data and collate existing databases to provide a comprehensive snapshot of the health and safety across western Victoria, Australia. Baseline data collected in the project will be used to forecast disease burden into the future, based on Australian Bureau of Statistics models. In order to determine gaps in service delivery, plan future interventions including prevention strategies, and evaluate their effectiveness, it is essential to have a contemporary evidence base and processes in place for monitoring on

  14. Low-dose ionising radiation and cardiovascular diseases--Strategies for molecular epidemiological studies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Michaela; Auvinen, Anssi; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Jourdain, Jean-Rene; Laurier, Dominique; Little, Mark P; Peters, Annette; Raj, Ken; Russell, Nicola S; Tapio, Soile; Zhang, Wei; Gomolka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that high-dose ionising radiation causes cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, the evidence for a causal relationship between long-term risk of cardiovascular diseases after moderate doses (0.5-5 Gy) is suggestive and weak after low doses (<0.5 Gy). However, evidence is emerging that doses under 0.5 Gy may also increase long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. This would have major implications for radiation protection with respect to medical use of radiation for diagnostic purposes and occupational or environmental radiation exposure. Therefore, it is of great importance to gain information about the presence and possible magnitude of radiation-related cardiovascular disease risk at doses of less than 0.5 Gy. The biological mechanisms implicated in any such effects are unclear and results from epidemiological studies are inconsistent. Molecular epidemiological studies can improve the understanding of the pathogenesis and the risk estimation of radiation-induced circulatory disease at low doses. Within the European DoReMi (Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration) project, strategies to conduct molecular epidemiological studies in this field have been developed and evaluated. Key potentially useful European cohorts are the Mayak workers, other nuclear workers, uranium miners, Chernobyl liquidators, the Techa river residents and several diagnostic or low-dose radiotherapy patient cohorts. Criteria for informative studies are given and biomarkers to be investigated suggested. A close collaboration between epidemiology, biology and dosimetry is recommended, not only among experts in the radiation field, but also those in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26041268

  15. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy to study hepatic metabolism in diffuse liver diseases, diabetes and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dagnelie, Pieter C; Leij-Halfwerk, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the current state of the art of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in in vivo investigations of diffuse liver disease. So far, MRS of the human liver in vivo has mainly been used as a research tool rather than a clinical tool. The liver is particularly suitable for static and dynamic metabolic studies due to its high metabolic activity. Furthermore, its relatively superficial position allows excellent MRS localization, while its large volume allows detection of signals with relatively low intensity. This review describes the application of MRS to study the metabolic consequences of different conditions including diffuse and chronic liver diseases, congenital diseases, diabetes, and the presence of a distant malignancy on hepatic metabolism. In addition, future prospects of MRS are discussed. It is anticipated that future technical developments such as clinical MRS magnets with higher field strength (3 T) and improved delineation of multi-component signals such as phosphomonoester and phosphodiester using proton decoupling, especially if combined with price reductions for stable isotope tracers, will lead to intensified research into metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, hepato-biliary diseases, as well as non-metastatic liver metabolism in patients with a distant malignant tumor. PMID:20355236

  16. Hemoglobin and Hematocrit Levels in the Prediction of Complicated Crohn's Disease Behavior – A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Florian; Paul, Gisela; Schnoy, Elisabeth; Schleder, Stephan; Wolf, Alexandra; Kamm, Florian; Dirmeier, Andrea; Strauch, Ulrike; Obermeier, Florian; Lopez, Rocio; Achkar, Jean-Paul; Rogler, Gerhard; Klebl, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background Markers that predict the occurrence of a complicated disease behavior in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) can permit a more aggressive therapeutic regimen for patients at risk. The aim of this cohort study was to test the blood levels of hemoglobin (Hgb) and hematocrit (Hct) for the prediction of complicated CD behavior and CD related surgery in an adult patient population. Methods Blood samples of 62 CD patients of the German Inflammatory Bowel Disease-network “Kompetenznetz CED” were tested for the levels of Hgb and Hct prior to the occurrence of complicated disease behavior or CD related surgery. The relation of these markers and clinical events was studied using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and adjusted COX-proportional hazard regression models. Results The median follow-up time was 55.8 months. Of the 62 CD patients without any previous complication or surgery 34% developed a complication and/or underwent CD related surgery. Low Hgb or Hct levels were independent predictors of a shorter time to occurrence of the first complication or CD related surgery. This was true for early as well as late occurring complications. Stable low Hgb or Hct during serial follow-up measurements had a higher frequency of complications compared to patients with a stable normal Hgb or Hct, respectively. Conclusions Determination of Hgb or Hct in complication and surgery naïve CD patients might serve as an additional tool for the prediction of complicated disease behavior. PMID:25116048

  17. Cerebral ischemia and asymptomatic coronary artery disease: a prospective study of 83 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Di Pasquale, G.; Andreoli, A.; Pinelli, G.; Grazi, P.; Manini, G.; Tognetti, F.; Testa, C.

    1986-11-01

    A prospective cardiologic evaluation was performed in 83 consecutive patients with transient cerebral ischemia or mild stroke and without symptoms or electrocardiographic signs of ischemic heart disease. Patients were studied with an electrocardiographic exercise test; a positive test was followed by exercise Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy. Results were compared to those obtained in a group of 83 age and sex-matched healthy subjects submitted to the same study protocol. Asymptomatic coronary artery disease was detected in 28% of cerebrovascular patients with adequate electrocardiographic exercise test. A scintigraphic perfusion defect of variable extension was found in 19 of them. In the control group the electrocardiographic exercise test was positive in only 6% (p less than 0.01). Our results support the concept that: asymptomatic ischemic heart disease is often associated with cerebrovascular disease; therefore cerebral ischemic attacks may be a marker of coronary artery disease, an active investigation of the heart should be considered in cerebrovascular patients in order to plan optimal, comprehensive management.

