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Sample records for disk drive actuator

  1. Optimization of a magnetic disk drive actuator with small skew actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhimin; Ong, Eng Hong; Guo, Guoxiao

    2002-05-01

    Currently the utilization of the voice-coil motor for actuating read/write head elements in magnetic hard disk drives results in a skewed actuation, which necessitates an involved microjogging process and thus a complicated servo system. Furthermore, in perpendicular recording systems, a small skew actuation will relax the requirement on pole trimming. This article presents a magnetic hard disk drive actuator and suspension assembly with small skew actuation. In the present study, the distance from the actuator pivot to the read/write head is chosen so that the skew angle variation is minimized. After that, the suspension head is assembled to the actuator arm at a slant angle with respect to the actuator longitudinal direction to achieve an absolute small skew actuation. Finite element modeling and experimental measurements reveal that there are no significant changes of the actuator assembly dynamic performance with and without the slant angle.

  2. Simple spark erosion device based on optical disk or hard disk drive actuators.

    PubMed

    Kamer, O

    2011-12-01

    We present the design of a compact electric discharge device incorporating hard disk or optical disk drive actuators. It is simple enough to be assembled in the absence of a mechanical workshop. The electronic circuit allows the adjustment of current, voltage, and discharge power. The system has been tested with organic dielectric liquids and deionized water and spark conditions; dynamic properties and machining characteristics were investigated. This device can be used to shape materials or to produce powdered samples with low material loss and minimal liquid consumption.

  3. Active-passive hybrid piezoelectric actuators for high-precision hard disk drive servo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwong Wah; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2006-03-01

    Positioning precision is crucial to today's increasingly high-speed, high-capacity, high data density, and miniaturized hard disk drives (HDDs). The demand for higher bandwidth servo systems that can quickly and precisely position the read/write head on a high track density becomes more pressing. Recently, the idea of applying dual-stage actuators to track servo systems has been studied. The push-pull piezoelectric actuated devices have been developed as micro actuators for fine and fast positioning, while the voice coil motor functions as a large but coarse seeking. However, the current dual-stage actuator design uses piezoelectric patches only without passive damping. In this paper, we propose a dual-stage servo system using enhanced active-passive hybrid piezoelectric actuators. The proposed actuators will improve the existing dual-stage actuators for higher precision and shock resistance, due to the incorporation of passive damping in the design. We aim to develop this hybrid servo system not only to increase speed of track seeking but also to improve precision of track following servos in HDDs. New piezoelectrically actuated suspensions with passive damping have been designed and fabricated. In order to evaluate positioning and track following performances for the dual-stage track servo systems, experimental efforts are carried out to implement the synthesized active-passive suspension structure with enhanced piezoelectric actuators using a composite nonlinear feedback controller.

  4. Robust H∞ stabilization of a hard disk drive system with a single-stage actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harno, Hendra G.; Kiin Woon, Raymond Song

    2015-04-01

    This paper considers a robust H∞ control problem for a hard disk drive system with a single stage actuator. The hard disk drive system is modeled as a linear time-invariant uncertain system where its uncertain parameters and high-order dynamics are considered as uncertainties satisfying integral quadratic constraints. The robust H∞ control problem is transformed into a nonlinear optimization problem with a pair of parameterized algebraic Riccati equations as nonconvex constraints. The nonlinear optimization problem is then solved using a differential evolution algorithm to find stabilizing solutions to the Riccati equations. These solutions are used for synthesizing an output feedback robust H∞ controller to stabilize the hard disk drive system with a specified disturbance attenuation level.

  5. Fabrication of piezoelectric ceramic micro-actuator and its reliability for hard disk drives.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yang; Luo, Jianbin; Yang, Wenyan; Ju, Guoxian

    2004-11-01

    A new U-type micro-actuator for precisely positioning a magnetic head in high-density hard disk drives was proposed and developed. The micro-actuator is composed of a U-type stainless steel substrate and two piezoelectric ceramic elements. Using a high-d31 piezoelectric coefficient PMN-PZT ceramic plate and adopting reactive ion etching process fabricate the piezoelectric elements. Reliability against temperature was investigated to ensure the practical application to the drive products. The U-type substrate attached to each side via piezoelectric elements also was simulated by the finite-element method and practically measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer in order to testify the driving mechanics of it. The micro-actuator coupled with two piezoelectric elements featured large displacement of 0.875 microm and high-resonance frequency over 22 kHz. The novel piezoelectric micro-actuators then possess a useful compromise performance to displacement, resonance frequency, and generative force. The results reveal that the new design concept provides a valuable alternative for multilayer piezoelectric micro-actuators.

  6. Fabrication of Beam-rotating Actuator for Multiple-beam Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Boung Jun; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kwak, Yoon Keun

    2002-05-01

    Current trends in computer and communication industries are towards increasingly higher resolution images and video processing techniques. However, such sophisticated processing tasks require massive storage systems such as a compact disk read only memory (CD-ROM) and digital versatile disc (DVD). Current demands in the development of such systems are higher data density storage media and an improved data transfer rate. The latter is discussed in this paper. A multiple-beam optical disk drive is presented as a method for improving the effective data transfer rate by increasing the beam spot number formed on an optical disk. The beam-rotating actuator is necessary for positioning the multiple-beam onto more than one track. Ray tracing was also employed for the real system setup. The beam-rotating actuator is made up of piezoelectric material, a high-stiffness wire hinge and a dove prism. The actuator has an approximately 1 kHz resonance frequency and a suitable operational range. The dynamic equation for the actuator is derived for the control of the real system.

  7. Enhanced laser shutter using a hard disk drive rotary voice-coil actuator.

    PubMed

    Scholten, R E

    2007-02-01

    Rotary voice-coil motors from computer hard disk drives make excellent mechanical shutters for light beams. However, the complexity of the necessary electronic driving circuit can hinder their application. A new design is presented here, using a single integrated circuit originally intended for controlling dc motors. A digital input signal switches a unipolar power supply bidirectionally through the voice coil. Short high-current pulses are generated on the transitions to ensure rapid shutter action, while a low holding current reduces the power requirement and heating of the actuator. The circuit can reverse the current to brake the shutter and reduce the impact at the end of its travel. With a focused laser beam, the shutter achieves rise times below 500 ns. A method for producing variable length pulses is also described, demonstrating durations as short as 700 ns.

  8. Disk Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A new material known as AlBeMet, developed by Brush Wellman for research applications in the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program, is now used for high performance disk drives. AlBeMet is a compression of aluminum, beryllium metal matrix composite. It reduces system weight and its high thermal conductivity can effectively remove heat and increase an electrical system's lifetime. The lighter, stiffer AlBeMet (AlBeMet 160) used in the disk drive means heads can be moved faster, improving disk performance.

  9. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  10. Rate dependent direct inverse hysteresis compensation of piezoelectric micro-actuator used in dual-stage hard disk drive head positioning system.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Arifur; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Yao, Kui

    2015-08-01

    The head positioning servo system in hard disk drive is implemented nowadays using a dual-stage actuator—the primary stage consisting of a voice coil motor actuator providing long range motion and the secondary stage controlling the position of the read/write head with fine resolution. Piezoelectric micro-actuator made of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) has been a popular choice for the secondary stage. However, PZT micro-actuator exhibits hysteresis—an inherent nonlinear characteristic of piezoelectric material. The advantage expected from using the secondary micro-actuator is somewhat lost by the hysteresis of the micro-actuator that contributes to tracking error. Hysteresis nonlinearity adversely affects the performance and, if not compensated, may cause inaccuracy and oscillation in the response. Compensation of hysteresis is therefore an important aspect for designing head-positioning servo system. This paper presents a new rate dependent model of hysteresis along with rigorous analysis and identification of the model. Parameters of the model are found using particle swarm optimization. Direct inverse of the proposed rate-dependent generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is used as the hysteresis compensator. Effectiveness of the overall solution is underscored through experimental results.

  11. Rate dependent direct inverse hysteresis compensation of piezoelectric micro-actuator used in dual-stage hard disk drive head positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Arifur; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Yao, Kui

    2015-08-01

    The head positioning servo system in hard disk drive is implemented nowadays using a dual-stage actuator—the primary stage consisting of a voice coil motor actuator providing long range motion and the secondary stage controlling the position of the read/write head with fine resolution. Piezoelectric micro-actuator made of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) has been a popular choice for the secondary stage. However, PZT micro-actuator exhibits hysteresis—an inherent nonlinear characteristic of piezoelectric material. The advantage expected from using the secondary micro-actuator is somewhat lost by the hysteresis of the micro-actuator that contributes to tracking error. Hysteresis nonlinearity adversely affects the performance and, if not compensated, may cause inaccuracy and oscillation in the response. Compensation of hysteresis is therefore an important aspect for designing head-positioning servo system. This paper presents a new rate dependent model of hysteresis along with rigorous analysis and identification of the model. Parameters of the model are found using particle swarm optimization. Direct inverse of the proposed rate-dependent generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is used as the hysteresis compensator. Effectiveness of the overall solution is underscored through experimental results.

  12. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  13. Direct drive field actuator motors

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  14. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1994-10-25

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw. 10 figs.

  15. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1994-01-01

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw.

  16. Future hard disk drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Roger

    2009-03-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of today's hard disk drive with the additional intention of orienting the reader to the overall mechanical and electrical architecture. The modern hard disk drive is a miracle of storage capacity and function together with remarkable economy of design. This paper presents a personal view of future customer requirements and the anticipated design evolution of the components. There are critical decisions and great challenges ahead for the key technologies of heads, media, head-disk interface, mechanics, and electronics.

  17. Direct-drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1995-07-11

    A high-torque, low speed, positive-drive field actuator motor is disclosed including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 37 figs.

  18. Direct-drive field actuator motors

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1995-01-01

    A high-torque, low speed, positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  19. Piezoelectric Microactuators for Use in Magnetic Disk Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Kazuaki; Hida, Masaharu; Umemiya, Shigeyoshi; Koganezawa, Shingi

    2004-09-01

    A head-slider drive dual-stage microactuator system for use in magnetic disk drives was developed. This microactuator system has a symmetrical structure and operation, and utilizes simple rectangular multilayered piezoelectric actuator devices. A prototype model with a pico slider and head suspension was tested and demonstrated. It exhibited a 0.8 μm displacement at a dc applied voltage of 30 V and a fundamental resonant frequency of over 20 kHz.

  20. Electrostatic comb drive for vertical actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A. P., LLNL

    1997-07-10

    The electrostatic comb finger drive has become an integral design for microsensor and microactuator applications. This paper reports on utilizing the levitation effect of comb fingers to design vertical-to-the-substrate actuation for interferometric applications. For typical polysilicon comb drives with 2 {micro}m gaps between the stationary and moving fingers, as well as between the microstructures and the substrate, the equilibrium position is nominally 1-2 {micro}m above the stationary comb fingers. This distance is ideal for many phase shifting interferometric applications. Theoretical calculations of the vertical actuation characteristics are compared with the experimental results, and a general design guideline is derived from these results. The suspension flexure stiffnesses, gravity forces, squeeze film damping, and comb finger thicknesses are parameters investigated which affect the displacement curve of the vertical microactuator. By designing a parallel plate capacitor between the suspended mass and the substrate, in situ position sensing can be used to control the vertical movement, providing a total feedback-controlled system. Fundamentals of various capacitive position sensing techniques are discussed. Experimental verification is carried out by a Zygo distance measurement interferometer.

  1. Study of scratch drive actuator force characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lijie; Brown, J. Gordon; Uttamchandani, Deepak

    2002-11-01

    Microactuators are one of the key components in MEMS technology, and various designs have been realized through different fabrication processes. One type of microactuator commonly used is the scratch drive actuator (SDA) that is frequently fabricated by surface micromachining processes. An experimental investigation has been conducted on the force characteristics of SDAs fabricated using the JDSU Microsystems MUMPs process. One-, two-, three- and four-plate SDAs connected to box-springs have been designed and fabricated for these experiments using MUMPs run 44. The spring constant for the box-springs has been calculated by FEM using ANSYS software. The product of the spring constant and spring extension is used to measure the forces produced by these SDAs. It is estimated that the forces produced exceed 250 μN from a one-plate SDA and 850 μN from a four-plate SDA.

  2. Wind turbine rotor simulation using the actuator disk and actuator line methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzimas, M.; Prospathopoulos, J.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper focuses on wind turbine rotor modeling for loads and wake flow prediction. Two steady-state models based on the actuator disk approach are considered, using either a uniform thrust or a blade element momentum calculation of the wind turbine loads. A third model is based on the unsteady-state actuator line approach. Predictions are compared with measurements in wind tunnel experiments and in atmospheric environment and the capabilities and weaknesses of the different models are addressed.

  3. Seventy Years of Magnetic Disk Drive Technology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryder, Mark H.

    2007-03-01

    The first hard disk drive, the IBM RAMAC, was shipped in September 1956. It was the size of a couple of refrigerators, contained fifty 24-inch diameter disks and stored information at an areal density of 2000 bits per square inch. Although ten years ago, the industry was widely perceived as facing a fundamental limit at 36 Gbit per square inch (Gbpsi) in the form of superparamagnetism, current disk drives provide areal densities in excess of 130 Gbpsi and capacities of 750 Gbytes. Although the original projections of superparamagnetism were correct, by changing the way the devices were scaled and, ultimately by changing from longitudinal to perpendicular recording, it has been possible to circumvent superparamagnetic effects. Our current understanding indicates that it may be possible to extend the areal density by yet another factor of 400 from present densities, if advanced technologies such as heat assisted magnetic recording and bit patterned media are implemented. Assuming this proceeds at the recent rate of 40 percent increase in areal density per year, we would reach roughly 50 Terabit per square inch (Tbpsi) in about 2026, 70 years after the development of the first disk drive. To achieve this, however, the industry will need higher sensitivity giant magnetoresistive sensors, high efficiency near-field transducers powered with surface plasmons and self-assembled or nano-imprinted magnetic particle arrays for media. In this presentation, the author will briefly describe the history of recording on magnetic disk drives, then describe the potential for future growth and some of the physics and materials problems that need solution in order to realize this full potential.

  4. An Electrostatic Microactuator for Positioning a Hard-Disk Drive Magnetic Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Tomonori; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi; Mita, Makoto; Kobayashi, Dai; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    We have newly developed a prototype model of silicon microfabricated piggyback actuator for positioning a read/write head of magnetic hard-disk drive, which is usually referred to as a dual servo system because the piggyback actuator for fine control is used in collaboration with the voice-coil motor for coarse control. The actuator is made of a 50-micron-thick SOI (silicon on insulator) wafer processed by deep RIE (reactive ion etching) of high-aspect ratio. Actuation mechanism is based upon electrostatic force generated by multiple parallel plates. Maximum displacement of 0.2μ with a dc driving voltage of 20V has been achieved with a 1mm × 0.3mm actuator of its resonance at 25kHz. An analytical model for predicting electromechanical performance has also been developed.

  5. Vibro-Acoustic Model of a Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Ran; Singh, Rajendra

    A new mathematical model of the vibro-acoustic characteristics of a computer hard-disk drive is presented in this paper. In particular, a mobility transfer function is defined that links sound radiated by a stationary or rotating disk to electromagnetic torque pulsations and structural dynamics. A simplified disk-drive system consisting of a brushless d.c. motor driving a single disk-spindle assembly, which is mounted on a flexible casing, is considered as the example case. Parametric studies illustrate the roles of bearing stiffness and disk geometry on the vibration and radiated sound.

  6. Drive piston assembly for a valve actuator assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Zongxuan

    2010-02-23

    A drive piston assembly is provided that is operable to selectively open a poppet valve. The drive piston assembly includes a cartridge defining a generally stepped bore. A drive piston is movable within the generally stepped bore and a boost sleeve is coaxially disposed with respect to the drive piston. A main fluid chamber is at least partially defined by the generally stepped bore, drive piston, and boost sleeve. First and second feedback chambers are at least partially defined by the drive piston and each are disposed at opposite ends of the drive piston. At least one of the drive piston and the boost sleeve is sufficiently configured to move within the generally stepped bore in response to fluid pressure within the main fluid chamber to selectively open the poppet valve. A valve actuator assembly and engine are also provided incorporating the disclosed drive piston assembly.

  7. Shock Response of the Clamped Disk in Small Form Factor Hard Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bin; Shu, Dongwei; Shi, Baojun; Lu, Guoxing

    As small form factor (one-inch and smaller) hard disk drives are widely used in portable consumer appliances and gadgets, their mechanical robustness is of greater concern. In the previous work, it is found that when the disk is more tightly clamped, it helps to decrease the shock response of the disk and then avoid the head slap. In this paper, the real boundary condition of the disk for a small form factor hard disk drive from Seagate is investigated numerically. The disk is clamped between the clamp and the hub. The shock response of the disk under a half-sine acceleration pulse is simulated by using the finite element method. In the finite element model, both contact between disk and clamp and contact between disk and hub are considered. According to the simulation results, how to decrease the shock response of the disk is suggested.

  8. Evaluation of actuator disk theory for predicting indirect combustion noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashish; Bodony, Daniel J.

    2013-02-01

    Indirect combustion noise is believed to be a key component of turbofan engine core noise, but existing experimental data have not been able to definitively determine its importance. Instead, actuator disk theory (ADT) as developed by Cumpsty and Marble [The interaction of entropy fluctuations with turbine blade rows; a mechanism of turbojet noise, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A 357 (1977) 323-344] is commonly used to estimate its contribution based on combustor exit conditions and changes in the mean flow across blade rows. The theory, which assumes planar propagation of acoustic, entropic, and vortical waves in the long wavelength limit, is assessed by comparing its predictions to those from two-dimensional compressible Euler calculations of idealized entropy disturbances interacting with a 1980s era NASA turbine stator. Both low-frequency planar waves of constant frequency and higher-frequency, localized entropy disturbances are considered, with the former being within ADT's range of applicability and the latter outside of it. It is found that ADT performs well for the cut-on acoustic modes generated by the entropy-blade interaction but its accuracy suffers for the cut-off acoustic modes, which could impact indirect combustion noise predictions for turbines with closely spaced blade rows.

  9. NSSDC activities with 12-inch optical disk drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Barbara E.; Lopez-Swafford, Brian

    1986-01-01

    The development status of optical-disk data transfer and storage technology at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) is surveyed. The aim of the R&D program is to facilitate the exchange of large volumes of data. Current efforts focus on a 12-inch 1-Gbyte write-once/read-many disk and a disk drive which interfaces with VAX/VMS computer systems. The history of disk development at NSSDC is traced; the results of integration and performance tests are summarized; the operating principles of the 12-inch system are explained and illustrated with diagrams; and the need for greater standardization is indicated.

  10. Perpendicular recording media for hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piramanayagam, S. N.

    2007-07-01

    Perpendicular recording technology has recently been introduced in hard disk drives for computer and consumer electronics applications. Although conceptualized in the late 1970s, making a product with perpendicular recording that has competing performance, reliability, and price advantage over the prevalent longitudinal recording technology has taken about three decades. One reason for the late entry of perpendicular recording is that the longitudinal recording technology was quite successful in overcoming many of its problems and in staying competitive. Other reasons are the risks, problems, and investment needed in making a successful transition to perpendicular recording technology. Iwasaki and co-workers came up with many inventions in the late 1970s, such as single-pole head, CoCr alloy media with a perpendicular anisotropy, and recording media with soft magnetic underlayers [S. Iwasaki and K. Takemura, IEEE Trans. Magn. 11, 1173 (1975); S. Iwasaki and Y. Nakamura, IEEE Trans. Magn. 14, 436 (1978); S. Iwasaki, Y. Nakamura, and K. Ouchi, IEEE Trans. Magn. 15, 1456 (1979)]. Nevertheless, the research on perpendicular recording media has been intense only in the past five years or so. The main reason for the current interest comes from the need to find an alternative technology to get away from the superparamagnetic limit faced by the longitudinal recording. Out of the several recording media materials investigated in the past, oxide based CoCrPt media have been considered a blessing. The media developed with CoCrPt-oxide or CoCrPt -SiO2 have shown much smaller grain sizes, lower noise, and larger thermal stability than the perpendicular recording media of the past, which is one of the reasons for the success of perpendicular recording. Moreover, oxide-based perpendicular media have also overtaken the current longitudinal recording media in terms of better recording performance. Several issues that were faced with the soft underlayers have also been solved by the

  11. A description of model 3B of the multipurpose ventricular actuating system. [providing controlled driving pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The multipurpose ventricular actuating system is a pneumatic signal generating device that provides controlled driving pressures for actuating pulsatile blood pumps. Overall system capabilities, the timing circuitry, and calibration instruction are included.

  12. Dynamics simulation of MEMS device embedded-hard-disk-drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiaping; Chai, Jie; Lim, Boon Baun; Chen, Shixin

    2002-04-01

    Currently, hard disk drives (HHD) use rotating disks to store digital data and magnetic recording heads are flying on the disk to read/write data. The recording heads are mounted on a slider- suspension assembly, which makes heads move from one track to another on the disk. The heads movement is controlled by close-loop feedback servo system. It is well known that dynamic behaviors of head-slider-suspension-assembly (HSA) system are of great influence on the track per inch capacity of HDD1,2. As the problem is structurally complex, it is usually investigated using experimental methods or finite element simulation models 3. Furthermore, the dual-stage servo system, that is, a conventional VCM as the primary stage and a MEMS actuator as the secondary stage for MEMS device embedded HAS, has resulted in more difficulties in predicting HDD dynamic performance. This paper presents studies of the problem using macromodeling simulation approach. It applies efficient FEM based sub-structuring synthesis (SSS)4 and fast boundary element method (BEM) approaches incorporated with system dynamics technology to investigate dynamic characteristics of MEMS actuator embedded HAS system for HDD.

  13. Monitoring trace anion contamination in disk drive components.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Edward; Rohrer, Jeff; Campbell, Faye

    2003-05-16

    Ion chromatography was used to determine trace anionic contamination on the surface of hard disk drive components. These contaminants can have a detrimental effect on device reliability and yield. Disk drive components were soaked in deionized water and these extracts were analyzed for anions. The anions fluoride, acetate, formate, acrylate, methacrylate, chloride, nitrite, bromide, nitrate, benzoate, sulfate, oxalate, phthalate and phosphate were separated on a high-performance anion-exchange column and determined at concentrations less than 1 microg/l with suppressed conductivity detection. The extract solutions were analyzed either by injecting 1 ml or by preconcentrating 5 ml. We evaluated the performance of both methods.

  14. Optimal Design of Rotary-Type Voice Coil Motor Using Multisegmented Magnet Array for Small Form Factor Optical Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jaehwa; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2007-05-01

    For a small form factor optical disk drive (SFFODD), a high-performance actuator satisfying the requirements for small size, high speed, and low-power consumption simultaneously is required. In this paper, we propose a rotary-type voice coil motor (VCM) using a multisegmented magnet array (MSMA) for the SFFODD. The VCM is designed to move the entire system including miniaturized optical components, which are necessary in reading and writing data. To increase the actuating force of the VCM, the MSMA, a novel magnetic circuit, is adopted because it can provide a higher flux density than a conventional magnet array in the rotary-type VCM. To obtain the best performance from the VCM in the limit of actuator size, design optimization is performed. The manufactured actuator with optimally designed parameters is described and the potential performance of track seeking is evaluated and presented.

  15. What's Under the Hood: How a Disk Drive Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Sharon

    1990-01-01

    Describes step-by-step procedures for taking apart a disk drive on an Apple microcomputer for a student demonstration. Lesson preparation is discussed, the use of small groups of students is recommended, and suggestions for teaching the lesson are given. (LRW)

  16. Pulsatile blood pump with a linear drive actuator.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Kazuyoshi; Homma, Akihiko; Funakubo, Akio; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Kitamura, Soichiro; Fukui, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to develop an implantable direct-electromagnetic left ventricular assist system driven by a linear actuator (linear LVAS). The linear LVAS is a pulsatile pump with a pusher plate that is driven directly by a linear oscillatory actuator (LOA) without any movement converters. This prototype pump unit with a LOA was 100 mm in diameter, 50 mm in thickness, and weighed 740 g. The full-fill/full-eject driving method was applied to the control algorithm. In addition, a mechanism to detect and release sucking was realized to overcome this problem that accompanies the active-filling type of VAS. The performance of the linear LVAS was evaluated in a long-term animal experiment using a goat (56 kg). The goat survived for 42 days. The reason why we terminated this experiment was that thrombus was found in the pump. There was no frictional debris found around the LOA. The linear LVAS did not exhibit electrical or mechanical problems during the first animal experiment.

  17. Controller for Driving a Piezoelectric Actuator at Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, Jack; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Chang, Zensheu

    2008-01-01

    A digital control system based partly on an extremum-seeking control algorithm tracks the changing resonance frequency of a piezoelectric actuator or an electrically similar electromechanical device that is driven by a sinusoidal excitation signal and is required to be maintained at or near resonance in the presence of uncertain, changing external loads and disturbances. Somewhat more specifically, on the basis of measurements of the performance of the actuator, this system repeatedly estimates the resonance frequency and alters the excitation frequency as needed to keep it at or near the resonance frequency. In the original application for which this controller was developed, the piezoelectric actuator is part of an ultrasonic/sonic drill/corer. Going beyond this application, the underlying principles of design and operation are generally applicable to tracking changing resonance frequencies of heavily perturbed harmonic oscillators. Resonance-frequency-tracking analog electronic circuits are commercially available, but are not adequate for the present purpose for several reasons: The input/output characteristics of analog circuits tend to drift, often necessitating recalibration, especially whenever the same controller is used in driving a different resonator. In the case of an actuator in a system that has multiple modes characterized by different resonance frequencies, an analog controller can tune erroneously to one of the higher-frequency modes. The lack of programmability of analog controllers is problematic when faults occur, and is especially problematic for preventing tuning to a higher-frequency mode. In contrast, a digital controller can be programmed to restrict itself to a specified frequency range and to maintain stability even when the affected resonator is driven at high power and subjected to uncertain disturbances and variable loads. The present digital control system (see figure) is implemented by means of an algorithm that comprises three main

  18. On the Future of Head-Based Microactuators in Hard Disk Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernow, Josiah Natan

    Dual-stage actuation is an important technology enabler for advancing hard disk drive capacity and performance. This thesis describes the ongoing trend of decreasing track pitches required for areal density growth and increasing disturbances arising from rising spindle speeds, demonstrating that future dual-stage actuators will need to overcome the bandwidth limitations faced by the current suspension-based devices. First, the state of the art for dual-stage actuation is presented in the form of a literature review. This is followed by an overview of a new servo-mechanical design and analysis technique which is a hybrid of Galerkin beam elements and optimal linear quadratic Gaussian control analysis. This new technique is used to demonstrate the potential performance benefits of head-based actuation over suspension-based actuation. With the driving goal of designing a new head-based actuator, the constraints posed by industry are presented and discussed in detail. This is followed by an overview of the various actuation mechanisms evaluated, including several electrostatic and piezoelectric devices. The two most significant challenges identified through this analysis are the introduction of a gap at the trailing edge of the air-bearing and the necessity to actuate traces with sufficiently high actuation force. A quasi-shear mode piezoelectric actuator is proposed as a cost-effective head-based actuator which meets the given criteria and can be implemented at the wafer-scale. A new prototype was fabricated at the Berkeley Nanofabrication Laboratory with a measured bandwidth above 50 kHz. Since the proposed head-based actuation scheme requires a gap in the air-bearing surface, a second actuation mode is also presented. It is shown that the gap width between the slider body and read/write head can be controlled independently of track-following displacement in order to minimize pressure loss at the air-bearing surface. It is also shown that the directionality along

  19. Sensorless optimal sinusoidal brushless direct current for hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, C. S.; Bi, C.

    2009-04-01

    Initiated by the availability of digital signal processors and emergence of new applications, market demands for permanent magnet synchronous motors have been surging. As its back-emf is sinusoidal, the drive current should also be sinusoidal for reducing the torque ripple. However, in applications like hard disk drives, brushless direct current (BLDC) drive is adopted instead of sinusoidal drive for simplification. The adoption, however, comes at the expense of increased harmonics, losses, torque pulsations, and acoustics. In this paper, we propose a sensorless optimal sinusoidal BLDC drive. First and foremost, the derivation for an optimal sinusoidal drive is presented, and a power angle control scheme is proposed to achieve an optimal sinusoidal BLDC. The scheme maintains linear relationship between the motor speed and drive voltage. In an attempt to execute the sensorless drive, an innovative power angle measurement scheme is devised, which takes advantage of the freewheeling diodes and measures the power angle through the detection of diode voltage drops. The objectives as laid out will be presented and discussed in this paper, supported by derivations, simulations, and experimental results. The proposed scheme is straightforward, brings about the benefits of sensorless sinusoidal drive, negates the need for current sensors by utilizing the freewheeling diodes, and does not incur additional cost.

  20. Actuator disk theory for incompressible highly rotating flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oates, G. C.

    1971-01-01

    A solution has been obtained for a stator-rotor pair operating in an annulus with constant hub and tip radii. The stator and rotor are represented as actuator discs, and perfect fluid flow is assumed. The solutions are exact within these limitations, no linearization being required. The forms of blade loadings considered allow the introduction of large vorticity by either the rotor or stator. As a result, the rotor may be a ?nonconstant-work' row. The solutions obtained are of summational form, but many of the summations are obtained in closed form, the resultant formulas allowing rapid calculation of desired examples. An example numerical result is included.

  1. Semi-actuator disk theory for compressor choke flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micklow, J.; Jeffers, J.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical anaysis predict the unsteady aerodynamic utilizing semi actuator theory environment for a cascade of airfoils harmonically oscillating in choked flow was developed. A normal shock is located in the blade passage, its position depending on the time dependent geometry, and pressure perturbations of the system. In addition to shock dynamics, the model includes the effect of compressibility, interblade phase lag, and an unsteady flow field upstream and downstream of the cascade. Calculated unsteady aerodynamics were compared with isolated airfoil wind tunnel data, and choke flutter onset boundaries were compared with data from testing of an F100 high pressure compressor stage.

  2. Studying Wake Deflection of Wind Turbines in Yaw using Drag Disk Experiments and Actuator Disk Modeling in LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Michael; Bossuyt, Juliaan; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    Recently, there has been a push towards the optimization in the power output of entire large wind farms through the control of individual turbines, as opposed to operating each turbine in a maximum power point tracking manner. In this vane, the wake deflection by wind turbines in yawed conditions has generated considerable interest in recent years. In order to effectively study the wake deflection according to classical actuator disk momentum theory, a 3D printed drag disk model with a coefficient of thrust of approximately 0.75 - 0.85 and a diameter of 3 cm is used, studied under uniform inflow in a wind tunnel with test section of 1 m by 1.3 m, operating with a negligible inlet turbulence level at an inflow velocity of 10 m/s. Mean velocity profile measurements are performed using Pitot probes. Different yaw angles are considered, including 10, 20, and 30 degrees. We confirm earlier results that (e.g.) a 30 degree yaw angle deflects the center of the wake around 1/2 of a rotor diameter when it impinges on a downstream turbine. Detailed comparisons between the experiments and Large Eddy Simulations using actuator disk model for the wind turbines are carried out in order to help validate the CFD model. Work supported by NSF (grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project) and by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no. 306471).

  3. LES of wind farm response to transient scenarios using a high fidelity actuator disk model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, M.; Duponcheel, M.; Winckelmans, G.; Chatelain, P.

    2016-09-01

    Large eddy simulations coupled to Actuator Disks are used to investigate wake effects in wind farms. An effort is made on the wind turbine model: it uses the prevailing velocities at each point of the disk to estimate the aerodynamic loads and is improved using a tip-loss correction and realistic control schemes. This accurate and efficient tool is used to study the wind farm response in terms of flow and power production during an unsteady scenario: this work focuses on an emergency shutdown of one rotor inside a wind farm.

  4. Design and driving characteristics of a novel ‘pusher’ type piezoelectric actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a novel ‘pusher’ type piezoelectric actuator based on clamping blocks, where a solid mover can be driven at a high resolution and with a designed stroke of 4 mm. The working principle of the actuator is presented and the design process of its key component ‘stator’ is described. Via finite element simulation, the rationality of the structure of the device was analyzed. The prototype actuator was manufactured and its main performance was tested. The driving characteristics of the proposed actuator produced the following experimental results. The movement resolution was 31.5 nm, the maximum speed was 248 μm s-1 and the maximum loading capacity was 123.5 N, verifying that it could meet the needs of precise positioning with a high resolution and a large load capacity. The actuator was also found to achieve various step speeds when the driving voltage and working frequency were changed.

  5. Large-Stroke Self-Aligned Vertical Comb Drive Actuators for Adaptive Optics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, E J; Olivier, S S; Solgaard, O

    2005-10-27

    A high-stroke micro-actuator array was designed, modeled, fabricated and tested. Each pixel in the 4x4 array consists of a self-aligned vertical comb drive actuator. This micro-actuator array was designed to become the foundation of a micro-mirror array that will be used as a deformable mirror for adaptive optics applications. Analytical models combined with CoventorWare{reg_sign} simulations were used to design actuators that would move up to 10{micro}m in piston motion with 100V applied. Devices were fabricated according to this design and testing of these devices demonstrated an actuator displacement of 1.4{micro}m with 200V applied. Further investigation revealed that fabrication process inaccuracy led to significantly stiffer mechanical springs in the fabricated devices. The increased stiffness of the springs was shown to account for the reduced displacement of the actuators relative to the design.

  6. Development of an advanced actuator disk model for Large-Eddy Simulation of wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This work aims at improving the fidelity of the wind turbine modelling for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of wind farms, in order to accurately predict the loads, the production, and the wake dynamics. In those simulations, the wind turbines are accounted for through actuator disks. i.e. a body-force term acting over the regularised disk swept by the rotor. These forces are computed using the Blade Element theory to estimate the normal and tangential components (based on the local simulated flow and the blade characteristics). The local velocities are modified using the Glauert tip-loss factor in order to account for the finite number of blades; the computation of this correction is here improved thanks to a local estimation of the effective upstream velocity at every point of the disk. These advanced actuator disks are implemented in a 4th order finite difference LES solver and are compared to a classical Blade Element Momentum method and to high fidelity wake simulations performed using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method in uniform and turbulent flows.

  7. Large eddy simulation of unsteady wind farm behavior using advanced actuator disk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The present project aims at improving the level of fidelity of unsteady wind farm scale simulations through an effort on the representation and the modeling of the rotors. The chosen tool for the simulations is a Fourth Order Finite Difference code, developed at Universite catholique de Louvain; this solver implements Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approaches. The wind turbines are modeled as advanced actuator disks: these disks are coupled with the Blade Element Momentum method (BEM method) and also take into account the turbine dynamics and controller. A special effort is made here to reproduce the specific wake behaviors. Wake decay and expansion are indeed initially governed by vortex instabilities. This is an information that cannot be obtained from the BEM calculations. We thus aim at achieving this by matching the large scales of the actuator disk flow to high fidelity wake simulations produced using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method. It is obtained by adding a controlled excitation at the disk. We apply this tool to the investigation of atmospheric turbulence effects on the power production and on the wake behavior at a wind farm level. A turbulent velocity field is then used as inflow boundary condition for the simulations. We gratefully acknowledge the support of GDF Suez for the fellowship of Mrs Maud Moens.

  8. Optimization of sensing and feedback control for vibration/flutter of rotating disk by PZT actuators via air coupled pressure.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tianhong; Xu, Xinsheng; Han, Jianqiang; Lin, Rongming; Ju, Bingfeng; Li, Qing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a feedback control mechanism and its optimization for rotating disk vibration/flutter via changes of air-coupled pressure generated using piezoelectric patch actuators are studied. A thin disk rotates in an enclosure, which is equipped with a feedback control loop consisting of a micro-sensor, a signal processor, a power amplifier, and several piezoelectric (PZT) actuator patches distributed on the cover of the enclosure. The actuator patches are mounted on the inner or the outer surfaces of the enclosure to produce necessary control force required through the airflow around the disk. The control mechanism for rotating disk flutter using enclosure surfaces bonded with sensors and piezoelectric actuators is thoroughly studied through analytical simulations. The sensor output is used to determine the amount of input to the actuator for controlling the response of the disk in a closed loop configuration. The dynamic stability of the disk-enclosure system, together with the feedback control loop, is analyzed as a complex eigenvalue problem, which is solved using Galerkin's discretization procedure. The results show that the disk flutter can be reduced effectively with proper configurations of the control gain and the phase shift through the actuations of PZT patches. The effectiveness of different feedback control methods in altering system characteristics and system response has been investigated. The control capability, in terms of control gain, phase shift, and especially the physical configuration of actuator patches, are also evaluated by calculating the complex eigenvalues and the maximum displacement produced by the actuators. To achieve a optimal control performance, sizes, positions and shapes of PZT patches used need to be optimized and such optimization has been achieved through numerical simulations.

  9. Physics and Hard Disk Drives-A Career in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Steven

    2014-03-01

    I will participate in a panel discussion about ``Career Opportunities for Physicists.'' I enjoyed 27 years doing technology development and product support in the hard disk drive business. My PhD in low temperature physics was excellent training for this career since I learned how to work in a lab, analyze data, write and present technical information, and define experiments that got to the heart of a problem. An academic position did not appeal to me because I had no passion to pursue a particular topic in basic physics. My work in industry provided an unending stream of challenging problems to solve, and it was a rich and rewarding experience. I'm now employed by the APS to focus on our interactions with physicists in industry. I welcome the chance to share my industrial experience with students, post-docs, and others who are making decisions about their career path. Industrial Physics Fellow, APS Headquarters.

  10. A disk-pivot structure micro piezoelectric actuator using vibration mode B11.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiangcheng; Ma, Long; Li, Longtu

    2006-12-22

    Micro piezoelectric actuator using vibration mode B(11) (B(mn), where m is the number of nodal circles, n is the nodal diameters) is designed. Different from conventional wobble-type ultrasonic motor using piezoelectric rod or cylinder, piezoelectric disc is used to excite wobble modes and metal cylinder stator is used to amplify the transverse displacement, metal rod rotor is actuated to rotate. The outer diameter of the actuator is 14mm. There are features such as low drive voltage, micromation, and convenient control of wobble state by modifying the structure of stator, etc. Finite element analysis (FEA) of the stator has been made. It is found that the resonant frequency of vibration mode B(11) is 49.03kHz, which is measured at 45.7kHz by the laser vibrometer and impedance analyzer. The rotation speed has been measured, which could be as high as 10,071rpm under an alternating current 100V. Such piezoelectric actuator can be optimized and adjusted to fit practical conditions. It can be applied in the fields of precise instrument, bioengineering and other micro actuator system.

  11. Effects of driving mode on the performance of multiple-chamber piezoelectric pumps with multiple actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Kan, Junwu; Wang, Shuyun; Wang, Hongyun; Ma, Jijie; Jiang, Yonghua

    2015-09-01

    Due to the limited output capability of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the driving voltage is frequently increased to obtain the desired output. However, the excessive voltage application may lead to a large deformation in the piezoelectric ceramics, which could cause it to breakdown or become damaged. Therefore, increasing the number of chambers to obtain the desired output is proposed. Using a check-valve quintuple-chamber pump with quintuple piezoelectric actuators, the characteristics of the pump under different driving modes are investigated through experiments. By changing the number and connection mode of working actuators, pump performances in terms of flow rate and backpressure are tested at a voltage of 150 V with a frequency range of 60 Hz -400 Hz. Experiment results indicate that the properties of the multiple-chamber pump change significantly with distinct working chambers even though the number of pumping chambers is the same. Pump performance declines as the distance between the working actuators increases. Moreover, pump performance declines dramatically when the working piezoelectric actuator closest to the outlet is involved. The maximum backpressures of the pump with triple, quadruple, and quintuple actuators are increased by 39%, 83%, and 128%, respectively, compared with the pump with double working actuators; the corresponding maximum flow rates of the pumps are simply increased by 25.9%, 49.2%, and 67.8%, respectively. The proposed research offers practical guidance for the effective utilization of the multiple-chamber pumps under different driving modes.

  12. Structure design and driving voltage optimization of a novel giant magnetostrictive actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guangming; Zhang, Peilin; He, Zhongbo; Li, Dongwei; Cai, Canwei

    2017-01-01

    Typical giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA) cannot meet the requirement of driving a high-speed on-off valve for limitation in bias magnetic field exerted on giant magnetostrictive material. To solve this problem, a novel GMA is designed with zero bias magnetic field. Furthermore, to satisfy the requirement of the displacement direction, a “T” type transfer rod is joined to convert material’s elongating into actuator’s shortening. Simultaneously, long responding time of the actuator, especially the rising time of coil current, is also considered in this paper. The transient-state current is modeled based on the equivalent circuit considering parallel resistance of the coil, and from computed result, high opening voltage can be taken to promote responding speed of the actuator, and then an optimized driving voltage wave is presented. At last, with the help of an experimental system, the current model is verified and the driving effect of optimized voltage wave is tested and analyzed.

  13. An Evolutionary Algorithm for Feature Subset Selection in Hard Disk Drive Failure Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhasin, Harpreet

    2011-01-01

    Hard disk drives are used in everyday life to store critical data. Although they are reliable, failure of a hard disk drive can be catastrophic, especially in applications like medicine, banking, air traffic control systems, missile guidance systems, computer numerical controlled machines, and more. The use of Self-Monitoring, Analysis and…

  14. Linear Stepper Actuation Driving Drop Resonance and Modifying Hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Katariya, Mayur; Huynh, So Hung; McMorran, Darren; Lau, Chun Yat; Muradoglu, Murat; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2016-08-23

    In this work, 2 μL water drops are placed on substrates that are created to have a circular hydrophilic region bounded by superhydrophobicity so that they exhibit high contact angles. When the substrate is translated by a linear stepper actuator, the random force components present in the actuator are shown to cause the drop to rock resonantly. When the substrate is translated downward at inclination angles of up to 6° with respect to the horizontal, the contact angle hysteresis increases progressively to a limiting condition. When the substrate is moved up at inclined angles, alternatively, the contact angle hysteresis increases initially to the limiting condition before it is progressively restored to its static state. These behaviors are accounted for by the reversible micro-Cassie to Wenzel wetting state transformations that are made possible by the hierarchical microscale and nanoscale structures present in the superhydrophobic regions.

  15. Design and Simulation of an Electrothermal Actuator Based Rotational Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, Sterling; Dallas, Tim

    2008-10-01

    As a participant in the Micro and Nano Device Engineering (MANDE) Research Experience for Undergraduates program at Texas Tech University, I learned how MEMS devices operate and the limits of their operation. Using specialized AutoCAD-based design software and the ANSYS simulation program, I learned the MEMS fabrication process used at Sandia National Labs, the design limitations of this process, the abilities and drawbacks of micro devices, and finally, I redesigned a MEMS device called the Chevron Torsional Ratcheting Actuator (CTRA). Motion is achieved through electrothermal actuation. The chevron (bent-beam) actuators cause a ratcheting motion on top of a hub-less gear so that as voltage is applied the CTRA spins. The voltage applied needs to be pulsed and the frequency of the pulses determine the angular frequency of the device. The main objective was to design electromechanical structures capable of transforming the electrical signals into mechanical motion without overheating. The design was optimized using finite element analysis in ANSYS allowing multi-physics simulations of our model system.

  16. Design and fabrication of a piezoelectric instrumented suspension for hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kon, Stanley; Oldham, Kenn; Ruzicka, Ryan; Horowitz, Roberto

    2006-03-01

    As data densities in computer hard disk drives increase, airflow-induced vibration of the disk drive suspension becomes a major barrier to positioning the read-write head with sufficient precision. One component in reducing these vibrations is a dedicated sensor system for detecting vibration on the sensor arm directly, which enables high-frequency sampling and modal selectivity. In this paper, an efficient method for identifying optimal position and shape of piezoelectric strain gages on a flexible structure is presented, and applied to the steel suspension of a hard disk drive. Zinc oxide deposition processes are adapted to steel substrates, and used to fabricate miniature zinc oxide strain gages at the optimal strain gage location. Substrates with sensors installed were assembled into full disk drive suspensions and tested in a commercial disk drive.

  17. Note: A simple vibrating orifice monodisperse droplet generator using a hard drive actuator arm

    SciTech Connect

    Kosch, Sebastian E-mail: ashgriz@mie.utoronto.ca; Ashgriz, Nasser E-mail: ashgriz@mie.utoronto.ca

    2015-04-15

    We propose that the rotary voice coil actuators found in magnetic hard drives are fit to supercede loudspeakers as expedient vibration sources in the laboratory setting. A specific use case is the excitation of a liquid jet to induce controlled breakup into monodisperse droplets. Like loudspeakers, which are typically used for prototyping such devices, hard drive actuators are cheap and ubiquitous, but they are less unwieldy and supply greater amplitudes without producing noise. Frequencies between 0 and 17 kHz, and likely beyond, can be reproduced reliably. No machining tools or amplifying electronics are needed for the construction and operation of the presented droplet generator.

  18. Note: A simple vibrating orifice monodisperse droplet generator using a hard drive actuator arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, Sebastian; Ashgriz, Nasser

    2015-04-01

    We propose that the rotary voice coil actuators found in magnetic hard drives are fit to supercede loudspeakers as expedient vibration sources in the laboratory setting. A specific use case is the excitation of a liquid jet to induce controlled breakup into monodisperse droplets. Like loudspeakers, which are typically used for prototyping such devices, hard drive actuators are cheap and ubiquitous, but they are less unwieldy and supply greater amplitudes without producing noise. Frequencies between 0 and 17 kHz, and likely beyond, can be reproduced reliably. No machining tools or amplifying electronics are needed for the construction and operation of the presented droplet generator.

  19. Disposal of waste computer hard disk drive: data destruction and resources recycling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guoqing; Xue, Mianqiang; Xu, Zhenming

    2013-06-01

    An increasing quantity of discarded computers is accompanied by a sharp increase in the number of hard disk drives to be eliminated. A waste hard disk drive is a special form of waste electrical and electronic equipment because it holds large amounts of information that is closely connected with its user. Therefore, the treatment of waste hard disk drives is an urgent issue in terms of data security, environmental protection and sustainable development. In the present study the degaussing method was adopted to destroy the residual data on the waste hard disk drives and the housing of the disks was used as an example to explore the coating removal process, which is the most important pretreatment for aluminium alloy recycling. The key operation points of the degaussing determined were: (1) keep the platter plate parallel with the magnetic field direction; and (2) the enlargement of magnetic field intensity B and action time t can lead to a significant upgrade in the degaussing effect. The coating removal experiment indicated that heating the waste hard disk drives housing at a temperature of 400 °C for 24 min was the optimum condition. A novel integrated technique for the treatment of waste hard disk drives is proposed herein. This technique offers the possibility of destroying residual data, recycling the recovered resources and disposing of the disks in an environmentally friendly manner.

  20. Straining graphene with low-temperature compatible electrostatic comb-drive actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodkov, Tymofiy; Goldsche, Matthias; Reichardt, Sven; Stampfer, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    Graphene holds great promises as an active element in future nano electromechanical systems. Therefore, thorough study of electromechanical properties of this 2D material is a crucial step towards its applications in flexible electronics. We present the fabrication and characterization of silicon-based electrostatic comb-drive actuators made for integrating individual graphene sheets. The micromachined comb-drive actuators are designed such that they can induce significant mechanical forces for straining graphene allowing to systematically investigate mechanical and electromechanical properties of high-quality graphene. By using highly doped silicon the comb-drive actuators become compatible with low temperatures, i.e. cryogenic temperatures allowing for quantum electromechanical experiments. Further device functionality is introduced by a local gate that enables the tunability of the chemical potential of the graphene. This approach makes possible a detailed study of the graphene under controlled high strain allowing simultaneous and independent tuning of other external parameters, i.e temperature, charge density, magnetic field. With Raman spectroscopy we measure and characterize mono and bilayer graphene samples at room temperature under applied strains up to 1%. A detailed analysis of data allows clear separation of strain and doping. It is demonstrated that with this technique graphene sheet reproducibly experiences only strain while operating the comb-drive actuator.

  1. Speed Sensorless Induction Motor Drives for Electrical Actuators: Schemes, Trends and Tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Kankam, M. David

    1997-01-01

    For a decade, induction motor drive-based electrical actuators have been under investigation as potential replacement for the conventional hydraulic and pneumatic actuators in aircraft. Advantages of electric actuator include lower weight and size, reduced maintenance and operating costs, improved safety due to the elimination of hazardous fluids and high pressure hydraulic and pneumatic actuators, and increased efficiency. Recently, the emphasis of research on induction motor drives has been on sensorless vector control which eliminates flux and speed sensors mounted on the motor. Also, the development of effective speed and flux estimators has allowed good rotor flux-oriented (RFO) performance at all speeds except those close to zero. Sensorless control has improved the motor performance, compared to the Volts/Hertz (or constant flux) controls. This report evaluates documented schemes for speed sensorless drives, and discusses the trends and tradeoffs involved in selecting a particular scheme. These schemes combine the attributes of the direct and indirect field-oriented control (FOC) or use model adaptive reference systems (MRAS) with a speed-dependent current model for flux estimation which tracks the voltage model-based flux estimator. Many factors are important in comparing the effectiveness of a speed sensorless scheme. Among them are the wide speed range capability, motor parameter insensitivity and noise reduction. Although a number of schemes have been proposed for solving the speed estimation, zero-speed FOC with robustness against parameter variations still remains an area of research for speed sensorless control.

  2. Dry actuation testing of viscous drag micropumping systems for determination of optimal drive waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnowchik, Brian D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Sharp, Kendra V.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Horn, Mark W.; Hendrix, Jason R.

