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Sample records for disk winds driven

  1. Evidence for Magnetically Driven Protoplanetary Disk Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Molly; Pascucci, Ilaria; Edwards, Suzan; Feng, Wanda; Rigliaco, Elisabetta; Gorti, Uma; Hollenbach, David J.; Tuttle Keane, James

    2017-01-01

    We present Keck high resolution (~7km/s) optical spectra from a sample of 32 pre-main sequence T-Tauri stars in Taurus-Auriga plus TW Hya. We focus on low-excitation forbidden emission lines like the [O I] 6300 Å and 5577 Å lines, whose high-velocity component, with blueshifts between ~30 - 150 km/s, is known to trace fast outflowing material in the form of jets (e.g. Hartigan et al. 1995). The origin of the low-velocity component (LVC), with blueshifts on the order of ~5 km/s, has been long debated. We demonstrate that the LVC can be described by a combination of a broad and a narrow line emitting region. We show that the broad line emitting region is very common, arises within ~0.5 AU from the star, and shows the expected disk wind signature, i.e. larger blueshifts associated with narrower lines and lower disc inclinations. Such winds must be magnetically driven given that the emitting region is well inside the gravitational potential well of the central star. The origin of the narrow line emitting region remains difficult to assess, in particular we cannot exclude that it traces a thermally driven (photoevaporative) wind. Disk winds, both thermally and magnetically driven, might play a major role in the evolution and eventual dispersal of protoplanetary material, which has implications for solar system architectures and planet formation more generally. Hence, it is critical to determine the rate at which mass is lost via disk winds.

  2. DUST-DRIVEN WIND FROM DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Mahavir; Nath, Biman B.; Shchekinov, Yuri E-mail: biman@rri.res.in

    2011-08-01

    We study gaseous outflows from disk galaxies driven by radiation pressure on dust grains. We include the effect of bulge and dark matter halo and show that the existence of such an outflow implies a maximum value of disk mass-to-light ratio. We show that the terminal wind speed is proportional to the disk rotation speed in the limit of a cold gaseous outflow, and that in general there is a contribution from the gas sound speed. Using the mean opacity of dust grains and the evolution of the luminosity of a simple stellar population, we then show that the ratio of the wind terminal speed (v{sub {infinity}}) to the galaxy rotation speed (v{sub c}) ranges between 2 and 3 for a period of {approx}10 Myr after a burst of star formation, after which it rapidly decays. This result is independent of any free parameter and depends only on the luminosity of the stellar population and the relation between disk and dark matter halo parameters. We briefly discuss the possible implications of our results.

  3. Thermal stability of a thin disk with magnetically driven winds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuang-Liang; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2014-05-01

    The absence of thermal instability in the high/soft state of black hole X-ray binaries, in disagreement with the standard thin disk theory, has been a long-standing riddle for theoretical astronomers. We have tried to resolve this question by studying the thermal stability of a thin disk with magnetically driven winds in the M-dot −Σ plane. It is found that disk winds can greatly decrease the disk temperature and thus help the disk become more stable at a given accretion rate. The critical accretion rate, M-dot {sub crit}, corresponding to the thermal instability threshold, is significantly increased in the presence of disk winds. For α = 0.01 and B {sub φ} = 10B {sub p}, the disk is quite stable even for a very weak initial poloidal magnetic field [β{sub p,0}∼2000,β{sub p}=(P{sub gas}+P{sub rad})/(B{sub p}{sup 2}/8π)]. However, when B {sub φ} = B {sub p} or B {sub φ} = 0.1B {sub p}, a somewhat stronger (but still weak) field (β{sub p,} {sub 0} ∼ 200 or β{sub p,} {sub 0} ∼ 20) is required to make the disk stable. Nevertheless, despite the great increase of M-dot {sub crit}, the luminosity threshold, corresponding to instability, remains almost constant or decreases slowly with increasing M-dot {sub crit} due to decreased gas temperature. The advection and diffusion timescales of the large-scale magnetic field threading the disk are also investigated in this work. We find that the advection timescale can be smaller than the diffusion timescale in a disk with winds, because the disk winds take away most of the gravitational energy released in the disk, resulting in the decrease of the magnetic diffusivity η and the increase of the diffusion timescale.

  4. Simulations of Disk Galaxies with Cosmic Ray Driven Galactic Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, C. M.; Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-11-01

    We present results from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of isolated Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC)- and Milky-Way-sized galaxies that include a model for feedback from galactic cosmic rays (CRs). We find that CRs are naturally able to drive winds with mass loading factors of up to ~10 in dwarf systems. The scaling of the mass loading factor with circular velocity between the two simulated systems is consistent with \\eta \\propto v_circ^{1-2} required to reproduce the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In addition, simulations with CR feedback reproduce both the normalization and the slope of the observed trend of wind velocity with galaxy circular velocity. We find that winds in simulations with CR feedback exhibit qualitatively different properties compared to supernova-driven winds, where most of acceleration happens violently in situ near star forming sites. The CR-driven winds are accelerated gently by the large-scale pressure gradient established by CRs diffusing from the star-forming galaxy disk out into the halo. The CR-driven winds also exhibit much cooler temperatures and, in the SMC-sized system, warm (T ~ 104 K) gas dominates the outflow. The prevalence of warm gas in such outflows may provide a clue as to the origin of ubiquitous warm gas in the gaseous halos of galaxies detected via absorption lines in quasar spectra.

  5. SIMULATIONS OF DISK GALAXIES WITH COSMIC RAY DRIVEN GALACTIC WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C. M.; Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-11-01

    We present results from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of isolated Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC)- and Milky-Way-sized galaxies that include a model for feedback from galactic cosmic rays (CRs). We find that CRs are naturally able to drive winds with mass loading factors of up to ∼10 in dwarf systems. The scaling of the mass loading factor with circular velocity between the two simulated systems is consistent with η∝v{sub circ}{sup 1-2} required to reproduce the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In addition, simulations with CR feedback reproduce both the normalization and the slope of the observed trend of wind velocity with galaxy circular velocity. We find that winds in simulations with CR feedback exhibit qualitatively different properties compared to supernova-driven winds, where most of acceleration happens violently in situ near star forming sites. The CR-driven winds are accelerated gently by the large-scale pressure gradient established by CRs diffusing from the star-forming galaxy disk out into the halo. The CR-driven winds also exhibit much cooler temperatures and, in the SMC-sized system, warm (T ∼ 10{sup 4} K) gas dominates the outflow. The prevalence of warm gas in such outflows may provide a clue as to the origin of ubiquitous warm gas in the gaseous halos of galaxies detected via absorption lines in quasar spectra.

  6. Wind-driven Accretion in Transitional Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lile; Goodman, Jeremy J.

    2017-01-01

    Transitional protostellar disks have inner cavities that are heavily depleted in dust and gas, yet most of them show signs of ongoing accretion, often at rates comparable to full disks. We show that recent constraints on the gas surface density in a few well-studied disk cavities suggest that the accretion speed is at least transsonic. We propose that this is the natural result of accretion driven by magnetized winds. Typical physical conditions of the gas inside these cavities are estimated for plausible X-ray and FUV radiation fields. The gas near the midplane is molecular and predominantly neutral, with a dimensionless ambipolar parameter in the right general range for wind solutions of the type developed by Königl, Wardle, and others. That is to say, the density of ions and electrons is sufficient for moderately good coupling to the magnetic field, but it is not so good that the magnetic flux needs to be dragged inward by the accreting neutrals.

  7. Centrifugally driven winds from protostellar disks. I - Wind model and thermal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safier, Pedro N.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal structure of a wind that is centrifugally driven from the surface of a protostellar disk is studied. A generalized version of the Blandford and Payne self-similar wind model is introduced, and the temperature and ionization distributions in the outflow are investigated. For the evolution of atomic winds, the heat equation and the rate equations that describe the ionization and excitation state of hydrogen are solved self-consistently. Ambipolar diffusion is found to be a robust mechanism for heating the gas. In the more powerful outflows, molecular hydrogen is collisionally dissociated close to the disk surface, and hydrogen is mainly atomic within a few astronomical units from the central source. It is also demonstrated that these outflows have enough momentum to lift dust grains from the disk surface.

  8. Hydrodynamic Models of Line-Driven Accretion Disk Winds III: Local Ionization Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereyra, Nicolas Antonio; Kallman, Timothy R.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present time-dependent numerical hydrodynamic models of line-driven accretion disk winds in cataclysmic variable systems and calculate wind mass-loss rates and terminal velocities. The models are 2.5-dimensional, include an energy balance condition with radiative heating and cooling processes, and includes local ionization equilibrium introducing time dependence and spatial dependence on the line radiation force parameters. The radiation field is assumed to originate in an optically thick accretion disk. Wind ion populations are calculated under the assumption that local ionization equilibrium is determined by photoionization and radiative recombination, similar to a photoionized nebula. We find a steady wind flowing from the accretion disk. Radiative heating tends to maintain the temperature in the higher density wind regions near the disk surface, rather than cooling adiabatically. For a disk luminosity L (sub disk) = solar luminosity, white dwarf mass M(sub wd) = 0.6 solar mass, and white dwarf radii R(sub wd) = 0.01 solar radius, we obtain a wind mass-loss rate of M(sub wind) = 4 x 10(exp -12) solar mass yr(exp -1) and a terminal velocity of approximately 3000 km per second. These results confirm the general velocity and density structures found in our earlier constant ionization equilibrium adiabatic CV wind models. Further we establish here 2.5D numerical models that can be extended to QSO/AGN winds where the local ionization equilibrium will play a crucial role in the overall dynamics.

  9. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations of line-driven disk winds for ultra-fast outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Mariko; Ohsuga, Ken; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Wada, Keiichi; Yoshida, Tessei

    2016-02-01

    Using two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the origin of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) that are often observed in luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We found that the radiation force due to the spectral lines generates strong winds (line-driven disk winds) that are launched from the inner region of accretion disks (˜30 Schwarzschild radii). A wide range of black hole masses (MBH) and Eddington ratios (ε) was investigated to study the conditions causing the line-driven winds. For MBH = 106-109 M⊙ and ε = 0.1-0.7, funnel-shaped disk winds appear, in which dense matter is accelerated outward with an opening angle of 70°-80° and with 10% of the speed of light. If we observe the wind along its direction, the velocity, the column density, and the ionization state are consistent with those of the observed UFOs. As long as obscuration by the torus does not affect the observation of X-ray bands, the UFOs could be statistically observed in about 13%-28% of the luminous AGNs, which is not inconsistent with the observed ratio (˜40%). We also found that the results are insensitive to the X-ray luminosity and the density of the disk surface. Thus, we can conclude that UFOs could exist in any luminous AGNs, such as narrow-line Seyfert 1s and quasars with ε > 0.1, with which fast line-driven winds are associated.

  10. WIND-DRIVEN ACCRETION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. RADIAL DEPENDENCE AND GLOBAL PICTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xuening

    2013-08-01

    Non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical effects play a crucial role in determining the mechanism and efficiency of angular momentum transport as well as the level of turbulence in protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are the key to understanding PPD evolution and planet formation. It was shown in our previous work that at 1 AU, the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is completely suppressed when both ohmic resistivity and ambipolar diffusion (AD) are taken into account, resulting in a laminar flow with accretion driven by magnetocentrifugal wind. In this work, we study the radial dependence of the laminar wind solution using local shearing-box simulations. The scaling relation on the angular momentum transport for the laminar wind is obtained, and we find that the wind-driven accretion rate can be approximated as M-dot approx. 0.91 x 10{sup -8}R{sub AU}{sup 1.21}(B{sub p}/10 mG){sup 0.93} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, where B{sub p} is the strength of the large-scale poloidal magnetic field threading the disk. The result is independent of disk surface density. Four criteria are outlined for the existence of the laminar wind solution: (1) ohmic resistivity dominated the midplane region, (2) the AD-dominated disk upper layer, (3) the presence of a (not too weak) net vertical magnetic flux, and (4) sufficiently well-ionized gas beyond the disk surface. All these criteria are likely to be met in the inner region of the disk from {approx}0.3 AU to about 5-10 AU for typical PPD accretion rates. Beyond this radius, the angular momentum transport is likely to proceed due to a combination of the MRI and disk wind, and eventually completely dominated by the MRI (in the presence of strong AD) in the outer disk. Our simulation results provide key ingredients for a new paradigm on the accretion processes in PPDs.

  11. Modeling X-ray Absorbers in AGNs with MHD-Driven Accretion-Disk Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C. R.; Tombesi, F.; Contopoulos, J.; Behar, E.

    2013-04-01

    We have proposed a systematic view of the observed X-ray absorbers, namely warm absorbers (WAs) in soft X-ray and highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs), in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind models. While potentially complicated by variability and thermal instability in these energetic outflows, in this simplistic model we have calculated 2D kinematic field as well as density and ionization structure of the wind with density profile of 1/r corresponding to a constant column distribution per decade of ionization parameter. In particular we show semi-analytically that the inner layer of the disk-wind manifests itself as the strongly-ionized fast outflows while the outer layer is identified as the moderately-ionized absorbers. The computed characteristics of these two apparently distinct absorbers are consistent with X-ray data (i.e. a factor of ~100 difference in column and ionization parameters as well as low wind velocity vs. near-relativistic flow). With the predicted contour curves for these wind parameters one can constrain allowed regions for the presence of WAs and UFOs.The model further implies that the UFO's gas pressure is comparable to that of the observed radio jet in 3C111 suggesting that the magnetized disk-wind with density profile of 1/r is a viable agent to help sustain such a self-collimated jet at small radii.

  12. Radiation Pressure--driven Magnetic Disk Winds in Broad Absorption Line Quasi-stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kool, Martijn; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1995-12-01

    We explore a model in which QSO broad absorption lines (BALs) are formed in a radiation pressure- driven wind emerging from a magnetized accretion disk. The magnetic field threading the disk material is dragged by the flow and is compressed by the radiation pressure until it is dynamically important and strong enough to contribute to the confinement of the BAL clouds. We construct a simple self-similar model for such radiatively driven magnetized disk winds, in order to explore their properties. It is found that solutions exist for which the entire magnetized flow is confined to a thin wedge over the surface of the disk. For reasonable values of the mass-loss rate, a typical magnetic field strength such that the magnetic pressure is comparable to the inferred gas pressure in BAL clouds, and a moderate amount of internal soft X-ray absorption, we find that the opening angle of the flow is approximately 0.1 rad, in good agreement with the observed covering factor of the broad absorption line region.

  13. Radiation Pressure-Driven Magnetic Disk Winds in Broad Absorption Line Quasi-Stellar Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeKool, Martin; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1995-01-01

    We explore a model in which QSO broad absorption lines (BALS) are formed in a radiation pressure-driven wind emerging from a magnetized accretion disk. The magnetic field threading the disk material is dragged by the flow and is compressed by the radiation pressure until it is dynamically important and strong enough to contribute to the confinement of the BAL clouds. We construct a simple self-similar model for such radiatively driven magnetized disk winds, in order to explore their properties. It is found that solutions exist for which the entire magnetized flow is confined to a thin wedge over the surface of the disk. For reasonable values of the mass-loss rate, a typical magnetic field strength such that the magnetic pressure is comparable to the inferred gas pressure in BAL clouds, and a moderate amount of internal soft X-ray absorption, we find that the opening angle of the flow is approximately 0.1 rad, in good agreement with the observed covering factor of the broad absorption line region.

  14. Disk-driven hydromagnetic winds as a key ingredient of active galactic nuclei unification schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konigl, Arieh; Kartje, John F.

    1994-01-01

    Centrifugally driven winds from the surfaces of magnetized accretion disks have been recognized as an attractive mechanism of removing the angular momentum of the accreted matter and of producing the bipolar outflows and jets that are often associated with compact astronomical objects. As previously suggested in the context of young stellar objects, such winds have unique observational manifestations stemming from their highly stratified density and velocity structure and from their exposure to the strong continuum radiation field of the compact object. We have applied this scenario to active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and investigated the properties of hydromagnetic outflows that originate within approximately 10(M(sub 8)) pc of the central 10(exp 8)(M(sub 8)) solar mass black hole. On the basis of our results, we propose that hydromagnetic disk-driven winds may underlie the classification of broad-line and narrow-line AGNs (e.g., the Seyfert 1/Seyfert 2 dichotomy) as well as the apparent dearth of luminous Seyfert 2 galaxies. More generally, we demonstrate that such winds could strongly influence the spectral characteristics of Seyfert galaxies, QSOs, and BL Lac objects (BLOs). In our picture, the torus is identified with the outer regions of the wind where dust uplifted from the disk surfaces by gas-grain collisions is embedded in the outflow. Using an efficient radiative transfer code, we show that the infrared emission of Seyfert galaxies and QSOs can be attributed to the reprocessing of the UV/soft X-ray AGN continuum by the dust in the wind and the disk. We demonstrate that the radiation pressure force flattens the dust distribution in objects with comparatively high (but possibly sub-Eddington) bolometric luminosities, and we propose this as one likely reason for the apparent paucity of narrow-line objects among certain high-luminosity AGNs. Using the XSTAR photoionization code, we show that the inner regions of the wind could naturally account for the warm

  15. Disk-driven hydromagnetic winds as a key ingredient of active galactic nuclei unification schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konigl, Arieh; Kartje, John F.

    1994-01-01

    Centrifugally driven winds from the surfaces of magnetized accretion disks have been recognized as an attractive mechanism of removing the angular momentum of the accreted matter and of producing the bipolar outflows and jets that are often associated with compact astronomical objects. As previously suggested in the context of young stellar objects, such winds have unique observational manifestations stemming from their highly stratified density and velocity structure and from their exposure to the strong continuum radiation field of the compact object. We have applied this scenario to active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and investigated the properties of hydromagnetic outflows that originate within approximately 10(M(sub 8)) pc of the central 10(exp 8)(M(sub 8)) solar mass black hole. On the basis of our results, we propose that hydromagnetic disk-driven winds may underlie the classification of broad-line and narrow-line AGNs (e.g., the Seyfert 1/Seyfert 2 dichotomy) as well as the apparent dearth of luminous Seyfert 2 galaxies. More generally, we demonstrate that such winds could strongly influence the spectral characteristics of Seyfert galaxies, QSOs, and BL Lac objects (BLOs). In our picture, the torus is identified with the outer regions of the wind where dust uplifted from the disk surfaces by gas-grain collisions is embedded in the outflow. Using an efficient radiative transfer code, we show that the infrared emission of Seyfert galaxies and QSOs can be attributed to the reprocessing of the UV/soft X-ray AGN continuum by the dust in the wind and the disk. We demonstrate that the radiation pressure force flattens the dust distribution in objects with comparatively high (but possibly sub-Eddington) bolometric luminosities, and we propose this as one likely reason for the apparent paucity of narrow-line objects among certain high-luminosity AGNs. Using the XSTAR photoionization code, we show that the inner regions of the wind could naturally account for the warm

  16. MAGNETICALLY DRIVEN ACCRETION DISK WINDS AND ULTRA-FAST OUTFLOWS IN PG 1211+143

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, Francesco; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-05-20

    We present a study of X-ray ionization of MHD accretion-disk winds in an effort to constrain the physics underlying the highly ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) inferred by X-ray absorbers often detected in various sub classes of Seyfert active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our primary focus is to show that magnetically driven outflows are indeed physically plausible candidates for the observed outflows accounting for the AGN absorption properties of the present X-ray spectroscopic observations. Employing a stratified MHD wind launched across the entire AGN accretion disk, we calculate its X-ray ionization and the ensuing X-ray absorption-line spectra. Assuming an appropriate ionizing AGN spectrum, we apply our MHD winds to model the absorption features in an XMM-Newton/EPIC spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert, PG 1211+143. We find, through identifying the detected features with Fe Kα transitions, that the absorber has a characteristic ionization parameter of log (ξ{sub c}[erg cm s{sup −1}]) ≃ 5–6 and a column density on the order of N{sub H} ≃ 10{sup 23} cm{sup −2} outflowing at a characteristic velocity of v{sub c}/c ≃ 0.1–0.2 (where c is the speed of light). The best-fit model favors its radial location at r{sub c} ≃ 200 R{sub o} (R{sub o} is the black hole’s innermost stable circular orbit), with an inner wind truncation radius at R{sub t} ≃ 30 R{sub o}. The overall K-shell feature in the data is suggested to be dominated by Fe xxv with very little contribution from Fe xxvi and weakly ionized iron, which is in good agreement with a series of earlier analyses of the UFOs in various AGNs, including PG 1211+143.

  17. Magnetically Driven Accretion Disk Winds and Ultra-fast Outflows in PG 1211+143

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, Francesco; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-05-01

    We present a study of X-ray ionization of MHD accretion-disk winds in an effort to constrain the physics underlying the highly ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) inferred by X-ray absorbers often detected in various sub classes of Seyfert active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our primary focus is to show that magnetically driven outflows are indeed physically plausible candidates for the observed outflows accounting for the AGN absorption properties of the present X-ray spectroscopic observations. Employing a stratified MHD wind launched across the entire AGN accretion disk, we calculate its X-ray ionization and the ensuing X-ray absorption-line spectra. Assuming an appropriate ionizing AGN spectrum, we apply our MHD winds to model the absorption features in an XMM-Newton/EPIC spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert, PG 1211+143. We find, through identifying the detected features with Fe Kα transitions, that the absorber has a characteristic ionization parameter of log (ξc[erg cm s-1]) ≃ 5-6 and a column density on the order of NH ≃ 1023 cm-2 outflowing at a characteristic velocity of vc/c ≃ 0.1-0.2 (where c is the speed of light). The best-fit model favors its radial location at rc ≃ 200 Ro (Ro is the black hole’s innermost stable circular orbit), with an inner wind truncation radius at Rt ≃ 30 Ro. The overall K-shell feature in the data is suggested to be dominated by Fe xxv with very little contribution from Fe xxvi and weakly ionized iron, which is in good agreement with a series of earlier analyses of the UFOs in various AGNs, including PG 1211+143.

  18. Resolved images of a protostellar outflow driven by an extended disk wind.

    PubMed

    Bjerkeli, Per; van der Wiel, Matthijs H D; Harsono, Daniel; Ramsey, Jon P; Jørgensen, Jes K

    2016-12-14

    Young stars are associated with prominent outflows of molecular gas. The ejection of gas is believed to remove angular momentum from the protostellar system, permitting young stars to grow by the accretion of material from the protostellar disk. The underlying mechanism for outflow ejection is not yet understood, but is believed to be closely linked to the protostellar disk. Various models have been proposed to explain the outflows, differing mainly in the region where acceleration of material takes place: close to the protostar itself ('X-wind', or stellar wind), in a larger region throughout the protostellar disk (disk wind), or at the interface between the two. Outflow launching regions have so far been probed only by indirect extrapolation because of observational limits. Here we report resolved images of carbon monoxide towards the outflow associated with the TMC1A protostellar system. These data show that gas is ejected from a region extending up to a radial distance of 25 astronomical units from the central protostar, and that angular momentum is removed from an extended region of the disk. This demonstrates that the outflowing gas is launched by an extended disk wind from a Keplerian disk.

  19. Line-driven disk winds in active galactic nuclei: The critical importance of ionization and radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbottom, Nick; Knigge, Christian; Matthews, James H.; Proga, Daniel; Long, Knox S.; Sim, Stuart A.

    2014-07-01

    Accretion disk winds are thought to produce many of the characteristic features seen in the spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). These outflows also represent a natural form of feedback between the central supermassive black hole and its host galaxy. The mechanism for driving this mass loss remains unknown, although radiation pressure mediated by spectral lines is a leading candidate. Here, we calculate the ionization state of, and emergent spectra for, the hydrodynamic simulation of a line-driven disk wind previously presented by Proga and Kallman. To achieve this, we carry out a comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation of the radiative transfer through, and energy exchange within, the predicted outflow. We find that the wind is much more ionized than originally estimated. This is in part because it is much more difficult to shield any wind regions effectively when the outflow itself is allowed to reprocess and redirect ionizing photons. As a result, the calculated spectrum that would be observed from this particular outflow solution would not contain the ultraviolet spectral lines that are observed in many AGN/QSOs. Furthermore, the wind is so highly ionized that line driving would not actually be efficient. This does not necessarily mean that line-driven winds are not viable. However, our work does illustrate that in order to arrive at a self-consistent model of line-driven disk winds in AGN/QSO, it will be critical to include a more detailed treatment of radiative transfer and ionization in the next generation of hydrodynamic simulations.

  20. Galactic Winds Driven by Isotropic and Anisotropic Cosmic-Ray Diffusion in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmor, R.; Pfrommer, C.; Simpson, C. M.; Springel, V.

    2016-06-01

    The physics of cosmic rays (CRs) is a promising candidate for explaining the driving of galactic winds and outflows. Recent galaxy formation simulations have demonstrated the need for active CR transport either in the form of diffusion or streaming to successfully launch winds in galaxies. However, due to computational limitations, most previous simulations have modeled CR transport isotropically. Here, we discuss high-resolution simulations of isolated disk galaxies in a 1011 M ⊙ halo with the moving-mesh code Arepo that include injection of CRs from supernovae, advective transport, CR cooling, and CR transport through isotropic or anisotropic diffusion. We show that either mode of diffusion leads to the formation of strong bipolar outflows. However, they develop significantly later in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion compared to the simulation with isotropic diffusion. Moreover, we find that isotropic diffusion allows most of the CRs to quickly diffuse out of the disk, while in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion, most CRs remain in the disk once the magnetic field becomes dominated by its azimuthal component, which occurs after ˜300 Myr. This has important consequences for the gas dynamics in the disk. In particular, we show that isotropic diffusion strongly suppresses the amplification of the magnetic field in the disk compared to anisotropic or no diffusion models. We therefore conclude that reliable simulations which include CR transport inevitably need to account for anisotropic diffusion.

  1. Stratified Magnetically Driven Accretion-Disk Winds and Their Relations To Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, Francesco; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    We explore the poloidal structure of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) winds in relation to their potential association with the X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) and the highly ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), in a single unifying approach. We present the density n(r, theta), ionization parameter xi(r, theta), and velocity structure v(r, theta) of such ionized winds for typical values of their fluid-to-magnetic flux ratio, F, and specific angular momentum, H, for which wind solutions become super-Alfvenic. We explore the geometrical shape of winds for different values of these parameters and delineate the values that produce the widest and narrowest opening angles of these winds, quantities necessary in the determination of the statistics of AGN obscuration. We find that winds with smaller H show a poloidal geometry of narrower opening angles with their Alfv´en surface at lower inclination angles and therefore they produce the highest line of sight (LoS) velocities for observers at higher latitudes with the respect to the disk plane. We further note a physical and spatial correlation between the X-ray WAs and UFOs that form along the same LoS to the observer but at different radii, r, and distinct values of n, xi, and v consistent with the latest spectroscopic data of radio-quiet Seyfert galaxies. We also show that, at least in the case of 3C 111, the winds' pressure is sufficient to contain the relativistic plasma responsible for its radio emission. Stratified MHD disk winds could therefore serve as a unique means to understand and unify the diverse AGN outflows.

  2. Stratified magnetically driven accretion-disk winds and their relations to jets

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, Francesco; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-01-10

    We explore the poloidal structure of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) winds in relation to their potential association with the X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) and the highly ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), in a single unifying approach. We present the density n(r, θ), ionization parameter ξ(r, θ), and velocity structure v(r, θ) of such ionized winds for typical values of their fluid-to-magnetic flux ratio, F, and specific angular momentum, H, for which wind solutions become super-Alfvénic. We explore the geometrical shape of winds for different values of these parameters and delineate the values that produce the widest and narrowest opening angles of these winds, quantities necessary in the determination of the statistics of AGN obscuration. We find that winds with smaller H show a poloidal geometry of narrower opening angles with their Alfvén surface at lower inclination angles and therefore they produce the highest line of sight (LoS) velocities for observers at higher latitudes with the respect to the disk plane. We further note a physical and spatial correlation between the X-ray WAs and UFOs that form along the same LoS to the observer but at different radii, r, and distinct values of n, ξ, and v consistent with the latest spectroscopic data of radio-quiet Seyfert galaxies. We also show that, at least in the case of 3C 111, the winds' pressure is sufficient to contain the relativistic plasma responsible for its radio emission. Stratified MHD disk winds could therefore serve as a unique means to understand and unify the diverse AGN outflows.

  3. Stratified Magnetically Driven Accretion-disk Winds and Their Relations to Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, Francesco; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    We explore the poloidal structure of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) winds in relation to their potential association with the X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) and the highly ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), in a single unifying approach. We present the density n(r, θ), ionization parameter ξ(r, θ), and velocity structure v(r, θ) of such ionized winds for typical values of their fluid-to-magnetic flux ratio, F, and specific angular momentum, H, for which wind solutions become super-Alfvénic. We explore the geometrical shape of winds for different values of these parameters and delineate the values that produce the widest and narrowest opening angles of these winds, quantities necessary in the determination of the statistics of AGN obscuration. We find that winds with smaller H show a poloidal geometry of narrower opening angles with their Alfvén surface at lower inclination angles and therefore they produce the highest line of sight (LoS) velocities for observers at higher latitudes with the respect to the disk plane. We further note a physical and spatial correlation between the X-ray WAs and UFOs that form along the same LoS to the observer but at different radii, r, and distinct values of n, ξ, and v consistent with the latest spectroscopic data of radio-quiet Seyfert galaxies. We also show that, at least in the case of 3C 111, the winds' pressure is sufficient to contain the relativistic plasma responsible for its radio emission. Stratified MHD disk winds could therefore serve as a unique means to understand and unify the diverse AGN outflows.

  4. Reverberation Mapping of the Broad Line Region: Application to a Hydrodynamical Line-driven Disk Wind Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Tim; Kashi, Amit; Proga, Daniel; Eracleous, Michael; Barth, Aaron J.; Greene, Jenny

    2016-08-01

    The latest analysis efforts in reverberation mapping are beginning to allow reconstruction of echo images (or velocity-delay maps) that encode information about the structure and kinematics of the broad line region (BLR) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Such maps can constrain sophisticated physical models for the BLR. The physical picture of the BLR is often theorized to be a photoionized wind launched from the AGN accretion disk. Previously we showed that the line-driven disk wind solution found in an earlier simulation by Proga and Kallman is virialized over a large distance from the disk. This finding implies that, according to this model, black hole masses can be reliably estimated through reverberation mapping techniques. However, predictions of echo images expected from line-driven disk winds are not available. Here, after presenting the necessary radiative transfer methodology, we carry out the first calculations of such predictions. We find that the echo images are quite similar to other virialized BLR models such as randomly orbiting clouds and thin Keplerian disks. We conduct a parameter survey exploring how echo images, line profiles, and transfer functions depend on both the inclination angle and the line opacity. We find that the line profiles are almost always single peaked, while transfer functions tend to have tails extending to large time delays. The outflow, despite being primarily equatorially directed, causes an appreciable blueshifted excess on both the echo image and line profile when seen from lower inclinations (i≲ 45^\\circ ). This effect may be observable in low ionization lines such as {{H}}β .

  5. Wind-driven Accretion in Protoplanetary Disks. I. Suppression of the Magnetorotational Instability and Launching of the Magnetocentrifugal Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M.

    2013-05-01

    We perform local, vertically stratified shearing-box MHD simulations of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) at a fiducial radius of 1 AU that take into account the effects of both Ohmic resistivity and ambipolar diffusion (AD). The magnetic diffusion coefficients are evaluated self-consistently from a look-up table based on equilibrium chemistry. We first show that the inclusion of AD dramatically changes the conventional picture of layered accretion. Without net vertical magnetic field, the system evolves into a toroidal field dominated configuration with extremely weak turbulence in the far-UV ionization layer that is far too inefficient to drive rapid accretion. In the presence of a weak net vertical field (plasma β ~ 105 at midplane), we find that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is completely suppressed, resulting in a fully laminar flow throughout the vertical extent of the disk. A strong magnetocentrifugal wind is launched that efficiently carries away disk angular momentum and easily accounts for the observed accretion rate in PPDs. Moreover, under a physical disk wind geometry, all the accretion flow proceeds through a strong current layer with a thickness of ~0.3H that is offset from disk midplane with radial velocity of up to 0.4 times the sound speed. Both Ohmic resistivity and AD are essential for the suppression of the MRI and wind launching. The efficiency of wind transport increases with increasing net vertical magnetic flux and the penetration depth of the FUV ionization. Our laminar wind solution has important implications on planet formation and global evolution of PPDs.

  6. WIND-DRIVEN ACCRETION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. SUPPRESSION OF THE MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY AND LAUNCHING OF THE MAGNETOCENTRIFUGAL WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xuening; Stone, James M.

    2013-05-20

    We perform local, vertically stratified shearing-box MHD simulations of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) at a fiducial radius of 1 AU that take into account the effects of both Ohmic resistivity and ambipolar diffusion (AD). The magnetic diffusion coefficients are evaluated self-consistently from a look-up table based on equilibrium chemistry. We first show that the inclusion of AD dramatically changes the conventional picture of layered accretion. Without net vertical magnetic field, the system evolves into a toroidal field dominated configuration with extremely weak turbulence in the far-UV ionization layer that is far too inefficient to drive rapid accretion. In the presence of a weak net vertical field (plasma {beta} {approx} 10{sup 5} at midplane), we find that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is completely suppressed, resulting in a fully laminar flow throughout the vertical extent of the disk. A strong magnetocentrifugal wind is launched that efficiently carries away disk angular momentum and easily accounts for the observed accretion rate in PPDs. Moreover, under a physical disk wind geometry, all the accretion flow proceeds through a strong current layer with a thickness of {approx}0.3H that is offset from disk midplane with radial velocity of up to 0.4 times the sound speed. Both Ohmic resistivity and AD are essential for the suppression of the MRI and wind launching. The efficiency of wind transport increases with increasing net vertical magnetic flux and the penetration depth of the FUV ionization. Our laminar wind solution has important implications on planet formation and global evolution of PPDs.

  7. DUST DYNAMICS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISK WINDS DRIVEN BY MAGNETOROTATIONAL TURBULENCE: A MECHANISM FOR FLOATING DUST GRAINS WITH CHARACTERISTIC SIZES

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Tomoya; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: stakeru@nagoya-u.jp

    2016-04-10

    We investigate the dynamics of dust grains of various sizes in protoplanetary disk winds driven by magnetorotational turbulence, by simulating the time evolution of the dust grain distribution in the vertical direction. Small dust grains, which are well-coupled to the gas, are dragged upward with the upflowing gas, while large grains remain near the midplane of a disk. Intermediate-size grains float near the sonic point of the disk wind located at several scale heights from the midplane, where the grains are loosely coupled to the background gas. For the minimum mass solar nebula at 1 au, dust grains with size of 25–45 μm float around 4 scale heights from the midplane. Considering the dependence on the distance from the central star, smaller-size grains remain only in an outer region of the disk, while larger-size grains are distributed in a broader region. We also discuss the implications of our result for observations of dusty material around young stellar objects.

  8. Magneto-thermal Disk Winds from Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Ye, Jiani; Goodman, Jeremy; Yuan, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The global evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) are governed by disk angular-momentum transport and mass-loss processes. Recent numerical studies suggest that angular-momentum transport in the inner region of PPDs is largely driven by magnetized disk wind, yet the wind mass-loss rate remains unconstrained. On the other hand, disk mass loss has conventionally been attributed to photoevaporation, where external heating on the disk surface drives a thermal wind. We unify the two scenarios by developing a one-dimensional model of magnetized disk winds with a simple treatment of thermodynamics as a proxy for external heating. The wind properties largely depend on (1) the magnetic field strength at the wind base, characterized by the poloidal Alfvén speed vAp, (2) the sound speed cs near the wind base, and (3) how rapidly poloidal field lines diverge (achieve {R}-2 scaling). When {v}{Ap}\\gg {c}{{s}}, corotation is enforced near the wind base, resulting in centrifugal acceleration. Otherwise, the wind is accelerated mainly by the pressure of the toroidal magnetic field. In both cases, the dominant role played by magnetic forces likely yields wind outflow rates that exceed purely hydrodynamical mechanisms. For typical PPD accretion-rate and wind-launching conditions, we expect vAp to be comparable to cs at the wind base. The resulting wind is heavily loaded, with a total wind mass-loss rate likely reaching a considerable fraction of the wind-driven accretion rate. Implications for modeling global disk evolution and planet formation are also discussed.

  9. DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RADIATION PRESSURE-DRIVEN TURBULENCE AND WINDS IN STAR CLUSTERS AND GALACTIC DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Thompson, Todd A. E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2012-12-01

    The pressure exerted by the radiation of young stars may be an important feedback mechanism that drives turbulence and winds in forming star clusters and the disks of starburst galaxies. However, there is great uncertainty in how efficiently radiation couples to matter in these high optical depth environments. In particular, it is unclear what levels of turbulence the radiation can produce, and whether the infrared radiation trapped by the dust opacity can give rise to heavily mass-loaded winds. In this paper, we report a series of two-dimensional flux-limited diffusion radiation-hydrodynamics calculations performed with the code ORION in which we drive strong radiation fluxes through columns of dusty matter confined by gravity in order to answer these questions. We consider both systems where the radiation flux is sub-Eddington throughout the gas column, and those where it is super-Eddington at the midplane but sub-Eddington in the atmosphere. In the latter, we find that the radiation-matter interaction gives rise to radiation-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which drives supersonic turbulence at a level sufficient to fully explain the turbulence seen in Galactic protocluster gas clouds, and to make a non-trivial contribution to the turbulence observed in starburst galaxy disks. However, the instability also produces a channel structure in which the radiation-matter interaction is reduced compared to time-steady analytic models because the radiation field is not fully trapped. For astrophysical parameters relevant to forming star clusters and starburst galaxies, we find that this effect reduces the net momentum deposition rate in the dusty gas by a factor of {approx}2-6 compared to simple analytic estimates, and that in steady state the Eddington ratio reaches unity and there are no strong winds. We provide an approximation formula, appropriate for implementation in analytic models and non-radiative simulations, for the force exerted by the infrared radiation

  10. Relativistic Radiation Hydrodynamical Accretion-Disk Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun; Akizuki, Chizuru

    2007-10-01

    Accretion-disk winds blowing off perpendicular to a luminous disk are examined within the framework of fully special relativistic radiation hydrodynamics. The wind is assumed to be steady, vertical, and isothermal. Using a velocity-dependent variable Eddington factor, we can solve the rigorous equations of relativistic radiative hydrodynamics, and can obtain radiatively driven winds accelerated up to relativistic speeds. For less-luminous cases, disk winds are transonic types passing through saddle-type critical points, and the final speeds of the winds increase as the disk flux and/or the isothermal sound speed increase. For luminous cases, on the other hand, disk winds are always supersonic, since the critical points disappear due to the characteristic nature of the disk gravitational fields. The boundary between the transonic and supersonic types is located at around hat{F}c ˜ 0.1(ɛ + p) / (ρc2) / γc, where hat{F}c is the radiative flux at the critical point normalized by the local Eddington luminosity, (ɛ + p) / (ρc2) is the enthalpy of the gas divided by the rest-mass energy, and γc is the Lorentz factor of the wind velocity at the critical point. In transonic winds, the final speed becomes 0.4-0.8c for typical parameters, while it can reach ˜ c in supersonic winds.

  11. 10 micron detection of the hard X-ray transient GRO J0422+32: Free-free emission from an X-ray-driven accretion disk wind?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paradijs, Van J.; Telesco, C. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    We report the detection of 10 micrometer emission from the transient low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) and optical nova GRO J0422+32 near the maximum of its outburst. We discuss this result in terms of (1) a 'standard' model according to which low-energy radiation of LMXB is caused by reprocessing of X-rays in an accretion disk; (2) emission from a cool secondary star; (3) emission from dust grains heated by the transient X-rays, and (4) free-free emission from an X-ray-driven wind from the accretion disk. Only the fourth alternative provides a viable explanation for the observed 10 micrometer emission, with a mass-loss rate in the disk wind that may be substantially higher than the rate of accretion onto the compact star. The presence of such a wind may have a profound effect on the evolution of the binary, and contribute to the solution of the 'birthrate problem' of millisecond ratio pulsars.

  12. 10 micron detection of the hard X-ray transient GRO J0422+32: Free-free emission from an X-ray-driven accretion disk wind?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paradijs, Van J.; Telesco, C. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    We report the detection of 10 micrometer emission from the transient low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) and optical nova GRO J0422+32 near the maximum of its outburst. We discuss this result in terms of (1) a 'standard' model according to which low-energy radiation of LMXB is caused by reprocessing of X-rays in an accretion disk; (2) emission from a cool secondary star; (3) emission from dust grains heated by the transient X-rays, and (4) free-free emission from an X-ray-driven wind from the accretion disk. Only the fourth alternative provides a viable explanation for the observed 10 micrometer emission, with a mass-loss rate in the disk wind that may be substantially higher than the rate of accretion onto the compact star. The presence of such a wind may have a profound effect on the evolution of the binary, and contribute to the solution of the 'birthrate problem' of millisecond ratio pulsars.

  13. Radiative-Thermal Winds from an Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2002-06-01

    We examine a hydrodynamical wind, which emanates from an accretion disk and is driven by thermal and radiation pressures, under a one-dimensional approximation along supposed streamlines. Such a disk wind is characterized by the disk gravitational and radiation fields, whose behavior is rather different from the spherical case. Along the streamline of winds, the gravitational field produced by the central object generally has a peak at some height, unlike the spherical case where it decreases monotonically. The radiation field produced by the disk, on the other hand, is almost constant near to the disk surface and decreases far from the disk, again unlike the spherical case. Due to these characteristic properties of force fields, disk winds are classified into three patterns: in the cold less-luminous case no wind can blow, in the warm luminous case transonic winds are established, and beyond some critical luminosity disk winds are always supersonic. We found that transonic winds can blow for the parameter range of a0 + 2Γeff >~ 0.8, where a0 is the initial sound speed in units of the Keplerian speed at the wind base and Γeff the normalized disk luminosity at the wind base. Furthermore, supersonic winds blow for Γeff >~ 0.4. We derive the terminal speed as a function of Γeff A radial extension of the flow is also discussed and applie d to mass outflow from several active objects.

  14. Radiative-Thermal Winds from an Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, J.

    We examine a hydrodynamical wind, which emanates from an accretion disk and is driven by thermal and radiation pressures, under a one-dimensional approximation along supposed streamlines. Such a disk wind is characterized by the disk gravitational and radiation fields, whose behavior is rather different from the spherical case. Along the streamline of winds, the gravitational field produced by the central object generally has a peak at some height. The radiation field produced by the disk, on the other hand, is almost constant near to the disk surface and decreases far from the disk. As a result of these characteristic properties of force fields, disk winds are classified into three patterns; in the cold less-luminous case no wind can blow, in the warm luminous case transonic winds are established, and beyond some critical luminosity disk winds are always supersonic. We found that transonic winds can blow for the parameter range of a0 + 2Γeff > 0.8, where a0 is the initial sound speed in units of the Keplerian speed at the wind base and Γeff the normalized disk luminosity at the wind base. Furthermore, supersonic winds blow for Γeff > 0.4.

  15. Wind driven air pump

    SciTech Connect

    Beisel, V.A.

    1983-05-31

    An improved pump for lifting water from an underground source utilizes a wind motor for driving an oil-less air compressor eliminating oil contamination of ground water which is forced to the surface. The wind motor is movable to face the wind by means of a novel swivel assembly which also eliminates the formation and freezing of condensate within the airline from the compressor. The propeller blades of the wind motor and the tail section are formed from a pair of opposed convex air foil shaped surfaces which provide the propeller blades and the tail section with fast sensitivity to slight changes in wind direction and speed. A novel well tower for supporting the wind motor and compressor and for lifting the water from the underground source is an optional modification which requires no welding and eliminates the problem of condensate freezing in the airline going to the well. The wind driven air pump disclosed is lightweight, can be easily installed, is relatively inexpensive to produce and is virtually maintenance-free and capable of operating in winds exceeding 100 miles per hour.

  16. Winds from disks in compact binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.W.

    1993-10-27

    We herein present an observational and theoretical review of the winds of compact binaries. After a brief consideration of the accretion disk coronae and winds of X-ray binaries, the review concentrates on the winds of cataclysmic variables (CVs). Specifically, we consider the related problems of the geometry and mass-loss rate of the winds of CVs, their ionization state and variability, and the results from studies of eclipsing CVs. Finally, the properties of bona fide accretion disk wind models are reviewed.

  17. Radiato-Magneto-Thermal Winds from an Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2004-02-01

    We examine a hydrodynamical wind, which emanates from an accretion disk and is driven by thermal, magnetic, and radiation pressures, under a one-dimensional approximation along supposed streamlines. The disk gas is assumed to be isothermal, the magnetic field has only a toroidal component, and the radiation field is evaluated along the streamline. Such a disk wind is characterized by an isothermal sound speed, the Alfvén speed at the footpoint, and the strength of radiation fields. Isothermal winds can always blow even in the cold less-luminous case, and transonic winds are established, except for the perfectly cold case without thermal pressure. Beyond some critical luminosity, disk winds are always supersonic, irrespective of the thermal and magnetic pressures. We found that the terminal speed v∞ is roughly expressed as (1/2) v∞2 = (1/2) v02 - (1/2) (GM/r0) + 10.5 aT2 + 0.7 aAO2 + 16 Γeff (GM/r0), where v0 is the initial velocity, M the mass of the central object, r0 the radius of the wind base on the disk, aT the isothermal sound speed, aA0 the initial Alfvén speed, and Γeff the effective normalized luminosity, although the coefficients depend on the configuration of the streamlines.

  18. Equatorial disk formation around rotating stars due to ram pressure confinement by the stellar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, J. E.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The axisymmetric 2D supersonic solution of a rotating, radiation-driven stellar wind presently obtained by a simple approximation predicts the formation of a dense equatorial disk, when the star's rotation rate lies above a threshold value that depends on the ratio of the wind's terminal speed to the escape speed of the star. The disk is formed because the trajectories of the wind leaving the stellar surface at high latitudes carry it down to the equatorial plane; there, the material passes through a standing oblique shock atop the disk; it is therefore the ram pressure of the polar wind that compresses and confines the disk.

  19. Quasar Unification Via Disk Winds: From Phenomenology to Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knigge, C.

    2015-09-01

    I will give an overview of a collaborative project aimed at testing the viability of QSO unification via accretion disk winds. In this scenario, most of the characteristic spectral features of QSOs are formed in these outflows. More specifically, broad absorption lines (BALs) are produced for sight lines within the outflow, while broad emission lines (BELs) are observed for other viewing angles. In order to test these ideas, we use a state-of- the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer and photoionization code to predict emergent spectra for a wide range of viewing angles and quasar properties (black hole mass, accretion rate, X-ray luminosity, etc). It turns out to be relatively straightforward to produce BALs, but harder to obtain sufficiently strong BELs. We also find that it is easy to overionize the wind with realistic X-ray luminosities. In addition, we are using our code to test and improve hydrodynamic disk wind models for quasars. So far, we have been able to demonstrate that the treatment of ionization in existing hydrodynamic models of line-driven disk winds is too simplistic to yield realistic results: the modelled outflows would be strongly overionized and hence would not feel the line-driving forces that are asssumed to produce them. We have therefore embarked on an effort to model line-driven disk winds self-consistently by linking a hydrodynamics code with our ionization and radiative transfer code. Finally, we can also predict the reverberation signatures produced by disk winds, which can be directly compared to the results of the latest reverberation mapping campaigns.

  20. X-ray Heated Winds from Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D. T.; Castor, J. I.; Klein, R. I.; McKee, C. F.; Bell, J. B.

    1993-05-01

    We present 2-D axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of thermally driven winds from accretion disks which result from the absorption of X-rays from a central compact object (~ 10(8M_sun) ). We have assumed the accretion disk flares with radius so that the outer parts can be directly exposed to the ionizing radiation from the central source. The effects of rotation, central gravity from the compact object, and optically thin heating and cooling have been added to a second-order Godunov scheme employing local adaptive mesh refinement. Each model exhibits solutions where there is a gravitationally bound, nearly isothermal corona for streamlines emanating from small radii, and a free flowing wind for streamlines from large radii. We have calculated models for a range of luminosities which show the different types of wind solutions possible. These range from a rapidly-heated, nearly isothermal wind for high luminosities to a slowly-heated, gravitationally inhibited wind for low luminosities. A direct comparison is made to the analytic prediction of mass loss rate as a function of radius of Begelman, McKee, and Shields (1983). We find good agreement at high luminosities; however, discrepancies are found at low luminosities indicating an improved description of the transition to a gravitationally retarded wind. Finally, for the purposes of X-ray spectroscopy of the wind, we present the column density of various iron ions as a function of inclination angle of the disk for a few of our models.

  1. Hall-effect-controlled gas dynamics in protoplanetary disks. I. Wind solutions at the inner disk

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2014-08-20

    The gas dynamics of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is largely controlled by non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects including Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Among these the role of the Hall effect is the least explored and most poorly understood. In this series, we have included, for the first time, all three non-ideal MHD effects in a self-consistent manner to investigate the role of the Hall effect on PPD gas dynamics using local shearing-box simulations. In this first paper, we focus on the inner region of PPDs, where previous studies (Bai and Stone 2013; Bai 2013) excluding the Hall effect have revealed that the inner disk up to ∼10 AU is largely laminar, with accretion driven by a magnetocentrifugal wind. We confirm this basic picture and show that the Hall effect modifies the wind solutions depending on the polarity of the large-scale poloidal magnetic field B{sub 0} threading the disk. When B{sub 0}⋅Ω>0, the horizontal magnetic field is strongly amplified toward the disk interior, leading to a stronger disk wind (by ∼50% or less in terms of the wind-driven accretion rate). The enhanced horizontal field also leads to much stronger large-scale Maxwell stress (magnetic braking) that contributes to a considerable fraction of the wind-driven accretion rate. When B{sub 0}⋅Ω<0, the horizontal magnetic field is reduced, leading to a weaker disk wind (by ≲ 20%) and negligible magnetic braking. Under fiducial parameters, we find that when B{sub 0}⋅Ω>0, the laminar region extends farther to ∼10-15 AU before the magnetorotational instability sets in, while for B{sub 0}⋅Ω<0, the laminar region extends only to ∼3-5 AU for a typical accretion rate of ∼10{sup –8} to10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. Scaling relations for the wind properties, especially the wind-driven accretion rate, are provided for aligned and anti-aligned field geometries.

  2. Thermally driven winds

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.

    1993-04-01

    This presentation will summarize the present state of knowledge on slope and valley wind systems, emphasizing physical concepts and recent gains in understanding from observational programs in various parts of the world. The presentation will begin with a discussion of terminology and a summary of the characteristics and relevant physics of slope and valley wind systems. The interrelationships between slope and valley wind systems will be covered as well as the cyclical development of the wind systems during the morning transition, daytime, evening transition, and nighttime periods. The discussion will focus on key physical factors including topography, temperature structure, surface energy budgets, atmospheric heat budgets, strength of overlying flows, etc. that produce variations in wind system behavior from one topographic and climatic setting to another. Deviant wind system behavior and winds associated with special topographic features will also be discussed.

  3. Radiation-Driven Warping. 2; Nonisothermal Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Nowak, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Recent work by Pringle and by Maloney, Begelman, & Pringle has shown that geometrically thin, optically thick, accretion disks are unstable to warping driven by radiation torque from the central source. This work was confined to isothermal (i.e., surface density Sigma varies as R(sup -3/2) disks. In this paper we generalize the study of radiation-driven warping to include general power-law surface density distributions, Sigma varies as R(sup -delta).We consider the range from Delta = 3/2 (the isothermal case) to Delta = -3/2, which corresponds to a radiation-pressure-supported disk; this spans the range of surface density distributions likely to be found in real astrophysical disks. In all cases there are an infinite number of zero-crossing solutions (i.e., solutions that cross the equator), which are the physically relevant modes if the outer boundary of the disk is required to lie in a specified plane. However, unlike the isothermal disk, which is the degenerate case, the frequency eigenvalues for Delta does not equal 3/2 are all distinct. In all cases the location of the zero moves outward from the steady state (pure precession) value with increasing growth rate; thus, there is a critical minimum size for unstable disks. Modes with zeros at smaller radii are damped. The critical radius and the steady state precession rate depend only weakly on Delta. An additional analytic solution has been found for Delta = 1. The case Delta = 1 divides the solutions into two qualitatively different regimes. For Delta greater than or equal to 1, the fastest growing modes have maximum warp amplitude, close to the disk outer edge, and the ratio of Beta(sub max) to the warp amplitude at the disk inner edge, Beta(sub o), is much greater than 1. For Delta less than 1, Beta(sub max/Beta(sub o) approximately equals 1, and the warp maximum steadily approaches the origin as Delta decreases. This implies that nonlinear effects must be important if the warp extends to the disk inner edge

  4. Radiation-Driven Warping. 2; Nonisothermal Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Nowak, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Recent work by Pringle and by Maloney, Begelman, & Pringle has shown that geometrically thin, optically thick, accretion disks are unstable to warping driven by radiation torque from the central source. This work was confined to isothermal (i.e., surface density Sigma varies as R(sup -3/2) disks. In this paper we generalize the study of radiation-driven warping to include general power-law surface density distributions, Sigma varies as R(sup -delta).We consider the range from Delta = 3/2 (the isothermal case) to Delta = -3/2, which corresponds to a radiation-pressure-supported disk; this spans the range of surface density distributions likely to be found in real astrophysical disks. In all cases there are an infinite number of zero-crossing solutions (i.e., solutions that cross the equator), which are the physically relevant modes if the outer boundary of the disk is required to lie in a specified plane. However, unlike the isothermal disk, which is the degenerate case, the frequency eigenvalues for Delta does not equal 3/2 are all distinct. In all cases the location of the zero moves outward from the steady state (pure precession) value with increasing growth rate; thus, there is a critical minimum size for unstable disks. Modes with zeros at smaller radii are damped. The critical radius and the steady state precession rate depend only weakly on Delta. An additional analytic solution has been found for Delta = 1. The case Delta = 1 divides the solutions into two qualitatively different regimes. For Delta greater than or equal to 1, the fastest growing modes have maximum warp amplitude, close to the disk outer edge, and the ratio of Beta(sub max) to the warp amplitude at the disk inner edge, Beta(sub o), is much greater than 1. For Delta less than 1, Beta(sub max/Beta(sub o) approximately equals 1, and the warp maximum steadily approaches the origin as Delta decreases. This implies that nonlinear effects must be important if the warp extends to the disk inner edge

  5. Winds from T Tauri stars. II - Balmer line profiles for inner disk winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Hewett, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of calculations of Balmer emission line profiles using escape probability methods for T Tauri wind models with nonspherically symmetric geometry. The wind is assumed to originate in the inner regions of an accretion disk surrounding the T Tauri star, and flows outward in a 'cone' geometry. Two types of wind models are considered, both with monotonically increasing expansion velocities as a function of radial distance. For flows with large turbulent velocities, such as the HF Alfven wave-driven wind models, the effect of cone geometry is to increase the blue wing emission, and to move the absorption reversal close to line center. Line profiles for a wind model rotating with the same angular velocity as the inner disk are also calculated. The Balmer lines of this model are significantly broader than observed in most objects, suggesting that the observed emission lines do not arise in a region rotating at Keplerian velocity.