  18. The Ophthalmic Branch of the Gutenberg Health Study: Study Design, Cohort Profile and Self-Reported Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Höhn, René; Kottler, Ulrike; Peto, Tunde; Blettner, Maria; Münzel, Thomas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Lackner, Karl J.; Beutel, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes the study design, methodology, cohort profile and self-reported diseases in the ophthalmological branch of the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS). Methods The GHS is an ongoing, prospective, interdisciplinary, single-center, population-based cohort study in Germany. The main goals of the ophthalmological section are to assess the prevalence and incidence of ocular diseases and to explore risk factors, genetic determinants and associations with systemic diseases and conditions. The eye examination at baseline included a medical history, self-reported eye diseases, visual acuity, refractive errors, intraocular pressure, visual field, pachymetry, keratometry, fundus photography and tear sampling. The 5-year follow-up visit additionally encompassed optical coherence tomography, anterior segment imaging and optical biometry. The general examination included anthropometry; blood pressure measurement; carotid artery ultrasound; electrocardiogram; echocardiography; spirometry; cognitive tests; questionnaires; assessment of mental conditions; and DNA, RNA, blood and urine sampling. Results Of 15,010 participants (aged 35-74 years at the time of inclusion), ocular data are available for 14,700 subjects (97.9%). The mean visual acuity (standard deviation), mean spherical equivalent, median decimal visual acuity, and mean intraocular pressure were 0.08 (0.17) logMar, -0.42 (2.43) diopters, 0.9 and 14.24 (2.79) mm Hg, respectively. The frequencies of self-reported strabismus, glaucoma, surgery for retinal detachment and retinal vascular occlusions were 2.7%, 2.3%, 0.2% and 0.4%, respectively. Conclusions The GHS is the most extensive dataset of ophthalmic diseases and conditions and their risk factors in Germany and one of the largest cohorts worldwide. This dataset will provide new insight in the epidemiology of ophthalmic diseases and related medical specialties. PMID:25775251

  19. Genetic impact on cognition and brain function in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: ICICLE-PD study.

    PubMed

    Nombela, Cristina; Rowe, James B; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie E; Hampshire, Adam; Owen, Adrian M; Breen, David P; Duncan, Gordon W; Khoo, Tien K; Yarnall, Alison J; Firbank, Michael J; Chinnery, Patrick F; Robbins, Trevor W; O'Brien, John T; Brooks, David J; Burn, David J; Barker, Roger A

    2014-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with multiple cognitive impairments and increased risk of dementia, but the extent of these deficits varies widely among patients. The ICICLE-PD study was established to define the characteristics and prevalence of cognitive change soon after diagnosis, in a representative cohort of patients, using a multimodal approach. Specifically, we tested the 'Dual Syndrome' hypothesis for cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease, which distinguishes an executive syndrome (affecting the frontostriatal regions due to dopaminergic deficits) from a posterior cortical syndrome (affecting visuospatial, mnemonic and semantic functions related to Lewy body pathology and secondary cholinergic loss). An incident Parkinson's disease cohort (n = 168, median 8 months from diagnosis to participation) and matched control group (n = 85) were recruited to a neuroimaging study at two sites in the UK. All participants underwent clinical, neuropsychological and functional magnetic resonance imaging assessments. The three neuroimaging tasks (Tower of London, Spatial Rotations and Memory Encoding Tasks) were designed to probe executive, visuospatial and memory encoding domains, respectively. Patients were also genotyped for three polymorphisms associated with cognitive change in Parkinson's disease and related disorders: (i) rs4680 for COMT Val158Met polymorphism; (ii) rs9468 for MAPT H1 versus H2 haplotype; and (iii) rs429358 for APOE-ε2, 3, 4. We identified performance deficits in all three cognitive domains, which were associated with regionally specific changes in cortical activation. Task-specific regional activations in Parkinson's disease were linked with genetic variation: the rs4680 polymorphism modulated the effect of levodopa therapy on planning-related activations in the frontoparietal network; the MAPT haplotype modulated parietal activations associated with spatial rotations; and APOE allelic variation influenced the magnitude of activation

  20. Autoimmune Diseases in Parents of Children with Infantile Autism: A Case--Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben; Nedergaard, Niels Jorgen

    2007-01-01

    This register study compared the rates and types of autoimmune disease in the parents of 111 patients (82 males, 29 females; mean age at diagnosis 5y 5mo [SD 2y 6mo]) with infantile autism (IA) with a matched control group of parents of 330 children from the general population. All parents were screened through the nationwide Danish National…

  1. Yeast Biocontrol of a Fungal Plant Disease: A Model for Studying Organism Interrelationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chanchaichaovivat, Arun; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip

    2008-01-01

    An experiment on the action of the yeast, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae", against a fungal plant disease is proposed for secondary students (Grade 11) to support their study of organism interrelationship. This biocontrol experiment serves as the basis for discussing relationships among three organisms (red chilli fruit, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae," and…

  2. FamPipe: An Automatic Analysis Pipeline for Analyzing Sequencing Data in Families for Disease Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ren-Hua; Tsai, Wei-Yun; Kang, Chen-Yu; Yao, Po-Ju; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    In disease studies, family-based designs have become an attractive approach to analyzing next-generation sequencing (NGS) data for the identification of rare mutations enriched in families. Substantial research effort has been devoted to developing pipelines for automating sequence alignment, variant calling, and annotation. However, fewer pipelines have been designed specifically for disease studies. Most of the current analysis pipelines for family-based disease studies using NGS data focus on a specific function, such as identifying variants with Mendelian inheritance or identifying shared chromosomal regions among affected family members. Consequently, some other useful family-based analysis tools, such as imputation, linkage, and association tools, have yet to be integrated and automated. We developed FamPipe, a comprehensive analysis pipeline, which includes several family-specific analysis modules, including the identification of shared chromosomal regions among affected family members, prioritizing variants assuming a disease model, imputation of untyped variants, and linkage and association tests. We used simulation studies to compare properties of some modules implemented in FamPipe, and based on the results, we provided suggestions for the selection of modules to achieve an optimal analysis strategy. The pipeline is under the GNU GPL License and can be downloaded for free at http://fampipe.sourceforge.net. PMID:27272119

  3. Adiponectin: an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease in men in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our aim was to determine whether plasma adiponectin levels were an independent predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Plasma adiponectin levels were measured in 3,188 male and female participants from cycle 6 of the Framingham Offspring Study (mean age: 57 years in both men and women; BMI:...