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents the dry actuation testing procedures and results for novel viscous drag micropumping systems. To overcome the limitations of previously developed mechanical pumps, we have developed pumps that are surface micromachined for efficient mass production which utilize viscous drag (dominant at low Reynolds numbers typical of microfluidics) to move fluid. The SUMMiT (www.sandia.gov/micromachine) fabricated pumps, presented first by Kilani et al., are being experimentally and computationally analyzed. In this paper we will describe the development of optimal waveforms to drive the electrostatic pumping mechanism while dry. While wet actuation will be significantly different, dry testing provides insight into how to optimally move the mechanism and differences between dry and wet actuation can be used to isolate fluid effects. Characterization began with an analysis of the driving voltage waveforms for the torsional ratcheting actuator (TRA), a micro-motor that drove the gear transmission for the pump, actuated with SAMA (Sandia"s Arbitrary waveform MEMS Actuator), a new waveform generating computer program with the ability to generate and output arbitrary voltage signals. Based upon previous research, a 50% duty cycle half-sine wave was initially selected for actuation of the TRA. However, due to the geometry of the half-sine waveform, the loaded micromotor could not transmit the motion required to pump the tested liquids. Six waveforms were then conceived, constructed, and selected for device actuation testing. Dry actuation tests included high voltage, low voltage, high frequency, and endurance/reliability testing of the TRA, gear transmission and pump assembly. In the SUMMiT process, all of the components of the system are fabricated together on one silicon chip already assembled in a monolithic microfabrication process. A 40% duty cycle quarter-sine waveform with a 20% DC at 60V has currently proved to be the most reliable, allowing for an 825Hz

  3. Dry actuation testing of viscous drag micropumping systems for determination of optimal drive waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnowchik, Brian D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Sharp, Kendra V.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Horn, Mark W.; Hendrix, Jason R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the dry actuation testing procedures and results for novel viscous drag micropumping systems. To overcome the limitations of previously developed mechanical pumps, we have developed pumps that are surface micromachined for efficient mass production which utilize viscous drag (dominant at low Reynolds numbers typical of microfluidics) to move fluid. The SUMMiT (www.sandia.gov/micromachine) fabricated pumps, presented first by Kilani et al., are being experimentally and computationally analyzed. In this paper we will describe the development of optimal waveforms to drive the electrostatic pumping mechanism while dry. While wet actuation will be significantly different, dry testing provides insight into how to optimally move the mechanism and differences between dry and wet actuation can be used to isolate fluid effects. Characterization began with an analysis of the driving voltage waveforms for the torsional ratcheting actuator (TRA), a micro-motor that drove the gear transmission for the pump, actuated with SAMA (Sandia"s Arbitrary waveform MEMS Actuator), a new waveform generating computer program with the ability to generate and output arbitrary voltage signals. Based upon previous research, a 50% duty cycle half-sine wave was initially selected for actuation of the TRA. However, due to the geometry of the half-sine waveform, the loaded micromotor could not transmit the motion required to pump the tested liquids. Six waveforms were then conceived, constructed, and selected for device actuation testing. Dry actuation tests included high voltage, low voltage, high frequency, and endurance/reliability testing of the TRA, gear transmission and pump assembly. In the SUMMiT process, all of the components of the system are fabricated together on one silicon chip already assembled in a monolithic microfabrication process. A 40% duty cycle quarter-sine waveform with a 20% DC at 60V has currently proved to be the most reliable, allowing for an 825Hz

  4. CD-ROM optics for flying height measurement in hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunstall, Glen; Jenkins, David F. L.; Clegg, Warwick W.; Li, Amei; Davey, Paul

    2001-12-01

    One of the most critical and effective parameters in increasing areal density is the flying height or spacing between the read-write head and the recording disk medium. As the flying height reduces to near contact, the head flies around 5 nm about the disk surface. To date, optical interferometry has been the major means for the characterization of this parameter. However, it is difficult to use it directly to measure the flying height on a sealed drive. To circumvent this limitation, a system based upon CD-ROM optics has been designed. The results from the system are correlated to measurements of suspension arm movement and disk flutter using poly-vinylidine-flouride (PVdF) strain sensors. A CD-ROM drive utilizes a laser with photodiodes to read data from the disk. The photo detector output responds linearly to changes in the lens-disk separation. In our system two CD-ROM heads are located within a rig that allows independent positioning in all three planes. The optics are configured to reflect off of a typical hard disk drive disk and the slider. To validate its performance a thin (110 micron) sheet of poly vinylidine flouride (PVdF) piezoelectric material is bonded to the suspension arm to measure the average induced strain. A further PVdF sensor was used to measure the edge displacement of the disk due to disk bending. The sensor used was in a cantilever configuration, with one end rigidly bonded to the drive chassis in a manner that pre-tensions the cantilever against the disk. Any movement of the disk would change the strain induced in the cantilever.

  5. Piezo-Hydraulic Actuation for Driving High Frequency Miniature Split-Stirling Pulse Tube Cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaway, I.; Grossman, G.

    2008-03-01

    In recent years piezoelectric actuation has been identified as a promising means of driving miniature Stirling devices. It supports miniaturization, has a high power to volume ratio, can operate at almost any frequency, good electrical to mechanical efficiencies, and potentially has a very long operating life. The major drawback of piezoelectric actuation, however, is the very small displacements that this physical phenomenon produces. This study shows that by employing valve-less hydraulic amplification an oscillating pressure wave can be created that is sufficiently large to drive a high frequency miniature pulse tube cryocooler (as high as 500 Hz in our experiments and perhaps higher). Beyond the direct benefits derived from using piezoelectric actuation, there are further benefits derived from using the piezo-hydraulic arrangement with membranes. Due to the incompressibility of the hydraulic fluid, the actuator may be separated from the main body of the cryocooler by relatively large distances with almost no detrimental effects, and the complete lack of rubbing parts in the power conversion processes makes this type of cryocooler extremely robust. The design and experimental device, coined the "Piezo-Hydraulic Membrane Oscillator", are presented along with some test results.

  6. Comparison of theoretical and experimental determination of the flexing of scratch drive actuator plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lijie; Brown, James G.; Uttamchandani, Deepak G.

    2002-09-01

    The scratch drive actuator (SDA) is a key element in microelectromechanical System (MEMS) technology. The actuator can be designed to travel very long distance with precise step size. Various articles describe the characteristics of scratch drive actuators.3, 6, 8 The MEMS designer needs models of SDA in order to incorporate them into their Microsystems applications. The objective of our effort is to develop models for SDA when it is in the working state. In this paper, a suspended SDA plate actuated by electrostatic force is analyzed. A mathematical model is established based on electrostatic coupled mechanical theory. Two phases have been calculated because the plate will contact the bottom surface due to the electrostatic force. One phase is named non-contact mode, and another is named contact mode. From these two models, the relationship between applied voltage and contact distance has been obtained. The geometrical model of bending plate is established to determine the relationship between contact distance and step size. Therefore we can use those two results to obtain the result of step size versus applied voltage that we expect. Finally, couple-field electro-mechanical simulation has been done by commercial software IntelliSuite. We assume that the dimension of SDA plate and bushing are fixed. All the material properties are from JDSU Cronos MUMPs. A Veeco NT1000 surface profiling tool has been used to investigate the bending of SDA plate. The results of experimental and theoretical are compared.

  7. Design and fabrication of a high-aspect-ratio parylene-based comb-drive actuator for large displacements at a low driving force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Chen-Wei; Liu, Chih-Ming

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a comb-drive actuator integrated with parylene-based flexible beams for large displacements at a low driving force. Single-crystal silicon and polysilicon are the traditional materials used for comb-drive actuators in the microeletromechanical systems industry. However, the larger Young's modulus limits the displacement at a low applied voltage. This study uses the parylene beams with the characteristic of a low modulus of the elastic comb-drive actuator as a compliant suspension to create a larger displacement (>50 µm) with smaller driving forces than that of silicon. High-aspect-ratio parylene beams can be fabricated through the deposition and removal of parylene in multiple stages on a silicon micro-trench. The proposed process uses a silicon-on-insulator wafer as the substrate to fabricate suspended silicon and parylene beams as rigid and compliant structures, respectively. The test devices of parylene- and silicon-based comb-drive actuators were fabricated with 100 pairs of comb fingers with gaps of 5 µm, and compliant beams of 15 µm in width, 2000 µm in span and 50 µm in thickness. When a driving voltage of 40 V dc was applied, the parylene-based comb-drive actuator generated a displacement of up to 55 µm, whereas the silicon-based comb-drive actuator generated a displacement of 2 µm. The parylene-based comb-drive actuator can generate about 27 times of displacement than that of silicon. This design is suitable for application in devices with large in-plane displacement and low switching speed.

  8. Design and modeling of new suspension system using direct drive servo-valve system actuated by piezostack actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chulhee; Kim, Wan Ho; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a new type of a direct-drive valve (DDV) suspension system for vehicle controlled by the piezostack actuator associated with displacement amplifier. In order to achieve this goal, a new type of controllable piezostack DDV damper is designed and its performance evaluation of damping force is undertaken. Next, a full vehicle suspension system consisting of sprung mass, spring, tire and the piezostack DDV damper is constructed. After deriving the governing equations of the motion for the proposed the piezostack DDV suspension system, the skyhook controller is implemented for the realization of the full vehicle. Analytical model of the whole suspension system is then derived and performance characteristics are analyzed through numerical simulation. Finally, vibration control responses of the vehicle suspension system such as vertical acceleration are evaluated under both bump and sine road conditions.

  9. Approach of Improving Disk Performance to High-Quality Gap Control in Near-Field Optical Disk Drive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Tsutomu; Kim, Sunmin; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Yukumoto, Tomomi; Nakaoki, Ariyoshi; Yamamoto, Masanobu

    2007-06-01

    Near-field technology has been expected as one of the promising techniques for increasing the recording density in an optical storage disk system since it was introduced. In a near-field optical disk drive system (NFDD), the gap between a disk and a solid immersion lens (SIL) is required to be less than one-tenth laser wavelength with a high accuracy in order to generate an evanescent wave for reading or writing a signal. This is because the gap performance has detrimental effects on the RF amplitude vibration in a reading channel and on the signal laser peak power vibration in a writing channel. In this study, we first clarify whether specific disk resonances cause the deterioration of the gap performance in the NFDD. We then demonstrate an approach of improving the disk mechanical performance in order to achieve a highly precise gap performance. Finally, we investigate a high-performance gap servo system by utilizing the disk substrate suitable for the NFDD.

  10. Feasibility of using PZT actuators to study the dynamic behavior of a rotating disk due to rotor-stator interaction.

    PubMed

    Presas, Alexandre; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Valentin, David; Seidel, Ulrich

    2014-07-07

    In this paper, PZT actuators are used to study the dynamic behavior of a rotating disk structure due to rotor-stator interaction excitation. The disk is studied with two different surrounding fluids-air and water. The study has been performed analytically and validated experimentally. For the theoretical analysis, the natural frequencies and the associated mode shapes of the rotating disk in air and water are obtained with the Kirchhoff-Love thin plate theory coupled with the interaction with the surrounding fluid. A model for the Rotor Stator Interaction that occurs in many rotating disk-like parts of turbomachinery such as compressors, hydraulic runners or alternators is presented. The dynamic behavior of the rotating disk due to this excitation is deduced. For the experimental analysis a test rig has been developed. It consists of a stainless steel disk (r = 198 mm and h = 8 mm) connected to a variable speed motor. Excitation and response are measured from the rotating system. For the rotating excitation four piezoelectric patches have been used. Calibrating the piezoelectric patches in amplitude and phase, different rotating excitation patterns are applied on the rotating disk in air and in water. Results show the feasibility of using PZT to control the response of the disk due to a rotor-stator interaction.

  11. Feasibility of Using PZT Actuators to Study the Dynamic Behavior of a Rotating Disk due to Rotor-Stator Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Presas, Alexandre; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Valentin, David; Seidel, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, PZT actuators are used to study the dynamic behavior of a rotating disk structure due to rotor-stator interaction excitation. The disk is studied with two different surrounding fluids—air and water. The study has been performed analytically and validated experimentally. For the theoretical analysis, the natural frequencies and the associated mode shapes of the rotating disk in air and water are obtained with the Kirchhoff-Love thin plate theory coupled with the interaction with the surrounding fluid. A model for the Rotor Stator Interaction that occurs in many rotating disk-like parts of turbomachinery such as compressors, hydraulic runners or alternators is presented. The dynamic behavior of the rotating disk due to this excitation is deduced. For the experimental analysis a test rig has been developed. It consists of a stainless steel disk (r = 198 mm and h = 8 mm) connected to a variable speed motor. Excitation and response are measured from the rotating system. For the rotating excitation four piezoelectric patches have been used. Calibrating the piezoelectric patches in amplitude and phase, different rotating excitation patterns are applied on the rotating disk in air and in water. Results show the feasibility of using PZT to control the response of the disk due to a rotor-stator interaction. PMID:25004151

  12. Electrical connections and driving electronics for piezo-actuated x-ray thin glass optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Cicero, Ugo; Sciortino, Luisa; Lullo, Giuseppe; Di Bella, Maurizio; Barbera, Marco; Collura, Alfonso; Candia, Roberto; Spiga, Daniele; Basso, Stefano; Civitani, Marta; Pelliciari, Carlo; Salmaso, Bianca

    2016-09-01

    Use of thin glass modular optics is a technology currently under study to build light, low cost, large area X-ray telescopes for high energy astrophysics space missions. The angular resolution of such telescopes is limited by local deviations from the ideal shape of the mirrors. One possible strategy to improve it consists in actively correcting the mirror profile by gluing thin ceramic piezo-electric actuators on the back of the glasses. A large number of actuators, however, requires several electrical connections to drive them with the different needed voltages. We have developed a process for depositing conductive paths directly on the back of non-planar thin foil mirrors by means of a photolithographic process, combined with metal thin film evaporation and selective removal. We have also designed and built a modular multichannel electronic driver with each module capable of driving simultaneously up to 16 actuators with a very low power consumption. Here we present our electrical interconnections technology and the solutions adopted in the implementation of the electronics.

  13. Problems Encountered During the Recertification of the GLORY Solar Array Dual Axis Gimbal Drive Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Marc; Schepis, Jospeh P.; Bruckner, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The Glory observatory is the current incarnation of the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mission spacecraft bus. The VCL spacecraft bus, having been cancelled for programmatic reasons in 2000, was nearly integrated when it was put into storage for possible future use. The Glory mission was a suitable candidate for using this spacecraft and in 2006 an effort to recertify the two axis solar array gimbal drive after its extended storage was begun. What was expected to be a simple performance validation of the two dual axis gimbal stepper motors became a serious test, diagnosis and repair task once questions arose on the flight worthiness of the hardware. A significant test program logic flow was developed which identified decisions that could be made based on the results of individual recertification tests. Without disassembling the bi-axial gimbals, beginning with stepper motor threshold voltage measurements and relating these to powered drive torque measurements, both performed at the spacecraft integrator s facility, a confusing picture of the health of the actuators came to light. Tests at the gimbal assembly level and tests of the disassembled actuators were performed by the manufacturer to validate our results and torque discrepancies were noted. Further disassembly to the component level of the actuator revealed the source of the torque loss.

  14. Modeling and Simulation of Control Actuation System with Fuzzy-PID Logic Controlled Brushless Motor Drives for Missiles Glider Applications.

    PubMed

    Muniraj, Murali; Arulmozhiyal, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    A control actuation system has been used extensively in automotive, aerospace, and defense applications. The major challenges in modeling control actuation system are rise time, maximum peak to peak overshoot, and response to nonlinear system with percentage error. This paper addresses the challenges in modeling and real time implementation of control actuation system for missiles glider applications. As an alternative fuzzy-PID controller is proposed in BLDC motor drive followed by linkage mechanism to actuate fins in missiles and gliders. The proposed system will realize better rise time and less overshoot while operating in extreme nonlinear dynamic system conditions. A mathematical model of BLDC motor is derived in state space form. The complete control actuation system is modeled in MATLAB/Simulink environment and verified by performing simulation studies. A real time prototype of the control actuation is developed with dSPACE-1104 hardware controller and a detailed analysis is carried out to confirm the viability of the proposed system.

  15. Context-Based Filtering for Assisted Brain-Actuated Wheelchair Driving

    PubMed Central

    Vanacker, Gerolf; del R. Millán, José; Lew, Eileen; Ferrez, Pierre W.; Moles, Ferran Galán; Philips, Johan; Van Brussel, Hendrik; Nuttin, Marnix

    2007-01-01

    Controlling a robotic device by using human brain signals is an interesting and challenging task. The device may be complicated to control and the nonstationary nature of the brain signals provides for a rather unstable input. With the use of intelligent processing algorithms adapted to the task at hand, however, the performance can be increased. This paper introduces a shared control system that helps the subject in driving an intelligent wheelchair with a noninvasive brain interface. The subject's steering intentions are estimated from electroencephalogram (EEG) signals and passed through to the shared control system before being sent to the wheelchair motors. Experimental results show a possibility for significant improvement in the overall driving performance when using the shared control system compared to driving without it. These results have been obtained with 2 healthy subjects during their first day of training with the brain-actuated wheelchair. PMID:18354739

  16. Driving Disk Winds and Heating Hot Coronae by MRI Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Io, Yuki; Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the formation of hot coronae and vertical outflows in accretion disks by magnetorotational turbulence. We perform local three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations with the vertical stratification by explicitly solving an energy equation with various effective ratios of specific heats, γ. Initially imposed weak vertical magnetic fields are effectively amplified by magnetorotational instability and winding caused by the differential rotation. In the isothermal case (γ = 1), the disk winds are driven mainly by the Poynting flux associated with the MHD turbulence and show quasi-periodic intermittency. In contrast, in the non-isothermal cases with γ >= 1.1, the regions above 1-2 scale heights from the midplane are effectively heated to form coronae with temperature ~50 times the initial value, which are connected to the cooler midplane region through the pressure-balanced transition regions. As a result, the disk winds are driven mainly by the gas pressure, exhibiting more time-steady nature, although the nondimensional time-averaged mass loss rates are similar to that of the isothermal case. Sound-like waves are confined in the cool midplane region in these cases, and the amplitude of the density fluctuations is larger than that of the isothermal case.

  17. Driving disk winds and heating hot coronae by MRI turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Io, Yuki; Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the formation of hot coronae and vertical outflows in accretion disks by magnetorotational turbulence. We perform local three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations with the vertical stratification by explicitly solving an energy equation with various effective ratios of specific heats, γ. Initially imposed weak vertical magnetic fields are effectively amplified by magnetorotational instability and winding caused by the differential rotation. In the isothermal case (γ = 1), the disk winds are driven mainly by the Poynting flux associated with the MHD turbulence and show quasi-periodic intermittency. In contrast, in the non-isothermal cases with γ ≥ 1.1, the regions above 1-2 scale heights from the midplane are effectively heated to form coronae with temperature ∼50 times the initial value, which are connected to the cooler midplane region through the pressure-balanced transition regions. As a result, the disk winds are driven mainly by the gas pressure, exhibiting more time-steady nature, although the nondimensional time-averaged mass loss rates are similar to that of the isothermal case. Sound-like waves are confined in the cool midplane region in these cases, and the amplitude of the density fluctuations is larger than that of the isothermal case.

  18. Practical relevance of standardized disk and drive measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerger, Scott A.

    1999-11-01

    Literally hundreds of parameters have been specified for measuring Compact Disc (CD) and Digital Video Disc (DVD) characteristics but virtually none for drive performance. For the hundreds of optical disc characteristics, there are many differing methods for measuring each one. After having chosen the 'best' methods for measuring the disc characteristics and conducting the measurements, conformance to the industry specifications (de-facto standards) must be judged. The practical relevance of the relationships between disc parameters, measurement methods, and drive performance must be understood and managed such that the value experienced by the customer is preserved.

  19. Laser processes for precise microfabrication of magnetic disk-drive components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Andrew C.

    2000-11-01

    The technique of laser micro-processing has recently found several important and widespread applications in the manufacturing of disk-drive components. Examples provided here include the cleaning of surface contaminants, the formation of nano-bumps on disk surfaces for controlled surface texturing or for making glide height standards, and the micro-bending of magnetic head sliders for flight-height controls. Short-pulsed laser irradiation at suitable wavelength, fluence, and incidence direction can be used to clean off particulate and organic-film contaminants from surfaces of critical components, for example, the slider and the disk. Controlled disk texturing is needed to alleviate the problem of stiction which occurs when the disk stop spinning and the super smooth slider comes into stationary contact with the super smooth disk. A compact laser operating at high pulse repetition rate can be used to produce a low-stiction racetrack composed of typically a million nano-bumps. This can be done both for NiP/aluminum disks, or for glass disks. Single isolated bump with a specified height for providing height-standard can also be tailor-made. Very recently, we have developed a 'laser curvature adjust technique' and implemented it into production of magnetic head sliders. Here, microscopic adjustments of the curvature of air bearing surface of sliders can be produced by suitable laser scribing at the back side of the ceramic slider.

  20. Same phase drive-type ultrasonic motors using two degenerate bending vibration modes of a disk.

    PubMed

    Takano, T; Tomikawa, Y; Kusakabe, C

    1992-01-01

    Same-phase drive-type ultrasonic motors, using two degenerate bending vibration modes of a disk, are presented. The distinctive feature of the motor is in using the standing wave modes. The motor is not driven by two input signals with different phases, but by input signals with the same phase. Therefore, only one amplifier is sufficient to drive the motor. The experimental results have proved that the motor can yield stable operational characteristics at low speed and high torque.

  1. Integrated mechanism that both removes accretion disk angular momentum and drives astrophysical jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Using concepts from laboratory experiments, Hamiltonian mechanics, Hall MHD, and weakly ionized plasmas, I propose a mechanism that simultaneously drives astrophysical jets and removes accretion disk angular momentum. The mechanism depends on the extreme stratification of ionization between the weakly ionized accretion disk and the highly ionized exterior region. In the exterior region, axisymmetric Hamiltonian mechanics constrain charged particles to move on nested poloidal flux surfaces. In contrast, fluid elements in the weakly ionized, highly collisional accretion disk behave like collisionless meta-particles with effective q / m reduced from than that of an ion by the nominal disk 10-15 - 10-8 fractional ionization; this means that the meta-particle effective cyclotron frequency ωc can be of order of the Kepler frequency ωK =(MG /r3) 1 / 2 . Meta-particles with ωc = - 2ωK have zero canonical angular momentum, experience no centrifugal force and spiral in towards the central body. Because these inward spiraling meta-particles are positive, their accumulation near the central body produces radially and axially outward electric fields. The axial outward electric field drives an out-of-plane poloidal electric current along poloidal flux surfaces in the external region. As in lab experiments, this current and its associated toroidal magnetic field drive astrophysical jets flowing normal to and away from the disk. Supported by NSF/DOE Partnership in Plasma Physics.

  2. Finite Element Analysis of the Vertical Levitation Force in an Electrostatic MEMS Comb Drive Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, J.; Blackburn, J.; Muniz-Piniella, A.; Stewart, M.; Shean, T. A. V.; Weaver, P. M.; Cain, M. G.

    2013-11-01

    A vertical levitation electrostatic comb drive actuator was manufactured for the purpose of measuring piezoelectric coefficients in small-scale materials and devices. Previous modelling work on comb drive levitation has focussed on control of the levitation in standard poly-silicon devices in order to minimize effects on lateral modes of operation required for the accelerometer and gyroscope applications. The actuator developed in this study was manufactured using a 20 μm electroplated Ni process with a 25 μm trench created beneath the released structure through chemical wet etching. A finite element analysis using ZINC was used to model electrostatic potential around a cross section of one static and one movable electrode, from which the net levitation force per unit electrode was calculated. The model was first verified using the electrode geometry from previously studied systems, and then used to study the variation of force as a function of decreasing substrate-electrode distance. With the top electrode surfaces collinear the calculated force density is 0.00651 epsilon0V2Mμm-1, equivalent to a total force for the device of 36.4 μN at an applied voltage of VM=100 V, just 16% larger than the observed value. The measured increase in force with distance was smaller than predicted with the FEA, due to the geometry of the device in which the electrodes at the anchored ends of the supporting spring structure displace by a smaller amount than those at the centre.

  3. a Study of Head-Disk Interaction Detection in the Hard-Disk Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segu, Dawit Zenebe; Khan, Polina V.; Hwang, Pyung

    2015-09-01

    The reliability and performance of precision mechanical components that experience sliding under contact depend heavily on the friction and wear characteristics at the sliding interface. In order to improve the reliability of the sliding interface, there is a need to predict, measure and monitor any physical interactions at the head-disk interface (HDI). In the present work, the basic tribological characteristics of HDI were analyzed. The HDI during start-stop and constant speed operation using acoustic emission (AE) were studied. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis of the AE signal was used to understand the interaction between the AE signal and the state of contact. In addition, we developed laser textured (LT) disk and the contact start-stop (CSS) tests were performed to investigate the effect of dimples on the stiction performance of the HDI. Furthermore, numerical analysis between the slider and disk surface pressure were performed using the boundary coordinate system and divergence formulation for the nonlinear Reynold's equation solution.

  4. An Evaluation of Personal Health Information Remnants in Second-Hand Personal Computer Disk Drives

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Emilio; Jonker, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Background The public is concerned about the privacy of their health information, especially as more of it is collected, stored, and exchanged electronically. But we do not know the extent of leakage of personal health information (PHI) from data custodians. One form of data leakage is through computer equipment that is sold, donated, lost, or stolen from health care facilities or individuals who work at these facilities. Previous studies have shown that it is possible to get sensitive personal information (PI) from second-hand disk drives. However, there have been no studies investigating the leakage of PHI in this way. Objectives The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which PHI can be obtained from second-hand computer disk drives. Methods A list of Canadian vendors selling second-hand computer equipment was constructed, and we systematically went through the shuffled list and attempted to purchase used disk drives from the vendors. Sixty functional disk drives were purchased and analyzed for data remnants containing PHI using computer forensic tools. Results It was possible to recover PI from 65% (95% CI: 52%-76%) of the drives. In total, 10% (95% CI: 5%-20%) had PHI on people other than the owner(s) of the drive, and 8% (95% CI: 7%-24%) had PHI on the owner(s) of the drive. Some of the PHI included very sensitive mental health information on a large number of people. Conclusions There is a strong need for health care data custodians to either encrypt all computers that can hold PHI on their clients or patients, including those used by employees and subcontractors in their homes, or to ensure that their computers are destroyed rather than finding a second life in the used computer market. PMID:17942386

  5. Parallel input parallel output high voltage bi-directional converters for driving dielectric electro active polymer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thummala, P.; Zhang, Z.; Andersen, M. A. E.; Rahimullah, S.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric electroactive polymer (DEAP) actuators are capacitive devices which provide mechanical motions when charged electrically. The charging characteristics of a DEAP actuator depends on its size, voltage applied to its electrodes, and its operating frequency. The main idea of this paper is to design and implement driving circuits for the DEAP actuators for their use in various applications. This paper presents implementation of parallel input, parallel output, high voltage (~2.5 kV) bi-directional DC-DC converters for driving the DEAP actuators. The topology is a bidirectional flyback DC-DC converter incorporating commercially available high voltage MOSFETs (4 kV) and high voltage diodes (5 kV). Although the average current of the aforementioned devices is limited to 300 mA and 150 mA, respectively, connecting the outputs of multiple converters in parallel can provide a scalable design. This enables operating the DEAP actuators in various static and dynamic applications e.g. positioning, vibration generation or damping, and pumps. The proposed idea is experimentally verified by connecting three high voltage converters in parallel to operate a single DEAP actuator. The experimental results with both film capacitive load and the DEAP actuator are shown for a maximum charging voltage of 2 kV.

  6. Simulation of Electrostatic Actuation in Interdigitated Comb Drive MEMS Resonator for Energy Harvester Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathya, S.; Pavithra, M.; Muruganand, S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an actuation mechanism based on the interdigitated comb drive MEMS resonator. The important role of that device is to establish MEMS resonators for the second order systems. Comb drive model is one of the basic model which uses the principle of electrostatic and force can be generated for the capacitive sensors. This work is done by overlapping movable and fixed comb fingers which produces an energy. The specific range of the polyimide material properties of young's modulus of 3.1GPa and density of 1300 Kg/m3. Results are shown in the structural domain performance of a lateral motion which corresponds to the applying voltage between the interdigitated comb fingers. It has laterally driven about 40pm with driving voltage. Also the resonance frequency 24Hz and 15Hz with high quality factors are depending on the spring length 260pm and 360pm and structure thickness of 2μm and 5 μm. Here Finite element method (FEM) is used to simulate the various physics scenario and it is designed as two dimensional structure multiphysics domain. The prototype of comb drive MEMS resonator has been suitable for energy harvesting system applications.

  7. Blank Computer Floppy Disk Formatting Using the AppleWorks Program, Apple IIe or GS Computers and a Duodisk or Two Disk Drives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This manual is a "how to" training device for formatting blank floppy disks in the AppleWorks program using an Apple IIe or Apple IIGS Computer with Duodisk or two disk drives. The manual provides step-by-step directions, and includes 11 figures depicting the computer screen at the various stages of the formatting sequence. (EW)

  8. Analog signal acquisition from computer optical disk drives for quantitative chemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Potyrailo, Radislav A; Morris, William G; Leach, Andrew M; Sivavec, Timothy M; Wisnudel, Marc B; Boyette, Scott

    2006-08-15

    Optoelectronic consumer products that are widely employed in the office and home attract attention for optical sensor applications due to (1) their cost advantage over analytical instruments produced only in small quantities, (2) robustness in operation due to the detailed manufacturability improvements, and (3) ease of operation. We demonstrate here a new approach for quantitative chemical/biochemical sensing when analog signals are acquired from conventional optical disk drives, and these signals are used for quantitative detection of optical changes of sensor films deposited on conventional CD and DVD optical disks. Because we do not alter manufacturing process of optical disks, any disk can be employed for deposition and readout of sensor films. The optical disk drives also perform their original function of reading and writing digital content to optical media because no optical modifications are introduced to obtain the analog signal. Such a sensor platform is quite universal and can be applied for chemical and biological quantitative detection, as well as for monitoring of changes of physical properties of regions deposited onto a CD or DVD (e.g., during combinatorial screening of materials). As a model example, we demonstrate the concept using chemical detection of ionic species such as Ca2+ in liquids (e.g., blood, urine, or water). Colorimetric calcium-sensitive sensor films were deposited onto a DVD, exposed to water with different concentrations of Ca2+, and quantified in the optical disk drive. The developed lab-on-DVD system demonstrated a 5 ppm detection limit of Ca2+ determinations, similar or slightly better than that achieved using a conventional fiber-optic portable spectrometer. This detection limit corresponded to a 0.023 absorbance unit resolution, as determined by the measurement of the same colorimetric films with a portable spectrometer. Determinations of Ca2+ unknowns using the lab-on-DVD system demonstrated +/-5 ppm accuracy and 2

  9. Four-plate piezoelectric actuator driving a large-diameter special optical fiber for nonlinear optical microendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Zhi; Liang, Xiaobao; Fu, Ling

    2016-08-22

    In nonlinear optical microendoscope (NOME), a fiber with excellent optical characteristics and a miniature scanning mechanism at the distal end are two key components. Double-clad fibers (DCFs) and double-clad photonic crystal fibers (DCPCFs) have shown great optical characteristics but limited vibration amplitude due to large diameter. Besides reducing the damping of fiber cantilever, optimizing the structural of the actuator for lower energy dissipation also contributes to better driving capability. This paper presented an optimized actuator for driving a particular fiber cantilever in the view point of energy. Firstly, deformation energy of a bending fiber cantilever operating in resonant mode is investigated. Secondly, strain and stress analyses revealed that the four-plate actuator achieved lower energy dissipation. Then, finite-element simulations showed that the large-diameter fiber yielded an adequate vibration amplitude driven by a four-plate actuator, which was confirmed by experiments of our home-made four-plate actuator prototypes. Additionally, a NOME based on a DCPCF with a diameter of 350 μm driven by four-plate piezoelectric actuator has been developed. The NOME can excite and collect intrinsic second-harmonic and two-photon fluorescence signals with the excitation power of 10-30 mW and an adequate field of view of 200 μm, which suggest great potential applications in neuroscience and clinical diagnoses.

  10. Smart-power integrated circuits to drive piezoelectric actuators for a cm3 microrobot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig-Vidal, Manel; Lopez-Sanchez, J.; Miribel-Catala, P.; Montane, Enric; Bota, Sebastian A.; Samitier, Josep; Simu, Urban; Johansson, Stefan A. I.

    2001-08-01

    Today, the use of robots for self acting tasks in applications ranging from biology and medicine to microsystems technology demand miniaturized dimensions and high-precision handling techniques. A lot of these tasks have been carried out by humans, but the manual capabilities are restricted to certain tolerances. Transport and manipulation of biological cells or assembly of micromechanical parts are the best suited applications for microrobots with sizes about cm3. Low cost and high-resolution actuators are critical performances which determine to choose piezoceramic materials as more suitable for micropositioning and micromanipulation units of a cm3 microrobot. Smart Piezoactuator Unit (SPUs) as a basic element of a new generation of cm3 microrobots have been developped. The main characteristic of this proposed Smart Piezoactuator Unit system is the integration of driving circuitry with the piezoelectric actuators and to include a serial communication interface to minimize the number of power and command wires. Micropositioning and micromanipulation units are developed combining properly 6 Smart Piezoactuator Units each one. A BCD technology (Bipolar, CMOS, DMOS) is used to design high voltage smart power integrated circuit for these Smart Piezoactuator Units. Using this technology we integrate in the same chip 4 power drivers with its control and protection circuitry.

  11. An Approach to the Prototyping of an Optimized Limited Stroke Actuator to Drive a Low Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation Valve

    PubMed Central

    Gutfrind, Christophe; Dufour, Laurent; Liebart, Vincent; Vannier, Jean-Claude; Vidal, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a limited stroke actuator and the corresponding prototype to drive a Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve for use in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). The direct drive actuator topology is an axial flux machine with two air gaps in order to minimize the rotor inertia and a bipolar surface-mounted permanent magnet in order to respect an 80° angular stroke. Firstly, the actuator will be described and optimized under constraints of a 150 ms time response, a 0.363 N·m minimal torque on an angular range from 0° to 80° and prototyping constraints. Secondly, the finite element method (FEM) using the FLUX-3D® software (CEDRAT, Meylan, France) will be used to check the actuator performances with consideration of the nonlinear effect of the iron material. Thirdly, a prototype will be made and characterized to compare its measurement results with the analytical model and the FEM model results. With these electromechanical behavior measurements, a numerical model is created with Simulink® in order to simulate an EGR system with this direct drive actuator under all operating conditions. Last but not least, the energy consumption of this machine will be estimated to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed EGR electromechanical system. PMID:27213398

  12. An Approach to the Prototyping of an Optimized Limited Stroke Actuator to Drive a Low Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation Valve.

    PubMed

    Gutfrind, Christophe; Dufour, Laurent; Liebart, Vincent; Vannier, Jean-Claude; Vidal, Pierre

    2016-05-20

    The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a limited stroke actuator and the corresponding prototype to drive a Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve for use in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). The direct drive actuator topology is an axial flux machine with two air gaps in order to minimize the rotor inertia and a bipolar surface-mounted permanent magnet in order to respect an 80° angular stroke. Firstly, the actuator will be described and optimized under constraints of a 150 ms time response, a 0.363 N·m minimal torque on an angular range from 0° to 80° and prototyping constraints. Secondly, the finite element method (FEM) using the FLUX-3D(®) software (CEDRAT, Meylan, France) will be used to check the actuator performances with consideration of the nonlinear effect of the iron material. Thirdly, a prototype will be made and characterized to compare its measurement results with the analytical model and the FEM model results. With these electromechanical behavior measurements, a numerical model is created with Simulink(®) in order to simulate an EGR system with this direct drive actuator under all operating conditions. Last but not least, the energy consumption of this machine will be estimated to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed EGR electromechanical system.

  13. On the driving force for crack growth during thermal actuation of shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxevanis, T.; Parrinello, A. F.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of thermomechanically induced phase transformation on the driving force for crack growth in polycrystalline shape memory alloys is analyzed in an infinite center-cracked plate subjected to a thermal actuation cycle under mechanical load in plain strain. Finite element calculations are carried out to determine the mechanical fields near the static crack and the crack-tip energy release rate using the virtual crack closure technique. A substantial increase of the energy release rate - an order of magnitude for some material systems - is observed during the thermal cycle due to the stress redistribution induced by large scale phase transformation. Thus, phase transformation occurring due to thermal variations under mechanical load may result in crack growth if the crack-tip energy release rate reaches a material specific critical value.

  14. Effect of driving frequency on actuation characteristics of ionic polymer-metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Yang, Y. W.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, the effect of driving frequency on the actuation characteristics of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) is studied. The charge motion within the polyelectrolyte membrane under a dynamic electric potential is first formulated and investigated. Subsequently, the dynamic ion-ion interactions within the polyelectrolyte membrane clusters are studied. By analyzing the volumetric changes of the membrane clusters due to the electric field induced stresses and the elastic stresses in the backbones of the membrane, the bending moment expression due to the applied electric potential is obtained. By using this bending moment expression, the vibrations of an IPMC cantilevered beam subjected to electric potentials of different frequencies are calculated. The characteristics of the IPMCs behavior are discussed with comparison with experimental results.

  15. An integrated plant/control design method and application in hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tingting; Du, Chunling; Sun, Weijie; Xie, Lihua

    2016-02-01

    One approach in servo control to achieve a high track density in hard disk drives is to minimise the H2 norm from disturbances to position error signal. The H2 performance optimisation is then deemed as a matter of great significance. This paper presents an integrated design method involving plant modification and controller design sequentially to achieve the H2 performance requirement. A linear matrix inequality-based approach is developed for the plant damping ratio modification using the plant output. The proposed model modification method is then applied to the voice coil motor plant in hard disk drives, followed by the optimal H2 controller design using the Riccati equation method with the modified plant. It turns out that the modified plant leads to better H2 performance, stability margins than the original plant.

  16. Design, analysis and experimental performance of a stepping type piezoelectric linear actuator based on compliant foot driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shupeng; Rong, Weibin; Wang, Lefeng; Sun, Lining

    2016-11-01

    A stepping type piezoelectric linear actuator based on compliant foot driving is proposed in this paper. With the help of four piezo-stacks and four compliant feet, the designed actuator can produce large range linear motions in both positive and negative directions with high accuracy. The mechanical structure and the operating principle are discussed. Mohr integration method is used to analyze the deformation of the key component compliant foot. To investigate the working performance, a prototype is fabricated and a series of experiments are carried out. The experimental results indicate that the displacement outputs under various driving voltages and various driving frequencies show good linear relationships with the time. The driving resolution and the maximum output force are 10.98 nm and 43 N, respectively. The displacements deviation between the forward and backward motions within 30 steps is 6.82 μm and the amplitude of the parasitic motions is about 0.638 μm. The experimental results also confirm that the designed actuator can achieve various speeds by changing the driving voltage and driving frequency.

  17. Thermal/structural analysis of the shaft-disk region of a fan drive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Peyton B.; Holland, Anne D.

    1990-01-01

    In January 1989, a mishap occurred in the National Transonic Facility wind tunnel at NASA-Langley. It is believed that the failure of an insulation retainer holding foam insulation around the exterior of the fan drive shaft resulted in the subsequent damage to other components in the tunnel. The effect was determined of removing the external thermal insulation on the shaft would have on the stresses on the shaft, disk and bolts holding the two together. To accomplish this, a detailed thermal/structural finite element analysis of the shaft-disk interface was performed. The maximum stresses on the three components were determined for several configurations and conditions with and without the external thermal insulation, and then these results were compared to the original analyses to access the effect of removing the external thermal insulation on the proposed future operation of the shaft/disk structures of the fan drive system. Although the stresses were higher without the external insulation, the stresses did meet all stress criteria. In addition, all stresses were within the infinite life regime of the Modified Goodman diagram. Therefore, it was determined that the structural integrity of the shaft-disk region is not compromised if the external insulation is removed.

  18. Hard Disk/Solid State Drive Synergy in Support of Data-Intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Ke; Jiang, Song; Davis, Kei

    2012-07-19

    Data-intensive applications are becoming increasingly common in high-performance computing. Examples include combustion simulation, human genome analysis, and satellite image processing. Efficient access of data sets is critical to the performance of these applications. Because of the size of the data today's economically feasible approach is to store the data files on an array of hard disks or data servers equipped with hard disks and managed by a parallel file system such as PVFS or Lustre wherein the data is striped over a (large) number of disks for high aggregate I/O throughout. With file striping, a request for a segment of logically contiguous file space is decomposed into multiple sub-requests, each to a different server. While the data unit for this striping is usually reasonably large to benefit disk efficiency, the first and/or last sub-requests can be much smaller than the striping unit if the request does not align with the striping pattern, severely compromising hard disk efficiency and thus application performance. We propose to exploit solid state drives (SSD), whose efficiency is much less sensitive to small random accesses, to enable the alignment of requests to disk with the data striping pattern. In this scheme hard disks mainly serve large, aligned, sequential requests, with SSDs serving small or unaligned requests, thus respecting the relative cost, performance, and durability characteristics of the two media, and thereby achieving synergy in performance/cost. We will describe the design of the proposed scheme, its implementation on CCS-7's Darwin cluster, and performance results.

  19. Detailed study of scratch drive actuator characteristics using high-speed imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lijie; Brown, James G.; Uttamchandani, Deepak G.

    2001-10-01

    Microactuators are one of the key components in MEMS and Microsystems technology, and various designs have been realized through different fabrication processes. One type of microactuator commonly used is the scratch drive actuator (SDA) that is frequently fabricated by surface micromachining processes. An experimental investigation has been conducted on the characteristics of SDAs fabricated using the Cronos Microsystems MUMPs process. The motivation is to compare the response of SDAs located on the same die, and SDAs located on the different dies from the same fabrication batch. A high-speed imaging camera has been used to precisely determine important SDA characteristics such as step size, velocity, maximum velocity, and acceleration over long travel distance. These measurements are important from a repeatability point of view, and in order to fully exploit the potential of the SDA as a precise positioning mechanism. 2- and 3-stage SDAs have been designed and fabricated for these experiments. Typical step sizes varying from 7 nm at a driving voltage of 60 V to 23 nm at 290 V have been obtained.

  20. Modeling and Simulation of Control Actuation System with Fuzzy-PID Logic Controlled Brushless Motor Drives for Missiles Glider Applications

    PubMed Central

    Muniraj, Murali; Arulmozhiyal, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    A control actuation system has been used extensively in automotive, aerospace, and defense applications. The major challenges in modeling control actuation system are rise time, maximum peak to peak overshoot, and response to nonlinear system with percentage error. This paper addresses the challenges in modeling and real time implementation of control actuation system for missiles glider applications. As an alternative fuzzy-PID controller is proposed in BLDC motor drive followed by linkage mechanism to actuate fins in missiles and gliders. The proposed system will realize better rise time and less overshoot while operating in extreme nonlinear dynamic system conditions. A mathematical model of BLDC motor is derived in state space form. The complete control actuation system is modeled in MATLAB/Simulink environment and verified by performing simulation studies. A real time prototype of the control actuation is developed with dSPACE-1104 hardware controller and a detailed analysis is carried out to confirm the viability of the proposed system. PMID:26613102

  1. Improvement of System Performance of the Optical Disc Drive Adopting Ferrofluidic Damper for Pick-up Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Byung Youn; Jang, Dae Jong; Lee, Young Bin; Lee, Junghoon

    2007-06-01

    Mechanical resonance of optical pick-up actuators can cause errors in reading information from high-speed optical discs. Ferrofluid on the surface of magnets is retained in a magnetic field and its viscosity provides the desired mechanical damping to a moving mass. A ferrofluidic damper that is controlled by saturation magnetization for an optical pick-up actuator not only improves system performance such as settling time and access time of a drive on warped or eccentric discs but also remarkably delays temperature increase due to the induction of overcurrent on the coils.

  2. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE): Hamilton Standard cam/harmonic drive variable pitch fan actuation system detail design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A variable pitch fan actuation system was designed which incorporates a remote nacelle-mounted blade angle regulator. The regulator drives a rotating fan-mounted mechanical actuator through a flexible shaft and differential gear train. The actuator incorporates a high ratio harmonic drive attached to a multitrack spherical cam which changes blade pitch through individual cam follower arms attached to each blade trunnion. Detail design parameters of the actuation system are presented. These include the following: design philosophies, operating limits, mechanical, hydraulic and thermal characteristics, mechanical efficiencies, materials, weights, lubrication, stress analyses, reliability and failure analyses.

  3. Theory and practice of ubiquitous quantitative chemical analysis using conventional computer optical disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Morris, William G.; Leach, Andrew M.; Hassib, Lamyaa; Krishnan, Kasiraman; Surman, Cheryl; Wroczynski, Ronald; Boyette, Scott; Xiao, Caibin; Shrikhande, Prashant; Agree, Alan; Cecconie, Ted

    2007-10-01

    We demonstrate a new attractive approach for ubiquitous quantitative chemical or biological sensing when analog signals are acquired from conventional optical disk drives, and these signals are used for quantitative detection of optical changes of sensing films deposited on conventional CD and DVD optical disks. Our developed analytical model of the operation of this Lab-on-DVD system describes the optical response of sensing films deposited onto the read surface of optical disks by taking into account the practical aspects of system performance that include possible reagent leaching effects, water sampling (delivering) efficiency, and possible changes of the film morphology after water removal. By applying a screen-printing process, we demonstrated a laboratory-scale automated production of sensing films with an average thickness of ˜10 μm and a thickness relative standard deviation of <3% across multiple films. Finally, we developed a system for delivery of water-sample volumes to sensing films on the disk that utilized a multifunctional jewel case assembly.

  4. Optimality based repetitive controller design for track-following servo system of optical disk drives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wentao; Zhang, Weidong

    2009-10-01

    In an optical disk drive servo system, to attenuate the external periodic disturbances induced by inevitable disk eccentricity, repetitive control has been used successfully. The performance of a repetitive controller greatly depends on the bandwidth of the low-pass filter included in the repetitive controller. However, owing to the plant uncertainty and system stability, it is difficult to maximize the bandwidth of the low-pass filter. In this paper, we propose an optimality based repetitive controller design method for the track-following servo system with norm-bounded uncertainties. By embedding a lead compensator in the repetitive controller, both the system gain at periodic signal's harmonics and the bandwidth of the low-pass filter are greatly increased. The optimal values of the repetitive controller's parameters are obtained by solving two optimization problems. Simulation and experimental results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. A novel driving principle by means of the parasitic motion of the microgripper and its preliminary application in the design of the linear actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hu; Zhao, Hongwei; Yang, Zhaojun; Mi, Jie; Fan, Zunqiang; Wan, Shunguang; Shi, Chengli; Ma, Zhichao

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a novel driving principle by means of the parasitic motion of the microgripper. Actuators based on this principle can realize the large displacement range and high speed easily. Also the structure can be simple. A parasitic motion principle linear actuator mainly consisting of two piezoelectric stacks, two microgrippers and a mover was designed. Experimental results indicate that at a low driving frequency of 5 Hz, large velocity over 40 μm/s is obtained with the driving voltage of 100 V. Backward motion was observed and analyzed. Experimental results verify the feasibility of the new principle and it can be used to design new linear or rotary actuators.

  6. Dynamics of a pneumatic artificial muscle actuation system driving a trailing edge flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Benjamin K. S.; Kothera, Curt S.; Wang, Gang; Wereley, Norman M.

    2014-09-01

    This study presents a time domain dynamic model of an antagonistic pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) driven trailing edge flap (TEF) system for next generation active helicopter rotors. Active rotor concepts are currently being widely researched in the rotorcraft community as a means to provide a significant leap forward in performance through primary aircraft control, vibration mitigation and noise reduction. Recent work has shown PAMs to be a promising candidate for active rotor actuation due to their combination of high force, large stroke, light weight, and suitable bandwidth. When arranged into biologically inspired agonist/antagonist muscle pairs they can produce bidirectional torques for effectively driving a TEF. However, there are no analytical dynamic models in the literature that can accurately capture the behavior of such systems across the broad range of frequencies required for this demanding application. This work combines mechanical, pneumatic, and aerodynamic component models into a global flap system model developed for the Bell 407 rotor system. This model can accurately predict pressure, force, and flap angle response to pneumatic control valve inputs over a range of operating frequencies from 7 to 35 Hz (1/rev to 5/rev for the Bell 407) and operating pressures from 30 to 90 psi.

  7. Wind from the black-hole accretion disk driving a molecular outflow in an active galaxy.

    PubMed

    Tombesi, F; Meléndez, M; Veilleux, S; Reeves, J N; González-Alfonso, E; Reynolds, C S

    2015-03-26

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei are often thought to affect the evolution of both supermassive black holes and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the close relationship between black holes and galaxies. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultraluminous infrared galaxies support this quasar-feedback idea, because they directly trace the gas from which stars form. Theoretical models suggest that these outflows originate as energy-conserving flows driven by fast accretion-disk winds. Proposed connections between large-scale molecular outflows and accretion-disk activity in ultraluminous galaxies were incomplete because no accretion-disk wind had been detected. Conversely, studies of powerful accretion-disk winds have until now focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyfert galaxies and a few higher-redshift quasars. Here we report observations of a powerful accretion-disk wind with a mildly relativistic velocity (a quarter that of light) in the X-ray spectrum of IRAS F11119+3257, a nearby (redshift 0.189) optically classified type 1 ultraluminous infrared galaxy hosting a powerful molecular outflow. The active galactic nucleus is responsible for about 80 per cent of the emission, with a quasar-like luminosity of 1.5 × 10(46) ergs per second. The energetics of these two types of wide-angle outflows is consistent with the energy-conserving mechanism that is the basis of the quasar feedback in active galactic nuclei that lack powerful radio jets (such jets are an alternative way to drive molecular outflows).

  8. How does the presence of a body affect the performance of an actuator disk ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, G.; Pereira, R. B.; Ragni, D.; Avallone, F.; van Bussel, G.

    2016-09-01

    The article seeks to unify the treatment of conservative force interactions between axi-symmetric bodies and actuators in inviscid flow. Applications include the study of hub interference, diffuser augmented wind turbines and boundary layer ingestion propeller configurations. The conservation equations are integrated over infinitesimal streamtubes to obtain an exact momentum model contemplating the interaction between an actuator and a nearby body. No assumptions on the shape or topology of the body are made besides (axi)symmetry. Laws are derived for the thrust coefficient, power coefficient and propulsive efficiency. The proposed methodology is articulated with previous efforts and validated against the numerical predictions of a planar vorticity equation solver. Very good agreement is obtained between the analytical and numerical methods.

  9. A novel smooth impact drive mechanism actuation method with dual-slider for a compact zoom lens system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghyun; Kwon, Won Sik; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a novel actuation method for a smooth impact drive mechanism that positions dual-slider by a single piezo-element is introduced and applied to a compact zoom lens system. A mode chart that determines the state of the slider at the expansion or shrinkage periods of the piezo-element is presented, and the design guide of a driving input profile is proposed. The motion of dual-slider holding lenses is analyzed at each mode, and proper modes for zoom functions are selected for the purpose of positioning two lenses. Because the proposed actuation method allows independent movement of two lenses by a single piezo-element, the zoom lens system can be designed to be compact. For a feasibility test, a lens system composed of an afocal zoom system and a focusing lens was developed, and the passive auto-focus method was implemented.