  6. MHD Modelling of Protostellar Disk Winds and Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Christopher; Sutherland, Ralph; Salmeron, Raquel; Bicknell, Geoff

    2013-07-01

    One of the outstanding challenges in star formation is the angular momentum problem. Angular momentum transport is required to allow a cloud core to collapse to form a star. Angular momentum in the initial collapsing cloud prevents the majority of material falling directly onto the protostar, instead settling into a circumstellar disk around it. It is from this point that the angular momentum must be redistributed to allow material to accrete. Radial transport of angular momentum is accomplished via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Vertical angular momentum transport has generally been attributed to centrifugally driven winds (CDWs) from the disk surface. Both modes of transport depend on the strength of the local magnetic field, parametrised by the ratio of the vertical Alfven speed to the isothermal sound speed, a0. MRI is expected to dominate in the presence of weak fields (a0 ≪ 1), whereas CDWs require a strong field (a0 ≲ 1). Here we present calculations of the structure of minimum-mass solar nebula protostellar disks in strong fields (a0 = 1) around a solar mass star, focusing on the regions of these disks that may launch a CDW from their surface. These results have implications for disk-driven models of protostellar jet launching including the connection between disk properties and large scale features of jets.

  7. CONSTRAINTS ON COMPTON-THICK WINDS FROM BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISKS: CAN WE SEE THE INNER DISK?

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2012-11-01

    Strong evidence is emerging that winds can be driven from the central regions of accretion disks in both active galactic nuclei and Galactic black hole binaries. Direct evidence for highly ionized, Compton-thin inner-disk winds comes from observations of blueshifted (v {approx} 0.05-0.1c) iron-K X-ray absorption lines. However, it has been suggested that the inner regions of black hole accretion disks can also drive Compton-thick winds-such winds would enshroud the inner disk, preventing us from seeing direct signatures of the accretion disk (i.e., the photospheric thermal emission, or the Doppler/gravitationally broadened iron K{alpha} line). Here, we show that, provided the source is sub-Eddington, the well-established wind-driving mechanisms fail to launch a Compton-thick wind from the inner disk. For the accelerated region of the wind to be Compton-thick, the momentum carried in the wind must exceed the available photon momentum by a factor of at least 2/{lambda}, where {lambda} is the Eddington ratio of the source, ruling out radiative acceleration unless the source is very close to the Eddington limit. Compton-thick winds also carry large mass fluxes, and a consideration of the connections between the wind and the disk shows this to be incompatible with magneto-centrifugal driving. Finally, thermal driving of the wind is ruled out on the basis of the large Compton radii that typify black hole systems. In the absence of some new acceleration mechanisms, we conclude that the inner regions of sub-Eddington accretion disks around black holes are indeed naked.

  8. Magnetically driven jets and winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Berk, H. L.; Contopoulos, J.

    1991-01-01

    Four equations for the origin and propagation of nonrelativistic jets and winds are derived from the basic conservation laws of ideal MHD. The axial current density is negative in the vicinity of the axis and positive at larger radii; there is no net current because this is energetically favored. The magnetic field is essential for the jet solutions in that the zz-component of the magnetic stress acts, in opposition to gravity, to drive matter through the slow magnetosonic critical point. For a representative self-consistent disk/jet solution relevant to a protostellar system, the reaction of the accreted mass expelled in the jets is 0.1, the ratio of the power carried by the jets to the disk luminosity is 0.66, and the ratio of the boundary layer to disk luminosities is less than about 0.13. The star's rotation rate decreases with time even for rotation rates much less than the breakup rate.

  9. Driving disk winds and heating hot coronae by MRI turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Io, Yuki; Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the formation of hot coronae and vertical outflows in accretion disks by magnetorotational turbulence. We perform local three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations with the vertical stratification by explicitly solving an energy equation with various effective ratios of specific heats, γ. Initially imposed weak vertical magnetic fields are effectively amplified by magnetorotational instability and winding caused by the differential rotation. In the isothermal case (γ = 1), the disk winds are driven mainly by the Poynting flux associated with the MHD turbulence and show quasi-periodic intermittency. In contrast, in the non-isothermal cases with γ ≥ 1.1, the regions above 1-2 scale heights from the midplane are effectively heated to form coronae with temperature ∼50 times the initial value, which are connected to the cooler midplane region through the pressure-balanced transition regions. As a result, the disk winds are driven mainly by the gas pressure, exhibiting more time-steady nature, although the nondimensional time-averaged mass loss rates are similar to that of the isothermal case. Sound-like waves are confined in the cool midplane region in these cases, and the amplitude of the density fluctuations is larger than that of the isothermal case.

  10. Driving Disk Winds and Heating Hot Coronae by MRI Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Io, Yuki; Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the formation of hot coronae and vertical outflows in accretion disks by magnetorotational turbulence. We perform local three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations with the vertical stratification by explicitly solving an energy equation with various effective ratios of specific heats, γ. Initially imposed weak vertical magnetic fields are effectively amplified by magnetorotational instability and winding caused by the differential rotation. In the isothermal case (γ = 1), the disk winds are driven mainly by the Poynting flux associated with the MHD turbulence and show quasi-periodic intermittency. In contrast, in the non-isothermal cases with γ >= 1.1, the regions above 1-2 scale heights from the midplane are effectively heated to form coronae with temperature ~50 times the initial value, which are connected to the cooler midplane region through the pressure-balanced transition regions. As a result, the disk winds are driven mainly by the gas pressure, exhibiting more time-steady nature, although the nondimensional time-averaged mass loss rates are similar to that of the isothermal case. Sound-like waves are confined in the cool midplane region in these cases, and the amplitude of the density fluctuations is larger than that of the isothermal case.

  11. On local ionization equilibrium and disk winds in QSOs

    SciTech Connect

    Pereyra, Nicolas A.

    2014-11-01

    We present theoretical C IV λλ1548,1550 absorption line profiles for QSOs calculated assuming the accretion disk wind (ADW) scenario. The results suggest that the multiple absorption troughs seen in many QSOs may be due to the discontinuities in the ion balance of the wind (caused by X-rays), rather than discontinuities in the density/velocity structure. The profiles are calculated from a 2.5-dimensional time-dependent hydrodynamic simulation of a line-driven disk wind for a typical QSO black hole mass, a typical QSO luminosity, and for a standard Shakura-Sunyaev disk. We include the effects of ionizing X-rays originating from within the inner disk radius by assuming that the wind is shielded from the X-rays from a certain viewing angle up to 90° ({sup e}dge on{sup )}. In the shielded region, we assume constant ionization equilibrium, and thus constant line-force parameters. In the non-shielded region, we assume that both the line-force and the C IV populations are nonexistent. The model can account for P-Cygni absorption troughs (produced at edge on viewing angles), multiple absorption troughs (produced at viewing angles close to the angle that separates the shielded region and the non-shielded region), and for detached absorption troughs (produced at an angle in between the first two absorption line types); that is, the model can account for the general types of broad absorption lines seen in QSOs as a viewing angle effect. The steady nature of ADWs, in turn, may account for the steady nature of the absorption structure observed in multiple-trough broad absorption line QSOs. The model parameters are M {sub bh} = 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} and L {sub disk} = 10{sup 47} erg s{sup –1}.

  12. On Local Ionization Equilibrium and Disk Winds in QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, Nicolas A.

    2014-11-01

    We present theoretical C IV λλ1548,1550 absorption line profiles for QSOs calculated assuming the accretion disk wind (ADW) scenario. The results suggest that the multiple absorption troughs seen in many QSOs may be due to the discontinuities in the ion balance of the wind (caused by X-rays), rather than discontinuities in the density/velocity structure. The profiles are calculated from a 2.5-dimensional time-dependent hydrodynamic simulation of a line-driven disk wind for a typical QSO black hole mass, a typical QSO luminosity, and for a standard Shakura-Sunyaev disk. We include the effects of ionizing X-rays originating from within the inner disk radius by assuming that the wind is shielded from the X-rays from a certain viewing angle up to 90° ("edge on"). In the shielded region, we assume constant ionization equilibrium, and thus constant line-force parameters. In the non-shielded region, we assume that both the line-force and the C IV populations are nonexistent. The model can account for P-Cygni absorption troughs (produced at edge on viewing angles), multiple absorption troughs (produced at viewing angles close to the angle that separates the shielded region and the non-shielded region), and for detached absorption troughs (produced at an angle in between the first two absorption line types); that is, the model can account for the general types of broad absorption lines seen in QSOs as a viewing angle effect. The steady nature of ADWs, in turn, may account for the steady nature of the absorption structure observed in multiple-trough broad absorption line QSOs. The model parameters are M bh = 109 M ⊙ and L disk = 1047 erg s-1.

  13. Simulations of Accretion Disk Wind Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Craig L.; Yong, Suk Yee; O'Dowd, Matthew; Webster, Rachel L.; Bate, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The kinematics of the broad emission line region (BELR) in quasars is largely unknown, however there is strong evidence that outflows may be a key component. For example, in approximately 15% of quasars we observe broad, blue-shifted absorption features which may be ubiquitous based on line-of-sight arguments. We use a new mathematical description of an outflowing disk-wind with an initial rotational component to predict surface brightness distributions of this wind at different orientations. These surface brightness distributions will allow us to simulate gravitational microlensing of BELR light, with a view to mapping the structure and better understanding the kinematics of these flows.

  14. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recchia, S.; Blasi, P.; Morlino, G.

    2016-11-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfvén waves, that in turn determines the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here, we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the implications for the spectrum of cosmic rays by solving together the hydrodynamical equations for the wind and the transport equation for cosmic rays under the action of self-generated diffusion and advection with the wind and the self-excited Alfvén waves.

  15. LIMB-DARKENED RADIATION-DRIVEN WINDS FROM MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Cure, M.; Cidale, L.

    2012-10-01

    We calculated the influence of the limb-darkened finite-disk correction factor in the theory of radiation-driven winds from massive stars. We solved the one-dimensional m-CAK hydrodynamical equation of rotating radiation-driven winds for all three known solutions, i.e., fast, {Omega}-slow, and {delta}-slow. We found that for the fast solution, the mass-loss rate is increased by a factor of {approx}10%, while the terminal velocity is reduced about 10%, when compared with the solution using a finite-disk correction factor from a uniformly bright star. For the other two slow solutions, the changes are almost negligible. Although we found that the limb darkening has no effects on the wind-momentum-luminosity relationship, it would affect the calculation of synthetic line profiles and the derivation of accurate wind parameters.

  16. Global self-similar protostellar disk/wind models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitler, Seth A.

    The magnetocentrifugal disk wind mechanism is the leading candidate for producing the large-scale, bipolar jets commonly seen in protostellar systems. I present a detailed formulation of a global, radially self-similar model for a fully general, non-ideal disk that launches a magnetocentrifugal disk wind. This formulation generalizes the conductivity tensor formalism previously used in radially localized disk models to a global disk model. The model involves matching a solution of the equations of non-ideal MHD describing matter in the disk to a solution of the equations of ideal MHD describing a "cold" wind. The disk solution is required to pass smoothly through the sonic point, the wind solution is required to pass smoothly through the Alfven point, and the two solutions must match at the disk/wind interface. This model includes for the first time a self-consistent treatment of the evolution of magnetic flux threading the disk, which can change on the disk accretion timescale. These constraints fix the distribution of the magnetic field threading the disk, the midplane accretion speed, and the midplane migration speed of flux surfaces. Specializing to the case of a disk in the ambipolar diffusivity regime, I present a representative solution using the neutral matter-field coupling constant. I conclude with a brief discussion of the importance of self-similar disk/wind models in studying global processes in protostellar systems.

  17. Wind driven power generating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Andruszkiw, W.; Andrushkiw, R.

    1986-10-14

    A vertically adjustable wind driven power generating apparatus comprised of, in combination, a well in which is vertically movably mounted a wind driven power generating apparatus comprised of: (i) a wind driven power generating means comprised of a tubular housing having rotatably mounted therein a horizontally extending shaft. The shaft has a centrally disposed bevel gear fixedly attached thereto and helical vanes disposed longitudinally on both sides of the bevel gear; (ii) means for vertical movement of the tubular housing within the well comprised of (a) a hollow vertical support column having a circular cross section and having one end thereof attached to the bottom of the tubular housing and (b) a vertically extending hollow tubular member having a hollow interior fixedly mounted at its bottom end in the floor of the well and being open at its other end, the tubular member adapted to telescopically receive the vertical support column in its open end; (iii) vertical movement control means comprised of (a) downward movement control means comprising an inverted wing system generating inverse-lift mounted on the tubular housing, and (b) upward movement control means comprising a cylinder having an axially movable piston therein; (iv) power transmission means comprising a vertically extending power transmitting shaft that drives a power generator.

  18. Protosteller Disks Under the Influence of Winds and UV Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H. W.

    2003-01-01

    Star formation and the creation of protostellar disks generally occur in a crowded environment. Nearby young stars and protostars can influence the disks of their closets neighbors by a combination of outflows and hard radiation. The central stars themselves can have a stellar wind and may produce sufficient UV and X-ray to ultimately destroy their surrounding disks. Here we describe the results of numerical simulations of the influence that an external UV source and a central star's wind can have on its circumstellar disk. The numerical method (axial symmetry assumed) is described elsewhere. We find that protostellar disks will be destroyed on a relatively short time scale ( 10(sup 5)yr) unless they are well shielded from O-stars. Initially isotropic T-Tauri winds do not significantly influence their disks, but instead are focused toward the rotation axis by the disk wind from photoevaporation.

  19. Protosteller Disks Under the Influence of Winds and UV Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H. W.

    2003-01-01

    Star formation and the creation of protostellar disks generally occur in a crowded environment. Nearby young stars and protostars can influence the disks of their closets neighbors by a combination of outflows and hard radiation. The central stars themselves can have a stellar wind and may produce sufficient UV and X-ray to ultimately destroy their surrounding disks. Here we describe the results of numerical simulations of the influence that an external UV source and a central star's wind can have on its circumstellar disk. The numerical method (axial symmetry assumed) is described elsewhere. We find that protostellar disks will be destroyed on a relatively short time scale ( 10(sup 5)yr) unless they are well shielded from O-stars. Initially isotropic T-Tauri winds do not significantly influence their disks, but instead are focused toward the rotation axis by the disk wind from photoevaporation.

  20. Mass loss from pre-main-sequence accretion disks. I - The accelerating wind of FU Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Kenyon, Scott J.

    1993-01-01

    We present evidence that the wind of the pre-main-sequence object FU Orionis arises from the surface of the luminous accretion disk. A disk wind model calculated assuming radiative equilibrium explains the differential behavior of the observed asymmetric absorption-line profiles. The model predicts that strong lines should be asymmetric and blueshifted, while weak lines should be symmetric and double-peaked due to disk rotation, in agreement with observations. We propose that many blueshifted 'shell' absorption features are not produced in a true shell of material, but rather form in a differentially expanding wind that is rapidly rotating. The inference of rapid rotation supports the proposal that pre-main-sequence disk winds are rotationally driven.

  1. Disk-driven rotating bipolar outflow in Orion Source I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Tomoya; Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsushita, Yuko; Motogi, Kazuhito; Matsumoto, Naoko; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Burns, Ross A.; Honma, Mareki

    2017-07-01

    One of the outstanding problems in star formation theory concerns the transfer of angular momentum so that mass can accrete onto a newly born young stellar object (YSO). From a theoretical standpoint, outflows and jets are predicted to play an essential role in the transfer of angular momentum 1,2,3,4 and their rotations have been reported for both low- 5 and high-mass 6,7 YSOs. However, little quantitative discussion on outflow launching mechanisms has been presented for high-mass YSOs due to a lack of observational data. Here we present a clear signature of rotation in the bipolar outflow driven by Orion Source I, a high-mass YSO candidate, using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). A rotational transition of silicon monoxide (Si18O) reveals a velocity gradient perpendicular to the outflow axis, which is consistent with that of the circumstellar disk traced by a high excitation water line. The launching radii and outward velocity of the outflow are estimated to be >10 au and 10 km s-1, respectively. These parameters rule out the possibility that the observed outflow is produced by the entrainment of a high-velocity jet 8 , and that contributions from the stellar wind 9 or X-wind 10 , which have smaller launching radii, are significant in the case of Source I. Thus these results provide convincing evidence of a rotating outflow directly driven by the magneto-centrifugal disk wind launched by a high-mass YSO candidate 6,11 .

  2. Global Self-similar Protostellar Disk/Wind Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitler, Seth

    2011-05-01

    The magnetocentrifugal disk wind mechanism is the leading candidate for producing the large-scale, bipolar jets commonly seen in protostellar systems. I present a detailed formulation of a global, radially self-similar model for a non-ideal disk that launches a magnetocentrifugal wind. This formulation generalizes the conductivity tensor formalism previously used in radially localized disk models. The model involves matching a solution of the equations of non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) describing matter in the disk to a solution of the equations of ideal MHD describing a "cold" wind. The disk solution must pass smoothly through the sonic point, the wind solution must pass smoothly through the Alfvén point, and the two solutions must match at the disk/wind interface. This model includes for the first time a self-consistent treatment of the evolution of magnetic flux threading the disk, which can change on the disk accretion timescale. The formulation presented here also allows a realistic conductivity profile for the disk to be used in a global disk/wind model for the first time. The physical constraints on the model solutions fix the distribution of the magnetic field threading the disk, the midplane accretion speed, and the midplane migration speed of flux surfaces. I present a representative solution that corresponds to a disk in the ambipolar conductivity regime with a nominal neutral-matter-magnetic-field coupling parameter that is constant along field lines, matched to a wind solution. I conclude with a brief discussion of the importance of self-similar disk/wind models in studying global processes such as dust evolution in protostellar systems. Presented as a dissertation to the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the PhD degree.

  3. DISPERSAL OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS BY CENTRAL WIND STRIPPING

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, I.; Johnstone, D.; Hollenbach, D.

    2009-07-20

    We present a model for the dispersal of protoplanetary disks by winds from either the central star or the inner disk. These winds obliquely strike the flaring disk surface and strip away disk material by entraining it in an outward radial-moving flow at the wind-disk interface, which lies several disk scale heights above the midplane. The disk dispersal time depends on the entrainment velocity, v{sub d} = {epsilon}c{sub s} , at which disk material flows into this turbulent shear layer interface, where {epsilon} is a scale factor and c{sub s} is the local sound speed in the disk surface just below the entrainment layer. If {epsilon} {approx} 0.1, a likely upper limit, the dispersal time at 1 AU is {approx}6 Myr for a disk with a surface density of 10{sup 3} g cm{sup -2}, a solar mass central star, and a wind with an outflow rate M-dot{sub w}=10{sup -8}M{sub odot}yr{sup -1} and terminal velocity v{sub w} = 200kms{sup -1}. When compared with photoevaporation and viscous evolution, wind stripping can be a dominant mechanism only for the combination of low accretion rates ({approx}<10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) and wind outflow rates approaching these accretion rates. This case is unusual since generally outflow rates are {approx}<0.1 of accretion rates.

  4. Constraining MHD Disk-Winds with X-ray Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, F.; Shrader, C. R.; Kazanas, D.; Contopoulos, J.; Behar, E.

    2014-01-01

    From the state-of-the-art spectroscopic observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) the robust features of absorption lines (e.g. most notably by H/He-like ions), called warm absorbers (WAs), have been often detected in soft X-rays (< 2 keV). While the identified WAs are often mildly blueshifted to yield line-of-sight velocities up to ~100-3,000 km/sec in typical X-ray-bright Seyfert 1 AGNs, a fraction of Seyfert galaxies such as PG 1211+143 exhibits even faster absorbers (v/ 0.1-0.2) called ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) whose physical condition is much more extreme compared with the WAs. Motivated by these recent X-ray data we show that the magnetically- driven accretion-disk wind model is a plausible scenario to explain the characteristic property of these X-ray absorbers. As a preliminary case study we demonstrate that the wind model parameters (e.g. viewing angle and wind density) can be constrained by data from PG 1211+143 at a statistically significant level with chi-squared spectral analysis. Our wind models can thus be implemented into the standard analysis package, XSPEC, as a table spectrum model for general analysis of X-ray absorbers.

  5. The Accretion Disk Wind in the Black Hole GRS 1915 + 105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.M.; Raymond, J.; Fabian, A. C.; Gallo, E.; Kaastra, J.; Kallman, T.; King, A. L.; Proga, D.; Reynolds, C. S.; Zoghbi, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 120 kiloseconds Chandra/HETG spectrum of the black hole GRS 1915+105. The observation was made during an extended and bright soft state in 2015 June. An extremely rich disk wind absorption spectrum is detected, similar to that observed at lower sensitivity in 2007. The very high resolution of the third-order spectrum reveals four components to the disk wind in the Fe K band alone; the fastest has a blueshift of v = 0.03 c (velocity equals 0.03 the speed of light). Broadened reemission from the wind is also detected in the first-order spectrum, giving rise to clear accretion disk P Cygni profiles. Dynamical modeling of the re-emission spectrum gives wind launching radii of r approximately equal to 10 (sup 2-4) GM (Gravitational constant times Mass) divided by c (sup 2) (the speed of light squared). Wind density values of n approximately equal to 10 (sup 13-16) per cubic centimeter are then required by the ionization parameter formalism. The small launching radii, high density values, and inferred high mass outflow rates signal a role for magnetic driving. With simple, reasonable assumptions, the wind properties constrain the magnitude of the emergent magnetic field to be B approximately equal to 10 (sup 3-4) G (Gravitational constant) if the wind is driven via magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure from within the disk and B approximately equal to 10 (sup 4-5) G (Gravitational constant) if the wind is driven by magnetocentrifugal acceleration. The MHD estimates are below upper limits predicted by the canonical alpha-disk model. We discuss these results in terms of fundamental disk physics and black hole accretion modes.

  6. The Accretion Disk Wind in the Black Hole GRS 1915 + 105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.M.; Raymond, J.; Fabian, A. C.; Gallo, E.; Kaastra, J.; Kallman, T.; King, A. L.; Proga, D.; Reynolds, C. S.; Zoghbi, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 120 kiloseconds Chandra/HETG spectrum of the black hole GRS 1915+105. The observation was made during an extended and bright soft state in 2015 June. An extremely rich disk wind absorption spectrum is detected, similar to that observed at lower sensitivity in 2007. The very high resolution of the third-order spectrum reveals four components to the disk wind in the Fe K band alone; the fastest has a blueshift of v = 0.03 c (velocity equals 0.03 the speed of light). Broadened reemission from the wind is also detected in the first-order spectrum, giving rise to clear accretion disk P Cygni profiles. Dynamical modeling of the re-emission spectrum gives wind launching radii of r approximately equal to 10 (sup 2-4) GM (Gravitational constant times Mass) divided by c (sup 2) (the speed of light squared). Wind density values of n approximately equal to 10 (sup 13-16) per cubic centimeter are then required by the ionization parameter formalism. The small launching radii, high density values, and inferred high mass outflow rates signal a role for magnetic driving. With simple, reasonable assumptions, the wind properties constrain the magnitude of the emergent magnetic field to be B approximately equal to 10 (sup 3-4) G (Gravitational constant) if the wind is driven via magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure from within the disk and B approximately equal to 10 (sup 4-5) G (Gravitational constant) if the wind is driven by magnetocentrifugal acceleration. The MHD estimates are below upper limits predicted by the canonical alpha-disk model. We discuss these results in terms of fundamental disk physics and black hole accretion modes.

  7. THE PHOTOEVAPORATIVE WIND FROM THE DISK OF TW Hya

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, I.; Sterzik, M.; Alexander, R. D.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.; Owen, J.; Ercolano, B.; Edwards, S.

    2011-07-20

    Photoevaporation driven by the central star is expected to be a ubiquitous and important mechanism for dispersing the circumstellar dust and gas from which planets form. Here, we present a detailed study of the circumstellar disk surrounding the nearby star TW Hya and provide observational constraints to its photoevaporative wind. Our new high-resolution (R {approx} 30,000) mid-infrared spectroscopy in the [Ne II] 12.81 {mu}m line confirms that this gas diagnostic traces the unbound wind component within 10 AU of the star. From the blueshift and asymmetry in the line profile, we estimate that most (>80%) of the [Ne II] emission arises from disk radii where the midplane is optically thick to the redshifted outflowing gas, meaning beyond the 1 or 4 AU dust rim inferred from other observations. We re-analyze high-resolution (R {approx} 48,000) archival optical spectra searching for additional transitions that may trace the photoevaporative flow. Unlike the [Ne II] line, optical forbidden lines from O I, S II, and Mg I are centered at stellar velocity and have symmetric profiles. The only way these lines can trace the photoevaporative flow is if they arise from a disk region physically distinct from that traced by the [Ne II] line, specifically from within the optically thin dust gap. However, the small ({approx}10 km s{sup -1}) FWHM of these lines suggests that most of the emitting gas traced at optical wavelengths is bound to the system rather than unbound. We discuss the implications of our results for a planet-induced gap versus a photoevaporation-induced gap.

  8. Characterizing Inflow Conditions Across the Rotor Disk of a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Kelley, N.; Scott, G.; Jager, D.; Schreck, S.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-megawatt utility-scale wind turbines operate in a turbulent, thermally-driven atmosphere where wind speed and air temperature vary with height. Turbines convert the wind's momentum into electrical power, and so changes in the atmosphere across the rotor disk influence the power produced by the turbine. To characterize the inflow into utility scale turbines at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Boulder, Colorado, NREL recently built two 135-meter inflow monitoring towers. This poster introduces the towers and the measurements that are made, showing some of the data obtained in the first few months of operation in 2011.

  9. On the virialization of disk winds: Implications for the black hole mass estimates in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kashi, Amit; Proga, Daniel; Nagamine, Kentaro; Greene, Jenny; Barth, Aaron J.

    2013-11-20

    Estimating the mass of a supermassive black hole in an active galactic nucleus usually relies on the assumption that the broad line region (BLR) is virialized. However, this assumption seems to be invalid in BLR models that consist of an accretion disk and its wind. The disk is likely Keplerian and therefore virialized. However, beyond a certain point, the wind material must be dominated by an outward force that is stronger than gravity. Here, we analyze hydrodynamic simulations of four different disk winds: an isothermal wind, a thermal wind from an X-ray-heated disk, and two line-driven winds, one with and the other without X-ray heating and cooling. For each model, we determine whether gravity governs the flow properties by computing and analyzing the volume-integrated quantities that appear in the virial theorem: internal, kinetic, and gravitational energies. We find that in the first two models, the winds are non-virialized, whereas the two line-driven disk winds are virialized up to a relatively large distance. The line-driven winds are virialized because they accelerate slowly so that the rotational velocity is dominant and the wind base is very dense. For the two virialized winds, the so-called projected virial factor scales with inclination angle as 1/sin {sup 2} i. Finally, we demonstrate that an outflow from a Keplerian disk becomes unvirialized more slowly when it conserves the gas specific angular momentum, as in the models considered here, than when it conserves the angular velocity, as in the so-called magneto-centrifugal winds.

  10. Effects of Magnetic Fields on Winds and Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. C.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    2005-11-01

    The problems facing magnetically guided wind models for the generation of stellar disks are outlined, particularly in relation to Be stars. Various parametric, analytic and numerical treatments have been published; some with and some without rotation, but all considering dipole like magnetic fields that can steer the star's wind to create a compressed equatorial region, variously termed; Magnetically Torqued Disk ( MTD), Magnetically Rigidized Disk, or Magnetically Confined Wind Shocked Disk. The essential issues are A) What field and rotation are required to create a MTD that is dense enough to generate emission line Equivalent Widths, the observed level of intrinsic polarization, and IR excesses? B) Can semi-corotational velocity fields be reconciled with observed line profiles and with the long term V/R variations normally attributed to spiral density waves in a Keplerian disk? C) What limits the lifetime of such a disk? D) Can the Keplerian disks model be reconciled with the fact that recently observed B fields in some early B type stars are large enough for MTD production. E) Can any other model predict as well as MTD does, the range of Spectral types in which disks are observed. F) What are the critical observations that might test the MTD model?

  11. Ultraviolet line diagnostics of accretion disk winds in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitello, Peter; Shlosman, Isaac

    1993-01-01

    The IUE data base is used to analyze the UV line shapes of the cataclysmic variables RW Sex, RW Tri, and V Sge. Observed lines are compared to synthetic line profiles computed using a model of rotating biconical winds from accretion disks. The wind model calculates the wind ionization structure self-consistently including photoionization from the disk and boundary layer and treats 3D line radiation transfer in the Sobolev approximation. It is found that winds from accretion disks provide a good fit for reasonable parameters to the observed UV lines which include the P Cygni profiles for low-inclination systems and pure emission at large inclination. Disk winds are preferable to spherical winds which originate on the white dwarf because they: (1) require a much lower ratio of mass-loss rate to accretion rate and are therefore more plausible energetically; (2) provide a natural source for a biconical distribution of mass outflow which produces strong scattering far above the disk leading to P Cygni profiles for low-inclination systems and pure line emission profiles at high inclination with the absence of eclipses in UV lines; and (3) produce rotation-broadened pure emission lines at high inclination.

  12. UV line diagnostics of accretion disk winds in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitello, Peter; Shlosman, Isaac

    1992-01-01

    The IUE data base is used to analyze the UV line shapes of cataclysmic variables RW Sex, RW Tri, and V Sge. Observed lines are compared to synthetic line profiles computed using a model of rotating bi-conical winds from accretion disks. The wind model calculates the wind ionization structure self-consistently including photoionization from the disk and boundary layer and treats 3-D line radiation transfer in the Sobolev approximation. It is found that winds from accretion disks provide a good fit for reasonable parameters to the observed UV lines which include the P Cygni profiles for low inclination systems and pure emission at large inclination. Disk winds are preferable to spherical winds which originate on the white dwarf because they (1) require a much lower ratio of mass loss rate to accretion rate and are therefore more plausible energetically, (2) provide a natural source for a bi-conical distribution of mass outflow which produces strong scattering far above the disk leading to P Cygni profiles for low inclination systems, and pure line emission profiles at high inclination with the absence of eclipses in UV lines, and (3) produce rotation broadened pure emission lines at high inclination.

  13. Magnetically driven jets and winds: Exact solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Contopoulos, J.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    1994-01-01

    We present a general class of self-similar solutions of the full set of MHD equations that include matter flow, electromagnetic fields, pressure, and gravity. The solutions represent axisymmetric, time-independent, nonrelativistic, ideal, magnetohydrodynamic, collimated outflows (jet and winds) from magnetized accretion disks around compact objects. The magnetic field extracts angular momentum from the disk, accelerates the outflows perpedicular to the disk, and provides collimation at large distances. The terminal outflow velocities are of the order of or greater than the rotational velocity of the disk at the base of the flow. When a nonzero electric current flows along the jet, the outflow radius oscillates with axial distance, whereas when the total electric current is zero (with the return current flowing across the jet's cross section), the outflow radius increase to a maximum and then decreases. The method can also be applied to relativistic outflows.

  14. PROTOPLANETARY DISK WINDS VIA MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY: FORMATION OF AN INNER HOLE AND A CRUCIAL ASSIST FOR PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Muto, Takayuki

    2010-08-01

    By constructing a global model based on three-dimensional local magnetohydrodynamical simulations, we show that the disk wind driven by magnetorotational instability (MRI) plays a significant role in the dispersal of the gas component of protoplanetary disks. Because the mass loss timescale of the MRI-driven disk winds is proportional to the local Keplerian rotation period, a gas disk dynamically evaporates from the inner region, possibly creating a gradually expanding inner hole, while a sizable amount of the gas remains in the outer region. The disk wind is highly time dependent with a quasi-periodicity of several times the Keplerian rotation period at each radius, which will be observed as the time variability of protostar-protoplanetary disk systems. These features persistently hold even if a dead zone exists because the disk winds are driven from the surface regions where ionizing cosmic rays and high energy photons can penetrate. Moreover, the predicted inside-out clearing significantly suppresses the infall of boulders to a central star and the type I migration of proto-planets, which are favorable for the formation and survival of planets.

  15. Magnetically Induced Disk Winds and Transport in the HL Tau Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Flock, Mario; Turner, Neal J.

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism of angular momentum transport in protoplanetary disks is fundamental to understanding the distributions of gas and dust in the disks. The unprecedented ALMA observations taken toward HL Tau at high spatial resolution and subsequent radiative transfer modeling reveal that a high degree of dust settling is currently achieved in the outer part of the HL Tau disk. Previous observations, however, suggest a high disk accretion rate onto the central star. This configuration is not necessarily intuitive in the framework of the conventional viscous disk model, since efficient accretion generally requires a high level of turbulence, which can suppress dust settling considerably. We develop a simplified, semi-analytical disk model to examine under what condition these two properties can be realized in a single model. Recent, non-ideal MHD simulations are utilized to realistically model the angular momentum transport both radially via MHD turbulence and vertically via magnetically induced disk winds. We find that the HL Tau disk configuration can be reproduced well when disk winds are properly taken into account. While the resulting disk properties are likely consistent with other observational results, such an ideal situation can be established only if the plasma β at the disk midplane is β 0 ≃ 2 × 104 under the assumption of steady accretion. Equivalently, the vertical magnetic flux at 100 au is about 0.2 mG. More detailed modeling is needed to fully identify the origin of the disk accretion and quantitatively examine plausible mechanisms behind the observed gap structures in the HL Tau disk.

  16. Recent Developments in Understanding Wind Driven Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrison, J. P.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Holstein-Rathlou, C.; Knak Jensen, S.; Nørnberg, P.; Rasmussen, K. R.

    2011-10-01

    The wind driven transport of granular material is an important environmental/climatic factor on Earth and even more so on Mars. Several related aspects of Aeolian activity are presently being studied in the laboratory. These include simulating wind driven erosion in the laboratory and the study of mineral change due to mechanical activation as well as quantifying erosion rates. The generation of electric fields and the effects of these electric fields on grain transport is also being investigated using environmental wind tunnel simulators.

  17. Stellar winds driven by Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, J. W.; Olbert, S.

    1973-01-01

    Models of stellar winds were considered in which the dynamic expansion of a corona is driven by Alfven waves propagating outward along radial magnetic field lines. In the presence of Alfven waves, a coronal expansion can exist for a broad range of reference conditions which would, in the absence of waves, lead to static configurations. Wind models in which the acceleration mechanism is due to Alfven waves alone and exhibit lower mass fluxes and higher energies per particle are compared to wind models in which the acceleration is due to thermal processes. For example, winds driven by Alfven waves exhibit streaming velocities at infinity which may vary between the escape velocity at the coronal base and the geometrical mean of the escape velocity and the speed of light. Upper and lower limits were derived for the allowed energy fluxes and mass fluxes associated with these winds.

  18. Wind from the black-hole accretion disk driving a molecular outflow in an active galaxy.

    PubMed

    Tombesi, F; Meléndez, M; Veilleux, S; Reeves, J N; González-Alfonso, E; Reynolds, C S

    2015-03-26

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei are often thought to affect the evolution of both supermassive black holes and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the close relationship between black holes and galaxies. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultraluminous infrared galaxies support this quasar-feedback idea, because they directly trace the gas from which stars form. Theoretical models suggest that these outflows originate as energy-conserving flows driven by fast accretion-disk winds. Proposed connections between large-scale molecular outflows and accretion-disk activity in ultraluminous galaxies were incomplete because no accretion-disk wind had been detected. Conversely, studies of powerful accretion-disk winds have until now focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyfert galaxies and a few higher-redshift quasars. Here we report observations of a powerful accretion-disk wind with a mildly relativistic velocity (a quarter that of light) in the X-ray spectrum of IRAS F11119+3257, a nearby (redshift 0.189) optically classified type 1 ultraluminous infrared galaxy hosting a powerful molecular outflow. The active galactic nucleus is responsible for about 80 per cent of the emission, with a quasar-like luminosity of 1.5 × 10(46) ergs per second. The energetics of these two types of wide-angle outflows is consistent with the energy-conserving mechanism that is the basis of the quasar feedback in active galactic nuclei that lack powerful radio jets (such jets are an alternative way to drive molecular outflows).

  19. Wind driven generator with blade protecting means

    SciTech Connect

    Bosard, J.H.

    1981-09-08

    A wind driven generator is described which comprises a shaft having one end rotatably mounted in the apex of a conical wind deflector, a wind wheel keyed on the shaft in an open housing behind the deflector. An armature is mounted on the other end of the shaft in close proximity to a stator in a housing so that when the shaft is rotated by the wind the armature rotates in the stator to generate an electric current. Semi-circular perforated shields are hinged in front of the wind wheel so as to cover the space between the periphery of the housing and the outer edges of the deflector. The shields are held open by a counter weight until the wind attains an excessive velocity.

  20. Powerful, Rotating Disk Winds from Stellar-mass Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Kaastra, J.; Kallman, T.; King, A. L.; Proga, D.; Raymond, J.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of ionized X-ray disk winds found in the Fe K band of four stellar-mass black holes observed with Chandra, including 4U 1630-47, GRO J1655-40, H 1743-322, and GRS 1915+105. High-resolution photoionization grids were generated in order to model the data. Third-order gratings spectra were used to resolve complex absorption profiles into atomic effects and multiple velocity components. The Fe xxv line is found to be shaped by contributions from the intercombination line (in absorption), and the Fe xxvi line is detected as a spin-orbit doublet. The data require 2-3 absorption zones, depending on the source. The fastest components have velocities approaching or exceeding 0.01c, increasing mass outflow rates and wind kinetic power by orders of magnitude over prior single-zone models. The first-order spectra require re-emission from the wind, broadened by a degree that is loosely consistent with Keplerian orbital velocities at the photoionization radius. This suggests that disk winds are rotating with the orbital velocity of the underlying disk, and provides a new means of estimating launching radii—crucial to understanding wind driving mechanisms. Some aspects of the wind velocities and radii correspond well to the broad-line region in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), suggesting a physical connection. We discuss these results in terms of prevalent models for disk wind production and disk accretion itself, and implications for massive black holes in AGNs.

  1. ACCELERATION AND COLLIMATION OF RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC DISK WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian E-mail: fendt@mpia.d

    2010-02-01

    We perform axisymmetric relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate the acceleration and collimation of jets and outflows from disks around compact objects. Newtonian gravity is added to the relativistic treatment in order to establish the physical boundary condition of an underlying accretion disk in centrifugal and pressure equilibrium. The fiducial disk surface (respectively a slow disk wind) is prescribed as boundary condition for the outflow. We apply this technique for the first time in the context of relativistic jets. The strength of this approach is that it allows us to run a parameter study in order to investigate how the accretion disk conditions govern the outflow formation. Substantial effort has been made to implement a current-free, numerical outflow boundary condition in order to avoid artificial collimation present in the standard outflow conditions. Our simulations using the PLUTO code run for 500 inner disk rotations and on a physical grid size of 100 x 200 inner disk radii. The simulations evolve from an initial state in hydrostatic equilibrium and an initially force-free magnetic field configuration. Two options for the initial field geometries are applied-an hourglass-shaped potential magnetic field and a split monopole field. Most of our parameter runs evolve into a steady state solution which can be further analyzed concerning the physical mechanism at work. In general, we obtain collimated beams of mildly relativistic speed with Lorentz factors up to 6 and mass-weighted half-opening angles of 3-7 deg. The split-monopole initial setup usually results in less collimated outflows. The light surface of the outflow magnetosphere tends to align vertically-implying three relativistically distinct regimes in the flow-an inner subrelativistic domain close to the jet axis, a (rather narrow) relativistic jet and a surrounding subrelativistic outflow launched from the outer disk surface-similar to the spine-sheath structure currently

  2. Acceleration and Collimation of Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Disk Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian

    2010-02-01

    We perform axisymmetric relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate the acceleration and collimation of jets and outflows from disks around compact objects. Newtonian gravity is added to the relativistic treatment in order to establish the physical boundary condition of an underlying accretion disk in centrifugal and pressure equilibrium. The fiducial disk surface (respectively a slow disk wind) is prescribed as boundary condition for the outflow. We apply this technique for the first time in the context of relativistic jets. The strength of this approach is that it allows us to run a parameter study in order to investigate how the accretion disk conditions govern the outflow formation. Substantial effort has been made to implement a current-free, numerical outflow boundary condition in order to avoid artificial collimation present in the standard outflow conditions. Our simulations using the PLUTO code run for 500 inner disk rotations and on a physical grid size of 100 × 200 inner disk radii. The simulations evolve from an initial state in hydrostatic equilibrium and an initially force-free magnetic field configuration. Two options for the initial field geometries are applied—an hourglass-shaped potential magnetic field and a split monopole field. Most of our parameter runs evolve into a steady state solution which can be further analyzed concerning the physical mechanism at work. In general, we obtain collimated beams of mildly relativistic speed with Lorentz factors up to 6 and mass-weighted half-opening angles of 3-7 deg. The split-monopole initial setup usually results in less collimated outflows. The light surface of the outflow magnetosphere tends to align vertically—implying three relativistically distinct regimes in the flow—an inner subrelativistic domain close to the jet axis, a (rather narrow) relativistic jet and a surrounding subrelativistic outflow launched from the outer disk surface—similar to the spine-sheath structure

  3. The structure and appearance of winds from supercritical accretion disks. I - Numerical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Equations for the structure and appearance of supercritical accretion disks and the radiation-driven winds which emanate from them are derived and solved by a steady-state hydrodynamic computer code with a relaxation technique used in stellar structure problems. The present model takes into account the mass of the accreting star, the total accretion rate, a generalization of the disk alpha parameter which accounts for heating by processes in addition to viscosity, and the ratio of the total luminosity to the Eddington luminosity. Solutions indicate that for accretion onto a hard-surfaced star, steady, optically thick winds result for even slightly supercritical accretion, and the object will appear as a supergiant star with a high mass loss rate and a nonblackbody spectrum. Winds from black hole accretion disks are expected to depend on the form of the accretion interior to the critical radius, possibly consisting of no ejection at all, a wind similar to that of a hard-surfaced star, or a column of material ejected from a hole in the accretion disk.

  4. The structure and appearance of winds from supercritical accretion disks. I - Numerical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Equations for the structure and appearance of supercritical accretion disks and the radiation-driven winds which emanate from them are derived and solved by a steady-state hydrodynamic computer code with a relaxation technique used in stellar structure problems. The present model takes into account the mass of the accreting star, the total accretion rate, a generalization of the disk alpha parameter which accounts for heating by processes in addition to viscosity, and the ratio of the total luminosity to the Eddington luminosity. Solutions indicate that for accretion onto a hard-surfaced star, steady, optically thick winds result for even slightly supercritical accretion, and the object will appear as a supergiant star with a high mass loss rate and a nonblackbody spectrum. Winds from black hole accretion disks are expected to depend on the form of the accretion interior to the critical radius, possibly consisting of no ejection at all, a wind similar to that of a hard-surfaced star, or a column of material ejected from a hole in the accretion disk.

  5. Thermal Disk Winds in X-Ray Binaries: Realistic Heating and Cooling Rates Give Rise to Slow, but Massive, Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbottom, N.; Proga, D.; Knigge, C.; Long, K. S.

    2017-02-01

    A number of X-ray binaries exhibit clear evidence for the presence of disk winds in the high/soft state. A promising driving mechanism for these outflows is mass loss driven by the thermal expansion of X-ray heated material in the outer disk atmosphere. Higginbottom & Proga recently demonstrated that the properties of thermally driven winds depend critically on the shape of the thermal equilibrium curve, since this determines the thermal stability of the irradiated material. For a given spectral energy distribution, the thermal equilibrium curve depends on an exact balance between the various heating and cooling mechanisms at work. Most previous work on thermally driven disk winds relied on an analytical approximation to these rates. Here, we use the photoionization code cloudy to generate realistic heating and cooling rates which we then use in a 2.5D hydrodynamic model computed in ZEUS to simulate thermal winds in a typical black hole X-ray binary. We find that these heating and cooling rates produce a significantly more complex thermal equilibrium curve, with dramatically different stability properties. The resulting flow, calculated in the optically thin limit, is qualitatively different from flows calculated using approximate analytical rates. Specifically, our thermal disk wind is much denser and slower, with a mass-loss rate that is a factor of two higher and characteristic velocities that are a factor of three lower. The low velocity of the flow—{v}\\max ≃ 200 km s-1—may be difficult to reconcile with observations. However, the high mass-loss rate—15 × the accretion rate—is promising, since it has the potential to destabilize the disk. Thermally driven disk winds may therefore provide a mechanism for state changes.

  6. MOMENTUM TRANSPORT FROM CURRENT-DRIVEN RECONNECTION IN ASTROPHYSICAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahimi, F.; Prager, S. C.

    2011-12-20

    Current-driven reconnection is investigated as a possible mechanism for angular momentum transport in astrophysical disks. A theoretical and computational study of angular momentum transport from current-driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities is performed. It is found that both a single resistive tearing instability and an ideal instability can transport momentum in the presence of azimuthal Keplerian flow. The structure of the Maxwell stress is examined for a single mode through analytic quasilinear theory and computation. Full nonlinear multiple-mode computation shows that a global Maxwell stress causes significant momentum transport.

  7. Introduction to Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamers, Henny J. G. L. M.; Cassinelli, Joseph P.

    1999-06-01

    Preface; 1. Historical overview; 2. Observations of stellar winds; 3. Basic concepts: isothermal winds; 4. Basic concepts: non-isothermal winds; 5. Coronal winds; 6. Sound wave driven winds; 7. Dust driven winds; 8. Line driven winds; 9. Magnetic rotator theory; 10. Alfvén wave driven winds; 11. Outflowing disks from rotating stars; 12. Winds colliding with the interstellar medium; 13. The effects of mass loss on stellar evolution; 14. Problems; Appendices; Bibliography; Object index; Index.

  8. A disk wind in AB Aurigae traced with Hα interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perraut, K.; Dougados, C.; Lima, G. H. R. A.; Benisty, M.; Mourard, D.; Ligi, R.; Nardetto, N.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Farrington, C.

    2016-11-01

    Context. A crucial issue in star formation is understanding the physical mechanism by which mass is accreted onto and ejected by a young star, then collimated into jets. Hydrogen lines are often used to trace mass accretion in young stars, but recent observations suggest that they could instead trace mass outflow in a disk wind. Aims: Obtaining direct constraints on the HI line formation regions is crucial in order to disentangle the different models. We present high angular and spectral resolution observations of the Hα line of the Herbig Ae star AB Aur to probe the origin of this line at sub-AU scales, and to place constraints on the geometry of the emitting region. Methods: We use the visible spectrograph VEGA at the CHARA long-baseline optical array to resolve the AB Aur circumstellar environment from spectrally resolved interferometric measurements across the Hα emission line. We developed a 2D radiative transfer model to fit the emission line profile and the spectro-interferometric observables. The model includes the combination of a Blandford & Payne magneto-centrifugal disk wind and a magnetospheric accretion flow. Results: We measure a visibility decrease within the Hα line, indicating that we clearly resolve the Hα formation region. We derive a Gaussian half width at half maximum between 0.05 and 0.15 AU in the core of the line, which indicates that the bulk of the Hα emission has a size scale intermediate between the disk inner truncation radius and the dusty disk inner rim. A clear asymmetric differential phase signal is found with a minimum of -30° ± 15° towards the core of the line. We show that these observations are in general agreement with predictions from a magneto-centrifugal disk wind arising from the innermost regions of the disk. Better agreement, in particular with the differential phases, is found when a compact magnetospheric accretion flow is included. Conclusions: We resolve the Hα formation region in a young accreting

  9. Wind-driven pyroelectric energy harvesting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Mengying; Zabek, Daniel; Bowen, Chris; Abdelmageed, Mostafa; Arafa, Mustafa

    2016-12-01

    Pyroelectric materials have recently received attention for harvesting waste heat owing to their potential to convert temperature fluctuations into useful electrical energy. One of the main challenges in designing pyroelectric energy harvesters is to provide a means to induce a temporal heat variation in a pyroelectric material autonomously from a steady heat source. To address this issue, we propose a new form of wind-driven pyroelectric energy harvester, in which a propeller is set in rotational motion by an incoming wind stream. The speed of the propeller’s shaft is reduced by a gearbox to drive a slider-crank mechanism, in which a pyroelectric material is placed on the slider. Thermal cycling is obtained as the reciprocating slider moves the pyroelectric material across alternative hot and cold zones created by a stationary heat lamp and ambient temperature, respectively. The open-circuit voltage and closed-circuit current are investigated in the time domain at various wind speeds. The device was experimentally tested under wind speeds ranging from 1.1 to 1.6 m s-1 and charged an external 100 nF capacitor through a signal conditioning circuit to demonstrate its effectiveness for energy harvesting. Unlike conventional wind turbines, the energy harvested by the pyroelectric material is decoupled from the wind flow and no mechanical power is drawn from the transmission; hence the system can operate at low wind speeds (<2 m s-1).

  10. Accretion Disks, Magnetospheres, and Disk Winds as Emitters of the Hydrogen Lines in Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambovtseva, L. V.; Grinin, V. P.; Weigelt, G.; Schertl, D.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Caratti o Garatti, A.; Garcia Lopez, R.

    2017-02-01

    Various disk and outflow components of the circumstellar environment of young Herbig Ae/Be stars may contribute to the hydrogen line emission. These are a magnetosphere, a disk wind, and a gaseous accretion disk. Non-LTE modeling was performed to show the influence of the model parameters on the intensity and the line profiles for each emitting region to present the spatial distribution of the brightness for each component and to compare their contributions to the total line emission. The modeling shows that the disk wind is the dominant contributor to the Brγ and Hα lines rather than the magnetospheric accretion and gaseous accretion disk.

  11. Wind-accretion Disks in Wide Binaries, Second-generation Protoplanetary Disks, and Accretion onto White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Hagai B.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2013-02-01

    Mass transfer from an evolved donor star to its binary companion is a standard feature of stellar evolution in binaries. In wide binaries, the companion star captures some of the mass ejected in a wind by the primary star. The captured material forms an accretion disk. Here, we study the evolution of wind-accretion disks, using a numerical approach which allows us to follow the long-term evolution. For a broad range of initial conditions, we derive the radial density and temperature profiles of the disk. In most cases, wind accretion leads to long-lived stable disks over the lifetime of the asymptotic giant branch donor star. The disks have masses of a few times 10-5-10-3 M ⊙, with surface density and temperature profiles that follow broken power laws. The total mass in the disk scales approximately linearly with the viscosity parameter used. Roughly, 50%-80% of the mass falling into the disk accretes onto the central star; the rest flows out through the outer edge of the disk into the stellar wind of the primary. For systems with large accretion rates, the secondary accretes as much as 0.1 M ⊙. When the secondary is a white dwarf, accretion naturally leads to nova and supernova eruptions. For all types of secondary star, the surface density and temperature profiles of massive disks resemble structures observed in protoplanetary disks, suggesting that coordinated observational programs might improve our understanding of uncertain disk physics.

  12. Accretion disk winds in active galactic nuclei: X-ray observations, models, and feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are often invoked to play a fundamental role in the evolution of both supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the tight SMBH-galaxy relations. A strong support of this ``quasar mode'' feedback came from the recent X-ray observation of a mildly relativistic accretion disk wind in a ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) and its connection with a large-scale molecular outflow, providing a direct link between the SMBH and the gas out of which stars form. Spectroscopic observations, especially in the X-ray band, show that such accretion disk winds may be common in local AGN and quasars. However, their origin and characteristics are still not fully understood. Detailed theoretical models and simulations focused on radiation, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or a combination of these two processes to investigate the possible acceleration mechanisms and the dynamics of these winds. Some of these models have been directly compared to X-ray spectra, providing important insights into the wind physics. However, fundamental improvements on these studies will come only from the unprecedented energy resolution and sensitivity of the upcoming X-ray observatories, namely ASTRO-H (launch date early 2016) and Athena (2028).

  13. RESISTIVITY-DRIVEN STATE CHANGES IN VERTICALLY STRATIFIED ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Jacob B.; Hawley, John F.; Beckwith, Kris

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the effect of shear viscosity, {nu}, and Ohmic resistivity, {eta}, on the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in vertically stratified accretion disks through a series of local simulations with the Athena code. First, we use a series of unstratified simulations to calibrate physical dissipation as a function of resolution and background field strength; the effect of the magnetic Prandtl number, P{sub m} = {nu}/{eta}, on the turbulence is captured by {approx}32 grid zones per disk scale height, H. In agreement with previous results, our stratified disk calculations are characterized by a subthermal, predominately toroidal magnetic field that produces MRI-driven turbulence for |z| {approx}< 2H. Above |z| {approx} 2H, the magnetic pressure dominates and the field is buoyantly unstable. Large-scale radial and toroidal fields are also generated near the mid-plane and subsequently rise through the disk. The polarity of this mean field switches on a roughly 10 orbit period in a process that is well modeled by an {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo. Turbulent stress increases with P{sub m} but with a shallower dependence compared to unstratified simulations. For sufficiently large resistivity, {eta} {approx} c{sub s} H/1000, where c{sub s} is the sound speed, MRI turbulence within 2H of the mid-plane undergoes periods of resistive decay followed by regrowth. This regrowth is caused by amplification of the toroidal field via the dynamo. This process results in large amplitude variability in the stress on 10-100 orbital timescales, which may have relevance for partially ionized disks that are observed to have high- and low-accretion states.