  4. Cardiovascular disease and arsenic exposure in Inner Mongolia, China: a case control study

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Millions of people are at risk from the adverse effects of arsenic exposure through drinking water. Increasingly, non-cancer effects such as cardiovascular disease have been associated with drinking water arsenic exposures. However, most studies have been conducted in...

  5. Extralinguistic Communication Compensates for the Loss of Verbal Fluency: A Case Study of Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabat, Steven R.; Cagigas, Xavier E.

    1997-01-01

    The case study of an older woman with Alzheimer's disease shows that while her command of words and syntax had deteriorated, her ability to use other forms of communication had not. Her alternative forms of communication included use of gesture, facial expression, posture, and tone of voice. (MSE)

  6. Factors Related to Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction in Midlife and Older Women: A Qualitative Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death for women in the United States. Although a healthy diet and appropriate physical activity can help reduce risk, few women are engaging in these behaviors. In this study, qualitative methods were used to better understand: knowledge and aware...

  7. Impact of the 2001 Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreak in Britain: Implications for Rural Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alister; Christie, Michael; Midmore, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact of the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in terms of its implications for the discipline of rural studies. In particular, it focuses on the position of agriculture in rural economy and society, the standing of the government after its management of the outbreak, and the performance of the new devolved regional…

  8. Adipokines as Possible New Predictors of Cardiovascular Diseases: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pala, Laura; Monami, Matteo; Ciani, Silvia; Dicembrini, Ilaria; Pasqua, Alessandro; Pezzatini, Anna; Francesconi, Paolo; Cresci, Barbara; Mannucci, Edoardo; Rotella, Carlo Maria

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims. The secretion of several adipocytokines, such as adiponectin, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aFABP), and visfatin, is altered in subjects with abdominal adiposity; these endocrine alterations could contribute to increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of the study was to assess the relationship among adiponectin, RBP4, aFABP, and visfatin, and incident cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results. A case-control study, nested within a prospective cohort, on 2945 subjects enrolled for a diabetes screening program was performed. We studied 18 patients with incident fatal or nonfatal IHD (Ischemic Heart Disease) or CVD (Cerebrovascular Disease), compared with 18 matched control subjects. Circulating adiponectin levels were significantly lower in cases of IHD with respect to controls. Circulating RBP4 levels were significantly increased in CVD and decreased in IHD with respect to controls. Circulating aFABP4 levels were significantly increased in CVD, while no difference was associated with IHD. Circulating visfatin levels were significantly lower in cases of both CVD and IHD with respect to controls, while no difference was associated with CVD. Conclusions. The present study confirms that low adiponectin is associated with increased incidents of IHD, but not CVD, and suggests, for the first time, a major effect of visfatin, aFABP, and RBP4 in the development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:21869928

  9. Pathologic studies of fatal cases in outbreak of hand, foot, and mouth disease, Taiwan.

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, W. J.; Jung, S. M.; Hsueh, C.; Kuo, T. T.; Mounts, A.; Parashar, U.; Yang, C. F.; Guarner, J.; Ksiazek, T. G.; Dawson, J.; Goldsmith, C.; Chang, G. J.; Oberste, S. M.; Pallansch, M. A.; Anderson, L. J.; Zaki, S. R.

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, an outbreak of enterovirus 71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease occurred in Taiwan. Pathologic studies of two fatal cases with similar clinical features revealed two different causative agents, emphasizing the need for postmortem examinations and modern pathologic techniques in an outbreak investigation. PMID:11266307

  10. Brain Disease and the Study of Learning Disabilities in the Netherlands (c. 1950-85)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Nelleke

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the role brain disease has played in the discourse and practices of child scientists involved in the study of learning disabilities and behavioural disorders from the 1950s up to the mid-1980s, particularly in the Netherlands as part of a developing international scientific community. In the pre-ADHD era, when child sciences…

  11. Model for Postgraduate Medical Education: Study of Crohn's Disease in New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Daniel H.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to introduce a model system for the continuous retrieval, storage, and dissemination of relevant clinical information that has proven to be an effective resource of real-life data. Patients with Crohn's disease from a geographic area served as the population base for 2 groups of physicians, one group practicing in the…

  12. Genome-wide association study of antibody response to Newcastle disease virus in chicken

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the first outbreak in Indonesia in 1926, Newcastle disease has become one of the most common and contagious bird diseases throughout the world. To date, enhancing host antibody response by vaccination remains the most efficient strategy to control outbreaks of Newcastle disease. Antibody response plays an important role in host resistance to Newcastle disease, and selection for antibody response can effectively improve disease resistance in chickens. However, the molecular basis of the variation in antibody response to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is not clear. The aim of this study was to detect genes modulating antibody response to NDV by a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in chickens. Results To identify genes or chromosomal regions associated with antibody response to NDV after immunization, a GWAS was performed using 39,833 SNP markers in a chicken F2 resource population derived from a cross between two broiler lines that differed in their resistance. Two SNP effects reached 5% Bonferroni genome-wide significance (P<1.26×10-6). These two SNPs, rs15354805 and rs15355555, were both on chicken (Gallus gallus) chromosome 1 and spanned approximately 600 Kb, from 100.4 Mb to 101.0 Mb. Rs15354805 is in intron 7 of the chicken Roundabout, axon guidance receptor, homolog 2 (ROBO2) gene, and rs15355555 is located about 243 Kb upstream of ROBO2. Rs15354805 explained 5% of the phenotypic variation in antibody response to NDV, post immunization, in chickens. Rs15355555 had a similar effect as rs15354805 because of its linkage disequilibrium with rs15354805 (r2=0.98). Conclusion The region at about 100 Mb from the proximal end of chicken chromosome 1, including the ROBO1 and ROBO2 genes, has a strong effect on the antibody response to the NDV in chickens. This study paves the way for further research on the host immune response to NDV. PMID:23663563