  10. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, O. Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.

    2015-03-15

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  11. Hard disk drive based microsecond X-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Müller, O; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D; Frahm, R

    2015-03-01

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  12. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, O.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.

    2015-03-01

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  13. Dynamics analysis of constrained layer damping treated covers for hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanning; Xu, Yanchu

    2002-06-01

    A finite element model is developed to study the dynamics properties, vibration, shock and acoustics performance of constrained layer damping treated covers for hard disk drives (HDD). The ever-increasing storage density of HDD requires smaller vibration level of HDD components, especially the storage disks inside. In the mean time, tighter vibration, shock and acoustics specifications are required by customers. In practice, it is found that the vibration of the storage disks and the shock/vibration and acoustics performance of HDD are closely related to the properties of the HDD covers. The existence of viscoelastic materials (VEM) inside the HDD covers makes them hard to analyze and the complex modulus provided by VEM manufactures can only be utilized in frequency domain. In this paper, the VEM properties are fitted with GHM (Golla, Hughes and McTavish) parameters so that a complex eigenvalue analysis can be performed to extract modal frequencies and damping of the cover. Parametric study is conducted to understand how some essential design parameters affect the dynamics properties of the cover. Vibration/shock and acoustics responses of the cover are also simulated to provide insights for HDD cover design.

  14. Neodymium as the main feature of permanent magnets from hard disk drives (HDDs).

    PubMed

    München, Daniel Dotto; Veit, Hugo Marcelo

    2017-03-01

    As a way to manage neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets wasted in end-of-life hard disk drives (HDDs), a waste characterization is needed prior to a recycling process. Due to their magnetic properties, NdFeB magnets are essential in technological applications nowadays, thus causing an increase in the industrial demand for rare earth metals. However, these metals have a short supply, since they are difficult to obtain from ores, creating a critical market. In this work, a study of the characterization of sintered neodymium-iron-boron magnets was undertaken by qualitatively and quantitatively uncovering the neodymium recovery potential from this type of electronic waste. From the collection and disassembly of hard disk drives, in which the magnet represents less than 3% of the total weight, an efficient demagnetization process was proceeded at 320°C. Then, the magnet was ground and screened for an X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, which showed the Nd2Fe14B tetragonal phase as the dominant constituent of the sample. An analysis was also carried out in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), where the magnet composition showed 21.5wt% of neodymium and 65.1wt% of iron, among other chemicals. This Nd content is higher than the one found in Nd ores, enhancing the recyclability and the importance of waste management.

  15. Analysis, design, and testing of a low cost, direct force command linear proof mass actuator for structural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.; Shelley, Stuart; Jacobson, Mark

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the design, analysis, and test of a low cost, linear proof mass actuator for vibration control is presented. The actuator is based on a linear induction coil from a large computer disk drive. Such disk drives are readily available and provide the linear actuator, current feedback amplifier, and power supply for a highly effective, yet inexpensive, experimental laboratory actuator. The device is implemented as a force command input system, and the performance is virtually the same as other, more sophisticated, linear proof mass systems.

  16. Study on the parallel servo-control system of a multi-pickup and multi-disk drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Benyong; Qi, Guosheng; Li, Dacheng

    2003-04-01

    We propose a novel multi-pickup and multi-disk drive, in which multiple optical disks are mounted on a spindle at a equal spacing and multiple optical pickups, whose quantity is equal to that of the data surfaces of the optical disks, simultaneously read or write data in parallel. The key part of the drive is its servo-control system, which controls these optical pickups in parallel to implement the focusing servo-control and the tracking servo-control of each optical pickup in real-time in order to ensure the correct data read or write. The drive is important solution to offer super-large-capacity and quick-data-access information storage.

  17. Quadrature mechatronic actuator (QMA) drives for heavy ship doors and machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Gareth J.; Bird, Ross W.; Goehrig, Michael J.; Knoll, William C.; Hoffman, Heath; Park, Jaedo

    2004-07-01

    An important part of the Navy objectives is to be both more efficient and enable manpower reduction is to reduce maintenance, reduce manpower, and eliminate pollutants through creating a more all-electric ship environment. However, placement of both non-centralized and centralized hydraulic systems for control of heavy machinery, large bay doors, articulated systems such as rudders for controlling air flow to the skirt system (such as in Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC) is extremely challenging. At the base of the design approach to a Mechatronic Motion System is the fact that such applications do not require high precision. What is required is that the actuator delivers sufficient thrust power without increasing the existing actuator weight and be a self-contained unit. To address this need, QorTek and PSU have been developing a new concept of an entirely new kind of motion system actuator that has few parts, enormous thrust capability for its compact size, and is amenable to affordable manufacture. The new Quadrature Mechatronic Actuator (QMA) is a hydraulic replacement that will match hydraulic force-displacement capabilities in a fully solid-state design. Quadrature Mechatronic Actuators will look very similar to the existing hydraulic actuators currently used on LCAC. These compact self-contained units represent a one-for-one substitute for existing equipment. The Mechatronic Actuator itself will be lighter and slightly smaller than its hydraulic actuator equivalent and use one or more internal hybrid solid-state drivers that are internally coupled to a linear translator.

  18. Recycling potential of neodymium: the case of computer hard disk drives.

    PubMed

    Sprecher, Benjamin; Kleijn, Rene; Kramer, Gert Jan

    2014-08-19

    Neodymium, one of the more critically scarce rare earth metals, is often used in sustainable technologies. In this study, we investigate the potential contribution of neodymium recycling to reducing scarcity in supply, with a case study on computer hard disk drives (HDDs). We first review the literature on neodymium production and recycling potential. From this review, we find that recycling of computer HDDs is currently the most feasible pathway toward large-scale recycling of neodymium, even though HDDs do not represent the largest application of neodymium. We then use a combination of dynamic modeling and empirical experiments to conclude that within the application of NdFeB magnets for HDDs, the potential for loop-closing is significant: up to 57% in 2017. However, compared to the total NdFeB production capacity, the recovery potential from HDDs is relatively small (in the 1-3% range). The distributed nature of neodymium poses a significant challenge for recycling of neodymium.

  19. High-density ferroelectric recording using a hard disk drive-type data storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Tomonori; Hiranaga, Yoshiomi; Cho, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric probe data storage has been proposed as a novel data storage method in which bits are recorded based on the polarization directions of individual domains. These bits are subsequently read by scanning nonlinear dielectric microscopy. The domain walls of typical ferroelectric materials are quite thin: often only several times the lattice constant, which is advantageous for high-density data storage. In this work, high-density read/write (R/W) demonstrations were conducted using a hard disk drive-type test system, and the writing of bit arrays with a recording density of 3.4 Tbit/in.2 was achieved. Additionally, a series of writing and reading operations was successfully demonstrated at a density of 1 Tbit/in.2. Favorable characteristics of ferroelectric recording media for use with the proposed method are discussed in the latter part of this paper.

  20. Laser micro-bending for precise micro-fabrication of magnetic disk drive components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Naohisa

    2003-11-01

    Laser Micro-Bending technology attracts attention as one of the laser processing technology promising from now on. It has the feature that does not contact and does not have the spring back that fabrication in high accuracy can be performed. In our company, Laser Micro-Bending technology development is tackled about ten years before, and the laser bending fabrication technology of a sheet metal and ceramic material has so far been established. It has utilized as rapid prototyping of the sheet metal. But, by re-examination of laser oscillation control etc., it finds out that it is the excellent processing method for manufacture of the high precision mechanism parts for magnetic disk drives. This report explains the technology and machines of the roll and pitch adjustment of a magnetic head suspension, and flatting or crowning of the air bearing surface of a magnetic head slider by using Laser Micro-Bending technology.

  1. High Performance Piezoelectric Actuated Gimbal (HIERAX)

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Tschaggeny; Warren Jones; Eberhard Bamberg

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a 3-axis gimbal whose three rotational axes are actuated by a novel drive system: linear piezoelectric motors whose linear output is converted to rotation by using drive disks. Advantages of this technology are: fast response, high accelerations, dither-free actuation and backlash-free positioning. The gimbal was developed to house a laser range finder for the purpose of tracking and guiding unmanned aerial vehicles during landing maneuvers. The tilt axis was built and the test results indicate excellent performance that meets design specifications.

  2. Nano-optomechanical characterization of surface-plasmon-based tunable filter integrated with comb-drive actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, H.; Mitsudome, M.; Ishida, M.; Sawada, K.; Takahashi, K.

    2017-03-01

    We report a tunable plasmonic color filter consisting of a metamaterial periodic grating and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator. An aluminum subwavelength grating is integrated with electrostatic comb-drive actuators to expand the metal subwavelength period, which allows continuous control of the excitation wavelength of surface plasmons (SPs). We develop a batch fabrication process by employing a liftoff technique using an electron beam resist altered by the electron dose depending on different aspect ratios (length/width) for various components such as the subwavelength grating, nanohinge flexural suspensions, and comb fingers. We successfully demonstrate a continuous shift in the excitation wavelength over the 514–635 nm range by nanopitch expansion. The design margin of the grating period for SP excitation is evaluated by comparing the experimental pitch variation and theoretically calculated values. The resonance frequency of the tunable filter is optically measured to be approximately 10 kHz. The optically and mechanically obtained values agree well with the theory of electrostatic actuation and finite-difference time-domain simulation.

  3. Developing Simple Budgets Using the AppleWorks Spreadsheet Subprogram, Apple IIe or GS Computers, and a Single Disk Drive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This manual is a "how to" training device for developing spreadsheet files in the AppleWorks program using an Apple IIe or Apple IIGS Computer with a single disk drive. The manual provides step-by-step directions, and includes 36 figures depicting the computer screen at the various stages of the spreadsheet development sequence. (EW)

  4. Investigation on driving characteristics of a piezoelectric stick–slip actuator based on resonant/off-resonant hybrid excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tinghai; Li, Hengyu; He, Meng; Zhao, Hongwei; Lu, Xiaohui; Gao, Haibo

    2017-03-01

    A resonant/off-resonant hybrid excitation of a piezoelectric stick–slip actuator is proposed in this paper. It is accomplished by a resonant sinusoidal friction regulation wave (RSFR-wave) and an off-resonant saw-tooth wave (ORST-wave). The RSFR-wave is applied to the rapid deformation stage of the ORST-wave. In this stage, the first-order longitudinal vibration mode of the stator can be obtained. By this longitudinal vibration mode, the kinetic friction between the slider and frictional rod is obviously decreased utilizing ultrasonic friction reduction. The backward displacement is remarkably restrained. The high velocity, large mass of load and smooth displacement are achieved. The operation principle of hybrid excitation was discussed in detail, and a prototype was simulated, designed, and fabricated. A series of experiments were carried out and the results indicate that the step efficiency under the saw-tooth excitation and resonant/off-resonant hybrid excitation can realize 36.9% and 91.2%, respectively. The output velocity is increased by 147.23% relative to saw-tooth excitation. The minimum input power and the minimum driving voltage are decreased by 89.56% and 58.33%, respectively. Besides, the maximum mass of load capacity is 2.88 times that of saw-tooth excitation. The driving capacity of the actuator is increased by 466.13%.

  5. Vibro-Acoustic Analysis of Computer Disk Drive Components with Emphasis on Electro-Mechanical Noise Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Ran

    Vibro-acoustic characteristics of compact electro -mechanical devices are not well understood. This study examines fundamental research issues in this area through the example case of a 3.5" personal computer hard disk drive. In particular, a narrow band mathematical model of the drive has been developed to predict prominent pure tones over the high frequency range (1-6.5 KHz). Through detailed analytical studies, it has been found that the motor torque pulsation of the brushless d.c. motor is the source for this noise problem. Accordingly, a simplified disk drive model consisting of motor driving a single disk is used to investigate key components, with emphasis on the development of new mathematical models to describe the source, path and radiator characteristics. Two different mathematical models have been developed for brushless d.c. motor to predict the torque spectrum associated with invertor switching logic, pulse width modulation control scheme, eccentricity, and magnetic saturation. Frequency contents of predicted variables are identified and matched with measured sound data. Additionally, the Galerkin's method (or modified harmonic balance) is also employed successfully to develop an efficient computational scheme which predicts the Fourier coefficients of torque pulsations directly including various effects associated with inductance harmonics and the fluctuation of rotor angular velocity. For the radiator (annular disk), modal base formulations of sound radiation have been developed by approximating disk eigen-functions. Specifically, the effects of modal coupling and source rotation on radiated sound are investigated. Analytical predictions match well with numerical results obtained by using a boundary element program. New mobility transfer functions (path) are derived to couple the source and radiator formulations in order to construct an overall vibro-acoustic model. Potential areas of further research including experimental validation are discussed.

  6. A micro-drive hearing aid: a novel non-invasive hearing prosthesis actuator.

    PubMed

    Paulick, Peyton Elizabeth; Merlo, Mark W; Mahboubi, Hossein; Djalilian, Hamid R; Bachman, Mark

    2014-12-01

    The direct hearing device (DHD) is a new auditory prosthesis that combines conventional hearing aid and middle ear implant technologies into a single device. The DHD is located deep in the ear canal and recreates sounds with mechanical movements of the tympanic membrane. A critical component of the DHD is the microactuator, which must be capable of moving the tympanic membrane at frequencies and magnitudes appropriate for normal hearing, with little distortion. The DHD actuator reported here utilized a voice coil actuator design and was 3.7 mm in diameter. The device has a smoothly varying frequency response and produces a precisely controllable force. The total harmonic distortion between 425 Hz and 10 kHz is below 0.5 % and acoustic noise generation is minimal. The device was tested as a tympanic membrane driver on cadaveric temporal bones where the device was coupled to the umbo of the tympanic membrane. The DHD successfully recreated ossicular chain movements across the frequencies of human hearing while demonstrating controllable magnitude. Moreover, the micro-actuator was validated in a short-term human clinical performance study where sound matching and complex audio waveforms were evaluated by a healthy subject.

  7. Development of a closed air loop electropneumatic actuator for driving a pneumatic blood pump.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gi Seok; Hwang, Chang Mo; Nam, Kyoung Won; Ahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ho Chul; Lee, Jung Joo; Choi, Jaesoon; Son, Ho Sung; Fang, Yong Hu; Son, Kuk Hui; Lim, Choon Hak; Sun, Kyung

    2009-08-01

    In this study, we developed a small pneumatic actuator that can be used as an extracorporeal biventricular assist device. It incorporated a bellows-transforming mechanism to generate blood-pumping pressure. The cylindrical unit is 88 +/- 0.1 mm high, has a diameter of 150 +/- 0.1 mm, and weighs 2.4 +/- 0.01 kg. In vitro, maximal outflow at the highest pumping rate (PR) exceeded 8 L/min when two 55 mL blood sacs were used under an afterload pressure of 100 mm Hg. At a pumping rate of 100 beats per minute (bpm), maximal hydraulic efficiency was 9.34% when the unit supported a single ventricle and 13.8% when it supported both ventricles. Moreover, pneumatic efficiencies of the actuator were 17.3% and 33.1% for LVAD and BVAD applications, respectively. The energy equivalent pressure was 62.78 approximately 208.10 mm Hg at a PR of 60 approximately 100 bpm, and the maximal value of dP/dt during systole was 1269 mm Hg/s at a PR of 60 bpm and 979 mm Hg/s at a PR of 100 bpm. When the unit was applied to 15 calves, it stably pumped 3 approximately 4 L/min of blood at 60 bpm, and no mechanical malfunction was experienced over 125 days of operation. We conclude that the presently developed pneumatic actuator can be utilized as an extracorporeal biventricular assist device.

  8. Nanodomain Formation on Ferroelectrics and Development of Hard-Disk-Drive-Type Ferroelectric Data Storage Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranaga, Yoshiomi; Uda, Tomoya; Kurihashi, Yuichi; Tochishita, Hikari; Kadota, Michio; Cho, Yasuo

    2009-09-01

    In this study, several read/write (R/W) tests were conducted using a hard-disk-drive-type ferroelectric data storage test system based on scanning nonlinear dielectric microscopy (SNDM). A periodically inverted signal, which corresponded to artificial domain stripes formed on LiTaO3 single crystal, could be read correctly with a bit rate of 2 Mbps using this test system. Bit writing on a 50-nm-thick epitaxial LiTaO3 film at 20 Mbps was also demonstrated. In addition, a noncontact probe-height control technique was adapted to solve the problem of tip abrasion. The gap distance between a probe and a medium surface was successfully controlled on the nanometer order using a noncontact SNDM technique with sharp-pointed tungsten needle probes prepared by electrolytic polishing. Bit writing under a noncontact state was also studied. Artificial domain dots with diameters of less than 100 nm could be formed under the noncontact state.

  9. A Design Method of a Full Closed Loop Sampled Servo Control for Hard Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takashi; Atsumi, Takenori

    This paper presents a design methodology for fast and precise positioning using a full closed loop sampled servo control system. A servo control of hard disk drive (HDD) achieves 3-4 ms fast access and nanoscale positioning accuracy. To achieve the nanoscale precise positioning, a full closed loop feedback control is a key structure. From control theory viewpoint, the full closed loop is an ideal method, but it is difficult to take this method in industries due to sensor allocation. In HDD, this full closed loop feedback control has been applied for last 20 years. The full closed loop sometimes brings drawbacks to the servo control design. In HDD case, that is a limited sampling rate selection. In this paper, based on these two features which are the full closed loop and a sampled servo, uniquely developed servo design methods for HDD are presented, which include two-degrees-of-freedom (TDOF) controller with multi-rate sampling, reference trajectory design not to excite higher order mechanical resonances, settling servo to compensate for tracking error near the target, phase stabilized design of feedback control to have better sensitivity, and multi-rate filter design to suppress disturbances above the Nyquist frequency.

  10. Magneto-optical disk drive technology using multiple fiber-coupled flying optical heads. Part I. System design and performance.

    PubMed

    Wilde, J P; Heanue, J F; Tselikov, A A; Hurst, J E

    2001-02-10

    A novel flying-optical-head data storage technology is described. It is based on a micro-optical recording head that contains a silicon micromachined torsional mirror for high-bandwidth track following. Multiple heads and disks are contained in a Winchester-style rotating disk drive. Single-mode optical fibers provide light delivery to and from the heads. Both polarization-maintaining and low-birefringence fiber systems have been implemented for magneto-optical (MO) recording. A fixed optics module containing a laser diode, MO detection optics, and a 1 x N fiber bundle switch has been developed as an integral part of this new recording architecture. A 5.25-in. (13.33-cm), half-height prototype drive design and its performance are presented.

  11. A Disk EMG System for Driving Impacting Liners to 20 km/s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    disk explosive magnetic flux compression generators (DEMG) with electrically exploded fuse opening switches (FOS), similar to the systems used in the... explosive , “old” [1,2] and “new” [3,4,6], were performed using the 1D( MHD )n code [7] developed based on the UP-OK technique [8]. In this code, all...parameters on disk EMG performance // Pres. at Int. Conf. MG-12, Novosibirsk, 2008. [7] A.M.Buyko. Disk explosive magnetic generator and

  12. Do Circumnuclear Dense Gas Disks Drive Mass Accretion onto Supermassive Black Holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Takuma; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Kohno, Kotaro

    2016-08-01

    We present a positive correlation between the mass of dense molecular gas ({M}{{dense}}) of ˜100 pc scale circumnuclear disks (CNDs) and the black hole mass accretion rate ({\\dot{M}}{{BH}}) in a total of 10 Seyfert galaxies, based on data compiled from the literature and an archive (median aperture θ med = 220 pc). A typical {M}{{dense}} of CNDs is 107-8 {M}⊙ , estimated from the luminosity of the dense gas tracer, the HCN(1-0) emission line. Because dense molecular gas is the site of star formation, this correlation is virtually equivalent to the one between the nuclear star-formation rate and {\\dot{M}}{{BH}} revealed previously. Moreover, the {M}{{dense}}{--}{\\dot{M}}{{BH}} correlation was tighter for CND-scale gas than for the gas on kiloparsec or larger scales. This indicates that CNDs likely play an important role in fueling black holes, whereas greater than kiloparesec scale gas does not. To demonstrate a possible approach for studying the CND-scale accretion process with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we used a mass accretion model where angular momentum loss due to supernova explosions is vital. Based on the model prediction, we suggest that only the partial fraction of the mass accreted from the CND ({\\dot{M}}{{acc}}) is consumed as {\\dot{M}}{{BH}}. However, {\\dot{M}}{{acc}} agrees well with the total nuclear mass flow rate (i.e., {\\dot{M}}{{BH}} + outflow rate). Although these results are still tentative with large uncertainties, they support the view that star formation in CNDs can drive mass accretion onto supermassive black holes in Seyfert galaxies.

  13. Cleaner Technology in the Hard Disk Drive Manufacturing Industry: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moolla, Premchai; Chompu-inwai, Rungchat

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this research are to improve raw material and energy consumption efficiency, as well as reduce defects and the use of chemicals in the arm coil assembly process of hard disk drive manufacturing in the case study company by applying the Cleaner Technology concepts. The four main sequential steps used in this research were: (1) pre-assessment, (2) assessment, (3) feasibility study, and (4) implementation. In the first step, raw data, such as process flows, raw material usage and defects data were collected. In the second step, the loss during production and causes of loss were analyzed. Opportunities to reduce raw material, chemical and energy wastage could then be recommended. The next step was to evaluate the feasibility and potential benefits of a particular Cleaner Technology opportunity. Finally, in the last step, after a thorough evaluation and implementation of the opportunities to apply Cleaner Technology, the results showed that arm coil defects could be reduced by improving the production process using the ECRS technique. ECRS stands for Eliminate, Combine, Rearrange and Simplify. This improvement reduced arm coil defect rates from 0.48% to 0.15%, thus saving approximately 139,638 Thai Baht per month. In addition, production stoppage decision made by workers was used to increase employee involvement in defect detection. Allowing workers to participate in such a decision was an effective way to reduce defect rate and could motivate workers to produce a better quality job. This resulted in arm coil defects reducing from 0.41% to 0.025%, with about 74,562 Thai Baht per month saving. Additionally, an increase in the efficiency of electricity consumption occurred, by increasing the speed of the infrared oven conveyor belt, improving average productivity from 533 pieces/hour to 560 pieces/hour, without adversely affecting product costs and quality, thus producing products of up to the value of 206,242 Thai Baht per month. Furthermore, the new

  14. Energy-efficient control of a screw-drive pipe robot with consideration of actuator's characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Ma, Shugen; Lyu, Congyi; Jiang, Xin; Liu, Yunhui

    Pipe robots can perform inspection tasks to alleviate the damage caused by the pipe problems. Usually, the pipe robots carry batteries or use a power cable draining power from a vehicle that has many equipments for exploration. Nevertheless, the energy is limited for the whole inspection task and cannot keep the inspection time too long. In this paper, we use the total input energy as the cost function and a more accurate DC motor model to generate an optimal energy-efficient velocity control for a screw-drive pipe robot to make use of the limited energy in field environment. We also propose a velocity selection strategy that includes the actual velocity capacity of the motor, according to the velocity ratio [Formula: see text], to keep the robot working in safe region and decrease the energy dissipation. This selection strategy considers three situations of the velocity ratio [Formula: see text] and has a wide range of application. Simulations are conducted to compare the proposed method with the sinusoidal control and loss minimization control (minimization of copper losses of the motor), and results are discussed in this paper.

  15. A flat and cost effective actuator based on superabsorbent polymer driving a skin attachable drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosseler, Michael; Clemenz, Markus; Zengerle, Roland

    2012-10-01

    We present a flat and cost effective volume displacement actuator based on superabsorbent polymer. It offers slow kinetics and is able to work against reasonable back-pressures, e.g. 0.50 ml in 235 min at 140 kPa. It is predestined for low-cost skin attachable drug delivery devices. The actuator consists of a plastic ring filled with superabsorbent polymer granulate. It is sealed with a thermoplastic elastomeric membrane on one side and a stiff filter membrane on the other side. After adding a defined amount (e.g. 2 or 10 ml) of swelling agent the actuator shows a fast initial volume displacement within a few minutes followed by a slow continuous increase of this volume within hours. Minimized initial volume displacement and maximized displaced volume after 4 h cannot be combined in one actuator. A minimized initial displacement can be as low as 0.10 ml± 0.03 ml. A maximized displaced volume after 4 h can be 1.71 ml± 0.18 ml, not considering the initial effect. The back-pressure dependency of one selected actuator design was studied. At a back-pressure of 100 kPa the displaced volume is reduced by 33%. We investigated various actuator designs with varying surface area, hardness of the elastomeric membrane and superabsorbent polymer. Finally, we demonstrate a skin attachable drug delivery system based on the employment of the superabsorbent polymer actuator.

  16. Wind tunnel measurements of wake structure and wind farm power for actuator disk model wind turbines in yaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Michael; Bossuyt, Juliaan; Kang, Justin; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    Reducing wake losses in wind farms by deflecting the wakes through turbine yawing has been shown to be a feasible wind farm control approach. In this work, the deflection and morphology of wakes behind a wind turbine operating in yawed conditions are studied using wind tunnel experiments of a wind turbine modeled as a porous disk in a uniform inflow. First, by measuring velocity distributions at various downstream positions and comparing with prior studies, we confirm that the nonrotating wind turbine model in yaw generates realistic wake deflections. Second, we characterize the wake shape and make observations of what is termed a "curled wake," displaying significant spanwise asymmetry. Through the use of a 100 porous disk micro-wind farm, total wind farm power output is studied for a variety of yaw configurations. Strain gages on the tower of the porous disk models are used to measure the thrust force as a substitute for turbine power. The frequency response of these measurements goes up to the natural frequency of the model and allows studying the spatiotemporal characteristics of the power output under the effects of yawing. This work has been funded by the National Science Foundation (Grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project). JB and JM are supported by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, Grant No. 306471).

  17. COSMIC RAYS CAN DRIVE STRONG OUTFLOWS FROM GAS-RICH HIGH-REDSHIFT DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hanasz, M.; Kowalik, K.; Wóltański, D.; Lesch, H.; Naab, T.; Gawryszczak, A.

    2013-11-10

    We present simulations of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM) in models of massive star-forming (40 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) disk galaxies with high gas surface densities (Σ{sub gas} ∼ 100 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}) similar to observed star-forming high-redshift disks. We assume that type II supernovae deposit 10% of their energy into the ISM as cosmic rays (CRs) and neglect the additional deposition of thermal energy or momentum. With a typical Galactic diffusion coefficient for CRs (3 × 10{sup 28} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}), we demonstrate that this process alone can trigger the local formation of a strong low-density galactic wind maintaining vertically open field lines. Driven by the additional pressure gradient of the relativistic fluid, the wind speed can exceed 10{sup 3} km s{sup –1}, much higher than the escape velocity of the galaxy. The global mass loading, i.e., the ratio of the gas mass leaving the galactic disk in a wind to the star formation rate, becomes of order unity once the system has settled into an equilibrium. We conclude that relativistic particles accelerated in supernova remnants alone provide a natural and efficient mechanism to trigger winds similar to observed mass-loaded galactic winds in high-redshift galaxies. These winds also help in explaining the low efficiencies for the conversion of gas into stars in galaxies, as well as the early enrichment of the intergalactic medium with metals. This mechanism may be at least of similar importance to the traditionally considered momentum feedback from massive stars and thermal and kinetic feedback from supernova explosions.

  18. Implementation of a generalized actuator disk wind turbine model into the weather research and forecasting model for large-eddy simulation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mirocha, J. D.; Kosovic, B.; Aitken, M. L.; Lundquist, J. K.

    2014-01-10

    A generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine parameterization designed for large-eddy simulation (LES) applications was implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. WRF-LES with the GAD model enables numerical investigation of the effects of an operating wind turbine on and interactions with a broad range of atmospheric boundary layer phenomena. Numerical simulations using WRF-LES with the GAD model were compared with measurements obtained from the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS-2011), the goal of which was to measure both the inflow to and wake from a 2.3-MW wind turbine. Data from a meteorological tower and two light-detection and ranging (lidar) systems, one vertically profiling and another operated over a variety of scanning modes, were utilized to obtain forcing for the simulations, and to evaluate characteristics of the simulated wakes. Simulations produced wakes with physically consistent rotation and velocity deficits. Two surface heat flux values of 20 W m–2 and 100 W m–2 were used to examine the sensitivity of the simulated wakes to convective instability. Simulations using the smaller heat flux values showed good agreement with wake deficits observed during TWICS-2011, whereas those using the larger value showed enhanced spreading and more-rapid attenuation. This study demonstrates the utility of actuator models implemented within atmospheric LES to address a range of atmospheric science and engineering applications. In conclusion, validated implementation of the GAD in a numerical weather prediction code such as WRF will enable a wide range of studies related to the interaction of wind turbines with the atmosphere and surface.

  19. Disk drive flat optics:design factors affecting manufacturing and cost in volume.

    PubMed

    Westney, R P; Swaby, B L

    1988-02-15

    Polarizers and beam splitters for optical drives are small but expensive. Crystalline, prismatic, or cemented optics can often be replaced with coated flats of comparable performance- Cost drivers are examined, and spectral comparison is made between a plate and cube polarizer. Moisture stability of thin film coatings is discussed, and related applications examined, especially those involving control of the relative phase shift between S and P polarization on reflection. Processes now exist enabling the volume manufacture of these optics.

  20. Rise time reduction of thermal actuators operated in air and water through optimized pre-shaped open-loop driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T.; Doll, J. C.; Loizeau, F.; Hosseini, N.; Peng, A. W.; Fantner, G. E.; Ricci, A. J.; Pruitt, B. L.

    2017-04-01

    Electrothermal actuators have many advantages compared to other actuators used in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). They are simple to design, easy to fabricate and provide large displacements at low voltages. Low voltages enable less stringent passivation requirements for operation in liquid. Despite these advantages, thermal actuation is typically limited to a few kHz bandwidth when using step inputs due to its intrinsic thermal time constant. However, the use of pre-shaped input signals offers a route for reducing the rise time of these actuators by orders of magnitude. We started with an electrothermally actuated cantilever having an initial 10–90% rise time of 85 μs in air and 234 μs in water for a standard open-loop step input. We experimentally characterized the linearity and frequency response of the cantilever when operated in air and water, allowing us to obtain transfer functions for the two cases. We used these transfer functions, along with functions describing desired reduced rise-time system responses, to numerically simulate the required input signals. Using these pre-shaped input signals, we improved the open-loop 10–90% rise time from 85 μs to 3 μs in air and from 234 μs to 5 μs in water, an improvement by a factor of 28 and 47, respectively. Using this simple control strategy for MEMS electrothermal actuators makes them an attractive alternative to other high speed micromechanical actuators such as piezoelectric stacks or electrostatic comb structures which are more complex to design, fabricate, or operate.

  1. Computer simulations of effects of disk tilt and lens tilt on push-pull tracking error signal in an optical disk drive.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, C L; Kay, D; Mansuripur, M

    1997-11-10

    We quantify the effects of disk tilt and objective lens tilt on the push-pull tracking error signal of an optical disk data storage system. For a grooved disk, such as a recordable compact disk that operates at a laser wavelength of lambda, it is found that disk tilt produces a tracking offset of 0.05lambda per degree of tilt, whereas objective lens tilt produces an offset of 0.012lambda per degree of tilt. The amplitude of the tracking error signal decreases by 2.5% at the disk tilt angle of 0.3 degrees and by 5% at the objective lens tilt of 0.3 degrees . We achieved these simulations with the computer program Diffract, which performs a combination of diffraction and ray-tracing calculations through the entire optical path, from the light source to the detectors.

  2. Developing Simple Grade Books Using the AppleWorks Spreadsheet Subprogram, Apple IIe or GS Computers, and a Duodisk or Two Disk Drives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This manual is a "how to" training device for developing grade books using the AppleWorks spreadsheet subprogram with an Apple IIe or Apple IIGS Computer which has a Duodisk or two disk drives and an 80-column card. The manual provides step-by-step directions, and includes 41 figures depicting the computer screen at the various stages of…

  3. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  4. Coupling the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and Large Eddy Simulations with Actuator Disk Model: predictions of wind farm power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cartagena, Edgardo Javier; Santoni, Christian; Ciri, Umberto; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Leonardi, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    A large-scale wind farm operating under realistic atmospheric conditions is studied by coupling a meso-scale and micro-scale models. For this purpose, the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is coupled with an in-house LES solver for wind farms. The code is based on a finite difference scheme, with a Runge-Kutta, fractional step and the Actuator Disk Model. The WRF model has been configured using seven one-way nested domains where the child domain has a mesh size one third of its parent domain. A horizontal resolution of 70 m is used in the innermost domain. A section from the smallest and finest nested domain, 7.5 diameters upwind of the wind farm is used as inlet boundary condition for the LES code. The wind farm consists in six-turbines aligned with the mean wind direction and streamwise spacing of 10 rotor diameters, (D), and 2.75D in the spanwise direction. Three simulations were performed by varying the velocity fluctuations at the inlet: random perturbations, precursor simulation, and recycling perturbation method. Results are compared with a simulation on the same wind farm with an ideal uniform wind speed to assess the importance of the time varying incoming wind velocity. Numerical simulations were performed at TACC (Grant CTS070066). This work was supported by NSF, (Grant IIA-1243482 WINDINSPIRE).

  5. Pre-actuation and post-actuation in control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iamratanakul, Dhanakorn

    This research proposes a direct approach to solve the output-transition problem in linear systems. The objective is to find an input that changes the system output from an initial value to a final value during a specified output-transition time-interval. It is noted that the output-transition problem (i.e., changing the output of a system from one value to another) is a fundamental control problem, which appears in a wide range of flexible structure applications. When performing fast maneuvers with such flexible structures, it is critical to suppress residual vibrations (at the end of the maneuver) that cause a loss of positioning precision. For example, in disk-drive applications, read and write operations cannot be performed (before and after the output transition) if the output position is not precisely maintained at the desired track. This research studies such residual-vibration-free (rest-to-rest) output transitions, where the output is maintained at a constant value outside the output-transition time-interval. The novelty of the proposed approach is that inputs are not applied just during the output-transition time-interval; rather, inputs are also applied outside the output-transition time-interval, i.e., before the beginning of and after the end of the output-transition time-interval (these inputs are called pre-actuation and post-actuation, respectively). The advantage of using pre-actuation and post-actuation when compared to standard methods that do not use such pre- and post-actuation is studied in this research.

  6. Ultrasensitive mechanical detection of magnetic moment using a commercial disk drive write head

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Y.; Eichler, A.; Holzherr, T.; Degen, C. L.

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive detection of weak magnetic moments is an essential capability in many areas of nanoscale science and technology, including nanomagnetism, quantum readout of spins and nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging. Here we show that the write head of a commercial hard drive may enable significant advances in nanoscale spin detection. By approaching a sharp diamond tip to within 5 nm from a write pole and measuring the induced diamagnetic moment with a nanomechanical force transducer, we demonstrate a spin sensitivity of 0.032 μB Hz−1/2, equivalent to 21 proton magnetic moments. The high sensitivity is enabled in part by the pole's strong magnetic gradient of up to 28 × 106 T m−1 and in part by the absence of non-contact friction due to the extremely flat writer surface. In addition, we demonstrate quantitative imaging of the pole field with ∼10 nm spatial resolution. We foresee diverse applications for write heads in experimental condensed matter physics, especially in spintronics, ultrafast spin manipulation and mesoscopic physics. PMID:27647039

  7. Ultrasensitive mechanical detection of magnetic moment using a commercial disk drive write head.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Eichler, A; Holzherr, T; Degen, C L

    2016-09-20

    Sensitive detection of weak magnetic moments is an essential capability in many areas of nanoscale science and technology, including nanomagnetism, quantum readout of spins and nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging. Here we show that the write head of a commercial hard drive may enable significant advances in nanoscale spin detection. By approaching a sharp diamond tip to within 5 nm from a write pole and measuring the induced diamagnetic moment with a nanomechanical force transducer, we demonstrate a spin sensitivity of 0.032 μB Hz(-1/2), equivalent to 21 proton magnetic moments. The high sensitivity is enabled in part by the pole's strong magnetic gradient of up to 28 × 10(6) T m(-1) and in part by the absence of non-contact friction due to the extremely flat writer surface. In addition, we demonstrate quantitative imaging of the pole field with ∼10 nm spatial resolution. We foresee diverse applications for write heads in experimental condensed matter physics, especially in spintronics, ultrafast spin manipulation and mesoscopic physics.

  8. Tracking the Flow of Resources in Electronic Waste - The Case of End-of-Life Computer Hard Disk Drives.

    PubMed

    Habib, Komal; Parajuly, Keshav; Wenzel, Henrik

    2015-10-20

    Recovery of resources, in particular, metals, from waste flows is widely seen as a prioritized option to reduce their potential supply constraints in the future. The current waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) treatment system is more focused on bulk metals, where the recycling rate of specialty metals, such as rare earths, is negligible compared to their increasing use in modern products, such as electronics. This study investigates the challenges in recovering these resources in the existing WEEE treatment system. It is illustrated by following the material flows of resources in a conventional WEEE treatment plant in Denmark. Computer hard disk drives (HDDs) containing neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets were selected as the case product for this experiment. The resulting output fractions were tracked until their final treatment in order to estimate the recovery potential of rare earth elements (REEs) and other resources contained in HDDs. The results further show that out of the 244 kg of HDDs treated, 212 kg comprising mainly of aluminum and steel can be finally recovered from the metallurgic process. The results further demonstrate the complete loss of REEs in the existing shredding-based WEEE treatment processes. Dismantling and separate processing of NdFeB magnets from their end-use products can be a more preferred option over shredding. However, it remains a technological and logistic challenge for the existing system.

  9. Enhancement of Optical Adaptive Sensing by Using a Dual-Stage Seesaw-Swivel Actuator with a Tunable Vibration Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Po-Chien; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Stone

    2011-01-01

    Technological obstacles to the use of rotary-type swing arm actuators to actuate optical pickup modules in small-form-factor (SFF) disk drives stem from a hinge’s skewed actuation, subsequently inducing off-axis aberrations and deteriorating optical quality. This work describes a dual-stage seesaw-swivel actuator for optical pickup actuation. A triple-layered bimorph bender made of piezoelectric materials (PZTs) is connected to the suspension of the pickup head, while the tunable vibration absorber (TVA) unit is mounted on the seesaw swing arm to offer a balanced force to reduce vibrations in a focusing direction. Both PZT and TVA are designed to satisfy stable focusing operation operational requirements and compensate for the tilt angle or deformation of a disc. Finally, simulation results verify the performance of the dual-stage seesaw-swivel actuator, along with experimental procedures and parametric design optimization confirming the effectiveness of the proposed system. PMID:22163877

  10. Rotating Symmetrical Piezoelectric Microactuators for Magnetic Head Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Kazuaki; Hida, Masaharu; Umemiya, Shigeyoshi; Kondo, Masao; Koganezawa, Shinji

    2006-09-01

    A unique piezoelectric microactuator for the head-slider drive dual-stage actuator systems in magnetic disk drives has been developed. This microactuator is based on a rotating symmetrical structure and a symmetrical operation. The piezoelectric actuator elements used in the system have a simple rectangular multilayered structure. A prototype model with pico slider and head suspension has been tested to demonstrate 0.86 μm displacement at a dc applied voltage of 30 V and observed main resonant frequency of over 20 kHz. No fluctuation in flying height was observed.

  11. Investigating wind turbine impacts on near-wake flow using profiling Lidar data and large-eddy simulations with an actuator disk model

    SciTech Connect

    Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Rajewski, Daniel A.; Marjanovic, Nikola; Lundquist, Julie K.; Kosovic, Branko; Draxl, Caroline; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, wind turbine impacts on the atmospheric flow are investigated using data from the Crop Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX-11) and large-eddy simulations (LESs) utilizing a generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine model. CWEX-11 employed velocity-azimuth display (VAD) data from two Doppler lidar systems to sample vertical profiles of flow parameters across the rotor depth both upstream and in the wake of an operating 1.5 MW wind turbine. Lidar and surface observations obtained during four days of July 2011 are analyzed to characterize the turbine impacts on wind speed and flow variability, and to examine the sensitivity of these changes to atmospheric stability. Significant velocity deficits (VD) are observed at the downstream location during both convective and stable portions of four diurnal cycles, with large, sustained deficits occurring during stable conditions. Variances of the streamwise velocity component, σu, likewise show large increases downstream during both stable and unstable conditions, with stable conditions supporting sustained small increases of σu , while convective conditions featured both larger magnitudes and increased variability, due to the large coherent structures in the background flow. Two representative case studies, one stable and one convective, are simulated using LES with a GAD model at 6 m resolution to evaluate the compatibility of the simulation framework with validation using vertically profiling lidar data in the near wake region. Virtual lidars were employed to sample the simulated flow field in a manner consistent with the VAD technique. Simulations reasonably reproduced aggregated wake VD characteristics, albeit with smaller magnitudes than observed, while σu values in the wake are more significantly underestimated. The results illuminate the limitations of using a GAD in combination with coarse model resolution in the simulation of near wake physics, and validation thereof using VAD data.

  12. Investigating wind turbine impacts on near-wake flow using profiling Lidar data and large-eddy simulations with an actuator disk model

    DOE PAGES

    Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Rajewski, Daniel A.; Marjanovic, Nikola; ...

    2015-08-27

    In this study, wind turbine impacts on the atmospheric flow are investigated using data from the Crop Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX-11) and large-eddy simulations (LESs) utilizing a generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine model. CWEX-11 employed velocity-azimuth display (VAD) data from two Doppler lidar systems to sample vertical profiles of flow parameters across the rotor depth both upstream and in the wake of an operating 1.5 MW wind turbine. Lidar and surface observations obtained during four days of July 2011 are analyzed to characterize the turbine impacts on wind speed and flow variability, and to examine the sensitivity of thesemore » changes to atmospheric stability. Significant velocity deficits (VD) are observed at the downstream location during both convective and stable portions of four diurnal cycles, with large, sustained deficits occurring during stable conditions. Variances of the streamwise velocity component, σu, likewise show large increases downstream during both stable and unstable conditions, with stable conditions supporting sustained small increases of σu , while convective conditions featured both larger magnitudes and increased variability, due to the large coherent structures in the background flow. Two representative case studies, one stable and one convective, are simulated using LES with a GAD model at 6 m resolution to evaluate the compatibility of the simulation framework with validation using vertically profiling lidar data in the near wake region. Virtual lidars were employed to sample the simulated flow field in a manner consistent with the VAD technique. Simulations reasonably reproduced aggregated wake VD characteristics, albeit with smaller magnitudes than observed, while σu values in the wake are more significantly underestimated. The results illuminate the limitations of using a GAD in combination with coarse model resolution in the simulation of near wake physics, and validation thereof using VAD data.« less

  13. Controlling Vibration of HDD Actuator by Using Dummy Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Noritaka; Watanabe, Keiko; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomida, Kenji; Arisaka, Toshihiro

    Some hard disk drives (HDDs) have fewer than the maximum number of magnetic heads. Such HDDs need to be re-designed to keep their position accuracy. We focused on adding dummy heads instead of re-designing the whole actuator. A dummy head is put on the edge of an arm model, and it influences the vibration characteristics of the model. Because the vibration characteristics of the arm model are related to those of the whole actuator, we optimized the dummy head design by focusing on the vibration characteristics of a local arm model instead of focusing on the whole actuator. We created a dummy head that would enable HDDs to keep the gain of their vibration characteristics around the sampling frequency as low as those of an HDD with the maximum number of mountable magnetic heads.

  14. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  15. Application of photothermal effect to manufacture ultrasonic actuators (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-yi; Cheng, Li-ping; Shui, Xiu-ji; Yu, Jiong; Dong, Shu-xiang

    2003-01-01

    Photothermal (PT) effect has been applied to manufacture disks [A. C. Tam, a lecture at the Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, People's Republic of China (1996)] and magnetic head sliders for disk drives [A. C. Tam, C. C. Poon, and L. Crawforth, Analyt. Sci. 17, s 419 (2001)]. Now we apply the PT effect to manufacture ultrasonic motors (actuators). Recently, the ultrasonic actuators with different ultrasonic modes, such as Rayleigh (surface acoustic) mode, Lamb (plate) mode, etc., have been developed. We have designed and fabricated two rotary motors driven by surface acoustic wave (SAW) with different frequencies, but lower than 30 MHz [L. P. Cheng, G. M. Zhang, S. Y. Zhang, J. Yu, and X. J. Shui, Ultrasonics 39, 591 (2002)]. On the SAW motors (actuators), two Rayleigh wave beams were generated and propagating along the surface of a 128° YK-LiNbO3 substrate in opposite directions with each other as a stator, and a plastic disk with balls distributed along the circle of the disk was as a rotor. For miniaturizing the rotary SAW motors, and increasing the rotation velocity, the SAW frequency must be increased. Then we improve the manufacturing technology of the mechanical structure by PT effect instead of the conventional mechanical processes of the stator and rotor of the motor. A new type of rotary SAW motor (actuator) has been fabricated, in which both SAW beams with opposite propagating directions are excited by two pairs of interdigital transducers with the frequency between 30-50 MHz. In the surface of the stator (128° YX-LiNbO3 substrate), a hole with the depth about 500 μm is impinged by a focused pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam (PT effect) between two SAW propagating ways on the 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrate for fixing the axis of the motor, with the frequency between 30-50 MHz. In the bottom of the rotor (plastic disk), a lot of crown (flange) blocks with the high of 20-30 μm and the diameter of also 20-30 μm can be made by the focused pulsed Nd

  16. Herniated disk

    MedlinePlus

    Lumbar radiculopathy; Cervical radiculopathy; Herniated intervertebral disk; Prolapsed intervertebral disk; Slipped disk; Ruptured disk; Herniated nucleus pulposus: Low back pain - herniated disk; LBP - herniated disk; Sciatica - herniated disk; Herniated disk

  17. Scissor thrust valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    DeWall, Kevin G.; Watkins, John C; Nitzel, Michael E.

    2006-08-29

    Apparatus for actuating a valve includes a support frame and at least one valve driving linkage arm, one end of which is rotatably connected to a valve stem of the valve and the other end of which is rotatably connected to a screw block. A motor connected to the frame is operatively connected to a motor driven shaft which is in threaded screw driving relationship with the screw block. The motor rotates the motor driven shaft which drives translational movement of the screw block which drives rotatable movement of the valve driving linkage arm which drives translational movement of the valve stem. The valve actuator may further include a sensory control element disposed in operative relationship with the valve stem, the sensory control element being adapted to provide control over the position of the valve stem by at least sensing the travel and/or position of the valve stem.

  18. Note: A novel rotary actuator driven by only one piezoelectric actuator.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hu; Fu, Lu; Zhao, Hongwei; Shi, Chengli; Ren, Luquan; Li, Jianping; Qu, Han

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a novel piezo-driven rotary actuator based on the parasitic motion principle. Output performances of the rotary actuator were tested and discussed. Experiment results indicate that using only one piezoelectric actuator and simple sawtooth wave control, the rotary actuator reaches the rotation velocity of about 20,097 μrad/s when the driving voltage is 100 V and the driving frequency is 90 Hz. The actuator can rotate stably with the minimum resolution of 0.7 μrad. This paper verifies feasibility of the parasitic motion principle for applications of rotary actuators, providing new design ideas for precision piezoelectric rotary actuators.

  19. Rotary Series Elastic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.

  20. Rotary series elastic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.

  1. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  2. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  3. Non-contact start/stop motion control of HDD suspension using shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soo-Cheol; Park, Jong-Sung; Choi, Seung-Bok; Park, Young-Pil

    2001-10-01

    In hard disk drives (HDD), an important issue related to increased storage density is the tribological problem of the head/disk interface. The conventional head gimbal assembly (HGA) of the HDD is used in a contact start/stop mode which results in wear particles and debris. This may cause a serious problem for the read/write function. In this paper, we propose a new type of suspension featuring a shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator in order to prevent friction between the head (slider) and disk. As a first step, a finite element analysis is undertaken to investigate modal characteristics of the proposed HGA. Using the principal modal parameters, such as natural frequency, a control system model is established and a sliding mode control algorithm to achieve a non-contact start/stop (non-CSS) mode is formulated. The key control principle for accomplishing the non-CSS mode is that the control input is to be employed in the SMA actuator before the disk rotates, and is disconnected when the angular velocity of the disk is fully developed to achieve a certain flying height. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control system, a conventional HGA is modified to integrate the SMA actuator. The control algorithm is experimentally realized and controlled motions for the non-CSS mode are presented in the time domain.