  14. Winds driven by the Saharan heat low

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalu, Giovanni; Baldi, Marina; Gaetani, Marco

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the winds driven by the Saharan heat low (SHL), generated in summer by the sensible heat fluxes over the hot Sahara desert. The SHL is longitudinally as wide as the Sahara desert and seasonally oscillates between 8 degrees north and 25 degrees north, to the west of the Hoggar massif. The SHL is the summer evolution of the West African heat low (WAHL), which is smaller and deeper in winter, and occupies a south-easterly position to the east of the Gulf of Guinea. These lows are important, because they drive the surface and the mid-tropospheric winds. In the mixed layer above the surface, the desert winds have a cyclonic curvature up to 1.5 km in winter and up to 2.5 km in summer. In the free troposphere above the mixed layer, the winds are more intense with a small anticyclonic curvature. The dry north-easterly surface winds to the north of the desert low are known as Harmattan; while the south-westerly surface winds to the south of the desert low carry moisture from the Tropical Atlantic. This moist air converges towards the thermal heat low, where it rises up to the mid-troposphere, and, subsiding to the north of the heat low, generates the Libyan anticyclone. To the south of the desert low, the tropospheric winds are characterized by a strong easterly jet, known as African easterly jet, and it is important for the sub-Sahara region, because it acts as waveguide for the easterly weather perturbations, which bring the rainfall to the Sahel. In addition, about half of the hurricanes, which cross the Tropical Atlantic, are generated by these perturbations.

  15. Wind tunnel measurements of wake structure and wind farm power for actuator disk model wind turbines in yaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Michael; Bossuyt, Juliaan; Kang, Justin; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    Reducing wake losses in wind farms by deflecting the wakes through turbine yawing has been shown to be a feasible wind farm control approach. In this work, the deflection and morphology of wakes behind a wind turbine operating in yawed conditions are studied using wind tunnel experiments of a wind turbine modeled as a porous disk in a uniform inflow. First, by measuring velocity distributions at various downstream positions and comparing with prior studies, we confirm that the nonrotating wind turbine model in yaw generates realistic wake deflections. Second, we characterize the wake shape and make observations of what is termed a "curled wake," displaying significant spanwise asymmetry. Through the use of a 100 porous disk micro-wind farm, total wind farm power output is studied for a variety of yaw configurations. Strain gages on the tower of the porous disk models are used to measure the thrust force as a substitute for turbine power. The frequency response of these measurements goes up to the natural frequency of the model and allows studying the spatiotemporal characteristics of the power output under the effects of yawing. This work has been funded by the National Science Foundation (Grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project). JB and JM are supported by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, Grant No. 306471).

  16. Analytic Theory of Wind-Driven Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. E.

    2016-12-01

    Wind-driven sea is characterized by the spatial energy spectrum E(k), k - is a wave vector. The spectrum has a sharp maximum at k ≈ kp is defined by the wind velocity U and by the "wave-age" - degree of the sea development. For the"well developed sea" kp ≈ g/U2. For a typical value of U ≈ 15 m/sec (moderate gale) λp = 2π/kp≈ 100m. The minimalscale λcap < 10-3m, thus λp/λcap ≈ 105. Obviously, the wind-driven sea needs its statistical description. The wholek-space can be separated in two main regions:1. Energy-capacitive region λp > λ > λcrit, λcrit ≈ 10-2λp. This range of scales contains more then 90% of wave energy. Wave dissipation in this range is negligibly small.2. Region of energy dissipation λ < λcrit. This region contains no more than 10% of wave energy but provides dissipation of all wave energy.If the wind velocity is smooth U < 5m/sec, the sea is also smooth and the dissipation is provided by transformation of gravity waves to capillary waves. For strong winds the dissipation is realized due to wave breaking. In this case one can observe the range of scales 5•10-2m < λ < λcrit which can be called " the Phillips sea". The main message of this lecture is the following. The most interesting energy-capacitive range of wave scales can be self-consistently discribed by the method of theoretical physics. The statistical description of this part of the wind driven sea is described by the Hasselmann kinetic equation for the energy spectrum. This kinetic equation has a rich family of exact solutions, both stationary and time-dependent. It allows a comfortable and fast numerical simulations. Putting together results of the analytical theory and numerical simulations of waves it is possible to explain a bulk of facts, accumulated by experimentalists for decades.

  17. Reverberation Mapping of Accretion Disk Winds in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangham, S.

    2015-09-01

    Reverberation mapping is commonly used for determining black holes masses in AGN from the delayed response of the Broad Line Region (BLR) to fluctuations in the intensity of the AGN continuum source. However, it can also be an effective tool for investigating the structure and kinematics of the BLR itself. Much prior work has been performed to simulate the transfer functions associated with a range of basic geometries (e.g. Keplerian disks, Hubble-like outflows, etc). One promising model for the BLR is that the emission lines are formed in an equatorial accretion disk wind. Here, we predict the reverberation signatures expected from such a model, by modifying the radiative transfer and ionisation code Python that has previously been used to model broad absorption line quasars. This allows to account self-consistently for ionization and radiative transfer effects in the predicted BLR response, which are normally ignored in such calculations. We discuss the agreement between our results and prior work and consider the possibility of detecting the signature of rotating equatorial disk winds in observations obtained by velocity-resolved reverberation mapping campaigns.

  18. Ultraviolet eclipse observations of an accretion disk wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drew, J. E.; Mason, K. O.; Cordova, F. A.; Horne, K. D.; Mauche, C. W.; Raymond, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    We present eclipse time series of ultraviolet CIV 1549A and HeII profiles in the spectrum of the nova-like variable UX UMa, obtained using the Goddard High Resolution Spectrometer (GHRS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These data provide important new insights into the origin of these mainly wind-formed lines. Specifically, they show that the shallow line eclipses first discovered in International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations are due to the occultation of superposed narrow absorption features and provide the first clear evidence that the outflows in high-state cataclysmic variables (CV) are rooted in the inner accretion disk.

  19. Integrated Nucleosynthesis in Neutrino Driven Winds

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L F; Woosley, S E; Hoffman, R D

    2010-03-26

    Although they are but a small fraction of the mass ejected in core-collapse supernovae, neutrino-driven winds (NDWs) from nascent proto-neutron stars (PNSs) have the potential to contribute significantly to supernova nucleosynthesis. In previous works, the NDW has been implicated as a possible source of r-process and light p-process isotopes. In this paper we present time-dependent hydrodynamic calculations of nucleosynthesis in the NDW which include accurate weak interaction physics coupled to a full nuclear reaction network. Using two published models of PNS neutrino luminosities, we predict the contribution of the NDW to the integrated nucleosynthetic yield of the entire supernova. For the neutrino luminosity histories considered, no true r-process occurs in the most basic scenario. The wind driven from an older 1.4M{sub {circle_dot}} model for a PNS is moderately neutron-rich at late times however, and produces {sup 87}Rb, {sup 88}Sr, {sup 89}Y, and {sup 90}Zr in near solar proportions relative to oxygen. The wind from a more recently studied 1.27M{sub {circle_dot}} PNS is proton-rich throughout its entire evolution and does not contribute significantly to the abundance of any element. It thus seems very unlikely that the simplest model of the NDW can produce the r-process. At most, it contributes to the production of the N = 50 closed shell elements and some light p-nuclei. In doing so, it may have left a distinctive signature on the abundances in metal poor stars, but the results are sensitive to both uncertain models for the explosion and the masses of the neutron stars involved.

  20. Nonaxisymmetric secular instabilities driven by star/disk coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, James, N.; Toman, Joseph; Durisen, Richard H.; Pickett, Brian K.; Yang, Shelby

    1995-01-01

    We determine conditions for the onset of nonaxisymmetric secular instabilities in polytropes with a wide range of angular momentum distributions using Lagrangian techniques, and then calculate the growth rate of such instabilities when driven by the coupling of the perturbed star to a circumstellar disk. We use Langrangian displacement vectors with azimuthal dependence proportional to exp (im phi), where m is an integer and phi is the azimuthal coordinate. The onset of secular instability in terms of the quantity T/absolute value of W, the ratio of rotational kinetic energy to gravitational potential energy, is affected by both the compressibility and the angular momentum distribution of the polytrope. The largest effects occur when the angular momentum distribution is varied. For polytropic index n = 3/2, the onset of secular instability for the m = 2 mode (the bar mode), as determined by its neutral point, shifts from T/absolute value of W = 0.141 to 0.093, while the m = 5 mode neutral point shifts from T/absolute value of W = 0.088 to 0.031 over the range of angular momentum distributions we consider. The smallest critical T/absolute value of W-values occur for the angular momentum distributions which are the most peaked toward the equator. For the angular momentum distribution of a Maclaurin spheroid, as the polytropic index n is increased from 3/2 to 5/2, the neutral point for m = 2 shifts from T/absolute value of W = 0.141 to 0.144 and the netural point for m = 5 shifts from T/absolute value of W = 0.069 to 0.078. The netural points for m = 2 and 5 for the Maclaurin sequence (n = 0) are 0.137 and 0.0629, respectively. As the angular momentum distribution becomes more peaked toward the equatorial radius of the polytropes, the critical T/absolute value of W-values generally become less sensitive to the compressibility of the polytrope. Star/disk coupling can drive the secular instability in systems where the star is surrounded by a massive disk and, if the

  1. STARBURST-DRIVEN GALACTIC WINDS: FILAMENT FORMATION AND EMISSION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jackie L.; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2009-09-20

    We have performed a series of three-dimensional simulations of the interaction of a supersonic wind with a nonspherical radiative cloud. These simulations are motivated by our recent three-dimensional model of a starburst-driven galactic wind interacting with an inhomogeneous disk, which shows that an optically emitting filament can be formed by the breakup and acceleration of a cloud into a supersonic wind. In this study, we consider the evolution of a cloud with two different geometries (fractal and spherical) and investigate the importance of radiative cooling on the cloud's survival. We have also undertaken a comprehensive resolution study in order to ascertain the effect of the assumed numerical resolution on the results. We find that the ability of the cloud to radiate heat is crucial for its survival, with a radiative cloud experiencing a lower degree of acceleration and having a higher relative Mach number to the flow than in the adiabatic case. This diminishes the destructive effect of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the cloud. While an adiabatic cloud is destroyed over a short period of time, a radiative cloud is broken up via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability into numerous small, dense cloudlets, which are drawn into the flow to form a filamentary structure. The degree of fragmentation is highly dependent on the resolution of the simulation, with the number of cloudlets formed increasing as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is better resolved. Nevertheless, there is a clear qualitative trend, with the filamentary structure still persistent at high resolution. The geometry of the cloud affects the speed at which the cloud fragments; a wind more rapidly breaks up the cloud in regions of least density. A cloud with a more inhomogeneous density distribution fragments faster than a cloud with a more uniform structure (e.g., a sphere). We confirm the mechanism behind the formation of the Halpha emitting filaments found in our global simulations of a

  2. Performance of a wind-profiling LIDAR in the region of wind turbine rotor disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, M.; Rhodes, M. E.; Lundquist, J. K.

    2010-12-01

    As the wind energy sector continues to grow, so does the need for reliable vertical wind profiles for assessing wind turbine performance and diagnosing underperformance issues. In situ instrumentation mounted on meteorological towers can rarely probe the atmosphere at the altitudes of modern turbine rotor disks, up to 200 m above the surface. Remote sensing LIDAR, on the other hand, can quantify winds and turbulence at altitudes throughout the ranges of modern turbine rotor disks (40 m to 200 m above the surface). By measuring the Doppler shift of laser light backscattered by particles in the atmosphere, LIDAR has proven a promising technology for both wind resource assessment and turbine response characterization; to date, however, LIDAR data availability has not been well-quantified. To determine situations of suitable data return rates, we have deployed a Windcube LIDAR, co-located with a Vaisala CL31 ceilometer, as part of the Skywatch Observatory at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Aerosol backscatter, as measured by the ceilometer, and LIDAR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are strongly correlated. Additionally, we find that LIDAR SNR also depends weakly on atmospheric turbulence characteristics and atmospheric relative humidity. This relationship suggests an ability to predict LIDAR performance based on widely available air quality assessments (such as the EPA Air Quality Index), thus providing guidance for useful LIDAR deployments at wind farms to characterize turbine performance. *Acknowledgments: Skywatch Observatory is funded through NSF grant 0837388.

  3. Evidence for Simultaneous Jets and Disk Winds in Luminous Low-mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Jeroen; Neilsen, Joseph; Allen, Jessamyn L.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Fender, Rob; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Schulz, Norbert

    2016-10-01

    Recent work on jets and disk winds in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) suggests that they are to a large extent mutually exclusive, with jets observed in spectrally hard states and disk winds observed in spectrally soft states. In this paper we use existing literature on jets and disk winds in the luminous neutron star (NS) LMXB GX 13+1, in combination with archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data, to show that this source is likely able to produce jets and disk winds simultaneously. We find that jets and disk winds occur in the same location on the source’s track in its X-ray color-color diagram. A further study of literature on other luminous LMXBs reveals that this behavior is more common, with indications for simultaneous jets and disk winds in the black hole LMXBs V404 Cyg and GRS 1915+105 and the NS LMXBs Sco X-1 and Cir X-1. For the three sources for which we have the necessary spectral information, we find that simultaneous jets/winds all occur in their spectrally hardest states. Our findings indicate that in LMXBs with luminosities above a few tens of percent of the Eddington luminosity, jets and disk winds are not mutually exclusive, and the presence of disk winds does not necessarily result in jet suppression.

  4. THE DISK-WIND-JET CONNECTION IN THE BLACK HOLE H 1743-322

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.; King, A. L.; Raymond, J.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R.; Cackett, E. M.; Van der Klis, M.; Steeghs, D. T. H.

    2012-11-01

    X-ray disk winds are detected in spectrally soft, disk-dominated phases of stellar-mass black hole outbursts. In contrast, compact, steady, relativistic jets are detected in spectrally hard states that are dominated by non-thermal X-ray emission. Although these distinctive outflows appear to be almost mutually exclusive, it is possible that a disk wind persists in hard states but cannot be detected via X-ray absorption lines owing to very high ionization. Here, we present an analysis of a deep, 60 ks Chandra/HETGS observation of the black hole candidate H 1743-322 in the low/hard state. The spectrum shows no evidence of a disk wind, with tight limits, and within the range of ionizing flux levels that were measured in prior Chandra observations wherein a wind was clearly detected. In H 1743-322, at least, disk winds are actually diminished in the low/hard state, and disk winds and jets are likely state dependent and anti-correlated. These results suggest that although the launching radii of winds and jets may differ by orders of magnitude, they may both be tied to a fundamental property of the inner accretion flow, such as the mass accretion rate and/or the magnetic field topology of the disk. We discuss these results in the context of disk winds and jets in other stellar-mass black holes, and possible launching mechanisms for black hole outflows.

  5. A HYBRID MAGNETICALLY/THERMALLY DRIVEN WIND IN THE BLACK HOLE GRO J1655-40?

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Joseph; Homan, Jeroen

    2012-05-01

    During its 2005 outburst, GRO J1655-40 was observed twice with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer; the second observation revealed a spectrum rich with ionized absorption lines from elements ranging from O to Ni, indicative of an outflow too dense and too ionized to be driven by radiation or thermal pressure. To date, this spectrum is the only definitive evidence of an ionized wind driven off the accretion disk by magnetic processes in a black hole X-ray binary. Here we present our detailed spectral analysis of the first Chandra observation, nearly three weeks earlier, in which the only signature of the wind is the Fe XXVI absorption line. Comparing the broadband X-ray spectra via photoionization models, we argue that the differences in the Chandra spectra cannot possibly be explained by the changes in the ionizing spectrum, which implies that the properties of the wind cannot be constant throughout the outburst. We explore physical scenarios for the changes in the wind, which we suggest may begin as a hybrid MHD/thermal wind, but evolves over the course of weeks into two distinct outflows with different properties. We discuss the implications of our results for the links between the state of the accretion flow and the presence of transient disk winds.

  6. Runaway of Line-driven Winds toward Critical and Overloaded Solutions.

    PubMed

    Feldmeier; Shlosman

    2000-04-01

    Line-driven winds from hot stars and accretion disks are thought to follow a unique, critical solution that corresponds to a maximum mass-loss rate and a particular velocity law. We show that in the presence of negative velocity gradients, radiative-acoustic (Abbott) waves can drive shallow wind solutions toward larger velocities and mass-loss rates. Perturbations that are introduced downstream from the critical point of the wind lead to a convergence toward the critical solution. By contrast, low-lying perturbations cause evolution toward a mass-overloaded solution, developing a broad deceleration region in the wind. Such a wind differs fundamentally from the critical solution. For sufficiently deep-seated perturbations, overloaded solutions become time-dependent and develop shocks and shells.

  7. The wind of EG Andromedae is not dust driven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Buren, Dave; Dgani, Ruth; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    1994-01-01

    The symbiotic star EG Andromedae has recently been the subject of several studies investigating its wind properties. Late-type giants are usually considered to have winds driven by radiation pressure on dust. Indeed, the derived wind velocity for EG Andromedae is consistent with this model. We point out here that there is no appreciable dust opacity in the wind of EG Andromedae using constraints on extinction limits from International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) and far infrared fluxes from Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). An alternate mechanism must operate in this star. We suggest that the wind can be driven by radiation pressure on molecular lines.

  8. Nonspherical Radiation Driven Wind Models Applied to Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arauxo, F. X.

    1990-11-01

    ABSTRACT. In this work we present a model for the structure of a radiatively driven wind in the meridional plane of a hot star. Rotation effects and simulation of viscous forces were included in the motion equations. The line radiation force is considered with the inclusion of the finite disk correction in self-consistent computations which also contain gravity darkening as well as distortion of the star by rotation. An application to a typical BlV star leads to mass-flux ratios between equator and pole of the order of 10 and mass loss rates in the range 5.l0 to Mo/yr. Our envelope models are flattened towards the equator and the wind terminal velocities in that region are rather high (1000 Km/s). However, in the region near the star the equatorial velocity field is dominated by rotation. RESUMEN. Se presenta un modelo de la estructura de un viento empujado radiativamente en el plano meridional de una estrella caliente. Se incluyeron en las ecuaciones de movimiento los efectos de rotaci6n y la simulaci6n de fuerzas viscosas. Se consider6 la fuerza de las lineas de radiaci6n incluyendo la correcci6n de disco finito en calculos autoconsistentes los cuales incluyen oscurecimiento gravitacional asi como distorsi6n de la estrella por rotaci6n. La aplicaci6n a una estrella tipica BlV lleva a cocientes de flujo de masa entre el ecuador y el polo del orden de 10 de perdida de masa en el intervalo 5.l0 a 10 Mo/ano. Nuestros modelos de envolvente estan achatados hacia el ecuador y las velocidads terminales del viento en esa regi6n son bastante altas (1000 Km/s). Sin embargo, en la regi6n cercana a la estrella el campo de velocidad ecuatorial esta dominado por la rotaci6n. Key words: STARS-BE -- STARS-WINDS

  9. 3-D MHD disk wind simulations of protostellar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid; Tanaka, Kei; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of large scale, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of disk winds for different initial magnetic field configurations. The jets are followed from the source to distances, which are resolvable by HST and ALMA observations. Our simulations show that jets are heated along their length by many shocks. The mass of the protostar is a free parameter that can be inserted in the post processing of the data, and we apply the simulations to both low mass and high mass protostars. For the latter we also compute the expected diagnostics when the outflow is photoionized by the protostar. We compute the emission lines that are produced, and find excellent agreement with observations. For a one solar mass protostar, we find the jet width to be between 20 and 30 au while the maximum velocities perpendicular to the jet are found to be 100 km s-1. The initially less open magnetic field configuration simulations result in a wider, two-component jet; a cylindrically shaped outer jet surrounding a narrow and much faster, inner jet. For the initially most open magnetic field configuration the kink mode creates a narrow corkscrew-like jet without a clear Keplerian rotation profile and even regions where we observe rotation opposite to the disk (counter-rotating). This is not seen in the less open field configurations.

  10. ON THE PROPERTIES OF THERMAL DISK WINDS IN X-RAY TRANSIENT SOURCES: A CASE STUDY OF GRO J1655-40

    SciTech Connect

    Luketic, S.; Proga, D.; Kallman, T. R.; Raymond, J. C.; Miller, J. M. E-mail: dproga@physics.unlv.ed

    2010-08-10

    We present the results of hydrodynamical simulations of the disk photosphere irradiated by strong X-rays produced in the innermost part of the disk of an accreting black hole. As expected, the irradiation heats the photosphere and drives a thermal wind. To apply our results to the well-studied X-ray transient source GRO J1655-40, we adopted the observed mass of its black hole and the observed properties of its X-ray radiation. To compare the results with the observations, we also computed transmitted X-ray spectra based on the wind solution. Our main finding is that the density of the fast-moving part of the wind is more than 1 order of magnitude lower than that inferred from the observations. Consequently, the model fails to predict spectra with line absorption as strong and as blueshifted as those observed. However, despite the thermal wind being weak and Compton thin, the ratio between the mass-loss rate and the mass-accretion rate is about seven. This high ratio is insensitive to the accretion luminosity, in the limit of lower luminosities. Most of the mass is lost from the disk between 0.07 and 0.2 of the Compton radius. We discovered that beyond this range the wind solution is self-similar. In particular, soon after it leaves the disk, the wind flows at a constant angle with respect to the disk. Overall, the thermal winds generated in our comprehensive simulations do not match the wind spectra observed in GRO J1655-40. This supports the conclusion of Miller et al. and Kallman et al. that the wind in GRO J1655-40, and possibly in other X-ray transients, may be driven by magnetic processes. This in turn implies that the disk wind carries even more material than our simulations predict and as such has a very significant impact on the accretion disk structure and dynamics.

  11. The Kinematics of Quasar Broad Emission Line Regions Using a Disk-Wind Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Suk Yee; Webster, Rachel L.; King, Anthea L.; Bate, Nicholas F.; O'Dowd, Matthew J.; Labrie, Kathleen

    2017-09-01

    The structure and kinematics of the broad line region in quasars are still unknown. One popular model is the disk-wind model that offers a geometric unification of a quasar based on the viewing angle. We construct a simple kinematical disk-wind model with a narrow outflowing wind angle. The model is combined with radiative transfer in the Sobolev, or high velocity, limit. We examine how angle of viewing affects the observed characteristics of the emission line. The line profiles were found to exhibit distinct properties depending on the orientation, wind opening angle, and region of the wind where the emission arises.

  12. Numerical experiments in galactic disks: Gravitational instability, stochastic accretion, and galactic winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, John C.

    Using 0D, 1D, and 3D models of galaxies, I explore different problems in galaxy evolution most suited to each technique. In the simplest case, a galaxy is described by a few numbers integrated via coupled ordinary differential equations. By allowing the galaxies to respond to a stochastic accretion rate, I show a natural way of generating the finite scatter observed in several galaxy scaling relations: the correlation between a galaxy's stellar mass and its star formation rate or metallicity. By comparing this simple model to observations, we constrain the process by which gas accretes onto galaxies, which must occur, but is essentially impossible to observe directly. Adding an additional dimension to the models, we explore the structure of galactic disks as a function of radius. We find that turbulence driven by gravitational instability in the disks and the resulting migration of gas can explain a wide variety of phenomena, including the age-velocity dispersion correlation of stars in the solar neighborhood, the central quenching star formation in disk galaxies, rings of star formation, and the observed radial profile of gas column densities. Finally, we run a set of fully three-dimensional galaxy simulations to try to understand what physics is responsible for basic properties of galaxies, including the rate at which they form stars, and the rate at which they eject mass in large-scale winds. We find that supernovae are capable of driving moderate metal-enhanced winds, but surprisingly they have very little effect on the star formation rates of dwarf galaxies. Instead, ordinary photoelectric heating dominates the star formation law in low-mass galaxies.

  13. Tracking the Disk Wind Behavior of MAXI J1305-704

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Kimberly Poppy; Miller, Jon M.

    2017-01-01

    There is still much to be understood about black hole accretion disks and their relationship to black hole disk winds. In an attempt to better understand these relationships, we have analyzed the x-ray transient black hole binary MAXI J1305-704 during its outburst in 2012 in order to draw conclusions about the parameters of its disk. The source showed strong absorption signs, as detected by Chandra, on April 21, 2012. From this date on, we analyzed SWIFT observations of the source, using XSPEC from HEASOFT, in order to find strong signals of absorption. By modeling 67 successive observations over the period of 74 days, we were able to closely track the evolution of various disk properties, from inner disk temperature, to power law index, to column density. We could also analyze various parameter relationships in order to determine if there is a statistically significant correlation between any of the properties of a disk. We found that there are strong linear relationships between disk temperature & ionization, photon index & disk temperature, and photon index & ionization. These relationships seem to imply that the corona, in addition to the disk, may be driving the wind properties. Additionally, the counterintuitive relationship between disk temperature and ionization, where disk temperature increases as ionization decreases, seems to imply that there are mechanisms at play in the disk system that are not yet fully understood.

  14. Reconnection-driven oscillations in dwarf nova disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tajima, T.; Gilden, D.

    1987-01-01

    A class of oscillations observed during eruption of dwarf novae has been interpreted as oscillations of the accretion disks in these systems.These oscillations are quasi-periodic with coherence times typically between three and 15 cycles. It is shown that magnetic field reconnection at high magnetic Reynolds number can drive disk oscillations. The expected stochastic geometry of disk magnetic fields could naturally produce the observed phase incoherency.

  15. No Disk Winds in Failed Black Hole Outbursts? New Observations of H1743-322

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Joseph; Coriat, Mickael; Motta, Sara; Fender, Rob P.; Ponti, Gabriele; Corbel, Stephane

    2016-04-01

    The rich and complex physics of stellar-mass black holes in outburst is often referred to as the "disk-jet connection," a term that encapsulates the evolution of accretion disks over several orders of magnitude in Eddington ratio; through Compton scattering, reflection, and thermal emission; as they produce steady compact jets, relativistic plasma ejections, and (from high spectral resolution revelations of the last 15 years) massive, ionized disk winds. It is well established that steady jets are associated with radiatively inefficient X-ray states, and that winds tend to appear during states with more luminous disks, but the underlying physical processes that govern these connections (and their changes during state transitions) are not fully understood. I will present a unique perspective on the disk-wind-jet connection based on new Chandra HETGS, NuSTAR, and JVLA observations of the black hole H1743-322. Rather than following the usual outburst track, the 2015 outburst of H1743 fizzled: the disk never appeared in X-rays, and the source remained spectrally hard for the entire ~100 days. Remarkably, we find no evidence for any accretion disk wind in our data, even though H1743-322 has produced winds at comparable hard X-ray luminosities. I will discuss the implications of this "failed outburst" for our picture of winds from black holes and the astrophysics that governs them.

  16. New Insights into Radiation Line-Driven Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cidale, L.; Venero, R. O. J.; Curé, M.; Haucke, M.

    2017-02-01

    The classical theory of radiatively driven stellar winds reproduces the observed stellar wind conditions (mass loss and terminal velocity) of massive supergiants fairly well. However, some differences are still found between the wind parameters predicted by theory and those observed in mid-B, late-B, and A-type supergiants. Inclusion of rotation in the models brought a remarkable progress in the development of the theory of stellar winds. Three types of stationary wind regimes are currently known: the classical fast solution, the Ω-slow solution that arises for fast rotators, and the δ-slow solution that takes place in highly ionized winds. We show synthetic line profiles and discuss all the hydrodynamical solutions in the context of the observed wind properties of B and B[e] supergiants. We also discuss the variability of spectral lines formed in the wind of B-supergiants.

  17. Protoplanetary Disk Heating and Evolution Driven by Spiral Density Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-11-01

    Scattered light imaging of protoplanetary disks often reveals prominent spiral arms, likely excited by massive planets or stellar companions. Assuming that these arms are density waves, evolving into spiral shocks, we assess their effect on the thermodynamics, accretion, and global evolution of the disk. We derive analytical expressions for the direct (irreversible) heating, angular momentum transport, and mass accretion rate induced by disk shocks of arbitrary amplitude. These processes are very sensitive to the shock strength. We show that waves of moderate strength (density jump at the shock ΔΣ/Σ ∼ 1) result in negligible disk heating (contributing at the ∼1% level to the energy budget) in passive, irradiated protoplanetary disks on ∼100 au scales, but become important within several au. However, shock heating is a significant (or even dominant) energy source in disks of cataclysmic variables, stellar X-ray binaries, and supermassive black hole binaries, heated mainly by viscous dissipation. Mass accretion induced by the spiral shocks is comparable to (or exceeds) the mass inflow due to viscous stresses. Protoplanetary disks featuring prominent global spirals must be evolving rapidly, in ≲0.5 Myr at ∼100 au. A direct upper limit on the evolution timescale can be established by measuring the gravitational torque due to the spiral arms from the imaging data. We find that, regardless of their origin, global spiral waves must be important agents of the protoplanetary disk evolution. They may serve as an effective mechanism of disk dispersal and could be related to the phenomenon of transitional disks.

  18. Mechanics of interrill erosion with wind-driven rain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The vector physics of wind-driven rain (WDR) differs from that of wind-free rain, and the interrill soil detachment equations in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model were not originally developed to deal with this phenomenon. This article provides an evaluation of the performance of the...

  19. Mechanics of Interrill Erosion with Wind-Driven Rain (WDR)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This article provides an evaluation analysis for the performance of the interrill component of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model for Wind-Driven Rain (WDR) events. The interrill delivery rates (Di) were collected in the wind tunnel rainfall simulator facility of the International Cen...

  20. LES of wind farm response to transient scenarios using a high fidelity actuator disk model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, M.; Duponcheel, M.; Winckelmans, G.; Chatelain, P.

    2016-09-01

    Large eddy simulations coupled to Actuator Disks are used to investigate wake effects in wind farms. An effort is made on the wind turbine model: it uses the prevailing velocities at each point of the disk to estimate the aerodynamic loads and is improved using a tip-loss correction and realistic control schemes. This accurate and efficient tool is used to study the wind farm response in terms of flow and power production during an unsteady scenario: this work focuses on an emergency shutdown of one rotor inside a wind farm.

  1. Rupture-disk-less shock-tube with compression tube driven by free piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, T.; Ogura, E.; Sato, S.; Funabiki, K.

    A new technique is proposed for a shock tube driven by a freely moving piston. In a conventional free-piston-driven shock tube, a rupture disk is employed between the compression tube and the shock generation tube. In the present method, however, the conventional rupture disk is replaced by a newly developed fast action valve which is activated by the compressed gas generated in the compression tube. The present method enables us to generate high Mach number shock waves of arbitrary strength with good reproducibility. The performance of the new method is demonstrated experimentally. This also enables us to be carefree to scattering of fragments of the rupture disk.

  2. The Behavior of Accretion Disks in Low Mass X-ray Binaries: Disk Winds and Alpha Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayless, Amanda J.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation presents research on two low mass X-ray binaries. The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822-371 is the prototypical accretion disk corona (ADC) system. We have obtained new time-resolved UV spectroscopy with the ACS/SBC on the Hubble Space Telescope and new V- and J-band photometry with the 1.3-m SMARTS telescope at CTIO. We show that the accretion disk in the system has a strong wind with projected velocities up to 4000 km/s as determined from the Doppler width of the C IV emission line. The broad and shallow eclipse indicates that the disk has a vertically-extended, optically-thick component at optical wavelengths. This component extends almost to the edge of the disk and has a height equal to 50% of the disk radius. As it has a low brightness temperature, we identify it as the optically-thick base of the disk wind. V1408 Aql (=4U 1957+115) is a low mass X-ray binary which continues to be a black hole candidate. We have new photometric data of this system from the Otto Struve 2.1-m telescope's high speed CCD photometer at McDonald Observatory. The light curve is largely sinusoidal which we model with two components: a constant light source from the disk and a sinusoidal modulation at the orbital period from the irradiated face of the companion star. This is a radical re-interpretation of the orbital light curve. We do not require a large or asymmetric disk rim to account for the modulation in the light curve. Thus, the orbital inclination is unconstrained in our new model, removing the foundation for any claims of the compact object being a black hole.

  3. Studying Wake Deflection of Wind Turbines in Yaw using Drag Disk Experiments and Actuator Disk Modeling in LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Michael; Bossuyt, Juliaan; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    Recently, there has been a push towards the optimization in the power output of entire large wind farms through the control of individual turbines, as opposed to operating each turbine in a maximum power point tracking manner. In this vane, the wake deflection by wind turbines in yawed conditions has generated considerable interest in recent years. In order to effectively study the wake deflection according to classical actuator disk momentum theory, a 3D printed drag disk model with a coefficient of thrust of approximately 0.75 - 0.85 and a diameter of 3 cm is used, studied under uniform inflow in a wind tunnel with test section of 1 m by 1.3 m, operating with a negligible inlet turbulence level at an inflow velocity of 10 m/s. Mean velocity profile measurements are performed using Pitot probes. Different yaw angles are considered, including 10, 20, and 30 degrees. We confirm earlier results that (e.g.) a 30 degree yaw angle deflects the center of the wake around 1/2 of a rotor diameter when it impinges on a downstream turbine. Detailed comparisons between the experiments and Large Eddy Simulations using actuator disk model for the wind turbines are carried out in order to help validate the CFD model. Work supported by NSF (grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project) and by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no. 306471).

  4. Radiation-driven Warping of Circumbinary Disks around Eccentric Young Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Sohn, Bong Won; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Jung, Taehyun; Zhao, Guangyao; Naito, Tsuguya

    2014-12-01

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating, circumbinary disk around young binary stars on an eccentric orbit. Such a disk is subject to both the tidal torques due to a time-dependent binary potential and the radiative torques due to radiation emitted from each star. The tilt angle between the circumbinary disk plane and the binary orbital plane is assumed to be very small. We find that there is a radius within/beyond which the circumbinary disk is unstable to radiation-driven warping, depending on the disk density and temperature gradient indices. This marginally stable warping radius is very sensitive to viscosity parameters, a fiducial disk radius and the temperature measured there, the stellar luminosity, and the disk surface density at a radius where the disk changes from optically thick to thin for the irradiation from the central stars. On the other hand, it is insensitive to the orbital eccentricity and binary irradiation parameter, which is a function of the binary mass ratio and luminosity of each star. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping in the inner part of the circumbinary disk, the disk starts to be warped in the outer part. While the circumbinary disks are most likely to be subject to the radiation-driven warping on an AU to kilo-AU scale for binaries with young massive stars more luminous than 104 L ⊙, the radiation-driven warping does not work for those around young binaries with the luminosity comparable to the solar luminosity.

  5. Radiation-driven warping of circumbinary disks around eccentric young star binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Sohn, Bong Won; Jung, Taehyun; Zhao, Guangyao; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Naito, Tsuguya

    2014-12-10

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating, circumbinary disk around young binary stars on an eccentric orbit. Such a disk is subject to both the tidal torques due to a time-dependent binary potential and the radiative torques due to radiation emitted from each star. The tilt angle between the circumbinary disk plane and the binary orbital plane is assumed to be very small. We find that there is a radius within/beyond which the circumbinary disk is unstable to radiation-driven warping, depending on the disk density and temperature gradient indices. This marginally stable warping radius is very sensitive to viscosity parameters, a fiducial disk radius and the temperature measured there, the stellar luminosity, and the disk surface density at a radius where the disk changes from optically thick to thin for the irradiation from the central stars. On the other hand, it is insensitive to the orbital eccentricity and binary irradiation parameter, which is a function of the binary mass ratio and luminosity of each star. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping in the inner part of the circumbinary disk, the disk starts to be warped in the outer part. While the circumbinary disks are most likely to be subject to the radiation-driven warping on an AU to kilo-AU scale for binaries with young massive stars more luminous than 10{sup 4} L {sub ☉}, the radiation-driven warping does not work for those around young binaries with the luminosity comparable to the solar luminosity.

  6. Nucleosynthesis in Early Neutrino Driven Winds

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R; Fisker, J; Pruet, J; Woosley, S; Janka, H; Buras, R

    2008-01-09

    Two recent issues related to nucleosynthesis in early proton-rich neutrino winds are investigated. In the first part we investigate the effect of nuclear physics uncertainties on the synthesis of {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. Based on recent experimental results, we find that the proton rich winds of the model investigated here can not be the only source of the solar abundance of {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. In the second part we investigate the nucleosynthesis from neutron rich bubbles and show that they do not contribute to the nucleosynthesis integrated over both neutron and proton-rich bubbles and proton-rich winds.

  7. Nucleosynthesis in Early Neutrino Driven Winds

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R. D.; Fisker, J. L.; Pruet, J.; Woosley, S. E.; Janka, H.-T.; Buras, R.

    2008-04-17

    Two recent issues realted to nucleosynthesis in early proton-rich neutrino winds are investigated. In the first part we investigate the effect of nuclear physics uncertainties on the synthesis of {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. Based on recent experimental results, we find that the proton rich winds of the model investigated here can not be the only source of the solar abundance of {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. In the second part we investigate the nucleosynthesis from neutron rich bubbles and show that they do not contribute to the nucleosynthesis integrated over both neutron and proton-rich bubbles and proton-rich winds.

  8. Radiation Driven Wind Solutions and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curé, M.

    2016-11-01

    The standard modified-CAK equation of motion is a non-linear differential equation that possesses many singular points and therefore many solutions. Apart from the standard solution, we have found three other physical solutions: i) when the rotational velocity is higher than 3/4 of the critical rotational speed; ii) when there is a high ionization change throughout the wind; and iii) when the k line force parameter is very high (k is the fraction of the total stellar flux which would be blocked in the photosphere if all lines were optically thick). We also show some applications of these solutions, e.g., the wind of a B[e] supergiant, the oblate wind of a Be star, and the winds of BA supergiants. Furthermore, we calculate synthetic spectra with FASTWIND, where we have used our new hydrodynamical solutions as input to the code.

  9. The ALMA view of the protostellar system HH212. The wind, the cavity, and the disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codella, C.; Cabrit, S.; Gueth, F.; Podio, L.; Leurini, S.; Bachiller, R.; Gusdorf, A.; Lefloch, B.; Nisini, B.; Tafalla, M.; Yvart, W.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Because it is viewed simply edge-on, the HH212 protostellar system is an ideal laboratory for studying the interplay of infall, outflow, and rotation in the earliest stages of low-mass star formation. Aims: We wish to exploit the unmatched combination of high angular resolution, high sensitivity, high-imaging fidelity, and spectral coverage provided by ALMA to shed light on the complex kinematics of the innermost central regions of HH212. Methods: We mapped the inner 10″ (4500 AU) of the HH212 system at ≃0.5″ resolution in several molecular tracers and in the 850 μm dust continuum using the ALMA interferometer in band 7 in the extended configuration of the Early Science Cycle 0 operations. Results: Within a single ALMA spectral set-up, we simultaneously identify all the crucial ingredients known to be involved in the star formation recipe: (i) the fast, collimated bipolar SiO jet driven by the protostar; (ii) the large-scale swept-up CO outflow; (iii) the flattened rotating and infalling envelope, with bipolar cavities carved by the outflow (in C17O(3-2)); and (iv) a rotating wide-angle flow that fills the cavities and surrounds the axial jet (in C34S(7-6)). In addition, the compact high-velocity C17O emission (±1.9-3.5 km s-1 from systemic) shows a velocity gradient along the equatorial plane consistent with a rotating disk of ≃0farcs2 = 90 AU around a ≃0.3 ± 0.1 M⊙ source. The rotating disk is possibly Keplerian. Conclusions: HH212 is the third Class 0 protostar with possible signatures of a Keplerian disk of radius ≥30 AU. The warped geometry in our CS data suggests that this large Keplerian disk might result from misaligned magnetic and rotation axes during the collapse phase. The wide-angle CS flow suggests that disk winds may be present in this source. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFinal reduced ALMA cubes (FITS) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp

  10. Wind-driven angular momentum loss in binary systems. I - Ballistic case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brookshaw, Leigh; Tavani, Marco

    1993-01-01

    We study numerically the average loss of specific angular momentum from binary systems due to mass outflow from one of the two stars for a variety of initial injection geometries and wind velocities. We present results of ballistic calculations in three dimensions for initial mass ratios q of the mass-losing star to primary star in the range q between 10 exp -5 and 10. We consider injection surfaces close to the Roche lobe equipotential surface of the mass-losing star, and also cases with the mass-losing star underfilling its Roche lobe. We obtain that the orbital period is expected to have a negative time derivative for wind-driven secular evolution of binaries with q greater than about 3 and with the mass-losing star near filling its Roche lobe. We also study the effect of the presence of an absorbing surface approximating an accretion disk on the average final value of the specific angular momentum loss. We find that the effect of an accretion disk is to increase the wind-driven angular momentum loss. Our results are relevant for evolutionary models of high-mass binaries and low-mass X-ray binaries.

  11. Curvature-driven stability of defects in nematic textures over spherical disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiuqing; Yao, Zhenwei

    2017-06-01

    Stabilizing defects in liquid-crystal systems is crucial for many physical processes and applications ranging from functionalizing liquid-crystal textures to recently reported command of chaotic behaviors of active matters. In this work, we perform analytical calculations to study the curvature-driven stability mechanism of defects based on the isotropic nematic disk model that is free of any topological constraint. We show that in a growing spherical disk covering a sphere the accumulation of curvature effect can prevent typical +1 and +1/2 defects from forming boojum textures where the defects are repelled to the boundary of the disk. Our calculations reveal that the movement of the equilibrium position of the +1 defect from the boundary to the center of the spherical disk occurs in a very narrow window of the disk area, exhibiting the first-order phase-transition-like behavior. For the pair of +1/2 defects by splitting a +1 defect, we find the curvature-driven alternating repulsive and attractive interactions between the two defects. With the growth of the spherical disk these two defects tend to approach and finally recombine towards a +1 defect texture. The sensitive response of defects to curvature and the curvature-driven stability mechanism demonstrated in this work in nematic disk systems may have implications towards versatile control and engineering of liquid-crystal textures in various applications.

  12. Wind-driven lateral variability in a partially mixed estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds-Fleming, Janelle V.; Luettich, Richard A.

    2004-07-01

    A circulation study of the upper Neuse River Estuary (NRE) was initiated to characterize the nature of motion in the lateral dimension and to understand the role that this motion may play in the occurrences of warm weather fish kills. Low frequency wind-driven variability in across channel bottom salinity was identified and attributed to variability in the synoptic wind band. Diurnal variability in bottom salinity appeared to be driven by diurnal wind variability, presumably associated with the local sea breeze. In both cases the lateral response of the system was driven predominantly by across channel wind forcing and not by Ekman setup associated with along channel winds. Additional variability at near diurnal periods may have been due to baroclinic seiches. A lateral, barotropic seiche with a period of ˜30 min was also identified. High salinity water was found to be a good marker for low DO water across the estuary. Wind-driven upwelling of low DO/high salinity water and downwelling of high DO/low salinity water was documented and provides a plausible causal mechanism for the death of pelagic fish in the upper NRE.

  13. Disk-Wind Connection during the Heartbeats of GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Miller, J. M.; King, A. L.; Miller, M. C.; Proga, D.; Kallman, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Harrison, F. A.; Kaastra, J.; Raymond, J.; Reynolds, C. S.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W.; Hailey, C. J.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2016-12-01

    Disk and wind signatures are seen in the soft state of Galactic black holes, while the jet is seen in the hard state. Here we study the disk-wind connection in the ρ class of variability in GRS 1915+105 using a joint NuSTAR-Chandra observation. The source shows 50 s limit cycle oscillations. By including new information provided by the reflection spectrum and using phase-resolved spectroscopy, we find that the change in the inner disk inferred from the blackbody emission is not matched by reflection measurements. The latter is almost constant, independent of the continuum model. The two radii are comparable only if the disk temperature color correction factor changes, an effect that could be due to the changing opacity of the disk caused by changes in metal abundances. The disk inclination is similar to that inferred from the jet axis, and oscillates by ˜10°. The simultaneous Chandra data show the presence of two wind components with velocities between 500 and 5000 km s-1, and possibly two more with velocities reaching 20,000 km s-1 (˜0.06 c). The column densities are ˜5 × 1022 cm-2. An upper limit to the wind response time of 2 s is measured, implying a launch radius of <6 × 1010 cm. The changes in wind velocity and absorbed flux require the geometry of the wind to change during the oscillations, constraining the wind to be launched from a distance of 290-1300 r g from the black hole. Both data sets support fundamental model predictions in which a bulge originates in the inner disk and moves outward as the instability progresses.

  14. Disk-Wind Connection During the Heartbeats of GRS 1915+105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Miller, J. M.; King, A. L.; Miller, M. C.; Proga, D.; Kallman, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Harrison, F. A.; Kaastra, J.; Raymond, J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Disk and wind signatures are seen in the soft state of Galactic black holes, while the jet is seen in the hard state. Here we study the disk-wind connection in the Rho class of variability in GRS 1915+105 using a joint NuSTAR-Chandra observation. The source shows 50 s limit cycle oscillations. By including new information provided by the reflection spectrum and using phase-resolved spectroscopy, we find that the change in the inner disk inferred from the blackbody emission is not matched by reflection measurements. The latter is almost constant, independent of the continuum model. The two radii are comparable only if the disk temperature color correction factor changes, an effect that could be due to the changing opacity of the disk caused by changes in metal abundances. The disk inclination is similar to that inferred from the jet axis, and oscillates by approx.10 deg. The simultaneous Chandra data show the presence of two wind components with velocities between 500 and 5000 km s(exp. -1), and possibly two more with velocities reaching 20,000 km s(exp. -1) (approx. 0.06 c). The column densities are approx. 5 × 10(exp. 22) cm(exp. -2). An upper limit to the wind response time of 2 s is measured, implying a launch radius of less than 6 × 10(exp. 10) cm. The changes in wind velocity and absorbed flux require the geometry of the wind to change during the oscillations, constraining the wind to be launched from a distance of 290-1300 r (sub g) from the black hole. Both data sets support fundamental model predictions in which a bulge originates in the inner disk and moves outward as the instability progresses.

  15. Bucket rotor wind-driven generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. H.; Mccracken, H.

    1973-01-01

    As compared with the ordinary propeller type rotor, the bucket rotor is limited in rotational speed since the tip rotor speed can never exceed the wind speed. However, it does not present the blade fatigue problem that the ordinary rotor has, and it perhaps causes less sight pollution. The deflector vanes also provide a venturi passage to capture greater wind flow. The bucket rotors can be strung together end-to-end up to thousands of feet long to produce large amounts of power.

  16. Wind turbine rotor simulation using the actuator disk and actuator line methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzimas, M.; Prospathopoulos, J.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper focuses on wind turbine rotor modeling for loads and wake flow prediction. Two steady-state models based on the actuator disk approach are considered, using either a uniform thrust or a blade element momentum calculation of the wind turbine loads. A third model is based on the unsteady-state actuator line approach. Predictions are compared with measurements in wind tunnel experiments and in atmospheric environment and the capabilities and weaknesses of the different models are addressed.

  17. The Photoionized Disk Wind in MWC 349AOrigin of the photo-ionized wind in MWC349A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Báez-Rubio, A.; Martín-Pintado, J.

    2017-02-01

    Establishing how dense photo-ionized winds around stars are formed is key to understanding which physical mechanisms have an important role in the evolution of their circumstellar disks. In the case of the massive star MWC 349A, the extensive research carried out since the discovery of its hydrogen recombination lines has lead to a profound knowledge of the characteristics of the system formed by its ionized wind and disk. We present a summary of the current knowledge of their kinematics, which suggests that its dense wind is formed by photoevaporation of the circumstellar disk at a distance of ˜ 24 AU from the central star. We briefly discuss the reasons why disk-wind models are favored because of the radius where its launching occurs. Finally, we compare our results with the recent discovery of maser recombination lines toward another B[e] star, MWC 922, by Sanchez Contreras et al. (in prep.). This finding opens new prospects for studying the origin of winds around stars showing the B[e] phenomenon.

  18. Wind Tunnel Testing of Various Disk-Gap-Band Parachutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Mineck, Raymond E.; Keller, Donald F.; Bobskill, Maria V.

    2003-01-01

    Two Disk-Gap-Band model parachute designs were tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The purposes of these tests were to determine the drag and static stability coefficients of these two model parachutes at various subsonic Mach numbers in support of the Mars Exploration Rover mission. The two model parachute designs were designated 1.6 Viking and MPF. These model parachute designs were chosen to investigate the tradeoff between drag and static stability. Each of the parachute designs was tested with models fabricated from MIL-C-7020 Type III or F-111 fabric. The reason for testing model parachutes fabricated with different fabrics was to evaluate the effect of fabric permeability on the drag and static stability coefficients. Several improvements over the Viking-era wind tunnel tests were implemented in the testing procedures and data analyses. Among these improvements were corrections for test fixture drag interference and blockage effects, and use of an improved test fixture for measuring static stability coefficients. The 1.6 Viking model parachutes had drag coefficients from 0.440 to 0.539, while the MPF model parachutes had drag coefficients from 0.363 to 0.428. The 1.6 Viking model parachutes had drag coefficients 18 to 22 percent higher than the MPF model parachute for equivalent fabric materials and test conditions. Model parachutes of the same design tested at the same conditions had drag coefficients approximately 11 to 15 percent higher when manufactured from F-111 fabric as compared to those fabricated from MIL-C-7020 Type III fabric. The lower fabric permeability of the F-111 fabric was the source of this difference. The MPF model parachutes had smaller absolute statically stable trim angles of attack as compared to the 1.6 Viking model parachutes for equivalent fabric materials and test conditions. This was attributed to the MPF model parachutes larger band height to nominal diameter ratio. For both designs, model parachutes

  19. Controlled power transfer from wind driven reluctance generator

    SciTech Connect

    Rahim, Y.H.A.; Al-Sabbagh, A.M.L.

    1997-12-01

    The paper describes the dynamic performance of a wind driven reluctance generator connected to an electric network of large capacity. A controller that makes possible the regular flow of power to the network has been considered. Controller parameters that successfully suppress unwanted mechanical and electrical stresses and overshoots due to wind gust, have been estimated. The performance of the controller has also been examined for short-circuit faults at the terminals of the generators.

  20. Angular Momentum in Disk Wind Revealed in the Young Star MWC 349A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Claus, Brian; Watson, Linda; Moran, James

    2017-03-01

    Disk winds are thought to play a critical role in star birth. As winds extract excess angular momentum from accretion disks, matter in the disk can be transported inward to the star to fuel mass growth. However, observational evidence of wind carrying angular momentum has been very limited. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the young star MWC 349A in the H26α and H30α recombination lines. The high signal-to-noise ratios made possible by the maser emission process allow us to constrain the relative astrometry of the maser spots to milli-arcsecond precision. Previous observations of the H30α line with the SMA and the Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI) showed that masers are distributed in the disk and wind. Our new high-resolution observations of the H26α line reveal differences in spatial distribution from that of the H30α line. H26α line masers in the disk are excited in a thin annulus with a radius of about 25 au, while the H30α line masers are formed in a slightly larger annulus with a radius of 30 au. This is consistent with expectations for maser excitation in the presence of an electron density variation of approximately R ‑4. In addition, the H30α and H26α line masers arise from different parts in the wind. This difference is also expected from maser theory. The wind component of both masers exhibits line-of-sight velocities that closely follow a Keplerian law. This result provides strong evidence that the disk wind extracts significant angular momentum, thereby facilitating mass accretion in the young star.

  1. Temperature fluctuations driven by magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Yang, Chao-Chin E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org E-mail: ccyang@astro.lu.se

    2014-08-10

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives magnetized turbulence in sufficiently ionized regions of protoplanetary disks, leading to mass accretion. The dissipation of the potential energy associated with this accretion determines the thermal structure of accreting regions. Until recently, the heating from the turbulence has only been treated in an azimuthally averaged sense, neglecting local fluctuations. However, magnetized turbulence dissipates its energy intermittently in current sheet structures. We study this intermittent energy dissipation using high resolution numerical models including a treatment of radiative thermal diffusion in an optically thick regime. Our models predict that these turbulent current sheets drive order-unity temperature variations even where the MRI is damped strongly by Ohmic resistivity. This implies that the current sheet structures where energy dissipation occurs must be well-resolved to correctly capture the flow structure in numerical models. Higher resolutions are required to resolve energy dissipation than to resolve the magnetic field strength or accretion stresses. The temperature variations are large enough to have major consequences for mineral formation in disks, including melting chondrules, remelting calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, and annealing silicates; and may drive hysteresis: current sheets in MRI active regions could be significantly more conductive than the remainder of the disk.

  2. Temperature Fluctuations Driven by Magnetorotational Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander; Yang, Chao-Chin; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2014-08-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives magnetized turbulence in sufficiently ionized regions of protoplanetary disks, leading to mass accretion. The dissipation of the potential energy associated with this accretion determines the thermal structure of accreting regions. Until recently, the heating from the turbulence has only been treated in an azimuthally averaged sense, neglecting local fluctuations. However, magnetized turbulence dissipates its energy intermittently in current sheet structures. We study this intermittent energy dissipation using high resolution numerical models including a treatment of radiative thermal diffusion in an optically thick regime. Our models predict that these turbulent current sheets drive order-unity temperature variations even where the MRI is damped strongly by Ohmic resistivity. This implies that the current sheet structures where energy dissipation occurs must be well-resolved to correctly capture the flow structure in numerical models. Higher resolutions are required to resolve energy dissipation than to resolve the magnetic field strength or accretion stresses. The temperature variations are large enough to have major consequences for mineral formation in disks, including melting chondrules, remelting calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, and annealing silicates; and may drive hysteresis: current sheets in MRI active regions could be significantly more conductive than the remainder of the disk.