  13. The Burden of Acute Disease in Mahajanga, Madagascar – A 21 Month Study

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Vijay C.; Andriamalala, Clara N.; Reynolds, Teri A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Efforts to develop effective and regionally-appropriate emergency care systems in sub-Saharan Africa are hindered by a lack of data on both the burden of disease in the region and on the state of existing care delivery mechanisms. This study describes the burden of acute disease presenting to an emergency unit in Mahajanga, Madagascar. Methods and Findings Handwritten patient registries on all emergency department patients presenting between 1 January 2011 and 30 September 2012 were reviewed and data entered into a database. Data included age, sex, diagnosis, and disposition. We classified diagnoses into Clinical Classifications Software (CCS) multi-level categories. The population was 53.5% male, with a median age of 31 years. The five most common presenting conditions were 1) Superficial injury; contusion, 2) Open wounds of head; neck; and trunk, 3) Open wounds of extremities, 4) Intracranial injury, and 5) Unspecified injury and poisoning. Trauma accounted for 48%, Infectious Disease for 15%, Mental Health 6.1%, Noncommunicable 29%, and Neoplasms 1.2%. The acuity seen was high, with an admission rate of 43%. Trauma was the most common reason for admission, representing 19% of admitted patients. Conclusions This study describes the burden of acute disease at a large referral center in northern Madagascar. The Centre Hôpitalier Universitaire de Mahajanga sees a high volume of acutely ill and injured patients. Similar to other reports from the region, trauma is the most common pathology observed, though infectious disease was responsible for the majority of adult mortality. Typhoid fever other intestinal infections were the most lethal CCS-coded pathologies. By utilizing a widely understood classification system, we are able to highlight contrasts between Mahajanga’s acute and overall disease burden as well as make comparisons between this region and the rest of the globe. We hope this study will serve to guide the development of context

  14. Clinical study of an outbreak of Legionnaire's disease in Alcoy, Southeastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Fernández, J A; López, P; Orozco, D; Merino, J

    2002-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the clinical features of Legionnaires' disease, sudden outbreaks of which demand a quick and flexible clinical approach, particularly with regard to diagnosis and therapy. A prospective and comparative study based on a clinical protocol was performed during an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in Alcoy, Spain. The outbreak was environmental in origin, linked to cooling towers. Data about epidemiological and clinical features, blood chemistry values, radiological and microbiological findings, and characteristics related to the clinical course of Legionnaires' disease were obtained for 357 patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired pneumonia (177 with Legionella pneumonia). Patients with Legionnaires' disease were younger (mean age, 65.3+/-16.5 years) and more likely to be smokers compared with patients with other types of pneumonia (28.8% vs. 11.1%; P<0.01). Moreover, they had not been admitted to any hospital because of pneumonia in the previous year. Patients with Legionnaires' disease had higher fever, more severe headache, and less expectoration as well as lower sodium blood levels (mean, 132.6+/-4.8 mmol/l vs. 135.7 mmol/l; P<0.01). Radiological studies also showed that fewer patients with Legionnaires' disease had pleural effusion (9% vs. 19.4% of those with non- Legionella pneumonia). The presence of headache, high fever, hyponatremia, scanty or null expectoration, and current cigarette smoking provides physicians with important clues for a high suspicion of Legionella pneumonia before the results of confirmatory laboratory tests are available.

  15. A 24-Hour Study of the Hypothalamo-Pituitary Axes in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nambron, Rajasree; Costelloe, Seán J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hill, Nathan R.; Frost, Chris; Watt, Hilary C.; Hindmarsh, Peter; Björkqvist, Maria; Warner, Thomas T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Huntington’s disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterised by motor, cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. Patients exhibit other symptoms including sleep and mood disturbances, muscle atrophy and weight loss which may be linked to hypothalamic pathology and dysfunction of hypothalamo-pituitary axes. Methods We studied neuroendocrine profiles of corticotropic, somatotropic and gonadotropic hypothalamo-pituitary axes hormones over a 24-hour period in controlled environment in 15 healthy controls, 14 premanifest and 13 stage II/III Huntington’s disease subjects. We also quantified fasting levels of vasopressin, oestradiol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, free total thyroxine, prolactin, adrenaline and noradrenaline. Somatotropic axis hormones, growth hormone releasing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like factor binding protein-3 were quantified at 06:00 (fasting), 15:00 and 23:00. A battery of clinical tests, including neurological rating and function scales were performed. Results 24-hour concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone, cortisol, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone did not differ significantly between the Huntington’s disease group and controls. Daytime growth hormone secretion was similar in control and Huntington’s disease subjects. Stage II/III Huntington’s disease subjects had lower concentration of post-sleep growth hormone pulse and higher insulin-like growth factor-1:growth hormone ratio which did not reach significance. In Huntington’s disease subjects, baseline levels of hypothalamo-pituitary axis hormones measured did not significantly differ from those of healthy controls. Conclusions The relatively small subject group means that the study may not detect subtle perturbations in hormone concentrations. A targeted study of the somatotropic axis in larger cohorts may be warranted. However, the lack

  16. Study of antibodies against viruses, chlamydiae, rickettsiae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in children with respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Copelovici, Y; Niculescu, R; Teleguţă, L; Dincă, A; Stoian, N; Cristea, A; Ossman, J; Alămiţă, I; Vlăsceanu, S

    1981-01-01

    Seroconversion to different viral, chlamydial, rickettsial and mycoplasma antigens was followed up in 134 children aged 0-6 years, hospitalized with different respiratory diseases. Parainfluenza viruses type 1, 2 and 3 and adenoviruses appeared to be involved in the etiology of most of the cases; respiratory syncytial virus was often found to play a role in pneumonia/bronchopneumonia and in "influenza-like illness", while chlamydiae and M. pneumoniae could be incriminated in cases of "influenza-like illness", as well as in the other categories of respiratory disease. Mixed infections with the agents studied could be detected.