  4. Ultrasonically Actuated Tools for Abrading Rock Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Rainen, Richard; Askin, Steve; Bickler, Donald; Lewis, Donald; Carson, John; Dawson, Stephen; Bao, Xiaoqi; Chang, Zensheu; Peterson, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    An ultrasonic rock-abrasion tool (URAT) was developed using the same principle of ultrasonic/sonic actuation as that of the tools described in two prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: Ultrasonic/ Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors (NPO-20856), Vol. 25, No. 1 (January 2001), page 38 and Ultrasonic/ Sonic Mechanisms for Drilling and Coring (NPO-30291), Vol. 27, No. 9 (September 2003), page 65. Hence, like those tools, the URAT offers the same advantages of low power demand, mechanical simplicity, compactness, and ability to function with very small axial loading (very small contact force between tool and rock). Like a tool described in the second of the cited previous articles, a URAT includes (1) a drive mechanism that comprises a piezoelectric ultrasonic actuator, an amplification horn, and a mass that is free to move axially over a limited range and (2) an abrasion tool bit. A URAT tool bit is a disk that has been machined or otherwise formed to have a large number of teeth and an overall shape chosen to impart the desired shape (which could be flat or curved) to the rock surface to be abraded. In operation, the disk and thus the teeth are vibrated in contact with the rock surface. The concentrated stresses at the tips of the impinging teeth repeatedly induce microfractures and thereby abrade the rock. The motion of the tool induces an ultrasonic transport effect that displaces the cuttings from the abraded area. The figure shows a prototype URAT. A piezoelectric-stack/horn actuator is housed in a cylindrical container. The movement of the actuator and bit with respect to the housing is aided by use of mechanical sliders. A set of springs accommodates the motion of the actuator and bit into or out of the housing through an axial range between 5 and 7 mm. The springs impose an approximately constant force of contact between the tool bit and the rock to be abraded. A dust shield surrounds the bit, serving as a barrier to reduce the migration of rock debris to

  5. Thin-disk piezoceramic ultrasonic motor. Part I: design and performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fuh Liang; Yen, Chi Yung; Ouyang, Minsun

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain the knowledge and experience in the design of thin-disk piezoceramic-driving ultrasonic actuator dedicated. In this paper, the design and construction of an innovative ultrasonic actuator is developed as a stator, which is a composite structure consisting of piezoceramic (PZT) membrane bonded on a metal sheet. Such a concentric PZT structure possesses the electrical and mechanical coupling characteristics in flexural wave. The driving ability of the actuator comes from the mechanical vibration of extension and shrinkage of a metal sheet due to the converse piezoelectric effect, corresponding to the frequency of a single-phase AC power. By applying the constraints on the specific geometry positions on the metal sheet, the various behaviors of flexural waves have been at the different directions. The rotor is impelled by the actuator with rotational speeds of 600 rpm in maximum using a friction-contact mechanism. Very high actuating and braking abilities are obtained. This simple and inexpensive structure of actuator demonstrates that the mechanical design of actuator and rotor could be done separately and flexibly according to the requirements for various applications. And, its running accuracy and positioning precision are described in Part II.A closed loop servo positioning control i.e. sliding mode control (SMC) is used to compensate automatically for nonlinearly mechanical behaviors such as dry friction, ultrasonic vibrating, slip-stick phenomena. Additionally, SMC scheme has been successfully applied to position tracking to prove the excellent robust performance in noise rejection.

  6. Operating Characteristics of a Same-Phase Drive-Type Ultrasonic Motor Using a Flexural Disk Vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Takehiro; Tomikawa, Yoshiro; Kusakabe, Chiharu

    1999-05-01

    In this paper we describe an ultrasonic motor using a flexural disk vibrating in two degeneration modes driven by a same-phase input signal. Its operating characteristics depend considerably on the pressing force between the stator and the rotor. We report some experimental studies of this effect. Measurements of the vibration mode showed that the change in the rotational direction of the motor was caused by a shift in the vibration axis of the mode synthesized from two degeneration modes. It is also shown that the motor's operating characteristics can be adjusted via an electrical element connected to the control terminal.

  7. Analog actuator-piston memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sable, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    Simple analog control system of digitally controlled acuator uses 'stopped' position of actuator as 'memory' and potentiometer as sensing element during power failure to reload drive circuit to value equal to its last position preceding power loss.

  8. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The linear proof mass actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (mass, upper housing, lower housing, and center support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operating testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  9. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, S. E., III

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The Linear Proof Mass Actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (Mass, Upper Housing, Lower Housing, and Center Support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operational testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  10. Development of a highly efficient hard disk drive spindle motor with a passive magnetic thrust bearing and a hydrodynamic journal bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, G. H.; Park, J. S.

    2005-05-01

    This article presents a highly efficient hard disk drive (HDD) spindle motor with a passive magnetic thrust bearing and a hydrodynamic journal bearing. It eliminates the mechanical friction loss of a thrust bearing which is around 14% of total power consumption of a 3.5 in. HDD spindle motor, by replacing a conventional hydrodynamic thrust bearing with a passive magnetic thrust bearing. The passive magnetic thrust bearing using permanent magnets is inherently unstable in radial direction. However, the radial hydrodynamic force of the hydrodynamic journal bearing counterbalances the radial magnetic force of magnetic thrust bearing to achieve the stability as the motor spins up. Numerical analysis is performed to verify feasibility of the proposed system.

  11. Variability of Disk Emission in Pre-main-sequence and Related Stars. I. HD 31648 and HD 163296: Isolated Herbig Ae Stars Driving Herbig-Haro Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Carpenter, William J.; Kimes, Robin L.; Wilde, J. Leon; Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Rudy, Richard J.; Mazuk, Stephan M.; Venterini, Catherine C.; Puetter, Richard C.; Grady, Carol A.; Polomski, Elisha F.; Wisnewski, John P.; Brafford, Suellen M.; Hammel, H. B.; Perry, R. Brad

    2008-01-01

    Infrared photometry and spectroscopy covering a time span of a quarter-century are presented for HD 31648 (MWC 480) and HD 163296 (MWC 275). Both are isolated Herbig Ae stars that exhibit signs of active accretion, including driving bipolar flows with embedded Herbig-Haro (HH) objects. HD 163296 was found to be relatively quiescent photometrically in its inner disk region, with the exception of a major increase in emitted flux in a broad wavelength region centered near 3 micron in 2002. In contrast, HD 31648 has exhibited sporadic changes in the entire 3-13 micron region throughout this span of time. In both stars, the changes in the 1-5 micron flux indicate structural changes in the region of the disk near the dust sublimation zone, possibly causing its distance from the star to vary with time. Repeated thermal cycling through this region will result in the preferential survival of large grains, and an increase in the degree of crystallinity. The variability observed in these objects has important consequences for the interpretation of other types of observations. For example, source variability will compromise models based on interferometry measurements unless the interferometry observations are accompanied by nearly simultaneous photometric data.

  12. Variability of Disk Emission in Pre-Main Sequence and Related Stars. I. HD 31648 and HD 163296 - Isolated Herbig Ae Stars Driving Herbig-Haro Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Carpenter, William J.; Kimes, Robin L.; Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Rudy, Richard J.; Mazuk, Stephan M.; Venturini, Catherine C.; Puetter, Richard C.; Grady, Carol A.; Polomski, Elisha F.; Wisnewski, John P.; Brafford, Suellen M.; Hammel, H. B.; Perry, Raleigh B.

    2007-01-01

    Infrared photometry and spectroscopy covering a time span of a quarter century are presented for HD 31648 (MWC 480) and HD 163296 (MWC 275). Both are isolated Herbig Ae stars that exhibit signs of active accretion, including driving bipolar flows with embedded Herbig-Haro (HH) objects. HD 163296 was found to be relatively quiescent photometrically in its inner disk region, with the exception of a major increase in emitted flux in a broad wavelength region centered near 3 pm in 2002. In contrast, HD 31648 has exhibited sporadic changes in the entire 3-13 pm region throughout this span of time. In both stars the changes in the 1-5 pm flux indicate structural changes in the region of the disk near the dust sublimation zone, possibly causing its distance from the star to vary with time. Repeated thermal cycling through this region will result in the preferential survival of large grains, and an increase in the degree of crystallinity. The variability observed in these objects has important consequences for the interpretation of other types of observations. For example, source variability will compromise models based on interferometry measurements unless the interferometry observations are accompanied by nearly-simultaneous photometric data.

  13. Linear mass actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III (Inventor); Crossley, Edward A., Jr. (Inventor); Jones, Irby W. (Inventor); Miller, James B. (Inventor); Davis, C. Calvin (Inventor); Behun, Vaughn D. (Inventor); Goodrich, Lewis R., Sr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A linear mass actuator includes an upper housing and a lower housing connectable to each other and having a central passageway passing axially through a mass that is linearly movable in the central passageway. Rollers mounted in the upper and lower housings in frictional engagement with the mass translate the mass linearly in the central passageway and drive motors operatively coupled to the roller means, for rotating the rollers and driving the mass axially in the central passageway.

  14. Noncontact start/stop motion control of HDD suspension using shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, SooCheol; Park, Jong-Sung; Choi, Seung-Bok; Park, Young-Pil

    2001-08-01

    In hard disk drive (HDD), and important issue related to increased storage density is the tribological problem of the head/disk interface. The conventional head gimbal assembly (HGA) of the HDD is contact start/stop (CSS) mode which results in wear particles and debris. This may cause a serious problem for read/write function. In this work, we propose a new type of suspension featuring shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator in order to prevent the friction between the slider and the dksi. As a first step, a finite element analysis is undertaken to investigate modal characteristics of the proposed SMA-HGA. Using the principal modal parameters such as natural frequency, a control system model is established and sliding mode control algorithm to achieve non-contact start/stop (Non-CSS) mode is formulated. The control principle for accomplishing the Non-CSS mode is briefly discussed as follows. The control input is employed to SMA actuator before the disk rotates, and disconnected when the angular velocity of the disk is fully developed to have a certain flying height. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control system, one of conventional HGA is modified to integrate the SMA actuator. The control algorithm is experimentally realized and controlled motions for Non-CSS mode are presented in time domain.

  15. A study of the influence of the rolling of moving part on the dynamic characteristics of OPU actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Jigang; Pan, Longfa; Ma, Jianshe; Shi, Hongwei

    2005-09-01

    As the executive part, the actuator of optical pick-up (OPU) accomplishes the servo action actually. The dynamic characteristics of the OPU actuator determine the precision of focusing and tracking servo system, so it will influence the reading performance of optical pick-up. As the density of optical storage increases, the OPU actuator has a high servo bandwidth for its focusing and tracking control to follow dynamic disturbances by high density and high rotational speed of disk. The dynamic response curve should be as smooth as possible in its linear area. In this paper, the influence of the rolling of moving part on the actuator's dynamic characteristics is studied. Because of some design reasons, the moving part of the actuator may roll in three dimensions during the working status. It's one of the most important factors to influence the dynamic characteristics of actuator. Firstly, the reason of rolling and the influence on dynamic characteristics are studied. In the design of actuator we should pay attention to three important points, which are the gravitational point, the equivalent driving force point and the equivalent sustained point. When the three points are not accordant during the moving action, the rolling occurs. The dynamic response curve will have some unexpected resonances at certain frequency area. This phenomenon is analyzed by kinetic method. Secondly, a model of the actuator is founded referring to an actual type of actuator. By finite element analysis software (ANSYS), the mechanical and magnetic simulation is performed. The special distributing of electromagnetic field is described and the driving force is analyzed. Thirdly, the dynamic characteristics of some actuators with rolling are tested. The experimental result is consistent with the simulation result. So the validity of this study is verified. At last, the possible methods to avoid rolling of moving part are introduced.

  16. T-Slide Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John

    2009-01-01

    T-slide linear actuators use gear bearing differential epicyclical transmissions (GBDETs) to directly drive a linear rack, which, in turn, performs the actuation. Conventional systems use a rotary power source in conjunction with a nut and screw to provide linear motion. Non-back-drive properties of GBDETs make the new actuator more direct and simpler. Versions of this approach will serve as a long-stroke, ultra-precision, position actuator for NASA science instruments, and as a rugged, linear actuator for NASA deployment duties. The T slide can operate effectively in the presence of side forces and torques. Versions of the actuator can perform ultra-precision positioning. A basic T-slide actuator is a long-stroke, rack-and-pinion linear actuator that, typically, consists of a T-slide, several idlers, a transmission to drive the slide (powered by an electric motor) and a housing that holds the entire assembly. The actuator is driven by gear action on its top surface, and is guided and constrained by gear-bearing idlers on its other two parallel surfaces. The geometry, implemented with gear-bearing technology, is particularly effective. An electronic motor operating through a GBDET can directly drive the T slide against large loads, as a rack and pinion linear actuator, with no break and no danger of back driving. The actuator drives the slide into position and stops. The slide holes position with power off and no brake, regardless of load. With the T slide configuration, this GBDET has an entire T-gear surface on which to operate. The GB idlers coupling the other two T slide parallel surfaces to their housing counterpart surfaces provide constraints in five degrees-of-freedom and rolling friction in the direction of actuation. Multiple GB idlers provide roller bearing strength sufficient to support efficient, rolling friction movement, even in the presence of large, resisting forces. T-slide actuators can be controlled using the combination of an off

  17. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  18. Electrifying the disk: a modular rotating platform for wireless power and data transmission for Lab on a disk application.

    PubMed

    Höfflin, Jens; Torres Delgado, Saraí M; Suárez Sandoval, Fralett; Korvink, Jan G; Mager, Dario

    2015-06-21

    We present a design for wireless power transfer, via inductively coupled coils, to a spinning disk. The rectified and stabilised power feeds an Arduino-compatible microcontroller (μC) on the disc, which in turn drives and monitors various sensors and actuators. The platform, which has been conceived to flexibly prototype such systems, demonstrates the feasibility of a wireless power supply and the use of a μC circuit, for example for Lab-on-a-disk applications, thereby eliminating the need for cumbersome slip rings or batteries, and adding a cogent and new degree of freedom to the setup. The large number of sensors and actuators included demonstrate that a wide range of physical parameters can be easily monitored and altered. All devices are connected to the μC via an I(2)C bus, therefore can be easily exchanged or augmented by other devices in order to perform a specific task on the disk. The wireless power supply takes up little additional physical space and should work in conjunction with most existing Lab-on-a-disk platforms as a straightforward add-on, since it does not require modification of the rotation axis and can be readily adapted to specific geometrical requirements.

  19. Composite flight-control actuator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bott, Richard; Ching, Fred

    1992-01-01

    The composite actuator is 'jam resistant', satisfying a survivability requirement for the Navy. Typically, the push-pull force needed to drive through the wound area of the composite actuator is 73 percent less than that of an all-metal actuator. In addition to improving the aircraft's combat survivability, significant weight savings were realized. The current design of the survivable, composite actuator cylinder is 36 percent lighter than that of the production steel cylinder, which equates to a 15 percent overall actuator weight savings.

  20. Thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper reports design and characterization testing of thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays. The micromirrors were fabricated in the DARPA-sponsored MUMPs polysilicon surface micromachining process. The power averaging characteristic of thermal actuation is exploited in a novel line addressing scheme which reduces wiring for an n2 array to 2n wires. Mirror deflections were measured with a microscope laser interferometer system equipped with a vacuum chamber. Data presented includes device uniformity, frequency response, and deflection versus drive power for varied ambient pressure. Initial test results confirm that thermally actuated piston micromirrors offer several advantages over more common electrostatic designs. Thermally actuated micromirrors offer greater deflections at drive voltages compatible with CMOS circuitry. Measured thermal piston micromirror deflection versus drive voltage is nonlinear, but does not exhibit the 'snap through instability' characteristic of electrostatic devices. Operation of thermally actuated devices in rarefied ambient significantly decreases power dissipation. For a given deflection range, the power reduction facilitated by vacuum operation makes large arrays feasible. Frequency response of thermally actuated devices is limited by the ability of the device to dissipate heat, but operation at 1 kHz rates is feasible.

  1. Robust vibration control at critical resonant modes using indirect-driven self-sensing actuation in mechatronic systems.

    PubMed

    Hong, Fan; Pang, Chee Khiang

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents an improved indirect-driven self-sensing actuation circuit for robust vibration control of piezoelectrically-actuated flexible structures in mechatronic systems. The circuit acts as a high-pass filter and provides better self-sensing strain signals with wider sensing bandwidth and higher signal-to-noise ratio. An adaptive non-model-based control is used to compensate for the structural vibrations using the strain signals from the circuit. The proposed scheme is implemented in a PZT-actuated suspension of a commercial dual-stage hard disk drive. Experimental results show improvements of 50% and 75% in the vibration suppression at 5.4kHz and 21kHz respectively, compared to the conventional PI control.

  2. Magnetic bearings for a spaceflight optical disk recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockney, Richard; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hawkey, Timothy

    1991-01-01

    The development and testing of a magnetic bearing system for the translator of the read/write head in a magneto-optic disk drive are discussed. The asymmetrical three-pole actuators with permanent magnet bias support the optical head, and its tracking and focusing servos, through their radial excursion above the disk. The specifications for the magnetic bearing are presented, along with the configuration of the magnetic hardware. Development of a five degree of freedom collision model is examined which allowed assessment of the system response during large scale transients. Experimental findings and the results of performance testing are presented, including the roll-off of current-to-force due to eddy current loss in the magnetic materials.

  3. Electromechanical actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigham, J.

    1982-01-01

    Materials illustrating a presentation on the development of electromechanical actuators (EMA) for electric flight systems are presented. Technology issues are identified, and major steps relative to EMA development, NASA's role, and a technology procurement plan are outlined.

  4. How to Buy a Disk System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Ivan

    1982-01-01

    Describes floppy disk information storage systems and discusses capabilities and advantages of floppy disks for microcomputer users. The functions of disk operating systems (DOS) are reviewed and the effect of DOS formats on the choice of an appropriate disk drive system is outlined. (JL)

  5. Dielectric elastomer actuators for facial expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuzhe; Zhu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators have the advantage of mimicking the salient feature of life: movements in response to stimuli. In this paper we explore application of dielectric elastomer actuators to artificial muscles. These artificial muscles can mimic natural masseter to control jaw movements, which are key components in facial expressions especially during talking and singing activities. This paper investigates optimal design of the dielectric elastomer actuator. It is found that the actuator with embedded plastic fibers can avert electromechanical instability and can greatly improve its actuation. Two actuators are then installed in a robotic skull to drive jaw movements, mimicking the masseters in a human jaw. Experiments show that the maximum vertical displacement of the robotic jaw, driven by artificial muscles, is comparable to that of the natural human jaw during speech activities. Theoretical simulations are conducted to analyze the performance of the actuator, which is quantitatively consistent with the experimental observations.

  6. Patterned magnetic traps for magnetophoretic assembly and actuation of microrotor pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henighan, T.; Giglio, D.; Chen, A.; Vieira, G.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate a microscopic magnetic rotor pump for fluidic channels whose components are assembled in situ and powered by weak external magnetic fields (<150 Oe). A platform of patterned Permalloy microdisks and microcavities provided for the transport, trapping, and rotation of the superparamagnetic spherical microrotors. Parallel actuation of several rotors without direct physical link to external energy sources, tunable rotation speeds, and reversible drive torques offers significant advantages over macroscopic techniques to control flow within microfluidic devices. The effectiveness of trapping and transporting magnetic nanoparticles by the disks illustrate scalability to smaller, submicrometer sized devices.

  7. Design and experimental study of a novel giant magnetostrictive actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guangming; Zhang, Peilin; He, Zhongbo; Li, Dongwei; Huang, Yingjie; Xie, Wenqiang

    2016-12-01

    Giant magnetostrictive actuator has been widely used in precise driving occasions for its excellent performance. However, in driving a switching valve, especially the ball-valve in an electronic controlled injector, the actuator can't exhibit its good performance for limits in output displacement and responding speed. A novel giant magnetostrictive actuator, which can reach its maximum displacement for being exerted with no bias magnetic field, is designed in this paper. Simultaneously, elongating of the giant magetostrictive material is converted to shortening of the actuator's axial dimension with the help of an output rod in "T" type. Furthermore, to save responding time, the driving voltage with high opening voltage while low holding voltage is designed. Responding time and output displacement are studied experimentally with the help of a measuring system. From measured results, designed driving voltage can improve the responding speed of actuator displacement quite effectively. And, giant magnetostrictive actuator can output various steady-state displacements to reach more driving effects.

  8. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  9. Kilohertz scanning all-fiber optical delay line using piezoelectric actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, David A.; Hoffman, Conrad; Culhane, Robert; Viggiano, Dan, III

    2004-12-01

    Commercial applications for fiber sensing and low-coherence interferometry are rapidly growing in medical, industrial and aerospace markets. These new instruments must be smaller, more robust and less expensive. An all-fiber optical delay line or "fiber stretcher", using piezoelectric (PZT) actuation, offers a simple solid-state solution that eliminates free space optics. The challenges for PZT fiber stretchers include: reducing non-linearity and hysteresis, achieving sufficient scan range with minimum fiber length, maximizing scan frequency and reducing losses in the drive electronics. PZT actuators are essentially large ceramic capacitors that must be rapidly charged and discharged to achieve fast scanning. The mechanical response of the PZT ceramic is greater than 10 kHz which makes it practical to scan at four kilohertz. A thin-walled piezoelectric disk or cylinder achieves 4.5 millimeters of fiber stretch using 20 meters of coiled fiber. Digitally controlled series resonant electronics produce a 1200 volt sinusoidal drive signal at a fixed frequency of four kilohertz while dissipating only 16 Watts. An all-fiber optical delay line module, using piezoelectric actuators and a series resonant drive, is a miniature, robust and efficient alternative to free-space optics with dithering mirrors or spinning polygons.

  10. High torque miniature rotary actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalbandian, Ruben

    2005-07-01

    This paper summarizes the design and the development of a miniature rotary actuator (36 mm diameter by 100 mm length) used in spacecraft mechanisms requiring high torques and/or ultra-fine step resolution. This actuator lends itself to applications requiring high torque but with strict volume limitations which challenge the use of conventional rotary actuators. The design challenge was to develop a lightweight (less than 500 grams), very compact, high bandwidth, low power, thermally stable rotary actuator capable of producing torques in excess of 50 N.m and step resolutions as fine as 0.003 degrees. To achieve a relatively high torsional stiffness in excess of 1000 Nm/radian, the design utilizes a combination of harmonic drive and multistage planetary gearing. The unique design feature of this actuator that contributes to its light weight and extremely precise motion capability is a redundant stepper motor driving the output through a multistage reducing gearbox. The rotary actuator is powered by a high reliability space-rated stepper motor designed and constructed by Moog, Inc. The motor is a three-phase stepper motor of 15 degree step angle, producing twenty-four full steps per revolution. Since micro-stepping is not used in the design, and un-powered holding torque is exhibited at every commanded step, the rotary actuator is capable of reacting to torques as high as 35 Nm by holding position with the power off. The output is driven through a gear transmission having a total train ratio of 5120:1, resulting in a resolution of 0.003 degrees output rotation per motor step. The modular design of the multi-stage output transmission makes possible the addition of designs having different output parameters, such as lower torque and higher output speed capability. Some examples of an actuator family based on this growth capability will be presented in the paper.

  11. Herniated Disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... to pain if the back is stressed. A herniated disk is a disk that ruptures. This allows the ... or back pain. Your doctor will diagnose a herniated disk with a physical exam and, sometimes, imaging tests. ...

  12. Parallel-coupled micro-macro actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell, J.B.; Salisbury, J.K.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents a new actuator system consisting of a micro-actuator and a macro-actuator coupled in parallel via a compliant transmission. The system is called the parallel-coupled micro-macro actuator, or PaCMMA. In this system, the micro-actuator is capable of high-bandwidth force control owing to its low mass and direct-drive connection to the output shaft. The compliant transmission of the macro-actuator reduces the impedance (stiffness) at the output shaft, and increases the dynamic range of force. Performance improvement over single-actuator systems was expected in force control, impedance control, force distortion, and transient impact force reduction. Several theoretical performance limits are derived from the saturation limits of the system. A control law is presented. A prototype test bed was built and an experimental comparison was performed between this actuator concept and two single-actuator systems. A set of quantitative measures is proposed and the actuator system is evaluated against them with the following results: force bandwidth of 56 Hz, torque dynamic range of 800:1, peak torque of 1,040 mNm, and minimum torque of 1.3 mNm. Peak impact force, force distortion, and back-driven impedance of the PaCMMA system are shown to be better than either of the single-actuator configurations considered.

  13. Two position optical element actuator device

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a two position optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to hold an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, in a first position. A non-powered means drives the actuation arm to a second position, when the powered means ceases to receive power. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive, reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm from the first to second position.

  14. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  15. Light-Mediated Manufacture and Manipulation of Actuators.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Ma, Jia-Nan; Liu, Yu-Qing; Han, Bing; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-10-01

    Recent years have seen a considerable growth of research interests in developing novel technologies that permit designable manufacture and controllable manipulation of actuators. Among various fabrication and driving strategies, light has emerged as an enabler to reach this end, contributing to the development of actuators. Several accessible light-mediated manufacturing technologies, such as ultraviolet (UV) lithography and direct laser writing (DLW), are summarized. A series of light-driven strategies including optical trapping, photochemical actuation, and photothermal actuation for controllable manipulation of actuators is introduced. Current challenges and future perspectives of this field are discussed. To generalize, light holds great promise for the development of actuators.

  16. Microwave Power for Smart Membrane Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.; Golembiewski, Walter T.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; King, Glen C.

    2002-01-01

    The concept of microwave-driven smart membrane actuators is envisioned as the best option to alleviate the complexity associated with hard-wired control circuitry. A large, ultra-light space structure, such as solar sails and Gossamer spacecrafts, requires a distribution of power into individual membrane actuators to control them in an effective way. A patch rectenna array with a high voltage output was developed to drive smart membrane actuators. Networked patch rectenna array receives and converts microwave power into a DC power for an array of smart actuators. To use microwave power effectively, the concept of a power allocation and distribution (PAD) circuit is developed and tested for networking a rectenna/actuator patch array. For the future development, the PAD circuit could be imbedded into a single embodiment of rectenna and actuator array with the thin-film microcircuit embodiment. Preliminary design and fabrication of PAD circuitry that consists of a sixteen nodal elements were made for laboratory testing.

  17. Actuators for a space manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, W.; Brunson, P.

    1987-01-01

    The robotic manipulator can be decomposed into distinct subsytems. One particular area of interest of mechanical subsystems is electromechanical actuators (or drives). A drive is defined as a motor with an appropriate transmission. An overview is given of existing, as well as state-of-the-art drive systems. The scope is limited to space applications. A design philosophy and adequate requirements are the initial steps in designing a space-qualified actuator. The focus is on the d-c motor in conjunction with several types of transmissions (harmonic, tendon, traction, and gear systems). The various transmissions will be evaluated and key performance parameters will be addressed in detail. Included in the assessment is a shuttle RMS joint and a MSFC drive of the Prototype Manipulator Arm. Compound joints are also investigated. Space imposes a set of requirements for designing a high-performance drive assembly. Its inaccessibility and cryogenic conditions warrant special considerations. Some guidelines concerning these conditions are present. The goal is to gain a better understanding in designing a space actuator.

  18. Piezoelectric step-motion actuator

    DOEpatents

    Mentesana; Charles P.

    2006-10-10

    A step-motion actuator using piezoelectric material to launch a flight mass which, in turn, actuates a drive pawl to progressively engage and drive a toothed wheel or rod to accomplish stepped motion. Thus, the piezoelectric material converts electrical energy into kinetic energy of the mass, and the drive pawl and toothed wheel or rod convert the kinetic energy of the mass into the desired rotary or linear stepped motion. A compression frame may be secured about the piezoelectric element and adapted to pre-compress the piezoelectric material so as to reduce tensile loads thereon. A return spring may be used to return the mass to its resting position against the compression frame or piezoelectric material following launch. Alternative embodiment are possible, including an alternative first embodiment wherein two masses are launched in substantially different directions, and an alternative second embodiment wherein the mass is eliminated in favor of the piezoelectric material launching itself.

  19. Bidirectional drive and brake mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, Scott A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A space transport vehicle is disclosed as including a body which is arranged to be movably mounted on an elongated guide member disposed in outer space and driven therealong. A drive wheel is mounted on a drive shaft and arranged to be positioned in rolling engagement with the elongated guide carrying the vehicle. A brake member is arranged on the drive shaft for movement into and out of engagement with an adjacent surface of the drive wheel. An actuator is mounted on the body to be manually moved back and forth between spaced positions in an arc of movement. A ratchet-and-pawl mechanism is arranged to operate upon movements of the actuator in one direction between first and second positions for coupling the actuator to the drive wheel to incrementally rotate the wheel in one rotational direction and to operate upon movements of the actuator in the opposite direction for uncoupling the actuator from the wheel. The brake member is threadedly coupled to the drive shaft in order that the brake member will be operated only when the actuator is moved on beyond its first and second positions for shifting the brake member along the drive shaft and into frictional engagement with the adjacent surface on the drive wheel.

  20. Fast-acting valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Nakwon

    1980-01-01

    A fast-acting valve actuator utilizes a spring driven pneumatically loaded piston to drive a valve gate. Rapid exhaust of pressurized gas from the pneumatically loaded side of the piston facilitates an extremely rapid piston stroke. A flexible selector diaphragm opens and closes an exhaust port in response to pressure differentials created by energizing and de-energizing a solenoid which controls the pneumatic input to the actuator as well as selectively providing a venting action to one side of the selector diaphragm.

  1. Rewriteable optical disk recorder development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, Thomas A.; Rinsland, Pamela L.

    1991-01-01

    A NASA program to develop a high performance (high rate, high capability) rewriteable optical disk recorder for spaceflight applications is presented. An expandable, adaptable system concept is proposed based on disk Drive modules and a modular Controller. Drive performance goals are 10 gigabyte capacity are up to 1.8 gigabits per second rate with concurrent I/O, synchronous data transfer, and 2 to 5 years operating life in orbit. Technology developments, design concepts, current status, and future plans are presented.

  2. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofan

    in tactile display is investigated by the prototyping of a large scale refreshable Braille display device. Braille is a critical way for the vision impaired community to learn literacy and improve life quality. Current piezoelectrics-based refreshable Braille display technologies are limited to up to 1 line of Braille text, due to the bulky size of bimorph actuators. Based on the unique actuation feature of BSEP, refreshable Braille display devices up to smartphone-size have been demonstrated by polymer sheet laminates. Dots in the devices can be individually controlled via incorporated field-driven BSEP actuators and Joule heater units. A composite material consisting of silver nanowires (AgNW) embedded in a polymer substrate is brought up as a compliant electrode candidate for BSEP application. The AgNW composite is highly conductive (Rs: 10 Ω/sq) and remains conductive at strains as high as 140% (Rs: <10 3 Ω/sq). The baseline conductivity has only small changes up to 90% strain, which makes it low enough for both field driving and stretchable Joule heating. An out-of-plane bistable area strain up to 68% under Joule heating is achieved.

  3. Electromechanical propellant control system actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill; Weir, Rae Ann

    1990-01-01

    New control mechanism technologies are currently being sought to provide alternatives to hydraulic actuation systems. The Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is involved in the development of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for this purpose. Through this effort, an in-house designed electromechanical propellant valve actuator has been assembled and is presently being evaluated. This evaluation will allow performance comparisons between EMA and hydraulics systems. The in-house design consists of the following hardware: a three-phase brushless motor, a harmonic drive, and an output spline which will mate with current Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) propellant control valves. A resolver and associated electronics supply position feedback for the EMA. System control is provided by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply. Frequency response testing has been performed with further testing planned as hardware and test facilities become available.

  4. Nanostructured carbon materials based electrothermal air pump actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Luqi; Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid films as heating elements to transfer electrical stimulus into thermal energy, and finally convert it into mechanical energy. Both the actuation displacement and working temperature of the actuator films show the monotonically increasing trend with increasing driving voltage within the actuation process. Compared with common polymer nanocomposites based electrothermal actuators, our actuators exhibited better actuation performances with a low driving voltage (<10 V), large generated stress (tens of MPa), high gravimetric density (tens of J kg-1), and short response time (few hundreds of milliseconds). Besides that, the pump actuators exhibited excellent stability under cyclic actuation tests. Among these actuators, a relatively larger actuation strain was obtained for the r-GO film actuator due to the intrinsic gas-impermeability nature of graphene platelets. In addition, the high modulus of the r-GO and GO/SWCNT films also guaranteed the large generated stress and high work density. Specifically, the generated stress and gravimetric work density of the GO/SWCNT hybrid film actuator could reach up to more than 50 MPa and 30 J kg-1, respectively, under a driving voltage of 10 V. The resulting stress value is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that of natural muscles (~0.4 MPa).Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid

  5. Memory metal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical actuator can be constructed by employing a plurality of memory metal actuator elements in parallel to control the amount of actuating force. In order to facilitate direct control by digital control signals provided by a computer or the like, the actuating elements may vary in stiffness according to a binary relationship. The cooling or reset time of the actuator elements can be reduced by employing Peltier junction cooling assemblies in the actuator.

  6. Multilayer Piezoelectric Stack Actuator Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Jones, Christopher M.; Aldrich, Jack B.; Blodget, Chad; Bao, Xioaqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2008-01-01

    Future NASA missions are increasingly seeking to use actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of fractions of a nanometer. For this purpose, multilayer piezoelectric stacks are being considered as actuators for driving these precision mechanisms. In this study, sets of commercial PZT stacks were tested in various AC and DC conditions at both nominal and extreme temperatures and voltages. AC signal testing included impedance, capacitance and dielectric loss factor of each actuator as a function of the small-signal driving sinusoidal frequency, and the ambient temperature. DC signal testing includes leakage current and displacement as a function of the applied DC voltage. The applied DC voltage was increased to over eight times the manufacturers' specifications to investigate the correlation between leakage current and breakdown voltage. Resonance characterization as a function of temperature was done over a temperature range of -180C to +200C which generally exceeded the manufacturers' specifications. In order to study the lifetime performance of these stacks, five actuators from one manufacturer were driven by a 60volt, 2 kHz sine-wave for ten billion cycles. The tests were performed using a Lab-View controlled automated data acquisition system that monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The measurements included the displacement, impedance, capacitance and leakage current and the analysis of the experimental results will be presented.

  7. Multilayer piezoelectric stack actuator characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Jones, Christopher M.; Aldrich, Jack B.; Blodget, Chad; Bao, Xioaqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2008-03-01

    Future NASA missions are increasingly seeking to use actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of fractions of a nanometer. For this purpose, multilayer piezoelectric stacks are being considered as actuators for driving these precision mechanisms. In this study, sets of commercial PZT stacks were tested in various AC and DC conditions at both nominal and extreme temperatures and voltages. AC signal testing included impedance, capacitance and dielectric loss factor of each actuator as a function of the small-signal driving sinusoidal frequency, and the ambient temperature. DC signal testing includes leakage current and displacement as a function of the applied DC voltage. The applied DC voltage was increased to over eight times the manufacturers' specifications to investigate the correlation between leakage current and breakdown voltage. Resonance characterization as a function of temperature was done over a temperature range of -180°C to +200°C which generally exceeded the manufacturers' specifications. In order to study the lifetime performance of these stacks, five actuators from one manufacturer were driven by a 60volt, 2 kHz sine-wave for ten billion cycles. The tests were performed using a Lab-View controlled automated data acquisition system that monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The measurements included the displacement, impedance, capacitance and leakage current and the analysis of the experimental results will be presented.

  8. Additional Drive Circuitry for Piezoelectric Screw Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, Robert; Palmer, Dean; Gursel, Yekta; Reder, Leonard; Savedra, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    Modules of additional drive circuitry have been developed to enhance the functionality of a family of commercially available positioning motors (Picomotor . or equivalent) that provide linear motion controllable, in principle, to within increments .30 nm. A motor of this type includes a piezoelectric actuator that turns a screw. Unlike traditional piezoelectrically actuated mechanisms, a motor of this type does not rely on the piezoelectric transducer to hold position: the screw does not turn except when the drive signal is applied to the actuator.

  9. Shared inductor hybrid topology for weight constrained piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, A. D. T.; Caccia, A.; Thomas, A.; Astolfi, A.; Mitcheson, P. D.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a new circuit topology designed to minimise the weight of the control circuit required to actuate multiple piezoelectric actuators. It can independently set the phase and bias voltage on each piezoelectric actuator through the use of a single inductor. This is highly desirable in weight constrained applications such as unmanned aerial vehicles as the ferroelectric material required for the inductor is heavy. Furthermore, the circuit topology can also use the same inductor to generate the high bias voltage required to drive the actuators. The full system has been verified in PSpice and a pair of piezoelectric actuators have been successfully driven using off the shelf components.

  10. Electromechanical flight control actuator, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An electromechanical actuator was developed that will follow a proportional control command with minimum wasted energy to demonstrate the feasibility of meeting space vehicle actuator requirements using advanced electromechanical concepts. The approach was restricted to a four-channel redundant configuration. Each channel has independent drive and control electronics, a brushless electric motor with brake, and velocity and position feedback transducers. A differential gearbox sums the output velocities of the motors. Normally, two motors are active and the other two are braked.

  11. Digital flight control actuation system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossing, R.; Hupp, R.

    1974-01-01

    Flight control actuators and feedback sensors suitable for use in a redundant digital flight control system were examined. The most appropriate design approach for an advanced digital flight control actuation system for development and use in a fly-by-wire system was selected. The concept which was selected consisted of a PM torque motor direct drive. The selected system is compatible with concurrent and independent development efforts on the computer system and the control law mechanizations.

  12. Flexible dielectric elastomer actuators for wearable human-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzmacher, Christian; Biggs, James; Srinivasan, Mandayam

    2006-03-01

    Wearable dielectric elastomer actuators have the potential to enable new technologies, such as tactile feedback gloves for virtual reality, and to improve existing devices, such as automatic blood pressure cuffs. They are potentially lighter, quieter, thinner, simpler, and cheaper than pneumatic and hydraulic systems now used to make compliant, actuated interfaces with the human body. Achieving good performance without using a rigid frame to prestrain the actuator is a fundamental challenge in using these actuators on body. To answer this challenge, a new type of fiber-prestrained composite actuator was developed. Equations that facilitate design of the actuator are presented, along with FE analysis, material tests, and experimental results from prototypes. Bending stiffness of the actuator material was found to be comparable to textiles used in clothing, confirming wearability. Two roll-to-roll machines are also presented that permit manufacture of this material in bulk as a modular, compact, prestressed composite that can be cut, stacked, and staggered, in order to build up actuators for a range of desired forces and displacements. The electromechanical properties of single- layered actuators manufactured by this method were measured (N=5). At non-damaging voltages, blocking force ranged from 3,7-5,0 gram per centimeter of actuator width, with linear strains of 20,0-30%. Driving the actuators to breakdown produced maximum force of 8,3-10 gram/cm, and actuation strain in excess 30%. Using this actuator, a prototype tactile display was constructed and demonstrated.

  13. Optic disk drusen.

    PubMed

    Auw-Haedrich, Claudia; Staubach, Flemming; Witschel, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    Optic disk drusen occur in 3.4 to 24 per 1,000 population and are bilateral in approximately 75%. Disturbance in the axonal metabolism in the presence of a small scleral canal--regardless of eyelength--is considered responsible for the development. The drusen increase in size, becoming more visible with age due to continuing calcium apposition, and they are associated with visual field defects in a considerable number of patients. Patients do not usually notice these defects, despite their progressive nature over the years, and this indicates an insidious course. A correct diagnosis of optic disk drusen is mandatory, although effective treatment is not yet available. It is most important to differentiate optic disk drusen from papilledema in order to avoid unnecessary neurological examinations, but also to avoid overlooking genuine neurologic disorders. Because optic disk drusen can cause severe visual field defects, patients require individual consultation regarding work issues and whether or not to drive. Optic disk drusen can be accompanied by vascular complications as well. In some cases these vascular changes--for example, choroidal neovascularization--are treatable. Patients with optic disk drusen should undergo regular visual field, IOP, and nerve fiber layer examinations. In patients with deteriorating visual field and borderline IOP, we recommend antiglaucomatous therapy.

  14. Nanostructured carbon materials based electrothermal air pump actuators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Luqi; Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Zhong

    2014-06-21

    Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid films as heating elements to transfer electrical stimulus into thermal energy, and finally convert it into mechanical energy. Both the actuation displacement and working temperature of the actuator films show the monotonically increasing trend with increasing driving voltage within the actuation process. Compared with common polymer nanocomposites based electrothermal actuators, our actuators exhibited better actuation performances with a low driving voltage (<10 V), large generated stress (tens of MPa), high gravimetric density (tens of J kg(-1)), and short response time (few hundreds of milliseconds). Besides that, the pump actuators exhibited excellent stability under cyclic actuation tests. Among these actuators, a relatively larger actuation strain was obtained for the r-GO film actuator due to the intrinsic gas-impermeability nature of graphene platelets. In addition, the high modulus of the r-GO and GO/SWCNT films also guaranteed the large generated stress and high work density. Specifically, the generated stress and gravimetric work density of the GO/SWCNT hybrid film actuator could reach up to more than 50 MPa and 30 J kg(-1), respectively, under a driving voltage of 10 V. The resulting stress value is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that of natural muscles (∼ 0.4 MPa).

  15. Protoplanetary Disks as (Possibly) Viscous Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2017-03-01

    Protoplanetary disks are believed to evolve on megayear timescales in a diffusive (viscous) manner as a result of angular momentum transport driven by internal stresses. Here we use a sample of 26 protoplanetary disks resolved by ALMA with measured (dust-based) masses and stellar accretion rates to derive the dimensionless α-viscosity values for individual objects, with the goal of constraining the angular momentum transport mechanism. We find that the inferred values of α do not cluster around a single value, but instead have a broad distribution extending from 10‑4 to 0.04. Moreover, they correlate with neither the global disk parameters (mass, size, surface density) nor the stellar characteristics (mass, luminosity, radius). However, we do find a strong linear correlation between α and the central mass accretion rate \\dot{M}. This correlation is unlikely to result from the direct physical effect of \\dot{M} on internal stress on global scales. Instead, we suggest that it is caused by the decoupling of stellar \\dot{M} from the global disk characteristics in one of the following ways: (1) The behavior (and range) of α is controlled by a yet-unidentified parameter (e.g., ionization fraction, magnetic field strength, or geometry), ultimately driving the variation of \\dot{M}. (2) The central \\dot{M} is decoupled from the global accretion rate as a result of an instability, or mass accumulation (or loss in a wind or planetary accretion) in the inner disk. (3) Perhaps the most intriguing possibility is that angular momentum in protoplanetary disks is transported nonviscously, e.g., via magnetohydrodynamic winds or spiral density waves.

  16. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  17. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  18. Effects of an asymmetrically molded plastic objective lens on the push-pull tracking-error signal in an optical disk drive.

    PubMed

    Hung, K M

    2000-03-10

    The effects of a plastic objective lens's astigmatism on the push-pull tracking-error signal (TES) of an optical disk data storage system were investigated theoretically and experimentally. Astigmatism of plastic objective lenses arises commonly from the asymmetric deviation from their designed shape during the molding process. By carefully studying the aberration characteristics of the objective lens and including the astigmatism of the laser diode in the analysis, we can calculate the combined effects of astigmatism of these two components on the push-pull TES. It is found, from both the simulations and the experiments, that, by rotation of the objective lens about the optical axis, the peak-to-peak value of the push-pull TES varies with the lens's rotation angle, and a change as great as 340% in its value was observed in a given optical pickup.

  19. Pneumatic squirming robot based on flexible pneumatic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qinghua; Zhang, Libin; Bao, Guanjun; Ruan, Jian

    2005-12-01

    The design of a kind of pneumatic squirming robot is presented. It is based on the use of flexible pneumatic actuator. The flexible pneumatic actuator was made of caoutchouc. Its working principle is described. The structure, working principle, pneumatic and electrical control system of the pneumatic squirming robot are designed. All of the actuator's driving and squirming parts are composed of pneumatic elements. The vacuum osculums, which act as feet, are connected to the flexible pneumatic actuator. When the vacuum pumps operate, vacuum will be produced in the corresponding osculums, which can adsorb on the contacting surface and orient the robot. The actuator, operating under air pressure, drives the robot. By controlling the vacuum pumps and the actuator, straight and bending squirming of this robot can be obtained.

  20. Common drive unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, R. C.; Fink, R. A.; Moore, E. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Common Drive Unit (CDU) is a high reliability rotary actuator with many versatile applications in mechanism designs. The CDU incorporates a set of redundant motor-brake assemblies driving a single output shaft through differential. Tachometers provide speed information in the AC version. Operation of both motors, as compared to the operation of one motor, will yield the same output torque with twice the output speed.

  1. Special Reports: Optical Disks: Mass Storage of Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Jonah

    1984-01-01

    Examines trends in the mass storage of information using optical disks, focusing on applications and various types of systems. Includes a list of optical disk drive products with manufacturer, product, capacity, and access time. (JN)

  2. Piezoelectric multilayer actuator life test.

    PubMed

    Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Jones, Christopher M; Aldrich, Jack B; Blodget, Chad J; Moore, James D; Carson, John W; Goullioud, Renaud

    2011-04-01

    Potential NASA optical missions such as the Space Interferometer Mission require actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of nanometers. Commercially available multilayer piezoelectric stack actuators are being considered for driving these precision mirror positioning mechanisms. These mechanisms have potential mission operational requirements that exceed 5 years for one mission life. To test the feasibility of using these commercial actuators for these applications and to determine their reliability and the redundancy requirements, a life test study was undertaken. The nominal actuator requirements for the most critical actuators on the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) in terms of number of cycles was estimated from the Modulation Optics Mechanism (MOM) and Pathlength control Optics Mechanism (POM) and these requirements were used to define the study. At a nominal drive frequency of 250 Hz, one mission life is calculated to be 40 billion cycles. In this study, a set of commercial PZT stacks configured in a potential flight actuator configuration (pre-stressed to 18 MPa and bonded in flexures) were tested for up to 100 billion cycles. Each test flexure allowed for two sets of primary and redundant stacks to be mechanically connected in series. The tests were controlled using an automated software control and data acquisition system that set up the test parameters and monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The samples were driven between 0 and 20 V at 2000 Hz to accelerate the life test and mimic the voltage amplitude that is expected to be applied to the stacks during operation. During the life test, 10 primary stacks were driven and 10 redundant stacks, mechanically in series with the driven stacks, were open-circuited. The stroke determined from a strain gauge, the temperature and humidity in the chamber, and the temperature of each individual stack were recorded. Other properties of the stacks, including the

  3. Active Joint Mechanism Driven by Multiple Actuators Made of Flexible Bags: A Proposal of Dual Structural Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Inou, Norio

    2013-01-01

    An actuator is required to change its speed and force depending on the situation. Using multiple actuators for one driving axis is one of the possible solutions; however, there is an associated problem of output power matching. This study proposes a new active joint mechanism using multiple actuators. Because the actuator is made of a flexible bag, it does not interfere with other actuators when it is depressurized. The proposed joint achieved coordinated motion of multiple actuators. This report also discusses a new actuator which has dual cylindrical structure. The cylinders are composed of flexible bags with different diameters. The joint torque is estimated based on the following factors: empirical formula for the flexible actuator torque, geometric relationship between the joint and the actuator, and the principle of virtual work. The prototype joint mechanism achieves coordinated motion of multiple actuators for one axis. With this motion, small inner actuator contributes high speed motion, whereas large outer actuator generates high torque. The performance of the prototype joint is examined by speed and torque measurements. The joint showed about 30% efficiency at 2.0 Nm load torque under 0.15 MPa air input. PMID:24385868

  4. Active joint mechanism driven by multiple actuators made of flexible bags: a proposal of dual structural actuator.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hitoshi; Matsuzaki, Takuya; Kataoka, Mokutaro; Inou, Norio

    2013-01-01

    An actuator is required to change its speed and force depending on the situation. Using multiple actuators for one driving axis is one of the possible solutions; however, there is an associated problem of output power matching. This study proposes a new active joint mechanism using multiple actuators. Because the actuator is made of a flexible bag, it does not interfere with other actuators when it is depressurized. The proposed joint achieved coordinated motion of multiple actuators. This report also discusses a new actuator which has dual cylindrical structure. The cylinders are composed of flexible bags with different diameters. The joint torque is estimated based on the following factors: empirical formula for the flexible actuator torque, geometric relationship between the joint and the actuator, and the principle of virtual work. The prototype joint mechanism achieves coordinated motion of multiple actuators for one axis. With this motion, small inner actuator contributes high speed motion, whereas large outer actuator generates high torque. The performance of the prototype joint is examined by speed and torque measurements. The joint showed about 30% efficiency at 2.0 Nm load torque under 0.15 MPa air input.

  5. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  6. An electro-thermally activated rotary micro-positioner for slider-level dual-stage positioning in hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keong Lau, Gih; Yang, Jiaping; Tan, Cheng Peng; Boon Chong, Nyok

    2016-03-01

    Slider-level micro-positioners are useful to assist a voice coil motor to perform fine head positioning over a Tb/in2 magnetic disk. Recently, a new kind of slider-level micro-positioner was developed using the thermal unimorph of the Si/SU8 composite. It has the advantages of a very small footprint and high mechanical resonant frequency, but its stroke generation is inadequate, with a 50 nm dynamic stroke at 1 kHz. There is a need for a larger thermally induced stroke. This paper presents a rotary design of an electrothermal micro-positioner to address the stroke requirements without consuming more power or decreasing the mechanical resonant frequency. Experimental studies show the present rotary design can produce a six-fold larger displacement, as compared to the previous lateral design, while possessing a 35 kHz resonant frequency. In addition, simple analytical models were developed to estimate: (i) the rotational stiffness and system’s natural frequency, (ii) thermal unimorph bending and stage rotation, and (iii) the system’s thermal time constant for this rotary electro-thermal micro-positioner. This study found that this rotary electro-thermal micro-positioner can meet the basic stroke requirement and high mechanical resonant frequency for a moving slider, but its thermal cut-off frequency needs to be increased further.

  7. Electrostatic repulsive out-of-plane actuator using conductive substrate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weimin; Wang, Qiang; Ren, Hao; Ma, Wenying; Qiu, Chuankai; Chen, Zexiang; Fan, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A pseudo-three-layer electrostatic repulsive out-of-plane actuator is proposed. It combines the advantages of two-layer and three-layer repulsive actuators, i.e., fabrication requirements and fill factor. A theoretical model for the proposed actuator is developed and solved through the numerical calculation of Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. Theoretical and simulated results show that the pseudo-three-layer actuator offers higher performance than the two-layer and three-layer actuators with regard to the two most important characteristics of actuators, namely, driving force and theoretical stroke. Given that the pseudo-three-layer actuator structure is compatible with both the parallel-plate actuators and these two types of repulsive actuators, a 19-element two-layer repulsive actuated deformable mirror is operated in pseudo-three-layer electrical connection mode. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that the pseudo-three-layer mode produces a larger displacement of 0–4.5 μm for a dc driving voltage of 0–100 V, when compared with that in two-layer mode. PMID:27713542

  8. Electrostatic repulsive out-of-plane actuator using conductive substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weimin; Wang, Qiang; Ren, Hao; Ma, Wenying; Qiu, Chuankai; Chen, Zexiang; Fan, Bin

    2016-10-01

    A pseudo-three-layer electrostatic repulsive out-of-plane actuator is proposed. It combines the advantages of two-layer and three-layer repulsive actuators, i.e., fabrication requirements and fill factor. A theoretical model for the proposed actuator is developed and solved through the numerical calculation of Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. Theoretical and simulated results show that the pseudo-three-layer actuator offers higher performance than the two-layer and three-layer actuators with regard to the two most important characteristics of actuators, namely, driving force and theoretical stroke. Given that the pseudo-three-layer actuator structure is compatible with both the parallel-plate actuators and these two types of repulsive actuators, a 19-element two-layer repulsive actuated deformable mirror is operated in pseudo-three-layer electrical connection mode. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that the pseudo-three-layer mode produces a larger displacement of 0–4.5 μm for a dc driving voltage of 0–100 V, when compared with that in two-layer mode.