  3. Toward realistic simulations of magneto-thermal winds from weakly-ionized protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressel, Oliver

    2017-05-01

    Protoplanetary disks (PPDs) accrete onto their central T Tauri star via magnetic stresses. When the effect of ambipolar diffusion (AD) is included, and in the presence of a vertical magnetic field, the disk remains laminar between 1-5 au, and a magnetocentrifugal disk wind forms that provides an important mechanism for removing angular momentum. We present global MHD simulations of PPDs that include Ohmic resistivity and AD, where the time-dependent gas-phase electron and ion fractions are computed under FUV and X-ray ionization with a simplified recombination chemistry. To investigate whether the mass loading of the wind is potentially affected by the limited vertical extent of our existing simulations, we attempt to develop a model of a realistic disk atmosphere. To this end, by accounting for stellar irradiation and diffuse reprocessing of radiation, we aim at improving our models towards more realistic thermodynamic properties.

  4. Superluminous Transients at AGN Centers from Interaction between Black Hole Disk Winds and Broad-line Region Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Tanaka, Masaomi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Ohsuga, Ken

    2017-07-01

    We propose that superluminous transients that appear at central regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) such as CSS100217:102913+404220 (CSS100217) and PS16dtm, which reach near- or super-Eddington luminosities of the central black holes, are powered by the interaction between accretion-disk winds and clouds in broad-line regions (BLRs) surrounding them. If the disk luminosity temporarily increases by, e.g., limit-cycle oscillations, leading to a powerful radiatively driven wind, strong shock waves propagate in the BLR. Because the dense clouds in the AGN BLRs typically have similar densities to those found in SNe IIn, strong radiative shocks emerge and efficiently convert the ejecta kinetic energy to radiation. As a result, transients similar to SNe IIn can be observed at AGN central regions. Since a typical black hole disk-wind velocity is ≃0.1c, where c is the speed of light, the ejecta kinetic energy is expected to be ≃1052 erg when ≃1 M ⊙ is ejected. This kinetic energy is transformed to radiation energy in a timescale for the wind to sweep up a similar mass to itself in the BLR, which is a few hundred days. Therefore, both luminosities (˜1044 erg s-1) and timescales (˜100 days) of the superluminous transients from AGN central regions match those expected in our interaction model. If CSS100217 and PS16dtm are related to the AGN activities triggered by limit-cycle oscillations, they become bright again in coming years or decades.

  5. Using Hydrogen Recombination Masers to Study Disk and Wind Kinematics in MWC 349A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Deanna Lily; Zhang, Qizhou

    2017-06-01

    The kinematics of circumstellar disks and disk winds are poorly understood due to the difficulty of producing well resolved observational data. The bright hydrogen recombination-line maser emission originating from the circumstellar disk of MWC 349A offers a unique opportunity to study the disk at milli-arcsecond precision. Using high angular resolution observations of the maser emission from MWC 349A carried out by the SMA, we were able to produce and analyze rotation curves for the H26α, H30α, and H31α transitions. We found that maser features originating from the disk follow Keplerian motion. Furthermore, the H31α masers in the disk appear to form in a narrow annulus at a fixed radius from the star, consistent with previous studies of the H30α and H26α masers. Based on analysis of the rotation curves for the three maser transitions, we determined that maser transitions for lower quantum numbers occur in the inner and denser regions of the disk than the higher quantum transitions. Additionally, we derived the density distribution within the disk, which follows the relation ne ~ R-4.9 ± 0.6. Finally, we found that a stellar mass of M = 10 ± 3 M⊙ was most consistent with the kinematics of the maser features originating from the Keplerian disk.

  6. CORONAE AND WINDS FROM IRRADIATED DISKS IN X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbottom, Nick; Proga, Daniel E-mail: dproga@physics.unlv.edu

    2015-07-01

    X-ray and UV line emission in X-ray binaries (XRBs) can be accounted for by a hot corona. Such a corona forms through irradiation of the outer disk by radiation produced in the inner accretion flow. The same irradiation can produce a strong outflow from the disk at sufficiently large radii. Outflowing gas has been recently detected in several XRBs via blueshifted absorption lines. However, the causal connection between winds produced by irradiation and the blueshifted absorption lines is problematic, particularly in the case of GRO J1655–40. Observations of this source imply wind densities about two orders of magnitude higher than theoretically predicted. This discrepancy does not mean that these “thermal disk winds” cannot explain blueshifted absorption in other systems, nor that they are unimportant as a sink of matter. Motivated by the inevitability of thermal disk winds and wealth of data taken with current observatories such as Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku, as well as the future AstroH mission, we decided to investigate the requirements to produce very dense winds. Using physical arguments, hydrodynamical simulations, and absorption-line calculations, we found that modification of the heating and cooling rates by a factor of a few results in an increase of the wind density of up to an order of magnitude and the wind velocity by a factor of about two. Therefore, the mass-loss rate from the disk can be one, if not even two, orders of magnitude higher than the accretion rate onto the central object. Such a high mass-loss rate is expected to destabilize the disk and perhaps provides a mechanism for state change.

  7. Coronae and Winds from Irradiated Disks in X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbottom, Nick; Proga, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    X-ray and UV line emission in X-ray binaries (XRBs) can be accounted for by a hot corona. Such a corona forms through irradiation of the outer disk by radiation produced in the inner accretion flow. The same irradiation can produce a strong outflow from the disk at sufficiently large radii. Outflowing gas has been recently detected in several XRBs via blueshifted absorption lines. However, the causal connection between winds produced by irradiation and the blueshifted absorption lines is problematic, particularly in the case of GRO J1655-40. Observations of this source imply wind densities about two orders of magnitude higher than theoretically predicted. This discrepancy does not mean that these “thermal disk winds” cannot explain blueshifted absorption in other systems, nor that they are unimportant as a sink of matter. Motivated by the inevitability of thermal disk winds and wealth of data taken with current observatories such as Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku, as well as the future AstroH mission, we decided to investigate the requirements to produce very dense winds. Using physical arguments, hydrodynamical simulations, and absorption-line calculations, we found that modification of the heating and cooling rates by a factor of a few results in an increase of the wind density of up to an order of magnitude and the wind velocity by a factor of about two. Therefore, the mass-loss rate from the disk can be one, if not even two, orders of magnitude higher than the accretion rate onto the central object. Such a high mass-loss rate is expected to destabilize the disk and perhaps provides a mechanism for state change.

  8. An Overview of Wind-Driven Rovers for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajos, Gregory A.; Jones, Jack A.; Behar, Alberto; Dodd, Micheal

    2005-01-01

    The use of in-situ propulsion is considered enabling technology for long duration planetary surface missions. Most studies have focused on stored energy from chemicals extracted from the soil or the use of soil chemicals to produce photovoltaic arrays. An older form of in-situ propulsion is the use of wind power. Recent studies have shown potential for wind driven craft for exploration of Mars, Titan and Venus. The power of the wind, used for centuries to power wind mills and sailing ships, is now being applied to modern land craft. Efforts are now underway to use the wind to push exploration vehicles on other planets and moons in extended survey missions. Tumbleweed rovers are emerging as a new type of wind-driven science platform concept. Recent investigations by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) indicate that these light-weight, mostly spherical or quasi-spherical devices have potential for long distance surface exploration missions. As a power boat has unique capabilities, but relies on stored energy (fuel) to move the vessel, the Tumbleweed, like the sailing ships of the early explorers on earth, uses an unlimited resource the wind to move around the surface of Mars. This has the potential to reduce the major mass drivers of robotic rovers as well as the power generation and storage systems. Jacques Blamont of JPL and the University of Paris conceived the first documented Mars wind-blown ball in 1977, shortly after the Viking landers discovered that Mars has a thin CO2 atmosphere with relatively strong winds. In 1995, Jack Jones, et al, of JPL conceived of a large wind-blown inflated ball for Mars that could also be driven and steered by means of a motorized mass hanging beneath the rolling axis of the ball. A team at NASA Langley Research Center started a biomimetic Tumbleweed design study in 1998. Wind tunnel and CFD analysis were applied to a variety of concepts to optimize the aerodynamic

  9. Radiation-driven winds of hot stars. V - Wind models for central stars of planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauldrach, A.; Puls, J.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Mendez, R. H.; Heap, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    Wind models using the recent improvements of radiation driven wind theory by Pauldrach et al. (1986) and Pauldrach (1987) are presented for central stars of planetary nebulae. The models are computed along evolutionary tracks evolving with different stellar mass from the Asymptotic Giant Branch. We show that the calculated terminal wind velocities are in agreement with the observations and allow in principle an independent determination of stellar masses and radii. The computed mass-loss rates are in qualitative agreement with the occurrence of spectroscopic stellar wind features as a function of stellar effective temperature and gravity.

  10. Radiation-driven winds of hot stars. V - Wind models for central stars of planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauldrach, A.; Puls, J.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Mendez, R. H.; Heap, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    Wind models using the recent improvements of radiation driven wind theory by Pauldrach et al. (1986) and Pauldrach (1987) are presented for central stars of planetary nebulae. The models are computed along evolutionary tracks evolving with different stellar mass from the Asymptotic Giant Branch. We show that the calculated terminal wind velocities are in agreement with the observations and allow in principle an independent determination of stellar masses and radii. The computed mass-loss rates are in qualitative agreement with the occurrence of spectroscopic stellar wind features as a function of stellar effective temperature and gravity.

  11. COUNTERROTATION IN MAGNETOCENTRIFUGALLY DRIVEN JETS AND OTHER WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Sauty, C.; Cayatte, V.; Lima, J. J. G.; Matsakos, T.; Tsinganos, K.

    2012-11-01

    Rotation measurement in jets from T Tauri stars is a rather difficult task. Some jets seem to be rotating in a direction opposite to that of the underlying disk, although it is not yet clear if this affects the totality or part of the outflows. On the other hand, Ulysses data also suggest that the solar wind may rotate in two opposite ways between the northern and southern hemispheres. We show that this result is not as surprising as it may seem and that it emerges naturally from the ideal MHD equations. Specifically, counterrotating jets neither contradict the magnetocentrifugal driving of the flow nor prevent extraction of angular momentum from the disk. The demonstration of this result is shown by combining the ideal MHD equations for steady axisymmetric flows. Provided that the jet is decelerated below some given threshold beyond the Alfven surface, the flow will change its direction of rotation locally or globally. Counterrotation is also possible for only some layers of the outflow at specific altitudes along the jet axis. We conclude that the counterrotation of winds or jets with respect to the source, star or disk, is not in contradiction with the magnetocentrifugal driving paradigm. This phenomenon may affect part of the outflow, either in one hemisphere, or only in some of the outflow layers. From a time-dependent simulation, we illustrate this effect and show that it may not be permanent.

  12. The dynamics of radiation-driven, optically thick winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Rong-Feng; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-06-01

    Recent observation of some luminous transient sources with low colour temperatures suggests that the emission is dominated by optically thick winds driven by super-Eddington accretion. We present a general analytical theory of the dynamics of radiation pressure-driven, optically thick winds. Unlike the classical adiabatic stellar wind solution whose dynamics are solely determined by the sonic radius, here the loss of the radiation pressure due to photon diffusion also plays an important role. We identify two high mass-loss rate regimes (dot{M} > L_Edd/c^2). In the large total luminosity regime, the solution resembles an adiabatic wind solution. Both the radiative luminosity, L, and the kinetic luminosity, Lk, are super-Eddington with L < Lk and L ∝ L_k^{1/3}. In the lower total luminosity regime, most of the energy is carried out by the radiation with Lk < L ≈ LEdd. In a third, low mass-loss regime (dot{M} < L_Edd/c^2), the wind becomes optically thin early on and, unless gas pressure is important at this stage, the solution is very different from the adiabatic one. The results are independent from the energy generation mechanism at the foot of the wind; therefore, they are applicable to a wide range of mass ejection systems, from black hole accretion, to planetary nebulae, and to classical novae.

  13. Magnetocentrifugally driven flows from young stars and disks. 3: Numerical solution of the sub-Alfvenic region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Najita, Joan R.; Shu, Frank H.

    1994-01-01

    We construct steady, axisymmetric, numerical models of the sub-Alfvenic regions of cool winds driven by the X-celerator mechanism. We find that smooth acceleration to speeds of the order of the escape speed accompanied by substantial collimation of the flow can be achieved within the Alfven surface, located characteristically at several stellar radii. We apply the nondimensional results to winds which emerge from the equator of magnetized YSOs rotating at breakup and from circumstellar disks interacting with the magnetospheres of slowly rotating T Tauri stars. Stellar magnetic fields of kilogauss strength can drive wind mass-loss rates of 10(exp -6) solar mass/year from rapidly accreting YSOs and 10(exp -8) solar mass/year from slowly accreting T Tauri stars. The X-celerator mechanism can accelerate winds from these systems to velocities of hundreds of km/sec within a few stellar radii in the case of embedded YSOs and approximately 10 stellar radii in the case of T Tauri stars.

  14. CFD and Experimental Studies on Wind Turbines in Complex Terrain by Improved Actuator Disk Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Yan, Shu; Mu, Yanfei; Chen, Xinming; Shi, Shaoping

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, an onshore wind farm in mountainous area of southwest China was investigated through numerical and experimental methods. An improved actuator disk method, taking rotor data (i.e. blade geometry information, attack angle, blade pitch angle) into account, was carried out to investigate the flow characteristic of the wind farm, especially the wake developing behind the wind turbines. Comparing to the classic AD method and the situ measurements, the improved AD shows better agreements with the measurements. The turbine power was automatically predicted in CFD by blade element method, which agreed well with the measurement results. The study proved that the steady CFD simulation with improved actuator disk method was able to evaluate wind resource well and give good balance between computing efficiency and accuracy, in contrary to much more expensive computation methods such as actuator-line/actuator-surface transient model, or less accurate methods such as linear velocity reduction wake model.

  15. Signatures of MRI-driven Turbulence in Protoplanetary Disks: Predictions for ALMA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob B.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Bai, Xue-Ning; Armitage, Philip J.

    2015-08-01

    Spatially resolved observations of molecular line emission have the potential to yield unique constraints on the nature of turbulence within protoplanetary disks. Using a combination of local non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations and radiative transfer calculations, tailored to properties of the disk around HD 163296, we assess the ability of ALMA to detect turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Our local simulations show that the MRI produces small-scale turbulent velocity fluctuations that increase in strength with height above the mid-plane. For a set of simulations at different disk radii, we fit a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution to the turbulent velocity and construct a turbulent broadening parameter as a function of radius and height. We input this broadening into radiative transfer calculations to quantify observational signatures of MRI-driven disk turbulence. We find that the ratio of the peak line flux to the flux at line center is a robust diagnostic of turbulence that is only mildly degenerate with systematic uncertainties in disk temperature. For the CO(3-2) line, which we expect to probe the most magnetically active slice of the disk column, variations in the predicted peak-to-trough ratio between our most and least turbulent models span a range of approximately 15%. Additional independent constraints can be derived from the morphology of spatially resolved line profiles, and we estimate the resolution required to detect turbulence on different spatial scales. We discuss the role of lower optical depth molecular tracers, which trace regions closer to the disk mid-plane where velocities in MRI-driven models are systematically lower.

  16. SIGNATURES OF MRI-DRIVEN TURBULENCE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: PREDICTIONS FOR ALMA OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Jacob B.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Bai, Xue-Ning; Armitage, Philip J.

    2015-08-01

    Spatially resolved observations of molecular line emission have the potential to yield unique constraints on the nature of turbulence within protoplanetary disks. Using a combination of local non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations and radiative transfer calculations, tailored to properties of the disk around HD 163296, we assess the ability of ALMA to detect turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Our local simulations show that the MRI produces small-scale turbulent velocity fluctuations that increase in strength with height above the mid-plane. For a set of simulations at different disk radii, we fit a Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution to the turbulent velocity and construct a turbulent broadening parameter as a function of radius and height. We input this broadening into radiative transfer calculations to quantify observational signatures of MRI-driven disk turbulence. We find that the ratio of the peak line flux to the flux at line center is a robust diagnostic of turbulence that is only mildly degenerate with systematic uncertainties in disk temperature. For the CO(3–2) line, which we expect to probe the most magnetically active slice of the disk column, variations in the predicted peak-to-trough ratio between our most and least turbulent models span a range of approximately 15%. Additional independent constraints can be derived from the morphology of spatially resolved line profiles, and we estimate the resolution required to detect turbulence on different spatial scales. We discuss the role of lower optical depth molecular tracers, which trace regions closer to the disk mid-plane where velocities in MRI-driven models are systematically lower.

  17. Magnetocentrifugally driven flows from young stars and disks. 1: A generalized model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank; Najita, Joan; Ostriker, Eve; Wilkin, Frank; Ruden, Steven; Lizano, Susana

    1994-01-01

    We propose a generalized model for stellar spin-down, disk accretion, and truncation, and the origin of winds, jets, and bipolar outflows from young stellar objects. We consider the steady state dynamics of accretion of matter from a viscous and imperfectly conducting disk onto a young star with a strong magnetic field. For an aligned stellar magnetosphere, shielding currents in the surface layers of the disk prevent stellar field lines from penetrating the disk everywhere except for a range of radii about pi = R(sub x), where the Keplerian angular speed of rotation Omega(sub x) equals the angular speed of the star Omega(sub *). For the low disk accretion rates and high magnetic fields associated with typical T Tauri stars, R(sub x) exceeds the radius of the star R(sub *) by a factor of a few, and the inner disk is effectively truncated at a radius R(sub t) somewhat smaller than R(sub x). Where the closed field lines between R(sub t) and R(sub x) bow sufficiently inward, the accreting gas attaches itself to the field and is funneled dynamically down the effective potential (gravitational plus centrifugal) onto the star. Contrary to common belief, the accompanying magnetic torques associated with this accreting gas may transfer angular momentum mostly to the disk rather than to the star. Thus, the star can spin slowly as long as R(sub x) remains significantly greater than R(sub *). Exterior to R(sub x) field lines threading the disk bow outward, which makes the gas off the mid-plane rotate at super-Keplerian velocities. This combination drives a magnetocentrifugal wind with a mass-loss rate M(sub w) equal to a definite fraction f of the disk accretion rate M(sub D). For high disk accretion rates, R(sub x) is forced down to the stellar surface, the star is spun to breakup, and the wind is generated in a manner identical to that proposed by Shu, Lizano, Ruden, & Najita in a previous communication to this journal. In two companion papers (II and III), we develop a

  18. Magnetocentrifugally driven flows from young stars and disks. 1: A generalized model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank; Najita, Joan; Ostriker, Eve; Wilkin, Frank; Ruden, Steven; Lizano, Susana

    1994-01-01

    We propose a generalized model for stellar spin-down, disk accretion, and truncation, and the origin of winds, jets, and bipolar outflows from young stellar objects. We consider the steady state dynamics of accretion of matter from a viscous and imperfectly conducting disk onto a young star with a strong magnetic field. For an aligned stellar magnetosphere, shielding currents in the surface layers of the disk prevent stellar field lines from penetrating the disk everywhere except for a range of radii about pi = R(sub x), where the Keplerian angular speed of rotation Omega(sub x) equals the angular speed of the star Omega(sub *). For the low disk accretion rates and high magnetic fields associated with typical T Tauri stars, R(sub x) exceeds the radius of the star R(sub *) by a factor of a few, and the inner disk is effectively truncated at a radius R(sub t) somewhat smaller than R(sub x). Where the closed field lines between R(sub t) and R(sub x) bow sufficiently inward, the accreting gas attaches itself to the field and is funneled dynamically down the effective potential (gravitational plus centrifugal) onto the star. Contrary to common belief, the accompanying magnetic torques associated with this accreting gas may transfer angular momentum mostly to the disk rather than to the star. Thus, the star can spin slowly as long as R(sub x) remains significantly greater than R(sub *). Exterior to R(sub x) field lines threading the disk bow outward, which makes the gas off the mid-plane rotate at super-Keplerian velocities. This combination drives a magnetocentrifugal wind with a mass-loss rate M(sub w) equal to a definite fraction f of the disk accretion rate M(sub D). For high disk accretion rates, R(sub x) is forced down to the stellar surface, the star is spun to breakup, and the wind is generated in a manner identical to that proposed by Shu, Lizano, Ruden, & Najita in a previous communication to this journal. In two companion papers (II and III), we develop a

  19. Optical spectroscopy of Z Canis Majoris, V1057 Cygni, and FU Orionis - Accretion disks and signatures of disk winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Alan D.; Strom, Stephen E.; Edwards, Suzan; Kenyon, Scott J.; Hartmann, Lee W.

    1992-09-01

    High resolution, high SNR optical spectra have been used to investigate the hypothesis that in outburst, FU Ori objects are self-luminous accretion disks whose light dominates at optical and near-IR wavelengths. Strong evidence has been found for linewidth versus wavelength correlation in good agreement with model predictions for Z CMa and V1057 Cyg, but not for FU Ori itself. Linewidth varies continuously with wavelength at optical wavelengths in the former two objects, In the case of FU Ori, it is argued that a combination of strong wind components to spectral lines, and surface gravity possibly being lower than that of supergiants, conceals the underlying linewidth versus wavelength relationship. A marginal correlation is found between linewidth and lower excitation potential in all three objects. Synthetic disk spectra are subtracted from observed spectral, and remarkably good fits are found for all three objects for wavelengths longer than about 5000 A.

  20. Optical spectroscopy of Z Canis Majoris, V1057 Cygni, and FU Orionis - Accretion disks and signatures of disk winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welty, Alan D.; Strom, Stephen E.; Edwards, Suzan; Kenyon, Scott J.; Hartmann, Lee W.

    1992-01-01

    High resolution, high SNR optical spectra have been used to investigate the hypothesis that in outburst, FU Ori objects are self-luminous accretion disks whose light dominates at optical and near-IR wavelengths. Strong evidence has been found for linewidth versus wavelength correlation in good agreement with model predictions for Z CMa and V1057 Cyg, but not for FU Ori itself. Linewidth varies continuously with wavelength at optical wavelengths in the former two objects, In the case of FU Ori, it is argued that a combination of strong wind components to spectral lines, and surface gravity possibly being lower than that of supergiants, conceals the underlying linewidth versus wavelength relationship. A marginal correlation is found between linewidth and lower excitation potential in all three objects. Synthetic disk spectra are subtracted from observed spectral, and remarkably good fits are found for all three objects for wavelengths longer than about 5000 A.

  1. Slotted-wall research with disk and parachute models in a low-speed wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Macha, J.M.; Buffington, R.J.; Henfling, J.L. ); Every, D. Van; Harris, J.L. )

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation of slotted-wall blockage interference has been conducted using disk and parachute models in a low speed wind tunnel. Test section open area ratio, model geometric blockage ratio, and model location along the length of the test section were systematically varied. Resulting drag coefficients were compared to each other and to interference-free measurements obtained in a much larger wind tunnel where the geometric blockage ratio was less than 0.0025. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Quasar Rain: The Broad Emission Line Region as Condensations in the Warm Accretion Disk Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The origin of the broad emission line region (BELR) in quasars and active galactic nuclei is still unclear. I propose that condensations form in the warm, radiation-pressure-driven, accretion disk wind of quasars creating the BEL clouds and uniting them with the other two manifestations of cool (∼104 K) gas in quasars, the low ionization phase of the warm absorbers (WAs) and the clouds causing X-ray eclipses. The cool clouds will condense quickly (days to years), before the WA outflows reach escape velocity (which takes months to centuries). Cool clouds form in equilibrium with the warm phase of the wind because the rapidly varying X-ray quasar continuum changes the force multiplier, causing pressure waves to move gas into stable locations in pressure–temperature space. The narrow range of two-phase equilibrium densities may explain the (luminosity){}1/2 scaling of the BELR size, while the scaling of cloud formation timescales could produce the Baldwin effect. These dense clouds have force multipliers of order unity and so cannot be accelerated to escape velocity. They fall back on a dynamical timescale (months to centuries), producing an inflow that rains down toward the central black hole. As they soon move at Mach ∼10–100 with respect to the WA outflow, these “raindrops” will be rapidly destroyed within months. This rain of clouds may produce the elliptical BELR orbits implied by velocity-resolved reverberation mapping in some objects and can explain the opening angle and destruction timescale of the narrow “cometary” tails of the clouds seen in X-ray eclipse observations. Some consequences and challenges of this “quasar rain” model are presented, along with several avenues for theoretical investigation.

  3. EXPLORING THE EFFECTS OF STELLAR ROTATION AND WIND CLEARING: DEBRIS DISKS AROUND F STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizusawa, Trisha F.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Stauffer, John R.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Meyer, Michael; Song, Inseok

    2012-11-01

    We have conducted a study of debris disks around F stars in order to explore correlations between rotation, stellar winds, and circumstellar disks. We obtained new 24 {mu}m photometry from the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) camera for a sample of 188 relatively nearby F dwarfs with various rotation rates and optical colors, and combined it with archival MIPS data for 66 more F stars, as well as Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer data for the entire sample, plus 9 more F stars. Based on the objects' K{sub s} - [24] and [3.4] - [22] colors, we identify 22 stars in our sample as having 22 and/or 24 {mu}m excesses above our detection limit, 13 of which are new discoveries. Our overall disk detection rate is 22/263, or 8%, consistent with previous determinations of disk fractions in the solar neighborhood. While fast-rotating stars are expected to have strong winds capable of efficiently removing dust, we find no correlation between rotational velocity and infrared excess. Similarly, we find no significant difference in excess detection rate between late-type F stars, which have convective surfaces, and early-type F stars, which have fully radiative envelopes. However, the essentially unknown range of ages in this sample may be washing out any effects relating rotation, winds, and disks.

  4. Wind-driven zonal jets in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, William S.; Gourdeau, Lionel

    2006-02-01

    Zonal jets west of the large islands of the South Pacific Ocean are predicted by theory, commonly seen in ocean models with sufficiently high resolution, and are beginning to be observed. These jets are often taken to reflect the blocking effect of the islands in the South Equatorial Current through ``Island Rule'' dynamics. Here it is shown that quasi-permanent structures of the basin-wide wind field imply the existence of jets formed independently of the islands. Evidence for the existence of the wind-driven jets is found in climatological geostrophic currents. The hydrographic structures that produce the jets occur well below the thermocline.

  5. TOWARD A GLOBAL EVOLUTIONARY MODEL OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2016-04-20

    A global picture of the evolution  of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is key to understanding almost every aspect of planet formation, where standard α-disk models have been continually employed for their simplicity. In the meantime, disk mass loss has been conventionally attributed to photoevaporation, which controls disk dispersal. However, a paradigm shift toward accretion driven by magnetized disk winds has taken place in recent years, thanks to studies of non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects in PPDs. I present a framework of global PPD evolution aiming to incorporate these advances, highlighting the role of wind-driven accretion and wind mass loss. Disk evolution is found to be largely dominated by wind-driven processes, and viscous spreading is suppressed. The timescale of disk evolution is controlled primarily by the amount of external magnetic flux threading the disks, and how rapidly the disk loses the flux. Rapid disk dispersal can be achieved if the disk is able to hold most of its magnetic flux during the evolution. In addition, because wind launching requires a sufficient level of ionization at the disk surface (mainly via external far-UV (FUV) radiation), wind kinematics is also affected by the FUV penetration depth and disk geometry. For a typical disk lifetime of a few million years, the disk loses approximately the same amount of mass through the wind as through accretion onto the protostar, and most of the wind mass loss proceeds from the outer disk via a slow wind. Fractional wind mass loss increases with increasing disk lifetime. Significant wind mass loss likely substantially enhances the dust-to-gas mass ratio and promotes planet formation.

  6. Local scale structures in Earth's thermospheric winds and their consequences for wind driven transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadly, Manbharat Singh

    In the traditional picture of Earth's upper thermosphere (~190--300 km), it is widely presumed that its convective stability and enormous kinematic viscosity attenuate wind gradients, and hence smooth out any structure present in the wind over scale size of several hundreds of kilometers. However, several independent experimental studies have shown that observed upper thermospheric wind fields at high latitudes contain stronger than expected local-scale spatial structures. The motivation of this dissertation is to investigate how the resulting local-scale gradients would distort neutral air masses and complicate thermospheric wind transport. To achieve this goal, we examined the behavior of a simple parameter that we refer to as the "distortion gradient". It incorporates all of the wind field's departures from uniformity, and is thus capable of representing all resulting contributions to the distortion or mixing of air masses. Climatological analysis of the distortion gradient using 2010, 2011, and 2012 wind data from the All-sky Scanning Doppler Imager (SDI) located at Poker Flat (65.12N, 147.47W) revealed the diurnal and seasonal trends in distortion of thermospheric masses. Distortion was observed to be dependent on geomagnetic activity and orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field. To understand the time-cumulative influence of these local-scale non-uniformities on thermospheric wind driven transport, time-resolved two-dimensional maps of the thermospheric vector wind fields were used to infer forward and backward air parcel trajectories. Tracing air parcel trajectories through a given geographic location indicates where they came from previously, and where they will go in the future. Results show that wind driven transport is very sensitive to small-scale details of the wind field. Any local-scale spatial wind gradients can significantly complicate air parcel trajectories. Transport of thermospheric neutral species in the presence of the local

  7. Escape conditions of radiative-driven strati from luminous accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Takuya; Fukue, Jun

    2015-10-01

    We examine the dynamical motion and escape conditions of continuum-driven strati (flat cloud) with finite optical depth from luminous accretion disks around a black hole. We adopt the near-disk approximation, and treat the problem in the framework of special relativity, where the radiation drag force as well as the radiation pressure are included. We find that the optically thin strati are easy to accelerate, compared with the particles, and the escape condition of the stratus is reduced. That is, when the disk luminosity is around the Eddington luminosity, the optically thin strati can escape from the inner disk (≲ 20 rg; rg being the Schwarzschild radius). When the disk luminosity is about half the Eddington luminosity, it can escape at around 5 rg. This is due to the translucent effect. In addition, the trajectories of the strati are not vertical, but a funnel-like shape due to the centrifugal force. Stratus outflow could easily blow out from usual accretion disks with sub-Eddington luminosities, and this may explain outflows observed in broad absorption line quasars and ultra-fast outflow objects.

  8. Numerical models of wind-driven circulation in lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Powell, T.M.; Dillon, T.M.

    1976-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of numerical modelling of large-scale wind-driven circulation in lakes is presented. The governing equations which describe this motion are discussed along with the appropriate numerical techniques necessary to solve them in lakes. The numerical models are categorized into three large primary groups: the layered models, the Ekman-type models, and the other three-dimensional models. Discussions and comparison of models are given and future research directions are suggested. ?? 1976.

  9. The Propagation of Kinks in Line-driven Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmeier, A.; Rätzel, D.; Owocki, S. P.

    2008-05-01

    We show that discontinuities in spatial derivatives of the velocity and density law, so-called kinks, can propagate upstream at Mach numbers > 1 with respect to radiative-acoustic waves in stellar winds driven by radiation scattering in spectral lines. This fast upstream propagation of kinks can, for example, explain the slow evolution of discrete absorption components found in P Cygni line profiles from O stars.

  10. Flutter-driven triboelectrification for harvesting wind energy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jihyun; Lee, Jeongsu; Kim, SeongMin; Ha, Jaewook; Lee, Byoung-Sun; Park, YoungJun; Choong, Chweelin; Kim, Jin-Baek; Wang, Zhong Lin; Kim, Ho-Young; Park, Jong-Jin; Chung, U-In

    2014-09-23

    Technologies to harvest electrical energy from wind have vast potentials because wind is one of the cleanest and most sustainable energy sources that nature provides. Here we propose a flutter-driven triboelectric generator that uses contact electrification caused by the self-sustained oscillation of flags. We study the coupled interaction between a fluttering flexible flag and a rigid plate. In doing so, we find three distinct contact modes: single, double and chaotic. The flutter-driven triboelectric generator having small dimensions of 7.5 × 5 cm at wind speed of 15 ms(-1) exhibits high-electrical performances: an instantaneous output voltage of 200 V and a current of 60 μA with a high frequency of 158 Hz, giving an average power density of approximately 0.86 mW. The flutter-driven triboelectric generation is a promising technology to drive electric devices in the outdoor environments in a sustainable manner.

  11. Significance of laboratory observations for modeling wind-driven seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badulin, S. I.; Caulliez, G.

    2009-04-01

    In what sense can the laboratory wind-wave observations help in investigating and modeling wave growth in wind-driven seas? This old outstanding question is addressed by an extensive laboratory study in the large IRPHE wind-wave tank (Caulliez, 2009). We show that for a wide range of parameters the fetch-limited wind wave growth observed in the facility follows fairly well the wind-wave growth law predicted by weak turbulence model (Badulin et al., 2007). The wind speeds were ranging from 3.5 to 16 m/s and wave ages cp•U10 were smaller than 0.15 (cp being the phase speed of spectral peak waves, and U10 the equivalent 10 m level wind speed). The recent model of wind wave evolution proposed by Badulin et al. (2007) assumes the dominance of nonlinear four-wave resonant interactions over the direct wave input from wind and wave dissipation. The model predicts that the total wave energy is rigidly linked to the total wave energy flux (i.e. the energy growth rate dE•dt) by the relationship: E ?4 ( ?3dE •dt)1•3 --2p= α -p--2--- g g (1) where the wave energy E is defined in a "wind-wave study sense" as the water surface elevation variance density ⟨η2⟩, ?p is the wave spectral peak frequency, and α is a self-similarity parameter. Experimental data reveal that the spectral peak wave energy observed in the wind-wave tank at large fetches evolves in accordance with the asymptotic weakly turbulent theory in a wide range of wind speeds. Furthermore, the found value of the self-similarity parameter α ( α ≃ 0.5) matches very well the estimates from more than 20 data set collected over the last 50 years of wind-wave studies at sea. It is then shown that the characteristic parameters of the laboratory wave field development follow remarkably well the 3•2 Toba's law H ~ T3•2, H and T being the significant wave height and period. In a definite range of fetches and wind speeds, its dependency on friction velocity u* is also described by an expression similar

  12. Nucleosynthesis in Neutrino-Driven Winds in Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujibayashi, Sho; Yoshida, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro

    We investigate the nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds blown off from massive proto-neutron stars (mPNSs) temporarily formed in the collapse of the rotating massive stars, which are thought to be progenitors of hypernovae. Such an mPNS formation is indicated in a recent numerical relativity simulation. We construct steady, spherically symmetric wind solutions with large neutrino luminosities of ˜1053 erg s-1 and average energies of electron neutrinos and antineutrinos in the ranges of 9-16 and 11-18 MeV based on the numerical simulation. The winds have much shorter expansion timescale than that of the winds from ordinary PNSs and, depending on the energy of neutrinos, they can be both neutron (n)-rich and proton (p)-rich. In the n-rich wind, the r-process occurs and the abundance distribution of a fiducial wind model gives an approximate agreement with the abundance pattern of a metal-poor weak r star HD 122563, although the third-peak elements are produced only when the antineutrino energy is much larger than the neutrino one. In the p-rich wind, the strong ν p-process occurs and A > 100 nuclides are synthesized. In addition, an interesting nucleosynthesis occur in the wind with Ye ˜ 0.5. In this process, the abundance distribution of heavy nuclei of A > 100 achieves quasi-statistical equilibrium (QSE) at high temperature and the abundance is frozen when the temperature falls. This process can be understood using the "α QSE" abundances we formulated.

  13. Collimation of magnetic jets by disk winds - the case of M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Amir

    2015-08-01

    The interaction of a magnetic jet emerging from the ergosphere of an accreting black hole, with a transonic wind emanating from the accretion flow surrounding the black hole will be discussed. It is found that effective collimation of the polar jet occurs already for modest ratios of the wind and jet powers. The jet is ensheathed by a shocked wind layer that can be a significant source of low energy emission at relatively small radii. It is suggested that a disk wind from the RIAF may be responsible for the collimation of the jet in M87, and that the shocked wind layer may be the source of the radio emission detected by the EHT. The variable TeV emission may originate from a sparking gap at the base of the magnetic jet, as proposed recently.

  14. Development of an advanced actuator disk model for Large-Eddy Simulation of wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This work aims at improving the fidelity of the wind turbine modelling for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of wind farms, in order to accurately predict the loads, the production, and the wake dynamics. In those simulations, the wind turbines are accounted for through actuator disks. i.e. a body-force term acting over the regularised disk swept by the rotor. These forces are computed using the Blade Element theory to estimate the normal and tangential components (based on the local simulated flow and the blade characteristics). The local velocities are modified using the Glauert tip-loss factor in order to account for the finite number of blades; the computation of this correction is here improved thanks to a local estimation of the effective upstream velocity at every point of the disk. These advanced actuator disks are implemented in a 4th order finite difference LES solver and are compared to a classical Blade Element Momentum method and to high fidelity wake simulations performed using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method in uniform and turbulent flows.

  15. Large eddy simulation of unsteady wind farm behavior using advanced actuator disk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The present project aims at improving the level of fidelity of unsteady wind farm scale simulations through an effort on the representation and the modeling of the rotors. The chosen tool for the simulations is a Fourth Order Finite Difference code, developed at Universite catholique de Louvain; this solver implements Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approaches. The wind turbines are modeled as advanced actuator disks: these disks are coupled with the Blade Element Momentum method (BEM method) and also take into account the turbine dynamics and controller. A special effort is made here to reproduce the specific wake behaviors. Wake decay and expansion are indeed initially governed by vortex instabilities. This is an information that cannot be obtained from the BEM calculations. We thus aim at achieving this by matching the large scales of the actuator disk flow to high fidelity wake simulations produced using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method. It is obtained by adding a controlled excitation at the disk. We apply this tool to the investigation of atmospheric turbulence effects on the power production and on the wake behavior at a wind farm level. A turbulent velocity field is then used as inflow boundary condition for the simulations. We gratefully acknowledge the support of GDF Suez for the fellowship of Mrs Maud Moens.

  16. Star formation driven galactic winds in UGC 10043

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Cobá, C.; Sánchez, S. F.; Moiseev, A. V.; Oparin, D. V.; Bitsakis, T.; Cruz-González, I.; Morisset, C.; Galbany, L.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Roth, M. M.; Dettmar, R.-J.; Bomans, D. J.; González Delgado, Rosa M.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Marino, R. A.; Kehrig, C.; Monreal Ibero, A.; Abril-Melgarejo, V.

    2016-12-01

    We study the galactic wind in the edge-on spiral galaxy UGC 10043 with the combination of the CALIFA integral field spectroscopy data, scanning Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI), and multiband photometry. We detect ionized gas in the extraplanar regions reaching a relatively high distance, up to ˜ 4 kpc above the galactic disk. The ionized gas line ratios ([N II]/Hα, [S II]/Hα and [O I]/Hα) present an enhancement along the semi minor axis, in contrast with the values found at the disk, where they are compatible with ionization due to H II-regions. These differences, together with the biconic symmetry of the extra-planar ionized structure, makes UGC 10043 a clear candidate for a galaxy with gas outflows ionizated by shocks. From the comparison of shock models with the observed line ratios, and the kinematics observed from the FPI data, we constrain the physical properties of the observed outflow. The data are compatible with a velocity increase of the gas along the extraplanar distances up to < 400 km s-1 and the preshock density decreasing in the same direction. We also observe a discrepancy in the SFR estimated based on Hα (0.36 M⊙ yr-1) and the estimated with the CIGALE code, being the latter 5 times larger. Nevertheless, this SFR is still not enough to drive the observed galactic wind if we do not take into account the filling factor. We stress that the combination of the three techniques of observation with models is a powerful tool to explore galactic winds in the Local Universe.

  17. Shock-driven Accretion in Circumplanetary Disks: Observables and Satellite Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Ju, Wenhua; Stone, James M.

    2016-12-01

    Circumplanetary disks (CPDs) control the growth of planets, supply material for satellites to form, and provide observational signatures of young forming planets. We have carried out two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations with radiative cooling to study CPDs and suggested a new mechanism to drive the disk accretion. Two spiral shocks are present in CPDs, excited by the central star. We find that spiral shocks can at least contribute to, if not dominate, the angular momentum transport and energy dissipation in CPDs. Meanwhile, dissipation and heating by spiral shocks have a positive feedback on shock-driven accretion itself. As the disk is heated up by spiral shocks, the shocks become more open, leading to more efficient angular momentum transport. This shock-driven accretion is, on the other hand, unsteady due to production and destruction of vortices in disks. After being averaged over time, a quasi-steady accretion is reached from the planet’s Hill radius all the way to the planet surface, and the disk α coefficient characterizing angular momentum transport is ˜0.001-0.02. The disk surface density ranges from 10 to 1000 g cm-2 in our simulations, which is at least three orders of magnitude smaller than the “minimum-mass subnebula” model used to study satellite formation; instead it is more consistent with the “gas-starved” satellite formation model. Finally, we calculate the millimeter flux emitted by CPDs at ALMA and EVLA wavelength bands and predict the flux for several recently discovered CPD candidates, which suggests that ALMA is capable of discovering these accreting CPDs.

  18. Tide- and wind-driven flushing of Boston Harbor, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The flushing of Boston Harbor, a shallow, tidally dominated embayment with little fresh water input, is investigated using a depth-averaged model. The modeled tidal currents exhibit strong spatial variability and ebb/flood asymmetry due to complex topography and coastline geometry and were verified by shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements. At the inlets to the harbor, the asymmetry between flood and ebb gives rise to a net exchange of water, which acts over successive tidal cycles to flush the harbor. The flushing is examined by tracking water that starts out in Boston Harbor for 40 M2 tidal cycles. The tidal flushing is very efficient at mixing water in the vicinity of the inlets over several tidal cycles, but efficiency decreases with time as ``tidal mixing regions'' form on either side of the harbor inlets. When wind forcing is included, the wind-driven currents act to flush the tidal mixing regions, giving rise to more efficient flushing. The exception is when the wind is from the southwest, which confines the jet-like ebb flow from the harbor and therefore reduces the flushing efficiency. In general, flushing is shown to be a two-step process: (1) rapid exchange due to tides over a large region in the vicinity of the harbor inlets and (2) flushing of this region by wind-driven flow. The model also demonstrates that flushing is not uniform over the entire harbor but occurs rapidly in the deep tidal channels and slowly in the regions of weak tidal currents around the harbor periphery. Although the depth-averaged approach to flushing is appropriate over most of the harbor due to the harbor's shallow depth and broad depth distribution, the lack of bathymetric variability and the presence of locally important density driven currents in the Boston Inner Harbor indicates that flushing of this localized area must be approached with a three-dimensional model.

  19. Local magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and the wave-driven dynamo in accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, Ethan T.; Diamond, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    We consider the consequences of magnetic buoyancy and the magnetic shearing instability (MSI) on the strength and organization of the magnetic field in a thin accretion disk. We discuss a model in which the wave-driven dynamo growth rate is balanced by the dissipative effects of the MSI. As in earlier work, the net helicity is due to small advective motions driven by nonlinear interactions between internal waves. Assuming a simple model of the internal wave spectrum generated from the primary m = 1 internal waves, we find that the magnetic energy density saturates at about (H/r) exp 4/3 times the local pressure (where H is the disk thickness and r is its radius). On very small scales the shearing instability will produce an isotropic fluctuating field. For a stationary disk this is equivalent to a dimensionless 'viscosity' of about (H/r) exp 4/3. The vertical and radial diffusion coefficients will be comparable to each other. Magnetic buoyancy will be largely suppressed by the turbulence due to the MSI. We present a rough estimate of its effects and find that it removes magnetic flux from the disk at a rate comparable to that caused by turbulent diffusion.

  20. Evolution of protoplanetary discs with magnetically driven disc winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Ogihara, Masahiro; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Crida, Aurélien; Guillot, Tristan

    2016-12-01

    Aims: We investigate the evolution of protoplanetary discs (PPDs) with magnetically driven disc winds and viscous heating. Methods: We considered an initially massive disc with 0.1 M⊙ to track the evolution from the early stage of PPDs. We solved the time evolution of surface density and temperature by taking into account viscous heating and the loss of mass and angular momentum by the disc winds within the framework of a standard α model for accretion discs. Our model parameters, turbulent viscosity, disc wind mass-loss, and disc wind torque, which were adopted from local magnetohydrodynamical simulations and constrained by the global energetics of the gravitational accretion, largely depends on the physical condition of PPDs, particularly on the evolution of the vertical magnetic flux in weakly ionized PPDs. Results: Although there are still uncertainties concerning the evolution of the vertical magnetic flux that remains, the surface densities show a large variety, depending on the combination of these three parameters, some of which are very different from the surface density expected from the standard accretion. When a PPD is in a wind-driven accretion state with the preserved vertical magnetic field, the radial dependence of the surface density can be positive in the inner region <1-10 au. The mass accretion rates are consistent with observations, even in the very low level of magnetohydrodynamical turbulence. Such a positive radial slope of the surface density strongly affects planet formation because it inhibits the inward drift or even causes the outward drift of pebble- to boulder-sized solid bodies, and it also slows down or even reversed the inward type-I migration of protoplanets. Conclusions: The variety of our calculated PPDs should yield a wide variety of exoplanet systems.

  1. Gas content of transitional disks: a VLT/X-Shooter study of accretion and winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, C. F.; Testi, L.; Natta, A.; Rosotti, G.; Benisty, M.; Ercolano, B.; Ricci, L.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Transitional disks are thought to be a late evolutionary stage of protoplanetary disks whose inner regions have been depleted of dust. The mechanism responsible for this depletion is still under debate. To constrain the various models it is mandatory to have a good understanding of the properties of the gas content in the inner part of the disk. Aims: Using X-Shooter broad band - UV to near-infrared - medium-resolution spectroscopy, we derive the stellar, accretion, and wind properties of a sample of 22 transitional disks. The analysis of these properties allows us to place strong constraints on the gas content in a region very close to the star (≲0.2 AU) that is not accessible with any other observational technique. Methods: We fitted the spectra with a self-consistent procedure to simultaneously derive spectral type, extinction, and accretion properties of the targets. From the continuum excess at near-infrared wavelength we distinguished whether our targets have dust free inner holes. By analyzing forbidden emission lines, we derived the wind properties of the targets. We then compared our findings with results for classical T Tauri stars. Results: The accretion rates and wind properties of 80% of the transitional disks in our sample, which is strongly biased toward stongly accreting objects, are comparable to those of classical T Tauri stars. Thus, there are (at least) some transitional disks with accretion properties compatible with those of classical T Tauri stars, irrespective of the size of the dust inner hole. Only in two cases are the mass accretion rates much lower, while the wind properties remain similar. We detected no strong trend of the mass accretion rates with the size of the dust-depleted cavity or with the presence of a dusty optically thick disk very close to the star. These results suggest that, close to the central star, there is a gas-rich inner disk with a density similar to that of classical T Tauri star disks. Conclusions: The

  2. Two-body relaxation driven evolution of the young stellar disk in the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Šubr, Ladislav; Haas, Jaroslav

    2014-05-10

    The center of our Galaxy hosts almost two hundred very young stars, a subset of which is orbiting the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) in a relatively thin disk-like structure. First analyses indicated a power-law surface density profile of the disk, Σ∝R {sup β} with β = –2. Recently, however, doubts about this profile arose. In particular, it now seems to be better described by a sort of broken power law. By means of both analytical arguments and numerical N-body modeling, we show that such a broken power-law profile is a natural consequence of the two-body relaxation of the disk. Due to the small relative velocities of the nearby stars in co-planar Keplerian orbits around the SMBH, two-body relaxation is effective enough to affect the evolution of the disk on timescales comparable to its estimated age. In the inner, densest part of the disk, the profile becomes rather flat (β ≈ –1) while the outer parts keep imprints of the initial state. Our numerical models show that the observed projected surface density profile of the young stellar disk can result from two-body relaxation driven evolution of a disk with initial single power-law profile with –2 ≲ β ≲ –1.5. In addition, we suggest that two-body relaxation may have caused a significant radial migration of the S-stars toward the central SMBH, thus playing an important role in their formation scenario.

  3. Dynamic phases, clustering, and chain formation for driven disk systems in the presence of quenched disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; McDermott, D.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson; Reichhardt, C.

    2017-04-01

    We numerically examine the dynamic phases and pattern formation of two-dimensional monodisperse repulsive disks driven over random quenched disorder. We show that there is a series of distinct dynamic regimes as a function of increasing drive, including a clogged or pile-up phase near depinning, a homogeneous disordered flow state, and a dynamically phase separated regime consisting of high-density crystalline regions surrounded by a low density of disordered disks. At the highest drives the disks arrange into one-dimensional moving chains. The phase separated regime has parallels with the phase separation observed in active matter systems, but arises from a distinct mechanism consisting of the combination of nonequilibrium fluctuations with density-dependent mobility. We discuss the pronounced differences between this system and previous studies of driven particles with longer-range repulsive interactions moving over random substrates, such as superconducting vortices or electron crystals, where dynamical phase separation and distinct one-dimensional moving chains are not observed. Our results should be generic to a broad class of systems in which the particle-particle interactions are short ranged, such as sterically interacting colloids or Yukawa particles with strong screening driven over random pinning arrays, superconducting vortices in the limit of small penetration depths, or quasi-two-dimensional granular matter flowing over rough landscapes.

  4. Is the Blazar Sequence related to accretion disk winds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boula, Stella; Mastichiadis, Apostolos; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2016-08-01

    Adopting the hypothesis that the nonthermal emission of blazars is primarily due to the acceleration of electrons, we construct a simple leptonic model in order to explain the Blazar Sequence. The acceleration process is assumed to be of the first order Fermi type and the injected electrons and photons in the emitting region of the blazar are described by spatially averaged kinetic equations. According to the leptonic scenario, the spectral energy distributions of blazars have two basic components: a low frequency component, peaking in the optical through X-rays, from synchrotron emission; and a high frequency one, peaking in the γ rays, probably originating from Compton scattering of some seed photon source, either internal (synchrotron self-Compton) and/or external to the jet (external Compton). We find an adequate description of the Blazar Sequence by assuming a wind density profile of the form n(r) 1/r. Higher luminosity objects have higher accretion rates, higher optical thicknesses of the wind to Compton scattering and thus higher external photon fields than the lower luminosity ones. Therefore, we present indicative Blazar Sequence models which reproduce the basic observational trends just by varying one parameter, namely the mass accretion rate dot{m}.

  5. ON CONTINUUM-DRIVEN WINDS FROM ROTATING STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shacham, Tomer; Shaviv, Nir J.

    2012-10-01

    We study the dynamics of continuum-driven winds from rotating stars and develop an approximate analytical model. We then discuss the evolution of stellar angular momentum, and show that just above the Eddington limit, the winds are sufficiently concentrated toward the poles to spin-up the star. A twin-lobe structure of the ejected nebula is seen to be a generic consequence of critical rotation. We find that if the pressure in such stars is sufficiently dominated by radiation, an equatorial ejection of mass will occur during eruptions. These results are then applied to {eta}-Carinae. We show that if it began its life with a high enough angular momentum, the present-day wind could have driven the star toward critical rotation, if it is the dominant mode of mass loss. We find that the shape and size of the Homunculus nebula, as given by our model, agree with recent observations. Moreover, the contraction expected due to the sudden increase in luminosity at the onset of the Great Eruption explains the equatorial 'skirt' as well.

  6. Self-similar Theory of Wind-driven Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    More than two dozens field experiments performed in the ocean and on the lakes show that the fetch-limited growth of dimensionless energy and dimensionless peak frequency is described by powerlike functions of the dimensionless fetch. Moreover, the exponents of these two functions are connected with a proper accuracy by the standard "magic relation", 10q-2p=1. Recent massive numerical experiments as far as experiments in wave tanks also confirm this magic relation. All these experimental facts can be interpreted in a framework of the following simple theory. The wind-driven sea is described by the "conservative" Hasselmann kinetic equation. The source terms, wind input and white-capping dissipation, play a secondary role in comparison with the nonlinear term Snl that is responsible for the four-wave resonant interaction. This equation has four-parameter family of self-similar solutions. The magic relation holds for all numbers of this family. This fact gives strong hope that development of self-consistent analytic theory of wind-driven sea is quite realizable task.

  7. Solar Wind Driven Plasma Fluxes from the Venus Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez De Tejada, H. A.; Lundin, R. N.; Zhang, T.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.

    2012-12-01

    SOLAR WIND DRIVEN PLASMA FLUXES FROM THE VENUS IONOSPHERE H. Pérez-de-Tejada (1), R. Lundin (2), H. Durand-Manterola (1), S. Barabash (2), T. L. Zhang (3), J. A., Sauvaud (4), and M. Reyes-Ruiz (5) 1 - Institute of Geophysics, UNAM, México, D. F. 2 - Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna, Sweden 3 - Space Research Institute, Graz, Austria 4 - CESR, Toulouse, France 5 - Institute of Astronomy, UNAM, Ensenada, México Measurements conducted with the ASPERA-4 instrument and the magnetometer of the Venus Express spacecraft show that the kinetic pressure of planetary O+ ion fluxes measured in the Venus wake can be significantly larger than the local magnetic pressure and, as a result, those ions are not being driven by magnetic forces but by the kinetic energy of the solar wind. Beams of planetary O+ ions with those properties have been detected in several orbits of the Venus Express through the wake as the spacecraft traverses by the noon-midnight plane along its near polar trajectory. The momentum flux of the O+ ions leads to superalfvenic flow conditions. It is suggested that such O+ ion beams are produced in the vicinity of the magnetic polar regions of the Venus ionosphere where the solar wind erodes the local plasma leading to plasma channels that extend downstream from those regions.

  8. The r-PROCESS IN THE NEUTRINO-DRIVEN WIND FROM A BLACK-HOLE TORUS

    SciTech Connect

    Wanajo, Shinya; Janka, Hans-Thomas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-02-20

    We examine r-process nucleosynthesis in the neutrino-driven wind from the thick accretion disk (or 'torus') around a black hole. Such systems are expected as remnants of binary neutron star or neutron star-black hole mergers. We consider a simplified, analytic, time-dependent evolution model of a 3 M{sub Sun} central black hole surrounded by a neutrino emitting accretion torus with 90 km radius, which serves as basis for computing spherically symmetric neutrino-driven wind solutions. We find that ejecta with modest entropies ({approx}30 per nucleon in units of the Boltzmann constant) and moderate expansion timescales ({approx}100 ms) dominate in the mass outflow. The mass-integrated nucleosynthetic abundances are in good agreement with the solar system r-process abundance distribution if a minimal value of the electron fraction at the charged-particle freezeout, Y{sub e,min} {approx} 0.2, is achieved. In the case of Y{sub e,min} {approx} 0.3, the production of r-elements beyond A {approx} 130 does not reach to the third peak but could still be important for an explanation of the abundance signatures in r-process deficient stars in the early Galaxy. The total mass of the ejected r-process nuclei is estimated to be {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun }. If our model was representative, this demands a Galactic event rate of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} yr{sup -1} for black-hole-torus winds from merger remnants to be the dominant source of the r-process elements. Our result thus suggests that black-hole-torus winds from compact binary mergers have the potential to be a major, but probably not the dominant, production site of r-process elements.