  17. Population admixture associated with disease prevalence in the Boston Puerto Rican health study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chao-Qiang; Tucker, Katherine L; Choudhry, Shweta; Parnell, Laurence D; Mattei, Josiemer; García-Bailo, Bibiana; Beckman, Kenny; Burchard, Esteban González; Ordovás, José M

    2009-03-01

    Older Puerto Ricans living in the continental U.S. suffer from higher rates of diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and depression compared to non-Hispanic White populations. Complex diseases, such as these, are likely due to multiple, potentially interacting, genetic, environmental and social risk factors. Presumably, many of these environmental and genetic risk factors are contextual. We reasoned that racial background may modify some of these risk factors and be associated with health disparities among Puerto Ricans. The contemporary Puerto Rican population is genetically heterogeneous and originated from three ancestral populations: European settlers, native Taíno Indians, and West Africans. This rich-mixed ancestry of Puerto Ricans provides the intrinsic variability needed to untangle complex gene-environment interactions in disease susceptibility and severity. Herein, we determined whether a specific ancestral background was associated with either of four major disease outcomes (diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and depression). We estimated the genetic ancestry of 1,129 subjects from the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study based on genotypes of 100 ancestry informative markers (AIMs). We examined the effects of ancestry on tests of association between single AIMs and disease traits. The ancestral composition of this population was 57.2% European, 27.4% African, and 15.4% Native American. African ancestry was negatively associated with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and positively correlated with hypertension. It is likely that the high prevalence rate of diabetes in Africans, Hispanics, and Native Americans is not due to genetic variation alone, but to the combined effects of genetic variation interacting with environmental and social factors.

  18. Hypergammaglobulinemia in the pediatric population as a marker for underlying autoimmune disease: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The significance of hypergammaglobulinemia as a marker of immune activation is unknown, as a differential diagnosis for hypergammaglobulinemia in children has not been adequately established. The goal of this study was to identify conditions associated with hypergammaglobulinemia in children, with the hypothesis that elevated immunoglobulin levels may precede or predict the development of autoimmune conditions. Methods We reviewed the medical records for all children with IgG level ≥2000 mg/dL treated at a tertiary care children’s hospital from January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2009. We compared clinical and laboratory features of these patients, and developed an algorithm to predict the likelihood of underlying autoimmunity based on these characteristics. Results After excluding children who had received IVIG, a total of 442 patients with hypergammaglobulinemia were identified. Of these, nearly half had autoimmune conditions, most frequently systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus-related disorders. Autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease were also common. Infectious diseases were the next largest category of diseases, followed with much less frequency by malignant, drug-related, and other conditions. In comparison with non-autoimmune conditions, patients with autoimmune disease had higher IgG levels, lower white blood cell counts, lower hemoglobin values, and lower C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Multivariable logistic regression confirmed that CRP (P = 0.002), white blood cell count (P < 0.001), hemoglobin (P = 0.015), and female gender (P < 0.001) are independent risk factors for autoimmune disease in patients with high IgG levels. Conclusions In a cohort of pediatric patients at a tertiary care children’s hospital, hypergammaglobulinemia was most commonly associated with autoimmune diseases. In female patients with hypergammaglobulinemia, the presence of leukopenia, anemia, and normal CRP

  19. Clinical features of Crohn disease concomitant with ankylosing spondylitis: A preliminary single-center study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Ding, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wanqing; Feng, Min; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-07-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) cause increased morbidity and decreased quality of life in Crohn disease (CD). Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) belongs to EIMs. Very little is known on the clinical features of CD concomitant with AS. This study is to investigate the clinical features of CD patients with AS.We retrospectively collected all CD patients with AS in our hospital, and established a comparison group (CD without AS) with age, sex, and duration of Crohn disease matched. Clinical information was retrieved for comparison.Eight CD + AS patients were identified from 195 CD patients. Sixteen CD patients were randomly selected into comparison group. All CD + AS patients were male, HLA-B27 (+), and rheumatoid factor (-) with an average age of 40.8 ± 4.52 years. Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and AS was revealed (r = 0.857, P = 0.011). Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and functional limitation associated with AS was identified (r = 0.881, P < 0.01). C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and globulin were positively correlated to Crohn disease activity index (CDAI), Bath AS disease activity index, and Bath AS functional index(BASFI) scores (r = 0.73-0.93, P < 0.05). Albumin was negatively associated with CDAI and BASFI (r = -0.73 to -0.91, P < 0.05). The ratio of albumin to globulin (Alb/Glo) was significantly related to all 3 scores (r = -0.81 to -0.91, P < 0.05).Male predominance with a 4.12% concomitant incidence of AS is observed in CD patients. Disease activity of CD correlates with disease activity of AS and functional limitation caused by AS. CRP, ESR, and Alb/Glo may serve as biomarkers for disease activity and functional limitation in CD patients concomitant with AS, although future studies are expected. PMID:27428240