  9. Electrostatic repulsive out-of-plane actuator using conductive substrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weimin; Wang, Qiang; Ren, Hao; Ma, Wenying; Qiu, Chuankai; Chen, Zexiang; Fan, Bin

    2016-10-07

    A pseudo-three-layer electrostatic repulsive out-of-plane actuator is proposed. It combines the advantages of two-layer and three-layer repulsive actuators, i.e., fabrication requirements and fill factor. A theoretical model for the proposed actuator is developed and solved through the numerical calculation of Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. Theoretical and simulated results show that the pseudo-three-layer actuator offers higher performance than the two-layer and three-layer actuators with regard to the two most important characteristics of actuators, namely, driving force and theoretical stroke. Given that the pseudo-three-layer actuator structure is compatible with both the parallel-plate actuators and these two types of repulsive actuators, a 19-element two-layer repulsive actuated deformable mirror is operated in pseudo-three-layer electrical connection mode. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that the pseudo-three-layer mode produces a larger displacement of 0-4.5 μm for a dc driving voltage of 0-100 V, when compared with that in two-layer mode.

  10. Grasp Assist Device with Shared Tendon Actuator Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bergelin, Bryan J. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A grasp assist device includes a glove with first and second tendon-driven fingers, a tendon, and a sleeve with a shared tendon actuator assembly. Tendon ends are connected to the respective first and second fingers. The actuator assembly includes a drive assembly having a drive axis and a tendon hook. The tendon hook, which defines an arcuate surface slot, is linearly translatable along the drive axis via the drive assembly, e.g., a servo motor thereof. The flexible tendon is routed through the surface slot such that the surface slot divides the flexible tendon into two portions each terminating in a respective one of the first and second ends. The drive assembly may include a ball screw and nut. An end cap of the actuator assembly may define two channels through which the respective tendon portions pass. The servo motor may be positioned off-axis with respect to the drive axis.

  11. Active Damping Using Distributed Anisotropic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Quinones, Juan D.; Wier, Nathan C.

    2010-01-01

    A helicopter structure experiences substantial high-frequency mechanical excitation from powertrain components such as gearboxes and drive shafts. The resulting structure-borne vibration excites the windows which then radiate sound into the passenger cabin. In many cases the radiated sound power can be reduced by adding damping. This can be accomplished using passive or active approaches. Passive treatments such as constrained layer damping tend to reduce window transparency. Therefore this paper focuses on an active approach utilizing compact decentralized control units distributed around the perimeter of the window. Each control unit consists of a triangularly shaped piezoelectric actuator, a miniature accelerometer, and analog electronics. Earlier work has shown that this type of system can increase damping up to approximately 1 kHz. However at higher frequencies the mismatch between the distributed actuator and the point sensor caused control spillover. This paper describes new anisotropic actuators that can be used to improve the bandwidth of the control system. The anisotropic actuators are composed of piezoelectric material sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes, which enables the application of the electric field in a preferred in-plane direction. When shaped correctly the anisotropic actuators outperform traditional isotropic actuators by reducing the mismatch between the distributed actuator and point sensor at high frequencies. Testing performed on a Plexiglas panel, representative of a helicopter window, shows that the control units can increase damping at low frequencies. However high frequency performance was still limited due to the flexible boundary conditions present on the test structure.

  12. Using Appleworks To Format Data Disks for Use with the Apple IIGS Computer. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This step-by-step guide to using AppleWorks V2.0 to format data disks for use with the Apple IIGS computer, includes program loading, selecting other activities, selecting a different disk or drive, selecting Disk 1, disk formatting, volume naming, using Disk 1 (Slot 6), formatting, using screen directions, exiting the format option, escaping the…

  13. Nebra Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pásztor, Emília

    An important archaeological find from the Bronze Age has come to light in Germany. It is a round bronze disk adorned with gold figures that might be interpreted as symbols for stars, the sun, and the moon, making the disk the oldest known surviving depiction of celestial objects in Europe. By comparing the iconography and ideography of the disk with archaeological finds, ethnographic material, and historical notes of different cultures and periods, the conclusion has been reached that the compositional elements might be understood as the depiction of a traditional folk worldview.

  14. Magnetic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinson, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic disk recording was invented in 1953 and has undergone intensive development ever since. As a result of this 38 years of development, the cost per byte and the areal density have halved and doubled respectively every 2-2 1/2 years. Today, the cost per byte is lower than 10(exp -6) dollars per byte and area densities exceed 100 10(exp 6) bits per square inch. In this talk, the recent achievements in magnetic disk recording are first surveyed briefly. Then, the principal areas of current technical development are outlined. Finally, some comments are made about the future of magnetic disk recording.

  15. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  16. Molecular valves actuated by intermolecular forces.

    PubMed

    Snyder, M A; Vlachos, D G

    2005-06-01

    Phase behavior in nanostructured thin films under a gradient in chemical potential is studied via kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. Switching between saturated, partially saturated, and unsaturated states drives precipitous changes in permeation. This phenomenon could render nanostructured thin films as molecular valves, where adsorbate-adsorbate forces actuate the flow of molecules.

  17. Thermally actuated micropump for biological and medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaud, D.; Lefevre, R.; Salette, A.; Dargent, L.; Marko, H.; Le Masne, Q.; Dehan, C.; Morfouli, P.; Montès, L.

    2013-06-01

    While most actual micropumps use piezoelectric based actuators, we present an original approach based on bimetallic effect for deflecting a flexible silicon membranes. We have simulated, fabricated and characterized fully integrated thermally actuated membranes. Analytical and numerical models have been used to simulate and optimize the performance of the actuated diaphragm. It predicts the deflection behavior under definite power actuation and pressure. In particular, heat transfer analysis is conducted to evaluate temperature field distribution within the device. High displacements (~80μm) where obtained under low driving power. Our results show a very good fit between experiments under pressure and theoretical predictions.

  18. A small-gap electrostatic micro-actuator for large deflections

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Holger; Schenk, Harald; Kaiser, Bert; Langa, Sergiu; Gaudet, Matthieu; Schimmanz, Klaus; Stolz, Michael; Lenz, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Common quasi-static electrostatic micro actuators have significant limitations in deflection due to electrode separation and unstable drive regions. State-of-the-art electrostatic actuators achieve maximum deflections of approximately one third of the electrode separation. Large electrode separation and high driving voltages are normally required to achieve large actuator movements. Here we report on an electrostatic actuator class, fabricated in a CMOS-compatible process, which allows high deflections with small electrode separation. The concept presented makes the huge electrostatic forces within nanometre small electrode separation accessible for large deflections. Electrostatic actuations that are larger than the electrode separation were measured. An analytical theory is compared with measurement and simulation results and enables closer understanding of these actuators. The scaling behaviour discussed indicates significant future improvement on actuator deflection. The presented driving concept enables the investigation and development of novel micro systems with a high potential for improved device and system performance. PMID:26655557

  19. A small-gap electrostatic micro-actuator for large deflections.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Holger; Schenk, Harald; Kaiser, Bert; Langa, Sergiu; Gaudet, Matthieu; Schimmanz, Klaus; Stolz, Michael; Lenz, Miriam

    2015-12-11

    Common quasi-static electrostatic micro actuators have significant limitations in deflection due to electrode separation and unstable drive regions. State-of-the-art electrostatic actuators achieve maximum deflections of approximately one third of the electrode separation. Large electrode separation and high driving voltages are normally required to achieve large actuator movements. Here we report on an electrostatic actuator class, fabricated in a CMOS-compatible process, which allows high deflections with small electrode separation. The concept presented makes the huge electrostatic forces within nanometre small electrode separation accessible for large deflections. Electrostatic actuations that are larger than the electrode separation were measured. An analytical theory is compared with measurement and simulation results and enables closer understanding of these actuators. The scaling behaviour discussed indicates significant future improvement on actuator deflection. The presented driving concept enables the investigation and development of novel micro systems with a high potential for improved device and system performance.

  20. Meridional circulation in optically thick accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabot, W.; Savedoff, M. P.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal imbalances in stars due to rotation are known to drive mass motions in the meridional plane. A preliminary analytic investigation has been made of a similar effect in optically thick accretion disks using conventional thin-disk approximations. It is found that estimated circulation times can be as short as thermal timescales, resulting in rapid transport of heat and angular momentum. This indicates that the simple approximations commonly used are incomplete with regard to detailed, two-dimensional disk structure.

  1. Design and Test of a Hydra-Optic Flight Control Actuation System (HOFCAS) Concept

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    surface actuation system that provides immunity to electromagnetic radiation. The direct drive actuator, developed in a previous multi- phase Navy...direct digital control of a surface actuator, and the HOFCAS extends this technology to demonstrate that conventional interconnecting electrical wiring...to the surface actuators can be eliminated. The HOFCAS was laboratory tested using T-2C flight hardware and the results demonstrated the system to

  2. Bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor); Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Sarkisov, Jr., Sergey S. (Inventor); Fields, Aisha B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator, in one embodiment using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a photosensitive body, transmitting light over fiber optic cables, and controlling the shape and pulse duration of the light pulse to control movement of the actuator. Multiple light beams are utilized to generate different ranges of motion for the actuator from a single photomechanical body and alternative designs use multiple light beams and multiple photomechanical bodies to provide controlled movement. Actuator movement using one or more ranges of motion is utilized to control motion to position an actuating element in three dimensional space.

  3. Optical Disks at the 1987 AIIM Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffady, William

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the major write-once read-many (WORM) optical-disk products and systems demonstrated at the 1987 Association of Image and Information Management conference. Products are grouped as follows: (1) disk drives and jukeboxes; (2) systems integrators and value-added resellers; (3) turnkey systems; and (4) read-only systems. Addresses for 38…

  4. The Load Capability of Piezoelectric Single Crystal Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing; Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2006-01-01

    Piezoelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) single crystal is one of the most promising materials for electromechanical device applications due to its high electrical field induced strain and high electromechanical coupling factor. PMN-PT single crystal-based multilayer stack actuators and multilayer stack-based flextensional actuators have exhibited high stroke and high displacement-voltage ratios. The actuation capabilities of these two actuators were evaluated using a newly developed method based upon a laser vibrometer system under various loading conditions. The measured displacements as a function of mechanical loads at different driving voltages indicate that the displacement response of the actuators is approximately constant under broad ranges of mechanical load. The load capabilities of these PMN-PT single crystal-based actuators and the advantages of the capability for applications will be discussed.

  5. The Load Capability of Piezoelectric Single Crystal Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing; Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2007-01-01

    Piezoelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) single crystal is one of the most promising materials for electromechanical device applications due to its high electrical field induced strain and high electromechanical coupling factor. PMN-PT single crystal-based multilayer stack actuators and multilayer stack-based flextensional actuators have exhibited high stroke and high displacement-voltage ratios. The actuation capabilities of these two actuators were evaluated using a newly developed method based upon a laser vibrometer system under various loading conditions. The measured displacements as a function of mechanical loads at different driving voltages indicate that the displacement response of the actuators is approximately constant under broad ranges of mechanical load. The load capabilities of these PMN-PT single crystal-based actuators and the advantages of the capability for applications will be discussed.

  6. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  7. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  8. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  9. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  10. Curved Piezoelectric Actuators for Stretching Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Assemblies containing curved piezoceramic fiber composite actuators have been invented as means of stretching optical fibers by amounts that depend on applied drive voltages. Piezoceramic fiber composite actuators are conventionally manufactured as sheets or ribbons that are flat and flexible, but can be made curved to obtain load-carrying ability and displacement greater than those obtainable from the flat versions. In the primary embodiment of this invention, piezoceramic fibers are oriented parallel to the direction of longitudinal displacement of the actuators so that application of drive voltage causes the actuator to flatten, producing maximum motion. Actuator motion can be transmitted to the optical fiber by use of hinges and clamp blocks. In the original application of this invention, the optical fiber contains a Bragg grating and the purpose of the controlled stretching of the fiber is to tune the grating as part of a small, lightweight, mode-hop-free, rapidly tunable laser for demodulating strain in Bragg-grating strain-measurement optical fibers attached to structures. The invention could also be used to apply controllable tensile force or displacement to an object other than an optical fiber.

  11. Elastic actuator for precise force control

    DOEpatents

    Pratt, G.A.; Williamson, M.M.

    1997-07-22

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section. 30 figs.

  12. Elastic actuator for precise force control

    DOEpatents

    Pratt, Gill A.; Williamson, Matthew M.

    1997-07-22

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section.

  13. Magnetostrictive direct drive motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    A new rare earth alloy, Terfenol-D, combines low frequency operation and extremely high energy density with high magnetostriction. Its material properties make it suitable as a drive element for actuators requiring high output torque. The high strains, the high forces and the high controllability of Terfenol alloys provide a powerful and challenging basis for new ways to generate motion in actuators. Two prototypes of motors using Terfenol-D rods were developed at NASA Goddard. The basic principles of operation are provided of the motor along with other relevant details. A conceptual design of a torque limiting safety clutch/brake under development is illustrated. Also, preliminary design drawings of a linear actuator using Terfenol-D is shown.

  14. Linear actuation using milligram quantities of CL-20 and TAGDNAT.

    SciTech Connect

    Snedigar, Shane; Salton, Jonathan Robert; Tappan, Alexander Smith; Ball, James Patrick; Basiliere, Marc; Fischer, Gary John

    2009-07-01

    There are numerous applications for small-scale actuation utilizing pyrotechnics and explosives. In certain applications, especially when multiple actuation strokes are needed, or actuator reuse is required, it is desirable to have all gaseous combustion products with no condensed residue in the actuator cylinder. Toward this goal, we have performed experiments on utilizing milligram quantities of high explosives to drive a millimeter-diameter actuator with a stroke of 30 mm. Calculations were performed to select proper material quantities to provide 0.5 J of actuation energy. This was performed utilizing the thermochemical code Cheetah to calculate the impetus for numerous propellants and to select quantities based on estimated efficiencies of these propellants at small scales. Milligram quantities of propellants were loaded into a small-scale actuator and ignited with an ignition increment and hot wire ignition. Actuator combustion chamber pressure was monitored with a pressure transducer and actuator stroke was monitored using a laser displacement meter. Total actuation energy was determined by calculating the kinetic energy of reaction mass motion against gravity. Of the materials utilized, the best performance was obtained with a mixture of 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) and bis-triaminoguanidinium(3,3{prime}dinitroazotriazolate) (TAGDNAT).

  15. Physical Analysis and Scaling of a Jet and Vortex Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachowicz, Jason T.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Joslin, Ronald D.

    2004-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the Jet and Vortex Actuator generates free-jet, wall-jet, and near- wall vortex flow fields. That is, the actuator can be operated in different modes by simply varying the driving frequency and/or amplitude. For this study, variations are made in the actuator plate and wide-slot widths and sine/asymmetrical actuator plate input forcing (drivers) to further study the actuator induced flow fields. Laser sheet flow visualization, particle- image velocimetry, and laser velocimetry are used to measure and characterize the actuator induced flow fields. Laser velocimetry measurements indicate that the vortex strength increases with the driver repetition rate for a fixed actuator geometry (wide slot and plate width). For a given driver repetition rate, the vortex strength increases as the plate width decreases provided the wide-slot to plate-width ratio is fixed. Using an asymmetric plate driver, a stronger vortex is generated for the same actuator geometry and a given driver repetition rate. The nondimensional scaling provides the approximate ranges for operating the actuator in the free jet, wall jet, or vortex flow regimes. Finally, phase-locked velocity measurements from particle image velocimetry indicate that the vortex structure is stationary, confirming previous computations. Both the computations and the particle image velocimetry measurements (expectantly) show unsteadiness near the wide-slot opening, which is indicative of mass ejection from the actuator.

  16. Pulsed-DC DBD Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Alan; McGowan, Ryan; Disser, Katherine; Corke, Thomas; Matlis, Eric

    2016-11-01

    A new powering system for dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators that utilizes a pulsed-DC waveform is presented. The plasma actuator arrangement is identical to most typical AC-DBD designs with staggered electrodes that are separated by a dielectric insulator. However instead of an AC voltage input to drive the actuator, the pulsed-DC utilizes a DC voltage source. The DC source is supplied to both electrodes, and remains constant in time for the exposed electrode. The DC source for the covered electrode is periodically grounded for very short instants and then allowed to rise to the source DC level. This process results in a plasma actuator body force that is significantly larger than that with an AC-DBD at the same voltages. The important characteristics used in optimizing the pulsed-DC plasma actuators are presented. Time-resolved velocity measurements near the actuator are further used to understand the underlying physics of its operation compared to the AC-DBD. Supported by NASA Glenn RC.

  17. Spaceflight optical disk recorder development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurczyk, Stephen G.; Hines, Glenn D.; Shull, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Mass memory systems based on rewriteable optical disk media are expected to play an important role in meeting the data system requirements for future NASA spaceflight missions. NASA has established a program to develop a high performance (high rate, large capacity) optical disk recorder focused on use aboard unmanned Earth orbiting platforms. An expandable, adaptable system concept is proposed based on disk drive modules and a modular controller. Drive performance goals are 10 gigabyte capacity, 300 megabit/s transfer rate, 10 exp -12 corrected bit error rate, and 150 millisec access time. This performance is achieved by writing eight data tracks in parallel on both sides of a 14 in. optical disk using two independent heads. System goals are 160 gigabyte capacity, 1.2 gigabits/s data rate with concurrent I/O, 250 millisec access time, and two to five year operating life on orbit. The system can be configured to meet various applications. This versatility is provided by the controller. The controller provides command processing, multiple drive synchronization, data buffering, basic file management, error processing, and status reporting. Technology developments, design concepts, current status including a computer model of the system and a Controller breadboard, and future plans for the Drive and Controller are presented.

  18. Performance evaluation of an improved fish robot actuated by piezoceramic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. S.; Heo, S.; Park, H. C.; Byun, D.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents an improved fish robot actuated by four lightweight piezocomposite actuators. Our newly developed actuation mechanism is simple to fabricate because it works without gears. With the new actuation mechanism, the fish robot has a 30% smaller cross section than our previous model. Performance tests of the fish robot in water were carried out to measure the tail-beat angle, the thrust force, the swimming speed for various tail-beat frequencies from 1 to 5 Hz and the turning radius at the optimal frequency. The maximum swimming speed of the fish robot is 7.7 cm s - 1 at a tail-beat frequency of 3.9 Hz. A turning experiment shows that the swimming direction of the fish robot can be controlled by changing the duty ratio of the driving voltage; the fish robot has a turning radius of 0.41 m for a left turn and 0.68 m for a right turn.

  19. MEMS fluidic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Johnston, Gabriel A.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Galambos, Paul C.; Okandan, Murat

    2007-07-24

    The present invention comprises a novel, lightweight, massively parallel device comprising microelectromechanical (MEMS) fluidic actuators, to reconfigure the profile, of a surface. Each microfluidic actuator comprises an independent bladder that can act as both a sensor and an actuator. A MEMS sensor, and a MEMS valve within each microfluidic actuator, operate cooperatively to monitor the fluid within each bladder, and regulate the flow of the fluid entering and exiting each bladder. When adjacently spaced in a array, microfluidic actuators can create arbitrary surface profiles in response to a change in the operating environment of the surface. In an embodiment of the invention, the profile of an airfoil is controlled by independent extension and contraction of a plurality of actuators, that operate to displace a compliant cover.

  20. Series elastic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Matthew M.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, construction, control and evaluation of a novel for controlled actuator. Traditional force controlled actuators are designed from the premise that 'Stiffer is better'. This approach gives a high bandwidth system, prone to problems of contact instability, noise, and low power density. The actuator presented in this thesis is designed from the premise that 'Stiffness isn't everything'. The actuator, which incorporates a series elastic element, trades off achievable bandwidth for gains in stable, low noise force control, and protection against shock loads. This thesis reviews related work in robot force control, presents theoretical descriptions of the control and expected performance from a series elastic actuator, and describes the design of a test actuator constructed to gather performance data. Finally the performance of the system is evaluated by comparing the performance data to theoretical predictions.

  1. Effective Actuation: High Bandwidth Actuators and Actuator Scaling Laws

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER I-ioh Bandwidth Actiintorv and Actuator 9clinp Iaw-, 65502F 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER A. B. Cain, G. R. Raman , and E...of possible applications include the high frequency excitation for supprc~sion of flow induced resonance in weapons bay cavities (see Raman et al...systems. Adaptive high bandwidth actuators are required to adapt to changes in flow speed and conditions during flight. Raman et al. (2000) and Stanek et

  2. Hydraulic Actuator Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-01

    Hydraulic Actuator Project Stakeholder meeting held 7- 8 October in Los Angeles; 58 attendees representing aircraft and actuator OEMs, seal...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Research Laboratory,4555 Overlook Ave., SW ,Washington,DC,20375 8 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8 -98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Actuator JTP: Coupon Testing Substrate

  3. Remote switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Edwin Gerard; Beauman, Ronald; Palo, Jr., Stefan

    2013-01-29

    The invention provides a device and method for actuating electrical switches remotely. The device is removably attached to the switch and is actuated through the transfer of a user's force. The user is able to remain physically removed from the switch site obviating need for protective equipment. The device and method allow rapid, safe actuation of high-voltage or high-current carrying electrical switches or circuit breakers.

  4. Electrostatically Driven Nanoballoon Actuator.

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Hamid Reza; Yan, Aiming; Coh, Sinisa; Gracia-Espino, Eduardo; Dunn, Gabriel; Wågberg, Thomas; Louie, Steven G; Cohen, Marvin L; Zettl, Alex

    2016-11-09

    We demonstrate an inflatable nanoballoon actuator based on geometrical transitions between the inflated (cylindrical) and collapsed (flattened) forms of a carbon nanotube. In situ transmission electron microscopy experiments employing a nanoelectromechanical manipulator show that a collapsed carbon nanotube can be reinflated by electrically charging the nanotube, thus realizing an electrostatically driven nanoballoon actuator. We find that the tube actuator can be reliably cycled with only modest control voltages (few volts) with no apparent wear or fatigue. A complementary theoretical analysis identifies critical parameters for nanotube nanoballoon actuation.

  5. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James

    2004-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to many industrial uses, such as steam turbines, process control valves, dampers, motion control, etc. The advantageous features of the improved electrohydraulic linear actuators are best described with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators that the improved ones are intended to supplant. The flow of hydraulic fluid to the two ports of the actuator cylinder is controlled by a servo valve that is controlled by a signal from a servo amplifier that, in turn, receives an analog position-command signal (a current having a value between 4 and 20 mA) from a supervisory control system of the facility. As the position command changes, the servo valve shifts, causing a greater flow of hydraulic fluid to one side of the cylinder and thereby causing the actuator piston to move to extend or retract a piston rod from the actuator body. A linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) directly linked to the piston provides a position-feedback signal, which is compared with the position-command signal in the servo amplifier. When the position-feedback and position-command signals match, the servo valve moves to its null position, in which it holds the actuator piston at a steady position.

  6. Research Trends of Soft Actuators based on Electroactive Polymers and Conducting Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneto, K.

    2016-04-01

    Artificial muscles (or soft actuators) based on electroactive polymers (EAPs) are attractive power sources to drive human-like robots in place of electrical motor, because they are quiet, powerful, light weight and compact. Among EAPs for soft actuators, conducting polymers are superior in strain, stress, deformation form and driving voltage compared with the other EAPs. In this paper, the research trends of EAPs and conducting polymers are reviewed by retrieval of the papers and patents. The research activity of EAP actuators showed the maximum around 2010 and somehow declining now days. The reasons for the reducing activity are found to be partly due to problems of conducting polymer actuators for the practical application. The unique characteristics of conducting polymer actuators are mentioned in terms of the basic mechanisms of actuation, creeping, training effect and shape retention under high tensile loads. The issues and limitation of conducting polymer soft actuators are discussed.

  7. Design and performance testing of an ultrasonic linear motor with dual piezoelectric actuators.

    PubMed

    Smithmaitrie, Pruittikorn; Suybangdum, Panumas; Laoratanakul, Pitak; Muensit, Nantakan

    2012-05-01

    In this work, design and performance testing of an ultrasonic linear motor with dual piezoelectric actuator patches are studied. The motor system consists of a linear stator, a pre-load weight, and two piezoelectric actuator patches. The piezoelectric actuators are bonded with the linear elastic stator at specific locations. The stator generates propagating waves when the piezoelectric actuators are subjected to harmonic excitations. Vibration characteristics of the linear stator are analyzed and compared with finite element and experimental results. The analytical, finite element, and experimental results show agreement. In the experiments, performance of the ultrasonic linear motor is tested. Relationships between velocity and pre-load weight, velocity and applied voltage, driving force and applied voltage, and velocity and driving force are reported. The design of the dual piezoelectric actuators yields a simpler structure with a smaller number of actuators and lower stator stiffness compared with a conventional design of an ultrasonic linear motor with fully laminated piezoelectric actuators.

  8. A reduced order model for dielectric elastomer actuators over a range of frequencies and prestrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, Jillian; Manning, Michael; Adler, David; Breuer, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    The actuation strain of an equibiaxially prestrained dielectric elastomer membrane is studied as a function of driving frequency and prestrain. Experimental data are gathered on the membrane's creep and recovery following DC actuation, as well as the steady state amplitude and phase for AC driving voltages ranging from 2 to 40 Hz. The effect of prestretch on steady state actuation was also investigated, using membranes of both 250% and 300% prestretch. A three-element generalized Kelvin-Voigt model is developed to capture the transient and steady-state actuation responses as a function of frequency and prestrain. We show that, despite its relative simplicity, this model captures the relevant timescales for the membrane behavior with good fidelity and can be used to accurately predict the actuation magnitude and phase as a function of time over a range of actuation configurations and driving conditions.

  9. Microfabricated actuators and their application to optics

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Garcia, E.J.

    1994-12-31

    Several authors have given overviews of microelectromechanical systems, including microactuators. In our presentation we will review some of these results, and provide a brief description of the basic principles of operation, fabrication, and application, of a few selected microactuators (electrostatic and surface tension driven). We present a description of a three-level mechanical polysilicon surface-micromachining technology with a discussion of the advantages of this level of process complexity. This technology, is capable of forming complex, batch-fabricated, interconnected, and interactive, microactuated micromechanisms which include optical elements. The inclusion of a third deposited layer of mechanical polysilicon greatly extends the degree of complexity available for micromechanism design. Two examples of microactuators fabricated using this process are provided to illustrate the capabilities and usefulness of the technology. The first actuator is an example of a novel actuation mechanism based on the effect of surface tension at these micro-scale dimensions and of a microstructure within a microstructure. The second is a comb-drive-based microengine which has direct application as a drive and power source for micro optical elements, specifically, micro mirrors and micro shutters. This design converts linear oscillatory motion from electrostatic comb drive actuators into rotational motion via a direct linkage connection. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque to a micromechanism.

  10. Microfabricated actuators and their application to optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    1995-05-01

    Several authors have given overviews of microelectromechanical systems, including microactuators. In our presentation we review some of these results, and provide a brief description of the basic principles of operation, fabrication, and application, of a few selected microactuators (electrostatic and surface tension driven). We present a description of a three- level mechanical polysilicon surface-micromachining technology with a discussion of the advantages of this level of process complexity. This technology is capable of forming complex, batch-fabricated, interconnected, and interactive, microactuated micromechanisms which include optical elements. The inclusion of a third deposited layer of mechanical polysilicon greatly extends the degree of complexity available for micromechanism design. Two examples of microactuators fabricated using this process are provided to illustrate the capabilities and usefulness of the technology. The first actuator is an example of a novel actuation mechanism based on the effect of surface tension at these micro-scale dimensions and of a microstructure within a microstructure. The second is a comb-drive-based microengine which has direct application as a drive and power source for micro optical elements, specifically, micro mirrors and micro shutters. This design converts linear oscillatory motion from electrostatic comb drive actuators into rotational motion via a direct linkage connection. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque to a micromechanism.

  11. RAID 7 disk array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, Lloyd

    1993-01-01

    Each RAID level reflects a different design architecture. Associated with each is a backdrop of imposed limitations, as well as possibilities which may be exploited within the architectural constraints of that level. There are three unique features that differentiate RAID 7 from all other levels. RAID 7 is asynchronous with respect to usage of I/O data paths. Each I/O drive (includes all data and one parity drives) as well as each host interface (there may be multiple host interfaces) has independent control and data paths. This means that each can be accessed completely, independently, of the other. This is facilitated by a separate device cache for each device/interface as well. RAID 7 is asynchronous with respect to device hierarchy and data bus utilization. Each drive and each interface is connected to a high speed data bus controlled by the embedded operating system to make independent transfers to and from central cache. RAID 7 is asynchronous with respect to the operation of an embedded real time process oriented operating system. This means that exclusive and independent of the host, or multiple host paths, the embedded OS manages all I/O transfers asynchronously across the data and parity drives. A key factor to consider is that of the RAID 7's ability to anticipate and match host I/O usage patterns. This yields the following benefits over RAID's built around micro-code based architectures. RAID 7 appears to the host as a normally connected Big Fast Disk (BFD). RAID 7 appears, from the perspective of the individual disk devices, to minimize the total number of accesses and optimize read/write transfer requests. RAID 7 smoothly integrates the random demands of independent users with the principles of spatial and temporal locality. This optimizes small, large, and time sequenced I/O requests which results in users having an I/O performance which approaches performance to that of main memory.

  12. Roller/Gear Drives For Robotic Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William J.; Shipitalo, William

    1995-01-01

    Pitch/yaw roller/gear drive and wrist-roll roller/gear drive designed to incorporate several features desirable in robotic-joint actuators. Includes zero backlash, high efficiency, smooth motion (little ripple in torque and in speed ratio), and high degree of back-drivability. Pitch/yaw drive is novel two-axis drive containing combination of gears, rollers, and springs acting together eliminating backlash and cogging. Wrist-roll drive more-conventional single-axis drive offering advantages like those of pitch/yaw drive.

  13. Drive reconfiguration mechanism for tracked robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Willis, W. David

    2000-01-01

    Drive reconfiguration apparatus for changing the configuration of a drive unit with respect to a vehicle body may comprise a guide system associated with the vehicle body and the drive unit which allows the drive unit to rotate about a center of rotation that is located at about a point where the drive unit contacts the surface being traversed. An actuator mounted to the vehicle body and connected to the drive unit rotates the drive unit about the center of rotation between a first position and a second position.

  14. Control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  15. On the development of planar actuators for variable stiffness devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Markus; Gerlach, Gerald

    2013-04-01

    This contribution describes the development, the potential and the limitations of planar actuators for controlling bending devices with variable stiffness. Such structures are supposed to be components of new smart, self-sensing and -controlling composite materials for lightweight constructions. To realize a proper stiffness control, it is necessary to develop reliable actuators with high actuation capabilities based on smart materials. Several actuator designs driven by electroactive polymers (EAPs) are presented and discussed regarding to their applicability in such structures. To investigate the actuators, variable-flexural stiffness devices based on the control of its area moment of inertia were developed. The devices consist of a multi-layer stack of thin, individual plates. Stiffness variation is caused by planar actuators which control the sliding behavior between the layers by form closure structures. Previous investigations have shown that actuators with high actuation potential are needed to ensure reliable connections between the layers. For that reason, two kinds of EAPs Danfoss PolyPower and VHB 4905 by 3M, have been studied as driving unit. These EAP-driven actuators will be compared based on experimental measurements and finite element analyses.

  16. Basic Characteristics and Predicted Lifetime of Stacked Volumetric Optical Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Akira; Ido, Hiroshi; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Yamanaka, Hideaki; Osawa, Seigo; Tani, Manabu; Uchida, Takeshi; Watanabe, Yutaka; Arai, Shinichi; Yoshihiro, Masafumi; Iida, Tamotsu; Awano, Hiroyuki; Ota, Norio; Yoshida, Takashi; Abe, Yukinobu; Yoshida, Kazushi

    2008-07-01

    A stacked volumetric optical disks (SVOD) system has been developed to achieve an over 1 Tbytes cartridge capacity using a commercialized drive and conventional recording layers. To confirm the reliability of thin optical disks in SVOD, several feasibility tests were conducted. The recording power margin, tilt margin and read stability of the thin optical disks were measured, and the lifetime of the thin optical disks was estimated. The results were similar to those of conventional 1.2-mm-thick optical disks regardless of the disk thickness.

  17. Self-actuated device

    DOEpatents

    Hecht, Samuel L.

    1984-01-01

    A self-actuated device, of particular use as a valve or an orifice for nuclear reactor fuel and blanket assemblies, in which a gas produced by a neutron induced nuclear reaction gradually accumulates as a function of neutron fluence. The gas pressure increase occasioned by such accumulation of gas is used to actuate the device.

  18. Remotely controllable actuating device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKillip, Jr., Robert M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An actuating device can change a position of an active member that remains in substantially the same position in the absence of a force of a predetermined magnitude on the active member. The actuating device comprises a shape-memory alloy actuating member for exerting a force when actuated by changing the temperature thereof, which shape-memory alloy actuating member has a portion for connection to the active member for exerting thereon a force having a magnitude at least as large as the predetermined magnitude for moving the active member to a desired position. Actuation circuitry is provided for actuating the shape-memory alloy actuating member by changing the temperature thereof only for the time necessary to move the active member to the desired position. The invention is particularly useful for changing the position of a camber-adjusting tab on a helicopter rotor blade by using two shape-memory alloy members that can act against each other to adjust dynamic properties of the rotor blade as it is rotating.

  19. Massively Redundant Electromechanical Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-30

    date of determination). DoD Controlling Office is (insert controlling DoD office). "Massively Redundant Electromechanical Actuators" August... electromechanical systems) processes are used to manufacture reliable and reproducible stators and sliders for the actuators. These processes include

  20. Forging Long Shafts On Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilghman, Chris; Askey, William; Hopkins, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Isothermal-forging apparatus produces long shafts integral with disks. Equipment based on modification of conventional isothermal-forging equipment, required stroke cut by more than half. Enables forging of shafts as long as 48 in. (122 cm) on typical modified conventional forging press, otherwise limited to making shafts no longer than 18 in. (46cm). Removable punch, in which forged material cools after plastic deformation, essential novel feature of forging apparatus. Technology used to improve such products as components of gas turbines and turbopumps and of other shaft/disk parts for powerplants, drive trains, or static structures.

  1. Modeling actuation forces and strains in nastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Luke A.; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2006-03-01

    Nastic structures are capable of three dimensional shape change using biological principles borrowed from plant motion. The plant motor cells increase or decrease in size through a change in osmotic pressure. When nonuniform cell swelling occurs, it causes the plant tissue to warp and change shape, resulting it net movement, known as nastic motion, which is the same phenomena that causes plants to angle their broad leaf and flower surfaces to face light sources. The nastic structures considered in this paper are composed of a bilayer of microactuator arrays with a fluid reservoir in between the two layers. The actuators are housed in a thin plate and expand when water from the fluid reservoir is pumped into the actuation chamber through a phospholipid bilayer with embedded active transport proteins, which move the water from the low pressure fluid reservoir into a high pressure actuation chamber. Increasing water pressure inside the actuator causes lateral expansion and axial bulging, and the non-uniform net volume change of actuators throughout the nastic structure results in twisting or bending shape change. Modifying the actuation displacement allows controlled volume change. This paper presents an analytical model of the driving and blocking forces involved in actuation, as well as stress and strain that occurs due to the pressure changes. Actuation is driven by increasing osmotic pressure, and blocking forces are taken into consideration to plan actuator response so that outside forces do not counteract the displacement of actuation. Nastic structures are designed with use in unmanned aerial vehicles in mind, so blocking forces are modeled to be similar to in-flight conditions. Stress in the system is modeled so that any residual strain or lasting deformation can be determined, as well as a lifespan before failure from repeated actuation. The long-term aim of our work is to determine the power and energy efficiency of nastic structures actuation mechanism.

  2. 40 HP Electro-Mechanical Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulmer, Chris

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed on the 40 BP electro-mechanical actuator (EMA) system developed on NASA contract NAS3-25799 for the NASA National Launch System and Electrical Actuation (ELA) Technology Bridging Programs. The system was designed to demonstrate the capability of large, high power linear ELA's for applications such as Thrust Vector Control (TVC) on rocket engines. It consists of a motor controller, high frequency power source, drive electronics and a linear actuator. The power source is a 25kVA 20 kHz Mapham inverter. The drive electronics are based on the pulse population modulation concept and operate at a nominal frequency of 40 kHz. The induction motor is a specially designed high speed, low inertia motor capable of a 68 peak HP. The actuator was originally designed by MOOG Aerospace under an internal R & D program to meet Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) TVC requirements. The design was modified to meet this programs linear rate specification of 7.4 inches/second. The motor and driver were tested on a dynamometer at the Martin Marietta Space Systems facility. System frequency response and step response tests were conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center facility. A complete description of the system and all test results can be found in the body of the report.

  3. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  4. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  5. Optical disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Swafford, B.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the different types of optical storage technology is presented. Research efforts to integrate this technology into the VAX/VMS environment are discussed. In addition, plans for future applications of optical disk technology are described. The applications should prove to be beneficial to the NSSDC user community as a whole. Of particular interest is the concentration on the collaboration with the Dynamics Explorer project.

  6. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  7. Photostrictive actuators for photonic control of shallow spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hui-Ru; Tzou, Horn-Sen

    2007-10-01

    Photostrictive materials, exhibiting light-induced strain, are of interest for the future generation of wireless remote control photo-actuators. Photostrictive actuators are expected to be used as the driving component in optically controlled flexible structures. In this paper, the photonic control of flexible spherical shells using discrete photostrictive actuators is investigated. This paper presents a coupled opto-piezothermoelastic shell theory that incorporates photovoltaic, pyroelectric and piezoelectric effects, and has the capability to predict the response of a spherical shell driven by the photostrictive actuators. In this study, the effects of actuator location as well as membrane and bending components on the control action have been analyzed. The results obtained indicate that the control forces are mode and location dependent. Analysis also shows that the membrane control action is much more significant than the bending control action.

  8. System and Method for Tensioning a Robotically Actuated Tendon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A tendon tensioning system includes a tendon having a proximal end and a distal end, an actuator, and a motor controller. The actuator may include a drive screw and a motor, and may be coupled with the proximal end of the tendon and configured to apply a tension through the tendon in response to an electrical current. The motor controller may be electrically coupled with the actuator, and configured to provide an electrical current having a first amplitude to the actuator until a stall tension is achieved through the tendon; provide a pulse current to the actuator following the achievement of the stall tension, where the amplitude of the pulse current is greater than the first amplitude, and return the motor to a steady state holding current following the conclusion of the pulse current.

  9. Implementation and analysis of an innovative digital charge amplifier for hysteresis reduction in piezoelectric stack actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Bazghaleh, Mohsen Grainger, Steven; Cazzolato, Ben; Lu, Tien-Fu; Oskouei, Reza

    2014-04-15

    Smart actuators are the key components in a variety of nanopositioning applications, such as scanning probe microscopes and atomic force microscopes. Piezoelectric actuators are the most common smart actuators due to their high resolution, low power consumption, and wide operating frequency but they suffer hysteresis which affects linearity. In this paper, an innovative digital charge amplifier is presented to reduce hysteresis in piezoelectric stack actuators. Compared to traditional analog charge drives, experimental results show that the piezoelectric stack actuator driven by the digital charge amplifier has less hysteresis. It is also shown that the voltage drop of the digital charge amplifier is significantly less than the voltage drop of conventional analog charge amplifiers.

  10. High speed hydraulically-actuated operating system for an electric circuit breaker

    DOEpatents

    Iman, I.

    1983-06-07

    This hydraulically-actuated operating system comprises a cylinder, a piston movable therein in an opening direction to open a circuit breaker, and an accumulator for supplying pressurized liquid to a breaker-opening piston-actuating space within the cylinder. A normally-closed valve between the accumulator and the actuating space is openable to allow pressurized liquid from the accumulator to flow through the valve into the actuating space to drive the piston in an opening direction. A dashpotting mechanism operating separately from the hydraulic actuating system is provided, thereby reducing flow restriction interference with breaker opening. 3 figs.

  11. Electromechanical flight control actuator, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Schematic diagrams are given for both the four-channel electromechanical actuator and the single-channel power electronics breadboard. Detailed design data is also given on the gears used in the differential gearbox and a copy of the operations manual for the system is included. Performance test results are given for the EMA motor and its current source indicator, the drive control electronics, and the overall system. The power converter waveform test results are also summarized.

  12. Tough Nanocomposite Ionogel-based Actuator Exhibits Robust Performance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinhua; He, Bin; Wang, Zhipeng; Tang, Haifeng; Su, Teng; Wang, Qigang

    2014-01-01

    Ionogel electrolytes can be fabricated for electrochemical actuators with many desirable advantages, including direct low-voltage control in air, high electrochemical and thermal stability, and complete silence during actuation. However, the demands for active actuators with above features and load-driving ability remain a challenge; much work is necessary to enhance the mechanical strength of electrolyte materials. Herein, we describe a cross-linked supramolecular approach to prepare tough nanocomposite gel electrolytes from HEMA, BMIMBF4, and TiO2 via self-initiated UV polymerization. The tough and stable ionogels are emerging to fabricate electric double-layer capacitor-like soft actuators, which can be driven by electrically induced ion migration. The ionogel-based actuator shows a displacement response of 5.6 mm to the driving voltage of 3.5 V. After adding the additional mass weight of the same as the actuator, it still shows a large displacement response of 3.9 mm. Furthermore, the actuator can not only work in harsh temperature environments (100°C and −10°C) but also realize the goal of grabbing an object by adjusting the applied voltage. PMID:25327414

  13. Tough nanocomposite ionogel-based actuator exhibits robust performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhua; He, Bin; Wang, Zhipeng; Tang, Haifeng; Su, Teng; Wang, Qigang

    2014-10-20

    Ionogel electrolytes can be fabricated for electrochemical actuators with many desirable advantages, including direct low-voltage control in air, high electrochemical and thermal stability, and complete silence during actuation. However, the demands for active actuators with above features and load-driving ability remain a challenge; much work is necessary to enhance the mechanical strength of electrolyte materials. Herein, we describe a cross-linked supramolecular approach to prepare tough nanocomposite gel electrolytes from HEMA, BMIMBF4, and TiO2 via self-initiated UV polymerization. The tough and stable ionogels are emerging to fabricate electric double-layer capacitor-like soft actuators, which can be driven by electrically induced ion migration. The ionogel-based actuator shows a displacement response of 5.6 mm to the driving voltage of 3.5 V. After adding the additional mass weight of the same as the actuator, it still shows a large displacement response of 3.9 mm. Furthermore, the actuator can not only work in harsh temperature environments (100°C and -10°C) but also realize the goal of grabbing an object by adjusting the applied voltage.

  14. Ultrasonic drive of small mechanical components on a tapered metal strip.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Hu, Junhui

    2013-02-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that small mechanical components such as bars, bar composites, disks and cogwheels, centered at a nodal point of tapered metal strip in flexural ultrasonic vibration, can be ultrasonically driven to rotate by the tapered metal strip. It is experimentally found that revolution speed of the small mechanical components is affected by the metal strip vibration, and the structure and size of the small mechanical components. The revolution speed increases as the metal strip vibration increases and the size of the small mechanical components decreases, and it may be higher than 600rpm. Measuring the transient response of angular speed, driving torque on the small disk with 4.7mm diameter and 0.1mm thickness is estimated to be 0.91μNm when the driving voltage is 100V(p-p) and the actuator is in resonance. Travelling waves are found around the nodal point of the metal strip, which may be the cause of the rotary drive.

  15. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest; Pardini, John A.; Walker, David E.

    1987-01-01

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  16. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  17. An Unconventional Inchworm Actuator Based on PZT/ERFs Control Technology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guojun; Zhang, Yanyan; Liu, Jianfang; Li, Jianqiao; Tang, Chunxiu; Wang, Tengfei; Yang, Xuhao

    2016-01-01

    An unconventional inchworm actuator for precision positioning based on piezoelectric (PZT) actuation and electrorheological fluids (ERFs) control technology is presented. The actuator consists of actuation unit (PZT stack pump), fluid control unit (ERFs valve), and execution unit (hydraulic actuator). In view of smaller deformation of PZT stack, a new structure is designed for actuation unit, which integrates the advantages of two modes (namely, diaphragm type and piston type) of the volume changing of pump chamber. In order to improve the static shear yield strength of ERFs, a composite ERFs valve is designed, which adopts the series-parallel plate compound structure. The prototype of the inchworm actuator has been designed and manufactured in the lab. Systematic test results indicate that the displacement resolution of the unconventional inchworm actuator reaches 0.038 μm, and the maximum driving force and velocity are 42 N, 14.8 mm/s, respectively. The optimal working frequency for the maximum driving velocity is 120 Hz. The complete research and development processes further confirm the feasibility of developing a new type of inchworm actuator with high performance based on PZT actuation and ERFs control technology, which provides a reference for the future development of a new type of actuator. PMID:27022234

  18. An Unconventional Inchworm Actuator Based on PZT/ERFs Control Technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guojun; Zhang, Yanyan; Liu, Jianfang; Li, Jianqiao; Tang, Chunxiu; Wang, Tengfei; Yang, Xuhao

    2016-01-01

    An unconventional inchworm actuator for precision positioning based on piezoelectric (PZT) actuation and electrorheological fluids (ERFs) control technology is presented. The actuator consists of actuation unit (PZT stack pump), fluid control unit (ERFs valve), and execution unit (hydraulic actuator). In view of smaller deformation of PZT stack, a new structure is designed for actuation unit, which integrates the advantages of two modes (namely, diaphragm type and piston type) of the volume changing of pump chamber. In order to improve the static shear yield strength of ERFs, a composite ERFs valve is designed, which adopts the series-parallel plate compound structure. The prototype of the inchworm actuator has been designed and manufactured in the lab. Systematic test results indicate that the displacement resolution of the unconventional inchworm actuator reaches 0.038 μm, and the maximum driving force and velocity are 42 N, 14.8 mm/s, respectively. The optimal working frequency for the maximum driving velocity is 120 Hz. The complete research and development processes further confirm the feasibility of developing a new type of inchworm actuator with high performance based on PZT actuation and ERFs control technology, which provides a reference for the future development of a new type of actuator.

  19. Robot Arm with Tendon Connector Plate and Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Nguyen, Vienny (Inventor); Millerman, Alexander (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic system includes a tendon-driven end effector, a linear actuator, a flexible tendon, and a plate assembly. The linear actuator assembly has a servo motor and a drive mechanism, the latter of which translates linearly with respect to a drive axis of the servo motor in response to output torque from the servo motor. The tendon connects to the end effector and drive mechanism. The plate assembly is disposed between the linear actuator assembly and the tendon-driven end effector and includes first and second plates. The first plate has a first side that defines a boss with a center opening. The second plate defines an accurate through-slot having tendon guide channels. The first plate defines a through passage for the tendon between the center opening and a second side of the first plate. A looped end of the flexible tendon is received within the tendon guide channels.

  20. Coalescence-induced droplet actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Mathieu; Verdier, Claude; Nock, Volker

    2011-11-01

    This work investigates a little explored driving mechanism to actuate droplets: the surface tension gradient which arises during the coalescence of two droplets of liquid having different compositions and therefore surface tensions. The resulting surface tension gradient gives rise to a Marangoni flow which, if sufficiently large, can displace the droplet. In order to understand, the flow dynamics arising during the coalescence of droplets of different fluids, a model has been developed in the lubrication framework. The numerical results confirm the existence of a self-propulsion window which depends on two dimensionless groups representing competing effects during the coalescence: the surface tension contrast between the droplets which promotes actuation and species diffusion which tends to make the mixture uniform thereby anihilating Marangoni flow and droplet motion. In parallel, experiments have been conducted to confirm this self-propulsion behaviour. The experiment consists in depositing a droplet of distilled water on a ``hydrophilic highway.'' This stripe was obtained by plasma-treating a piece of PDMS shielded in some parts by glass coverslips. This surface functionalization was found to be the most convenient way to control the coalescence. When a droplet of ethanol is deposited near the ``water slug,'' coalescence occurs and a rapid motion of the resulting mixture is observed. The support of the Dumont d'Urville NZ-France Science & Technology program is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Hydraulically-actuated operating system for an electric circuit breaker

    DOEpatents

    Barkan, Philip; Imam, Imdad

    1978-01-01

    This hydraulically-actuated operating system comprises a cylinder, a piston movable therein in an opening direction to open a circuit breaker, and an accumulator for supplying pressurized liquid to a piston-actuating space within the cylinder. A normally-closed valve between the accumulator and the actuating space is openable to allow pressurized liquid from the accumulator to flow through the valve into the actuating space to drive the piston in an opening direction. A vent is located hydraulically between the actuating space and the valve for affording communication between said actuating space and a low pressure region. Flow control means is provided for restricting leakage through said vent to a rate that prevents said leakage from substantially detracting from the development of pressure within said actuatng space during the period from initial opening of the valve to the time when said piston has moved through most of its opening stroke. Following such period and while the valve is still open, said flow control means allows effective leakage through said vent. The accumulator has a limited capacity that results in the pressure within said actuating space decaying promptly to a low value as a result of effective leakage through said vent after the piston has moved through a circuit-breaker opening stroke and while the valve is in its open state. Means is provided for resetting the valve to its closed state in response to said pressure decay in the actuating space.

  2. The design and analysis of a MEMS electrothermal actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suocheng, Wang; Yongping, Hao; Shuangjie, Liu

    2015-04-01

    This paper introduces a type of out-of-plane microelectrothermal actuator, which is based on the principle of bimetal film thermal expansion in the fuse. A polymer SU-8 material and nickel are used as the functional and structural materials of the actuator. Through heating the resistance wire using electricity, the actuator produces out-of-plane motion in the perpendicular axial direction of the device and the bias layer contact with the substrate, completing signal output. Using Coventorware software to establish the three-dimensional model, the geometric structure is optimized and the electrothermal capabilities are determined theoretically. From electrothermal analysis, the actuator's displacement is 18 μm and the temperature rises from 300 to 440 K under a voltage of 5 V and the response time is 5 ms. The actuator's displacement is 20 μm under a 100000 m/s2 acceleration in the accelerating field. In the coupled field, applying a 3 V voltage, the initial temperature is 300 K, while the acceleration is 50000 m/s2, the driving displacement of the actuator is 23 μm, and temperature rises to 400 K. Finally, through checking the stress in different field sources, the maximum stress of the actuator is smaller than the allowable stress of nickel. The results show that the electrothermal actuator has high reliability.