  9. The physics of galactic winds driven by active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-09-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) drive fast winds in the interstellar medium of their host galaxies. It is commonly assumed that the high ambient densities and intense radiation fields in galactic nuclei imply short cooling times, thus making the outflows momentum conserving. We show that cooling of high-velocity shocked winds in AGN is in fact inefficient in a wide range of circumstances, including conditions relevant to ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), resulting in energy-conserving outflows. We further show that fast energy-conserving outflows can tolerate a large amount of mixing with cooler gas before radiative losses become important. For winds with initial velocity vin ≳ 10 000 km s-1, as observed in ultraviolet and X-ray absorption, the shocked wind develops a two-temperature structure. While most of the thermal pressure support is provided by the protons, the cooling processes operate directly only on the electrons. This significantly slows down inverse Compton cooling, while free-free cooling is negligible. Slower winds with vin ˜ 1000 km s-1, such as may be driven by radiation pressure on dust, can also experience energy-conserving phases but under more restrictive conditions. During the energy-conserving phase, the momentum flux of an outflow is boosted by a factor ˜vin/2vs by work done by the hot post-shock gas, where vs is the velocity of the swept-up material. Energy-conserving outflows driven by fast AGN winds (vin ˜ 0.1c) may therefore explain the momentum fluxes Ṗ≫LAGN/c of galaxy-scale outflows recently measured in luminous quasars and ULIRGs. Shocked wind bubbles expanding normal to galactic discs may also explain the large-scale bipolar structures observed in some systems, including around the Galactic Centre, and can produce significant radio, X-ray and γ-ray emission. The analytic solutions presented here will inform implementations of AGN feedback in numerical simulations, which typically do not include all the important

  10. Ion‐driven instabilities in the solar wind: Wind observations of 19 March 2005

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Lan K.; Broiles, Thomas W.; Stevens, Michael L.; Podesta, John J.; Kasper, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intervals of enhanced magnetic fluctuations have been frequently observed in the solar wind. But it remains an open question as to whether these waves are generated at the Sun and then transported outward by the solar wind or generated locally in the interplanetary medium. Magnetic field and plasma measurements from the Wind spacecraft under slow solar wind conditions on 19 March 2005 demonstrate seven events of enhanced magnetic fluctuations at spacecraft‐frame frequencies somewhat above the proton cyclotron frequency and propagation approximately parallel or antiparallel to the background magnetic field B o. The proton velocity distributions during these events are characterized by two components: a more dense, slower core and a less dense, faster beam. Observed plasma parameters are used in a kinetic linear dispersion equation analysis for electromagnetic fluctuations at k x B o = 0; for two events the most unstable mode is the Alfvén‐cyclotron instability driven by a proton component temperature anisotropy T⊥/T|| > 1 (where the subscripts denote directions relative to B o), and for three events the most unstable mode is the right‐hand polarized magnetosonic instability driven primarily by ion component relative flows. Thus, both types of ion anisotropies and both types of instabilities are likely to be local sources of these enhanced fluctuation events in the solar wind. PMID:27818854

  11. Ion-driven instabilities in the solar wind: Wind observations of 19 March 2005.

    PubMed

    Gary, S Peter; Jian, Lan K; Broiles, Thomas W; Stevens, Michael L; Podesta, John J; Kasper, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    Intervals of enhanced magnetic fluctuations have been frequently observed in the solar wind. But it remains an open question as to whether these waves are generated at the Sun and then transported outward by the solar wind or generated locally in the interplanetary medium. Magnetic field and plasma measurements from the Wind spacecraft under slow solar wind conditions on 19 March 2005 demonstrate seven events of enhanced magnetic fluctuations at spacecraft-frame frequencies somewhat above the proton cyclotron frequency and propagation approximately parallel or antiparallel to the background magnetic field Bo. The proton velocity distributions during these events are characterized by two components: a more dense, slower core and a less dense, faster beam. Observed plasma parameters are used in a kinetic linear dispersion equation analysis for electromagnetic fluctuations at k x Bo = 0; for two events the most unstable mode is the Alfvén-cyclotron instability driven by a proton component temperature anisotropy T⊥/T|| > 1 (where the subscripts denote directions relative to Bo), and for three events the most unstable mode is the right-hand polarized magnetosonic instability driven primarily by ion component relative flows. Thus, both types of ion anisotropies and both types of instabilities are likely to be local sources of these enhanced fluctuation events in the solar wind.

  12. Ion-driven instabilities in the solar wind: Wind observations of 19 March 2005

    DOE PAGES

    Gary, S. Peter; Jian, Lan K.; Broiles, Thomas W.; ...

    2016-01-16

    Intervals of enhanced magnetic fluctuations have been frequently observed in the solar wind. However, it remains an open question as to whether these waves are generated at the Sun and then transported outward by the solar wind or generated locally in the interplanetary medium. Magnetic field and plasma measurements from the Wind spacecraft under slow solar wind conditions on 19 March 2005 demonstrate seven events of enhanced magnetic fluctuations at spacecraft-frame frequencies somewhat above the proton cyclotron frequency and propagation approximately parallel or antiparallel to the background magnetic field Bo. The proton velocity distributions during these events are characterized bymore » two components: a more dense, slower core and a less dense, faster beam. In conclusion, observed plasma parameters are used in a kinetic linear dispersion equation analysis for electromagnetic fluctuations at k x Bo = 0; for two events the most unstable mode is the Alfvén-cyclotron instability driven by a proton component temperature anisotropy T⊥/T|| > 1 (where the subscripts denote directions relative to Bo), and for three events the most unstable mode is the right-hand polarized magnetosonic instability driven primarily by ion component relative flows. Thus, both types of ion anisotropies and both types of instabilities are likely to be local sources of these enhanced fluctuation events in the solar wind.« less

  13. Ion-driven instabilities in the solar wind: Wind observations of 19 March 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, S. Peter; Jian, Lan K.; Broiles, Thomas W.; Stevens, Michael L.; Podesta, John J.; Kasper, Justin C.

    2016-01-16

    Intervals of enhanced magnetic fluctuations have been frequently observed in the solar wind. However, it remains an open question as to whether these waves are generated at the Sun and then transported outward by the solar wind or generated locally in the interplanetary medium. Magnetic field and plasma measurements from the Wind spacecraft under slow solar wind conditions on 19 March 2005 demonstrate seven events of enhanced magnetic fluctuations at spacecraft-frame frequencies somewhat above the proton cyclotron frequency and propagation approximately parallel or antiparallel to the background magnetic field Bo. The proton velocity distributions during these events are characterized by two components: a more dense, slower core and a less dense, faster beam. In conclusion, observed plasma parameters are used in a kinetic linear dispersion equation analysis for electromagnetic fluctuations at k x Bo = 0; for two events the most unstable mode is the Alfvén-cyclotron instability driven by a proton component temperature anisotropy T/T|| > 1 (where the subscripts denote directions relative to Bo), and for three events the most unstable mode is the right-hand polarized magnetosonic instability driven primarily by ion component relative flows. Thus, both types of ion anisotropies and both types of instabilities are likely to be local sources of these enhanced fluctuation events in the solar wind.

  14. The insulation design for transmission class HTS transformer with continuous disk winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, H. G.; Kwag, D. S.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, S. H.

    2007-10-01

    In the response to the demands for electrical energy, much effort aimed to develop and commercialize HTS power equipments have been made around the world. Among them HTS transformer is one of very promising one. In Korea, companies and universities are developing a power distribution and transmission class HTS transformer that is one of the 21st century superconducting frontier projects. The composite continuous disk winding of transmission class HTS transformer is concentrically arranged H1-L-H2 from center. For the development of transmission HTS transformer with continuous disk winding, the cryogenic insulation technology should be established. We have been analyzed insulation composition and investigated electrical characteristics such as the breakdown of LN2, barrier, kapton films, flashover on FRP in LN2. We are going to compare with measured each value and apply the value to most suitable insulating design of the HTS transformer.

  15. Disk wind and magnetospheric accretion in emission from the Herbig Ae star MWC 480

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambovtseva, L. V.; Grinin, V. P.; Potravnov, I. S.; Mkrtichian, D. E.

    2016-09-01

    The young Herbig Ae star MWC 480 (HD 31648) is one of the comprehensively spectroscopically studied stars in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared spectral ranges. Using non-LTE modeling of its hydrogen spectrum, we have calculated the contribution to the hydrogen emission from such important regions of the circumstellar environment as the disk wind and the magnetosphere. We have used our own observations of the stellar spectrum performed with the 2.4-m telescope at the Thai National Observatory to quantitatively check our theoretical calculations. In addition, all of the visible and infrared spectra available in the literature have been used for a qualitative comparison. The modeling results have revealed a significant role of the magneto-centrifugal disk wind in the formation of atomic hydrogen emission. The cause of the emission line variability in the spectrum ofMWC 480 is discussed.

  16. Data-driven RANS for simulations of large wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, G. V.; Viola, F.; Ciri, U.; Rotea, M. A.; Leonardi, S.

    2015-06-01

    In the wind energy industry there is a growing need for real-time predictions of wind turbine wake flows in order to optimize power plant control and inhibit detrimental wake interactions. To this aim, a data-driven RANS approach is proposed in order to achieve very low computational costs and adequate accuracy through the data assimilation procedure. The RANS simulations are implemented with a classical Boussinesq hypothesis and a mixing length turbulence closure model, which is calibrated through the available data. High-fidelity LES simulations of a utility-scale wind turbine operating with different tip speed ratios are used as database. It is shown that the mixing length model for the RANS simulations can be calibrated accurately through the Reynolds stress of the axial and radial velocity components, and the gradient of the axial velocity in the radial direction. It is found that the mixing length is roughly invariant in the very near wake, then it increases linearly with the downstream distance in the diffusive region. The variation rate of the mixing length in the downstream direction is proposed as a criterion to detect the transition between near wake and transition region of a wind turbine wake. Finally, RANS simulations were performed with the calibrated mixing length model, and a good agreement with the LES simulations is observed.

  17. Accretion disk winds as the jet suppression mechanism in the microquasar GRS 1915+105.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, Joseph; Lee, Julia C

    2009-03-26

    Stellar-mass black holes with relativistic jets, also known as microquasars, mimic the behaviour of quasars and active galactic nuclei. Because timescales around stellar-mass black holes are orders of magnitude smaller than those around more distant supermassive black holes, microquasars are ideal nearby 'laboratories' for studying the evolution of accretion disks and jet formation in black-hole systems. Whereas studies of black holes have revealed a complex array of accretion activity, the mechanisms that trigger and suppress jet formation remain a mystery. Here we report the presence of a broad emission line in the faint, hard states and narrow absorption lines in the bright, soft states of the microquasar GRS 1915+105. ('Hard' and 'soft' denote the character of the emitted X-rays.) Because the hard states exhibit prominent radio jets, we argue that the broad emission line arises when the jet illuminates the inner accretion disk. The jet is weak or absent during the soft states, and we show that the absorption lines originate when the powerful radiation field around the black hole drives a hot wind off the accretion disk. Our analysis shows that this wind carries enough mass away from the disk to halt the flow of matter into the radio jet.

  18. WIND-SHEARING IN GASEOUS PROTOPLANETARY DISKS AND THE EVOLUTION OF BINARY PLANETESIMALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perets, Hagai B.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.

    2011-05-20

    One of the first stages of planet formation is the growth of small planetesimals and their accumulation into large planetesimals and planetary embryos. This early stage occurs much before the dispersal of most of the gas from the protoplanetary disk. Due to their different aerodynamic properties, planetesimals of different sizes and shapes experience different drag forces from the gas during this time. Such differential forces produce a wind-shearing (WISH) effect between close by, different-sized planetesimals. For any two planetesimals, a WISH radius can be considered at which the differential acceleration due to the wind becomes greater than the mutual gravitational pull between the planetesimals. We find that the WISH radius could be much smaller than the gravitational shearing radius by the star (the Hill radius). In other words, during the gas-phase of the disk, WISH could play a more important role than tidal perturbations by the star. Here, we study the WISH radii for planetesimal pairs of different sizes and compare the effects of wind and gravitational shearing (drag force versus gravitational tidal force). We then discuss the role of WISH for the stability and survival of binary planetesimals. Binaries are sheared apart by the wind if they are wider than their WISH radius. WISH-stable binaries can also inspiral, and possibly coalesce, due to gas drag. Here, we calculate the WISH radius and the gas-drag-induced merger timescale, providing stability and survival criteria for gas-embedded binary planetesimals. Our results suggest that even WISH-stable binaries may merge in times shorter than the lifetime of the gaseous disk. This may constrain currently observed binary planetesimals to have formed far from the star or at a late stage after the dispersal of most of the disk gas. We note that the WISH radius may also be important for other processes such as planetesimal erosion and planetesimal encounters and collisions in a gaseous environment.

  19. Wind-driven marine phytoplank blooms: Satellite observation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, DanLing

    2016-07-01

    Algal bloom is defined as a rapid increase or accumulation in biomass in an aquatic system. It not only can increase the primary production but also could result in negative ecological consequence, e.g.,Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). According to the classic theory for the formation of algal blooms "critical depth" and "eutrophication", oligotrophic sea area is usually difficult to form a large area of algal blooms, and actuallythe traditional observation is only sporadic capture to the existence of algal blooms.Taking full advantage of multiple data of satellite remote sensing , this study introduces "Wind-driven algal blooms in open oceans: observation and mechanisms" It explained except classic coastal Ekman transport, the wind through a variety of mechanisms affecting the formation of algal blooms. Proposed a conceptual model of "Strong wind -upwelling-nutrient-phytoplankton blooms" in Western South China Sea (SCS) to assess role of wind-induced advection transport in phytoplankton bloom formation. It illustrates the nutrient resources that support long-term offshore phytoplankton blooms in the western SCS; (2)Proposal of the theory that "typhoons cause vertical mixing, induce phytoplankton blooms", and quantify their important contribution to marine primary production; Proposal a new ecological index for typhoon. Proposed remote sensing inversion models. (3)Finding of the spatial and temporaldistributions pattern of harmful algal bloom (HAB)and species variations of HAB in the South Yellow Sea and East China Sea, and in the Pearl River estuary, and their oceanic dynamic mechanisms related with monsoon; The project developed new techniques and generated new knowledge, which significantly improved understanding of the formation mechanisms of algal blooms. The proposed "wind-pump" mechanism integrates theoretical system combined "ocean dynamics, development of algal blooms, and impact on primary production", which will benefit fisheries management. These

  20. The Evolution of Disks and Winds in Dwarf Nova Outbursts - FUSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Knox

    2002-01-01

    This project was a project to study the FUV spectra of two proto-typical dwarf novae, U Gem and SS Cygni, through an outburst cycle. The luminosity of the boundary layer in the two systems, as evidenced by earlier EUVE observations, is different in the two systems. Our intensive study of the two systems was intended to (1) probe the ionization and kinematic structure of the wind as a function of system brightness, (2) isolate the contributions of the disk to the FUV spectra, and (3) examine physical conditions and abundances of material just being accreted onto the disk from the secondary. The U Gem and SS Cyg observations took place in March and October 2000, respectively. The data obtained with FUSE was of excellent quality. Analysis of the both observations is now essentially complete, although some modeling of the SS Cyg spectra is ongoing, as we complete an ApJ manuscript on this object. Our main results for U Gem are as follows: The plateau spectra have continuum shapes and fluxes that are approximated by steady state accretion disk model spectra with an accretion rate 7x10(exp 9) Msolar/yr. The spectra also show numerous absorption lines of H I, He II, and 2-5 times ionized transitions of C, N, O, P, S, and Si. There are no emission features in the spectra, with the possible exception of a weak feature on the red wing of the 0 VI doublet. The absorption lines are narrow (FWHM approx. 50 km/s), too narrow to arise from the disk photosphere, and at low velocities (less than or equal to 700 km/s). The S VI and O VI doublets are optically thick. The absorption lines in the plateau spectra show orbital variability: in spectra obtained at orbital phases between 0.53 and 0.79, low-ionization absorption lines appear and the central depths of the preexisting lines increase. The increase in line absorption occurs at the same orbital phases as previously observed EUV and X-ray light-curve dips. If the absorbing material is in (near-) Keplerian rotation around the disk

  1. Particle transport patterns of short-distance soil erosion by wind-driven rain, rain and wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzen, Miriam; Iserloh, Thomas; de Lima, João L. M. P.; Ries, Johannes B.

    2015-04-01

    Short distance erosion of soil surface material is one of the big question marks in soil erosion studies. The exact measurement of short-distance transported soil particles, prior to the occurrence of overland flow, is a challenge to soil erosion science due to the particular requirements of the experimental setup and test procedure. To approach a quantification of amount and distance of each type of transport, we applied an especially developed multiple-gutter system installed inside the Trier Portable Wind and Rainfall Simulator (PWRS). We measured the amount and travel distance of soil particles detached and transported by raindrops (splash), wind-driven rain (splash-saltation and splash-drift) and wind (saltation). The test setup included three different erosion agents (rain/ wind-driven rain/ wind), two substrates (sandy/ loamy), three surface structures (grain roughness/ rills lengthwise/ rills transversal) and three slope angles (0°/+7°/-7°). The results present detailed transport patterns of the three erosion agents under the varying soil and surface conditions up to a distance of 1.6 m. Under the applied rain intensity and wind velocity, wind-driven rain splash generates the highest erosion. The erodibility and travel distance of the two substrates depend on the erosion agent. The total erosion is slightly higher for the slope angle -7° (downslope), but for wind-driven rain splash, the inclination is not a relevant factor. The effect of surface structures (rills) changes with traveling distance. The wind driven rain splash generates a much higher amount of erosion and a further travel distance of the particles due to the combined action of wind and rain. The wind-driven rain factor appears to be much more significant than the other factors. The study highlights the effects of different erosion agents and surface parameters on short-distance particle transport and the powerful impact of wind-driven rain on soil erosion.

  2. Formation of wind-driven ice bridges in narrow straits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallabandi, Bhargav; Zheng, Zhong; Winton, Michael; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-11-01

    An ice bridge is a static arch made of tightly packed ice that can be formed when sea ice flows through a narrow strait between landmasses. The formation of a stable ice arch prevents the further flow of sea ice into warmer oceans, and therefore plays an important role in the regulation of the local climate and ecology and to an extent, the mass balance of Arctic ice. While ice bridges are a seasonal phenomenon in many parts of the Canadian Archipelago, the process of their formation and breakup is poorly understood. Using thin-layer theory along with dynamic sea ice models widely used in climate modeling, we develop a reduced-order description of wind-driven ice bridge formation in long, narrow straits. Our theory predicts a critical static condition for arrested flow that involves the ice properties (thickness and compactness), the geometry of the channel, and the magnitude of the wind stress. Further, we show that in a channel of varying shape and under a constant wind stress, a spatially uniform ice field evolves towards a steady state with discontinuities in its properties, consistent with observed mechanisms of ice bridge formation. The reduced-order model thus provides a predictive tool for the flow and stoppage of sea ice in straits.

  3. Neutrino-driven winds from neutron star merger remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, A.; Rosswog, S.; Cabezón, R. M.; Korobkin, O.; Käppeli, R.; Arcones, A.; Liebendörfer, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a detailed, three-dimensional hydrodynamic study of the neutrino-driven winds emerging from the remnant of a neutron star merger. Our simulations are performed with the Newtonian, Eulerian code FISH, augmented by a detailed, spectral neutrino leakage scheme that accounts for neutrino absorption. Consistent with earlier two-dimensional studies, a strong baryonic wind is blown out along the original binary rotation axis within ≈100 ms. From this model, we compute a lower limit on the expelled mass of 3.5 × 10-3 M⊙, relevant for heavy element nucleosynthesis. Because of stronger neutrino irradiation, the polar regions show substantially larger electron fractions than those at lower latitudes. The polar ejecta produce interesting r-process contributions from A ≈ 80 to about 130, while the more neutron-rich, lower latitude parts produce elements up to the third r-process peak near A ≈ 195. We calculate the properties of electromagnetic transients powered by the radioactivity in the wind, in addition to the `macronova' transient stemming from the dynamic ejecta. The polar regions produce ultraviolet/optical transients reaching luminosities up to 1041 erg s-1, which peak around 1 d in optical and 0.3 d in bolometric luminosity. The lower latitude regions, due to their contamination with high-opacity heavy elements, produce dimmer and more red signals, peaking after ˜2 d in optical and infrared.

  4. Disk Winds as an Explanation for Slowly Evolving Temperatures in Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. Coleman

    2015-05-01

    Among the many intriguing aspects of optically discovered tidal disruption events (TDEs) is that their temperatures are lower than predicted and that the temperature does not evolve as rapidly with a decreasing fallback rate as would be expected in standard disk theory. We show that this can be explained qualitatively using an idea proposed by Laor & Davis in the context of normal active galactic nuclei: that larger accretion rates imply stronger winds and thus that the accretion rate through the inner disk only depends weakly on the inflow rate at the outer edge of the disk. We also show that a reasonable quantitative agreement with data requires that, as has been suggested in recent papers, the characteristic radius of the tidal stream is approximately equal to the semimajor axis of the most bound orbit of the debris rather than twice the pericenter distance, which would be expected from circularization without rapid angular momentum redistribution. If this explanation is correct, it suggests that the evolution of TDEs may test both non-standard disk theory and the details of the interactions of the tidal stream.

  5. New Insights on the Accretion Disk-Winds Connection in Radio-Loud AGNs from Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombesi, F.; Sambruna, R. M.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.; Cappi, M.; Reynolds, S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    From the spectral analysis of long Suzaku observations of five radio-loud AGNs we have been able to discover the presence of ultra-fast outflows with velocities ,,approx.0.1 c in three of them, namely 3C III, 3C 120 and 3C 390.3. They are consistent with being accretion disk winds/outflows. We also performed a follow-up on 3C III to monitor its outflow on approx.7 days time-scales and detected an anti-correlated variability of a possible relativistic emission line with respect to blue-shifted Fe K features, following a flux increase. This provides the first direct evidence for an accretion disc-wind connection in an AGN. The mass outflow rate of these outflows can be comparable to the accretion rate and their mechanical power can correspond to a significant fraction of the bolometric luminosity and is comparable to their typical jet power. Therefore, they can possibly play a significant role in the expected feedback from AGNs and can give us further clues on the relation between the accretion disk and the formation of winds/jets.

  6. THE CIRCUMBINARY OUTFLOW: A PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW DRIVEN BY A CIRCUMBINARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Matsumoto, Tomoaki E-mail: inutsuka@nagoya-u.j

    2009-10-10

    Protostellar outflow is a star's first cry at the moment of birth. The outflows have an indispensable role in the formation of single stars because they carry off the excess angular momentum from the center of the shrinking gas cloud, and permit further collapse to form a star. On the other hand, a significant fraction of stars is supposedly born as binaries with circumbinary disks that are frequently observed. Here, we investigate the evolution of a magnetized rotating cloud using a three-dimensional resistive MHD nested-grid code, and show that the outflow is driven by the circumbinary disk and has an important role even in the binary formation. After the adiabatic core formation in the collapsing cloud core, the magnetic flux is significantly removed from the center of the cloud by the Ohmic dissipation. Since this removal makes the magnetic braking ineffective, the adiabatic core continuously acquires the angular momentum to induce fragmentation and subsequent binary formation. The magnetic field accumulates in the circumbinary disk where the removal and accretion of magnetic field are balanced, and finally drives the circumbinary outflow. This result explains the spectacular morphology of some specific young stellar objects such as L1551 IRS5. We can infer that most of the bipolar molecular outflows observed by low density tracers (i.e., CO) would correspond to circumbinary or circum-multiple outflows found in this Letter, since most of the young stellar objects are supposed to be binaries or multiples.

  7. Dynamical evolution of galactic disks driven by interaction with a satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Toshio

    2003-04-01

    Dynamical evolution of galactic disks driven by interaction with satellite galaxies, particularly the problem of the disk warping and thickening is studied numerically. One of the main purpose of the study is to resolve the long standing problem of the origin of the disk warping. A possible cause of the warp is interaction with a satellite galaxy. In the case of the Milky Way, the LMC has been considered as the candidate. Some linear analysis have already given a positive result, but one had to wait for a fully self-consistent simulation as a proof. I have accomplished the numerical simulations with a million particles, by introducing a hybrid algorithm, SCF-TREE. Those simulations give us quantitative estimates for the Milky Way system. We have found an example in which large warp amplitudes are developed. We also found that the warp amplitudes depend on the halo distribution. Among our three models, the most massive and spherical halo is preferable for the observable warp excitation.

  8. Wind-driven interannual variability over the northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Patrick F.; Lagerloef, Gary S. E.

    2004-12-01

    Interannual variability of the sea surface height (SSH) over the northeast Pacific Ocean is hindcast with a reduced-gravity, quasi-geostrophic model that includes linear damping. The model is forced with monthly Ekman pumping fields derived from the NCEP reanalysis wind stresses. The numerical solution is compared with SSH observations derived from satellite altimeter data and gridded at a lateral resolution of 1 degree. Provided that the reduced gravity parameter is chosen appropriately, the results demonstrate that the model has significant hindcast skill over interior regions of the basin, away from continental boundaries. A damping time scale of 2 to 3 years is close to optimal, although the hindcast skill is not strongly dependent on this parameter. A simplification of the quasi-geostrophic model is considered in which Rossby waves are eliminated, yielding a Markov model driven by local Ekman pumping. The results approximately reproduce the hindcast skill of the more complete quasi-geostrophic model and indicate that the interannual SSH variability is dominated by the local response to wind forcing. There is a close correspondence the two leading empirical orthogonal modes of the local model and those of the observed SSH anomalies. The latter account for over half of the variance of the interannual signal over the region.

  9. Impulsive solar wind-driven emission from Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, M.D.; Kaiser, M.L. ); Kurth, W.S. )

    1989-05-01

    Several days prior to the Voyager spacecraft encounter with Uranus, the plasma wave and radio astronomy receivers detected extraordinarily narrowband bursty signals, the first indication of any radio emission from the planet. The characteristics of these signals were so unusual that their identity as a natural planetary emission was questioned at first. Subsequent analysis has shown, however, that the n bursts are modulated at the 17.24-hour Uranus rotation period and are therefore planetary in origin. The authors show, in addition, that the typical bandwidth and time scale for the bursts are about 5 kHz and 250 ms, respectively. The phase of the rotation modulation suggests a probable source for these events in the vicinity of the north (weak) magnetic pole. The waves are right-hand polarized and are therefore emitted in the extraordinary magnetoionic mode if the emission in fact originates above the north magnetic pole. In the context of the electron cyclotron maser mechanism, inferred upper limit electron densities range from 15 cm{sup {minus}3} at 0.9 R{sub U} altitude to 0.4 cm{sup {minus}3} at 2.4 R{sub U} altitude. Discovery of events predating the counter identification by up to 1 month indicates the n bursts were organized into two major {approx equal} 10-day-long episodes. These episodes were simultaneous with times of enhanced solar wind levels at Uranus, leading to the first evidence of a solar wind-driven radiation at Uranus.

  10. Wind-Driven Formation of Ice Bridges in Straits.

    PubMed

    Rallabandi, Bhargav; Zheng, Zhong; Winton, Michael; Stone, Howard A

    2017-03-24

    Ice bridges are static structures composed of tightly packed sea ice that can form during the course of its flow through a narrow strait. Despite their important role in local ecology and climate, the formation and breakup of ice bridges is not well understood and has proved difficult to predict. Using long-wave approximations and a continuum description of sea ice dynamics, we develop a one-dimensional theory for the wind-driven formation of ice bridges in narrow straits, which is verified against direct numerical simulations. We show that for a given wind stress and minimum and maximum channel widths, a steady-state ice bridge can only form beyond a critical value of the thickness and the compactness of the ice field. The theory also makes quantitative predictions for ice fluxes, which are particularly useful to estimate the ice export associated with the breakup of ice bridges. We note that similar ideas are applicable to dense granular flows in confined geometries.

  11. Predictability of Wind-Driven Coastal Ocean Flow Over Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Samelson, R. M.; Synder, C.

    2008-12-01

    The predictability of coastal ocean circulation over the central Oregon shelf is studied using ensembles of model forecasts from 50-day primitive equation ocean model simulations. The central Oregon shelf is a region of strong wind-driven currents and variable topography. The model configuration uses realistic topography, and simplified lateral boundary conditions. The forcing is an observed wind time-series representative of the summer upwelling season. The main focus on this study is on the balance between deterministic response to well-predicted forcing, uncertainty in initial conditions, and sensitivity to instabilities and topographical interactions. Simulated model forecasts are verified by standard statistics such as anomaly correlation coefficient and root mean squared error, and a new variant of relative entropy, the forecast relative entropy which quantifies the predictive information content in the forecast relative entropy relative to initial ensemble. The results suggest that the deterministic response is stronger than instability growth over the 3-7 day forecast intervals considered here. Therefore, when sufficiently accurate initializations are available, important elements of the coastal circulation should be accessible to predictive, dynamical forecasts on the nominal 7-day predictability timescale of the atmospheric forcing.

  12. Wind-Driven Formation of Ice Bridges in Straits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallabandi, Bhargav; Zheng, Zhong; Winton, Michael; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-03-01

    Ice bridges are static structures composed of tightly packed sea ice that can form during the course of its flow through a narrow strait. Despite their important role in local ecology and climate, the formation and breakup of ice bridges is not well understood and has proved difficult to predict. Using long-wave approximations and a continuum description of sea ice dynamics, we develop a one-dimensional theory for the wind-driven formation of ice bridges in narrow straits, which is verified against direct numerical simulations. We show that for a given wind stress and minimum and maximum channel widths, a steady-state ice bridge can only form beyond a critical value of the thickness and the compactness of the ice field. The theory also makes quantitative predictions for ice fluxes, which are particularly useful to estimate the ice export associated with the breakup of ice bridges. We note that similar ideas are applicable to dense granular flows in confined geometries.

  13. Molecular chemistry in protostellar disk winds and observational predictions for Herschel and ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvart, W.; Cabrit, S.; Pineau Des Forets, G.; Garcia, P. J. V.; Ferreira, J.; Casse, F.

    2011-05-01

    The origin of protostellar jets, and their role in extracting angular momentum from the accreting system, remain as major open questions in star formation research. The presence of abundant molecules such as CO, H_2, H_2O, SO and SiO, in the youngest class 0 jets (see eg. Taffala et al. 2010) provides an important new challenge for proposed ejection models. Here we explore the possibility that the jet may trace a dusty magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) centrifugal disk wind launched beyond the dust sublimation radius of 0.1-0.2 AU. The coupled ionization, chemical, and thermal evolution along dusty flow streamlines is computed for a prescribed MHD disk wind solution (Casse & Ferreira 2000), using a method developed for magnetized shocks in the interstellar medium (Flower and Pineau des Forets 2003). We consider 134 species, including gas-phase atoms and molecules (neutral and singly ionized) as well as species on grain icy mantles and inside grain cores. The chemical network consists of 1143 reactions including neutral-neutral and ion-neutral reactions, photo-ionization and photodissociation, recombination with electrons, charge exchange, cosmic ray induced desorption from grains, and sputtering of grain mantles and cores by neutral impact. Heating by ambipolar diffusion, and irradiation by coronal X-rays and far-ultraviolet photons from accretion shocks, are included (see Panoglou et al. 2011), as well as an improved treatment of self-shielding of H_2 and CO (Yvart et al. 2011). We present predictions for the most abundant molecules in the MHD disk wind, and emission maps and line profiles in H_2, CO, and (if available) H_2O. These predictions are compared with observed characteristics from ground-based and space-borne infrared and submm telescopes (eg. Spitzer, Herschel) and with future ALMA capabilities.

  14. Wind-driven export of Weddell Sea slope water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijers, A. J. S.; Meredith, M. P.; Abrahamsen, E. P.; Morales Maqueda, M. A.; Jones, D. C.; Naveira Garabato, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    The export of waters from the Weddell Gyre to lower latitudes is an integral component of the southern subpolar contribution to the three-dimensional oceanic circulation. Here we use more than 20 years of repeat hydrographic data on the continental slope on the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and 5 years of bottom lander data on the slope at 1000 m to show the intermittent presence of a relatively cold, fresh, westward flowing current. This is often bottom-intensified between 600 and 2000 dbar with velocities of over 20 cm s-1, transporting an average of 1.5 ± 1.5 Sv. By comparison with hydrography on the continental slope within the Weddell Sea and modeled tracer release experiments we show that this slope current is an extension of the Antarctic Slope Current that has crossed the South Scotia Ridge west of Orkney Plateau. On monthly to interannual time scales the density of the slope current is negatively correlated (r > 0.6 with a significance of over 95%) with eastward wind stress over the northern Weddell Sea, but lagging it by 6-13 months. This relationship holds in both the high temporal resolution bottom lander time series and the 20+ year annual hydrographic occupations and agrees with Weddell Sea export variability observed further east. We compare several alternative hypotheses for this wind stress/export relationship and find that it is most consistent with wind-driven acceleration of the gyre boundary current, possibly modulated by eddy dynamics, and represents a mechanism by which climatic perturbations can be rapidly transmitted as fluctuations in the supply of intermediate-level waters to lower latitudes.

  15. Design, economic and system considerations of large wind-driven generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, G. E.; Lotker, M.; Meier, R. C.; Brierley, D.

    1976-01-01

    The increased search for alternative energy sources has lead to renewed interest and studies of large wind-driven generators. This paper presents the results and considerations of such an investigation. The paper emphasizes the concept selection of wind-driven generators, system optimization, control system design, safety aspects, economic viability on electric utility systems and potential electric system interfacing problems.

  16. Design, economic and system considerations of large wind-driven generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, G. E.; Lotker, M.; Meier, R. C.; Brierley, D.

    1976-01-01

    The increased search for alternative energy sources has lead to renewed interest and studies of large wind-driven generators. This paper presents the results and considerations of such an investigation. The paper emphasizes the concept selection of wind-driven generators, system optimization, control system design, safety aspects, economic viability on electric utility systems and potential electric system interfacing problems.

  17. Regulation of black-hole accretion by a disk wind during a violent outburst of V404 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Darias, T.; Casares, J.; Mata Sánchez, D.; Fender, R. P.; Armas Padilla, M.; Linares, M.; Ponti, G.; Charles, P. A.; Mooley, K. P.; Rodriguez, J.

    2016-06-01

    Accretion of matter onto black holes is universally associated with strong radiative feedback and powerful outflows. In particular, black-hole transients have outflows whose properties are strongly coupled to those of the accretion flow. This includes X-ray winds of ionized material, expelled from the accretion disk encircling the black hole, and collimated radio jets. Very recently, a distinct optical variability pattern has been reported in the transient stellar-mass black hole V404 Cygni, and interpreted as disrupted mass flow into the inner regions of its large accretion disk. Here we report observations of a sustained outer accretion disk wind in V404 Cyg, which is unlike any seen hitherto. We find that the outflowing wind is neutral, has a large covering factor, expands at one per cent of the speed of light and triggers a nebular phase once accretion drops sharply and the ejecta become optically thin. The large expelled mass (>10-8 solar masses) indicates that the outburst was prematurely ended when a sizeable fraction of the outer disk was depleted by the wind, detaching the inner regions from the rest of the disk. The luminous, but brief, accretion phases shown by transients with large accretion disks imply that this outflow is probably a fundamental ingredient in regulating mass accretion onto black holes.

  18. Regulation of black-hole accretion by a disk wind during a violent outburst of V404 Cygni.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Darias, T; Casares, J; Mata Sánchez, D; Fender, R P; Armas Padilla, M; Linares, M; Ponti, G; Charles, P A; Mooley, K P; Rodriguez, J

    2016-06-02

    Accretion of matter onto black holes is universally associated with strong radiative feedback and powerful outflows. In particular, black-hole transients have outflows whose properties are strongly coupled to those of the accretion flow. This includes X-ray winds of ionized material, expelled from the accretion disk encircling the black hole, and collimated radio jets. Very recently, a distinct optical variability pattern has been reported in the transient stellar-mass black hole V404 Cygni, and interpreted as disrupted mass flow into the inner regions of its large accretion disk. Here we report observations of a sustained outer accretion disk wind in V404 Cyg, which is unlike any seen hitherto. We find that the outflowing wind is neutral, has a large covering factor, expands at one per cent of the speed of light and triggers a nebular phase once accretion drops sharply and the ejecta become optically thin. The large expelled mass (>10(-8) solar masses) indicates that the outburst was prematurely ended when a sizeable fraction of the outer disk was depleted by the wind, detaching the inner regions from the rest of the disk. The luminous, but brief, accretion phases shown by transients with large accretion disks imply that this outflow is probably a fundamental ingredient in regulating mass accretion onto black holes.

  19. Evaluation of lightning accommodation systems for wind-driven turbine rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankaitis, H.

    1982-01-01

    Wind-driven turbine generators are being evaluated as an alternative source of electric energy. Areas of favorable location for the wind-driven turbines (high wind density) coincide with areas of high incidence of thunderstorm activity. These locations, coupled with the 30-m or larger diameter rotor blades, make the wind-driven turbine blades probable terminations for lightning strikes. Several candidate systems of lightning accommodation for composite-structural-material blades were designed and their effectiveness evaluated by submitting the systems to simulated lightning strikes. The test data were analyzed and system design were reviewed on the basis of the analysis.

  20. Absorption lines from magnetically driven winds in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravorty, S.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Ferreira, J.; Henri, G.; Belmont, R.; Clavel, M.; Corbel, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Coriat, M.; Drappeau, S.; Malzac, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High resolution X-ray spectra of black hole X-ray binaries (BHBs) show blueshifted absorption lines suggesting the presence of outflowing winds. Furthermore, observations show that the disk winds are equatorial and they occur in the Softer (disk dominated) states of the outburst and are less prominent or absent in the Harder (power-law dominated) states. Aims: We want to test whether the self-similar magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) accretion-ejection models can explain the observational results for accretion disk winds in BHBs. In our models, the density at the base of the outflow from the accretion disk is not a free parameter. This mass loading is determined by solving the full set of dynamical MHD equations without neglecting any physical term. Thus, the physical properties of the outflow depend on and are controlled by the global structure of the disk. Methods: We studied different MHD solutions characterized by different values of the disk aspect ratio (ɛ) and the ejection efficiency (p). We also generate two kinds of MHD solutions depending on the absence (cold solution) or presence (warm solution) of heating at the disk surface. Such heating could be either from dissipation of energy due to MHD turbulence in the disk or from illumination of the disk surface. Warm solutions can have large (>0.1) values of p, which would imply larger wind mass loading at the base of the outflow. We use each of these MHD solutions to predict the physical parameters (distance, density, velocity, magnetic field, etc.) of an outflow. Motivated by observational results, we have put limits on the ionization parameter (ξ), column density, and timescales. Further constraints were derived for the allowed values of ξ from thermodynamic instability considerations, particularly for the Hard SED. These physical constraints were imposed on each of these outflows to select regions within it, which are consistent with the observed winds. Results: The cold MHD solutions are found to be

  1. Raindrop and flow interactions for interrill erosion with wind-driven rain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wind-driven rain (WDR) experiments were conducted to evaluate interrill component of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model with two-dimensional experimental set-up in wind tunnel. Synchronized wind and rain simulations were applied to soil surfaces on windward and leeward slopes of 7, 15...

  2. Using Rare Earth Elements (REE) to determine wind-driven soil dispersal from a point source

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although erosion of soil by water is a predictably directional process, the erosion of soil by wind is determined by wind direction on an event-wise basis. The wind-driven dispersal patterns of chemical constituents including natural soil components and anthropogenic contaminants are not well under...

  3. Exploring Quenching, Morphological Transformation and AGN-Driven Winds with Simulations of Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Ryan; CANDELS

    2017-01-01

    We present an examination of the spheroid growth and star formation quenching experienced by galaxies since z~3 by studying the evolution with redshift of the quiescent and spheroid-dominated fractions of galaxies from the CANDELS and GAMA surveys. We compare these fractions with predictions from a semi-analytic model which includes prescriptions for bulge growth and AGN feedback due to mergers and disk instabilities. We then subdivide our population into the four quadrants of the specific star-formation rate (sSFR)-Sersic index plane. We find that the fraction of star forming disks declines steadily while the fraction of quiescent spheroids increases with cosmic time. The fraction of star-forming spheroids and quiescent disks are both non-negligible and remain nearly constant. Our model is qualitatively successful at reproducing these fractions, suggesting a plausible explanation for the observed correlations between star formation activity and galaxy structure.Next, we study the correlation of galaxy structural properties with their location relative to the star-formation rate-stellar mass correlation, or the star forming main sequence. We find that as we move from observed galaxies above the main sequence to those below it, we see a nearly monotonic trend towards higher median Sersic index, smaller radius, lower SFR density and higher stellar mass density. Our model again qualitatively reproduces these trends, supporting a picture in which bulges and black holes co-evolve and AGN feedback plays a critical role in galaxy quenching.Finally, we examine AGN-driven winds in a suite of cosmological zoom simulations including a novel mechanical and radiation-driven AGN feedback prescription and compare the gas cycle with a matched suite of zoom simulations that include only feedback from supernovae and young stars. We find that while stellar feedback can drive mass out of galaxies, it is unlikely to be able to keep the gas from re-accreting, whereas in our AGN runs it

  4. The Partition Between Terminal Speed and Mass Loss: Thin, Thick, and Rotating Line-Driven Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayley, K. G.; Onifer, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    Steady-state supersonic line-driven winds are important contributors to wind-blown bubbles in star forming regions. The key input to the bubble in the energy-conserving phase is the wind kinetic-energy flux, which involves both the mass-loss rate and the terminal speed. However, these quantities are themselves self-consistent parameters of the line-driving process, so relate to each other and to the resulting wind optical depth. This complex interrelation between optical depth, mass-loss, and wind speed lies at the heart of line-driven wind theory. Drawing on the successes and insights of ``CAK'' theory, I will convey a simplified view of how to unite these processes using the concept of effective opacity, with attention to the ramifications for nonspherical nebular and wind-blown structures. Recent extensions to nongray optically thick environments such as Wolf-Rayet winds and supernovae are also discussed.

  5. Stellar Winds and Dust Avalanches in the AU Mic Debris Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Eugene; Fung, Jeffrey

    2017-10-01

    We explain the fast-moving, ripple-like features in the edge-on debris disk orbiting the young M dwarf AU Mic. The bright features are clouds of submicron dust repelled by the host star’s wind. The clouds are produced by avalanches: radial outflows of dust that gain exponentially more mass as they shatter background disk particles in collisional chain reactions. The avalanches are triggered from a region a few au across—the “avalanche zone”—located on AU Mic’s primary “birth” ring at a true distance of ∼35 au from the star but at a projected distance more than a factor of 10 smaller: the avalanche zone sits directly along the line of sight to the star, on the side of the ring nearest Earth, launching clouds that disk rotation sends wholly to the southeast, as observed. The avalanche zone marks where the primary ring intersects a secondary ring of debris left by the catastrophic disruption of a progenitor up to Varuna in size, less than tens of thousands of years ago. Only where the rings intersect are particle collisions sufficiently violent to spawn the submicron dust needed to seed the avalanches. We show that this picture works quantitatively, reproducing the masses, sizes, and velocities of the observed escaping clouds. The Lorentz force exerted by the wind’s magnetic field, whose polarity reverses periodically according to the stellar magnetic cycle, promises to explain the observed vertical undulations. The timescale between avalanches, about 10 yr, might be set by time variability of the wind mass loss rate or, more speculatively, by some self-regulating limit cycle.

  6. Radiation Belt Transport Driven by Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mueller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The creation of the Earth's outer zone radiation belts is attributed to earthward transport and adiabatic acceleration of electrons by drift-resonant interactions with electromagnetic fluctuations in the magnetosphere. Three types of radial transport driven by solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations that have been identified are: (1) radial diffusion [Falthammer, 1965], (2) significant changes in the phase space density radial profile due to a single or few ULF drift-resonant interactions [Ukhorskiy et al., 2006; Degeling et al., 2008], and (3) shock associated injections of radiation belt electrons occurring in less than a drift period [Li et al., 1993]. A progress report will be given on work to fully characterize different forms of radial transport and their effect on the Earth's radiation belts. The work is being carried out by computing test-particle trajectories in electric and magnetic fields from a simple analytic ULF field model and from global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere. Degeling, A. W., L. G. Ozeke, R. Rankin, I. R. Mann, and K. Kabin (2008), Drift resonant generation of peaked relativistic electron distributions by Pc 5 ULF waves, textit{J. Geophys. Res., 113}, A02208, doi:10.1029/2007JA012411. Fälthammar, C.-G. (1965), Effects of Time-Dependent Electric Fields on Geomagnetically Trapped Radiation, J. Geophys. Res., 70(11), 2503-2516, doi:10.1029/JZ070i011p02503. Li, X., I. Roth, M. Temerin, J. R. Wygant, M. K. Hudson, and J. B. Blake (1993), Simulation of the prompt energization and transport of radiation belt particles during the March 24, 1991 SSC, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 20}(22), 2423-2426, doi:10.1029/93GL02701. Ukhorskiy, A. Y., B. J. Anderson, K. Takahashi, and N. A. Tsyganenko (2006), Impact of ULF oscillations in solar wind dynamic pressure on the outer radiation belt electrons, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 33}(6), L06111, doi:10.1029/2005GL024380.

  7. The Disk Wind in the Rapidly Spinning Stellar-mass Black Hole 4U 1630-472 Observed with NuSTAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ashley L.; Walton, Dominic J.; Miller, Jon M.; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fabian, Andy C.; Furst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Krivonos, Roman; Mori, Kaya; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of a short NuSTAR observation of the stellar-mass black hole and low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1630-472. Reflection from the inner accretion disk is clearly detected for the first time in this source, owing to the sensitivity of NuSTAR. With fits to the reflection spectrum, we find evidence for a rapidly spinning black hole, a* = 0.985(+0.005/-0.014) (1 sigma statistical errors). However, archival data show that the source has relatively low radio luminosity. Recently claimed relationships between jet power and black hole spin would predict either a lower spin or a higher peak radio luminosity. We also report the clear detection of an absorption feature at 7.03 +/- 0.03 keV, likely signaling a disk wind. If this line arises in dense, moderately ionized gas (log xi = 3.6(+0.2/-0.3) and is dominated by He-like Fe xxv, the wind has a velocity of v/c = 0.043(+0.002/-0.007) (12900(+600/-2100) km s(exp -1)). If the line is instead associated with a more highly ionized gas (log xi = 6.1(+0.7/-0.6)), and is dominated by Fe xxvi, evidence of a blueshift is only marginal, after taking systematic errors into account. Our analysis suggests the ionized wind may be launched within 200-1100 Rg, and may be magnetically driven.

  8. A FAST X-RAY DISK WIND IN THE TRANSIENT PULSAR IGR J17480-2446 IN TERZAN 5

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Jon M.; Maitra, Dipankar; Cackett, Edward M.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2011-04-10

    Accretion disk winds are revealed in Chandra gratings spectra of black holes. The winds are hot and highly ionized (typically composed of He-like and H-like charge states) and show modest blueshifts. Similar line spectra are sometimes seen in 'dipping' low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), which are likely viewed edge-on; however, that absorption is tied to structures in the outer disk, and blueshifts are not typically observed. Here, we report the detection of blueshifted He-like Fe XXV (3100 {+-} 400 km s{sup -1}) and H-like Fe XXVI (1000 {+-} 200 km s{sup -1}) absorption lines in a Chandra/HETG spectrum of the transient pulsar and LMXB IGR J17480-2446 in Terzan 5. These features indicate a disk wind with at least superficial similarities to those observed in stellar-mass black holes. The wind does not vary strongly with numerous weak X-ray bursts or flares. A broad Fe K emission line is detected in the spectrum, and fits with different line models suggest that the inner accretion disk in this system may be truncated. If the stellar magnetic field truncates the disk, a field strength of B= (0.7-4.0)x10{sup 9} G is implied, which is in line with estimates based on X-ray timing techniques. We discuss our findings in the context of accretion flows onto neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes.

  9. Recent Observational Progress on Accretion Disks Around Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jon M.

    2016-04-01

    Studies of accretion disks around black holes and neutron stars over the last ten years have made remarkable progress. Our understanding of disk evolution as a function of mass accretion rate is pushing toward a consensus on thin/thick disk transitions; an apparent switching between disk-driven outflow modes has emerged; and monitoring observations have revealed complex spectral energy distributions wherein disk reprocessing must be important. Detailed studies of disk winds, in particular, have the potential to reveal the basic physical processes that mediate disk accretion, and to connect with numerical simulations. This talk will review these developments and look ahead to the potential of Astro-H.

  10. Ab Initio Simulations of a Supernova-driven Galactic Dynamo in an Isolated Disk Galaxy

    DOE PAGES

    Butsky, Iryna; Zrake, Jonathan; Kim, Ji-hoon; ...

    2017-07-10

    Here, we study the magnetic field evolution of an isolated spiral galaxy, using isolated Milky Way–mass galaxy formation simulations and a novel prescription for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) supernova feedback. Our main result is that a galactic dynamo can be seeded and driven by supernova explosions, resulting in magnetic fields whose strength and morphology are consistent with observations. In our model, supernovae supply thermal energy and a low-level magnetic field along with their ejecta. The thermal expansion drives turbulence, which serves a dual role by efficiently mixing the magnetic field into the interstellar medium and amplifying it by means of a turbulentmore » dynamo. The computational prescription for MHD supernova feedback has been implemented within the publicly available ENZO code and is fully described in this paper. This improves upon ENZO's existing modules for hydrodynamic feedback from stars and active galaxies. We find that the field attains microgauss levels over gigayear timescales throughout the disk. The field also develops a large-scale structure, which appears to be correlated with the disk's spiral arm density structure. We find that seeding of the galactic dynamo by supernova ejecta predicts a persistent correlation between gas metallicity and magnetic field strength. We also generate all-sky maps of the Faraday rotation measure from the simulation-predicted magnetic field, and we present a direct comparison with observations.« less

  11. 3-D MHD disk wind simulations of jets and outflows from high-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; Tanaka, Kei; Tan, Jonathan C.; Zhang, Yichen; Liu, Mengyao

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a series of nested, large scale, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of disk winds with a Blandford-Payne like magnetic field configuration, resolving scales from the stellar surface to beyond the core. The goal is to understand the structure of massive protostellar cores at various stages of their formation as the protostellar mass grows from a massive core. At each stage of a given protostellar mass, first, we study how jets and winds develop from the inner accretion disk to ~100 AU scales. We use the results from these simulations to dictate the inner boundary condition of a set of simulation extending to the core boundary at ~10,000 AU of an initially 60 solar mass core. We run separate simulations where the protostellar mass is 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 Msun, and we are working on making a small grid of models in the context of the Turbulent Core Model with three different core masses and three different core surface densities. The wind is blown into the simulation box with properties derived from the previous jet simulations. We examine the opening angle of the outflow cavity and thus the star formation efficiency from the core due to outflow feedback. We find that the opening angle increases as the protostellar mass grows, but it is always less than 10 degrees, which is surprisingly small compared with previous analytic models. This is caused by the core which confines the outflow. Finally, we use our simulation results as input to a radiative transfer calculation, to compare with observations made by the SOMA survey.

  12. X-Ray Flares and Mass Outflows Driven by Magnetic Interaction between a Protostar and Its Surrounding Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M. R.; Shibata, K.; Matsumoto, R.

    1996-09-01

    We propose a model of hard X-ray flares in protostars observed by the ASCA satellite. We assumed that the dipole magnetic field of the protostar threads the protostellar disk and carried out 2.5 dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the disk-star interaction. The closed magnetic loops connecting the central star and the disk are twisted by the rotation of the disk. As the twist accumulates, magnetic loops expand and finally approach the open field configuration. A current sheet is formed inside the expanding loops. In the presence of resistivity, magnetic reconnection takes place in the current sheet. Outgoing magnetic island and postflare loops are formed as a result of the reconnection. The timescale of this "flare" is the order of the rotation period of the disk. The released magnetic energy partly goes into the thermal energy and heats up the flaring plasma up to 108 K. The length of the flaring loop is several times the radius of the central star, consistent with observations. The speed of the hot plasmoid ejected by the reconnection is 200--400 km s-1 when the footpoint of the loop is at 0.03 AU from 1 Msolar protostar. The hot plasma outflow can explain the speed and mass flow rate of optical jets. Dense, cold, magnetically accelerated wind (v ~ 150--250 km s-1) emanates from the surface of the disk along the partially open magnetic field lines threading the disk. This dense, cold wind may correspond to high-velocity neutral winds.

  13. Line-driven winds revisited in the context of Be stars: Ω-slow solutions with high k values

    SciTech Connect

    Silaj, J.; Jones, C. E.; Curé, M.

    2014-11-01

    The standard, or fast, solutions of m-CAK line-driven wind theory cannot account for slowly outflowing disks like the ones that surround Be stars. It has been previously shown that there exists another family of solutions—the Ω-slow solutions—that is characterized by much slower terminal velocities and higher mass-loss rates. We have solved the one-dimensional m-CAK hydrodynamical equation of rotating radiation-driven winds for this latter solution, starting from standard values of the line force parameters (α, k, and δ), and then systematically varying the values of α and k. Terminal velocities and mass-loss rates that are in good agreement with those found in Be stars are obtained from the solutions with lower α and higher k values. Furthermore, the equatorial densities of such solutions are comparable to those that are typically assumed in ad hoc models. For very high values of k, we find that the wind solutions exhibit a new kind of behavior.