  20. The Cohort for Childhood Origin of Asthma and allergic diseases (COCOA) study: design, rationale and methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes the background, aim, and design of a prospective birth-cohort study in Korea called the COhort for Childhood Origin of Asthma and allergic diseases (COCOA). COCOA objectives are to investigate the individual and interactive effects of genetics, perinatal environment, maternal lifestyle, and psychosocial stress of mother and child on pediatric susceptibility to allergic diseases. Methods/Design The participants in COCOA represents a Korean inner-city population. Recruitment started on 19 November, 2007 and will continue until 31 December, 2015. Recruitment is performed at five medical centers and eight public-health centers for antenatal care located in Seoul. Participating mother-baby pairs are followed from before birth to adolescents. COCOA investigates whether the following five environmental variables contribute causally to the development and natural course of allergic diseases: (1) perinatal indoor factors (i.e. house-dust mite, bacterial endotoxin, tobacco smoking, and particulate matters 2.5 and 10), (2) perinatal outdoor pollutants, (3) maternal prenatal psychosocial stress and the child’s neurodevelopment, (4) perinatal nutrition, and (5) perinatal microbiome. Cord blood and blood samples from the child are used to assess whether the child’s genes and epigenetic changes influence allergic-disease susceptibility. Thus, COCOA aims to investigate the contributions of genetics, epigenetics, and various environmental factors in early life to allergic-disease susceptibility in later life. How these variables interact to shape allergic-disease susceptibility is also a key aim. The COCOA data collection schedule includes 11 routine standardized follow-up assessments of all children at 6 months and every year until 10 years of age, regardless of allergic-disease development. The mothers will complete multiple questionnaires to assess the baseline characteristics, the child’s exposure to environmental factors, maternal pre

  1. The Peripheral Arterial disease study (PERART/ARTPER): prevalence and risk factors in the general population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The early diagnosis of atherosclerotic disease is essential for developing preventive strategies in populations at high risk and acting when the disease is still asymptomatic. A low ankle-arm index is a good marker of vascular events and may be diminished without presenting symptomatology (silent peripheral arterial disease). The aim of the study is to know the prevalence and associated risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in the general population. Methods We performed a cross-sectional, multicentre, population-based study in 3786 individuals >49 years, randomly selected in 28 primary care centres in Barcelona (Spain). Peripheral arterial disease was evaluated using the ankle-arm index. Values < 0.9 were considered as peripheral arterial disease. Results The prevalence (95% confidence interval) of peripheral arterial disease was 7.6% (6.7-8.4), (males 10.2% (9.2-11.2), females 5.3% (4.6-6.0); p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed the following risk factors: male sex [odds ratio (OR) 1.62; 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.59]; age OR 2.00 per 10 years (1.64-2.44); inability to perform physical activity [OR 1.77 (1.17-2.68) for mild limitation to OR 7.08 (2.61-19.16) for breathless performing any activity]; smoking [OR 2.19 (1.34-3.58) for former smokers and OR 3.83 (2.23-6.58) for current smokers]; hypertension OR 1.85 (1.29-2.65); diabetes OR 2.01 (1.42-2.83); previous cardiovascular disease OR 2.19 (1.52-3.15); hypercholesterolemia OR 1.55 (1.11-2.18); hypertriglyceridemia OR 1.55 (1.10-2.19). Body mass index ≥25 Kg/m2 OR 0.57 (0.38-0.87) and walking >7 hours/week OR 0.67 (0.49-0.94) were found as protector factors. Conclusions The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease is low, higher in males and increases with age in both sexes. In addition to previously described risk factors we found a protector effect in physical exercise and overweight. PMID:20529387

  2. Calling for an ecological approach to studying climate change and infectious diseases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2009-01-01

    My Concepts and Synthesis paper (Lafferty 2009),which inspired this Forum, echoed the premise that earlyreviews about climate change exaggerated claims thatinfectious diseases will increase in the future (Randolph2009). The paper sparked five well-reasoned commen-taries from ecologists with considerable expertise ininfectious diseases (Dobson 2009, Harvell et al. 2009,Ostfeld 2009, Pascual and Bouma 2009, Randolph2009). These reviews illustrate several examples andcase studies which corr elate i ncreases in infectiousdisease with existing climate variation, though alterna-tive explanations exist for many of these patterns(Dobson 2009, Harvell et al. 2009, Ostfeld 2009, Pascualand Bouma 2009, Randolph 2009). A common messageis that an ecological approach is increasingly relevant tothe challenging topic of infectious disease.

  3. The Rabbit as a Model for Studying Lung Disease and Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kamaruzaman, Nurfatin Asyikhin; Kamaldin, Nurulain ‘Atikah; Latahir, Ahmad Zaeri; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2013-01-01

    No single animal model can reproduce all of the human features of both acute and chronic lung diseases. However, the rabbit is a reliable model and clinically relevant facsimile of human disease. The similarities between rabbits and humans in terms of airway anatomy and responses to inflammatory mediators highlight the value of this species in the investigation of lung disease pathophysiology and in the development of therapeutic agents. The inflammatory responses shown by the rabbit model, especially in the case of asthma, are comparable with those that occur in humans. The allergic rabbit model has been used extensively in drug screening tests, and this model and humans appear to be sensitive to similar drugs. In addition, recent studies have shown that the rabbit serves as a good platform for cell delivery for the purpose of stem-cell-based therapy. PMID:23653896

  4. Studies of "unsteady gait disease" of the Tibetan gazelle (Procapra picticaudata).

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Li, Xia; Zhang, Renduo

    2010-04-01

    Clinical signs of a disease locally referred to as "unsteady gait disease" for the Tibetan gazelle (Procapra picticaudata) were observed in the Qinghai Lake watershed area, China. The objective of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between the disease and copper (Cu) deficiency. Chemical examinations showed that Cu concentrations in soil and forage samples were similar from areas where gazelles were affected and unaffected. However, concentrations of sulfur (S) and molybdenum (Mo) in the soil and forage samples from the affected area were significantly higher than those from the unaffected areas (P<0.01). Copper concentrations in samples of blood, hair, and liver from the affected gazelles were significantly lower than those in unaffected animals (P<0.01). Supplementation of CuSO(4) in affected gazelles improved their appetite and vigor. We conclude that the disorder of Tibetan gazelles was caused by Cu deficiency, attributable to the high S and Mo content in forage. PMID:20688650

  5. Replication Validity of Initial Association Studies: A Comparison between Psychiatry, Neurology and Four Somatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dumas-Mallet, Estelle; Button, Katherine; Boraud, Thomas; Munafo, Marcus; Gonon, François