  3. Spaceflight optical disk recorder development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, Thomas A.; Rinsland, Pamela L.

    1990-01-01

    A NASA program to develop a high performance (high rate, high capacity) rewriteable optical disk recorder for spaceflight applications is presented. An expandable, adaptable system concept is proposed based on disk drive modules and a modular controller. Drive performance goals are 10 Gbyte capacity, 300 Mb transfer rate, 10 to the -12th corrected bit-error rate, and 150 msec access time. The preliminary design for an expandable controller is presented. System goals are up to 160 Gbyte capacity at up to 1.8 Gb/sec rate with concurrent I/O, asynchronous data transfer, and 2-5-year operating life in orbit. Projected system environment and operational scenarios based on Polar Orbiting Platform applications are discussed.

  4. Electrostatic actuators for portable microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Joshua

    Both developed and developing nations have an urgent need to diagnose disease cheaply, reliably, and independently of centralized facilities. Microfulidic platforms are well-positioned to address the need for portable diagnostics, mainly due to their obvious advantage in size. However, most microfluidic methods rely on equipment outside of the chip either for driving fluid flow (e.g., syringe pumps) or for taking measurements (e.g., lasers or microscopes). The energy and space requirements of the whole system inhibit portability and contribute to costs. To capitalize on the strengths of microfluidic platforms and address the serious needs of society, system components need to be miniaturized. Also, miniaturization should be accomplished as simply as possible, considering that simplicity is usually requisite for achieving truly transformative technology. Herein, I attempt to address the issue of controlling fluid flow in portable microfluidic systems. I focus on systems that are driven by elastomer-based membrane valves, since these valves are inherently simple, yet they are capable of sophisticated fluid manipulation. Others have attempted to modify pneumatic microvalves for portable applications, e.g., by transitioning to electromagnetic, thermopneumatic, or piezoelectric actuation principles. However, none of these strategies maintain the proper balance of simplicity, functionality, and ease of integration. My research centers on electrostatic actuators, due to their conceptual simplicity and the efficacy of electrostatic forces on the microscale. To ensure easy integration with polymer-based systems, and to maintain simplicity in the fabrication procedure, the actuators were constructed solely from poly(dimethylsiloxane) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. In addition, the actuators were fabricated exclusively with soft-lithographic techniques. A mathematical model was developed to identify actuator parameters compatible with soft-lithography, and also to

  5. Printing low-voltage dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Alexandre; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of fully printed thin dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs), reducing the operation voltage below 300 V while keeping good actuation strain. DEAs are soft actuators capable of strains greater than 100% and response times below 1 ms, but they require driving voltage in the kV range, limiting the possible applications. One way to reduce the driving voltage of DEAs is to decrease the dielectric membrane thickness, which is typically in the 20-100 μm range, as reliable fabrication becomes challenging below this thickness. We report here the use of pad-printing to produce μm thick silicone membranes, on which we pad-print μm thick compliant electrodes to create DEAs. We achieve a lateral actuation strain of 7.5% at only 245 V on a 3 μm thick pad-printed membrane. This corresponds to a ratio of 125%/kV2, by far the highest reported value for DEAs. To quantify the increasing stiffening impact of the electrodes on DEA performance as the membrane thickness decreases, we compare two circular actuators, one with 3 μm- and one with 30 μm-thick membranes. Our experimental measurements show that the strain uniformity of the 3 μm-DEA is indeed affected by the mechanical impact of the electrodes. We developed a simple DEA model that includes realistic electrodes of finite stiffness, rather than assuming zero stiffness electrodes as is commonly done. The simulation results confirm that the stiffening impact of the electrodes is an important parameter that should not be neglected in the design of thin-DEAs. This work presents a practical approach towards low-voltage DEAs, a critical step for the development of real world applications.

  6. Ceramic vane drive joint

    DOEpatents

    Smale, Charles H.

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  7. Magneto-thermal Disk Winds from Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Ye, Jiani; Goodman, Jeremy; Yuan, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The global evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) are governed by disk angular-momentum transport and mass-loss processes. Recent numerical studies suggest that angular-momentum transport in the inner region of PPDs is largely driven by magnetized disk wind, yet the wind mass-loss rate remains unconstrained. On the other hand, disk mass loss has conventionally been attributed to photoevaporation, where external heating on the disk surface drives a thermal wind. We unify the two scenarios by developing a one-dimensional model of magnetized disk winds with a simple treatment of thermodynamics as a proxy for external heating. The wind properties largely depend on (1) the magnetic field strength at the wind base, characterized by the poloidal Alfvén speed vAp, (2) the sound speed cs near the wind base, and (3) how rapidly poloidal field lines diverge (achieve {R}-2 scaling). When {v}{Ap}\\gg {c}{{s}}, corotation is enforced near the wind base, resulting in centrifugal acceleration. Otherwise, the wind is accelerated mainly by the pressure of the toroidal magnetic field. In both cases, the dominant role played by magnetic forces likely yields wind outflow rates that exceed purely hydrodynamical mechanisms. For typical PPD accretion-rate and wind-launching conditions, we expect vAp to be comparable to cs at the wind base. The resulting wind is heavily loaded, with a total wind mass-loss rate likely reaching a considerable fraction of the wind-driven accretion rate. Implications for modeling global disk evolution and planet formation are also discussed.

  8. Development of robot hand with pneumatic actuator and construct of master-slave system.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Shinya; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Komatsubara, Hiroyuki; Kudawara, Tatuwo; Shimizu, Mikio

    2007-01-01

    Recently, research has concentrated on robots that can coexist with people and be of use to them. Such a robot needs to be both safe and flexible. Here, we use a pneumatic actuator as the driving source of a robot hand. We develop a pneumatic actuator driven by low pressure because we consider that the conventional pneumatic actuator is inadequate for the driving source of a robot hand. First, we examine the characteristics of our new pneumatic actuator. Next, we develop a five-fingered robot hand using this pneumatic actuator. The robot hand produced is both safe and flexible. We construct a master-slave system to enable the robot hand to perform the same operations as a human hand. Next, we make a joint model that has one degree of freedom using a pneumatic actuator. We construct a control system for the joint model and verify its control performance.

  9. Magnetically Actuated Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinera, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a magnetically actuated seal in which either a single electromagnet, or multiple electromagnets, are used to control the seal's position. This system can either be an open/ close type of system or an actively controlled system.

  10. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  11. Laser Optical Disk: The Coming Revolution in On-Line Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujitani, Larry

    1984-01-01

    Review of similarities and differences between magnetic-based and optical disk drives includes a discussion of the electronics necessary for their operation; describes benefits, possible applications, and future trends in development of laser-based drives; and lists manufacturers of laser optical disk drives. (MBR)

  12. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  13. Inertial Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren

    1995-01-01

    Inertial linear actuators developed to suppress residual accelerations of nominally stationary or steadily moving platforms. Function like long-stroke version of voice coil in conventional loudspeaker, with superimposed linear variable-differential transformer. Basic concept also applicable to suppression of vibrations of terrestrial platforms. For example, laboratory table equipped with such actuators plus suitable vibration sensors and control circuits made to vibrate much less in presence of seismic, vehicular, and other environmental vibrational disturbances.

  14. Combustion powered linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  15. Laser Initiated Actuator study

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B.

    1991-06-27

    The program task was to design and study a laser initiated actuator. The design of the actuator is described, it being comprised of the fiber and body subassemblies. The energy source for all experiments was a Spectra Diode 2200-H2 laser diode. The diode is directly coupled to a 100 micron core, 0.3 numerical aperture fiber optic terminated with an SMA connector. The successful testing results are described and recommendations are made.

  16. Hybrid electromechanical actuator and actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid electromechanical actuator has two different types of electromechanical elements, one that expands in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto and one that contracts in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto. The two electromechanical elements are (i) disposed in relation to one another such that the transverse directions thereof are parallel to one another, and (ii) mechanically coupled to one another at least at two opposing edges thereof. Electric power is applied simultaneously to the elements.

  17. Backed Bending Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.; Su, Ji

    2004-01-01

    Bending actuators of a proposed type would partly resemble ordinary bending actuators, but would include simple additional components that would render them capable of exerting large forces at small displacements. Like an ordinary bending actuator, an actuator according to the proposal would include a thin rectangular strip that would comprise two bonded layers (possibly made of electroactive polymers with surface electrodes) and would be clamped at one end in the manner of a cantilever beam. Unlike an ordinary bending actuator, the proposed device would include a rigid flat backplate that would support part of the bending strip against backward displacement; because of this feature, the proposed device is called a backed bending actuator. When an ordinary bending actuator is inactive, the strip typically lies flat, the tip displacement is zero, and the force exerted by the tip is zero. During activation, the tip exerts a transverse force and undergoes a bending displacement that results from the expansion or contraction of one or more of the bonded layers. The tip force of an ordinary bending actuator is inversely proportional to its length; hence, a long actuator tends to be weak. The figure depicts an ordinary bending actuator and the corresponding backed bending actuator. The bending, the tip displacement (d(sub t)), and the tip force (F) exerted by the ordinary bending actuator are well approximated by the conventional equations for the loading and deflection of a cantilever beam subject to a bending moment which, in this case, is applied by the differential expansion or contraction of the bonded layers. The bending, displacement, and tip force of the backed bending actuator are calculated similarly, except that it is necessary to account for the fact that the force F(sub b) that resists the displacement of the tip could be sufficient to push part of the strip against the backplate; in such a condition, the cantilever beam would be effectively shortened

  18. Development of characterization tools for reliability testing of micro-electro-mechanical system actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Norman F.; Eaton, William P.; Tanner, Danelle M.; Allen, James J.

    1999-08-01

    Characterization tools have been developed to study the performance characteristics and reliability of surface micromachined actuators. These tools include: (1) the ability to electrically stimulate or stress the actuator, (2) the capability to visually inspect the devices in operation, (3) a method for capturing operational information, and (4) a method to extract performance characteristics from the operational information. Additionally, a novel test structure has been developed to measure electrostatic forces developed by a comb drive actuator.

  19. Dynamic properties of a metal photo-thermal micro-actuator.

    PubMed

    Shi, B; Zhang, H J; Wang, B; Yi, F T; Jiang, J Z; Zhang, D X

    2015-02-20

    This work presents the design, modeling, simulation, and characterization of a metal bent-beam photo-thermal micro-actuator. The mechanism of actuation is based on the thermal expansion of the micro-actuator which is irradiated by a laser, achieving noncontact control of the power supply. Models for micro-actuators were established and finite-element simulations were carried out to investigate the effects of various parameters on actuation properties. It is found that the thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, and the geometry size largely affected actuation behavior whereas heat capacity, density, and Young's modulus did not. Experiments demonstrated the dynamic properties of a Ni micro-actuator fabricated via LIGA technology with 1100/30/100 μm (long/wide/thick) arms. The tip displacement of the micro-actuator could achieve up to 42 μm driven by a laser beam (1064 nm wavelength, 1.2 W power, and a driving frequency of 1 HZ). It is found that the tip displacement decreases with increasing laser driving frequency. For 8 Hz driving frequency, 17 μm (peak-valley value) can be still reached, which is large enough for the application as micro-electro-mechanical systems. Metal photo-thermal micro actuators have advantages such as large displacement, simple structure, and large temperature tolerance, and therefore they will be promising in the fields of micro/nanotechnology.

  20. Non-collinear valve actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A non-collinear valve actuator includes a primary actuating system and a return spring system with each applying forces to a linkage system in order to regulate the flow of a quarter-turn valve. The primary actuating system and return spring system are positioned non-collinearly, which simply means the primary actuating system and return spring system are not in line with each other. By positioning the primary actuating system and return spring system in this manner, the primary actuating system can undergo a larger stroke while the return spring system experiences significantly less displacement. This allows the length of the return spring to be reduced due to the minimization of displacement thereby reducing the weight of the return spring system. By allowing the primary actuating system to undergo longer strokes, the weight of the primary actuating system may also be reduced. Accordingly, the weight of the non-collinear valve actuator is reduced.

  1. Mechanical interface having multiple grounded actuators

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Kenneth M.; Levin, Mike D.; Rosenberg, Louis B.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for interfacing the motion of a user-manipulable object with a computer system includes a user object physically contacted or grasped by a user. A 3-D spatial mechanism is coupled to the user object, such as a stylus or a medical instrument, and provides three degrees of freedom to the user object. Three grounded actuators provide forces in the three degrees of freedom. Two of the degrees of freedom are a planar workspace provided by a closed-loop linkage of members, and the third degree of freedom is rotation of the planar workspace provided by a rotatable carriage. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between actuators and the user object and include drums coupled to the carriage, pulleys coupled to grounded actuators, and flexible cables transmitting force between the pulleys and the drums. The flexibility of the cable allows the drums to rotate with the carriage while the pulleys and actuators remain fixed to ground. The interface also may include a floating gimbal mechanism coupling the linkage to the user object. The floating gimbal mechanism includes rotatably coupled gimbal members that provide three degrees of freedom to the user object and capstan mechanisms coupled between sensors and the gimbal members for providing enhanced sensor resolution.

  2. Biomimetic photo-actuation: sensing, control and actuation in sun-tracking plants.

    PubMed

    Dicker, M P M; Rossiter, J M; Bond, I P; Weaver, P M

    2014-09-01

    Although the actuation mechanisms that drive plant movement have been investigated from a biomimetic perspective, few studies have looked at the wider sensing and control systems that regulate this motion. This paper examines photo-actuation-actuation induced by, and controlled with light-through a review of the sun-tracking functions of the Cornish Mallow. The sun-tracking movement of the Cornish Mallow leaf results from an extraordinarily complex-yet extremely elegant-process of signal perception, generation, filtering and control. Inspired by this process, a concept for a simplified biomimetic analogue of this leaf is proposed: a multifunctional structure employing chemical sensing, signal transmission, and control of composite hydrogel actuators. We present this multifunctional structure, and show that the success of the concept will require improved selection of materials and structural design. This device has application in the solar-tracking of photovoltaic panels for increased energy yield. More broadly it is envisaged that the concept of chemical sensing and control can be expanded beyond photo-actuation to many other stimuli, resulting in new classes of robust solid-state devices.

  3. 76 FR 10403 - Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Coporate Headquaters/Hard Drive Development Division, Lake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... Employment and Training Administration Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Coporate Headquaters/Hard Drive... Drive Development Division, Lake Forest, California (Western Digital Technologies). The Department's... supply engineering (development) services in support of hard drive (also known as disk...

  4. Mathematical model and characteristic analysis of hybrid photovoltaic/piezoelectric actuation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jing; Li, Xiaonan; Ding, Jincheng; Yue, Honghao; Deng, Zongquan

    2016-12-01

    Photovoltaic materials can turn light energy into electric energy directly, and thus have the advantages of high electrical output voltages and the ability to realize remote or non-contact control. When high-energy ultraviolet light illuminates polarized PbLaZrTi (PLZT) materials, high photovoltages will be generated along the spontaneous polarization direction due to the photovoltaic effect. In this paper, a novel hybrid photovoltaic/piezoelectric actuation mechanism is proposed. PLZT ceramics are used as a photovoltaic generator to drive a piezoelectric actuator. A mathematical model is established to define the time history of the actuation voltage between two electrodes of the piezoelectric actuator, which is experimentally validated by the test results of a piezoelectric actuator with different geometrical parameters under irradiation at different light intensities. Some important characteristics of this novel actuation mechanism are analyzed and it can be concluded that (1) it is experimentally validated that there is no hysteresis between voltage and deformation which exists in a PLZT actuator; (2) the saturated voltage and response speed can be improved by using a multi-patch PLZT generator to drive the piezoelectric actuator; and (3) the initial voltage of the piezoelectric actuator can be acquired by controlling the logical switch between the PLZT and the piezoelectric actuator while the initial voltages increase with the rise of light intensity.

  5. Redundant arrays of IDE drives

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Sanders et al.

    2002-01-02

    The authors report tests of redundant arrays of IDE disk drives for use in offline high energy physics data analysis. Parts costs of total systems using commodity EIDE disks are now at the $4000 per Terabyte level. Disk storage prices have now decreased to the point where they equal the cost per Terabyte of Storage Technology tape silos. The disks, however, offer far better granularity; even small institutions can afford to deploy systems. The tests include reports on software RAID-5 systems running under Linux 2.4 using Promise Ultra 100{trademark} disk controllers. RAID-5 protects data in case of a single disk failure by providing parity bits. Tape backup is not required. Journaling file systems are used to allow rapid recovery from crashes. The data analysis strategy is to encapsulate data and CPU processing power. Analysis for a particular part of a data set takes place on the PC where the data resides. The network is only used to put results together. They explore three methods of moving data between sites; internet transfers, not pluggable IDE disks in FireWire cases, and DVD-R disks.

  6. Digital Actuator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator

  7. Folded dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Salaris, Claudio; DeRossi, Danilo

    2007-04-01

    Polymer-based linear actuators with contractile ability are currently demanded for several types of applications. Within the class of dielectric elastomer actuators, two basic configurations are available today for such a purpose: the multi-layer stack and the helical structure. The first consists of several layers of elementary planar actuators stacked in series mechanically and parallel electrically. The second configuration relies on a couple of helical compliant electrodes alternated with a couple of helical dielectrics. The fabrication of both these configurations presents some specific drawbacks today, arising from the peculiarity of each structure. Accordingly, the availability of simpler solutions may boost the short-term use of contractile actuators in practical applications. For this purpose, a new configuration is here described. It consists of a monolithic structure made of an electroded sheet, which is folded up and compacted. The resulting device is functionally equivalent to a multi-layer stack with interdigitated electrodes. However, with respect to a stack the new configuration is advantageously not discontinuous and can be manufactured in one single phase, avoiding layer-by-layer multi-step procedures. The development and preliminary testing of prototype samples of this new actuator made of a silicone elastomer are presented here.

  8. A linear actuator for precision positioning of dual objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuxin; Cao, Jie; Guo, Zhao; Yu, Haoyong

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a linear actuator for precision positioning of dual objects is proposed based on a double friction drive principle using a single piezoelectric element (PZT). The linear actuator consists of an electromagnet and a permanent magnet, which are connected by the PZT. The electromagnet serves as an object 1, and another object (object 2) is attached on the permanent magnet by the magnetic force. For positioning the dual objects independently, two different friction drive modes can be alternated by an on-off control of the electromagnet. When the electromagnet releases from the guide way, it can be driven by impact friction force generated by the PZT. Otherwise, when the electromagnet clamps on the guide way and remains stationary, the object 2 can be driven based on the principle of smooth impact friction drive. A prototype was designed and constructed and experiments were carried out to test the basic performance of the actuator. It has been verified that with a compact size of 31 mm (L) × 12 mm (W) × 8 mm (H), the two objects can achieve long strokes on the order of several millimeters and high resolutions of several tens of nanometers. Since the proposed actuator allows independent movement of two objects by a single PZT, the actuator has the potential to be constructed compactly.

  9. A new class of high force, low-voltage, compliant actuation system

    SciTech Connect

    RODGERS,M. STEVEN; KOTA,SRIDHAR; HETRICK,JOEL; LI,ZHE; JENSEN,BRIAN D.; KRYGOWSKI,THOMAS W.; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; BARNES,STEPHEN MATTHEW; BURG,MICHAEL STANLEY

    2000-04-10

    Although many actuators employing electrostatic comb drives have been demonstrated in a laboratory environment, widespread acceptance in mass produced microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) may be limited due to issues associated with low drive force, large real estate demands, high operating voltages, and reliability concerns due to stiction. On the other hand, comb drives require very low drive currents, offer predictable response, and are highly compatible with the fabrication technology. The expand the application space and facilitate the widespread deployment of self-actuated MEMS, a new class of advanced actuation systems has been developed that maintains the highly desirable aspects of existing components, while significantly diminishing the issues that could impede large scale acceptance. In this paper, the authors will present low-voltage electrostatic actuators that offer a dramatic increase in force over conventional comb drive designs. In addition, these actuators consume only a small fraction of the chip area previously used, yielding significant gains in power density. To increase the stroke length of these novel electrostatic actuators, the authors have developed highly efficient compliant stroke amplifiers. The coupling of compact, high-force actuators with fully compliant displacement multipliers sets a new paradigm for highly integrated microelectromechanical systems.

  10. Hybrid Ultrasonic Actuator for Force-Feedback Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Tsuyoshi; Aoyagi, Manabu; Takano, Takehiro; Tamura, Hideki; Tomikawa, Yoshiro

    2008-05-01

    There is a great possibility that an ultrasonic motor (USM) can effectively reproduce realistic feelings of hardness and roughness on a virtual object in a haptic virtual reality system, because it has a rapid response characteristic. However, the state following an external force does not exist in an ordinal USM, because a stator vibrator is preloaded to a rotor or a slider and a breaking force always occurs. Moreover, it is hard to arbitrarily change the preload of a USM during operation. In this study, a hybrid ultrasonic actuator that combines a USM function and a clutch one was proposed and examined. Such an actuator can electrically control a preload using piezoelectric actuators and a mechanical amplifier. It can also widely control the generation of driving and braking torques. As an experimental result, the revolution and rapid clutch functions of the hybrid ultrasonic actuator are realized.

  11. Design and experiment performances of an inchworm type rotary actuator.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianping; Zhao, Hongwei; Shao, Mingkun; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Huang, Hu; Fan, Zunqiang

    2014-08-01

    A piezo-driven rotary actuator by means of inchworm principle is proposed in this paper. Six piezo-stacks and flexure hinges are used to realize large rotation ranges with high accuracy both in the forward and backward motions. Four right-angle flexure hinges and two right-circular flexure hinges are applied in the stator. The motion principle and theoretical analysis of the designed actuator are discussed. In order to investigate the working characteristics, a prototype actuator was manufactured and a series of experiment tests were carried out. The test results indicate that the maximum rotation velocity is 71,300 μrad/s; the maximum output torque is 19.6 N mm. The experiment results confirm that the designed actuator can obtain large rotation motion ranges with relatively high output torques and different rotation speeds on the condition of different driving voltages and frequencies.

  12. Dynamic profile of a prototype pivoted proof-mass actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. W.

    1981-08-01

    A prototype of a linear inertial reaction actuation (damper) device employing a flexure-pivoted reaction (proof) mass is discussed. The mass is driven by an electromechanic motor using a dc electromagnetic field and an ac electromagnetic drive. During the damping process, the actuator dissipates structural kinetic energy as heat through electromagnetic damping. A model of the inertial, stiffness and damping properties is presented along with the characteristic differential equations describing the coupled response of the actuator and structure. The equations, employing the dynamic coefficients, are oriented in the form of a feedback control network in which distributed sensors are used to dictate actuator response leading to a specified amount of structural excitation or damping.

  13. Micromachined sensor and actuator research at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S.; Rodriguez, J.L.; Smith, B.K.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    An overview of the major sensor and actuator projects using the micromachining capabilities of the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Development efforts are underway for a variety of micromechanical devices and control electronics for those devices. Surface micromachining is the predominant technology under development. Pressure sensors based on silicon nitride diaphragms have been developed. Hot polysilicon filaments for calorimetric gas sensing have been developed. Accelerometers based upon high-aspect ratio surface micromachining are under development. Actuation mechanisms employing either electrostatic or steam power are being combined with a three-level active (plus an additional passive level) polysilicon surface micromachining process to couple these actuators to external devices. Results of efforts toward integration of micromechanics with the driving electronics for actuators or the amplification/signal processing electronics for sensors is also described. This effort includes a tungsten metallization process to allow the CMOS electronics to withstand high-temperature micromechanical processing.

  14. Biodegradable and edible gelatine actuators for use as artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. D.; Winfield, J.; Ieropoulos, I.; Rossiter, J.

    2014-03-01

    The expense and use of non-recyclable materials often requires the retrieval and recovery of exploratory robots. Therefore, conventional materials such as plastics and metals in robotics can be limiting. For applications such as environmental monitoring, a fully biodegradable or edible robot may provide the optimum solution. Materials that provide power and actuation as well as biodegradability provide a compelling dimension to future robotic systems. To highlight the potential of novel biodegradable and edible materials as artificial muscles, the actuation of a biodegradable hydrogel was investigated. The fabricated gelatine based polymer gel was inexpensive, easy to handle, biodegradable and edible. The electro-mechanical performance was assessed using two contactless, parallel stainless steel electrodes immersed in 0.1M NaOH solution and fixed 40 mm apart with the strip actuator pinned directly between the electrodes. The actuation displacement in response to a bias voltage was measured over hydration/de-hydration cycles. Long term (11 days) and short term (1 hour) investigations demonstrated the bending behaviour of the swollen material in response to an electric field. Actuation voltage was low (<10 V) resulting in a slow actuation response with large displacement angles (<55 degrees). The stability of the immersed material decreased within the first hour due to swelling, however, was recovered on de-hydrating between actuations. The controlled degradation of biodegradable and edible artificial muscles could help to drive the development of environmentally friendly robotics.

  15. Design and investigation of a linear smart actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Chaitanya, S.; Dhanalakshmi, K.

    2015-04-01

    Motors are nearly the sole constituents for actuation and driving applications, but there exist cases where their use proves to be impractical. Shape memory alloy (SMA), then revolutionized the actuator technology, thereby opening the door for new ideas and designs and with it what seemed unfeasible in the past have now become challenging. Many conventional actuators and sensors could be substituted with SMA, obtaining advantages in terms of reduction of weight, dimensions and its cost. SMAs are a group of metallic materials that revert to a predefined shape via phase transformation induced by a thermal procedure. Unlike metals that exhibit thermal expansion, SMA exhibits contraction when heated, which is larger by a hundredfold and exerts tremendous force for its small size. The focus of this work is to realize SMA wire as actuator which finds suitable applications (space, aerospace, biomechanics, etc.) where minimizing space, weight and cost are prime objectives. The accomplishments reported in this paper represent a significant development in the design of SMA actuator configurations for linear actuation. Report on design, fabrication and characterisation of the proposed system is presented. The design took advantage of converting the small linear displacement of the SMA wire into a large linear elastic motion under the influence of biasing element. From the results with control it is aspired that with further improvements on the design, the actuator can be utilized in enabling practical SMA technologies for potential robotic and commercial applications.

  16. Dynamics of disk pairs in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipova, Alena; Denniston, Colin

    2016-11-01

    We use a hybrid lattice Boltzmann method to study the behavior of sets of ferromagnetic colloidal disks in a nematic liquid crystal. When a weak rotating magnetic field acts on the system, the disks rotate following the magnetic field. This leads to a distortion in the liquid crystal that drives translational motion of the disks. If the concentration of disks is high, disks get locked together: a stable chain configuration is created, where each disk lays on the nearest neighbor. For intermediate concentrations of disks, a different behavior is observed. When disks are rotated by the magnetic field by more than 90∘ from their initial orientation, the distortion in the liquid crystal leads to a simultaneous flip of both disks. The final disk positions depends only weakly on the initial configuration. Consecutive rotations of magnetic field push disks towards an equidistant configuration. Periodicity of the systems studied and analysis of the flipping motion of a single disk imply that one can use weak rotating magnetic fields to create stable crystal structures of disks.

  17. Hydraulically actuated artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, M. A.; Tiwari, R.; Wajcs, K. B.; Moses, C.; Reveles, I.; Garcia, E.

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic Artificial Muscles (HAMs) consisting of a polymer tube constrained by a nylon mesh are presented in this paper. Despite the actuation mechanism being similar to its popular counterpart, which are pneumatically actuated (PAM), HAMs have not been studied in depth. HAMs offer the advantage of compliance, large force to weight ratio, low maintenance, and low cost over traditional hydraulic cylinders. Muscle characterization for isometric and isobaric tests are discussed and compared to PAMs. A model incorporating the effect of mesh angle and friction have also been developed. In addition, differential swelling of the muscle on actuation has also been included in the model. An application of lab fabricated HAMs for a meso-scale robotic system is also presented.

  18. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  19. Design of direct drive robot using indigenously developed d.c. torque motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athani, Vithal V.

    The range of high-performance torque motors, which were indigenously developed for use in multistage satellite launch vehicles, is described. The main features that set dc torque motors apart from dc servomotors are: high peak torque, power, and current over short periods of operation, low speed of operation, obviating the need for gearing, high torque/inertia and torque/weight ratios, and high figure of merit = torque/sq rt watt ratio. The dc torque motors are eminently suited to high-performance applications requiring high torque at low speed of operation, such as aircraft and missile control surface actuation, control of multistage satellite launch vehicles, certain computer peripherals like magnetic tape transports and hard disk drives, and robotics, CNC systems, and machine tool control.

  20. A planar nano-positioner driven by shear piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Li, H.; Du, Z.

    2016-08-01

    A planar nano-positioner driven by the shear piezoelectric actuators is proposed in this paper based on inertial sliding theory. The performance of the nano-positioner actuated by different driving signals is analyzed and discussed, e.g. the resolution and the average velocity which depend on the frequency, the amplitude and the wave form of the driving curves. Based on the proposed design, a prototype system of the nano-positioner is developed by using a capacitive sensor as the measurement device. The experiment results show that the proposed nano-positioner is capable of outputting two-dimensional motions within an area of 10 mm × 10 mm at a maximum speed of 0.25 mm/s. The corresponding resolution can be as small as 21 nm. The methodology outlined in this paper can be employed and extended to shear piezoelectric actuators involved in high precision positioning systems.

  1. Disposable Fluidic Actuators for Miniature In-Vivo Surgical Robotics.

    PubMed

    Pourghodrat, Abolfazl; Nelson, Carl A

    2017-03-01

    Fusion of robotics and minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has created new opportunities to develop diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Surgical robotics is advancing from externally actuated systems to miniature in-vivo robotics. However, with miniaturization of electric-motor-driven surgical robots, there comes a trade-off between the size of the robot and its capability. Slow actuation, low load capacity, sterilization difficulties, leaking electricity and transferring produced heat to tissues, and high cost are among the key limitations of the use of electric motors in in-vivo applications. Fluid power in the form of hydraulics or pneumatics has a long history in driving many industrial devices and could be exploited to circumvent these limitations. High power density and good compatibility with the in-vivo environment are the key advantages of fluid power over electric motors when it comes to in-vivo applications. However, fabrication of hydraulic/pneumatic actuators within the desired size and pressure range required for in-vivo surgical robotic applications poses new challenges. Sealing these types of miniature actuators at operating pressures requires obtaining very fine surface finishes which is difficult and costly. The research described here presents design, fabrication, and testing of a hydraulic/pneumatic double-acting cylinder, a limited-motion vane motor, and a balloon-actuated laparoscopic grasper. These actuators are small, seal-less, easy to fabricate, disposable, and inexpensive, thus ideal for single-use in-vivo applications. To demonstrate the ability of these actuators to drive robotic joints, they were modified and integrated in a robotic arm. The design and testing of this surgical robotic arm are presented to validate the concept of fluid-power actuators for in-vivo applications.

  2. Actuation redundancy in a closed-chain robot mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropponen, Timo

    1993-03-01

    A method that solves the control of actuation redundancy in a closed chain robot manipulator is presented and verified by experiments and simulations. A closed chain direct drive robot with actuation redundancy is designed and constructed for the experiments. The control scheme of the actuation redundancy is implemented for the direct drive robot. The characteristics of two model based control methods, feedforward control and computed torque control, are evaluated and compared. The experiments verify that the proposed control scheme performs successfully and no algorithmic singularity is found. In dynamic load cases, the advantage achieved by the chosen redundant motor is not significant. However, in the stationary load case, the simulation indicates that the redundant actuator increases the maximum end point forces. The low net effect in dynamic motions is a consequence of the increased inertia induced by the redundant motor, and the low torque-weight ratio of the additional motor. To improve the effect of the redundant actuator, its location should be optimized in order to decrease the inertia torque. Also, a more efficient torque weight ratio of the motor would improve the redundant performance. The results show that the computed torque control is capable of greater and prompter position tracking than feedforward control. Similarly, the positioning accuracy in steady state is more precise for computed torque. The experiments verify that the new redundant actuation control distributes the joint torques correctly in real time. The study indicates that actuation redundancy benefits most in stationary situations, where large exerting end point forces are needed. This implies that the actuation redundancy offers potential for force control applications.

  3. Magnetic Gearing Versus Conventional Gearing in Actuators for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puchhammer, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic geared actuators (MGA) are designed to perform highly reliable, robust and precise motion on satellite platforms or aerospace vehicles. The design allows MGA to be used for various tasks in space applications. In contrast to conventional geared drives, the contact and lubrication free force transmitting elements lead to a considerable lifetime and range extension of drive systems. This paper describes the fundamentals of magnetic wobbling gears (MWG) and the deduced inherent characteristics, and compares conventional and magnetic gearing.

  4. Hydraulic involute cam actuator

    DOEpatents

    Love, Lonnie J [Knoxville, TN; Lind, Randall F [Loudon, TX

    2011-11-01

    Mechanical joints are provided in which the angle between a first coupled member and a second coupled member may be varied by mechanical actuators. In some embodiments the angle may be varied around a pivot axis in one plane and in some embodiments the angle may be varied around two pivot axes in two orthogonal planes. The joints typically utilize a cam assembly having two lobes with an involute surface. Actuators are configured to push against the lobes to vary the rotation angle between the first and second coupled member.

  5. Tetherless thermobiochemically actuated microgrippers

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Timothy G.; Randall, Christina L.; Benson, Bryan R.; Bassik, Noy; Stern, George M.; Gracias, David H.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate mass-producible, tetherless microgrippers that can be remotely triggered by temperature and chemicals under biologically relevant conditions. The microgrippers use a self-contained actuation response, obviating the need for external tethers in operation. The grippers can be actuated en masse, even while spatially separated. We used the microgrippers to perform diverse functions, such as picking up a bead on a substrate and the removal of cells from tissue embedded at the end of a capillary (an in vitro biopsy). PMID:19139411

  6. Performance of an Electro-Hydrostatic Actuator on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    1997-01-01

    An electro-hydrostatic actuator was evaluated at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The primary goal of testing this actuator system was the flight demonstration of power-by-wire technology on a primary flight control surface. The electro-hydrostatic actuator uses an electric motor to drive a hydraulic pump and relies on local hydraulics for force transmission. This actuator replaced the F-18 standard left aileron actuator on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft and was evaluated throughout the Systems Research Aircraft flight envelope. As of July 24, 1997 the electro-hydrostatic actuator had accumulated 23.5 hours of flight time. This paper presents the electro-hydrostatic actuator system configuration and component description, ground and flight test plans, ground and flight test results, and lessons learned. This actuator performs as well as the standard actuator and has more load capability than required by aileron actuator specifications of McDonnell- Douglas Aircraft, St. Louis, Missouri. The electro-hydrostatic actuator system passed all of its ground tests with the exception of one power-off test during unloaded dynamic cycling.

  7. Reconnection-driven oscillations in dwarf nova disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tajima, T.; Gilden, D.

    1987-01-01

    A class of oscillations observed during eruption of dwarf novae has been interpreted as oscillations of the accretion disks in these systems.These oscillations are quasi-periodic with coherence times typically between three and 15 cycles. It is shown that magnetic field reconnection at high magnetic Reynolds number can drive disk oscillations. The expected stochastic geometry of disk magnetic fields could naturally produce the observed phase incoherency.

  8. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) whirl test of cam/harmonic pitch change actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A variable pitch fan actuation system, which incorporates a remote nacelle mounted blade angle regulator, was tested. The regulator drives a rotating fan mounted mechanical actuator through a flexible shaft and differential gear train. The actuator incorporates a high ratio harmonic drive attached to a multitrack spherical cam which changes blade pitch through individual cam follower arms attached to each blade trunnion. Testing of the actuator on a whirl rig, is reported. Results of tests conducted to verify that the unit satisfied the design requirements and was structurally adequate for use in an engine test are presented.

  9. Pixelized Device Control Actuators for Large Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Gareth J.; Bird, Ross W.; Shea, Brian; Chen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A fully integrated, compact, adaptive space optic mirror assembly has been developed, incorporating new advances in ultralight, high-performance composite mirrors. The composite mirrors use Q-switch matrix architecture-based pixelized control (PMN-PT) actuators, which achieve high-performance, large adaptive optic capability, while reducing the weight of present adaptive optic systems. The self-contained, fully assembled, 11x11x4-in. (approx.= 28x28x10-cm) unit integrates a very-high-performance 8-in. (approx.=20-cm) optic, and has 8-kHz true bandwidth. The assembled unit weighs less than 15 pounds (=6.8 kg), including all mechanical assemblies, power electronics, control electronics, drive electronics, face sheet, wiring, and cabling. It requires just three wires to be attached (power, ground, and signal) for full-function systems integration, and uses a steel-frame and epoxied electronics. The three main innovations are: 1. Ultralightweight composite optics: A new replication method for fabrication of very thin composite 20-cm-diameter laminate face sheets with good as-fabricated optical figure was developed. The approach is a new mandrel resin surface deposition onto previously fabricated thin composite laminates. 2. Matrix (regenerative) power topology: Waveform correction can be achieved across an entire face sheet at 6 kHz, even for large actuator counts. In practice, it was found to be better to develop a quadrant drive, that is, four quadrants of 169 actuators behind the face sheet. Each quadrant has a single, small, regenerative power supply driving all 169 actuators at 8 kHz in effective parallel. 3. Q-switch drive architecture: The Q-switch innovation is at the heart of the matrix architecture, and allows for a very fast current draw into a desired actuator element in 120 counts of a MHz clock without any actuator coupling.

  10. Design and reliability of a MEMS thermal rotary actuator.

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Michael Sean; Corwin, Alex David

    2007-09-01

    A new rotary MEMS actuator has been developed and tested at Sandia National Laboratories that utilizes a linear thermal actuator as the drive mechanism. This actuator was designed to be a low-voltage, high-force alternative to the existing electrostatic torsional ratcheting actuator (TRA) [1]. The new actuator, called the Thermal Rotary Actuator (ThRA), is conceptually much simpler than the TRA and consists of a gear on a hub that is turned by a linear thermal actuator [2] positioned outside of the gear. As seen in Figure 1, the gear is turned through a ratcheting pawl, with anti-reverse pawls positioned around the gear for unidirectional motion (see Figure 1). A primary consideration in the design of the ThRA was the device reliability and in particular, the required one-to-one relationship between the ratcheting output motion and the electrical input signal. The electrostatic TRA design has been shown to both over-drive and under-drive relative to the number of input pulses [3]. Two different ThRA designs were cycle tested to measure the skip rate. This was done in an automated test setup by using pattern matching to measure the angle of rotation of the output gear after a defined number of actuation pulses. By measuring this gear angle over time, the number of skips can be determined. Figure 2 shows a picture of the ThRA during testing, with the pattern-matching features highlighted. In the first design tested, it was found that creep in the thermal actuator limited the number of skip-free cycles, as the rest position of the actuator would creep forward enough to prevent the counter-rotation pawls from fully engaging (Figure 3). Even with this limitation, devices were measured with up to 100 million cycles with no skipping. A design modification was made to reduce the operating temperature of the thermal actuator which has been shown in a previous study [2] to reduce the creep rate. In addition, changes were made to the drive ratchet design and actuation

  11. Fabrication of Polyurethane Dielectric Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    a summary of a 3 year Technology Investment Fund Project entitled “Dielectric Polymer Actuators for Active/ Passive Vibration Isolation”, which was...completed in March 2005. The purpose of this project was to investigate dielectric polymer materials for potential use in active/ passive vibration...devices and systems based on dielectric polymer actuators. Keywords: dielectric actuators, electroactive polymers , Technology Investment Fund 1

  12. "Mighty Worm" Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, Robert M.; Wada, Ben K.; Moore, Donald M.

    1994-01-01

    "Mighty Worm" piezoelectric actuator used as adjustable-length structural member, active vibrator or vibration suppressor, and acts as simple (fixed-length) structural member when inactive. Load force not applied to piezoelectric element in simple-structural-member mode. Piezoelectric element removed from load path when not in use.

  13. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  14. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  15. Electromechanical flight control actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using an electromechanical actuator (EMA) as the primary flight control equipment in aerospace flight is examined. The EMA motor design is presented utilizing improved permanent magnet materials. The necessary equipment to complete a single channel EMA using the single channel power electronics breadboard is reported. The design and development of an improved rotor position sensor/tachometer is investigated.

  16. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.

    1999-01-01

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing.

  17. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.

    1999-02-02

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing. 49 figs.

  18. Piezoelectric actuator renaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    This paper resumes the content of the invited talk of the author, read at the occasion of the International Workshop on Relaxor Ferroelectrics, IWRF 14, held on October 12-16, 2014 in Stirin, Czech Republic. It reviews the recent advances in materials, designing concepts, and new applications of piezoelectric actuators, as well as the future perspectives of this area.

  19. Designing optical disk systems into audio/video products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiandong

    2008-12-01

    Optical disk systems are still widely used in players in consumer electronics and automotive applications, although more and more audio and video contents are played from other medias such as flash memory and hard disk drive based devices. There are various architectures with the integrations of audio and video (A/V) decoders and optical disk servo components to reduced product BOM cost. Some issues are addressed for designing optical disk playing modules into an audio or video products. Servo implementation including tracking, seeking and rotating control needs to consider the characteristics of low cost mechanisms and non-ideal disks. When optical disk systems are used in portable or moving environments, the approaches from servo control side and electronic can be helpful for anti-shock. Special handlings to defect disks are important to playability.

  20. Charge driven piezoelectric actuators for structural vibration control: issues and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautier, B. J. G.; Moheimani, S. O. R.

    2005-08-01

    Piezoelectric actuators have been traditionally driven by voltage amplifiers. When driven at large voltages these actuators exhibit a significant amount of distortion, known as hysteresis, which may reduce the stability robustness of the system in feedback control applications. Electric charge is known to reduce the effects of this nonlinearity. To date little research has been done on the coupling between piezoelectric actuators and highly resonant structures when charge is used to drive the actuator. This arrangement was used in a control feedback scheme to reject disturbance vibrations acting on a cantilevered beam. During the analysis it is shown that the dynamics for the coupled 'piezoelectric-beam' system differs depending on whether voltage or charge is used to drive the piezoelectric actuator. Experimental results demonstrating the effectiveness of using electrical charge are included.

  1. Turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Daniels, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to define the nature of the aerodynamics and heat transfer for the flow within the disk cavities and blade attachments of a large-scale model, simulating the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump drive turbines. These experiments of the aerodynamic driving mechanisms explored the following: (1) flow between the main gas path and the disk cavities; (2) coolant flow injected into the disk cavities; (3) coolant density; (4) leakage flows through the seal between blades; and (5) the role that each of these various flows has in determining the adiabatic recovery temperature at all of the critical locations within the cavities. The model and the test apparatus provide close geometrical and aerodynamic simulation of all the two-stage cavity flow regions for the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump and the ability to simulate the sources and sinks for each cavity flow.

  2. Advanced optical disk storage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haritatos, Fred N.

    1996-01-01

    There is a growing need within the Air Force for more and better data storage solutions. Rome Laboratory, the Air Force's Center of Excellence for C3I technology, has sponsored the development of a number of operational prototypes to deal with this growing problem. This paper will briefly summarize the various prototype developments with examples of full mil-spec and best commercial practice. These prototypes have successfully operated under severe space, airborne and tactical field environments. From a technical perspective these prototypes have included rewritable optical media ranging from a 5.25-inch diameter format up to the 14-inch diameter disk format. Implementations include an airborne sensor recorder, a deployable optical jukebox and a parallel array of optical disk drives. They include stand-alone peripheral devices to centralized, hierarchical storage management systems for distributed data processing applications.

  3. Evaluation of Optical Disk Jukebox Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranade, Sanjay; Yee, Fonald

    1989-01-01

    Discusses software that is used to drive and access optical disk jukeboxes, which are used for data storage. Categories of the software are described, user categories are explained, the design of implementation approaches is discussed, and representative software products are reviewed. (eight references) (LRW)

  4. Microcomputer Software: Finding a Voice on Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rostron, Andrew; Plant, Richard

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the prototype of a software package being developed in England for use as an inexpensive and flexible speech synthesizer. The system, which uses a standard IBM-compatible laptop computer, color graphics, and a hard disk drive, provides flexibility in changing the nature of the speech available and how it is organized. (JDD)

  5. ACCRETION DISK WARPING BY RESONANT RELAXATION: THE CASE OF MASER DISK NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Bregman, Michal; Alexander, Tal

    2009-08-01

    The maser disk around the massive black hole (MBH) in active galaxy NGC 4258 exhibits an O(10 deg.) warp on the O(0.1 pc) scale. The physics driving the warp is still debated. Suggested mechanisms include torquing by relativistic frame dragging or by radiation pressure. We propose here a new warping mechanism: resonant torquing of the disk by stars in the dense cusp around the MBH. We show that resonant torquing can induce such a warp over a wide range of observed and deduced physical parameters of the maser disk.

  6. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving styles in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.

  7. Numerical and experimental study of actuator performance on piezoelectric microelectromechanical inkjet print head.

    PubMed

    Van So, Pham; Jun, Hyun Woo; Lee, Jaichan

    2013-12-01

    We have investigated the actuator performance of a piezoelectrically actuated inkjet print head via the numerical and experimental analysis. The actuator consisting of multi-layer membranes, such as piezoelectric, elastic and other buffer layers, and ink chamber was fabricated by MEMS processing. The maximum displacement of the actuator membrane obtained in the experiment is explained by numerical analysis. A simulation of the actuator performance with fluidic damping shows that the resonant frequency of the membrane in liquid is reduced from its resonant frequency in air by a factor of three, which was also verified in the experiment. These simulation and experimental studies demonstrate how much "dynamic force," in terms of a membrane's maximum displacement, maximum force and driving frequency, can be produced by an actuator membrane interacting with fluid.

  8. Double-section curvature tunable functional actuator with micromachined buckle and grid wire for electricity delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guo-Hua; Hou, Sheng-You

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC)-driven tentacle-like biocompatible flexible actuator with double-section curvature tunability. This actuator, possessing an embedded electrical transmission ability that mimics skeletal muscle nerves in the human body, affords versatile device functions. Novel micromachined copper buckles and grid wires are fabricated and their superiority in electricity delivery and driving the IPMC component with less flexural rigidity is demonstrated. In addition, soft conductive wires realized on a polydimethylsiloxane structure function as electrical signal transmitters. A light-emitting diode integrated with the developed actuator offers directional guiding light ability while the actuator performs a snake-like motion. The electrical conductivity and Young’s modulus of the key actuator components are investigated, and flexural rigidity and dynamic behavior analyses of the actuator under electrical manipulation are elaborated.

  9. Design and dynamic evaluation for a linear ultrasonic stage using the thin-disc structure actuator.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fuhliang; Yen, C-Y

    2007-12-01

    The design of a novel, single-axis ultrasonic actuating stage has been proposed. It consists of a movable plate, an edge-driving ultrasonic actuator as an actuating device, and a magnetic Magi encoder as a position sensor. The stage is impelled using a friction-contact mechanism by the ultrasonic actuator with long distance movement. Very high actuating and braking abilities are obtained. The stable and precise positioning control of the stage was achieved by using a neural-fuzzy controller. This simple and inexpensive structure of the single-axis stage demonstrates that the mechanical design of ultrasonic actuating concept could be done flexibly according to the requirements for various applications.

  10. Cryogenic actuator testing for the SAFARI ground calibration setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jonge, C.; Eggens, M.; Nieuwenhuizen, A. C. T.; Detrain, A.; Smit, H.; Dieleman, P.

    2012-09-01

    For the on-ground calibration setup of the SAFARI instrument cryogenic mechanisms are being developed at SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, including a filter wheel, XYZ-scanner and a flipmirror mechanism. Due to the extremely low background radiation requirement of the SAFARI instrument, all of these mechanisms will have to perform their work at 4.5 Kelvin and low-dissipative cryogenic actuators are required to drive these mechanisms. In this paper, the performance of stepper motors, piezoelectric actuators and brushless DC-motors as cryogenic actuators are compared. We tested stepper motor mechanical performance and electrical dissipation at 4K. The actuator requirements, test setup and test results are presented. Furthermore, design considerations and early performance tests of the flipmirror mechanism are discussed. This flipmirror features a 102 x 72 mm aluminum mirror that can be rotated 45°. A Phytron stepper motor with reduction gearbox has been chosen to drive the flipmirror. Testing showed that this motor has a dissipation of 49mW at 4K with a torque of 60Nmm at 100rpm. Thermal modeling of the flipmirror mechanism predicts that with proper thermal strapping the peak temperature of the flipmirror after a single action will be within the background level requirements of the SAFARI instrument. Early tests confirm this result. For low-duty cycle operations commercial stepper motors appear suitable as actuators for test equipment in the SAFARI on ground calibration setup.

  11. Disk File Management in a Medium-Scale Time-Sharing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzhugh, Robert J.; Pethia, Richard D.

    The paper descibes a compact and highly efficient disk file management system responsible for the management and allocation of space on moving head disk drives in a medium-scale time-sharing system. The disk file management system is a major component of the Experimental Time-Sharing System (ETSS) developed at the Learning Research and Development…

  12. MOSFET Switching Circuit Protects Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummin, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    A small-footprint, full surface-mount-component printed circuit board employs MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) power switches to switch high currents from any input power supply from 3 to 30 V. High-force shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators generally require high current (up to 9 A at 28 V) to actuate. SMA wires (the driving element of the actuators) can be quickly overheated if power is not removed at the end of stroke, which can damage the wires. The new analog driver prevents overheating of the SMA wires in an actuator by momentarily removing power when the end limit switch is closed, thereby allowing complex control schemes to be adopted without concern for overheating. Either an integral pushbutton or microprocessor-controlled gate or control line inputs switch current to the actuator until the end switch line goes from logic high to logic low state. Power is then momentarily removed (switched off by the MOSFET). The analog driver is suited to use with nearly any SMA actuator.