  14. Line-Driven Winds Revisited in the Context of Be Stars: Ω-slow Solutions with High k Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silaj, J.; Curé, M.; Jones, C. E.

    2014-11-01

    The standard, or fast, solutions of m-CAK line-driven wind theory cannot account for slowly outflowing disks like the ones that surround Be stars. It has been previously shown that there exists another family of solutions—the Ω-slow solutions—that is characterized by much slower terminal velocities and higher mass-loss rates. We have solved the one-dimensional m-CAK hydrodynamical equation of rotating radiation-driven winds for this latter solution, starting from standard values of the line force parameters (α, k, and δ), and then systematically varying the values of α and k. Terminal velocities and mass-loss rates that are in good agreement with those found in Be stars are obtained from the solutions with lower α and higher k values. Furthermore, the equatorial densities of such solutions are comparable to those that are typically assumed in ad hoc models. For very high values of k, we find that the wind solutions exhibit a new kind of behavior.

  15. ON THE ANISOTROPIC NATURE OF MRI-DRIVEN TURBULENCE IN ASTROPHYSICAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Gareth C.; Pessah, Martin E. E-mail: mpessah@nbi.dk

    2015-04-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is thought to play an important role in enabling accretion in sufficiently ionized astrophysical disks. The rate at which MRI-driven turbulence transports angular momentum is intimately related to both the strength of the amplitudes of the fluctuations on various scales and the degree of anisotropy of the underlying turbulence. This has motivated several studies to characterize the distribution of turbulent power in spectral space. In this paper we investigate the anisotropic nature of MRI-driven turbulence using a pseudo-spectral code and introduce novel ways for providing a robust characterization of the underlying turbulence. We study the growth of the MRI and the subsequent transition to turbulence via parasitic instabilities, identifying their potential signature in the late linear stage. We show that the general flow properties vary in a quasi-periodic way on timescales comparable to ∼10 inverse angular frequencies, motivating the temporal analysis of its anisotropy. We introduce a 3D tensor invariant analysis to quantify and classify the evolution of the anisotropy of the turbulent flow. This analysis shows a continuous high level of anisotropy, with brief sporadic transitions toward two- and three-component isotropic turbulent flow. This temporal-dependent anisotropy renders standard shell averaging especially when used simultaneously with long temporal averages, inadequate for characterizing MRI-driven turbulence. We propose an alternative way to extract spectral information from the turbulent magnetized flow, whose anisotropic character depends strongly on time. This consists of stacking 1D Fourier spectra along three orthogonal directions that exhibit maximum anisotropy in Fourier space. The resulting averaged spectra show that the power along each of the three independent directions differs by several orders of magnitude over most scales, except the largest ones. Our results suggest that a first

  16. On the Anisotropic Nature of MRI-driven Turbulence in Astrophysical Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Gareth C.; Pessah, Martin E.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is thought to play an important role in enabling accretion in sufficiently ionized astrophysical disks. The rate at which MRI-driven turbulence transports angular momentum is intimately related to both the strength of the amplitudes of the fluctuations on various scales and the degree of anisotropy of the underlying turbulence. This has motivated several studies to characterize the distribution of turbulent power in spectral space. In this paper we investigate the anisotropic nature of MRI-driven turbulence using a pseudo-spectral code and introduce novel ways for providing a robust characterization of the underlying turbulence. We study the growth of the MRI and the subsequent transition to turbulence via parasitic instabilities, identifying their potential signature in the late linear stage. We show that the general flow properties vary in a quasi-periodic way on timescales comparable to ∼10 inverse angular frequencies, motivating the temporal analysis of its anisotropy. We introduce a 3D tensor invariant analysis to quantify and classify the evolution of the anisotropy of the turbulent flow. This analysis shows a continuous high level of anisotropy, with brief sporadic transitions toward two- and three-component isotropic turbulent flow. This temporal-dependent anisotropy renders standard shell averaging especially when used simultaneously with long temporal averages, inadequate for characterizing MRI-driven turbulence. We propose an alternative way to extract spectral information from the turbulent magnetized flow, whose anisotropic character depends strongly on time. This consists of stacking 1D Fourier spectra along three orthogonal directions that exhibit maximum anisotropy in Fourier space. The resulting averaged spectra show that the power along each of the three independent directions differs by several orders of magnitude over most scales, except the largest ones. Our results suggest that a first

  17. Evidence for the Magnetic Origin of Black Hole Accretion Disk Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrader, Chris R.; Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demos; Tombesi, Francesco; Behar, Ehud

    2017-06-01

    Black hole accretion disks seem to produce plasma outflows that result in blue-shifted absorption features in their spectra1. The literature of the past decade or so has demonstrated that the X-ray absorption-line properties of these outflows are often diverse. They can range in velocity from non-relativistic (~300 km s^-1) to sub-relativistic (~0.1c) over broad range in ionization of the wind plasma. We report here that semi-analytical, self-similar magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) wind models that have successfully accounted for the X-ray absorber properties of supermassive black can also be applied to the high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the accreting stellar-mass black holes, in particular to the 2005 outburst of GRO J1655-40. This supports the argument of their MHD origin and is consistent with aligned with earlier observational claims. It further hints at the notion of a universal magnetic structure of the observed winds across the known black hole mass range.

  18. Planetesimal-driven planet migration in the presence of a gas disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capobianco, Christopher C.; Duncan, Martin; Levison, Harold F.

    2011-01-01

    We report here on an extension of a previous study by Kirsh et al. (Kirsh, D.R., Duncan, M., Brasser, R., Levison, H.F. [2009]. Icarus 199, 197-209) of planetesimal-driven migration using our N-body code SyMBA (Duncan, M.J., Levison, H.F., Lee, M.H. [1998]. Astron. J. 116, 2067-2077). The previous work focused on the case of a single planet of mass Mem, immersed in a planetesimal disk with a power-law surface density distribution and Rayleigh distributed eccentricities and inclinations. Typically 10 4-10 5 equal-mass planetesimals were used, where the gravitational force (and the back-reaction) on each planetesimal by the Sun and planet were included, while planetesimal-planetesimal interactions were neglected. The runs reported on here incorporate the dynamical effects of a gas disk, where the Adachi et al. (Adachi, I., Hayashi, C., Nakazawa, K. [1976]. Prog. Theor. Phys. 56, 1756-1771) prescription of aerodynamic gas drag is implemented for all bodies. In some cases the Papaloizou and Larwood (Papaloizou, J.C.B., Larwood, J.D. [2000]. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 315, 823-833) prescription of Type-I migration for the planet are implemented, as well as a mass distribution. In the gas-free cases, rapid planet migration was observed - at a rate independent of the planet's mass - provided the planet's mass was not large compared to the mass in planetesimals capable of entering its Hill sphere. In such cases, both inward and outward migrations can be self-sustaining, but there is a strong propensity for inward migration. When a gas disk is present, aerodynamic drag can substantially modify the dynamics of scattered planetesimals. For sufficiently large or small mono-dispersed planetesimals, the planet typically migrates inward. However, for a range of plausible planetesimal sizes (i.e. 0.5-5.0 km at 5.0 AU in a minimum mass Hayashi disk) outward migration is usually triggered, often accompanied by substantial planetary mass accretion. The origins of this behaviour are

  19. An Extreme X-ray Disk Wind in the Black Hole Candidate IGR J17091-3624

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, A. L.; Miller, J. M.; Raymond, J.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R.; Maitra, D.; Cackett, E. M.; Rupen, M. P.

    2012-01-01

    Chandra spectroscopy of transient stellar-mass black holes in outburst has clearly revealed accretion disk winds in soft, disk-dominated states, in apparent anti-correlation with relativistic jets in low/hard states. These disk winds are observed to be highly ionized. dense. and to have typical velocities of approx 1000 km/s or less projected along our line of sight. Here. we present an analysis of two Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating spectra of the Galactic black hole candidate IGR J17091-3624 and contemporaneous EVLA radio observations. obtained in 2011. The second Chandra observation reveals an absorption line at 6.91+/-0.01 keV; associating this line with He-like Fe XXV requires a blue-shift of 9300(+500/-400) km/ s (0.03c. or the escape velocity at 1000 R(sub schw)). This projected outflow velocity is an order of magnitude higher than has previously been observed in stellar-mass black holes, and is broadly consistent with some of the fastest winds detected in active galactic nuclei. A potential feature at 7.32 keV, if due to Fe XXVI, would imply a velocity of approx 14600 km/s (0.05c), but this putative feature is marginal. Photoionization modeling suggests that the accretion disk wind in IGR J17091-3624 may originate within 43,300 Schwarzschild radii of the black hole, and may be expelling more gas than accretes. The contemporaneous EVLA observations strongly indicate that jet activity was indeed quenched at the time of our Chandra observations. We discuss the results in the context of disk winds, jets, and basic accretion disk physics in accreting black hole systems

  20. AN EXTREME X-RAY DISK WIND IN THE BLACK HOLE CANDIDATE IGR J17091-3624

    SciTech Connect

    King, A. L.; Miller, J. M.; Maitra, D.; Raymond, J.; Fabian, A. C.; Cackett, E. M.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R.; Rupen, M. P.

    2012-02-20

    Chandra spectroscopy of transient stellar-mass black holes in outburst has clearly revealed accretion disk winds in soft, disk-dominated states, in apparent anti-correlation with relativistic jets in low/hard states. These disk winds are observed to be highly ionized, dense, and to have typical velocities of {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} or less projected along our line of sight. Here, we present an analysis of two Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating spectra of the Galactic black hole candidate IGR J17091-3624 and contemporaneous Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) radio observations, obtained in 2011. The second Chandra observation reveals an absorption line at 6.91 {+-} 0.01 keV; associating this line with He-like Fe XXV requires a blueshift of 9300{sup +500}{sub -400} km s{sup -1} (0.03c, or the escape velocity at 1000 R{sub Schw}). This projected outflow velocity is an order of magnitude higher than has previously been observed in stellar-mass black holes, and is broadly consistent with some of the fastest winds detected in active galactic nuclei. A potential feature at 7.32 keV, if due to Fe XXVI, would imply a velocity of {approx}14, 600 km s{sup -1} (0.05c), but this putative feature is marginal. Photoionization modeling suggests that the accretion disk wind in IGR J17091-3624 may originate within 43,300 Schwarzschild radii of the black hole and may be expelling more gas than it accretes. The contemporaneous EVLA observations strongly indicate that jet activity was indeed quenched at the time of our Chandra observations. We discuss the results in the context of disk winds, jets, and basic accretion disk physics in accreting black hole systems.

  1. Disk Wind in the Radiation of Two Herbig Ae/Be Stars: MWC 480 and IL Cep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinin, V.; Tambovtseva, L.; Potravnov, I.; Mkrtichian, D.

    2017-02-01

    Using non-LTE modeling for different components of the curcumstellar environment in Herbig AeBe stars, we reproduced hydrogen emission lines, such as Hα and Hβ, and determined geometrical and physical parameters of the line emitting regions. Two Herbig stars (MWC 480 and IL Cep) have been considered. The modeling shows that the disk wind or X-wind are the main contributors to the radiation of the lines of the Balmer series compared to the magnetospheric accreting region.

  2. Understanding the relation between wind- and pressure-driven sea level variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponte, Rui M.

    1994-01-01

    Sea surface adjustment to combined wind and pressure forcing is examined using numerical solutions to the shallow water equations. The experiments use coastal geometry and bottom topography representative of the North Atlantic and are forced by realistic barometric pressure and wind stress fields. The repsonse to pressure is essentially static or close to the inverted barometer solution at periods longer than a few days and dominates the sea level variability, with wind-driven sea level signals being relatively small. With regard to the dynamic signals, wind-driven fluctuations dominate at long periods, as expected from quasi-geostrophic theory. Pressure becomes more important than wind stress as a source of dynamic signals only at periods shorter than approximately three days. Wind- and pressure-driven sea level fluctuations are anticorrelated over most regions. Hence, regressions of sea level on barometric pressure yield coefficients generally smaller than expected for the inverted barometer response known to be the case in the model. In the regions of significant wind-pressure correlation effects, to infer the correct pressure reponse using statistical methods, input fields must include winds as well as pressure. Because of the nonlocal character of the wind response, multivariate statistical models with local wind driving as input are not very successful. Inclusion of nonlocal wind variability over extensive regions is necessary to extract the correct pressure response. Implications of these results to the interpretation of sea level observations are discussed.

  3. Understanding the relation between wind- and pressure-driven sea level variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponte, Rui M.

    1994-01-01

    Sea surface adjustment to combined wind and pressure forcing is examined using numerical solutions to the shallow water equations. The experiments use coastal geometry and bottom topography representative of the North Atlantic and are forced by realistic barometric pressure and wind stress fields. The repsonse to pressure is essentially static or close to the inverted barometer solution at periods longer than a few days and dominates the sea level variability, with wind-driven sea level signals being relatively small. With regard to the dynamic signals, wind-driven fluctuations dominate at long periods, as expected from quasi-geostrophic theory. Pressure becomes more important than wind stress as a source of dynamic signals only at periods shorter than approximately three days. Wind- and pressure-driven sea level fluctuations are anticorrelated over most regions. Hence, regressions of sea level on barometric pressure yield coefficients generally smaller than expected for the inverted barometer response known to be the case in the model. In the regions of significant wind-pressure correlation effects, to infer the correct pressure reponse using statistical methods, input fields must include winds as well as pressure. Because of the nonlocal character of the wind response, multivariate statistical models with local wind driving as input are not very successful. Inclusion of nonlocal wind variability over extensive regions is necessary to extract the correct pressure response. Implications of these results to the interpretation of sea level observations are discussed.

  4. Wind and Wave Driven Nearshore Circulation at Cape Hatteras Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N.; Voulgaris, G.; Warner, J. C.; List, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    We have used a measurement and modeling approach to identify hydrodynamic processes responsible for alongshore transport of sediment that can support the maintenance of Diamond Shoals, NC, a large inner-shelf sedimentary convergent feature. As a part of Carolina Coastal Change Processes project, a one month field experiment was conducted around Cape Hatteras point during February, 2010. The instrumentation consisted of 15 acoustic current meters (measuring pressure and velocity profile) deployed in water depths varying from 3-10m and a very high frequency (VHF) beam forming radar system providing surface waves and currents with a resolution of 150 m and a spatial coverage of 10-15 km2. Analysis of field observation suggests that wind-driven circulation and littoral current dominate surf zone and inner shelf processes at least at an order higher than tidally rectified flows. However, the data analysis identified that relevant processes like non-linear advective acceleration, pressure gradient and vortex-force (due to interaction between wave-induced drift and mean flow vorticity), may be significant, but were not assessed accurately due to instrument location and accuracy. To obtain a deeper physical understanding of the hydrodynamics in this study-site, we applied a three-dimensional Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave_Sediment-Transport (COAWST) numerical model. The COAWST modeling system is comprised of nested, coupled, three-dimensional ocean-circulation model (ROMS) and wave propagation model (SWAN), configured for the study site to simulate wave height, direction, period and mean current velocities (both Eulerian and Lagrangian). The nesting follows a two-way grid refinement process for the circulation module, and one-way for the wave model. The coarsest parent grid resolved processes on the spatial and temporal scales of mid-shelf to inner-shelf, and subsequent child grids evolved at inner-shelf and surf zone scales. Preliminary results show that the model

  5. RW Sextantis, a disk with a hot, high-velocity wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstein, J. L.; Oke, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    The continuum spectrum of the flickering blue variable RW Sex was observed from 10,000 to 1150 A. The star is a cataclysmic variable currently stabilized at maximum, and the spectrum is dominated by an accretion disk, with flat spectrum in the ultraviolet, except at more than 5000 A, where a blackbody near 7000 K is seen. A distance of 400 pc is derived, if the latter arises from an F type main sequence star. The accretion rate required is near 10 to the -8th solar masses per year. Only weak emission is seen, except for Lyman alpha; strong, broad UV absorption lines are seen with centers displaced up to -3000 km/s, with terminal velocities up to -4500 km/s, the velocity of escape from a white dwarf. The low X-ray flux may arise from absorption within an unusually dense, hot wind from the innermost portions of the disk. The estimated mass loss rate is nearly 10 to the -12th solar masses per year.

  6. The Disk Wind Model of the Broad Line Regions in Active Galactic Nuclei and Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell

    2002-01-01

    This is the final progress report for our Astrophysics Theory Program (NRA 97-OSS12) grant NAG5-7723. We have made considerable progress on incorporating photoionization calculations with a 2.5D hydrodynamical code to model disk winds in AGNs. Following up on our simultaneous broad band monitoring campaign of the type I Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548, we have investigated the constraints imposed on models of accretion in Seyfert galaxies by their optical, UV, and X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using results from thermal Comptonization models that relate the physical properties of the hot inner accretion flow to the thermal reprocessing that occurs in the surrounding colder thin disk, we find that we can constrain the central black hole mass, accretion rate and size scale of the hot central flow. We have applied our model to observations of Seyfert galaxies NGC 3516, NGC 7469 and NGC 5548. Our mass and accretion rate estimates for these objects roughly agree with those found using other methods.

  7. RW Sextantis, a disk with a hot, high-velocity wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstein, J. L.; Oke, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    The continuum spectrum of the flickering blue variable RW Sex was observed from 10,000 to 1150 A. The star is a cataclysmic variable currently stabilized at maximum, and the spectrum is dominated by an accretion disk, with flat spectrum in the ultraviolet, except at more than 5000 A, where a blackbody near 7000 K is seen. A distance of 400 pc is derived, if the latter arises from an F type main sequence star. The accretion rate required is near 10 to the -8th solar masses per year. Only weak emission is seen, except for Lyman alpha; strong, broad UV absorption lines are seen with centers displaced up to -3000 km/s, with terminal velocities up to -4500 km/s, the velocity of escape from a white dwarf. The low X-ray flux may arise from absorption within an unusually dense, hot wind from the innermost portions of the disk. The estimated mass loss rate is nearly 10 to the -12th solar masses per year.

  8. RW Sextantis, a disk with a hot, high-velocity wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenstein, J. L.; Oke, J. B.

    1982-07-01

    The continuum spectrum of the flickering blue variable RW Sex was observed from 10,000 to 1150 A. The star is a cataclysmic variable currently stabilized at maximum, and the spectrum is dominated by an accretion disk, with flat spectrum in the ultraviolet, except at more than 5000 A, where a blackbody near 7000 K is seen. A distance of 400 pc is derived, if the latter arises from an F type main sequence star. The accretion rate required is near 10 to the -8th solar masses per year. Only weak emission is seen, except for Lyman alpha; strong, broad UV absorption lines are seen with centers displaced up to -3000 km/s, with terminal velocities up to -4500 km/s, the velocity of escape from a white dwarf. The low X-ray flux may arise from absorption within an unusually dense, hot wind from the innermost portions of the disk. The estimated mass loss rate is nearly 10 to the -12th solar masses per year.

  9. The Disk Wind Model of the Broad Line Regions in Active Galactic Nuclei and Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell

    2002-01-01

    This is the final progress report for our Astrophysics Theory Program (NRA 97-OSS12) grant NAG5-7723. We have made considerable progress on incorporating photoionization calculations with a 2.5D hydrodynamical code to model disk winds in AGNs. Following up on our simultaneous broad band monitoring campaign of the type I Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548, we have investigated the constraints imposed on models of accretion in Seyfert galaxies by their optical, UV, and X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using results from thermal Comptonization models that relate the physical properties of the hot inner accretion flow to the thermal reprocessing that occurs in the surrounding colder thin disk, we find that we can constrain the central black hole mass, accretion rate and size scale of the hot central flow. We have applied our model to observations of Seyfert galaxies NGC 3516, NGC 7469 and NGC 5548. Our mass and accretion rate estimates for these objects roughly agree with those found using other methods.

  10. Mean Sea Level Derived from Altimetry and Wind-Driven Numerical Models in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perigaud, C.; Delecluse, P.; Greiner, E.; Rogel, P.

    1995-01-01

    Wind-driven model skill in simulating sea level variations in the Indian Ocean depends on our knowledge of the mean ocean dynamic topography. This is demonstrated by running the nonlinear or linear version of a shallow-water model driven by observed winds over Geosat and TOPEX periods. Geosat variations are assimilated in the nonlinear shallow-water model with the objective of obtaining topography data.

  11. Wake Flow Simulations for a Mid-Sized Rim Driven Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Rob O. Hovsapian; Various

    2014-06-01

    The onshore land where wind farms with conventional wind turbines can be places is limited by various factors including a requirement for relatively high wind speed for turbines' efficient operations. Where such a requirement cannot be met, mid-and small-sized turbines can be a solution. In the current paper simulations for near and for wakes behind a mid-sized Rim Driven Wind Turbine developed by Keuka Energy LLC is analyzed. The purposes of this study is to better understand the wake structure for more efficient wind farm planning. Simulations are conducted with the commercial CFD software STARCCM+

  12. ON SHOCKS DRIVEN BY HIGH-MASS PLANETS IN RADIATIVELY INEFFICIENT DISKS. II. THREE-DIMENSIONAL GLOBAL DISK SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lyra, Wladimir; Richert, Alexander J. W.; Boley, Aaron; Turner, Neal; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Flock, Mario; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark E-mail: neal.j.turner@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: ajr327@psu.edu E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org

    2016-02-01

    Recent high-resolution, near-infrared images of protoplanetary disks have shown that these disks often present spiral features. Spiral arms are among the structures predicted by models of disk–planet interaction and thus it is tempting to suspect that planetary perturbers are responsible for these signatures. However, such interpretation is not free of problems. The observed spirals have large pitch angles, and in at least one case (HD 100546) it appears effectively unpolarized, implying thermal emission of the order of 1000 K (465 ± 40 K at closer inspection). We have recently shown in two-dimensional models that shock dissipation in the supersonic wake of high-mass planets can lead to significant heating if the disk is sufficiently adiabatic. Here we extend this analysis to three dimensions in thermodynamically evolving disks. We use the Pencil Code in spherical coordinates for our models, with a prescription for thermal cooling based on the optical depth of the local vertical gas column. We use a 5M{sub J} planet, and show that shocks in the region around the planet where the Lindblad resonances occur heat the gas to substantially higher temperatures than the ambient gas. The gas is accelerated vertically away from the midplane to form shock bores, and the gas falling back toward the midplane breaks up into a turbulent surf. This turbulence, although localized, has high α values, reaching 0.05 in the inner Lindblad resonance, and 0.1 in the outer one. We find evidence that the disk regions heated up by the shocks become superadiabatic, generating convection far from the planet’s orbit.

  13. A wind-driven circulation model of the Tyrrhenian Sea area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, S.; Simioli, A.

    1998-12-01

    The wind-driven component of the circulation in the Tyrrhenian Sea area was analyzed by means of a free-surface, barotropic primitive equation model implemented in the whole Mediterranean Sea. The `National Meteorological Center' (NMC) wind data covering the period 1980-1988 were used to force the model. Both the seasonal and the high frequency variability were studied. For the first case, a perpetual wind forcing was constructed by instantaneously averaging the wind stresses over the 9 years, and the response was Fourier filtered in order to get rid of the residual rapid fluctuations. The daily variability was then produced for the test years 1981 and 1987 by making use of the instantaneous forcing. The main features of the wind-driven climatological Tyrrhenian circulation known from data and general circulation modelling were found to be reproduced by this process model. The winter cyclonic circulation induced by the strong positive wind vorticity input evolved into a much weaker, partially reversed circulation in summer months. A mainly northward flux through the strait of Corsica and a horizontally sheared current in the strait of Sicily were found. The rapid fluctuations that the wind was able to induce in the ocean were then studied. The instantaneous currents were found to be up to 10 times larger than the corresponding climatological ones, with episodes of reversal over a period of few days. The experimental evidence of the existence of these rapid wind-driven fluctuations is discussed. The analysis of the daily variability provides a realistic picture of the character of the wind-driven circulation in the Tyrrhenian Sea that differs considerably from the classical seasonal dynamics. As an indicator of the Tyrrhenian Sea dynamics, the mass transport through the strait of Corsica was evaluated for the year 1987 and compared with available experimental data. As a result, the low-passed wind-driven transport reflects the seasonal trend and accounts for 15

  14. Variable H13CO+ Emission in the IM Lup Disk: X-Ray Driven Time-dependent Chemistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A.; Öberg, Karin I.; Andrews, Sean; Wilner, David; Loomis, Ryan

    2017-07-01

    We report the first detection of a substantial brightening event in an isotopologue of a key molecular ion, HCO+, within a protoplanetary disk of a T Tauri star. The H13CO+ J=3-2 rotational transition was observed three times toward IM Lup between 2014 July and 2015 May with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The first two observations show similar spectrally integrated line and continuum fluxes, while the third observation shows a doubling in the disk-integrated J=3-2 line flux compared to the continuum, which does not change between the three epochs. We explore models of an X-ray active star irradiating the disk via stellar flares, and find that the optically thin H13CO+ emission variation can potentially be explained via X-ray-driven chemistry temporarily enhancing the HCO+ abundance in the upper layers of the disk atmosphere during large or prolonged flaring events. If the HCO+ enhancement is indeed caused by an X-ray flare, future observations should be able to spatially resolve these events and potentially enable us to watch the chemical aftermath of the high-energy stellar radiation propagating across the face of protoplanetary disks, providing a new pathway to explore ionization physics and chemistry, including electron density, in disks.

  15. Magnetically driven relativistic jets and winds: Exact solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Contopoulos, J.

    1994-01-01

    We present self-consistent solutions of the full set of ideal MHD equations which describe steady-state relativistic cold outflows from thin accretion disks. The magnetic field forms a spiral which is anchored in the disk, rotates with it, and accelerates the flow out of the disk plane. The collimation at large distances depends on the total amount of electric current that flows along the jet. We considered various distributions of electric current and derived the result that in straight jets which extend to infinite distances, a strong electric current flows along their axis of symmetry. The asymptotic flow velocities are of the order of the initial rotational velocity at the base of the flow (a few tenths of the speed of light). The solutions are applied to both galactic (small-scale) and extragalactic (large-scale) jets.

  16. Boundary layer development over a large array of porous-disk-modeled wind turbines via stereo particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Elizabeth; Vuppuluri, Vasant; Cal, Raúl

    2014-11-01

    The increasing size of wind turbine arrays in service highlights the importance of understanding the flow physics within such large turbine arrays. Thus, the development of a wind turbine array boundary layer (WTBL) was investigated experimentally for an 8 × 5 array of model wind turbines. Model wind turbines were on a 1:2000 scale and turbine rotors were represented by porous disks. Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) measurements were done along the centerline of the wind turbine array at several streamwise positions both within and above the canopy. Measurements and analysis of the mean and streamwise-averaged statistics of the SPIV fields focus on the rotors in the furthest downstream positions. Statistics will be used to determine if a fully developed WTBL has been achieved.

  17. NGC 1365: A low column density state unveiling a low ionization disk wind

    SciTech Connect

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Gofford, J.; Nardini, E.; Porquet, D.; Risaliti, G.

    2014-11-01

    We present the time-resolved spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton data of NGC 1365 collected during one XMM-Newton observation, which caught this 'changing-look' active galactic nucleus in a high flux state characterized also by a low column density (N {sub H} ∼ 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}) of the X-ray absorber. During this observation, the low-energy photoelectric cut-off is at about ∼1 keV and the primary continuum can be investigated with the XMM-Newton-RGS data, which show strong spectral variability that can be explained as a variable low N {sub H} that decreased from N {sub H} ∼ 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2} to 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2} in a 100 ks timescale. The spectral analysis of the last segment of the observation revealed the presence of several absorption features that can be associated with an ionized (log ξ ∼ 2 erg cm s{sup –1}) outflowing wind (v {sub out} ∼ 2000 km s{sup –1}). We detected for the first time a possible P-Cygni profile of the Mg XII Lyα line associated with this mildly ionized absorber indicative of a wide angle outflowing wind. We suggest that this wind is a low ionization zone of the highly ionized wind present in NGC 1365, which is responsible for the iron K absorption lines and is located within the variable X-ray absorber. At the end of the observation, we detected a strong absorption line at E ∼ 0.76 keV most likely associated with a lower ionization zone of the absorber (log ξ ∼ 0.2 erg cm s{sup –1}, N {sub H} ∼ 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}), which suggests that the variable absorber in NGC 1365 could be a low ionization zone of the disk wind.

  18. Turbulence in the Outer Regions of Protoplanetary Disks. II. Strong Accretion Driven by a Vertical Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob B.; Bai, Xue-Ning; Armitage, Philip J.; Stone, James M.; Beckwith, Kris

    2013-09-01

    We carry out a series of local, vertically stratified shearing box simulations of protoplanetary disks that include ambipolar diffusion and a net vertical magnetic field. The ambipolar diffusion profiles we employ correspond to 30 AU and 100 AU in a minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN) disk model, which consists of a far-ultraviolet-ionized surface layer and low-ionization disk interior. These simulations serve as a follow-up to Simon et al., in which we found that without a net vertical field, the turbulent stresses that result from the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are too weak to account for observed accretion rates. The simulations in this work show a very strong dependence of the accretion stresses on the strength of the background vertical field; as the field strength increases, the stress amplitude increases. For a net vertical field strength (quantified by β0, the ratio of gas to magnetic pressure at the disk mid-plane) of β0 = 104 and β0 = 105, we find accretion rates \\dot{M} \\sim 10^{-8}-10-7 M ⊙ yr-1. These accretion rates agree with observational constraints, suggesting a vertical magnetic field strength of ~60-200 μG and 10-30 μG at 30 AU and 100 AU, respectively, in a MMSN disk. Furthermore, the stress has a non-negligible component due to a magnetic wind. For sufficiently strong vertical field strengths, MRI turbulence is quenched, and the flow becomes largely laminar, with accretion proceeding through large-scale correlations in the radial and toroidal field components as well as through the magnetic wind. In all simulations, the presence of a low-ionization region near the disk mid-plane, which we call the ambipolar damping zone, results in reduced stresses there.

  19. Testing Accretion Disk Wind Models of Broad Absorption Line Quasars with SDSS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Sean; Gabel, Jack

    2017-06-01

    We present an investigation of a large sample of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars (QSO) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 5 (DR5). Properties of the BALs, such as absorption equivalent width, outflow velocities, and depth of BAL, are obtained from analysis by Gibson et al. We perform correlation analysis on these data to test the predictions made by the radiation driven, accretion disk streamline model of Murray and Chiang. We find the CIV BAL maximum velocity and the continuum luminosity are correlated, consistent with radiation driven models. The mean minimum velocity of CIV is lower in low ionization BALs (LoBALs), than highly ionized BALs (HiBALS), suggesting an orientation effect consistent with the Murray and Chiang model. Finally, we find that HiBALs greatly outnumber LoBALs in the general BAL population, supporting prediction of the Murray and Chiang model that HiBALs have a greater global covering factor than LoBALs.

  20. Ab Initio Simulations of a Supernova-driven Galactic Dynamo in an Isolated Disk Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butsky, Iryna; Zrake, Jonathan; Kim, Ji-hoon; Yang, Hung-I.; Abel, Tom

    2017-07-01

    We study the magnetic field evolution of an isolated spiral galaxy, using isolated Milky Way-mass galaxy formation simulations and a novel prescription for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) supernova feedback. Our main result is that a galactic dynamo can be seeded and driven by supernova explosions, resulting in magnetic fields whose strength and morphology are consistent with observations. In our model, supernovae supply thermal energy and a low-level magnetic field along with their ejecta. The thermal expansion drives turbulence, which serves a dual role by efficiently mixing the magnetic field into the interstellar medium and amplifying it by means of a turbulent dynamo. The computational prescription for MHD supernova feedback has been implemented within the publicly available ENZO code and is fully described in this paper. This improves upon ENZO's existing modules for hydrodynamic feedback from stars and active galaxies. We find that the field attains microgauss levels over gigayear timescales throughout the disk. The field also develops a large-scale structure, which appears to be correlated with the disk’s spiral arm density structure. We find that seeding of the galactic dynamo by supernova ejecta predicts a persistent correlation between gas metallicity and magnetic field strength. We also generate all-sky maps of the Faraday rotation measure from the simulation-predicted magnetic field, and we present a direct comparison with observations.

  1. Wind-Driven Ecological Flow Regimes Downstream from Hydropower Dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, J.; Characklis, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    Conventional hydropower can be turned on and off quicker and less expensively than thermal generation (coal, nuclear, or natural gas). These advantages enable hydropower utilities to respond to rapid fluctuations in energy supply and demand. More recently, a growing renewable energy sector has underlined the need for flexible generation capacity that can complement intermittent renewable resources such as wind power. While wind power entails lower variable costs than other types of generation, incorporating it into electric power systems can be problematic. Due to variable and unpredictable wind speeds, wind power is difficult to schedule and must be used when available. As a result, integrating large amounts of wind power into the grid may result in atypical, swiftly changing demand patterns for other forms of generation, placing a premium on sources that can be rapidly ramped up and down. Moreover, uncertainty in wind power forecasts will stipulate increased levels of 'reserve' generation capacity that can respond quickly if real-time wind supply is less than expected. These changes could create new hourly price dynamics for energy and reserves, altering the short-term financial signals that hydroelectric dam operators use to schedule water releases. Traditionally, hourly stream flow patterns below hydropower dams have corresponded in a very predictable manner to electricity demand, whose primary factors are weather (hourly temperature) and economic activity (workday hours). Wind power integration has the potential to yield more variable, less predictable flows at hydro dams, flows that at times could resemble reciprocal wind patterns. An existing body of research explores the impacts of standard, demand-following hydroelectric dams on downstream ecological flows; but weighing the benefits of increased reliance on wind power against further impacts to ecological flows may be a novel challenge for the environmental community. As a preliminary step in meeting this

  2. Data-driven RANS for prediction of wind turbine wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Viola, Francesco; Ciri, Umberto; Camarri, Simone; Rotea, Mario A.; Leonardi, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Wind turbine wakes are highly turbulent flows resulting from the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and wake vorticity structures. Measurement technologies, such as wind LiDARs, are currently available to perform velocity measurements in a set of locations of wakes past utility-scale wind turbines; however, computational methods are still needed to predict wake downstream evolution. In this work, a low-computational cost and accurate algorithm is proposed for prediction of the spatial evolution of wind turbine wakes. Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes equations (RANS) are formulated in cylindrical coordinates and simplified by using a boundary layer type approximation. Turbulence effects are taken into account with a mixing length model calibrated on the available observations. In this study, observations of wind turbine wakes consist in LES data of wakes produced by a wind turbine operating with different incoming wind and loading conditions. The mixing length calibrated on the LES data is constant in the near wake and only affected by the incoming turbulence, whereas further downstream it increases roughly linearly with the downstream position and with increased slope for increasing rotational speed of the turbine.

  3. How Spirals and Gaps Driven by Companions in Protoplanetary Disks Appear in Scattered Light at Arbitrary Viewing Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruobing; Fung, Jeffrey; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-07-01

    Direct imaging observations of protoplanetary disks at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths have revealed structures of potentially planetary origin. Investigations of observational signatures from planet-induced features have so far focused on disks viewed face-on. Combining 3D hydrodynamics and radiative transfer simulations, we study how the appearance of the spiral arms and the gap produced in a disk by a companion varies with inclination and position angle in NIR scattered light. We compare the cases of a 3M J and a 0.1M ⊙ companion, and make predictions suitable for testing with Gemini/GPI, Very Large Telescope/NACO/SPHERE, and Subaru/HiCIAO/SCExAO. We find that the two trailing arms produced by an external perturber can have a variety of morphologies in inclined systems—they may appear as one trailing arm; two trailing arms on the same side of the disk; or two arms winding in opposite directions. The disk ring outside a planetary gap may also mimic spiral arms when viewed at high inclinations. We suggest potential explanations for the features observed in HH 30, HD 141569 A, AK Sco, HD 100546, and AB Aur. We emphasize that inclined views of companion-induced features cannot be converted into face-on views using simple and commonly practiced image deprojections.

  4. SLOW RADIATION-DRIVEN WIND SOLUTIONS OF A-TYPE SUPERGIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cure, M.; Cidale, L.; Granada, A.

    2011-08-10

    The theory of radiation-driven winds succeeded in describing terminal velocities and mass-loss rates of massive stars. However, for A-type supergiants the standard m-CAK solution predicts values of mass loss and terminal velocity higher than the observed values. Based on the existence of a slow wind solution in fast rotating massive stars, we explore numerically the parameter space of radiation-driven flows to search for new wind solutions in slowly rotating stars that could explain the origin of these discrepancies. We solve the one-dimensional hydrodynamical equation of rotating radiation-driven winds at different stellar latitudes and explore the influence of ionization changes throughout the wind in the velocity profile. We have found that for particular sets of stellar and line-force parameters, a new slow solution exists over the entire star when the rotational speed is slow or even zero. In the case of slow rotating A-type supergiant stars, the presence of this novel slow solution at all latitudes leads to mass losses and wind terminal velocities which are in agreement with the observed values. The theoretical wind-momentum-luminosity relationship derived with these slow solutions shows very good agreement with the empirical relationship. In addition, the ratio between the terminal and escape velocities, which provides a simple way to predict stellar wind energy and momentum input into the interstellar medium, is also properly traced.

  5. Radiatively driven winds for different power law spectra. [for explaining narrow and broad quasar absorption lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltrametti, M.

    1980-01-01

    The analytic solutions for radiatively driven winds are given for the case in which the winds are driven by absorption of line and continuum radiation. The wind solutions are analytically estimated for different parameters of the central source and for different power law spectra. For flat spectra, three sonic points can exist; it is shown, however, that only one of these sonic points is physically realistic. Parameters of the central source are given which generate winds of further interest for explaining the narrow and broad absorption lines in quasars. For the quasar model presented here, winds which could give rise to the narrow absorption lines are generated by central sources with parameters which are not realistic for quasars.

  6. Radiatively driven winds for different power law spectra. [for explaining narrow and broad quasar absorption lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltrametti, M.

    1980-01-01

    The analytic solutions for radiatively driven winds are given for the case in which the winds are driven by absorption of line and continuum radiation. The wind solutions are analytically estimated for different parameters of the central source and for different power law spectra. For flat spectra, three sonic points can exist; it is shown, however, that only one of these sonic points is physically realistic. Parameters of the central source are given which generate winds of further interest for explaining the narrow and broad absorption lines in quasars. For the quasar model presented here, winds which could give rise to the narrow absorption lines are generated by central sources with parameters which are not realistic for quasars.

  7. Stochastic Modeling of Turbulence-Driven Systems: Application to Wind Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, P.; Waechter, M.; Peinke, J.

    2010-11-01

    The recent increase in the exploitation of the wind energy resource stresses the need for fundamental research in fluid dynamics. The complex wind inflows that drive wind turbines affect their availability in terms of electric power production, as well as in operation lifetime. Short-scale turbulent effects in the wind such as intermittency, as well as large-scale atmospheric non-stationarity lead to ever-changing power signals fed into the electric grid. This calls for a theoretical classification of wind energy phenomena into complex, turbulence-driven systems. Our raising dependence on wind energy requires a better understanding of these phenomena, as well as reliable models. A stochastic model is proposed as an alternative to standard wind energy models that often neglect turbulent effects or CFD models that cannot decribe large wind turbines yet. This model is based on the stochastic equation of Langevin that can simulate these complex systems after their proper characterization. This stochastic model can be applied separately on both atmospheric wind speed signals as well as wind turbine power production signals, after the wind turbine was characterized properly. The signals generated display the proper statistics and represent fast and flexible models for wind energy applications such as monitoring, availability prediction or grid integration. A future analysis of fatigue loads is also under development.

  8. A Climatological Study of Thermally Driven Wind Systems of the U.S. Intermountain West

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Jebb Q.; Whiteman, Charles D.; Steenburgh, W. J.; Bian, Xindi

    2002-05-01

    This paper investigates the diurnal evolution of thermally driven plain-mountain, valley, slope, and lake winds for summer fair-weather conditions in four regions of the Intermountain West where dense wind networks have been operated. Because of the diverse topography in these regions, the results are expected to be broadly representative of thermally driven wind climates in the Intermountain West. The regions include the Wasatch Front Valleys of northern Utah, the Snake River Plain of Idaho, the southern Nevada basin and range province, and central Arizona. The analysis examines wind characteristics including the regularity of the winds and interactions of four types of thermally driven winds. In general, on fair weather days, winds in all four regions exhibit a consistent direction from day to day at a given hour. A measure of this wind consistency is defined. The nighttime hours exhibit a high consistency, the daytime hours a moderate consistency, and transition periods a low consistency. The low consistency during the day-night and night-day transition periods reflects day-to-day variations in the timing of wind system reversals. Thermally driven circulations are similar in the four regions, but the Wasatch Front Valleys are influenced by lake breezes from the adjacent Great Salt Lake, the Snake River Plain is influenced by along-plain circulations and localized outflow from the Central Idaho Mountains, and winds in both southern Nevada and central Arizona are influenced by monsoonal plain-mountain circulations associated with regional-scale contrasts in elevation and surface heating.

  9. AK Sco: evidence of tide driven filling of the inner gap in the circumbinary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez de Castro, Ana I.; Lopez-Santiago, Javier; Talavera, Antonio; Sytov, A. Yu.; Bisikalo, Dmitri

    2013-07-01

    AK Sco stands out among pre-main sequence binaries because of its prominent ultraviolet excess, the high eccentricity of its orbit and the strong tides driven by it. AK Sco is made of two F5 type stars that get as close as 11R* at periastron passage. The presence of a dense (ne ~ 1011 cm-3) extended envelope has been unveiled recently. In this article, we report the results from a XMM-Newton based, monitoring of the system. We show that at periastron, X-ray and UV fluxes are enhanced by a factor of ~3 with respect to the apastron values. The X-ray radiation is produced in an optically thin plasma with T~6.4 MK and it is found that the NH column rises from 0.35 1021 cm-2 at periastron to 1.11 1021 cm-2 at apastron, in good agreement with previous polarimetric observations. The UV emission detected in the OM band seems to be caused by the reprocessing of the high energy magnetospheric radiation on the circumstellar material. Moreover, further evidence of the strong magnetospheric disturbances is provided by the detection of line broadening of 279 km s-1 in the N V line with HST/STIS. Numerical simulations of the mass flow from the circumbinary disk to the components have been carried out. They provide a consistent scenario to interpret AK Sco observations. We show that the eccentric orbit acts like a gravitational piston. At apastron, matter is dragged efficiently from the inner disk border, filling the inner gap and producing accretion streams that end as ring-like structures around each component of the system. At periastron, the ring-like structures get in contact, leading to angular momentum annihilation, and thus producing an accretion outburst. These results are published in Gómez de Castro et al. 2013, ApJ, 766, 62 We have also discovered a 780 s period oscillation in the UV continuum light curve triggered at periastron passage (Gómez de Castro, Lopez-Santiago & Talavera, 2013, MNRAS, 429, L1).

  10. Parameterization of surface wind-driven currents in the Black Sea using drifters, wind, and altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanichny, Sergey Vladimirovich; Kubryakov, Arseny Alexandrovich; Soloviev, Dmitry Markovich

    2016-01-01

    The original method is presented for parameterization of surface wind-driven currents in the Black Sea using drifters, altimetry, and wind data. Buoys velocities for the cases with small time variability of the altimetry-derived geostrophic currents were parameterized as a function of the amplitude coefficient b and rotation angle a between wind and residual current direction at drifter drogue depth ˜ 15 m. The results show that the variability of a and b for different cases is very high: angle a changes from 10 to 90° to the right, amplitude coefficient b varies from 0.01 to 0.03. At the same time, it is shown that amplitude coefficient b and rotation angle a on 15 m depth are not independent parameters and there is a robust dependence between them. Using quasi-Ekman theory and the revealed dependence, we can determine parameterization for wind-driven currents exactly on the surface. As a result, we found that wind-driven currents at z = 0 m are directed on b 0 = 13° to the right of wind direction with amplitudes equal to k = 2.8 % of wind velocity. It is important that these parameters did not depend on Ekman layer depth and can be used under different ocean conditions. This parameterization is used to compute the total surface currents and determine the trajectories of oil slick propagation observed on satellite images. Comparison shows that the presented method can be successfully used to predict floating objects trajectories basing on the satellite data.

  11. GLOBAL MODELING OF RADIATIVELY DRIVEN ACCRETION OF METALS FROM COMPACT DEBRIS DISKS ONTO WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Bochkarev, Konstantin V.; Rafikov, Roman R. E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-11-01

    Recent infrared observations have revealed the presence of compact (radii {approx}< R{sub sun}) debris disks around more than a dozen metal-rich white dwarfs (WDs), likely produced by a tidal disruption of asteroids. Accretion of high-Z material from these disks may account for the metal contamination of these WDs. It was previously shown using local calculations that the Poynting-Robertson (PR) drag acting on the dense, optically thick disk naturally drives metal accretion onto the WD at the typical rate M-dot{sub PR}{approx}10{sup 8} g s{sup -1}. Here we extend this local analysis by exploring the global evolution of the debris disk under the action of the PR drag for a variety of assumptions about the disk properties. We find that massive disks (mass {approx}> 10{sup 20} g), which are optically thick to incident stellar radiation, inevitably give rise to metal accretion at rates M-dot {approx}>0.2 M-dot{sub PR}. The magnitude of M-dot and its time evolution are determined predominantly by the initial pattern of the radial distribution of the debris (i.e., ring-like versus disk-like) but not by the total mass of the disk. The latter determines only the disk lifetime, which can be several Myr or longer. The evolution of an optically thick disk generically results in the development of a sharp outer edge of the disk. We also find that the low-mass ({approx}< 10{sup 20} g), optically thin disks exhibit M-dot << M-dot{sub PR} and evolve on a characteristic timescale {approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} yr, independent of their total mass.

  12. Soil erosion rates by wind-driven rain from a sandy soil in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fister, W.; Kuhn, N. J.; Itin, N.; Tesch, S.; Heckrath, G.; Ries, J. B.

    2012-04-01

    Soil erosion by wind and water is able to cause severe soil loss from agricultural fields. Laboratory studies in recent years have shown that wind most probably has an increasing effect on soil erosion rates by water. However, field studies have so far not been able to quantify and proof this assumption explicitly. Especially the differentiation between the influence of windless and wind-driven erosion seems to be the major issue. The objectives of this study were, therefore, to explicitly investigate the importance of wind-driven rain in relation to erosion rates without the effect of wind by applying a newly developed Portable Wind and Rainfall Simulator (PWRS) that is able to simulate the processes both separately and simultaneously. The PWRS was used on bare sandy soil near Viborg, Denmark. Prior to simulation the soil was ploughed and after consolidation harrowed to create surface structures and roughness representing typical conditions after seed bed preparation. To facilitate the separation of specific influences by wind-driven rain and to avoid systematic errors a defined order of four consecutive test runs was established: 0) single wind test run for 10 min, 1) single rainfall test run on dry soil, 2) single rainfall test run on moist soil, 3) simultaneous wind and rainfall test run (wind-driven rainfall). Each rainfall simulation lasted for 30 minutes with a 30 min break in between to allow for initial drainage of the soil and for remounting sediment catchers. By utilizing a gutter in combination with wedge-shaped sediment traps it was possible to separate between splash and runoff erosion from the 2.2 m2 plot. The results show a wide range of soil detachment raging from zero up to more than 500 g m-2 in 30 minutes. Five out of nine test sequences support the theory that wind-driven rain causes more erosion than windless rain. The relation between the two processes is therefore not as clear as expected and seems to be dominated by the natural variability

  13. THE DISK WIND IN THE RAPIDLY SPINNING STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE 4U 1630–472 OBSERVED WITH NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    King, Ashley L.; Miller, Jon M.; Walton, Dominic J.; Fürst, Felix; Harrison, Fiona A.; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Krivonos, Roman; Tomsick, John A.; Christensen, Finn E.; Fabian, Andy C.; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-03-20

    We present an analysis of a short NuSTAR observation of the stellar-mass black hole and low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1630–472. Reflection from the inner accretion disk is clearly detected for the first time in this source, owing to the sensitivity of NuSTAR. With fits to the reflection spectrum, we find evidence for a rapidly spinning black hole, a{sub ∗}=0.985{sub −0.014}{sup +0.005} (1σ statistical errors). However, archival data show that the source has relatively low radio luminosity. Recently claimed relationships between jet power and black hole spin would predict either a lower spin or a higher peak radio luminosity. We also report the clear detection of an absorption feature at 7.03 ± 0.03 keV, likely signaling a disk wind. If this line arises in dense, moderately ionized gas (log ξ=3.6{sub −0.3}{sup +0.2}) and is dominated by He-like Fe XXV, the wind has a velocity of v/c=0.043{sub −0.007}{sup +0.002} (12900{sub −2100}{sup +600} km s{sup –1}). If the line is instead associated with a more highly ionized gas (log ξ=6.1{sub −0.6}{sup +0.7}), and is dominated by Fe XXVI, evidence of a blueshift is only marginal, after taking systematic errors into account. Our analysis suggests the ionized wind may be launched within 200-1100 Rg, and may be magnetically driven.

  14. Wind data for wind driven plant. [site selection for optimal performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stodhart, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Simple, averaged wind velocity data provide information on energy availability, facilitate generator site selection and enable appropriate operating ranges to be established for windpowered plants. They also provide a basis for the prediction of extreme wind speeds.

  15. X-Ray--heated Coronae and Winds from Accretion Disks: Time-dependent Two-dimensional Hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D. Tod; Klein, Richard I.; Castor, John I.; McKee, Christopher F.; Bell, John B.

    1996-04-01

    We perform for the first time time-dependent, two-dimensional, axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations using local adaptive mesh refinement of thermally driven rotating winds from X-ray-irradiated accretion disks. The disk is assumed to flare in height with radius allowing direct exposure from the central X-ray source. The heating and cooling are treated strictly in the optically thin approximation. We adopt two spectra characteristic of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) which have Compton temperatures of TIC ≍ 1.3 x 107 K and 108 K. We have computed a number of models which cover a large range in luminosity (0.002 ≤ L/LEddington < 1) and radius (≲20 Compton radii). Our models enable us to extend and improve on the analytic predictions of Begelman, McKee, & Shields (BMS) for Compton-heated winds by including non-Compton processes such as photoionization heating and line cooling, typical of X-ray-heated winds. These non-Compton processes can be dominant at low temperatures (≲107 K), thus being important in the wind regions of AGNs. Our results agree well with a number of predictions given by BMS, even when non-Compton processes dominate, suggesting that their analytic approximations of the hydrodynamics of disk winds are applicable to the more general area of X-ray-heated winds. In the regime in which Compton processes dominate (i.e., TIC = 108 K spectrum), we have used our results to improve the analytic predictions of BMS, providing a new expression for the mass-loss rate and a modified view of the wind solution topology. We find that beginning from a basically static state, the time-dependent flow which develops eventually settles into a steady wind, without any evidence of hydrodynamic instabilities. The solution topology consists of a corona with an exponentially truncated wind at small radii, and a vigorous wind at large radii which can be impeded by gravity for small luminosities. We have constructed radius-luminosity parameter space plots of our numerical

  16. Wind Tunnel Test of Subscale Ringsail and Disk-Gap-Band Parachutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumwalt, Carlie H.; Cruz, Juan R.; Keller, Donald F.; O'Farrell, Clara

    2016-01-01

    A subsonic wind tunnel test was conducted to determine the drag and static aerodynamic coefficients, as well as to capture the dynamic motions of a new Supersonic Ringsail parachute developed by the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Project. To provide a comparison against current Mars parachute technology, the Mars Science Laboratory's Disk-Gap-Band parachute was also included in the test. To account for the effect of fabric permeability, two fabrics ("low" and "standard" permeability) were used to fabricate each parachute canopy type, creating four combinations of canopy type and fabric material. A wide range of test conditions were covered during the test, spanning Mach numbers from 0.09 to 0.5, and static pressures from 103 to 2116 pounds per square inch (psf) (nominal values). The fabric permeability is shown to have a first-order effect on the aerodynamic coefficients and dynamic motions of the parachutes. For example, for a given parachute type and test condition, models fabricated from "low" permeability fabric always have a larger drag coefficient than models fabricated from "standard" permeability material. This paper describes the test setup and conditions, how the results were analyzed, and presents and discusses a sample of the results. The data collected during this test is being used to create and improve parachute aerodynamic databases for use in flight dynamics simulations for missions to Mars.

  17. Radiatively driven winds from magnetic, fast-rotating stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerney, S.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical procedure is developed to solve the magnetohydrodynamic equations for the stellar wind problem in the strong-magnetic field, optically thick limit for hot stars. The slow-mode, Alfven, and fast-mode critical points are modified by the radiation terms in the force equation but in a manner that can be treated relatively easily. Once the velocities at the critical points and the distances to the points are known, the streamline constants are determined in a straight-forward manner. This allows the structure of the wind to be elucidated without recourse to complicated computational schemes.