    2016-01-01

    Context There are growing concerns about effect size inflation and replication validity of association studies, but few observational investigations have explored the extent of these problems. Objective Using meta-analyses to measure the reliability of initial studies and explore whether this varies across biomedical domains and study types (cognitive/behavioral, brain imaging, genetic and “others”). Methods We analyzed 663 meta-analyses describing associations between markers or risk factors and 12 pathologies within three biomedical domains (psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases). We collected the effect size, sample size, publication year and Impact Factor of initial studies, largest studies (i.e., with the largest sample size) and the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial studies were considered as replicated if they were in nominal agreement with meta-analyses and if their effect size inflation was below 100%. Results Nominal agreement between initial studies and meta-analyses regarding the presence of a significant effect was not better than chance in psychiatry, whereas it was somewhat better in neurology and somatic diseases. Whereas effect sizes reported by largest studies and meta-analyses were similar, most of those reported by initial studies were inflated. Among the 256 initial studies reporting a significant effect (p<0.05) and paired with significant meta-analyses, 97 effect sizes were inflated by more than 100%. Nominal agreement and effect size inflation varied with the biomedical domain and study type. Indeed, the replication rate of initial studies reporting a significant effect ranged from 6.3% for genetic studies in psychiatry to 86.4% for cognitive/behavioral studies. Comparison between eight subgroups shows that replication rate decreases with sample size and “true” effect size. We observed no evidence of association between replication rate and publication year or Impact Factor. Conclusion The differences in reliability

  6. Retrospective study of canine heartworm disease with caval syndrome in Grenada, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Chikweto, A; Bhaiyat, M I; Lanza-Perea, M; Veytsman, S; Tiwari, K; De Allie, C; Sharma, R N

    2014-10-15

    Canine heartworm disease caused by Dirofilaria immitis is an important disease of dogs. The aim of this retrospective study was to estimate the prevalence of canine heartworm disease and evaluate cases of caval syndrome in dogs submitted for necropsy in Grenada. Out of 1617 dogs necropsied over a period of 13 years (2001-2013), 249 were found to be infected with D. immitis; giving an overall prevalence of 15.4% (95% confidence interval, 13.6% to 17.1%). There was no significant difference between male and female dogs with respect to canine heartworm infection (p = 0.3). During this period, the annual prevalence of canine heartworm disease was 22% in 2001 before slightly declining to an average of 18% in 2002-2003 and peaking at 26.8% in 2004-2005. From 2006 onwards, annual prevalence rates have steadily been decreasing; reaching the lowest (9%) in 2013. Among the 249 positive cases, 33 (13.2%) of the dogs had caval syndrome. Caval syndrome cases presented with concurrent clinical signs and were associated with cardio-pulmonary and hepatic gross lesions at necropsy. Aberrant migration of D. immitis was also noted in 2 dogs with caval syndrome. This is the first report which presents the findings of canine heartworm disease with caval syndrome in Grenada.

  7. The Central Biobank and Virtual Biobank of BIOMARKAPD: A Resource for Studies on Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reijs, Babette L. R.; Teunissen, Charlotte E.; Goncharenko, Nikolai; Betsou, Fay; Blennow, Kaj; Baldeiras, Inês; Brosseron, Frederic; Cavedo, Enrica; Fladby, Tormod; Froelich, Lutz; Gabryelewicz, Tomasz; Gurvit, Hakan; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Koson, Peter; Kulic, Luka; Lehmann, Sylvain; Lewczuk, Piotr; Lleó, Alberto; Maetzler, Walter; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Miller, Anne-Marie; Molinuevo, José L.; Mollenhauer, Brit; Parnetti, Lucilla; Rot, Uros; Schneider, Anja; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Tsolaki, Magda; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Verhey, Frans R. J.; Zboch, Marzena; Winblad, Bengt; Scheltens, Philip; Zetterberg, Henrik; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2015-01-01

    Biobanks are important resources for biomarker discovery and assay development. Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease (BIOMARKAPD) is a European multicenter study, funded by the EU Joint Programme-Neurodegenerative Disease Research, which aims to improve the clinical use of body fluid markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). The objective was to standardize the assessment of existing assays and to validate novel fluid biomarkers for AD and PD. To support the validation of novel biomarkers and assays, a central and a virtual biobank for body fluids and associated data from subjects with neurodegenerative diseases have been established. In the central biobank, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples were collected according to the BIOMARKAPD standardized pre-analytical procedures and stored at Integrated BioBank of Luxembourg. The virtual biobank provides an overview of available CSF, plasma, serum, and DNA samples at each site. Currently, at the central biobank of BIOMARKAPD samples are available from over 400 subjects with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), AD, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), vascular dementia, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, PD, PD with dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies. The virtual biobank contains information on over 8,600 subjects with varying diagnoses from 21 local biobanks. A website has been launched to enable sample requests from the central biobank and virtual biobank. PMID:26528237

  8. Epidemiology of Major Neurodegenerative Diseases in Women: Contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Kassandra L.; Ascherio, Alberto; Grodstein, Francine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to identifying the role of lifestyle, diet, and genetic or biological factors in several neurodegenerative diseases, including cognitive decline, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Methods. We completed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II between 1976 and 2016. Results. In primary findings for cognitive function, higher intake of nuts, moderate alcohol consumption, and higher physical activity levels were associated with better cognitive function. Flavonoids, physical activity, and postmenopausal hormone therapy were related to cognitive decline over 2 to 6 years. The NHS also has been integral in establishing Epstein-Barr virus infection, inadequate vitamin D nutrition, cigarette smoking, and obesity as risk factors for multiple sclerosis and inverse associations between cigarette smoking and caffeine and risk of Parkinson’s disease. Increased risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has been associated with cigarette smoking and decreased risk associated with obesity. Conclusions. The NHS has provided invaluable resources on neurodegenerative diseases and contributed to their etiological understanding. We anticipate that the NHS cohorts will continue to make important contributions to the field of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27459462