  13. More Insight of Piezoelectric-based Synthetic Jet Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housley, Kevin; Amitay, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Increased understanding of the internal flow of piezoelectric-based synthetic jet actuators is needed for the development of specialized actuator cavity geometries to increase jet momentum coefficients and tailor acoustic resonant frequencies. Synthetic jet actuators can benefit from tuning of the structural resonant frequency of the piezoelectric diaphragm(s) and the acoustic resonant frequency of the actuator cavity such that they experience constructive coupling. The resulting coupled behavior produces increased jet velocities. The ability to design synthetic jet actuators to operate with this behavior at select driving frequencies allows for them to be better used in flow control applications, which sometimes require specific jet frequencies in order to utilize the natural instabilities of a given flow field. A parametric study of varying actuator diameters was conducted to this end. Phase-locked data were collected on the jet velocity, the cavity pressure at various locations, and the three-dimensional deformation of the surface of the diaphragm. These results were compared to previous analytical work on the interaction between the structural resonance of the diaphragm and the acoustic resonance of the cavity. Funded by the Boeing Company.

  14. Development of pneumatic actuator with low-wave reflection characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H.; Tsung, T. T.; Jwo, C. S.; Chiang, J. C.

    2010-08-01

    This study aims at the development of a less reflective electromagnetic pneumatic actuator often used in the anechoic chamber. Because a pneumatic actuator on the market is not appropriate for use in such a chamber and a metallic one has high dielectric constant which generates reflective electromagnetic waves to influence test parameters in the chamber. The newly developed pneumatic actuator is made from low dielectric constant plastics with less reflective of electromagnetic. A turbine-type air motor is used to develop the pneumatic actuator and a employ Prony tester is used to run the brake horsepower test for the performance test of pneumatic actuator. Test results indicate that the pneumatic actuator in the minimal starting flow is 17 l/min, and it generates a brake horsepower of 48 mW; in the maximum flow is 26 l/min, it generates a brake horsepower of 108 mW. Therefore, it works with a torque between 0.24 N-m and 0.55 N-m, and such a torque will be sufficient to drive the target button.

  15. Actuation of atomic force microscopy microcantilevers using contact acoustic nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2013-11-15

    A new method of actuating atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers is proposed in which a high frequency (>5 MHz) wave modulated by a lower frequency (∼300 kHz) wave passes through a contact acoustic nonlinearity at the contact interface between the actuator and the cantilever chip. The nonlinearity converts the high frequency, modulated signal to a low frequency drive signal suitable for actuation of tapping-mode AFM probes. The higher harmonic content of this signal is filtered out mechanically by the cantilever transfer function, providing for clean output. A custom probe holder was designed and constructed using rapid prototyping technologies and off-the-shelf components and was interfaced with an Asylum Research MFP-3D AFM, which was then used to evaluate the performance characteristics with respect to standard hardware and linear actuation techniques. Using a carrier frequency of 14.19 MHz, it was observed that the cantilever output was cleaner with this actuation technique and added no significant noise to the system. This setup, without any optimization, was determined to have an actuation bandwidth on the order of 10 MHz, suitable for high speed imaging applications. Using this method, an image was taken that demonstrates the viability of the technique and is compared favorably to images taken with a standard AFM setup.

  16. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.

    1997-07-08

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The ``micro`` size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed. 22 figs.

  17. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, Milton A.; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1997-01-01

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The "micro" size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed.

  18. Electrical Actuation Technology Bridging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Monica (Compiler); Sharkey, John (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the NASA Electrical Actuation Technology Bridging (ELA-TB) Workshop held in Huntsville, Alabama, September 29-October 1, 1992. The workshop was sponsored by the NASA Office of Space Systems Development and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The workshop addressed key technologies bridging the entire field of electrical actuation including systems methodology, control electronics, power source systems, reliability, maintainability, and vehicle health management with special emphasis on thrust vector control (TVC) applications on NASA launch vehicles. Speakers were drawn primarily from industry with participation from universities and government. In addition, prototype hardware demonstrations were held at the MSFC Propulsion Laboratory each afternoon. Splinter sessions held on the final day afforded the opportunity to discuss key issues and to provide overall recommendations. Presentations are included in this document.

  19. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  20. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-06-15

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. 8 figs.

  1. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... in the past year. Middle Figure: Driving after marijuana use is more common than driving after alcohol ...

  2. Impaired Driving

    MedlinePlus

    Impaired driving is dangerous. It's the cause of more than half of all car crashes. It means operating a ... texting Having a medical condition which affects your driving For your safety and the safety of others, ...

  3. Dissolution actuated sample container

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  4. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  5. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Shires, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  6. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  7. Shape Memory Actuator System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-31

    The advantage in utilizing 15 shape-memory cables made of Nitinol for size reduction of the remote control actuator system is 1 Fi well suited for...a submarine environment because of its non-magnetic and corrosion resistance 17 properties. Use of thermoelastic Nitinol introduces other...problems because of the cooling and 18 resetting properties of Nitinol cables. It is therefore an important object of the present invention 19 on to

  8. Passively actuated valve

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2005-09-20

    A passively actuated valve for isolating a high pressure zone from a low pressure zone and discontinuing the isolation when the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below a preset threshold. If the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below the preset threshold, the valve opens and allows flow from the high pressure zone to the low pressure zone. The valve remains open allowing pressure equalization and back-flow should a pressure inversion between the two pressure zone occur.

  9. Actuator for automatic cruising system

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.

    1989-03-07

    An actuator for an automatic cruising system is described, comprising: a casing; a control shaft provided in the casing for rotational movement; a control motor for driving the control shaft; an input shaft; an electromagnetic clutch and a reduction gear which are provided between the control motor and the control shaft; and an external linkage mechanism operatively connected to the control shaft; wherein the reduction gear is a type of Ferguson's mechanical paradox gear having a pinion mounted on the input shaft always connected to the control motor; a planetary gear meshing with the pinion so as to revolve around the pinion; a static internal gear meshing with the planetary gear and connected with the electromagnetic clutch for movement to a position restricting rotation of the static internal gear; and a rotary internal gear fixed on the control shaft and meshed with the planetary gear, the rotary internal gear having a number of teeth slightly different from a number of teeth of the static internal gear; and the electromagnetic clutch has a tubular electromagnetic coil coaxially provided around the input shaft and an engaging means for engaging and disengaging with the static internal gear in accordance with on-off operation of the electromagnetic coil.

  10. NASA spaceborne optical disk recorder development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, Thomas A.; Holloway, Reginald M.; Conway, Bruce A.

    1988-01-01

    Spaceflight application of a high performance (high rate, high capacity) erasable optical disk recorder is discussed. An expandable modular system concept is proposed consisting of multiple drive modules and a modular system controller. A drive contains two 14-inch magneto-optic disks and four electro-optic heads, each containing a nine-diode solid state laser array (eight data tracks, one pilot track). The performance goals of the drive module are 20 gigabyte capacity, 300 megabit per second transfer rate, 10x(Exp-10) corrected BER, and 100 millisecond access time. The system goals are 120 gigabyte capacity at up to 1.8 gigabits per second rate, concurrent 1/0, varying data rates, reconfigurable architecture, and 2 to 5 year operating life in orbit. The system environment and operational scenarios are presented.

  11. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  12. Microelectromechanical (MEM) thermal actuator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J [Albuquerque, NM; Fulcher, Clay W. G. [Sandia Park, NM

    2012-07-31

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) buckling beam thermal actuators are disclosed wherein the buckling direction of a beam is constrained to a desired direction of actuation, which can be in-plane or out-of-plane with respect to a support substrate. The actuators comprise as-fabricated, linear beams of uniform cross section supported above the substrate by supports which rigidly attach a beam to the substrate. The beams can be heated by methods including the passage of an electrical current through them. The buckling direction of an initially straight beam upon heating and expansion is controlled by incorporating one or more directional constraints attached to the substrate and proximal to the mid-point of the beam. In the event that the beam initially buckles in an undesired direction, deformation of the beam induced by contact with a directional constraint generates an opposing force to re-direct the buckling beam into the desired direction. The displacement and force generated by the movement of the buckling beam can be harnessed to perform useful work, such as closing contacts in an electrical switch.

  13. ESD testing of the 8S actuator (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Mchugh, Douglas C

    2010-12-03

    The 8S actuator is a hot-wire initiated explosive component used to drive the W76-1 2X Acorn 1V valve. It is known to be safe from human electrostatic discharge (ESD) pin-to-pin and all pin-to-cup stimuli as well as 1 amp/1 watt safe. However low impedance (furniture) ESD stimuli applied pin-to-pin has not been evaluated. Components were tested and the results analyzed. The 8S actuator has been shown to be immune to human and severe furniture ESD, whether applied pin-to-pin or pin-to-cup.

  14. Electromechanical actuation for cryogenic valve control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lister, M. J.; Reichmuth, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    The design and analysis of the electromechanical actuator (EMA) being developed for the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center as part of the National Launch System (NLS) Propellant Control Effector Advanced Development Program (ADP) are addressed. The EMA design uses several proven technologies combined into a single modular package which includes single stage high ratio gear reduction, redundant electric motors mounted on a common drive shaft, redundant drive and control electronics, and digital technology for performing the closed loop position feedback, communication, and health monitoring functions. Results of tests aimed at evaluating both component characteristics and overall system performance demonstrated that the goal of low cost, reliable control in a cryogenic environment is feasible.

  15. Electric motors and actuators at cryogenic tempertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugeat, J. P.; Macaigne, J.; Valentian, D.

    A small electric motor and an actuating mechanism for use at temperatures around 4.2 K under ultra high vacuum was tested in order to assess the feasibility of such a driving mechanism working in the coldest part of a spacecraft cryostat. A variable reluctance stepping motor driving a simple screw nut mechanism was used. Dry lubrication was provided by polyimide slide bearings and nut and by composite retainer roller bearings. Motor and mechanism sustained extended tests at liquid helium temperature with continuous operation for 8 hr periods and faultless restart after 16 hr rest periods. Power consumption was reduced to 15 mV leading to low liquid helium comsumption. Post test analysis indicates no change in motor characteristics and no damage to bearings, screw and nut.

  16. DISK PUMP FEASIBILITY INVESTIGATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The disk pump was investigated at the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) to determine the feasibility of using a novel viscous pumping... pump primarily for application as an inducer. The disk pump differs drastically from conventional pumps because of the following major factors: (1) The...The pump inlet relative velocity is equal only to the through flow velocity between the disks. Therefore, there is good indication that the disk pump will

  17. Accretion disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1985-01-01

    Accretion disk electrodynamic phenomena are separable into two classes: (1) disks and coronas with turbulent magnetic fields; (2) disks and black holes which are connected to a large-scale external magnetic field. Turbulent fields may originate in an alpha-omega dynamo, provide anomalous viscous transport, and sustain an active corona by magnetic buoyancy. The large-scale field can extract energy and angular momentum from the disk and black hole, and be dynamically configured into a collimated relativistic jet.

  18. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator for flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opaits, Dmitry Florievich

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) and magnetohydrodynamic phenomena are being widely studied for aerodynamic applications. The major effects of these phenomena are heating of the gas, body force generation, and enthalpy addition or extraction, [1, 2, 3]. In particular, asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators are known to be effective EHD device in aerodynamic control, [4, 5]. Experiments have demonstrated their effectiveness in separation control, acoustic noise reduction, and other aeronautic applications. In contrast to conventional DBD actuators driven by sinusoidal voltages, we proposed and used a voltage profile consisting of nanosecond pulses superimposed on dc bias voltage. This produces what is essentially a non-self-sustained discharge: the plasma is generated by repetitive short pulses, and the pushing of the gas occurs primarily due to the bias voltage. The advantage of this non-self-sustained discharge is that the parameters of ionizing pulses and the driving bias voltage can be varied independently, which adds flexibility to control and optimization of the actuators performance. Experimental studies were conducted of a flow induced in a quiescent room air by a single DBD actuator. A new approach for non-intrusive diagnostics of plasma actuator induced flows in quiescent gas was proposed, consisting of three elements coupled together: the Schlieren technique, burst mode of plasma actuator operation, and 2-D numerical fluid modeling. During the experiments, it was found that DBD performance is severely limited by surface charge accumulation on the dielectric. Several ways to mitigate the surface charge were found: using a reversing DC bias potential, three-electrode configuration, slightly conductive dielectrics, and semi conductive coatings. Force balance measurements proved the effectiveness of the suggested configurations and advantages of the new voltage profile (pulses+bias) over the traditional sinusoidal one at relatively low

  19. Achieving Superior Two-Way Actuation by the Stress-Coupling of Nanoribbons and Nanocrystalline Shape Memory Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Shijie; Liu, Yinong; Ren, Yang; Jiang, Daqiang; Yang, Feng; Cong, Daoyong; Wang, Yandong; Cui, Lishan

    2016-06-08

    Inspired by the driving principle of traditional bias-type two-way actuators, we developed a novel two-way actuation nanocomposite wire in which a massive number of Nb nanoribbons with ultra-large elastic strains are loaded inside a shape memory alloy (SMA) matrix to form a continuous array of nano bias actuation pairs for two-way actuation. The composite exhibits a two-way actuation strain of 3.2% during a thermal cycle and an actuation stress of 934 MPa upon heating, which is about twice higher than that (~500 MPa) found in reported two-way SMAs. Upon cooling, the composite shows an actuation stress of 134 MPa and a mechanical work output of 1.08*106 J/ m3, which are about three and five times higher than that of reported two-way SMAs, respectively. It is revealed that the massive number of Nb nanoribbons in compressive state provides the high actuation stress and high work output upon cooling and the SMA matrix with high yield strength offers the high actuation stress upon heating. Compared to traditional bias-type two-way actuators, the two-way actuation composite with small volume and simple construct is in favour of the miniaturization and simplification of actuators.

  20. Understanding Floppy Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Pamela

    1980-01-01

    The author describes the floppy disk with an analogy to the phonograph record, and discusses the advantages, disadvantages, and capabilities of hard-sectored and soft-sectored floppy disks. She concludes that, at present, the floppy disk will continue to be the primary choice of personal computer manufacturers and their customers. (KC)

  1. Tatooine Nurseries: Structure and Evolution of Circumbinary Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, David; Garmilla, José A.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission provide motivation for understanding their birthplaces—protoplanetary disks around stellar binaries with separations ≲ 1 {{AU}}. We explore properties and evolution of such circumbinary disks focusing on modification of their structure caused by tidal coupling to the binary. We develop a set of analytical scaling relations describing viscous evolution of the disk properties, which are verified and calibrated using 1D numerical calculations with realistic inputs. Injection of angular momentum by the central binary suppresses mass accretion onto the binary and causes radial distribution of the viscous angular momentum flux {F}J to be different from that in a standard accretion disk around a single star with no torque at the center. Disks with no mass accretion at the center develop an {F}J profile that is flat in radius. Radial profiles of temperature and surface density are also quite different from those in disks around single stars. Damping of the density waves driven by the binary and viscous dissipation dominates heating of the inner disk (within 1-2 AU), pushing the ice line beyond 3-5 AU, depending on disk mass and age. Irradiation by the binary governs disk thermodynamics beyond ˜10 AU. However, self-shadowing by the hot inner disk may render central illumination irrelevant out to ˜20 AU. Spectral energy distribution of a circumbinary disk exhibits a distinctive bump around 10 μm, which may facilitate identification of such disks around unresolved binaries. Efficient tidal coupling to the disk drives orbital inspiral of the binary and may cause low-mass and relatively compact binaries to merge into a single star within the disk lifetime. We generally find that circumbinary disks present favorable sites for planet formation (despite their wider zone of volatile depletion), in agreement with the statistics of Kepler circumbinary planets.

  2. Telescoping cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite actuator assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox Chattin, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A telescoping actuator assembly includes a plurality of cylindrical actuators in a concentric arrangement. Each cylindrical actuator is at least one piezoelectric fiber composite actuator having a plurality of piezoelectric fibers extending parallel to one another and to the concentric arrangement's longitudinal axis. Each cylindrical actuator is coupled to concentrically-adjacent ones of the cylindrical actuators such that the plurality of cylindrical actuators can experience telescopic movement. An electrical energy source coupled to the cylindrical actuators applies actuation energy thereto to generate the telescopic movement.

  3. Scanning and rotating micromirrors using thermal actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Jeffrey T.; Bright, Victor M.; Reid, J. Robert

    1997-07-01

    This paper reports on micromachined polysilicon scanning and rotating micromirrors and the development of a CMOS drive system. The micromirrors described in this research were developed at the Air Force Institute of Technology and fabricated using the DARPA-sponsored multi-user MEMS processes (MUMPs). The scanning micromirror is connected to the substrate using micro-hinges. This allows the mirror plate to rotate off the substrate surface and lock into a support mechanism. The angle between the scanning mirror and the substrate is modulated by driving the mirror with a thermal actuator array through a range of 20 degrees. For the rotating mirror, the mirror plate is attached to the substrate by three floating substrate hinges connected to a rotating base. Actuator arrays are also used to position the rotating mirror. A computer controlled electrical interface was developed which automates the positioning of both the scanning and rotating mirrors. The low operating voltages of the micromirror positioning mechanism makes the use of CMOS technology attractive; and the development of a digital interface allows for flexible operation of the devices. These designs are well suited for micro-optical applications such as optical scanners, corner cube reflectors, and optical couplers where electrical positioning of a mirror is desired.

  4. Single coil bistable, bidirectional micromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tabat, Ned; Guckel, Henry

    1998-09-15

    Micromechanical actuators capable of bidirectional and bistable operation can be formed on substrates using lithographic processing techniques. Bistable operation of the microactuator is obtained using a single coil and a magnetic core with a gap. A plunger having two magnetic heads is supported for back and forth linear movement with respect to the gap in the magnetic core, and is spring biased to a neutral position in which the two heads are on each side of the gap in the core. The single electrical coil is coupled to the core and is provided with electrical current to attract one of the heads toward the core by reluctance action to drive the plunger to a limit of travel in one direction. The current is then cut off and the plunger returns by spring action toward the gap, whereafter the current is reapplied to the coil to attract the other head of the plunger by reluctance action to drive the plunger to its other limit of travel. This process can be repeated at a time when switching of the actuator is required.

  5. Floppy disk utility user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akers, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The Floppy Disk Utility Program transfers programs between files on the hard disk and floppy disk. It also copies the data on one floppy disk onto another floppy disk and compares the data. The program operates on the Data General NOVA-4X under the Real Time Disk Operating System (RDOS).

  6. Floppy disk utility user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akers, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    A floppy disk utility program is described which transfers programs between files on a hard disk and floppy disk. It also copies the data on one floppy disk onto another floppy disk and compares the data. The program operates on the Data General NOVA-4X under the Real Time Disk Operating System. Sample operations are given.

  7. Compact, Low-Force, Low-Noise Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    seconds for resetting. Thus, this design allows the actuator to work at a frequency of up to 0.1 Hz. The actuator does not make use of the whole range of motion of the SMA material, allowing for large margins on the mechanical parameters of the design. The efficiency of the actuator is of the order of 10%, including the margins. The average dissipated power while driving at full speed is of the order of 1 W, and can be scaled down linearly if the rate of cycling is reduced. This design produces an extremely quiet actuator; it can generate a force greater than 2 N and a stroke greater than 1 cm. The operational duration of SMA materials is of the order of millions of cycles with some reduced stroke over a wide temperature range up to 150 C.

  8. Compact, Low-Force, Low-Noise Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    for resetting. Thus, this design allows the actuator to work at a frequency of up to 0.1 Hz. The actuator does not make use of the whole range of motion of the SMA material, allowing for large margins on the mechanical parameters of the design. The efficiency of the actuator is of the order of 10%, including the margins. The average dissipated power while driving at full speed is of the order of 1 W, and can be scaled down linearly if the rate of cycling is reduced. This design produces an extremely quiet actuator; it can generate a force greater than 2 N and a stroke greater than 1 cm. The operational duration of SMA materials is of the order of millions of cycles with some reduced stroke over a wide temperature range up to 150 C.

  9. Fault-tolerant rotary actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2006-10-17

    A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

  10. Linear Proof-Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III; Crossley, Edward A.; Miller, James B.; Jones, Irby W.; Davis, C. Calvin; Behun, Vaughn D.; Goodrich, Lewis R., Sr.

    1995-01-01

    Linear proof-mass actuator (LPMA) is friction-driven linear mass actuator capable of applying controlled force to structure in outer space to damp out oscillations. Capable of high accelerations and provides smooth, bidirectional travel of mass. Design eliminates gears and belts. LPMA strong enough to be used terrestrially where linear actuators needed to excite or damp out oscillations. High flexibility designed into LPMA by varying size of motors, mass, and length of stroke, and by modifying control software.

  11. Design and analysis of ultrasonic actuator in consideration of length reduction for a USDC (ultrasonic/sonic driller/corer)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zensheu; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2005-05-01

    Sample return and in-situ sampling and analysis is one of the major objectives of future NASA exploration missions. Existing drilling techniques are limited by the need for large axial forces, holding torques, and high power consumption. Lightweight robots and rovers have difficulties accommodating these requirements. To address these key challenges to the NASA objective of planetary in-situ rock sampling and analysis, a drilling technology called ultrasonic/sonic driller/corer (USDC) was developed. The USDC uses a novel driving mechanism, transferring ultrasonic vibration to sonic frequency impacts with the aid of a free-flying mass block (free-mass). The free mass then drives the drill bit. The actuator consists of a stack of piezoelectric disks with a horn that amplifies the induced vibration amplitudes. The standard USDC is a slender device, and some times its length is too long for specific NASA missions. It is of current interest to have novel designs that reduce the length of the device. For this purpose, two novel horn designs were examined analytically. One is the flipped horn, the other is the planar folded horn. The new designs of the horn were analyzed using finite element modeling and the results allow for the determination of the control parameters that can optimize the performance of the ultrasonic horn in terms of the tip displacement and velocity. The results of the modeling are described and discussed in this paper.

  12. Electrolysis-based diaphragm actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, C.; Tai, Y.-C.; Burdick, J. W.; Andersen, R. A.

    2006-02-01

    This work presents a new electrolysis-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) diaphragm actuator. Electrolysis is a technique for converting electrical energy to pneumatic energy. Theoretically electrolysis can achieve a strain of 136 000% and is capable of generating a pressure above 200 MPa. Electrolysis actuators require modest electrical power and produce minimal heat. Due to the large volume expansion obtained via electrolysis, small actuators can create a large force. Up to 100 µm of movement was achieved by a 3 mm diaphragm. The actuator operates at room temperature and has a latching and reversing capability.

  13. HNC IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Kastner, Joel

    2015-07-01

    The distributions and abundances of small organics in protoplanetary disks are potentially powerful probes of disk physics and chemistry. HNC is a common probe of dense interstellar regions and the target of this study. We use the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to observe HNC 3–2 toward the protoplanetary disks around the T Tauri star TW Hya and the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. HNC is detected toward both disks, constituting the first spatially resolved observations of HNC in disks. We also present SMA observations of HCN 3–2 and IRAM 30 m observations of HCN and HNC 1–0 toward HD 163296. The disk-averaged HNC/HCN emission ratio is 0.1–0.2 toward both disks. Toward TW Hya, the HNC emission is confined to a ring. The varying HNC abundance in the TW Hya disk demonstrates that HNC chemistry is strongly linked to the disk physical structure. In particular, the inner rim of the HNC ring can be explained by efficient destruction of HNC at elevated temperatures, similar to what is observed in the ISM. However, to realize the full potential of HNC as a disk tracer requires a combination of high SNR spatially resolved observations of HNC and HCN and disk-specific HNC chemical modeling.

  14. The magnetic nature of disk accretion onto black holes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jon M; Raymond, John; Fabian, Andy; Steeghs, Danny; Homan, Jeroen; Reynolds, Chris; van der Klis, Michiel; Wijnands, Rudy

    2006-06-22

    Although disk accretion onto compact objects-white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes-is central to much of high-energy astrophysics, the mechanisms that enable this process have remained observationally difficult to determine. Accretion disks must transfer angular momentum in order for matter to travel radially inward onto the compact object. Internal viscosity from magnetic processes and disk winds can both in principle transfer angular momentum, but hitherto we lacked evidence that either occurs. Here we report that an X-ray-absorbing wind discovered in an observation of the stellar-mass black hole binary GRO J1655 - 40 (ref. 6) must be powered by a magnetic process that can also drive accretion through the disk. Detailed spectral analysis and modelling of the wind shows that it can only be powered by pressure generated by magnetic viscosity internal to the disk or magnetocentrifugal forces. This result demonstrates that disk accretion onto black holes is a fundamentally magnetic process.

  15. Diskoseismology: Probing relativistic accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Michael Allen

    1992-08-01

    Helioseismology has provided a wealth of information about the structure of the solar atmosphere. Little is known, however, about the structure of accretion disks that are thought to exist around black holes and neutron stars. In this thesis we present calculations of modes that are trapped in thin Keplerian accretion disks. We hope to use observations of thes modes to elucidate the structure of the inner relativistic regions of accretion disks. Our calculations assume that the thin disk is terminated by an innermost stable orbit, as would occur around a slowly rotating black hole or weakly magnetized compact neutron star. The dominant relativistic effects, which allow modes to be trapped within the inner region of the disk, are approximated via a modified Newtonian potential. Using the Lagrangian formulation of Friedman and Schutz, we develop a general formalism for investigating the adiabatic oscillations of arbitrary unperturbed disk models. First we consider the special case of acoustic waves in disks with isothermal atmospheres. Next we describe the Lagrangian perturbation vectors in terms of the derivatives of a scalar potential, as has been done by Ipser and Lindblom. Using this potential, we derive a single partial differential equation governing the oscillations of a disk. The eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies of a variety of disk models are found to fall into two main classes which are analogous to the p-modes and g-modes in the sun. Specifically we use the potential formalism to compute the g-modes for disks with isothermal atmospheres. Physical arguments show that both the p-modes and g-modes belong to the same family of modes as the p-modes and g-modes in the sun, just viewed in a different parameter regime. With the aid of the Lagrangian formalism we consider possible growth or damping mechanisms and compute the (assumed) relatively small rates of growth or damping of the modes. Specifically, we consider gravitational radiation reaction and

  16. Design and performance of a piezoelectric actuated precise rotary positioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. C.; Chang, S. H.

    2006-10-01

    Industries including semiconductor, biotechnology, and nanotechnology are seeking compact and reliable nanometer resolution positioning techniques. To address this demand, this article presents a friction-drive rotary stage driven by a piezoelectric transducer (PZT) actuator. This stage includes a multilayer PZT actuator, the Scott-Russell mechanism, an actuation stage, a preload spring, and an output shaft. Its rotary positioning is accomplished by the stick-slip effect between the wire electrodischarge-machining rotary stage and the output shaft. Finite element analysis and Taguchi optimization method were extensively conducted to analyze the displacement, stress, and vibration behavior for optimum design. As shown by the experimental results, the stage achieved a resolution of 0.13μrad and a speed of 0.15°/h by tuning of the preload spring.

  17. Playback of multimedia data in low-power mobile drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jungwan; Won, Youjip

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, we present the novel scheduling algorithm of the multimedia data retrieval for the mobile disk drive. Our algorithm is focused on minimizing the power consumption in multimedia data retrieval. While the disk based storage devices, e.g. hard disk and optical disk becomes small enough to be used in mobile devices, the practical usage of which leaves much to be desired due to the stringent power consumption restriction of the mobile device. The playback of multimedia data requires that data blocks are delivered to the destination in periodic fashion. The major issue here has been how to guarantee the continuous flow of data. Most of preceding works assume that the disk drive always operates in the steady state. However, this does not hold in modern disk drive for the mobile device. Modern low power disk drive for mobile device goes into standby state when it is not in use. While this feature can significantly extend the battery life, it adds another dimension of complexity in scheduling of the multimedia data retrieval. We elaborately model the power consumption behavior of the low power mobile drive and develop an Adaptive Round Merge(ARM) scheduling algorithm which guarantees a certain disk bandwidth for the multimedia playback while minimizing the power consumption of the storage device. According to our simulation based experiment, the ARM algorithm reduces the power consumption by as much as 23%. It manifests itself when the video clip is relatively short, typically less than 30 sec.

  18. Lead screw linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A linear actuator which can apply high forces is described, which includes a reciprocating rod having a threaded portion engaged by a nut that is directly coupled to the rotor of an electric motor. The nut is connected to the rotor in a manner that minimizes loading on the rotor, by the use of a coupling that transmits torque to the nut but permits it to shift axially and radially with respect to the rotor. The nut has a threaded hydrostatic bearing for engaging the threaded rod portion, with an oilcarrying groove in the nut being interrupted.

  19. Piezoelectric actuated gimbal

    DOEpatents

    Tschaggeny, Charles W.; Jones, Warren F.; Bamberg, Eberhard

    2011-09-13

    A gimbal is described and which includes a fixed base member defining an axis of rotation; a second member concentrically oriented relative to the axis of rotation; a linear actuator oriented in immediate, adjoining force transmitting relation relative to the base member or to the second member, and which applies force along a linear axis which is tangential to the axis of rotation so as to cause the second member to rotate coaxially relative to the fixed base member; and an object of interest mounted to the second member such that the object of interest is selectively moved relative to the base member about the axis of rotation.

  20. Rover Wheel-Actuated Tool Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Janet; Ahmad, Norman; Wilcox, Brian

    2007-01-01

    A report describes an interface for utilizing some of the mobility features of a mobile robot for general-purpose manipulation of tools and other objects. The robot in question, now undergoing conceptual development for use on the Moon, is the All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) rover, which is designed to roll over gentle terrain or walk over rough or steep terrain. Each leg of the robot is a six-degree-of-freedom general purpose manipulator tipped by a wheel with a motor drive. The tool interface includes a square cross-section peg, equivalent to a conventional socket-wrench drive, that rotates with the wheel. The tool interface also includes a clamp that holds a tool on the peg, and a pair of fold-out cameras that provides close-up stereoscopic images of the tool and its vicinity. The field of view of the imagers is actuated by the clamp mechanism and is specific to each tool. The motor drive can power any of a variety of tools, including rotating tools for helical fasteners, drills, and such clamping tools as pliers. With the addition of a flexible coupling, it could also power another tool or remote manipulator at a short distance. The socket drive can provide very high torque and power because it is driven by the wheel motor.

  1. SDIO Workshop on Piezoelectric Ceramic Actuators for Space Applications Held in Alexandria, Virginia on 25 February 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    processes can be found on pages D-81 to D-83. 26 The piezoceramic material of interest is PZT-5H. 2-9 metallized (for electrodes) 27, and hot-pressed...forces and displacements. The moonie actuators5 consist of a piezoceramic disk sandwiched between two shaped metal electrodes, each having a flat...choice of metal for the electrodes is important since the metal does most of the straining during actuation. The stress state of the metal electrode

  2. Analysis of cache for streaming tape drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinnaswamy, V.

    1993-01-01

    A tape subsystem consists of a controller and a tape drive. Tapes are used for backup, data interchange, and software distribution. The backup operation is addressed. During a backup operation, data is read from disk, processed in CPU, and then sent to tape. The processing speeds of a disk subsystem, CPU, and a tape subsystem are likely to be different. A powerful CPU can read data from a fast disk, process it, and supply the data to the tape subsystem at a faster rate than the tape subsystem can handle. On the other hand, a slow disk drive and a slow CPU may not be able to supply data fast enough to keep a tape drive busy all the time. The backup process may supply data to tape drive in bursts. Each burst may be followed by an idle period. Depending on the nature of the file distribution in the disk, the input stream to the tape subsystem may vary significantly during backup. To compensate for these differences and optimize the utilization of a tape subsystem, a cache or buffer is introduced in the tape controller. Most of the tape drives today are streaming tape drives. A streaming tape drive goes into reposition when there is no data from the controller. Once the drive goes into reposition, the controller can receive data, but it cannot supply data to the tape drive until the drive completes its reposition. A controller can also receive data from the host and send data to the tape drive at the same time. The relationship of cache size, host transfer rate, drive transfer rate, reposition, and ramp up times for optimal performance of the tape subsystem are investigated. Formulas developed will also show the advantages of cache watermarks to increase the streaming time of the tape drive, maximum loss due to insufficient cache, tradeoffs between cache and reposition times and the effectiveness of cache on a streaming tape drive due to idle times or interruptions due in host transfers. Several mathematical formulas are developed to predict the performance of the tape

  3. Radiative ablation of disks around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan

    Hot, massive stars (spectral types O and B) have extreme luminosities (10. 4 -10. 6 L?) that drive strong stellar winds through UV line-scattering.Some massive stars also have disks, formed by either decretion from the star (as in the rapidly rotating "Classical Be stars"), or accretion during the star's formation. This dissertation examines the role of stellar radiation in driving (ablating) material away from these circumstellar disks. A key result is that the observed month to year decay of Classical Be disks can be explained by line-driven ablation without, as previously done, appealing to anomalously strong viscous diffusion. Moreover, the higher luminosity of O stars leads to ablation of optically thin disks on dynamical timescales of order a day, providing a natural explanation for the lack of observed Oe stars. In addition to the destruction of Be disks, this dissertation also introduces a model for their formation by coupling observationally inferred non-radial pulsation modes and rapid stellar rotation to launch material into orbiting Keplerian disks of Be-like densities. In contrast to such Be decretion disks, star-forming accretion disks are much denser and so are generally optically thick to continuum processes. To circumvent the computational challenges associated with radiation hydrodynamics through optically thick media, we develop an approximate method for treating continuum absorption in the limit of geometrically thin disks. The comparison of ablation with and without continuum absorption shows that accounting for disk optical thickness leads to less than a 50% reduction in ablation rate, implying that ablation rate depends mainly on stellar properties like luminosity. Finally, we discuss the role of "thin-shell mixing" in reducing X-rays from colliding wind binaries. Laminar, adiabatic shocks produce well understood X-ray emission, but the emission from radiatively cooled shocks is more complex due to thin-shell instabilities. The parameter

  4. Pile Driving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Machine-oriented structural engineering firm TERA, Inc. is engaged in a project to evaluate the reliability of offshore pile driving prediction methods to eventually predict the best pile driving technique for each new offshore oil platform. Phase I Pile driving records of 48 offshore platforms including such information as blow counts, soil composition and pertinent construction details were digitized. In Phase II, pile driving records were statistically compared with current methods of prediction. Result was development of modular software, the CRIPS80 Software Design Analyzer System, that companies can use to evaluate other prediction procedures or other data bases.

  5. The Disk and Jet of the Classical T Tauri Star AA Tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.; Woodgate, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of the classical T-Tauri star AA Tau have interpreted the UX Ononis-like photopolarimetric variability as being due to a warp in the inner disk caused by an inclined stellar magnetic dipole field. We test that these effects are macroscopically observable in the inclination and alignment of the disk. We use HST/STIS coronagraphic detection of the disk to measure the outer disk radius and inclination and find that the inner disk is both misinclined and misaligned with respect to the outer disk. AA Tau drives a faint jet which is also misaligned with respect to the outer disk minor axis. The jet is also poorly colimated near the sun. The measured inclination 71 +/- 1 deg is above the inclination range suggested for stars with UX Ononis-like variability, indicating that dust grains in the disk have grown and settled toward the disk midplane.

  6. SHADOWS CAST BY A WARP IN THE HD 142527 PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, S.; Perez, S.; Casassus, S.

    2015-01-10

    Detailed observations of gaps in protoplanetary disks have revealed structures that drive current research on circumstellar disks. One such feature is the two intensity nulls seen along the outer disk of the HD 142527 system, which are particularly well traced in polarized differential imaging. Here we propose that these are shadows cast by the inner disk. The inner and outer disk are thick, in terms of the unit-opacity surface in the H band, so that the shape and orientation of the shadows inform on the three-dimensional structure of the system. Radiative transfer predictions on a parametric disk model allow us to conclude that the relative inclination between the inner and outer disks is 70° ± 5°. This finding taps the potential of high-contrast imaging of circumstellar disks, and bears consequences on the gas dynamics of gapped disks, as well as on the physical conditions in the shadowed regions.

  7. The Disk and Jet of the Classical T Tauri Star AA Tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, A. W.; Grady, C. A.; Hamel, H.; Hornbeck, Jeremy; Russell, R.; Sitko, M.; Woodgate, B.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of the classical T Tauri star AA Tau have interpreted the UX Orionis-like photopolarimetric variability as being due to a warp in the inner disk caused by an inclined stellar magnetic dipolefield. We test that these effects are macroscopically observable in the inclination and alignment of the disk. We use the HST/STIS coronagraphic detection of the disk to measure the outer disk radius and inclination, and find that the inner disk is both misinclined and misaligned with respect to the outer disk. AA Tau drives a faint jet which is also misaligned with respect to the projection of the outer disk minor axis. The jet is also poorly collimated near the star. The measured inclination, 71+/-1deg, is above the inclination range suggested for stars with UX Orionis-like variability, indicating that dust grains in the disk have grown and settled toward the disk midplane.

  8. Shadows Cast by a Warp in the HD 142527 Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, S.; Perez, S.; Casassus, S.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed observations of gaps in protoplanetary disks have revealed structures that drive current research on circumstellar disks. One such feature is the two intensity nulls seen along the outer disk of the HD 142527 system, which are particularly well traced in polarized differential imaging. Here we propose that these are shadows cast by the inner disk. The inner and outer disk are thick, in terms of the unit-opacity surface in the H band, so that the shape and orientation of the shadows inform on the three-dimensional structure of the system. Radiative transfer predictions on a parametric disk model allow us to conclude that the relative inclination between the inner and outer disks is 70° ± 5°. This finding taps the potential of high-contrast imaging of circumstellar disks, and bears consequences on the gas dynamics of gapped disks, as well as on the physical conditions in the shadowed regions.

  9. Actuator operated microvalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuator operated microvalve and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The microvalve comprises a SiC housing which includes a first lower portion and a second upper portion. The lower portion of the SiC housing includes a passageway therethrough, a microvalve seat, and a moveable SiC diaphragm. The SiC diaphragm includes a centrally located boss and radially extending corrugations which may be sinusoidally shaped. The boss of the SiC diaphragm moves and modulates in a range of positions between a closed position wherein the boss interengages said microvalve seat prohibiting communication of fluid through the passageway and a fully open position when the boss is spaced apart from the seat at its maximum permitting communication of fluid through said passageway. The actuator includes a SiC top plate affixed to the boss of the diaphragm and a first electrode and the second upper portion of the SiC housing further includes a second electrode.

  10. Motor actuated vacuum door

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanagud, A. V.

    1986-10-01

    Doors that allow scientific instruments to record and retrieve the observed data are often required to be designed and installed as a part of sounding rocket hardware. The motor-actuated vacuum door was designed to maintain a medium vacuum of the order of 0.0001 torr or better while closed, and to provide an opening 15 inches long x 8.5 inches wide while open for cameras to image Halley's comet. When the electric motor receives the instruction to open the door through the payload battery, timer, and relay circuit, the first operation is to unlock the door. After unlatching, the torque transmitted by the motor to the main shaft through the links opens the door. A microswitch actuator, which rides on the linear motion conversion mechanism, is adjusted to trip the limit switch at the end of the travel. The process is repeated in the reverse order to close the door. 'O' rings are designed to maintain the seal. Door mechanisms similar to the one described have flown on Aerobee 17.018 and Black Brant 27.047 payloads.

  11. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  12. Remotely-actuated biomedical switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    Remotely-actuated biomedical switching circuit using transistors consumes no power in the off position and can be actuated by a single-frequency telemetry pulse to control implanted instrumentation. Silicon controlled rectifiers permit the circuit design which imposes zero drain on supply batteries when not in use.

  13. Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Redding, David; Lowman, Andrew; Cohen, David; Ohara, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts the planned Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope (AHMT), which is intended to demonstrate a new approach to the design and construction of wide-aperture spaceborne telescopes for astronomy and Earth science. This technology is also appropriate for Earth-based telescopes. The new approach can be broadly summarized as using advanced lightweight mirrors that can be manufactured rapidly at relatively low cost. More specifically, it is planned to use precise replicated metallic nanolaminate mirrors to obtain the required high-quality optical finishes. Lightweight, dimensionally stable silicon carbide (SiC) structures will support the nanolaminate mirrors in the required surface figures. To enable diffraction- limited telescope performance, errors in surface figures will be corrected by use of mirror-shape-control actuators that will be energized, as needed, by a wave-front-sensing and control system. The concepts of nanolaminate materials and mirrors made from nanolaminate materials were discussed in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. Nanolaminates constitute a relatively new class of materials that can approach theoretical limits of stiffness and strength. Nanolaminate mirrors are synthesized by magnetron sputter deposition of metallic alloys and/or compounds on optically precise master surfaces to obtain optical-quality reflector surfaces backed by thin shell structures. As an integral part of the deposition process, a layer of gold that will constitute the reflective surface layer is deposited first, eliminating the need for a subsequent and separate reflective-coating process. The crystallographic textures of the nanolaminate will be controlled to optimize the performance of the mirror. The entire deposition process for making a nanolaminate mirror takes less than 100 hours, regardless of the mirror diameter. Each nanolaminate mirror will be bonded to its lightweight SiC supporting structure. The lightweight nanolaminate mirrors and Si

  14. A hybrid actuated microrobot using an electromagnetic field and flagellated bacteria for tumor-targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Donghai; Choi, Hyunchul; Cho, Sunghoon; Jeong, Semi; Jin, Zhen; Lee, Cheong; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new concept for a hybrid actuated microrobot for tumor-targeting therapy. For drug delivery in tumor therapy, various electromagnetic actuated microrobot systems have been studied. In addition, bacteria-based microrobot (so-called bacteriobot), which use tumor targeting and the therapeutic function of the bacteria, has also been proposed for solid tumor therapy. Compared with bacteriobot, electromagnetic actuated microrobot has larger driving force and locomotive controllability due to their position recognition and magnetic field control. However, because electromagnetic actuated microrobot does not have self-tumor targeting, they need to be controlled by an external magnetic field. In contrast, the bacteriobot uses tumor targeting and the bacteria's own motility, and can exhibit self-targeting performance at solid tumors. However, because the propulsion forces of the bacteria are too small, it is very difficult for bacteriobot to track a tumor in a vessel with a large bloodstream. Therefore, we propose a hybrid actuated microrobot combined with electromagnetic actuation in large blood vessels with a macro range and bacterial actuation in small vessels with a micro range. In addition, the proposed microrobot consists of biodegradable and biocompatible microbeads in which the drugs and magnetic particles can be encapsulated; the bacteria can be attached to the surface of the microbeads and propel the microrobot. We carried out macro-manipulation of the hybrid actuated microrobot along a desired path through electromagnetic field control and the micro-manipulation of the hybrid actuated microrobot toward a chemical attractant through the chemotaxis of the bacteria. For the validation of the hybrid actuation of the microrobot, we fabricated a hydrogel microfluidic channel that can generate a chemical gradient. Finally, we evaluated the motility performance of the hybrid actuated microrobot in the hydrogel microfluidic channel. We expect

  15. Effect of grain size on actuator properties of piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackenberger, Wesley S.; Pan, Ming-Jen; Vedula, Venkata; Pertsch, Patrick; Cao, Wenwu; Randall, Clive A.; Shrout, Thomas R.

    1998-07-01

    Properties of piezoelectric ceramics important for actuator applications have been measured as a function of grain size. Fine grain piezoelectrics (<=1 μm) have been found to exhibit improved machinability and increased mechanical strength over conventional materials. Actuators made from fine grain ceramic are, therefore, expected to have improved reliability, higher driving fields, and lower driving voltages (from thinner layers in stacked or co-fired actuators) over devices fabricated from conventional materials. TRS Ceramics in collaboration with the Pennsylvania State University's Materials Research Laboratory, has developed fine grain piezoelectric ceramics with minimal or no reduction in piezoactivity. New chemical doping strategies designed to compensate ferroelectric domain clamping effects from grain boundaries have been successful in yielding submicron grain sized ceramics with both low and high field properties equivalent to conventional materials. In the case of Type II ceramics, reduced grain size results in a very stable domain state with respect to both electric field and compressive prestress. Work is in progress to develop both epoxy bonded stack and co-fired actuators from fine grain piezoelectrics.

  16. Electro-Mechanical Actuator. DC Resonant Link Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, Kenneth E.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed on the 68 HP electro-mechanical actuator (EMA) system developed on NASA contract for the Electrical Actuation (ELA) Technology Bridging Program. The system was designed to demonstrate the capability of large, high power linear ELAs for applications such as Thrust Vector Control (TVC) on rocket engines. It consists of a motor controller, drive electronics and a linear actuator capable of up to 32,00 lbs loading at 7.4 inches/second. The drive electronics are based on the Resonant DC link concept and operate at a nominal frequency of 55 kHz. The induction motor is a specially designed high speed, low inertia motor capable of a 68 peak HP. The actuator was originally designed by MOOG Aerospace under an internal R & D program to meet Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) TVC requirements. The design was modified to meet this programs linear rate specification of 7.4 inches/second. The motor and driver were tested on a dynamometer at the Martin Marietta Space Systems facility. System frequency response, step response and force-velocity tests were conducted at the MOOG Aerospace facility. A complete description of the system and all test results can be found in the body of the report.

  17. Ultrasonic resonant piezoelectric actuator with intrinsic torque measurement.

    PubMed

    Pott, Peter P; Matich, Sebastian; Schlaak, Helmut F

    2012-11-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic actuators are widely used in small-scale actuation systems, in which a closed-loop position control is usually utilized. To save an additional torque sensor, the intrinsic measurement capabilities of the piezoelectric material can be employed. To prove feasibility, a motor setup with clearly separated actuation for the friction and driving forces is chosen. The motor concept is based on resonant ultrasonic vibrations. To assess the effects of the direct piezoelectric effect, a capacitance bridge-type circuit has been selected. Signal processing is done by a measurement card with an integrated field-programmable gate array. The motor is used to drive a winch, and different torques are applied by means of weights to be lifted. Assessing the bridge voltage, a good proportionality to the applied torque of 1.47 mV/mN·m is shown. A hysteresis of 1% has been determined. The chosen motor concept is useful for intrinsic torque measurement. However, it provides drawbacks in terms of limited mechanical performance, wear, and thermal losses because of the soft piezoelectric material. Future work will comprise the application of the method to commercially available piezoelectric actuators as well as the implementation of the measurement circuit in an embedded system.

  18. 75 FR 65517 - Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Corporate Headquarters/Hard Drive Development Division, Lake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Corporate Headquarters/Hard Drive... TAA. The request for reconsideration alleges that increased imports of articles (disk drives)...

  19. Bumpless switching control for switched systems with partial actuator failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yiwen; Bao, Wen; Zhang, Qingxin; Chang, Juntao

    2016-11-01

    This study is concerned with the bumpless transfer problem for switched systems with partial actuator failures, in order to obtain smooth system performance output transition. Taking into account that the system requires a controller switching from current sub-controller to a fault-tolerant sub-controller after actuator fault. And bumpless transfer for control input cannot be traditionally designed when the actuator fault occurs, while performance smoothing can be considered and it is actually the ultimate goal of bumpless transfer. Specifically, the actuator fault model is firstly established and partial actuator fault is considered. Then, the system performance output signal is deemed as the main design variable of bumpless transfer, and closed-loop control systems both previous and after controller switching are constructed. Moreover, by using model matching thought and the adaptive sliding mode control technique, a bumpless transfer compensator design strategy is given to drive the performance output variable (after controller switching) to track the one of reference model. At last, simulation results of numeric and application examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed bumpless transfer strategy.

  20. Design and calibration of a piezoelectric actuator for interferometric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Luigi; Poggialini, Andrea; Felice, Giuseppina

    2007-12-01

    The present work reports a possible solution for a low-cost piezoelectric actuator available for interferometric applications. In the paper the design, the assembly and the calibration of the actuator are described in detail. The solution adopted consists of a machined stainless steel case deformed by three low-voltage multilayer plumbum zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic blocks. In the proposed arrangement a three degree of freedom device is obtained, by which a translation and two rotations can be performed. The PZTs are driven by a supply voltage provided by a 16 bit D/A converter directly connected to the parallel port of a personal computer which guarantees a very accurate output. This voltage is applied on each ceramic by means of a variable resistor, by which it is possible to adjust the maximum driving voltage for the single block. This electrical solution allows to match up the strokes of the ceramics in order to obtain a straight expansion of the whole actuator. After the mechanical and electrical set-up of the actuator, a static calibration was carried out by inserting it along one arm of a Michelson speckle interferometer. The calibration procedure had emphasized the hysteresis loop and the non-linearity of the electromechanical behaviour of the actuator.

  1. Characterization of PolyMUMPs-based in-plane electromagnetic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mawahib Gafare; Dennis, John-Ojur; Khir, Mohd-Haris; Rabih, Almur; Mian, Muhammad Umer

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a synopsis of the design and fabrication of an in-plane electromagnetic actuator using Polysilicon Multi-Users MEMS Process (PolyMUMPs). The electromagnetic actuator is driven by Lorentz force. This article is based on the premise that the proportionality of Lorentz force to magnetic field and driving current controls lateral displacement. The fabricated actuator consists of two plates; moving plate supported by four beams and a stationary plate in order to form a capacitor setup for sensing. This work experimentally demonstrates the actuation of the device using low frequencies of 0.5 Hz, 1 Hz and 2Hz. The characterization of the micro actuator using a Leica optical microscope showed a displacement exceeding 8 µm. This displacement is attained with a magnetic field of 20mT and applied current of approximately 5 mA.

  2. Distracted driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... the road Your hands on the wheel Your mind on driving Distracted driving occurs when something gets in the way of you doing all 3 things. Examples include: Talking on a cell phone Reading or sending text messages Eating and drinking Grooming ( ...

  3. Application of traction drives as servo mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Rohn, D. A.; Steinetz, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    The suitability of traction drives for a wide class of aerospace control mechanisms is examined. Potential applications include antenna or solar array drive positioners, robotic joints, control moment gyro (CMG) actuators and propeller pitch change mechanisms. In these and similar applications the zero backlash, high torsional stiffness, low hysteresis and torque ripple characteristics of traction drives are of particular interest, as is the ability to run without liquid lubrication in certain cases. Wear and fatigue considerations for wet and dry operation are examined along with the tribological performance of several promising self lubricating polymers for traction contracts. The speed regulation capabilities of variable ratio traction drives are reviewed. A torsional stiffness analysis described suggests that traction contacts are relatively stiff compared to gears and are significantly stiffer than the other structural elements in the prototype CMG traction drive analyzed. Discussion is also given of an advanced turboprop propeller pitch change mechanism that incorporates a traction drive.