  18. Effects of El Niño-driven changes in wind patterns on North Pacific albatrosses

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, L. H.; Conners, M. G.; Hazen, E. L.; Bograd, S. J.; Antolos, M.; Costa, D. P.; Shaffer, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Changes to patterns of wind and ocean currents are tightly linked to climate change and have important implications for cost of travel and energy budgets in marine vertebrates. We evaluated how El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-driven wind patterns affected breeding Laysan and black-footed albatross across a decade of study. Owing to latitudinal variation in wind patterns, wind speed differed between habitat used during incubation and brooding; during La Niña conditions, wind speeds were lower in incubating Laysan (though not black-footed) albatross habitat, but higher in habitats used by brooding albatrosses. Incubating Laysan albatrosses benefited from increased wind speeds during El Niño conditions, showing increased travel speeds and mass gained during foraging trips. However, brooding albatrosses did not benefit from stronger winds during La Niña conditions, instead experiencing stronger cumulative headwinds and a smaller proportion of trips in tailwinds. Increased travel costs during brooding may contribute to the lower reproductive success observed in La Niña conditions. Furthermore, benefits of stronger winds in incubating habitat may explain the higher reproductive success of Laysan albatross during El Niño conditions. Our findings highlight the importance of considering habitat accessibility and cost of travel when evaluating the impacts of climate-driven habitat change on marine predators. PMID:27278360

  19. Effects of El Niño-driven changes in wind patterns on North Pacific albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Thorne, L H; Conners, M G; Hazen, E L; Bograd, S J; Antolos, M; Costa, D P; Shaffer, S A

    2016-06-01

    Changes to patterns of wind and ocean currents are tightly linked to climate change and have important implications for cost of travel and energy budgets in marine vertebrates. We evaluated how El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-driven wind patterns affected breeding Laysan and black-footed albatross across a decade of study. Owing to latitudinal variation in wind patterns, wind speed differed between habitat used during incubation and brooding; during La Niña conditions, wind speeds were lower in incubating Laysan (though not black-footed) albatross habitat, but higher in habitats used by brooding albatrosses. Incubating Laysan albatrosses benefited from increased wind speeds during El Niño conditions, showing increased travel speeds and mass gained during foraging trips. However, brooding albatrosses did not benefit from stronger winds during La Niña conditions, instead experiencing stronger cumulative headwinds and a smaller proportion of trips in tailwinds. Increased travel costs during brooding may contribute to the lower reproductive success observed in La Niña conditions. Furthermore, benefits of stronger winds in incubating habitat may explain the higher reproductive success of Laysan albatross during El Niño conditions. Our findings highlight the importance of considering habitat accessibility and cost of travel when evaluating the impacts of climate-driven habitat change on marine predators. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. A dynamo driven by zonal winds at the upper surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guervilly, C.; Cardin, P.

    2009-12-01

    In a first approximation, Jupiter is made of two fluid layers: a deep metallic hydrogen layer where the jovian dynamo is generated and a superficial “atmospheric” non metallic envelope of approximately 10,000 km depth (10-20% of the total radius of the planet). Recent numerical simulations of three-dimensional rotating convection in a relatively thin spherical shell modelling the atmospheric layer of Jupiter reproduce zonal winds similar to the bands visible on Jupiter’s surface [1]. The simulated flow displays a quasi two-dimensional structure aligned with axis of rotation. Thus [1] suggests that the zonal winds may be “deep rooted” within Jupiter’s interior. These zonal winds are believed to be damped within the deep metallic hydrogen layer [2]. The main question that leads to our work is simple: can the external forcing created by the zonal winds at the top of the metallic hydrogen region drive a dynamo? The external zonal winds generate geostrophic shear layers inside which may lead to non-axisymmetric hydrodynamic instabilities. Such instabilities are known to excite dynamo action [3], [4] and the jovian dynamo will be discussed following these ideas. [1] Heimpel, M.H., Aurnou, J.M., Wicht, J., 2005. Simulation of equatorial and high-latitude jets on Jupiter in a deep convection model. Nature 438, 193-196. [2] Kirk, R.L., Stevenson, D.J., 1987. Hydromagnetic constraints on deep zonal flow in the giant planets. Astrophys. J. 316, 816-846 [3] Guervilly C. and Cardin P., 2009. Numerical simulations of dynamos generated in spherical Couette flows, submitted to Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. [4] Schaeffer, N. and Cardin, P., 2006. Quasi-geostrophic kinematic dynamos at low magnetic Prandtl number. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 245, 595-604.

  1. Wind-driven surface circulation in the Cape Blanc region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, P.; Pelegrí, J. L.; Benazzouz, A.

    2013-06-01

    We analyze the short-term transition, on time scales of the order of days and weeks, of the surface fields in the coastal transition zone off Northwest Africa, between 15°N and 25°N, during winter and spring 2005 and 2006. This is a complex region characterized by the baroclinic coastal jet north of Cape Blanc, along-shore convergence and water export at the Cape Blanc giant filament, and substantial mesoscale variability between Capes Verde and Blanc. We use the anomalies of the wind impulse and two different coastal upwelling indexes, evaluated off 17°N, 20°N and 23°N, in order to assess the importance of wind forcing in this short-term variability. We also employ daily and weekly surface maps of wind, temperature, surface height and currents to investigate which are the mechanisms that lead to the relatively fast changes in the flow patterns. The coastal baroclinic jet and the Cape Blanc giant filament are ubiquitous features, the two being intrinsically related through the intensity of upwelling off Cape Blanc. Therefore, the strength of both features responds, to a large extent, to the fluctuations of the northeasterly winds; their intensity is greater in spring than winter but during both seasons they experience relatively fast oscillations related to the intermittency of the wind field. The mesoscalar features are visible in the entire domain, with time scales typically of the order of two weeks, but become prominent in the southern region during spring, apparently related to an intense northward coastal jet south of Cape Blanc.

  2. Radar remote sensing of wind-driven land degradation processes in northeastern Patagonia.

    PubMed

    del Valle, H F; Blanco, P D; Metternicht, G I; Zinck, J A

    2010-01-01

    Wind-driven land degradation negatively impacts on rangeland production and infrastructure in the Valdes Peninsula, northeastern Patagonia. The Valdes Peninsula has the most noticeable dunefields of the Patagonian drylands. Wind erosion has been assessed at different scales in this region, but often with limited data. In general, terrain features caused by wind activity are better discriminated by active microwaves than by sensors operating in the visible and infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. This paper aims to analyze wind-driven land degradation processes that control the radar backscatter observed in different sources of radar imagery. We used subsets derived from SIR-C, ERS-1 and 2, ENVISAT ASAR, RADARSAT-1, and ALOS PALSAR data. The visibility of aeolian features on radar images is mostly a function of wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle. Stabilized sand deposits are clearly observed in radar images, with defined edges but also signals of ongoing wind erosion. One of the most conspicuous features corresponds to old track sand dunes, a mixture of active and inactive barchanoid ridges and parabolic dunes. This is a clear example of deactivation of migrating dunes under the influence of vegetation. The L-band data reveal details of these sand ridges, whereas the C-band data only allow detecting a few of the larger tracks. The results of this study enable us to make recommendations about the utility of some radar sensor configurations for wind-driven land degradation reconnaissance in mid-latitude regions.

  3. Spatial development of the wind-driven water surface flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, Rémi; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2015-04-01

    The water velocity field induced by wind and waves beneath an air-water interface is investigated experimentally versus fetch in the large Marseille-Luminy wind wave tank. Measurements of the vertical velocity profiles inside the subsurface shear layer were performed by a three-component Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The surface drift current was also derived from visualizations of small floating drifters recorded by a video camera looking vertically from above the water surface. Surface wave height and slopes were determined simultaneously by means of capacitance gauges and a single-point laser slope system located in the immediate vicinity of the profiler. Observations were made at steady low to moderate wind speeds and various fetches ranging between 1 and 15 meters. This study first corroborates that the thin subsurface water boundary layer forced by wind at the leading edge of the water sheet is laminar. The surface drift current velocity indeed increases gradually with fetch, following a 1/3 power law characteristic of an accelerated flat-plate laminar boundary layer. The laminar-turbulent transition manifests itself by a sudden decrease in the water surface flow velocity and a rapid deepening of the boundary layer due to the development of large-scale longitudinal vortices. Further downstream, when characteristic capillary-gravity wind waves develop at the surface, the water flow velocity increases again rapidly within a sublayer of typically 4 mm depth. This phenomenon is explained by the occurrence of an intense momentum flux from waves to the mean flow due to the dissipation of parasitic capillaries generated ahead of the dominant wave crests. This phenomenon also sustains significant small-scale turbulent motions within the whole boundary layer. However, when gravity-capillary waves of length longer than 10 cm then grow at the water surface, the mean flow velocity field decreases drastically over the whole boundary layer thickness. At the same

  4. DYNAMO ACTIVITIES DRIVEN BY MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY AND THE PARKER INSTABILITY IN GALACTIC GASEOUS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Mami; Nakamura, Kenji E.; Kudoh, Takahiro; Akahori, Takuya; Sofue, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2013-02-10

    We carried out global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of dynamo activities in galactic gaseous disks without assuming equatorial symmetry. Numerical results indicate the growth of azimuthal magnetic fields non-symmetric to the equatorial plane. As the magnetorotational instability (MRI) grows, the mean strength of magnetic fields is amplified until the magnetic pressure becomes as large as 10% of the gas pressure. When the local plasma {beta} (=p {sub gas}/p {sub mag}) becomes less than 5 near the disk surface, magnetic flux escapes from the disk by the Parker instability within one rotation period of the disk. The buoyant escape of coherent magnetic fields drives dynamo activities by generating disk magnetic fields with opposite polarity to satisfy the magnetic flux conservation. The flotation of the azimuthal magnetic flux from the disk and the subsequent amplification of disk magnetic field by the MRI drive quasi-periodic reversal of azimuthal magnetic fields on a timescale of 10 rotation periods. Since the rotation speed decreases with radius, the interval between the reversal of azimuthal magnetic fields increases with radius. The rotation measure computed from the numerical results shows symmetry corresponding to a dipole field.

  5. Emission of gravitational waves by precession of slim accretion disks dynamically driven by the Bardeen-Petterson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, W. D.; Sánchez, L. A.; Mosquera, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted from some astrophysical objects such as active galactic nuclei (AGN), micro-quasars (M-QSRs), and central engines of gamma-ray burst (GRBs), seems to have a similar physical origin: a powerful jet of plasma ejected from a localized system, presumably composed of an accretion disk encircling a compact object. This radiation is generally beamed in the polar directions and in some cases, it appears to have a spiral-like structure that could be explained if the central system itself precesses. In this work, we use the slim disk accretion model, presented by Popham et al. (1999), to studying the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted by the precession of the accretion disk around a solar-mass Kerr black hole (KBH). For practical purposes, this model describes the central engine of a class of GRBs when some astrophysical constrains are fulfilled. The induced precession considered here is driven by the Bardeen-Petterson effect, which results from the combination of viscous effects in such disks and the relativistic frame-dragging effect. We evaluate the feasibility of direct detection of the GWs computed for such a model and show that the precession of this kind of systems could be detected by gravitational wave observatories like DECIGO, ultimate-DECIGO, and BBO, with higher probability if such a class of sources are placed at distances less than 1 Mpc.

  6. Southern Ocean wind-driven entrainment enhances satellite chlorophyll-a through the summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, Magdalena M.; Gille, Sarah T.

    2015-01-01

    Despite being the largest High Nitrate Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) region, the Southern Ocean sustains phytoplankton blooms through the summer, when presumably there is sufficient light, but nutrients in the euphotic zone have been depleted. Physical processes that can potentially supply nutrients from subsurface waters to the euphotic zone, and promote phytoplankton growth in the summer, have not been fully explored at the large scale. By means of a correlation analysis, this study combines high-resolution satellite observations of ocean color, winds and sea surface temperature, surface heat fluxes from reanalysis and Argo mixed-layer depth (MLD) estimates to explore the role of the atmospheric forcing (i.e., winds and surface heat fluxes) on upper ocean processes that may help sustain high satellite chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) through the summer. Two physical processes that can supply nutrients to the euphotic zone are: MLD deepening, caused by wind-mixing and/or surface cooling, and Ekman pumping driven by the wind stress curl. We find that high winds correlate with high Chl-a over broad open ocean areas, suggesting that transient MLD deepening through wind-mixing (i.e., wind-driven entrainment) helps sustain high Chl-a. Wind-driven entrainment plays a dominant role on time scales associated with atmospheric synoptic storms (i.e., <10 days) and has a larger influence on surface Chl-a than storm scale local Ekman pumping. Based on our analysis of statistically significant correlation patterns, we identify regions in the Southern Ocean where wind-induced entrainment may play a role in sustaining summer phytoplankton blooms.

  7. Generalized Wind Turbine Actuator Disk Parameterization in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model for Real-World Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, N.; Mirocha, J. D.; Chow, F. K.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we examine the performance of a generalized actuator disk (GAD) model embedded within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model to study wake effects on successive rows of turbines at a North American wind farm. These wake effects are of interest as they can drastically reduce down-wind energy extraction and increase turbulence intensity. The GAD, which is designed for turbulence-resolving simulations, is used within downscaled large-eddy simulations (LES) forced with mesoscale simulations and WRF's grid nesting capability. The GAD represents the effects of thrust and torque created by a wind turbine on the atmosphere within a disk representing the rotor swept area. The lift and drag forces acting on the turbine blades are parameterized using blade-element theory and the aerodynamic properties of the blades. Our implementation permits simulation of turbine wake effects and turbine/airflow interactions within a realistic atmospheric boundary layer flow field, including resolved turbulence, time-evolving mesoscale forcing, and real topography. The GAD includes real-time yaw and pitch control to respond realistically to changing flow conditions. Simulation results are compared to SODAR data from operating wind turbines and an already existing WRF mesoscale turbine drag parameterization to validate the GAD parameterization.

  8. The multiphase starburst-driven galactic wind in NGC 5394

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Fernández, Pablo; Jiménez-Vicente, Jorge; Zurita, Almudena; Mediavilla, Evencio; Castillo-Morales, África

    2016-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the neutral and ionized gas phases in the galactic wind for the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 5394 based on new integral field spectroscopy obtained with the INTEGRAL fibre system at the William Herschel Telescope. The neutral gas phase in the wind is detected via the interstellar Na I D doublet absorption. After a careful removal of the stellar contribution to these lines, a significant amount of neutral gas (˜107 M⊙) is detected in a central region of ˜1.75 kpc size. This neutral gas is blueshifted by ˜165 km s-1 with respect to the underlying galaxy. The mass outflow of neutral gas is comparable to the star formation rate of the host galaxy. Simultaneously, several emission lines (Hα, [N II], [S II]) are also analysed looking for the ionized warm phase counterpart of the wind. A careful kinematic decomposition of the line profiles reveals the presence of a secondary, broader, kinematic component. This component is found roughly in the same region where the Na I D absorption is detected. It presents higher [N II]/Hα and [S II]/Hα line ratios than the narrow component at the same locations, indicative of contamination by shock ionization. This secondary component also presents blueshifted velocities, although smaller than those measured for the neutral gas, averaging to ˜-30 km s-1. The mass and mass outflow rate of the wind is dominated by the neutral gas, of which a small fraction might be able to escape the gravitational potential of the host galaxy. The observations in this system can be readily understood within a bipolar gas flow scenario.

  9. Magnetorotationally driven wind cycles in local disc models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riols, A.; Ogilvie, G. I.; Latter, H.; Ross, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Jets, from the protostellar to the AGN context, have been extensively studied but their connection to the turbulent dynamics of the underlying accretion disc is poorly understood. Following a similar approach to Lesur, Fereira & Ogilvie, we examine the role of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the production and acceleration of outflows from discs. Via a suite of 1D shearing-box simulations of stratified discs, we show that magnetocentrifugal winds exhibit cyclic activity with a period of 10-20 Ω-1, a few times the orbital period. The cycle seems to be more vigorous for strong vertical field; it is robust to the variation of relevant parameters and independent of numerical details. The convergence of these solutions (in particular the mass-loss rate) with vertical box size is also studied. By considering a sequence of magnetohydrostatic equilibria and their stability, the periodic activity may be understood as the succession of the following phases: (a) a dominant MRI channel mode, (b) strong magnetic field generation, (c) consequent wind launching, and ultimately (d) vertical expulsion of the excess magnetic field by the expanding and accelerating gas associated with the wind. We discuss potential connections between this behaviour and observed time-variability in disc-jet systems.

  10. Wind-Driven Coastal Generation of Annual Mesoscale Eddy Activity in the California Current

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    DATES COVERED 12/93 FINAL 10/ 1 /90-11/30/91 4. TintL AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Wind-driven Coastal Generation of Annual Mesoscale Eddy Activity in...winds. The other is a I 1 /2-layer primitive equation (PE) model with the ability to represent the coastal response to winds but not baroclinic...California Current ALEJANDRO PARES-SIERRA* WARREN B. WHITE " AD C_-K TA:* ’Cenifo de InrwoitCenriai£ ivnp S9,PCYw’ . 1 ,r Lnu~naaj (.Msnucnpt tecei~ed 𔄀 S c

  11. Atlantic to Mediterranean Sea Level Difference Driven by Winds near Gibraltar Strait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menemenlis, Dimitris; Fukumori, Ichiro; Lee, Tong

    2006-01-01

    Observations and numerical simulations show that winds near Gibraltar Strait cause an Atlantic Ocean to Mediterranean Sea sea level difference of 20 cm peak to peak with a 3-cm standard deviation for periods of days to years. Theoretical arguments and numerical experiments establish that this wind-driven sea level difference is caused in part by storm surges due to alongshore winds near the North African coastline on the Atlantic side of Gibraltar. The fraction of the Moroccan coastal current offshore of the 284-m isobath is deflected across Gibraltar Strait, west of Camarinal Sill, resulting in a geostrophic surface pressure gradient that contributes to a sea level difference at the stationary limit. The sea level difference is also caused in part by the along-strait wind setup, with a contribution proportional to the along-strait wind stress and to the length of Gibraltar Strait and adjoining regions and inversely proportional to its depth.

  12. Atlantic to Mediterranean Sea Level Difference Driven by Winds near Gibraltar Strait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menemenlis, Dimitris; Fukumori, Ichiro; Lee, Tong

    2006-01-01

    Observations and numerical simulations show that winds near Gibraltar Strait cause an Atlantic Ocean to Mediterranean Sea sea level difference of 20 cm peak to peak with a 3-cm standard deviation for periods of days to years. Theoretical arguments and numerical experiments establish that this wind-driven sea level difference is caused in part by storm surges due to alongshore winds near the North African coastline on the Atlantic side of Gibraltar. The fraction of the Moroccan coastal current offshore of the 284-m isobath is deflected across Gibraltar Strait, west of Camarinal Sill, resulting in a geostrophic surface pressure gradient that contributes to a sea level difference at the stationary limit. The sea level difference is also caused in part by the along-strait wind setup, with a contribution proportional to the along-strait wind stress and to the length of Gibraltar Strait and adjoining regions and inversely proportional to its depth.

  13. Data-driven Reduced Order Model for prediction of wind turbine wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, G. V.; Santoni-Ortiz, C.; Abkar, M.; Porté-Agel, F.; Rotea, M. A.; Leonardi, S.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper a new paradigm for prediction of wind turbine wakes is proposed, which is based on a reduced order model (ROM) embedded in a Kalman filter. The ROM is evaluated by means of dynamic mode decomposition performed on high fidelity LES numerical simulations of wind turbines operating under different operational regimes. The ROM enables to capture the main physical processes underpinning the downstream evolution and dynamics of wind turbine wakes. The ROM is then embedded within a Kalman filter in order to produce a time-marching algorithm for prediction of wind turbine wake flows. This data-driven algorithm enables data assimilation of new measurements simultaneously to the wake prediction, which leads to an improved accuracy and a dynamic update of the ROM in presence of emerging coherent wake dynamics observed from new available data. Thanks to its low computational cost, this numerical tool is particularly suitable for real-time applications, control and optimization of large wind farms.

  14. Chandra Spectroscopy of MAXI J1305-704: Detection of an Infalling Black Hole Disk Wind?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. M.; Raymond, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Maitra, D.; Fabian, A. C.; Proga, D.; Reynolds, C. S.; Reynolds, M. T.; Degenaar, N.; King, A. L.; Cackett, E. M.; Kennea, J. A.; Beardmore, A.

    2014-06-01

    active galactic nuclei, as well as the potential role of failed winds in emerging connections between disk outflows and black hole state transitions.

  15. Chandra spectroscopy of MAXI J1305–704: Detection of an infalling black hole disk wind?

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.; Maitra, D.; Reynolds, M. T.; Degenaar, N.; King, A. L.; Raymond, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Proga, D.; Reynolds, C. S.; Cackett, E. M.; Kennea, J. A.; Beardmore, A.

    2014-06-10

    , strong caution is warranted. We discuss our results in the context of accretion flows in stellar-mass black holes and active galactic nuclei, as well as the potential role of failed winds in emerging connections between disk outflows and black hole state transitions.

  16. Quasar Feedback in the Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy F11119+3257: Connecting the Accretion Disk Wind with the Large-scale Molecular Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, S.; Bolatto, A.; Tombesi, F.; Meléndez, M.; Sturm, E.; González-Alfonso, E.; Fischer, J.; Rupke, D. S. N.

    2017-07-01

    In Tombesi et al., we reported the first direct evidence for a quasar accretion disk wind driving a massive (>100 M ⊙ yr-1) molecular outflow. The target was F11119+3257, an ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) with unambiguous type 1 quasar optical broad emission lines. The energetics of the accretion disk wind and molecular outflow were found to be consistent with the predictions of quasar feedback models where the molecular outflow is driven by a hot energy-conserving bubble inflated by the inner quasar accretion disk wind. However, this conclusion was uncertain because the mass outflow rate, momentum flux, and mechanical power of the outflowing molecular gas were estimated from the optically thick OH 119 μm transition profile observed with Herschel. Here, we independently confirm the presence of the molecular outflow in F11119+3257, based on the detection of ˜±1000 km s-1 blue- and redshifted wings in the CO(1-0) emission line profile derived from deep ALMA observations obtained in the compact array configuration (˜2.″8 resolution). The broad CO(1-0) line emission appears to be spatially extended on a scale of at least ˜7 kpc from the center. Mass outflow rate, momentum flux, and mechanical power of (80-200) {R}7-1 M ⊙ yr-1, (1.5-3.0) {R}7-1 L AGN/c, and (0.15-0.40)% {R}7-1 {L}{AGN}, respectively, are inferred from these data, assuming a CO-to-H2 conversion factor appropriate for a ULIRG (R 7 is the radius of the outflow normalized to 7 kpc, and L AGN is the AGN luminosity). These rates are time-averaged over a flow timescale of 7 × 106 yr. They are similar to the OH-based rates time-averaged over a flow timescale of 4 × 105 yr, but about a factor of 4 smaller than the local (“instantaneous” ≲105 yr) OH-based estimates cited in Tombesi et al. The implications of these new results are discussed in the context of time-variable quasar-mode feedback and galaxy evolution. The need for an energy-conserving bubble to explain the molecular outflow

  17. Star formation driven galactic winds in UGC 10043

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Cobá, C.; Sánchez, S. F.; Moiseev, A. V.; Oparin, D. V.; Bitsakis, T.; Cruz-González, I.; Morisset, C.; Galbany, L.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Roth, M. M.; Dettmar, R.-J.; Bomans, D. J.; González Delgado, Rosa M.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Marino, R. A.; Kehrig, C.; Monreal Ibero, A.; Abril-Melgarejo, V.

    2017-06-01

    We study the galactic wind in the edge-on spiral galaxy UGC 10043 with the combination of the CALIFA integral field spectroscopy data, scanning Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) and multiband photometry. We detect ionized gas in the extraplanar regions reaching a relatively high distance, up to ˜4 kpc above the galactic disc. The ionized gas line ratios ([N ii]/Hα, [S ii]/Hα and [O i]/Hα) present an enhancement along the semiminor axis, in contrast with the values found at the disc, where they are compatible with ionization due to H ii-regions. These differences, together with the biconic symmetry of the extra-planar ionized structure, make UGC 10043 a clear candidate for a galaxy with gas outflows ionizated by shocks. From the comparison of shock models with the observed line ratios, and the kinematics observed from the FPI data, we constrain the physical properties of the observed outflow. The data are compatible with a velocity increase of the gas along the extraplanar distances up to <400 km s-1 and the pre-shock density decreasing in the same direction. We also observe a discrepancy in the SFR estimated based on Hα (0.36 M⊙ yr-1) and that estimated with the cigale code, the latter being five times larger. Nevertheless, this SFR is still not enough to drive the observed galactic wind if we do not take into account the filling factor. We stress that the combination of the three techniques of observation with the models is a powerful tool to explore galactic winds in the Local Universe.

  18. Solar wind driven dust acoustic instability with Lorentzian kappa distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, Kashif; Ehsan, Zahida; Khan, S. A.; Mahmood, S.

    2014-02-15

    In a three species electron-ion-dust plasma following a generalized non-Maxwellian distribution function (Lorentzian or kappa), it is shown that a kinetic instability of dust-acoustic mode exists. The instability threshold is affected when such (quasineutral) plasma permeates through another static plasma. Such case is of interest when the solar wind is streaming through the cometary plasma in the presence of interstellar dust. In the limits of phase velocity of the waves larger and smaller than the thermal velocity of dust particles, the dispersion properties and growth rate of dust-acoustic mode are investigated analytically with validation via numerical analysis.

  19. NLTE models of line-driven stellar winds - II. O stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtička, Jiří

    2006-04-01

    We calculate non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line-driven wind models of selected O stars in the spectral range of O4 to O9 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We compare predicted basic wind properties, i.e. the terminal velocity and the mass-loss rate with values derived from observation. We found relatively good agreement between theoretical and observed terminal velocities. On the other hand, predicted mass-loss rates and mass-loss rates derived from observation are in a good agreement only for higher mass-loss rates. Theoretical mass-loss rates lower than approximately 10-7Msolaryr-1 are significantly higher than those derived from observation. These results confirm the previously reported problem of weak winds, since our calculated mass-loss rates are in fair agreement with predictions of Vink et al. We study multicomponent models for these winds. For this purpose we develop a more detailed description of wind decoupling. We show that the instability connected with the decoupling of individual wind elements may occur for low-density winds. In the case of winds with very low observed mass-loss rates the multicomponent effects are important for the wind structure, however this is not able to explain consistently the difference between the predicted mass-loss rate and the mass-loss rate derived from observation for these stars. Similar to previous studies, we found the level of dependence of the wind parameters on the metallicity. We conclude that the wind mass-loss rate significantly increases with metallicity as , whereas the terminal velocity of wind on average depends on metallicity only slightly, namely v∞~Z0.06 (for studied stars).

  20. Investigating Wind-Driven Rain Intrusion in Walls with the CARWASh

    Treesearch

    C.R. Boardman; Samuel V. Glass

    2013-01-01

    Wind-driven rain provides the primary external moisture load for exterior walls.Water absorption by the cladding, runoff, and penetration through the cladding or at details determine how a wall system performs. In this paper we describe a new laboratory facility that can create controlled outdoor and indoor conditions and use it to investigate the water...

  1. A laboratory facility for research on wind-driven rain intrusion in building envelope assemblies

    Treesearch

    Samuel V. Glass

    2010-01-01

    Moisture management is critical for durable, energy-efficient buildings. To address the need for research on wind-driven rain intrusion in wall assemblies, the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory is developing a new facility. This paper describes the underlying principle of this facility and its capabilities.

  2. Potential errors in using one anemometer to characterize the wind power over an entire rotor disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Wind data collected at four levels on a 90-m tower in a prospective wind farm area are used to evaluate how well the 10-m wind speed data with and without intermittent vertical profile measurements compare with the 90-m tower data. If a standard, or even predictable, wind speed profile existed, there would be no need for a large, expensive tower. This cost differential becomes even more significant if several towers are needed to study a prospective wind farm.

  3. Assisted stellar suicide: the wind-driven evolution of the recurrent nova T Pyxidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knigge, Ch.; King, A. R.; Patterson, J.

    2000-12-01

    We show that the extremely high luminosity of the short-period recurrent nova T Pyx in quiescence can be understood if this system is a wind-driven supersoft x-ray source (SSS). In this scenario, a strong, radiation-induced wind is excited from the secondary star and accelerates the binary evolution. The accretion rate is therefore much higher than in an ordinary cataclysmic binary at the same orbital period, as is the luminosity of the white dwarf primary. In the steady state, the enhanced luminosity is just sufficient to maintain the wind from the secondary. The accretion rate and luminosity predicted by the wind-driven model for T Pyx are in good agreement with the observational evidence. X-ray observations with Chandra or XMM may be able to confirm T Pyx's status as a SSS. T Pyx's lifetime in the wind-driven state is on the order of a million years. Its ultimate fate is not certain, but the system may very well end up destroying itself, either via the complete evaporation of the secondary star, or in a Type Ia supernova if the white dwarf reaches the Chandrasekhar limit. Thus either the primary, the secondary, or both may currently be committing assisted stellar suicide.

  4. Kawasaki disease and ENSO-driven wind circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, Joan; Burns, Jane C.; Cayan, Dan; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Uehara, Ritei; Rodó, Xavier

    2013-05-01

    disease (KD) is the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children worldwide. Recently, a climatological study suggested that KD may be triggered by a windborne agent traveling across the north Pacific through the westerly wind flow prevailing at midlatitudes. Here we use KD records to describe the association between enhanced disease activity on opposite sides of the basin and different phases of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon, via the linkage to these tropospheric winds. Results show that years with higher-than-normal KD cases in Japan preferentially occur during either El Niño Modoki or La Niña conditions, while in San Diego during the mature phase of El Niño or La Niña events. Given that ENSO offers a degree of predictability at lead times of 6 months, these modulations suggest that seasonal predictions of KD could be used to alert clinicians to periods of increased disease activity.

  5. Wind tunnel tests of modified cross, hemisflo, and disk-gap-band parachutes with emphasis in the transonic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foughner, J. T., Jr.; Alexander, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    Transonic wind-tunnel studies were conducted with modified cross, hemisflo, and disk-gap-band parachute models in the wake of a cone-cylinder shape forebody. The basic cross design was modified with the addition of a circumferential constraining band at the lower edge of the canopy panels. The tests covered a Mach number range of 0.3 to 1.2 and a dynamic pressure range from 479 Newtons per square meter to 5746 Newtons per square meter. The parachute models were flexible textile-type structures and were tethered to a rigid forebody with a single flexible riser. Different size models of the modified cross and disk-gap-band canopies were tested to evaluate scale effects. Model reference diameters were 0.30, 0.61, and 1.07 meters (1.0, 2.0, and 3.5 ft) for the modified cross; and nominal diameters of 0.25 and 0.52 meter (0.83 and 1.7 ft) for the disk-gap-band; and 0.55 meter (1.8 ft) for the hemisflo. Reefing information is presented for the 0.61-meter-diameter cross and the 0.52-meter-diameter disk-gap-band. Results are presented in the form of the variation of steady-state average drag coefficient with Mach number. General stability characteristics of each parachute are discussed. Included are comments on canopy coning, spinning, and fluttering motions.

  6. PRODUCTION OF LIGHT-ELEMENT PRIMARY PROCESS NUCLEI IN NEUTRINO-DRIVEN WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Arcones, A.; Montes, F.

    2011-04-10

    We present first comparisons between light-element primary process (LEPP) abundances observed in some ultra metal-poor (UMP) stars and nucleosynthesis calculations based on long-time hydrodynamical simulations of core-collapse supernovae and their neutrino-driven wind. UMP star observations indicate that Z {>=} 38 elements include the contributions of at least two nucleosynthesis components: r-process nuclei that are synthesized by rapid neutron capture in a yet unknown site and LEPP elements (mainly Sr, Y, and Zr). We show that neutrino-driven wind simulations can explain the observed LEPP pattern. We explore in detail the sensitivity of the calculated abundances to the electron fraction, which is a key nucleosynthesis parameter but poorly known due to uncertainties in neutrino interactions and transport. Our results show that the observed LEPP pattern can be reproduced in proton- and neutron-rich winds.

  7. MIGRATION OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS: EFFECTS FROM X-WIND ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Fred C.; Cai, Mike J.; Lizano, Susana

    2009-09-10

    Magnetic fields are dragged in from the interstellar medium during the gravitational collapse that forms star/disk systems. Consideration of mean field magnetohydrodynamics in these disks shows that magnetic effects produce sub-Keplerian rotation curves and truncate the inner disk. This Letter explores the ramifications of these predicted disk properties for the migration of extrasolar planets. Sub-Keplerian flow in gaseous disks drives a new migration mechanism for embedded planets and modifies the gap-opening processes for larger planets. This sub-Keplerian migration mechanism dominates over Type I migration for sufficiently small planets (m{sub P} {approx}< 1 M {sub +}) and/or close orbits (r {approx}< 1 AU). Although the inclusion of sub-Keplerian torques shortens the total migration time by only a moderate amount, the mass accreted by migrating planetary cores is significantly reduced. Truncation of the inner disk edge (for typical system parameters) naturally explains final planetary orbits with periods P {approx} 4 days. Planets with shorter periods, P {approx} 2 days, can be explained by migration during FU-Orionis outbursts, when the mass accretion rate is high and the disk edge moves inward. Finally, the midplane density is greatly increased at the inner truncation point of the disk (the X-point); this enhancement, in conjunction with continuing flow of gas and solids through the region, supports the in situ formation of giant planets.

  8. The evolution of protostellar disks under the influence of external UV radiation and central stellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H. W.; Richling, S.

    2001-01-01

    The evolution and appearance of circumstellar disks in star forming regions can be influenced strongly by the radiation from nearby hot stars. Here we describe the results of numerical simulations of the evolution of protostellar disks and their immediate surroundings under the influence of external UV radiation.

  9. Fluid Aspects of Solar Wind Disturbances Driven by Coronal Mass Ejections. Appendix 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Riley, Pete

    2001-01-01

    Transient disturbances in the solar wind initiated by coronal eruptions have been modeled for many years, beginning with the self-similar analytical models of Parker and Simon and Axford. The first numerical computer code (one-dimensional, gas dynamic) to study disturbance propagation in the solar wind was developed in the late 1960s, and a variety of other codes ranging from simple one-dimensional gas dynamic codes through three-dimensional gas dynamic and magnetohydrodynamic codes have been developed in subsequent years. For the most part, these codes have been applied to the problem of disturbances driven by fast CMEs propagating into a structureless solar wind. Pizzo provided an excellent summary of the level of understanding achieved from such simulation studies through about 1984, and other reviews have subsequently become available. More recently, some attention has been focused on disturbances generated by slow CMEs, on disturbances driven by CMEs having high internal pressures, and disturbance propagation effects associated with a structured ambient solar wind. Our purpose here is to provide a brief tutorial on fluid aspects of solar wind disturbances derived from numerical gas dynamic simulations. For the most part we illustrate disturbance evolution by propagating idealized perturbations, mimicking different types of CMEs, into a structureless solar wind using a simple one-dimensional, adiabatic (except at shocks), gas dynamic code. The simulations begin outside the critical point where the solar wind becomes supersonic and thus do not address questions of how the CMEs themselves are initiated. Limited to one dimension (the radial direction), the simulation code predicts too strong an interaction between newly ejected solar material and the ambient wind because it neglects azimuthal and meridional motions of the plasma that help relieve pressure stresses. Moreover, the code ignores magnetic forces and thus also underestimates the speed with which

  10. Wind-driven nearshore sediment resuspension in a deep lake during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Kristin E.; Bombardelli, Fabián. A.; Moreno-Casas, Patricio A.; Rueda, Francisco J.; Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    2014-11-01

    Ongoing public concern over declining water quality at Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada (USA) led to an investigation of wind-driven nearshore sediment resuspension that combined field measurements and modeling. Field data included: wind speed and direction, vertical profiles of water temperature and currents, nearbed velocity, lakebed sediment characteristics, and suspended sediment concentration and particle size distribution. Bottom shear stress was computed from ADV-measured nearbed velocity data, adapting a turbulent kinetic energy method to lakes, and partitioned according to its contributions attributed to wind-waves, mean currents, and random motions. When the total shear stress exceeded the critical shear stress, the contribution to overall shear stress was about 80% from wind-waves and 10% each from mean currents and random motions. Therefore, wind-waves were the dominant mechanism resulting in sediment resuspension as corroborated by simultaneous increases in shear stress and total measured sediment concentration. The wind-wave model STWAVE was successfully modified to simulate wind-wave-induced sediment resuspension for viscous-dominated flow typical in lakes. Previous lake applications of STWAVE have been limited to special instances of fully turbulent flow. To address the validity of expressions for sediment resuspension in lakes, sediment entrainment rates were found to be well represented by a modified 1991 García and Parker formula. Last, in situ measurements of suspended sediment concentration and particle size distribution revealed that the predominance of fine particles (by particle count) that most negatively impact clarity was unchanged by wind-related sediment resuspension. Therefore, we cannot assume that wind-driven sediment resuspension contributes to Lake Tahoe's declining nearshore clarity.

  11. Atmospheric escape by magnetically driven wind from gaseous planets

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yuki A.; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the mass loss driven by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves from hot Jupiters by using MHD simulations in one-dimensional flux tubes. If a gaseous planet has a magnetic field, MHD waves are excited by turbulence at the surface, dissipate in the upper atmosphere, and drive gas outflows. Our calculation shows that mass-loss rates are comparable to the observed mass-loss rates of hot Jupiters; therefore, it is suggested that gas flow driven by MHD waves can play an important role in the mass loss from gaseous planets. The mass-loss rate varies dramatically with the radius and mass of a planet: a gaseous planet with a small mass but an inflated radius produces a very large mass-loss rate. We also derive an analytical expression for the dependence of mass-loss rate on planet radius and mass that is in good agreement with the numerical calculation. The mass-loss rate also depends on the amplitude of the velocity dispersion at the surface of a planet. Thus, we expect to infer the condition of the surface and the internal structure of a gaseous planet from future observations of mass-loss rate from various exoplanets.

  12. A data-driven method to characterize turbulence-caused uncertainty in wind power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Jain, Rishabh; Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2016-10-01

    A data-driven methodology is developed to analyze how ambient and wake turbulence affect the power generation of wind turbine(s). Using supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data from a wind plant, we select two sets of wind velocity and power data for turbines on the edge of the plant that resemble (i) an out-of-wake scenario and (ii) an in-wake scenario. For each set of data, two surrogate models are developed to represent the turbine(s) power generation as a function of (i) the wind speed and (ii) the wind speed and turbulence intensity. Three types of uncertainties in turbine(s) power generation are investigated: (i) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the reported power curve; (ii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for only mean wind speed; and (iii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for both mean wind speed and turbulence intensity. Results show that (i) the turbine(s) generally produce more power under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario with the same wind speed; and (ii) there is relatively more uncertainty in the power generation under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario.

  13. Shrinking galaxy disks with fountain-driven accretion from the halo

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Struck, Curtis; Hunter, Deidre A. E-mail: curt@iastate.edu

    2014-12-01

    Star formation in most galaxies requires cosmic gas accretion because the gas consumption time is short compared to the Hubble time. This accretion presumably comes from a combination of infalling satellite debris, cold flows, and condensation of hot halo gas at the cool disk interface, perhaps aided by a galactic fountain. In general, the accretion will have a different specific angular momentum than the part of the disk that receives it, even if the gas comes from the nearby halo. The gas disk then expands or shrinks over time. Here we show that condensation of halo gas at a rate proportional to the star formation rate in the fountain model will preserve an initial shape, such as an exponential, with a shrinking scale length, leaving behind a stellar disk with a slightly steeper profile of younger stars near the center. This process is slow for most galaxies, producing imperceptible radial speeds, and it may be dominated by other torques, but it could be important for blue compact dwarfs, which tend to have large, irregular gas reservoirs and steep blue profiles in their inner stellar disks.

  14. Wind-driven rain and its implications for natural hazard management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzen, Miriam; Iserloh, Thomas; de Lima, João L. M. P.; Fister, Wolfgang; Ries, Johannes B.

    2017-04-01

    Prediction and risk assessment of hydrological extremes are great challenges. Following climate predictions, frequent and violent rainstorms will become a new hazard to several regions in the medium term. Particularly agricultural soils will be severely threatened due to the combined action of heavy rainfall and accompanying winds on bare soil surfaces. Basing on the general underestimation of the effect of wind on rain erosion, conventional soil erosion measurements and modeling approaches lack related information to adequately calculate its impact. The presented experimental-empirical approach shows the powerful impact of wind on the erosive potential of rain. The tested soils had properties that characterise three different environments 1. Silty loam of semi-arid Mediterranean dryfarming and fallow, 2. clayey loam of humid agricultural sites and 3. cohesionless sandy substrates as found at coasts, dune fields and drift-sand areas. Erosion was found to increase by a factor of 1.3 to 7.1, depending on site characteristics. Complementary tests with a laboratory procedure were used to quantify explicitly the effect of wind on raindrop erosion as well as the influence of substrate, surface structure and slope on particle displacement. These tests confirmed the impact of wind-driven rain on total erosion rates to be of great importance when compared to all other tested factors. To successfully adapt soil erosion models to near-future challenges of climate change induced rain storms, wind-driven rain is supposed to be introduced into the hazard management agenda.

  15. Protoplanetary Disks as (Possibly) Viscous Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2017-03-01

    Protoplanetary disks are believed to evolve on megayear timescales in a diffusive (viscous) manner as a result of angular momentum transport driven by internal stresses. Here we use a sample of 26 protoplanetary disks resolved by ALMA with measured (dust-based) masses and stellar accretion rates to derive the dimensionless α-viscosity values for individual objects, with the goal of constraining the angular momentum transport mechanism. We find that the inferred values of α do not cluster around a single value, but instead have a broad distribution extending from 10‑4 to 0.04. Moreover, they correlate with neither the global disk parameters (mass, size, surface density) nor the stellar characteristics (mass, luminosity, radius). However, we do find a strong linear correlation between α and the central mass accretion rate \\dot{M}. This correlation is unlikely to result from the direct physical effect of \\dot{M} on internal stress on global scales. Instead, we suggest that it is caused by the decoupling of stellar \\dot{M} from the global disk characteristics in one of the following ways: (1) The behavior (and range) of α is controlled by a yet-unidentified parameter (e.g., ionization fraction, magnetic field strength, or geometry), ultimately driving the variation of \\dot{M}. (2) The central \\dot{M} is decoupled from the global accretion rate as a result of an instability, or mass accumulation (or loss in a wind or planetary accretion) in the inner disk. (3) Perhaps the most intriguing possibility is that angular momentum in protoplanetary disks is transported nonviscously, e.g., via magnetohydrodynamic winds or spiral density waves.

  16. Winds of winter: How solar wind driven particle precipitation can affect northern winters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asikainen, Timo; Maliniemi, Ville; Mursula, Kalevi

    2017-04-01

    Solar wind drives the variability in the near Earth space. Coupling of solar wind and the magnetosphere feeds energetic particles into the inner magnetosphere through reconnection in the magnetotail. During the declining phase of the solar cycle long-lived high-speed solar wind streams are more commonly observed at Earth's orbit. These accelerate particles to higher energies and in the process lead to enhanced particle precipitation into the atmosphere. Electrons from tens to hundreds of keV precipitate down to the mesosphere and upper stratosphere, where they can create nitrogen and hydrogen oxides. During winter, nitrogen oxides have enhanced lifetime in the polar night. They can descend down to the mid-stratosphere and destroy ozone, which leads to cooling of the high-latitude stratosphere. This enhances the meridional temperature gradient and westerly winds under the thermal-wind balance, thus accelerating the polar vortex. This mechanism is successfully modeled by chemistry-climate models. Dynamical changes in the stratosphere can descend down to the troposphere. During strong polar vortex, the northern annular mode (NAM) is anomalously positive. Positive NAM encloses the cold arctic air into the polar region and enhances the westerly winds at mid-latitudes. Enhancement of westerlies bring warm and moist air from Atlantic to the Northern Eurasia causing positive temperature anomalies. At the same time negative temperature anomalies are observed in the Northern Canada and Greenland. Our recent observations show that the positive relation between precipitating electron fluxes/geomagnetic activity and NAM exists during winter. Positive NAM pattern is observed during the declining phase of the solar cycle at least since the late 19th century. We also find that the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of equatorial winds strongly modulate this relation at high latitudes. These results give additional evidence that not only solar electromagnetic radiation but also the

  17. Solar wind and internally-driven motions of Saturn's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    Saturn's magnetosphere is replete with magnetospheric periodicities. Magnetic fields, plasma parameters, energetic particle fluxes, and radio emissions have all been observed to vary at a period close to that of Saturn's assumed sidereal rotation rate. In particular, periodicities in plasma, energetic particles and magnetic fields in Saturn's magnetotail can be interpreted in terms of periodic vertical motion of Saturn's outer magnetospheric plasma sheet [e.g., Khurana et al., 2009; Jackman et al., 2009; Arridge et al., submitted]. In this talk the forces driving the motion of Saturn's magnetotail will be examined to better understand the origin of both internally- (i.e., periodic) and externally-generated (i.e., solar wind) magnetotail motions.

  18. The wind- and wave-driven inner-shelf circulation.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Steven J; Fewings, Melanie R

    2012-01-01

    The inner continental shelf, which spans water depths ofa few meters to tens of meters, is a dynamically defined region that lies between the surf zone (where waves break) and the middle continental shelf (where the along-shelf circulation is usually in geostrophic balance). Many types of forcing that are often neglected over the deeper shelf-such as tides, buoyant plumes, surface gravitywaves, and cross-shelfwind stress-drive substantial circulations over the inner shelf. Cross-shelf circulation over the inner shelf has ecological and geophysical consequences: It connects the shore to the open ocean by transporting pollutants, larvae, phytoplankton, nutrients, and sediment. This review of circulation and momentum balances over the inner continental shelf contrasts prior studies, which focused mainly on the roles of along-shelfwind and pressure gradients, with recent understanding of the dominant roles of cross-shelf wind and surface gravity waves.

  19. Cosmic ray-driven galactic winds: streaming or diffusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Joshua; Pfrommer, Christoph; Peng Oh, S.

    2017-01-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) have recently re-emerged as attractive candidates for mediating feedback in galaxies because of their long cooling timescales. Simulations have shown that the momentum and energy deposited by CRs moving with respect to the ambient medium can drive galactic winds. However, simulations are hampered by our ignorance of the details of CR transport. Two key limits previously considered model CR transport as a purely diffusive process (with constant diffusion coefficient) and as an advective streaming process. With a series of GADGET simulations, we compare the results of these different assumptions. In idealised three-dimensional galaxy formation models, we show that these two cases result in significant differences for the galactic wind mass loss rates and star formation suppression in dwarf galaxies with halo masses M ≈ 1010 M⊙: diffusive CR transport results in more than ten times larger mass loss rates compared to CR streaming models. We demonstrate that this is largely due to the excitation of Alfvén waves during the CR streaming process that drains energy from the CR population to the thermal gas, which is subsequently radiated away. By contrast, CR diffusion conserves the CR energy in the absence of adiabatic changes and if CRs are efficiently scattered by Alfvén waves that are propagating up the CR gradient. Moreover, because pressure gradients are preserved by CR streaming, but not diffusion, the two can have a significantly different dynamical evolution regardless of this energy exchange. In particular, the constant diffusion coefficients usually assumed can lead to unphysically high CR fluxes.

  20. Using Wind Driven Tumbleweed Rovers to Explore Martian Gully Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antol, Jeffrey; Woodard, Stanley E.; Hajos, Gregory A.; Heldmann, Jennifer L.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2005-01-01

    Gully features have been observed on the slopes of numerous Martian crater walls, valleys, pits, and graben. Several mechanisms for gully formation have been proposed, including: liquid water aquifers (shallow and deep), melting ground ice, snow melt, CO2 aquifers, and dry debris flow. Remote sensing observations indicate that the most likely erosional agent is liquid water. Debate concerns the source of this water. Observations favor a liquid water aquifer as the primary candidate. The current strategy in the search for life on Mars is to "follow the water." A new vehicle known as a Tumbleweed rover may be able to conduct in-situ investigations in the gullies, which are currently inaccessible by conventional rovers. Deriving mobility through use of the surface winds on Mars, Tumbleweed rovers would be lightweight and relatively inexpensive thus allowing multiple rovers to be deployed in a single mission to survey areas for future exploration. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is developing deployable structure Tumbleweed concepts. An extremely lightweight measurement acquisition system and sensors are proposed for the Tumbleweed rover that greatly increases the number of measurements performed while having negligible mass increase. The key to this method is the use of magnetic field response sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits that produce magnetic field responses whose attributes correspond to values of physical properties for which the sensors measure. The sensors do not need a physical connection to a power source or to data acquisition equipment resulting in additional weight reduction. Many of the sensors and interrogating antennae can be directly placed on the Tumbleweed using film deposition methods such as photolithography thus providing further weight reduction. Concepts are presented herein for methods to measure subsurface water, subsurface metals, planetary winds and environmental gases.

  1. Using Wind Driven Tumbleweed Rovers to Explore Martian Gully Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antol, Jeffrey; Woodard, Stanley E.; Hajos, Gregory A.; Heldmann, Jennifer L.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2004-01-01

    Gully features have been observed on the slopes of numerous Martian crater walls, valleys, pits, and graben. Several mechanisms for gully formation have been proposed, including: liquid water aquifers (shallow and deep), melting ground ice, snow melt, CO2 aquifers, and dry debris flow. Remote sensing observations indicate that the most likely erosional agent is liquid water. Debate concerns the source of this water. Observations favor a liquid water aquifer as the primary candidate. The current strategy in the search for life on Mars is to "follow the water." A new vehicle known as a Tumbleweed rover may be able to conduct in-situ investigations in the gullies, which are currently inaccessible by conventional rovers. Deriving mobility through use of the surface winds on Mars, Tumbleweed rovers would be lightweight and relatively inexpensive thus allowing multiple rovers to be deployed in a single mission to survey areas for future exploration. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is developing deployable structure Tumbleweed concepts. An extremely lightweight measurement acquisition system and sensors are proposed for the Tumbleweed rover that greatly increases the number of measurements performed while having negligible mass increase. The key to this method is the use of magnetic field response sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits that produce magnetic field responses whose attributes correspond to values of physical properties for which the sensors measure. The sensors do not need a physical connection to a power source or to data acquisition equipment resulting in additional weight reduction. Many of the sensors and interrogating antennae can be directly placed on the Tumbleweed using film deposition methods such as photolithography thus providing further weight reduction. Concepts are presented herein for methods to measure subsurface water, subsurface metals, planetary winds and environmental gases.

  2. Cosmic ray-driven galactic winds: streaming or diffusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Joshua; Pfrommer, Christoph; Oh, S. Peng

    2017-05-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) have recently re-emerged as attractive candidates for mediating feedback in galaxies because of their long cooling time-scales. Simulations have shown that the momentum and energy deposited by CRs moving with respect to the ambient medium can drive galactic winds. However, simulations are hampered by our ignorance of the details of CR transport. Two key limits previously considered model CR transport as a purely diffusive process (with constant diffusion coefficient) and as an advective streaming process. With a series of gadget simulations, we compare the results of these different assumptions. In idealized three-dimensional galaxy formation models, we show that these two cases result in significant differences for the galactic wind mass-loss rates and star formation suppression in dwarf galaxies with halo masses M ≈ 1010 M⊙: diffusive CR transport results in more than 10 times larger mass-loss rates compared to CR streaming models. We demonstrate that this is largely due to the excitation of Alfvén waves during the CR streaming process that drains energy from the CR population to the thermal gas, which is subsequently radiated away. By contrast, CR diffusion conserves the CR energy in the absence of adiabatic changes and if CRs are efficiently scattered by Alfvén waves that are propagating up the CR gradient. Moreover, because pressure gradients are preserved by CR streaming, but not diffusion, the two can have a significantly different dynamical evolution regardless of this energy exchange. In particular, the constant diffusion coefficients usually assumed can lead to unphysically high CR fluxes.

  3. Solar Polar Jets Driven by Magnetic Reconnection, Gravity, and Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-06-01

    Polar jets are dynamic, narrow, radially extended structures observed in solar EUV emission near the limb. They originate within the open field of coronal holes in “anemone” regions, which are intrusions of opposite magnetic polarity. The key topological feature is a magnetic null point atop a dome-shaped fan surface of field lines. Applied stresses readily distort the null into a current patch, eventually inducing interchange reconnection between the closed and open fields inside and outside the fan surface (Antiochos 1996). Previously, we demonstrated that magnetic free energy stored on twisted closed field lines inside the fan surface is released explosively by the onset of fast reconnection across the current patch (Pariat et al. 2009, 2010). A dense jet comprised of a nonlinear, torsional Alfvén wave is ejected into the outer corona along the newly reconnected open field lines. Now we are extending those exploratory simulations by including the effects of solar gravity, solar wind, and expanding spherical geometry. We find that the model remains robust in the resulting more complex setting, with explosive energy release and dense jet formation occurring in the low corona due to the onset of a kink-like instability, as found in the earlier Cartesian, gravity-free, static-atmosphere cases. The spherical-geometry jet including gravity and wind propagates far more rapidly into the outer corona and inner heliosphere than a comparison jet simulation that excludes those effects. We report detailed analyses of our new results, compare them with previous work, and discuss the implications for understanding remote and in-situ observations of solar polar jets.This work was supported by NASA’s LWS TR&T program.

  4. Wind-driven variations in an overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringedal, Carina; Eldevik, Tor; Spall, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The Atlantic overturning circulation and poleward heat transport is balanced by northern heat loss to the atmosphere and corresponding water mass transformation. The structure of this circulation and transformation is particularly manifested - and observed - at the Greenland-Scotland ridge. There is however a rich variability in the exchanges across the ridge on seasonal and yearly time scales. This variability has been almost perfectly captured in atmospherically forced ocean GCMs (e.g. Olsen et al 2008, Sandø et al 2012), suggesting that on shorter time scales the variability of the exchanges are connected to sea level pressure and corresponding wind stress forcing. Focusing on seasonal and yearly time scales, we accordingly propose that the connection between the exchanges of overturning waters across the Greenland-Scotland ridge and the sea level pressure must be direct and simple, and we use idealized simulations to support this hypothesis. The mechanisms underlying the connection are formulated through conceptual models. Although the models and simulations are simplified with respect to bathymetry and hydrography, they can reproduce the main features of the overturning circulation in the Nordic seas. In the observations, the variable exchanges can largely be related to sea level pressure variations and large scale wind patterns, and the idealized simulations and accompanying conceptual models show how these impacts can manifest via coastal downwelling and gyre circulation. S. M. Olsen, B. Hansen, D. Quadfasel and S. Østerhus, Observed and modelled stability of overflow across the Greenland-Scotland ridge, Nature 455, (2008) A. B. Sandø, J. E. Ø. Nilsen, T. Eldevik and M. Bentsen, Mechanisms for variable North Atlantic-Nordic seas exchanges, Journal of Geophysical Research 117, (2012)

  5. The relevance of wind-driven rain for future soil erosion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fister, Wolfgang; Marzen, Miriam; Iserloh, Thomas; Seeger, Manuel; Heckrath, Goswin; Greenwood, Philip; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Ries, Johannes B.