  9. Influence of Obesity and Metabolic Disease on Carotid Atherosclerosis in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease (CordioPrev Study)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Gomez-Luna, Purificacion; Gomez-Garduño, Angela; Gomez-Delgado, Francisco; Alcala-Diaz, Juan F.; Yubero-Serrano, Elena; Marin, Carmen; Perez-Caballero, Ana I.; Fuentes-Jimenez, Francisco J.; Camargo, Antonio; Rodriguez-Cantalejo, Fernando; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Perez- Jimenez, Francisco; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent data suggest that the presence of associated metabolic abnormalities may be important modifiers of the association of obesity with a poorer prognosis in coronary heart disease. We determined the influence of isolated overweight and obesity on carotid intima media thickness (IMT-CC), and also assessed whether this influence was determined by the presence of metabolic abnormalities. Methods 1002 participants from the CordioPrev study were studied at entry. We determined their metabolic phenotypes and performed carotid ultrasound assessment. We evaluated the influence of obesity, overweight and metabolic phenotypes on the IMT-CC. Results Metabolically sick participants (defined by the presence of two or more metabolic abnormalities) showed a greater IMT-CC than metabolically healthy individuals (p = 4 * 10−6). Overweight and normal weight patients who were metabolically healthy showed a lower IMT-CC than the metabolically abnormal groups (all p<0.05). When we evaluated only body weight (without considering metabolic phenotypes), overweight or obese patients did not differ significantly from normal-weight patients in their IMT-CC (p = 0.077). However, obesity was a determinant of IMT-CC when compared to the composite group of normal weight and overweight patients (all not obese). Conclusions In coronary patients, a metabolically abnormal phenotype is associated with a greater IMT-CC, and may be linked to a higher risk of suffering new cardiovascular events. The protection conferred in the IMT-CC by the absence of metabolic abnormality may be blunted by the presence of obesity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00924937 PMID:27064675

  10. Fluorescence endoscopic imaging study of anastomotic recurrence of Crohn's disease after right ileocolonic resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Maunoury, Vincent; Klein, Olivier; Colombel, Jean-Frederic

    1995-12-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. Vasculitis is hypothesized but it was never demonstrated in vivo. This study aimed to evaluate the vascular mucosa perfusion using fluorescence imaging in 13 patients who had previously undergone eileocolonic resection and who agreed to participate in a prospective endoscopic study of anastomotic recurrence. This anastomotic recurrence rate is known to be high (73% after 1 year follow-up) and is characterized by ulcerations. The fluorescence study was started with an I.V. bolus injection of sodium fluorescein. The pre-anastomotic mucosa was endoscopically examined with blue light that stimulates fluorescein fluorescence. Fluorescence emission was recorded with an ultra-high-sensitivity camera connected to the endoscope via an interference filter (520 - 560 nm). A uniform fluorescence was observed a few seconds after the injection and lasted for 15 min in healthy subjects. In case of recurrence, the centers of the ulcerations displayed a very low fluorescence indicating localized ischemia. In contrast, the rims of the ulcers revealed brighter fluorescent images than those of normal mucosa. The anastomotic ulcerations of Crohn's disease recurrence exhibit a high fluorescence intensity at their margins indicating an increased mucosal blood flow and/or enhanced transcapillary diffusion. These findings support the hypothesis of a primary vasculitis in Crohn's disease.

  11. The influence of the young microbiome on inflammatory diseases--Lessons from animal studies.

    PubMed

    Bendtsen, Katja M; Fisker, Line; Hansen, Axel K; Hansen, Camilla H F; Nielsen, Dennis S

    2015-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are on the rise in the Westernized world. This rise has been correlated to a range of environmental factors, such as birth mode, rural versus urban living conditions, and use of antibiotics. Such environmental factors also influence early life gut microbiota (GM) colonization and maturation--and there is growing evidence that the negative effects of these factors on human health are mediated via GM alterations. Colonization of the gut initiates priming of the immune system from birth, driving tolerance towards non-harmful microorganisms and dietary antigens and proper reactions towards invading pathogens. This early colonization is crucial for the establishment of a healthy GM, and throughout life the balanced interaction of GM and immune system is a key element in maintaining health. An immune system out of balance increases the risk for later life inflammatory diseases. Animal models are indispensable in the studies of GM influence on disease mechanisms and progression, and focus points include studies of GM modification during pregnancy and perinatal life. Here, we present an overview of animal studies which have contributed to our understanding of GM functions in early life and how alterations affect risk and expression of certain inflammatory diseases with juvenile onset, including interventions, such as birth mode, antibiotics, and probiotics.

  12. Outdoor Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Diseases in Lebanon: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Zeina; Salameh, Pascale; Dakik, Habib; Elias, Elias; Abou Abbas, Linda; Levêque, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor air pollution is increasingly considered as a serious threat for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The aim of this study is to investigate the association between outdoor pollutants and cardiovascular diseases among adults in Lebanon and to examine the possible moderator effect of cigarette smoking status on this association. A multicenter case-control study was conducted between October 2011 and October 2012. Cases were hospitalized patients diagnosed with CVD by a cardiologist while the control group subjects were free of any cardiac diseases. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, tobacco consumption, self-rated global health, pollution exposure, and other risk factors was collected using a questionnaire. The results of the logistic regression revealed that living near busy highway (OR 5.04, 95% CI (4.44–12.85), P < 0.001) and close to local diesel generator (OR 4.76, 95% CI (2.07–10.91), P < 0.001) was significantly associated with CVD. The association between the CVD and exposure to outside pollutants differed by cigarette smoking status. A clear difference was noted between nonsmokers and current smokers OR 4.6, 95% CI (1.10–19.25) and OR 10.11, 95% CI (7.33–20.23), respectively. Forthcoming studies are needed to clarify the potential link between outdoor air pollution and cardiovascular diseases in Lebanon. Public health interventions must be implemented to reduce air pollution and to improve air quality. PMID:25653681

  13. Disease surveillance methods used in the 8-site MAL-ED cohort study.