  4. Modeling of a high force density fishbone shaped electrostatic comb drive microactuator.

    PubMed

    Megat Hasnan, Megat Muhammad Ikhsan; Mohd Sabri, Mohd Faizul; Mohd Said, Suhana; Nik Ghazali, Nik Nazri

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of a high force density fishbone shaped electrostatic comb drive actuator. This comb drive actuator has a branched structure similar to a fishbone, which is intended to increase the capacitance of the electrodes and hence increase the electrostatic actuation force. Two-dimensional finite element analysis was used to simulate the motion of the fishbone shaped electrostatic comb drive actuator and compared against the performance of a straight sided electrostatic comb drive actuator. Performances of both designs are evaluated by comparison of displacement and electrostatic force. For both cases, the active area and the minimum gap distance between the two electrodes were constant. An active area of 800 × 300 μm, which contained 16 fingers of fishbone shaped actuators and 40 fingers of straight sided actuators, respectively, was used. Through simulation, improvement of drive force of the fishbone shaped electrostatic comb driver is approximately 485% higher than conventional electrostatic comb driver. These results indicate that the fishbone actuator design provides good potential for applications as high force density electrostatic microactuator in MEMS systems.

  5. A high-speed, large-capacity, 'jukebox' optical disk system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ammon, G. J.; Calabria, J. A.; Thomas, D. T.

    1985-01-01

    Two optical disk 'jukebox' mass storage systems which provide access to any data in a store of 10 to the 13th bits (1250G bytes) within six seconds have been developed. The optical disk jukebox system is divided into two units, including a hardware/software controller and a disk drive. The controller provides flexibility and adaptability, through a ROM-based microcode-driven data processor and a ROM-based software-driven control processor. The cartridge storage module contains 125 optical disks housed in protective cartridges. Attention is given to a conceptual view of the disk drive unit, the NASA optical disk system, the NASA database management system configuration, the NASA optical disk system interface, and an open systems interconnect reference model.

  6. Disks in elliptical galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Rix, H.; White, S.D.M. )

    1990-10-01

    The abundance and strength of disk components in elliptical galaxies are investigated by studying the photometric properties of models containing a spheroidal r exp 1/4-law bulge and a weak exponential disk. Pointed isophotes are observed in a substantial fraction of elliptical galaxies. If these isophote distortions are interpreted in the framework of the present models, then the statistics of observed samples suggest that almost all radio-weak ellipticals could have disks containing roughly 20 percent of the light. It is shown that the E5 galaxy NGC 4660 has the photometric signatures of a disk containing a third of the light. 30 refs.

  7. Astounding Jumping Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzdziol, Edward S.

    1991-01-01

    Activities involving concave rubber disks are utilized to illustrate the scientific principles of kinetic and potential energy. Provides teacher instructions and questions related to the activity. (MDH)

  8. Glass rupture disk

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill; Nicolaysen, Scott D.; Beauchamp, Edwin K.

    2002-01-01

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  9. BINARY-DISK INTERACTION: GAP-OPENING CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    Valle, Luciano del; Escala, Andres

    2012-12-10

    We study the interaction of an equal mass binary with an isothermal circumbinary disk motivated by the evidence of the formation of massive black hole binaries surrounded by gas, after a major merger of gas-rich galaxies. We focus on the torques that the binary produces on the disk and how the exchange of angular momentum can drive the gap formation on it. We propose that the angular momentum exchange between the binary and the disk is through the gravitational interaction of the binary and a (tidally formed) global non-axisymmetric perturbation in the disk. Using this interaction, we derive an analytic criterion for the gap formation in the disk that can be expressed either via the characteristic velocities of the binary-disk system or in terms of the structural parameters h/a and M(< r)/M{sub bin}. Using numerical simulations we show that the simulations where the binary opens a gap in the disk and the simulations where the disk does not have a gap are distributed into two well separated regions. Our analytic criterion predicts a shape of the threshold between these two regions that is consistent with our simulations and the other ones in the literature. We propose an analogy between the regime without (with) a gap in the disk and the Type I (Type II) migration that is observed in simulations of planet-disk interaction (extreme mass ratio binary), emphasizing that the interaction that drives the formation of a gap on the disk is different in the regime that we analyze (comparable mass binary).

  10. Terabyte IDE RAID-5 Disk Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Sanders et al.

    2003-09-30

    High energy physics experiments are currently recording large amounts of data and in a few years will be recording prodigious quantities of data. New methods must be developed to handle this data and make analysis at universities possible. We examine some techniques that exploit recent developments in commodity hardware. We report on tests of redundant arrays of integrated drive electronics (IDE) disk drives for use in offline high energy physics data analysis. IDE redundant array of inexpensive disks (RAID) prices now are less than the cost per terabyte of million-dollar tape robots! The arrays can be scaled to sizes affordable to institutions without robots and used when fast random access at low cost is important.

  11. Halbach array type focusing actuator for small and thin optical data storage device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Q.; Park, Kang-Ho; Paek, Mun Chul

    2004-09-01

    The small form factor optical data storage devices are developing rapidly nowadays. Since it is designed for portable and compatibility with flesh memory, its components such as disk, head, focusing actuator, and spindle motor should be assembled within 5 mm. The thickness of focusing actuator is within 2 mm and the total working range is +/-100um, with the resolution of less than 1μm. Since the thickness is limited tightly, it is hard to place the yoke that closes the magnetic circuit and hard to make strong flux density without yoke. Therefore, Halbach array is adopted to increase the magnetic flux of one side without yoke. The proposed Halbach array type focusing actuator has the advantage of thin actuation structure with sacrificing less flex density than conventional magnetic array. The optical head unit is moved on the swing arm type tracking actuator. Focusing coil is attached to swing arm, and Halbach magnet array is positioned at the bottom of deck along the tracking line, and focusing actuator exerts force by the Fleming's left hand rule. The dynamics, working range, control resolution of focusing actuator are analyzed and performed.

  12. Preliminary study, analysis and design for a power switch for digital engine actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, E. C.; Zickwolf, H. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Innovative control configurations using high temperature switches to operate actuator driving solenoids were studied. The impact on engine control system life cycle costs and reliability of electronic control and (ECU) heat dissipation due to power conditioning and interface drivers were addressed. Various power supply and actuation schemes were investigated, including optical signal transmission and electronics on the actuator, engine driven alternator, and inside the ECU. The use of a switching shunt power conditioner results in the most significant decrease in heat dissipation within the ECU. No overall control system reliability improvement is projected by the use of remote high temperature switches for solenoid drivers.

  13. Laser-induced actuation of individual microsize liquid metal droplets on an open solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Chunqing; Dou, Guangbin; Tian, Yanhong; Yang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The actuation of microsize liquid metal droplets on an open solid surface with laser offset heating is reported in this work. The process allows the droplets to move towards the laser beam center. The analysis of the actuations showed that the droplets were predominantly driven by the thermally induced wettability alteration on the solid; in contrast, Marangoni flow and vapor recoil weakened the motion of the droplets. This indicates that a localized thermal gradient was the driving force for droplet motion and suggests that it may be an alternative actuation technique in manipulating liquid metal droplets for microsystems.

  14. Development of a shape memory alloy actuator for transanal endoscopic microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhigang; Hewit, Jim; Abel, Eric; Slade, Alan; Steele, Bob

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes problems in traditional transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), and proposes a mechatronics approach in new design. As one of several actuation mechanisms to expose rectal cavity, a compression coil spring made of shape memory alloy (SMA) has been studied. A custom SMA spring actuator was designed to displace 12 mm with 45 N driving force. This actuator was embedded with our new TEM tubular structure and can be used to expose a rectal site up to 60 mm wide and 80 mm long. This exposure is considered to be sufficient for treating many tumors.

  15. Multiplexed microimmunoassays on a digital versatile disk.

    PubMed

    Morais, Sergi; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis A; Arnandis-Chover, Tania; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Angel

    2009-07-15

    Multiplexed microimmunoassays for five critical compounds were developed using a digital versatile disk (DVD) as an analytical support and detecting technology. To this end, coating conjugates were adsorbed on the polycarbonate face of the disk; a pool of specific antibodies, gold labeled secondary antibodies, and silver amplification were addressed for developing the assays. The detection principle is based on the capture of attenuated analog signals with the disk drive that were proportional to optical density of the immunoreaction product. The multiplexed assay achieved detection limits (IC10) of 0.06, 0.25, 0.37, 0.16, and 0.10 microg/L, sensitivities of (IC50) 0.54, 1.54, 2.62, 2.02, and 5.9 microg/L, and dynamic ranges of 2 orders of magnitude for atrazine, chlorpyrifos, metolachlor, sulfathiazole, and tetracycline, respectively. The features of the methodology were verified by analyzing natural waters and compared with reference chromatographic methods, showing its potential for high-throughput multiplexed screening applications. Analytes of different chemical nature (pesticides and antibiotics) were directly quantified without sample treatment or preconcentration in a total time of 30 min with similar sensitivity and selectivity to the ELISA plate format using the same immunoreagents. The multianalyte capabilities of immunoassaying methods developed with digital disk and drive demonstrated the competitiveness to quantify targets that require different sample treatment and instrumentation by chromatographic methods.

  16. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  17. Application Actuation Trade Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    Rectifier Unit 3 1..5 37.5 Battery 40 A-Hr 1 76 75 Battery Charger 1 6.8 6.8 Static Inverter I 12.C 13.C AC Power Pelay 3 PDT 1 1.2 1.2 AC Povmr Relay 3 PD)T...Weight 0.7 pounds Total Weight 4.7 pounds Both actuators are Vowered by 28V DC brush type motors so that the system can be operated from battery pover in... DC -AC Inverter 2 34 68 Battery (2 @ 4C A-Hr) 2 75 150 AC Power Contactor 6POT 2 18 36 AC Power Contactor 6PST 2 12 24 AC Power Contactor SPST 4 1

  18. Polypyrrole actuators for tremor suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaarup, Steen; Mogensen, Naja; Bay, Lasse; West, Keld

    2003-07-01

    Neurological tremor affecting limbs can be divided into at least 6 different types with frequencies ranging from 2 to about 20 Hz. In order to alleviate the symptoms by suppressing the tremor, sensing and actuation systems able to perform at these frequencies are needed. Electroactive polymers exemplify "soft actuator" technology that may be especially suitable for use in conjunction with human limbs. The electrochemical and mechanical properties of polypyrrole dodecyl benzene sulphonate actuator films have been studied with this application in mind. The results show that the time constants for the change of length and for the stiffness change are significantly different; the stiffness change being about 10 times faster. Both force measurements and Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance measurements indicate that the actuation process is complex and involves at least two different processes. The EQCM results make it possible to formulate a hypothesis for the two different time constants: Sodium ions enter the polymer correlated with a fast mass change that probably involves a few (~4) strongly bound water molecules as well. On further reduction, about 10 additional water molecules enter the polymer in a slower process driven by osmotic pressure. Earlier work has tended to focus on achieving the maximum length change, therefore taking the time needed to include all processes. However, since the slower process described above is associated with the lowest strength of the actuator, concentrating on the faster stiffness change results in only a small reduction in the work done by the actuator. This may make actuation at higher frequencies feasible.

  19. Actuator design using electroactive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Diego; Moreno, Luis; Baselga, Juan

    2005-07-01

    In order to make EAP actuators technology scalable a design methodology for polymer actuators is required. Design variables, optimization formulas and a general architecture are required as it is usual in electromagnetic or hydraulic actuators design. This will allow the development of large EAP actuators from micro-actuator units, specifically designed for a particular application. It will also help to enhance the EAP material final performance. This approach is not new, since it is found in Nature. Skeletal muscle architecture has a profound influence on muscle force-generating properties and functionality. Based on existing literature on skeletal muscle biomechanics, the Nature design philosophy is inferred. Formulas and curves employed by Nature in the design of muscles are presented. Design units such as fiber, tendon, aponeurosis, and motor units are compared with the equivalent design units to be taken into account in the design of EAP actuators. Finally a complete design methodology for the design of actuators based on multiple EAP fiber/sheets is proposed. In addition, the procedure gives an idea of the required parameters that must be clearly modeled and characterized at EAP material level prior to attempt the design of complex Electromechanical Systems based on Electroactive Polymers.

  20. Reprocessing in Luminous Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, K. Robbins; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We develop and investigate a procedure that accounts for disk reprocessing of photons that originate in the disk itself. Surface temperatures and simple, black body spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of protostellar disks are calculated. In disks that flare with radius, reprocessing of stellar photons results in temperature profiles considerably shallower than r(sup -3/4). Including the disk as a radiation source (as in the case of actively secreting disks) along with the stellar source further flattens the temperature profile. Disks that flare strongly near the star and then smoothly curve over and become shadowed at some distance ("decreasing curvature" disks) exhibit nearly power-law temperature profiles which result in power-law infrared SEDs with slopes in agreement with typical observations of young stellar objects. Disk models in which the photospheric thickness is controlled by the local opacity and in which the temperature decreases with radius naturally show this shape. Uniformly flaring models do not match observations as well; progressively stronger reprocessing at larger radii leads to SEDs that flatten toward the infrared or even have a second peak at the wavelength corresponding (through the Wien law) to the temperature of the outer edge of the disk. In FU Orionis outbursting systems, the dominant source of energy is the disk itself. The details of the reprocessing depend sensitively on the assumed disk shape and emitted temperature profile. The thermal instability outburst models of Bell Lin reproduce trends in the observed SEDs of Fuors with T varies as r(sup -3/4) in the inner disk (r approx. less than 0.25au corresponding to lambda approx. less than 10 microns) and T varies as r(sup -1/2) in the outer disk. Surface irradiation during outburst and quiescence is compared in the region of planet formation (1 - 10 au). The contrast between the two phases is diminished by the importance of the reprocessing of photons from the relatively high mass

  1. Tilt/Tip/Piston Manipulator with Base-Mounted Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad

    2006-01-01

    A proposed three-degree-of-freedom (tilt/tip/piston) manipulator, suitable for aligning an optical or mechanical component, would offer several advantages over prior such manipulators: Unlike in some other manipulators, no actuator would support the weight of another actuator: All of the actuators would be mounted on a base. Hence, there would be less manipulated weight. The basic geometry of the manipulator would afford mechanical advantage: that is, actuator motions would be larger than the motions they produce in the manipulated object. Mechanical advantage inherently increases the accuracy and resolution of manipulation. Unlike in some other manipulators, it would not be necessary to route power and/or data lines through manipulator joints. The proposed manipulator (see figure) would include three prismatic actuators (T1N1, T2N2, and T3N3) mounted on the base and operating in the same plane. Examples of suitable prismatic actuators include lead-screw mechanisms, linear hydraulic motors, piezoelectric linear drives, inchworm-movement linear stepping motors, and linear flexure drives. The actuators would control the lengths of links R1T1, R2T2, and R3T3. Three spherical joints (P1, P2, and P3) would be located at the corners of an equilateral triangle of side length q on the platform holding the object to be manipulated. Three inextensible limbs (R1P1, R2P2, and R3P3) having length r would connect the spherical joints on the platform to revolute joints (R1, R2, and R3) at the ends of the actuator-controlled links R1T1, R2T2, and R3T3. By varying the lengths of these links, one could control the tilt, tip, and piston coordinates of the platform. Closed-form equations for direct or forward kinematics of the manipulator (given the lengths of the variable links, find the tilt, tip, and piston coordinates) have been derived. The equations of inverse kinematics (find the variable link lengths needed to obtain the desired tilt, tip, and piston coordinates) have also

  2. Valves Based on Amplified Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Letty, R.; Lhermet, N.; Patient, G.; Claeyssen, F.; Lang, M.

    2004-10-01

    Amplified Piezo Actuators have been developed at CEDRAT TECHNOLOGIES for several years and found several applications in space. Their well-known advantages (rapid response and precise positioning) have been used in valve designs to obtain either rapid or fine proportional valves. A first gas valve is using a small amplified piezo actuator and is further driven with a switched amplifier to get a high frequency modulation. A frequency modulation higher than 400 Hz with a stroke of 100 m has been measured. These properties can also be used for gasoline injectors. A second gas valve is also using an amplified piezo actuator, a linear amplifier, and a servo controller to get an accurate proportional valve dedicated to precise gas flow control in the fields of instrumentation and space. A linear and stable flow control has been demonstrated. The low power consumption of the piezoelectric valve in the space applications is an additional advantage. A stable flow of dry Nitrogen ranging from 0.1 sccm to 200 sccm has been measured with an inlet pressure of 1 bar. These valves have been designed with the help of several modelling tools: finite element procedure for the electro-mechanical part, the contact mechanics between the poppet and the seat, the computational fluid dynamics. The valves have been further measured by using several measuring equipment's, including a laser interferometer, a spectrum analyser to measure the gas flow stability, Thermal vacuum and leak tests have also been performed. A special emphasis is realised on the driving and control aspects of this valve for space applications.

  3. Fundamental study on improvement of piezoelectricity of poly(ι-lactic acid) and its application to film actuators.

    PubMed

    Tajitsu, Yoshiro

    2013-08-01

    We designed a new film actuator, whose driving force is generated by a surface wave, which induces rotational motion. Its performance is similar to that of a rotation motor even though the new film actuator has no complex mechanical parts. To realize the film actuator, we used a poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) film with improved piezoelectricity. First, we theoretically investigated the necessary conditions for a surface wave to be generated on the end face of a PLLA film by the fusion of its shear piezoelectricity and resonance, and then experimentally realized this. Using the actuator made using the PLLA film, we demonstrated that the clockwise and counterclockwise rotation of an object placed on the end face of the PLLA film actuator could be freely controlled by changing the frequency of the ac voltage applied to the actuator.

  4. Gear-Driven Turnbuckle Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Ricky N.

    2010-01-01

    This actuator design allows the extension and contraction of turnbuckle assemblies. It can be operated manually or remotely, and is extremely compact. It is ideal for turnbuckles that are hard to reach by conventional tools. The tool assembly design solves the problem of making accurate adjustments to the variable geometry guide vanes without having to remove and reinstall the actuator system back on the engine. The actuator does this easily by adjusting the length of the turnbuckles while they are still attached to the engine.

  5. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, Douglas B.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Segalman, Daniel J.; Witkowski, Walter R.

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots.

  6. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, D.B.; Shahinpoor, M.; Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1993-10-05

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots. 11 figures.

  7. Dementia & Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregiver Resource Center Family Care Navigator Research Registry Support Groups Caregiver Stories Connections e-Newsletter FCA+(plus) Services ... be like if you could no longer drive. Support groups provide a good venue for both the caregivers ...

  8. The Milky Way disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, G.

    2015-08-01

    This review summarises the invited presentation I gave on the Milky Way disc. The idea underneath was to touch those topics that can be considered hot nowadays in the Galactic disk research: the reality of the thick disk, the spiral structure of the Milky Way, and the properties of the outer Galactic disk. A lot of work has been done in recent years on these topics, but a coherent and clear picture is still missing. Detailed studies with high quality spectroscopic data seem to support a dual Galactic disk, with a clear separation into a thin and a thick component. Much confusion and very discrepant ideas still exist concerning the spiral structure of the Milky Way. Our location in the disk makes it impossible to observe it, and we can only infer it. This process of inference is still far from being mature, and depends a lot on the selected tracers, the adopted models and their limitations, which in many cases are neither properly accounted for, nor pondered enough. Finally, there are very different opinions on the size (scale length, truncation radius) of the Galactic disk, and on the interpretation of the observed outer disk stellar populations in terms either of external entities (Monoceros, Triangulus-Andromeda, Canis Major), or as manifestations of genuine disk properties (e.g., warp and flare).

  9. Development of novel single-wall carbon nanotube epoxy composite ply actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yeo-Heung; Shanov, Vesselin; Schulz, Mark J.; Narasimhadevara, Suhasini; Subramaniam, Srinivas; Hurd, Douglas; Boerio, F. J.

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes a carbon nanotube epoxy ply material that has electrochemical actuation properties. The material was formed by dispersing single-wall carbon nanotubes in a solvent and then solution casting a thin paper using a mold and vacuum oven. In order to take advantage of the high elastic modulus of carbon nanotubes for actuation, epoxy as a chemically inert polymer is considered. An epoxy layer was cast on the surface of the nanotube paper to make a two-layer ply. A wet electrochemical actuator was formed by placing the nanotube epoxy ply in a 2 M NaCl electrolyte solution. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were carried out to characterize the electrochemical properties of the actuator. The voltage-current relationship and power to drive the actuator material were also determined. Compared to previous single-wall carbon nanotube buckypaper tape actuators, which had poor adhesion between the nanotubes and tape, and other nanotube-thermal plastic polymer actuators, which could not provide high strength, the epoxy based actuator has a higher elastic modulus and strength, which will be useful for future structural applications. This demonstrates that a polymer layer can reinforce nanotube paper, which is an important step in building a new structural material that actuates. Further work is under way to develop a solid electrolyte to allow dry actuation. Finally, these actuator plies will be laminated to build a carbon nanocomposite material. This smart structural material will have potential applications that range from use in robotic surgical tools to use as structures that change shape.

  10. Hydrogel core flexible matrix composite (H-FMC) actuators: theory and preliminary modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicker, M. P. M.; Weaver, P. M.; Rossiter, J. M.; Bond, I. P.

    2014-09-01

    The underlying theory of a new actuator concept based on hydrogel core flexible matrix composites (H-FMC) is presented. The key principle that underlines the H-FMC actuator operation is that the three-dimensional swelling of a hydrogel is partially constrained in order to improve the amount of useful work done. The partial constraint is applied to the hydrogel by a flexible matrix composite (FMC) that minimizes the hydrogel's volume expansion while swelling. This constraint serves to maximize the fixed charge density and resulting osmotic pressure, the driving force behind actuation. In addition, for certain FMC fibre orientations the Poisson's ratio of the anisotropic FMC laminate converts previously unused hydrogel swelling in the radial and circumferential directions into useful axial strains. The potential benefit of the H-FMC concept to hydrogel actuator performance is shown through comparison of force-stroke curves and evaluation of improvements in useful actuation work. The model used to achieve this couples chemical and electrical components, represented with the Nernst-Plank and Poisson equations, as well as a linear elastic mechanical material model, encompassing limited geometric nonlinearities. It is found that improvements in useful actuation work in the order of 1500% over bare hydrogel performance are achieved by the H-FMC concept. A parametric study is also undertaken to determine the effect of various FMC design parameters on actuator free strain and blocking stress. A comparison to other actuator concepts is also included.

  11. High Performance Electroactive Polymer Actuators Based on Sulfonated Block Copolymers Comprising Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Onnuri; Park, Moon Jeong

    2015-03-01

    Electroactive polymer (EAP) actuators that show reversible deformation under external electric stimulus have attracted great attention toward a range of biomimetic applications such as microsensors and artificial muscles. Key challenges to advance the technologies can be placed on the achievement of fast response time, low driving voltage, and durable operation in air. In present study, we are motivated to solve these issues by employing self-assembled block copolymers containing ionic liquids (ILs) as polymer layers in the actuator based on knowledge of factors affecting electromechanical properties of actuators. By controlling the block architecture and molecular weight of block copolymers, bending strain and durability were controlled in a straightforward manner. It has also been revealed that the type of IL makes impact on the EAP actuator performance by determining ion migration dynamics. Our actuators demonstrated large bending strains (up to 4%) under low voltages of 1-3V, which far exceeds the best performance of other EAP actuators reported in the literature. To underpin the molecular-level understanding of actuation mechanisms underlying the improved performance, we carried out in situ spectroscopy and in situ scattering experiments under actuation.

  12. Multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, L.R.; Crawford, D.C.

    1983-10-06

    A multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism for controlling a nuclear reactor is provided. The mechanism includes an elongate pressure housing in which a plurality of closely spaced drive rods are located. Each drive rod is connected to a rod which is insertable in the reactor core. An electromechanical stationary latch device is provided which is actuatable to hold each drive rod stationary with respect to the pressure housing. An electromechanical movable latch device is also provided for each one of the drive rods. Each movable latch device is provided with a base and is actuatable to hold a respective drive rod stationary with respect to the base. An electromechanical lift device is further provided for each base which is actuatable for moving a respective base longitudinally along the pressure housing. In this manner, one or more drive rods can be moved in the pressure housing by sequentially and repetitively operating the electromechanical devices. Preferably, each latch device includes a pair of opposed latches which grip teeth located on the respective drive rod. Two, three, or four drive rods can be located symmetrically about the longitudinal axis of the pressure housing.

  13. Multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, Lawrence R.; Crawford, Donald C.

    1986-01-01

    A multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism for controlling a nuclear reactor is provided. The mechanism includes an elongate pressure housing in which a plurality of closely spaced drive rods are located. Each drive rod is connected to a rod which is insertable in the reactor core. An electromechanical stationary latch device is provided which is actuatable to hold each drive rod stationary with respect to the pressure housing. An electromechanical movable latch device is also provided for each one of the drive rods. Each movable latch device is provided with a base and is actuatable to hold a respective drive rod stationary with respect to the base. An electromechanical lift device is further provided for each base which is actuatable for moving a respective base longitudinally along the pressure housing. In this manner, one or more drive rods can be moved in the pressure housing by sequentially and repetitively operating the electromechanical devices. Preferably, each latch device includes a pair of opposed latches which grip teeth located on the respective drive rod. Two, three, or four drive rods can be located symmetrically about the longitudinal axis of the pressure housing.

  14. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  15. Protoplanetary Disks, Jets, and the Birth of the Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglada, G.

    2017-03-01

    Young stars are surrounded by rotating disks of gas and dust. These disks play an essential role in regulating the mass accretion onto the star and are the precursors of exoplanetary systems. Accretion disks also play an important role in driving the bipolar collimated ejections (jets) that remove the excess of angular momentum and allow the star to reach its final mass. Jets are partially ionized and their continuum free-free emission at centimeter wavelengths is a powerful tool to study at small scale (10-100 au) the region where they originate. Observations of the dust thermal emission at centimeter wavelengths are also well suited to study the distribution of dust grains that have evolved up to centimeter sizes and trace the signatures of planet formation in protoplanetary disks. I will present some recent results from VLA and ALMA observations of disks and jets in young stellar objects, and I will discuss future prospects with the SKA in this field.

  16. Investigation of selected disk systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The large disk systems offered by IBM, UNIVAC, Digital Equipment Corporation, and Data General were examined. In particular, these disk systems were analyzed in terms of how well available operating systems take advantage of the respective disk controller's transfer rates, and to what degree all available data for optimizing disk usage is effectively employed. In the course of this analysis, generic functions and components of disk systems were defined and the capabilities of the surveyed disk system were investigated.

  17. CONSTRAINTS ON COMPTON-THICK WINDS FROM BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISKS: CAN WE SEE THE INNER DISK?

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2012-11-01

    Strong evidence is emerging that winds can be driven from the central regions of accretion disks in both active galactic nuclei and Galactic black hole binaries. Direct evidence for highly ionized, Compton-thin inner-disk winds comes from observations of blueshifted (v {approx} 0.05-0.1c) iron-K X-ray absorption lines. However, it has been suggested that the inner regions of black hole accretion disks can also drive Compton-thick winds-such winds would enshroud the inner disk, preventing us from seeing direct signatures of the accretion disk (i.e., the photospheric thermal emission, or the Doppler/gravitationally broadened iron K{alpha} line). Here, we show that, provided the source is sub-Eddington, the well-established wind-driving mechanisms fail to launch a Compton-thick wind from the inner disk. For the accelerated region of the wind to be Compton-thick, the momentum carried in the wind must exceed the available photon momentum by a factor of at least 2/{lambda}, where {lambda} is the Eddington ratio of the source, ruling out radiative acceleration unless the source is very close to the Eddington limit. Compton-thick winds also carry large mass fluxes, and a consideration of the connections between the wind and the disk shows this to be incompatible with magneto-centrifugal driving. Finally, thermal driving of the wind is ruled out on the basis of the large Compton radii that typify black hole systems. In the absence of some new acceleration mechanisms, we conclude that the inner regions of sub-Eddington accretion disks around black holes are indeed naked.

  18. Variable Valve Actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Gutterman; A. J. Lasley

    2008-08-31

    Many approaches exist to enable advanced mode, low temperature combustion systems for diesel engines - such as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) or other HCCI-like combustion modes. The fuel properties and the quantity, distribution and temperature profile of air, fuel and residual fraction in the cylinder can have a marked effect on the heat release rate and combustion phasing. Figure 1 shows that a systems approach is required for HCCI-like combustion. While the exact requirements remain unclear (and will vary depending on fuel, engine size and application), some form of substantially variable valve actuation is a likely element in such a system. Variable valve actuation, for both intake and exhaust valve events, is a potent tool for controlling the parameters that are critical to HCCI-like combustion and expanding its operational range. Additionally, VVA can be used to optimize the combustion process as well as exhaust temperatures and impact the after treatment system requirements and its associated cost. Delphi Corporation has major manufacturing and product development and applied R&D expertise in the valve train area. Historical R&D experience includes the development of fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train on research engines as well as several generations of mechanical VVA for gasoline systems. This experience has enabled us to evaluate various implementations and determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. While a fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train system might be the 'ideal' solution technically for maximum flexibility in the timing and control of the valve events, its complexity, associated costs, and high power consumption make its implementation on low cost high volume applications unlikely. Conversely, a simple mechanical system might be a low cost solution but not deliver the flexibility required for HCCI operation. After modeling more than 200 variations of the

  19. Enzyme actuated bioresponsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew Nolan

    Bioresponsive hydrogels are emerging with technological significance in targeted drug delivery, biosensors and regenerative medicine. Conferred with the ability to respond to specific biologically derived stimuli, the design challenge is in effectively linking the conferred biospecificity with an engineered response tailored to the needs of a particular application. Moreover, the fundamental phenomena governing the response must support an appropriate dynamic range and limit of detection. The design of these systems is inherently complicated due to the high interdependency of the governing phenomena that guide the sensing, transduction, and the actuation response of hydrogels. To investigate the dynamics of these materials, model systems may be used which seek to interrogate the system dynamics by uni-variable experimentation and limit confounding phenomena such as: polymer-solute interactions, polymer swelling dynamics and biomolecular reaction-diffusion concerns. To this end, a model system, alpha-chymotrypsin (Cht) (a protease) and a cleavable peptide-chromogen (pro-drug) covalently incorporated into a hydrogel, was investigated to understand the mechanisms of covalent loading and release by enzymatic cleavage in bio-responsive delivery systems. Using EDC and Sulfo-NHS, terminal carboxyl groups of N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide, a cleavable chromogen, were conjugated to primary amines of a hydrated poly(HEMA)-based hydrogel. Hydrogel discs were incubated in buffered Cht causing enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide and concomitant release of the chromophore for monitoring. To investigate substrate loading and the effects of hydrogel morphology on the system, the concentration of the amino groups (5, 10, 20, and 30 mol%) and the cross-linked density (1, 5, 7, 9 and 12 mol%) were independently varied. Loading-Release Efficiency of the chromogen was shown to exhibit a positive relation to increasing amino groups (AEMA). The release rates demonstrated a

  20. Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.A.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

  1. Simulation-Based Design of a Rotatory SMA Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilthey, Sascha; Meier, Horst

    2009-08-01

    The design and optimization of a rotatory drive powered by shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators is described in this paper. SMA actuators used in technical applications are parameterized by the use of trial-and-error methods, because there is a lack of computer-aided design tools for this active material. A numerical modeling approach was developed to design and optimize the geometry and the load and heating conditions of SMA actuators in a technical system to achieve a good dynamic and a high reliability. The shape memory effect used in most technical systems is the extrinsic two way effect (2WE). This effect can be simulated with the numerical model which was implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK. The focus of the model is on the activation behavior of the SMA actuator, which defines its rate of heating and cooling. Different load conditions and various actuator geometries and shapes, e.g. wire or spring actuator, are simulated by the calculation of the energetic balance of the whole system. The numerical model can be used to simulate time variant heating currents in order to obtain an optimal system performance. The model was used to design a rotatory SMA-drive system, which is based on the moving concept of a wave drive gear set. In contrast to the conventional system, which is driven by an electric motor, the SMA drive consists of a strain wave gear and SMA wire actuators that are applied circularly to generate a rotatory movement. Special characteristics of this drive system are a high torque density and a high positioning accuracy.

  2. TEARING UP THE DISK: HOW BLACK HOLES ACCRETE

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, Chris; King, Andrew; Price, Daniel; Frank, Juhan

    2012-10-01

    We show that in realistic cases of accretion in active galactic nuclei or stellar-mass X-ray binaries, the Lense-Thirring effect breaks the central regions of tilted accretion disks around spinning black holes into a set of distinct planes with only tenuous flows connecting them. If the original misalignment of the outer disk to the spin axis of the hole is 45 Degree-Sign {approx}< {theta} {approx}< 135 Degree-Sign , as in {approx}70% of randomly oriented accretion events, the continued precession of these disks sets up partially counterrotating gas flows. This drives rapid infall as angular momentum is canceled and gas attempts to circularize at smaller radii. Disk breaking close to the black hole leads to direct dynamical accretion, while breaking further out can drive gas down to scales where it can accrete rapidly. For smaller tilt angles breaking can still occur and may lead to other observable phenomena such as quasi-periodic oscillations. For such effects not to appear, the black hole spin must in practice be negligibly small, or be almost precisely aligned with the disk. Qualitatively similar results hold for any accretion disk subject to a forced differential precession, such as an external disk around a misaligned black hole binary.

  3. Acoustic actuation of bioinspired microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Kaynak, Murat; Ozcelik, Adem; Nourhani, Amir; Lammert, Paul E; Crespi, Vincent H; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-31

    Acoustic actuation of bioinspired microswimmers is experimentally demonstrated. Microswimmers are fabricated in situ in a microchannel. Upon acoustic excitation, the flagellum of the microswimmer oscillates, which in turn generates linear or rotary movement depending on the swimmer design. The speed of these bioinspired microswimmers is tuned by adjusting the voltage amplitude applied to the acoustic transducer. Simple microfabrication and remote actuation are promising for biomedical applications.

  4. Electro-Active Polymer (EAP) Actuators for Planetary Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Leary, S.; Shahinpoor, M.; Harrison, J. O.; Smith, J.

    1999-01-01

    NASA is seeking to reduce the mass, size, consumed power, and cost of the instrumentation used in its future missions. An important element of many instruments and devices is the actuation mechanism and electroactive polymers (EAP) are offering an effective alternative to current actuators. In this study, two families of EAP materials were investigated, including bending ionomers and longitudinal electrostatically driven elastomers. These materials were demonstrated to effectively actuate manipulation devices and their performance is being enhanced in this on-going study. The recent observations are reported in this paper, include the operation of the bending-EAP at conditions that exceed the harsh environment on Mars, and identify the obstacles that its properties and characteristics are posing to using them as actuators. Analysis of the electrical characteristics of the ionomer EAP showed that it is a current driven material rather than voltage driven and the conductivity distribution on the surface of the material greatly influences the bending performance. An accurate equivalent circuit modeling of the ionomer EAP performance is essential for the design of effective drive electronics. The ionomer main limitations are the fact that it needs to be moist continuously and the process of electrolysis that takes place during activation. An effective coating technique using a sprayed polymer was developed extending its operation in air from a few minutes to about four months. The coating technique effectively forms the equivalent of a skin to protect the moisture content of the ionomer. In parallel to the development of the bending EAP, the development of computer control of actuated longitudinal EAP has been pursued. An EAP driven miniature robotic arm was constructed and it is controlled by a MATLAB code to drop and lift the arm and close and open EAP fingers of a 4-finger gripper. Keywords: Miniature Robotics, Electroactive Polymers, Electroactive Actuators, EAP

  5. Large Scale Magnetostrictive Valve Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A.; Holleman, Elizabeth; Eddleman, David

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's Valves, Actuators and Ducts Design and Development Branch developed a large scale magnetostrictive valve actuator. The potential advantages of this technology are faster, more efficient valve actuators that consume less power and provide precise position control and deliver higher flow rates than conventional solenoid valves. Magnetostrictive materials change dimensions when a magnetic field is applied; this property is referred to as magnetostriction. Magnetostriction is caused by the alignment of the magnetic domains in the material s crystalline structure and the applied magnetic field lines. Typically, the material changes shape by elongating in the axial direction and constricting in the radial direction, resulting in no net change in volume. All hardware and testing is complete. This paper will discuss: the potential applications of the technology; overview of the as built actuator design; discuss problems that were uncovered during the development testing; review test data and evaluate weaknesses of the design; and discuss areas for improvement for future work. This actuator holds promises of a low power, high load, proportionally controlled actuator for valves requiring 440 to 1500 newtons load.

  6. Airplane Actuation Trade Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    with fail-operate-twice capabilities for the flight critical surfaces . These surfaces are at least triple redundant, electrically and mechanically . For...the other surfaces /devices, triple redundancy is provided electrically but only dual redundancy mechanically . For the flight critical surfaces full... surfaces was to use a mechanical power hinge and drive it with a motor (electrical motor for the electrical system and hydraulic motor for the hydraulic

  7. Preliminary results on noncollocated torque control of space robot actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilley, Scott W.; Francis, Colin M.; Emerick, Ken; Hollars, Michael G.

    1989-01-01

    In the Space Station era, more operations will be performed robotically in space in the areas of servicing, assembly, and experiment tending among others. These robots may have various sets of requirements for accuracy, speed, and force generation, but there will be design constraints such as size, mass, and power dissipation limits. For actuation, a leading motor candidate is a dc brushless type, and there are numerous potential drive trains each with its own advantages and disadvantages. This experiment uses a harmonic drive and addresses some inherent limitations, namely its backdriveability and low frequency structural resonances. These effects are controlled and diminished by instrumenting the actuator system with a torque transducer on the output shaft. This noncollocated loop is closed to ensure that the commanded torque is accurately delivered to the manipulator link. The actuator system is modelled and its essential parameters identified. The nonlinear model for simulations will include inertias, gearing, stiction, flexibility, and the effects of output load variations. A linear model is extracted and used for designing the noncollocated torque and position feedback loops. These loops are simulated with the structural frequency encountered in the testbed system. Simulation results are given for various commands in position. The use of torque feedback is demonstrated to yield superior performance in settling time and positioning accuracy. An experimental setup being finished consists of a bench mounted motor and harmonic drive actuator system. A torque transducer and two position encoders, each with sufficient resolution and bandwidth, will provide sensory information. Parameters of the physical system are being identified and matched to analytical predictions. Initial feedback control laws will be incorporated in the bench test equipment and various experiments run to validate the designs. The status of these experiments is given.

  8. Piezo stack actuation control system for sperm injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, K. K.; Putra, A. S.

    2005-12-01

    Among the electric motor drives, the piezoelectric actuator (PA) is one drive which is becoming very popular in high precision biomedical applications, such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The main benefits of a PA include low thermal losses and, most importantly, the high precision and accuracy achievable consequent of the driect drive principle. One major source of uncertainties in PA control design is the hysteresis behavior which yields a rate-independent lag and residual displacement near zero input, reducing the precision of the actuators. Due to the typical precision positioning requirements and low offset tolerance of PA applications, the design and control of these systems, under the influence of these uncertainties, is particularly challenging since conventional PID control usually does not suffice in these application domains to meet the stringent performance requirements. In this paper, we consider the design and realization of a piezo stack actuator which is capable of linear motion and non-full rotation to fulfill the stringent requirements associated with sperm injection applications. A complementary precise control system is developed employing a robust adaptive control algorithm to reject the hysteresis phenomenon associated with general PAs and to achieve rapid and highly precise positioning. The controller comprises of a PID feedback component and an adaptive component for hysteresis compensation. The adaptive component is continuously refined based on just prevailing input and output signals. In the paper, it will be proven that the tracking error can asymptotically converge to zero. In addition, analytical quantification is given to illustrate the improvement of the system's transient performance. Real-time experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed micro actuator for high precision motion trajectory tracking in intracytoplasmic sperm injection using mice eggs.

  9. Multiple switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Edward T.

    1976-01-06

    The present invention relates to switches and switch actuating devices to be operated for purposes of arming a bomb or other missile as it is dropped or released from an aircraft. The particular bomb or missile in which this invention is applied is one in which there is a plurality of circuits which are to be armed by the closing of switches upon dropping or releasing of the bomb. The operation of the switches to closed position is normally accomplished by means of a pull-out wire; that is, a wire which is withdrawn from the bomb or missile at the time of release of the bomb, one end of the wire being attached to the aircraft. The conditions to be met are that the arming switches must be positively and surely maintained in open position until the bomb is released and the arming action is effected. The action of the pull-out wire in achieving the arming action must be sure and positive with minimum danger of malfunctioning, jamming or binding.

  10. Explosive actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Kenneth G.

    1983-01-01

    1. A device of the character described comprising the combination of a housing having an elongate bore and including a shoulder extending inwardly into said bore, a single elongate movable plunger disposed in said bore including an outwardly extending flange adjacent one end thereof overlying said shoulder, normally open conduit means having an inlet and an outlet perpendicularly piercing said housing intermediate said shoulder and said flange and including an intermediate portion intersecting and normally openly communicating with said bore at said shoulder, normally closed conduit means piercing said housing and intersecting said bore at a location spaced from said normally open conduit means, said elongate plunger including a shearing edge adjacent the other end thereof normally disposed intermediate both of said conduit means and overlying a portion of said normally closed conduit means, a deformable member carried by said plunger intermediate said flange and said shoulder and normally spaced from and overlying the intermediate portion of said normally open conduit means, and means on the housing communicating with the bore to retain an explosive actuator for moving said plunger to force the deformable member against the shoulder and extrude a portion of the deformable member out of said bore into portions of the normally open conduit means for plugging the same and to effect the opening of said normally closed conduit means by the plunger shearing edge substantially concomitantly with the plugging of the normally open conduit means.

  11. Downhole hydraulic actuated pump

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, G.K.

    1988-09-06

    This patent describes a downhole hydraulically actuated pump assembly of the type having a main housing within which an engine and pump is enclosed; a connecting rod, an engine piston, a pump plunger, means by which the engine and connecting rod reciprocate the pump plunger and thereby produces fluid; the main housing has a lower end having a formation fluid inlet; and upper end having a power fluid inlet; and, a produced fluid outlet; the plunger divides one marginal end of the housing into upper and lower production chambers; the lower end of the connecting rod is hollow and extends through the plunger into fluid communication with the formation fluid inlet to provide a source of formation fluid for the upper and lower production chambers; a traveling value assembly contained within the plunger and arranged to transfer formation fluid from the hollow rod, through the plunger, and into the upper and lower production chambers, respectively, as the plunger upstrokes and downstrokes; produced fluid valve means by which fluid flows from the upper and lower production chambers and through the produced fluid outlet.

  12. Quick actuating closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, III, Dorsey E. (Inventor); Updike, deceased, Benjamin T. (Inventor); Allred, Johnny W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A quick actuating closure for a pressure vessel 80 in which a wedge ring 30 with a conical outer surface 31 is moved forward to force shear blocks 40, with conical inner surfaces 41, radially outward to lock an end closure plug 70 within an opening 81 in the pressure vessel 80. A seal ring 60 and a preload ramp 50 sit between the shear blocks 40 and the end closure plug 70 to provide a backup sealing capability. Conical surfaces 44 and 55 of the preload ramp 50 and the shear blocks 40 interact to force the seal ring 60 into shoulders 73 and 85 in the end closure plug 70 and opening 81 to form a tight seal. The end closure plug 70 is unlocked by moving the wedge ring 30 rearward, which causes T-bars 32 of the wedge ring 30 riding within T -slots 42 of the shear blocks 40 to force them radially inward. The end closure plug 70 is then removed, allowing access to the interior of the pressure vessel 80.

  13. RESONANT CLUMPING AND SUBSTRUCTURE IN GALACTIC DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Shen, Juntai; Evans, N. Wyn E-mail: msmith@shao.ac.cn E-mail: nwe@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2015-05-10

    We describe a method to extract resonant orbits from N-body simulations, exploiting the fact that they close in frames rotating with a constant pattern speed. Our method is applied to the N-body simulation of the Milky Way by Shen et al. This simulation hosts a massive bar, which drives strong resonances and persistent angular momentum exchange. Resonant orbits are found throughout the disk, both close to the bar and out to the very edges of the disk. Using Fourier spectrograms, we demonstrate that the bar is driving kinematic substructure even in the very outer parts of the disk. We identify two major orbit families in the outskirts of the disk, one of which makes significant contributions to the kinematic landscape, namely, the m:l = 3:−2 family, resonating with the bar. A mechanism is described that produces bimodal distributions of Galactocentric radial velocities at selected azimuths in the outer disk. It occurs as a result of the temporal coherence of particles on the 3:−2 resonant orbits, which causes them to arrive simultaneously at pericenter or apocenter. This resonant clumping, due to the in-phase motion of the particles through their epicycle, leads to both inward and outward moving groups that belong to the same orbital family and consequently produce bimodal radial velocity distributions. This is a possible explanation of the bimodal velocity distributions observed toward the Galactic anticenter by Liu et al. Another consequence is that transient overdensities appear and dissipate (in a symmetric fashion), resulting in a periodic pulsing of the disk’s surface density.

  14. Attempting a classification for electrical polymeric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, T. F.; López Cascales, J.; Fernández-Romero, A. J.

    2007-04-01

    Polymeric actuators, electroactive polymer actuators, electromechanical polymeric actuators, artificial muscles, and other, are usual expressions to name actuators developed during the last 15-20 years based on interactions between the electric energy and polymer films. The polymeric actuators can be divided into two main fields: electromechanical actuators working by electrostatic interactions between the polymer and the applied electric fields, and electrochemomechanical actuators, or reactive actuators, working by an electrochemical reaction driven by the flowing electric current. The electromechanical actuators can be classified into electrostrictive, piezoelectric, ferroelectric, electrostatic and electrokinetic. They can include a solvent (wet) or not (dry), or they can include a salt or not. Similitude and differences related to the rate and position control or to the possibility or not to include sensing abilities are discussed.

  15. Inkjet printing of electroactive polymer actuators on polymer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, O.; Perelaer, J.; Beckert, E.; Schubert, U. S.; Eberhardt, R.; Tünnermann, A.

    2011-04-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAP) are promising materials for actuators in different application areas. This paper reports inkjet printing as a versatile tool for manufacturing EAP actuators. Drop-on-demand inkjet printing can be used for additive deposition of functional materials onto substrates. Cantilever bending actuators with lateral dimensions in the mm range are described here. A commercially available solution of electroactive polymers is dispensed onto metalized polycarbonate substrates using inkjet printing. These polymers exhibit piezoelectric behavior. Multiple layers are printed resulting in a film thickness of 5 to 10 μm. After printing, the polymer layers are annealed thermally at 130 °C. Top electrodes are deposited onto the EAP layer by inkjet printing a silver nanoparticle ink. The as-printed silver layers are sintered using an argon plasma - a recently developed sintering technique that is compatible with low TG polymer foils. After printing the EAP layers are poled. When applying an electric field across the polymer layer, piezoelectric strain in the EAP leads to a bending deflection of the structures. With driving voltages of 200 V the actuators generate displacements of 20 μm and blocking forces of approximately 3 mN. The first resonance frequency occurs at 230 Hz.

  16. Rotary ultrasonic motors actuated by traveling flexural waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Grandia, Willem

    1998-07-01

    Efficient miniature actuators that are compact and consume low power are needed to drive telerobotic devices and space mechanisms in future NASA missions. Ultrasonic rotary motors have the potential to meet this NASA need and they are developed as actuators for miniature telerobotic applications. The technology that has emerged in commercial products requires rigorous analytical tools for effective design of such motors. A finite element analytical model was developed to examine the excitation of flexural plate wave traveling in a rotary piezoelectrically actuated motor. The model uses annular finite elements that are applied to predict the excitation frequency and modal response of an annular stator. This model is being developed to enable the design of efficient ultrasonic motors (USMs) and it incorporates the details of the stator which include the teeth, piezoelectric crystals, stator geometry, etc. The theoretical predictions were corroborated experimentally for the stator. Parallel to this effect, USMs are made and incorporated into a robotic arm and their capability to operate at the environment of Mars is being studied. Motors with two different actuators layout were tested at cryovac conditions and were shown to operate down to -150 degree(s)C and 16-mTorr when the activation starts at ambient conditions.

  17. Precision Linear Actuator for Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) Siderostat Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant; Braun, David; Hankins, Steve; Koenig, John; Moore, Don

    2008-01-01

    'SIM PlanetQuest will exploit the classical measuring tool of astrometry (interferometry) with unprecedented precision to make dramatic advances in many areas of astronomy and astrophysics'(1). In order to obtain interferometric data two large steerable mirrors, or Siderostats, are used to direct starlight into the interferometer. A gimbaled mechanism actuated by linear actuators is chosen to meet the unprecedented pointing and angle tracking requirements of SIM. A group of JPL engineers designed, built, and tested a linear ballscrew actuator capable of performing submicron incremental steps for 10 years of continuous operation. Precise, zero backlash, closed loop pointing control requirements, lead the team to implement a ballscrew actuator with a direct drive DC motor and a precision piezo brake. Motor control commutation using feedback from a precision linear encoder on the ballscrew output produced an unexpected incremental step size of 20 nm over a range of 120 mm, yielding a dynamic range of 6,000,000:1. The results prove linear nanometer positioning requires no gears, levers, or hydraulic converters. Along the way many lessons have been learned and will subsequently be shared.

  18. Experimental dynamic characterizations and modelling of disk vibrations for HDDs.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chee Khiang; Ong, Eng Hong; Guo, Guoxiao; Qian, Hua

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the rotational speed of spindle motors in HDDs (Hard-Disk Drives) are increasing to improve high data throughput and decrease rotational latency for ultra-high data transfer rates. However, the disk platters are excited to vibrate at their natural frequencies due to higher air-flow excitation as well as eccentricities and imbalances in the disk-spindle assembly. These factors contribute directly to TMR (Track Mis-Registration) which limits achievable high recording density essential for future mobile HDDs. In this paper, the natural mode shapes of an annular disk mounted on a spindle motor used in current HDDs are characterized using FEM (Finite Element Methods) analysis and verified with SLDV (Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer) measurements. The identified vibration frequencies and amplitudes of the disk ODS (Operating Deflection Shapes) at corresponding disk mode shapes are modelled as repeatable disturbance components for servo compensation in HDDs. Our experimental results show that the SLDV measurements are accurate in capturing static disk mode shapes without the need for intricate air-flow aero-elastic models, and the proposed disk ODS vibration model correlates well with experimental measurements from a LDV.

  19. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  20. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.