    2014-05-01

    The influence of wind on falling raindrops and its potential to alter soil erosion rates was already proposed during the 1960s, but never really reached broad awareness in the soil erosion research community. Laboratory investigations over the last 15 years confirmed earlier findings and have proven that wind modifies the characteristics of falling raindrops in many ways. Most importantly, the impact angles and impact frequencies, as well as the drop velocities, drop sizes and hence the kinetic energy are modified. Consequently, the results of laboratory experiments on highly disturbed, loose, and mostly sandy substrates indicate that soil detachment and transport/splash distances of particles increase under the influence of wind. However, these experiments cannot reflect the complexity of naturally developed soils and a direct transfer of these findings to field conditions is therefore limited. So far, only a few field studies have reported increased erosion rates due to splash drift or increased runoff by wind-driven rain. Because of the lack of simultaneous reference measurements without the influence of wind, these studies were not able to discriminate between the different processes and thus couldn not clearly prove the relevance of wind-driven rainfall. Despite all these findings, the awareness of this phenomenon is, in our opinion, still limited. Almost all rainfall simulations exclude the factor of wind as a disturbance to reach more representative rainfall conditions on the plot. We think, that among other reasons, this underestimation of the influence of wind could be due to the absence of an adequate measurement device to simulate these processes and additionally, due to the fact that the relevance of wind-driven rain in a landscape context has not yet been proven. To overcome this lack of a useful device, and to take the research from the laboratory to the field on real soils again, the first portable wind and rainfall simulator was developed within

  6. Wind-driven coastal upwelling and westward circulation in the Yucatan shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Castillo, Eugenio; Gomez-Valdes, Jose; Sheinbaum, Julio; Rioja-Nieto, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    The wind-driven circulation and wind-induced coastal upwelling in a large shelf sea with a zonally oriented coast are examined. The Yucatan shelf is located to the north of the Yucatan peninsula in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. This area is a tropical shallow body of water with a smooth sloping bottom and is one of the largest shelves in the world. This study describes the wind-driven circulation and wind-induced coastal upwelling in the Yucatan shelf, which is forced by easterly winds throughout the year. Data obtained from hydrographic surveys, acoustic current profilers and environmental satellites are used in the analysis. Hydrographic data was analyzed and geostrophic currents were calculated in each survey. In addition an analytical model was applied to reproduce the currents. The results of a general circulation model were used with an empirical orthogonal function analysis to study the variability of the currents. The study area is divided in two regions: from the 40 m to the 200 m isobaths (outer shelf) and from the coast to the 40 m isobath (inner shelf). At the outer shelf, observations revealed upwelling events throughout the year, and a westward current with velocities of approximately 0.2 m s-1 was calculated from the numerical model output and hydrographic data. In addition, the theory developed by Pedlosky (2007) for a stratified fluid along a sloping bottom adequately explains the current's primary characteristics. The momentum of the current comes from the wind, and the stratification is an important factor in its dynamics. At the inner shelf, observations and numerical model output show a wind-driven westward current with maximum velocities of 0.20 m s-1. The momentum balance in this region is between local acceleration and friction. A cold-water band is developed during the period of maximum upwelling.

  7. Wind-driven Water Bodies : a new paradigm for lake geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutz, A.; Schuster, M.; Ghienne, J. F.; Roquin, C.; Bouchette, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we emphasize the importance in some lakes of wind-related hydrodynamic processes (fair weather waves, storm waves, and longshore, cross-shore and bottom currents) as a first order forcing for clastics remobilization and basin infill. This alternative view contrasts with more classical depositional models for lakes where fluvial-driven sedimentation and settling dominates. Here we consider three large lakes/paleo-lakes that are located in different climatic and geodynamic settings: Megalake Chad (north-central Africa), Lake Saint-Jean (Québec, Canada), and Lake Turkana (Kenya, East African Rift System). All of these three lake systems exhibit well developed modern and ancient high-energy littoral morphosedimentary structures which directly derive from wind-related hydrodynamics. The extensive paleo-shorelines of Megalake Chad are composed of beach-foredune ridges, spits, wave-dominated deltas, barriers, and wave-ravinment surface. For Lake Saint-Jean the influence of wind is also identified below the wave-base at lake bottom from erosional surfaces, and sediment drifts. In the Lake Turkana Basin, littoral landforms and deposits are identified for three different time intervals (today, Holocene, Plio-Pleistocene) evidencing that wind-driven hydrodynamics can be preserved in the geological record. Moreover, a preliminary global survey suggests that numerous modern lakes (remote sensing) and paleo-lakes (bibliographic review) behave as such. We thus coin the term "Wind-driven Water Bodies" (WWB) to refer to those lake systems where sedimentation (erosion, transport, deposition) is dominated by wind-induced hydrodynamics at any depth, as it is the case in the marine realm for shallow seas. Integrating wind forcing in lake models has strong implications for basin analysis (paleoenvironments and paleoclimates restitutions, resources exploration), but also for coastal engineering, wildlife and reservoirs management, or leisure activities.

  8. Data-driven modeling of the solar wind from 1 Rs to 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueshang; Ma, Xiaopeng; Xiang, Changqing

    2015-12-01

    We present here a time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solar wind simulation from the solar surface to the Earth's orbit driven by time-varying line-of-sight solar magnetic field data. The simulation is based on the three-dimensional (3-D) solar-interplanetary (SIP) adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) space-time conservation element and solution element (CESE) MHD (SIP-AMR-CESE MHD) model. In this simulation, we first achieve the initial solar wind background with the time-relaxation method by inputting a potential field obtained from the synoptic photospheric magnetic field and then generate the time-evolving solar wind by advancing the initial 3-D solar wind background with continuously varying photospheric magnetic field. The model updates the inner boundary conditions by using the projected normal characteristic method, inputting the high-cadence photospheric magnetic field data corrected by solar differential rotation, and limiting the mass flux escaping from the solar photosphere. We investigate the solar wind evolution from 1 July to 11 August 2008 with the model driven by the consecutive synoptic maps from the Global Oscillation Network Group. We compare the numerical results with the previous studies on the solar wind, the solar coronal observations from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope board on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and the measurements from OMNI at 1 astronomical unit (AU). Comparisons show that the present data-driven MHD model's results have overall good agreement with the large-scale dynamical coronal and interplanetary structures, including the sizes and distributions of the coronal holes, the positions and shapes of the streamer belts, the heliocentric distances of the Alfvénic surface, and the transitions of the solar wind speeds. However, the model fails to capture the small-sized equatorial holes, and the modeled solar wind near 1 AU has a somewhat higher density and weaker magnetic field strength than

  9. Shelfbreak current over the Canadian Beaufort Sea continental slope: Wind-driven events in January 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, Igor A.; Kirillov, Sergei A.; Forest, Alexandre; Gratton, Yves; Volkov, Denis L.; Williams, William J.; Lukovich, Jennifer V.; Belanger, Claude; Barber, David G.

    2016-04-01

    The shelfbreak current over the Beaufort Sea continental slope is known to be one of the most energetic features of the Beaufort Sea hydrography. In January 2005, three oceanographic moorings deployed over the Canadian (eastern) Beaufort Sea continental slope simultaneously recorded two consecutive shelfbreak current events with along-slope eastward bottom-intensified flow up to 120 cm s-1. Both events were generated by the local wind forcing associated with two Pacific-born cyclones passing north of the Beaufort Sea continental slope toward the Canadian Archipelago. Over the mooring array, the associated westerly wind exceeded 15 m s-1. These two cyclones generated storm surges along the Beaufort Sea coast with sea surface height (SSH) rising up to 1.4 m following the two westerly wind maxima. We suggest that the westerly along-slope wind generated a surface Ekman onshore transport. The associated SSH increase over the shelf produced a cross-slope pressure gradient that drove an along-slope eastward geostrophic current, in the same direction as the wind. This wind-driven barotropic flow was superimposed on the background baroclinic bottom-intensified shelfbreak current that consequently amplified. Summer-fall satellite altimetry data for 1992-2013 show that the SSH gradient in the southeastern Beaufort Sea is enhanced over the upper continental slope in response to frequent storm surge events. Because the local wind forcing and/or sea-ice drift could not explain the reduction of sea-ice concentration over the Beaufort Sea continental slope in January 2005, we speculate that wind-driven sea level fluctuations may impact the sea-ice cover in winter.

  10. Angular Momentum Transport and Variability in Boundary Layers of Accretion Disks Driven by Global Acoustic Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M.

    2012-11-01

    Disk accretion onto a weakly magnetized central object, e.g., a star, is inevitably accompanied by the formation of a boundary layer near the surface, in which matter slows down from the highly supersonic orbital velocity of the disk to the rotational velocity of the star. We perform high-resolution two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations in the equatorial plane of an astrophysical boundary layer with the goal of exploring the dynamics of non-axisymmetric structures that form there. We generically find that the supersonic shear in the boundary layer excites non-axisymmetric quasi-stationary acoustic modes that are trapped between the surface of the star and a Lindblad resonance in the disk. These modes rotate in a prograde fashion, are stable for hundreds of orbital periods, and have a pattern speed that is less than and of the order of the rotational velocity at the inner edge of the disk. The origin of these intrinsically global modes is intimately related to the operation of a corotation amplifier in the system. Dissipation of acoustic modes in weak shocks provides a universal mechanism for angular momentum and mass transport even in purely hydrodynamic (i.e., non-magnetized) boundary layers. We discuss the possible implications of these trapped modes for explaining the variability seen in accreting compact objects.

  11. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT AND VARIABILITY IN BOUNDARY LAYERS OF ACCRETION DISKS DRIVEN BY GLOBAL ACOUSTIC MODES

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Stone, James M.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-11-20

    Disk accretion onto a weakly magnetized central object, e.g., a star, is inevitably accompanied by the formation of a boundary layer near the surface, in which matter slows down from the highly supersonic orbital velocity of the disk to the rotational velocity of the star. We perform high-resolution two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations in the equatorial plane of an astrophysical boundary layer with the goal of exploring the dynamics of non-axisymmetric structures that form there. We generically find that the supersonic shear in the boundary layer excites non-axisymmetric quasi-stationary acoustic modes that are trapped between the surface of the star and a Lindblad resonance in the disk. These modes rotate in a prograde fashion, are stable for hundreds of orbital periods, and have a pattern speed that is less than and of the order of the rotational velocity at the inner edge of the disk. The origin of these intrinsically global modes is intimately related to the operation of a corotation amplifier in the system. Dissipation of acoustic modes in weak shocks provides a universal mechanism for angular momentum and mass transport even in purely hydrodynamic (i.e., non-magnetized) boundary layers. We discuss the possible implications of these trapped modes for explaining the variability seen in accreting compact objects.

  12. Hydrodynamic states in a wind-driven microtidal estuary (Alfacs Bay)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llebot, Clara; Rueda, Francisco J.; Solé, Jordi; Artigas, Mireia Lara; Estrada, Marta

    2014-01-01

    A conceptual model of the physical behavior of a shallow (6 m deep) micro-tidal estuary (Alfacs Bay) is proposed, based on the interpretation of a field data set, and subsequently tested against the results of three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. At seasonal timescales, the buoyancy associated with freshwater inflows dominates the tidal forcing, yielding a strongly stratified two-layered system, with the surface and the bottom layers flowing in opposite directions (classical estuarine circulation). Wind controls the physical behavior of the bay at shorter (days to weeks) timescales. Three scenarios or states have been defined, depending on the strength of stratification relative to the predominant direction and magnitude of the wind forcing, parameterized through the Wedderburn number, W. For weak winds (scenario 1), with W ≫ 1, mixing occurs as a consequence of stirring and convective cooling, and the mixed layer deepens slowly. For strong winds, with W ≪ 1/2, mixing is fast and is largely driven by shear at the pycnocline. Two scenarios are further identified for W ≪ 1/2 depending on the directionality of the winds: one for persistent NW winds (scenario 2) and another for diurnal SW winds (scenario 3). In scenario 2, the water is pushed laterally, overturning the stratification and generating transverse density gradients. In scenario 3, the estuarine circulation is weakened and even reversed, yielding strong longitudinal density gradients. The bay waters relax quickly (within 10-18 h) back to the original state, after the wind ceases, as a result of the horizontal density gradients developed under wind forcing. Bay-sea exchange rates are shown to decrease significantly in the low W scenarios, the magnitudes of these changes being largely dependent on wind direction. These scenarios have important implications for the ecology of the bay, including the occurrence of phenomena such as harmful algal blooms.

  13. Effects of wind-driven telescope vibrations on measurements of turbulent angle-of-arrival fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Tichkule, Shiril; Muschinski, Andreas

    2014-07-20

    Turbulence in the atmospheric refractive-index field causes optical angle-of-arrival (AOA) fluctuations that can be used for atmospheric remote sensing of various parameters, including wind velocities and the optical refractive-index turbulence structure parameter, C(n)2. If AOA measurements are contaminated by wind-induced telescope vibrations, the underlying retrieval algorithms may fail. In order to study the effects of wind-driven telescope vibrations on optical-turbulence measurements, we conducted a field experiment in which we exposed two small telescopes deliberately to the wind. We measured AOA fluctuations of visible light propagating along a horizontal, 174 m long path 1.7 m above flat terrain, and we used fast-response ultrasonic anemometers to measure the wind velocity at multiple locations along the path. We found (1) that the AOA turbulence spectra were contaminated by multiple resonance peaks, (2) that the resonance frequencies were independent of the wind speed, and (3) that the AOA variance associated with the dominating vibration mode was proportional to the fourth power of the wind speed.

  14. Observable Consequences of Merger-driven Gaps and Holes in Black Hole Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gültekin, Kayhan; Miller, Jon M.

    2012-12-01

    We calculate the observable signature of a black hole (BH) accretion disk with a gap or a hole created by a secondary BH embedded in the disk. We find that for an interesting range of parameters of BH masses (~106-109 M ⊙), orbital separation (~1 AU to ~0.1 pc), and gap width (10-190 disk scale heights), the missing thermal emission from a gap manifests itself in an observable decrement in the spectral energy distribution (SED). We present observational diagnostics in terms of power-law forms that can be fit to line-free regions in active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra or in fluxes from sequences of broad filters. Most interestingly, the change in slope in the broken power law is almost entirely dependent on the width of the gap in the accretion disk, which in turn is uniquely determined by the mass ratio of the BHs, such that it scales roughly as q 5/12. Thus, one can use spectral observations of the continuum of bright AGNs to infer not only the presence of a closely separated BH binary, but also the mass ratio. When the BH merger opens an entire hole (or cavity) in the inner disk, the broadband SED of the AGNs or quasar may serve as a diagnostic. Such sources should be especially luminous in optical bands but intrinsically faint in X-rays (i.e., not merely obscured). We briefly note that viable candidates may have already been identified, though extant detailed modeling of those with high-quality data have not yet revealed an inner cavity.

  15. Power controller for a wind-turbine-driven tandem induction generator

    SciTech Connect

    Perahia, J.; Nayar, C.V. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a controller for delivering either constant power or maximum power from a wind-turbine-driven grid connected induction generator with double stator windings, one fixed and the other able to be physically rotated, and a squirrel-cage rotor common to both stators is described. The load torque of the generator is controlled by varying the angular displacement between the two stators. The generator can feed power to the grid at variable speed and constant frequency and is termed a Tandem Induction Generator. Dynamic models for the wind energy conversion system are proposed for both controlled and uncontrolled operation to predict changes in shaft speed to shifts in wind speed using data pertaining to a commercial wind turbine. Results based on laboratory tests on a 1hp tandem machine driven by a dc motor demonstrating the feasibility of both controllers are presented. A steady state model of the tandem generator is also proposed and compared to measurements made on the test machine.

  16. Wind driven saltation: a hitherto overlooked challenge for life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Ebbe; Goul, Michael; Rasmussen, Martin; Moeller, Ralf; Nørnberg, Per; Knak Jensen, Svend; Finster, Kai

    2017-04-01

    The Martian surface is a hostile environment characterized by low water availability, low atmospheric pressure and high UV and ionizing radiation. Furthermore, wind-driven saltation leads to abrasion of silicates with a production of reactive surface sites and, through triboelectric charging, a release of electrical discharges with a concomitant production of reactive oxygen species. While the effects of low water availability, low pressure and radiation have been extensively studied in relation to the habitability of the Martian surface and the preservation of organic biosignatures, the effects of wind-driven saltation have hitherto been ignored. In this study, we have investigated the effect of exposing bacteria to wind-abraded silicates and directly to wind-driven saltation on Mars in controlled laboratory simulation experiments. Wind-driven saltation was simulated by tumbling mineral samples in a Mars-like atmosphere in sealed quartz ampoules. The effects on bacterial survival and structure were evaluated by colony forming unit counts in combination with scanning electron microscopy, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and life/dead-staining with flow cytometry. The viability of vegetative cells of P. putida, B. subtilis and D. radiodurans in aqueous suspensions was reduced by more than 99% by exposure to abraded basalt, while the viability of B. subtilis endospores was unaffected. B. subtilis mutants lacking different spore components were likewise highly resistant to the exposure to abraded basalt, which indicates that the resistance of spores is not associated with any specific spore component. We found a significant but reduced effect of abraded quartz and we suggest that the stress effect of abraded silicates is induced by a production of reactive oxygen species and hydroxyl radicals produced by Fenton-like reactions in the presence of transition metals. Direct exposure to simulated saltation had a dramatic effect on both D. radiodurans cells and B

  17. Effect of eddy diffusivity on wind-driven currents in a two-layer stratified lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, R. T.; Lick, W.; Molls, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    The steady state wind-driven circulation was numerically calculated in a rectangular stratified lake. The lake is composed of two layers having uniform but unequal densities and eddy diffusivities. The position in thermocline and the three-dimensional velocities in both layers calculated using shallow lake equations. The results show that, as the eddy diffusivity in the hypolimnion is increased, the thermocline tilt and hypolimnetic velocities increase. The effect of the other variables such as wind stress, density, basin length, and mean thermocline depth are also shown.

  18. Wind power demonstration and siting problems. [for recharging electrically driven automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergey, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Technical and economic feasibility studies on a small windmill to provide overnight charging for an electrically driven car are reported. The auxiliary generator provides power for heating and cooling the vehicle which runs for 25 miles on battery power alone, and for 50 miles with the onboard charger operating. The blades for this windmill have a diameter of 12 feet and are coupled through to a conventional automobile alternator so that they are able to completely recharge car batteries in 8 hours. Optimization of a windmill/storage system requires detailed wind velocity information which permits rational sitting of wind power system stations.

  19. An Ultra-fast X-Ray Disk Wind in the Neutron Star Binary GX 340+0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. M.; Raymond, J.; Cackett, E.; Grinberg, V.; Nowak, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a spectral analysis of a brief Chandra/HETG observation of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary GX 340+0. The high-resolution spectrum reveals evidence of ionized absorption in the Fe K band. The strongest feature, an absorption line at approximately 6.9 keV, is required at the 5σ level of confidence via an F-test. Photoionization modeling with XSTAR grids suggests that the line is the most prominent part of a disk wind with an apparent outflow speed of v = 0.04c. This interpretation is preferred at the 4σ level over a scenario in which the line is H-like Fe xxvi at a modest redshift. The wind may achieve this speed owing to its relatively low ionization, enabling driving by radiation pressure on lines; in this sense, the wind in GX 340+0 may be the stellar-mass equivalent of the flows in broad absorption line quasars. If the gas has a unity volume filling factor, the mass ouflow rate in the wind is over 10-5 M ⊙ yr-1, and the kinetic power is nearly 1039 erg s-1 (or, 5-6 times the radiative Eddington limit for a neutron star). However, geometrical considerations—including a small volume filling factor and low covering factor—likely greatly reduce these values.

  20. Wind-Driven Changes of Current, Temperature, and Chlorophyll Observed by Satellites North of New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radenac, M. H.; Léger, F.; Messié, M.; Dutrieux, P.; Eldin, G.; Menkes, C.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the physical and biological variability of the ocean in the Bismarck Sea, north of New Guinea, taking advantage of the high spatio-temporal resolution of satellite data to expand on past studies. Based on scarce cruise and mooring data, a trade wind situation (austral winter) and a northwest monsoon situation (austral summer) were differentiated; the New Guinea Coastal Current (NGCC) flows northwestward in winter and a coastal upwelling develops and the NGCC reverses in summer. Here, satellite observations confirm that the NGCC intensifies during the trade wind season and reverses in summer, except in Vitiaz Strait where the surface northwestward flow persists. Wavelet analyses of satellite-derived wind and currents, sea surface temperature (SST), and chlorophyll show that intraseasonal and seasonal time scale variations explain most of the variance north of New Guinea. The combination of satellite observations further shows that SST and chlorophyll variability is mainly driven by two processes: coastal upwelling and penetration of Solomon Sea water. Coastal upwelling is generated when winds are westerly (westerly wind event, northwest monsoon). Intraseasonal westerly wind events are most active seasonally between September and January and interannually during El Niño events. Upwelled coastal waters spread towards the equator and, during some westerly wind events, these phytoplankton-rich waters can be advected toward the eastern part of the warm pool by the surface current. Penetration of Solomon Sea water occurs during the trade wind situation when enhanced NGCC transports cold water through Vitiaz Strait in a narrow vein hugging the coast. At the interannual time scale, the upwelling influence in the Bismarck Sea combines with the coastal cold tongue influence on lowering SST and counteracts the penetration of low chlorophyll water from the Solomon Sea during El Niño. Below are maps showing the SST, wind stress, chlorophyll, and altimetric

  1. Are Protoplanetary Disks Born with Vortices? Rossby Wave Instability Driven by Protostellar Infall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2015-05-01

    We carry out two-fluid, two-dimensional global hydrodynamic simulations to test whether protostellar infall can trigger the Rossby wave instability (RWI) in protoplanetry disks. Our results show that infall can trigger the RWI and generate vortices near the outer edge of the mass landing on the disk (i.e., centrifugal radius). We find that the RWI is triggered under a variety of conditions, although the details depend on the disk parameters and the infall pattern. The common key feature of triggering the RWI is the steep radial gradient of the azimuthal velocity induced by the local increase in density at the outer edge of the infall region. Vortices form when the instability enters the nonlinear regime. In our standard model where self-gravity is neglected, vortices merge together to a single vortex within ˜20 local orbital times, and the merged vortex survives for the remaining duration of the calculation (>170 local orbital times). The vortex takes part in outward angular momentum transport, with a Reynolds stress of ≲10-2. Our two-fluid calculations show that vortices efficiently trap dust particles with stopping times of the order of the orbital time, locally enhancing the dust to gas ratio for particles of the appropriate size by a factor of ˜40 in our standard model. When self-gravity is considered, however, vortices tend to be impeded from merging and may eventually dissipate. We conclude it may well be that protoplanetary disks have favorable conditions for vortex formation during the protostellar infall phase, which might enhance early planetary core formation.

  2. ARE PROTOPLANETARY DISKS BORN WITH VORTICES? ROSSBY WAVE INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY PROTOSTELLAR INFALL

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu

    2015-05-20

    We carry out two-fluid, two-dimensional global hydrodynamic simulations to test whether protostellar infall can trigger the Rossby wave instability (RWI) in protoplanetry disks. Our results show that infall can trigger the RWI and generate vortices near the outer edge of the mass landing on the disk (i.e., centrifugal radius). We find that the RWI is triggered under a variety of conditions, although the details depend on the disk parameters and the infall pattern. The common key feature of triggering the RWI is the steep radial gradient of the azimuthal velocity induced by the local increase in density at the outer edge of the infall region. Vortices form when the instability enters the nonlinear regime. In our standard model where self-gravity is neglected, vortices merge together to a single vortex within ∼20 local orbital times, and the merged vortex survives for the remaining duration of the calculation (>170 local orbital times). The vortex takes part in outward angular momentum transport, with a Reynolds stress of ≲10{sup −2}. Our two-fluid calculations show that vortices efficiently trap dust particles with stopping times of the order of the orbital time, locally enhancing the dust to gas ratio for particles of the appropriate size by a factor of ∼40 in our standard model. When self-gravity is considered, however, vortices tend to be impeded from merging and may eventually dissipate. We conclude it may well be that protoplanetary disks have favorable conditions for vortex formation during the protostellar infall phase, which might enhance early planetary core formation.

  3. Mixing of dissolved oxygen in Chesapeake Bay driven by the interaction between wind-driven circulation and estuarine bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Malcolm E.

    2016-08-01

    Field observations collected in Chesapeake Bay demonstrate how wind-driven circulation interacts with estuarine bathymetry to control when and where the vertical mixing of dissolved oxygen occurs. In the across-Bay direction, the lateral Ekman response to along-Bay wind forcing contributes to the vertical mixing of dissolved oxygen in two ways. First, the lateral tilting of the pycnocline/oxycline, consistent with the thermal wind relationship, advects the region of high vertical gradient into the surface and bottom boundary layers where mixing can occur. Second, upwelling of low-oxygen water to the surface enhances the atmospheric influx. In the along-Bay direction, the abrupt change in bottom depth associated with Rappahannock Shoal results in surface convergence and downwelling, leading to localized vertical mixing. Water that is mixed on the shoal is entrained into the up-Bay residual bottom flow resulting in increases in bottom dissolved oxygen that propagate up the system. The increases in dissolved oxygen are often associated with increases in temperature and decreases in salinity, consistent with vertical mixing. However, the lagged arrival moving northward suggests that the propagation of this signal up the Bay is due to advection.

  4. Instabilities of spin torque driven auto-oscillations of a ferromagnetic disk magnetized in plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancilla-Almonacid, D.; Arias, R. E.

    2016-06-01

    The stability of the magnetization auto-oscillations of the ferromagnetic free layer of a cylindrical nanopillar structure is studied theoretically using a classical Hamiltonian formalism for weakly interacting nonlinear waves, in a weakly dissipative system. The free layer corresponds to a very thin circular disk, made of a soft ferromagnetic material like Permalloy, and it is magnetized in plane by an externally applied magnetic field. There is a dc electric current that traverses the structure, becomes spin polarized by a fixed layer, and excites the modes of the free layer through the transfer of spin angular momentum. If this current exceeds a critical value, it is possible to generate a large amplitude periodic auto-oscillation of a dynamic mode of the magnetization. We separate our theoretical study into two parts. First, we consider an approximate expression for the demagnetizing field in the disk, i.e., H⃗D=-4 π Mzz ̂ or a very thin film approximation, and secondly we consider the effect of the full demagnetizing field, where one sees important effects due to the edges of the disk. In both cases, as the applied current density is increased, we determine the modes that will first auto-oscillate and when these become unstable to the growth of other modes, i.e., their ranges of "isolated" auto-oscillation.

  5. Effect of Background Magnetic Field on Turbulence Driven by Magnetorotational Instability in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, Kazuhito; Katoh, Yuto; Terada, Naoki; Ono, Takayuki

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the background magnetic field dependence of the saturated state of a magnetorotational instability (MRI) in an accretion disk by performing three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We assume an unstratified disk by employing the local shearing box approximation. Three different uniform background magnetic field configurations are treated for a wide range of field intensities. These simulations indicate that the time variations of the turbulent stress and the magnetic energy are altered by the presence of a poloidal component of the background field. We find that the saturation amplitude of the turbulent stress and the magnetic energy are determined by both the poloidal and azimuthal components of the field. In particular, when the poloidal component has the same intensity, the obtained turbulent stress for β y0 ≈ 200 becomes smaller than those for a purely poloidal field case. Despite the fact that the background field affects the MRI turbulence, the correlation between the obtained turbulent stress and the magnetic energy in the nonlinear stage is independent of the field topology. Our results indicate that the saturated turbulent stress has a stronger correlation with the power of the perturbed component of the magnetic field than with the power of the total magnetic field. These results suggest that both the intensity and the direction of the background magnetic field significantly affect the turbulent motion of the MRI in accretion disks.

  6. Analysis of Dynamic Behavior of Multiple-Stage Planetary Gear Train Used in Wind Driven Generator

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jungang; Wang, Yong; Huo, Zhipu

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic model of multiple-stage planetary gear train composed of a two-stage planetary gear train and a one-stage parallel axis gear is proposed to be used in wind driven generator to analyze the influence of revolution speed and mesh error on dynamic load sharing characteristic based on the lumped parameter theory. Dynamic equation of the model is solved using numerical method to analyze the uniform load distribution of the system. It is shown that the load sharing property of the system is significantly affected by mesh error and rotational speed; load sharing coefficient and change rate of internal and external meshing of the system are of obvious difference from each other. The study provides useful theoretical guideline for the design of the multiple-stage planetary gear train of wind driven generator. PMID:24511295

  7. Proton-driven electromagnetic instabilities in high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham-Shrauner, B.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Electromagnetic instabilities of the field-aligned, right-hand circularly polarized magnetosonic wave and the left-hand circularly polarized Alfven wave driven by two drifted proton components are analyzed for model parameters determined from Imp 7 solar wind proton data measured during high-speed flow conditions. Growth rates calculated using bi-Lorentzian forms for the main and beam proton as well as core and halo electron velocity distributions do not differ significantly from those calculated using bi-Maxwellian forms. Using distribution parameters determined from 17 measured proton spectra, we show that considering the uncertainties the magnetosonic wave may be linearly stable and the Alfven wave is linearly unstable. Because proton velocity distribution function shapes are observed to persist for times long compared to the proton gyroperiod, the latter result suggests that linear stability theory fails for proton-driven ion cyclotron waves in the high-speed solar wind.

  8. Proton-driven electromagnetic instabilities in high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham-Shrauner, B.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Electromagnetic instabilities of the field-aligned, right-hand circularly polarized magnetosonic wave and the left-hand circularly polarized Alfven wave driven by two drifted proton components are analyzed for model parameters determined from Imp 7 solar wind proton data measured during high-speed flow conditions. Growth rates calculated using bi-Lorentzian forms for the main and beam proton as well as core and halo electron velocity distributions do not differ significantly from those calculated using bi-Maxwellian forms. Using distribution parameters determined from 17 measured proton spectra, we show that considering the uncertainties the magnetosonic wave may be linearly stable and the Alfven wave is linearly unstable. Because proton velocity distribution function shapes are observed to persist for times long compared to the proton gyroperiod, the latter result suggests that linear stability theory fails for proton-driven ion cyclotron waves in the high-speed solar wind.

  9. Analysis of dynamic behavior of multiple-stage planetary gear train used in wind driven generator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jungang; Wang, Yong; Huo, Zhipu

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic model of multiple-stage planetary gear train composed of a two-stage planetary gear train and a one-stage parallel axis gear is proposed to be used in wind driven generator to analyze the influence of revolution speed and mesh error on dynamic load sharing characteristic based on the lumped parameter theory. Dynamic equation of the model is solved using numerical method to analyze the uniform load distribution of the system. It is shown that the load sharing property of the system is significantly affected by mesh error and rotational speed; load sharing coefficient and change rate of internal and external meshing of the system are of obvious difference from each other. The study provides useful theoretical guideline for the design of the multiple-stage planetary gear train of wind driven generator.

  10. Global Simulations of the Inner Regions of Protoplanetary Disks with Comprehensive Disk Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2017-08-01

    The gas dynamics of weakly ionized protoplanetary disks (PPDs) are largely governed by the coupling between gas and magnetic fields, described by three non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) effects (Ohmic, Hall, ambipolar). Previous local simulations incorporating these processes have revealed that the inner regions of PPDs are largely laminar and accompanied by wind-driven accretion. We conduct 2D axisymmetric, fully global MHD simulations of these regions (˜1-20 au), taking into account all non-ideal MHD effects, with tabulated diffusion coefficients and approximate treatment of external ionization and heating. With the net vertical field aligned with disk rotation, the Hall-shear instability strongly amplifies horizontal magnetic field, making the overall dynamics dependent on initial field configuration. Following disk formation, the disk likely relaxes into an inner zone characterized by asymmetric field configuration across the midplane, which smoothly transitions to a more symmetric outer zone. Angular momentum transport is driven by both MHD winds and laminar Maxwell stress, with both accretion and decretion flows present at different heights, and modestly asymmetric winds from the two disk sides. With anti-aligned field polarity, weakly magnetized disks settle into an asymmetric field configuration with supersonic accretion flow concentrated at one side of the disk surface, and highly asymmetric winds between the two disk sides. In all cases, the wind is magneto-thermal in nature, characterized by a mass loss rate exceeding the accretion rate. More strongly magnetized disks give more symmetric field configuration and flow structures. Deeper far-UV penetration leads to stronger and less stable outflows. Implications for observations and planet formation are also discussed.

  11. SYNCHROTRON CONSTRAINTS ON A HYBRID COSMIC-RAY AND THERMALLY DRIVEN GALACTIC WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, John E.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Schiller, Quintin G.

    2010-03-01

    Cosmic rays and magnetic fields can substantially impact the launching of large-scale galactic winds. Many researchers have investigated the role of cosmic rays; our group previously showed that a cosmic-ray and thermally driven wind could explain soft X-ray emission toward the center of the Galaxy. In this paper, we calculate the synchrotron emission from our original wind model and compare it to observations; the synchrotron data show that earlier assumptions about the launching conditions of the wind must be changed: we are required to improve that earlier model by restricting the launching region to the domain of the inner 'Molecular Ring', and by decreasing the magnetic field strength from the previously assumed maximum strength. With these physically motivated modifications, we find that a wind model can fit both the radio synchrotron and the X-ray emission, although that model is required to have a higher gas pressure and density than the previous model in order to reproduce the observed X-ray emission within the smaller 'footprint'. The drop in magnetic field also decreases the effect of cosmic-ray heating, requiring a higher temperature at the base of the wind than the previous model.

  12. Effect of wave-current interaction on wind-driven circulation in narrow, shallow embayments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.; Beardsley, Robert C.; Graber, H. C.; Capotondi, A.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of wind waves on the steady wind-driven circulation in a narrow, shallow bay is investigated with a two-dimensional (y, z) circulation model and the Grant and Madsen [1979] bottom-boundary layer model, which includes wave-current interaction. A constant wind stress is applied in the along-channel x direction to a channel with a constant cross-sectional profile h(y). The wind-induced flushing of shallow bays is shown to be sensitive to both the shape of the cross section and the effects of surface waves. The flushing increases with increasing , where h′ is the standard deviation of cross-channel depth and  is the mean depth. This is consistent with the findings of Hearn et al. [1987]. The flushing decreases, however, with the inclusion of surface wave effects which act to increase the bottom drag felt by the currents. Increasing effective bottom friction reduces the strength of the circulation, while the along-bay surface slope, bottom stress and the structure of current profiles remain nearly unchanged. An implication of the circulation dependence on wave-current interaction is that low-frequency oscillatory winds may drive a mean circulation when the wave field changes with wind direction.x

  13. Advances in Statistical and Deterministic Modeling of Wind-Driven Seas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    Wind-Driven Seas Zakharov Vladimir, Pushkarev Andrei Waves and Solitons LLC 1719 W. Marlette Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85015 phone: +1 (602) 748-4286 e...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Waves and Solitons LLC,1719 W. Marlette Ave,Phoenix,AZ,85015 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING...decrement, kN – spectral density of wave action . Our numerical and analytical results show that kk NΓ and kF surpass conventional parameterizations

  14. Project-based Learning “Wind-Driven Transport System” based on Quality Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaku, Kaoru; Yamagiwa, Kazuaki

    Project-based learning “Wind-driven transport system” simulates product development project in manufacturing industries. It is connected with a subject “quality engineering” and needs only 7.5h including the competition. The outline of the project is presented in this article. The outcomes are discussed based on more than six years experiences. The reports submitted by the students and questionnaire proved the project highly creative and effective to improve design and teamwork skills.

  15. TESTING MODELS OF ACCRETION-DRIVEN CORONAL HEATING AND STELLAR WIND ACCELERATION FOR T TAURI STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2009-11-20

    Classical T Tauri stars are pre-main-sequence objects that undergo simultaneous accretion, wind outflow, and coronal X-ray emission. The impact of plasma on the stellar surface from magnetospheric accretion streams is likely to be a dominant source of energy and momentum in the upper atmospheres of these stars. This paper presents a set of models for the dynamics and heating of three distinct regions on T Tauri stars that are affected by accretion: (1) the shocked plasmas directly beneath the magnetospheric accretion streams, (2) stellar winds that are accelerated along open magnetic flux tubes, and (3) closed magnetic loops that resemble the Sun's coronal active regions. For the loops, a self-consistent model of coronal heating was derived from numerical simulations of solar field-line tangling and turbulent dissipation. Individual models are constructed for the properties of 14 well-observed stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. Predictions for the wind mass-loss rates are, on average, slightly lower than the observations, which suggests that disk winds or X-winds may also contribute to the measured outflows. For some of the stars, however, the modeled stellar winds do appear to contribute significantly to the measured mass fluxes. Predictions for X-ray luminosities from the shocks and loops are in general agreement with existing observations. The stars with the highest accretion rates tend to have X-ray luminosities dominated by the high-temperature (5-10 MK) loops. The X-ray luminosities for the stars having lower accretion rates are dominated by the cooler accretion shocks.

  16. Wind-Driven Wireless Networked System of Mobile Sensors for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davoodi, Faranak; Murphy, Neil

    2013-01-01

    A revolutionary way is proposed of studying the surface of Mars using a wind-driven network of mobile sensors: GOWON. GOWON would be a scalable, self-powered and autonomous distributed system that could allow in situ mapping of a wide range of environmental phenomena in a much larger portion of the surface of Mars compared to earlier missions. It could improve the possibility of finding rare phenomena such as "blueberries' or bio-signatures and mapping their occurrence, through random wind-driven search. It would explore difficult terrains that were beyond the reach of previous missions, such as regions with very steep slopes and cluttered surfaces. GOWON has a potentially long life span, as individual elements can be added to the array periodically. It could potentially provide a cost-effective solution for mapping wide areas of Martian terrain, enabling leaving a long-lasting sensing and searching infrastructure on the surface of Mars. The system proposed here addresses this opportunity using technology advances in a distributed system of wind-driven sensors, referred to as Moballs.

  17. Predictive Understanding of the Oceans' Wind-Driven Circulation on Interdecadal Time Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Ghil; Temam, Roger; Y. Feliks; Simonnet, E.; Tachim-Medjo, T.

    2008-09-30

    The goal of this project was to obtain a predictive understanding of a major component of the climate system's interdecadal variability: the oceans' wind-driven circulation. To do so, we developed and applied advanced computational and statistical methods to the problem of climate variability and climate change. The methodology was developed first for models of intermediate complexity, such as the quasi-geostrophic and the primitive equations, which describe the wind-driven, near-surface flow in mid-latitude ocean basins. Our computational work consisted in developing efficient multi-level methods to simulate this flow and study its dependence on physically relevant parameters. Our oceanographic and climate work consisted in applying these methods to study the bifurcations in the wind-driven circulation and their relevance to the flows observed at present and those that might occur in a warmer climate. Both aspects of the work are crucial for the efficient treatment of large-scale, eddy-resolving numerical simulations of the oceans and an increased understanding and better prediction of climate change. Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding ocean-atmosphere interaction in the mid-latitudes. An important by-product of this research is a novel approach to explaining the North Atlantic Oscillation.

  18. THE OPTICAL STRUCTURE OF THE STARBURST GALAXY M82. I. DYNAMICS OF THE DISK AND INNER-WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Westmoquette, M. S.; Smith, L. J.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Gallagher, J. S.; Trancho, G.

    2009-05-01

    We present Gemini-North GMOS-IFU observations of the central starburst clumps and inner wind of M82, together with WIYN DensePak IFU observations of the inner 2 x 0.9 kpc of the disk. These cover the emission lines of H{alpha}, [N II], [S II], and [S III] at a spectral resolution of 45-80 km s{sup -1}. The high signal-to-noise of the data is sufficient to accurately decompose the emission line profiles into multiple narrow components (FWHM {approx} 30-130 km s{sup -1}) superimposed on a broad (FWHM {approx} 150-350 km s{sup -1}) feature. This paper is the first of a series examining the optical structure of M82's disk and inner wind; here we focus on the ionized gaseous and stellar dynamics and present maps of the relevant emission line properties. Our observations show that ionized gas in the starburst core of M82 is dynamically complex with many overlapping expanding structures located at different radii. Localised line splitting of up to 100 km s{sup -1} in the narrow component is associated with expanding shells of compressed, cool, photoionized gas at the roots of the superwind outflow. We have been able to associate some of this inner-wind gas with a distinct outflow channel characterised by its dynamics and gas density patterns, and we discuss the consequences of this discovery in terms of the developing wind outflow. The broad optical emission line component is observed to become increasingly important moving outward along the outflow channel, and in general with increasing height above/below the plane. Following our recent work on the origins of this component, we associate it with turbulent gas in wind-clump interface layers and hence sites of mass loading, meaning that the turbulent mixing of cooler gas into the outflowing hot gas must become increasingly important with height, and provides powerful direct evidence for the existence of mass-loading over a large, spatially extended area reaching far into the inner wind. We discuss the consequences and

  19. θ Car: X-ray Emission from Low Density Radiation-Driven Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle (Mizusawa), Trisha; Petit, Veronique; Held Cohen, David; Fullerton, Alexander W.; Gagne, Marc; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Li, Zequn; Owocki, Stanley P.; Sundqvist, Jon; Wade, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray grating spectroscopy (and IUE spectroscopy) of the B0.2 V star, θ Carina. θ Car is in a critical transition region between the earliest B stars and the latest O stars, where the density of the wind is observed to decrease more than theoretically expected. In general, X-ray emission in this low-density wind regime should be less prominent, but observations have shown that there is a higher than expected production of X-ray emission from the winds of these stars; this severely challenges predictions of radiatively driven wind theory. We measure the f/i ratio, widths, and velocities of several Helium-like lines in the X-ray spectrum. The f/i ratio is a diagnostic of the radial location of the X-ray emitting plasma, which is sensitive to the specific transition of each He-like ion. We use θ Car to study the radiatively-driven mass-loss of early B-type stars.

  20. Magnetically Driven Winds from Post-Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars: Solutions for High-Speed Winds and Extreme Collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Segura, Guillermo; López, José Alberto; Franco, José

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) winds driven solely by magnetic pressure from the stellar surface. It is found that winds can reach high speeds under this assumption and lead to the formation of highly collimated proto-planetary nebulae. Bipolar knotty jets with periodic features and constant velocity are well reproduced by the models. Several wind models with terminal velocities from a few tens of km s-1 up to 103 km s-1 are calculated, yielding outflows with linear momenta in the range 1036-1040 g cm s-1, and kinetic energies in the range 1042-1047 ergs. These results are in accord with recent observations of proto-planetary nebulae that have pointed out serious energy and momentum deficits if radiation pressure is considered as the only driver for these outflows. Our models strengthen the notion that the large mass loss rates of post-AGB stars, together with the short transition times from the late AGB to the planetary nebula stage, could be directly linked with the generation of strong magnetic fields during this transition stage.

  1. Manifestations of dynamo driven large-scale magnetic field in accretion disks of compact objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chagelishvili, G. D.; Chanishvili, R. G.; Lominadze, J. G.; Sokhadze, Z. A.

    1991-01-01

    A turbulent dynamo nonlinear theory of turbulence was developed that shows that in the compact objects of accretion disks, the generated large-scale magnetic field (when the generation takes place) has a practically toroidal configuration. Its energy density can be much higher than turbulent pulsations energy density, and it becomes comparable with the thermal energy density of the medium. On this basis, the manifestations to which the large-scale magnetic field can lead at the accretion onto black holes and gravimagnetic rotators, respectively, are presented.

  2. Neutrino Transport in Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries: Dynamical Mass Ejection and Neutrino-Driven Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutoku, K.; Kiuchi, K.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present our recent results of numerical-relativity simulations of black hole-neutron star binary mergers incorporating approximate neutrino transport. We in particular discuss dynamical mass ejection and neutrino-driven wind.

  3. Free surface due to a flow driven by a rotating disk inside a vertical cylindrical tank: Axisymmetric configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahouadji, L.; Witkowski, L. Martin

    2014-07-01

    The flow driven by a rotating disk at the bottom of an open fixed cylindrical cavity is studied numerically and experimentally. The steady axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations projected onto a curvilinear coordinate system are solved by a Newton-Raphson algorithm. The free surface shape is computed by an iterative process in order to satisfy a zero normal stress balance at the interface. In previous studies, regarding the free surface deflection, there is a significant disagreement between a first-order approximation [M. Piva and E. Meiburg, "Steady axisymmetric flow in an open cylindrical container with a partially rotating bottom wall," Phys. Fluids 17, 063603 (2005)] and a full numerical simulation [R. Bouffanais and D. Lo Jacono, "Unsteady transitional swirling flow in the presence of a moving free surface," Phys. Fluids 21, 064107 (2009)]. For a small deflection, the first-order approximation matches with our numerical simulation and for a large deflection a good agreement is found with experimental measurements.

  4. Resolving Star Formation, Multiphase ISM Structure, and Wind Driving with MHD and RHD Models of Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostriker, Eve

    Current studies of star and galaxy formation have concluded that energetic feedback from young stars and supernovae (SNe) is crucial, both for controlling observed interstellar medium (ISM) properties and star formation rates in the Milky Way and other galaxies, and for driving galactic winds that govern the baryon abundance in dark matter halos. However, in many numerical studies of the ISM, energy inputs have not been implemented self-consistently with the evolving rate of gravitational collapse to make stars, or have considered only isolated star-forming clouds without a realistic galactic environment (including sheared rotation and externally-originating SNe), or have not directly incorporated radiation, magnetic, and chemical effects that are important or even dominant. In models of galaxy formation and evolution in the cosmic context, galactic winds are indispensable but highly uncertain as the physics of superbubble evolution and radiation-gas interactions cannot be resolved. Our central objectives are (1) to address the above limitations of current models, developing self-consistent simulations of the multiphase ISM in disk galaxies that resolve both star formation and stellar feedback, covering the range of scales needed to connect star cluster formation to galactic superwind ejection, and the range of environments from dwarfs to ULIRGs; and (2) to analyze the detailed properties of the gas, magnetic field, radiation field, and star formation/SNe in our simulations, including dependencies on local galactic disk environment, and to connect intrinsic properties with observable diagnostics. The proposed project will employ the Athena code for numerical magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) and radiation-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations, using comprehensive physics modules that have been developed, tested, and demonstrated in sample simulations. We will consider local ``shearing box'' disk models with gas surface density Sigma = 2 - 10,000 Msun/pc^2, and a range of stellar

  5. Unveiling the X-ray/UV properties of disk winds in active galactic nuclei using broad and mini-broad absorption line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustini, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of the uniform analysis of 46 XMM-Newton observations of six BAL and seven mini-BAL QSOs belonging to the Palomar-Green Quasar catalogue. Moderate-quality X-ray spectroscopy was performed with the EPIC-pn, and allowed to characterise the general source spectral shape to be complex, significantly deviating from a power law emission. A simple power law analysis in different energy bands strongly suggests absorption to be more significant than reflection in shaping the spectra. If allowing for the absorbing gas to be either partially covering the continuum emission source or to be ionised, large column densities of the order of 1022-1024 cm-2 are inferred. When the statistics was high enough, virtually every source was found to vary in spectral shape on various time scales, from years to hours. All in all these observational results are compatible with radiation driven accretion disk winds shaping the spectra of these intriguing cosmic sources.

  6. Wind-driven Modulation of Cross-shelf Exchange Driven by Gravitational Relaxation on a Shelf During Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, Stephen; Seim, Harvey

    2015-04-01

    A field program was conducted during the Winter of 2012 at Long Bay, off the coast of South Carolina, USA. Previous studies have shown that this region has unusually high wintertime productivity. During winter, the water on this shallow shelf (shelf break at approximately 60m depth) is often well-mixed, characterized by nearly vertical isotherms and a horizontal density gradient. Interestingly, we observed several wintertime stratification events. Integrating data from several sources (gliders, moorings, towed body, weather buoy, satellite), we implemented an energetics analysis to quantify the various physical processes that influence stratification. The analysis shows the importance of the horizontal advection of buoyancy, driven by downwelling favorable winds and Gulf Stream filaments.

  7. A radiation-driven stellar wind model with a line force cutoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Mark J.; Friend, David B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a model for a radiation-driven stellar wind in which the driving force is abruptly cut off at an adjustable distance from the star. The model is intended to give a first approximation of the effects of ionizing shocks in a stellar wind on the terminal velocity and mass-loss rate. As expected, the wind velocity is found to decrease after the line force is cut off. The terminal velocity depends directly on the velocity of the wind at the point where the driving force is cut off. The mass-loss rate is found to be unaffected as long as the cutoff is outside the critical point of the flow. The model is applied to the star Tau Sco, a strong X-ray source with an anomalously low terminal velocity. It is shown that this low terminal velocity can be caused by a cutoff of the line force at a distance which is consistent with the idea that the observed X-rate emission is produced by shocks in the wind.

  8. Modeling and model validation of wind-driven circulation in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.; Wood, T.

    2005-01-01

    The hydrodynamics in the Upper Klamath Lake (UKL) plays a significant role in the water quality conditions of the lake. In order to provide a quantitative evaluation of the impacts of hydrodynamics on water quality in UKL, a detailed hydrodynamic model was implemented using an unstructured grid 3-D hydrodynamic model known as the UnTRIM model. The circulation in UKL is driven primarily by wind. Wind speed and direction time-series records were used as input, the numerical model reproduced the wind "set-up" and "set-down" at down wind and upwind ends of the lake, respectively. Of the two acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) records, the UnTRIM model reproduced the measured velocity at the deep station. At the shallow station, the model results showed diurnal patterns that correlated well with wind variations, but the measured velocity showed water velocity sustained at 3 to 5 cm/sec or above. Discrepancies between the model results and observations at the shallow ADCP station is discussed on the basis of correct physics. If the field measurements are inconsistent with the known physics, there exists the possibility that the field data are suspect or the field data are revealing some physical processes that are not yet understood. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  9. Line-driven disc wind model for ultrafast outflows in active galactic nuclei - scaling with luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, M.; Ohsuga, K.

    2017-03-01

    In order to reveal the origin of the ultrafast outflows (UFOs) that are frequently observed in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we perform two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the line-driven disc winds, which are accelerated by the radiation force due to the spectral lines. The line-driven winds are successfully launched for the range of MBH = 106-9 M⊙ and ε = 0.1-0.5, and the resulting mass outflow rate (dot{M_w}), momentum flux (dot{p_w}), and kinetic luminosity (dot{E_w}) are in the region containing 90 per cent of the posterior probability distribution in the dot{M}_w-Lbol plane, dot{p}_w-Lbol plane, and dot{E}_w-Lbol plane shown in Gofford et al., where MBH is the black hole mass, ε is the Eddington ratio, and Lbol is the bolometric luminosity. The best-fitting relations in Gofford et al., d log dot{M_w}/d log {L_bol}˜ 0.9, d log dot{p_w}/d log {L_bol}˜ 1.2, and d log dot{E_w}/d log {L_bol}˜ 1.5, are roughly consistent with our results, d log dot{M_w}/d log {L_bol}˜ 9/8, d log dot{p_w}/d log {L_bol}˜ 10/8, and d log dot{E_w}/d log {L_bol}˜ 11/8. In addition, our model predicts that no UFO features are detected for the AGNs with ε ≲ 0.01, since the winds do not appear. Also, only AGNs with MBH ≲ 108 M⊙ exhibit the UFOs when ε ∼ 0.025. These predictions nicely agree with the X-ray observations. These results support that the line-driven disc wind is the origin of the UFOs.

  10. Suppression of star formation in the galaxy NGC 253 by a starburst-driven molecular wind.

    PubMed

    Bolatto, Alberto D; Warren, Steven R; Leroy, Adam K; Walter, Fabian; Veilleux, Sylvain; Ostriker, Eve C; Ott, Jürgen; Zwaan, Martin; Fisher, David B; Weiss, Axel; Rosolowsky, Erik; Hodge, Jacqueline

    2013-07-25

    The under-abundance of very massive galaxies in the Universe is frequently attributed to the effect of galactic winds. Although ionized galactic winds are readily observable, most of the expelled mass (that is, the total mass flowing out from the nuclear region) is likely to be in atomic and molecular phases that are cooler than the ionized phases. Expanding molecular shells observed in starburst systems such as NGC 253 (ref. 12) and M 82 (refs 13, 14) may facilitate the entrainment of molecular gas in the wind. Although shell properties are well constrained, determining the amount of outflowing gas emerging from such shells and the connection between this gas and the ionized wind requires spatial resolution better than 100 parsecs coupled with sensitivity to a wide range of spatial scales, a combination hitherto not available. Here we report observations of NGC 253, a nearby starburst galaxy (distance ∼ 3.4 megaparsecs) known to possess a wind, that trace the cool molecular wind at 50-parsec resolution. At this resolution, the extraplanar molecular gas closely tracks the Hα filaments, and it appears to be connected to expanding molecular shells located in the starburst region. These observations allow us to determine that the molecular outflow rate is greater than 3 solar masses per year and probably about 9 solar masses per year. This implies a ratio of mass-outflow rate to star-formation rate of at least 1, and probably ∼3, indicating that the starburst-driven wind limits the star-formation activity and the final stellar content.

  11. Two-fluid models for stationary dust-driven winds. I. Momentum and energy balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, D.; Gauger, A.; Sedlmayr, E.

    1994-10-01

    Self-consistent two-fluid models of stationary dust driven winds around cool C-stars have been calculated. The dust and the gas component are coupled by the condensation of dust from the gas phase and grain-gas collisions and are described by separate sets of equations. It was found that in the regime of substantial mass loss where purely dust driven winds are possible the dust grains move with their equilibrium drift velocity relative to the gas. Compared to one-fluid models the dust component is dynamically diluted, leading to a decreased radiative acceleration of the wind in the outer region. We have included detailed energy exchange rates between gas and radiation field by vibrational transitions of CO and pure rotational transitions of dipolar molecules (CO, HCN, C_2_H, C_3_H, CS, SiS). Our models show that frictional heating by drifting dust grains raises the gas temperature considerably above its radiative equilibrium value. This leads to significant extension of the dust condensation zone. A sequence of models with increasing luminosities shows that the drift velocity of the dust decreases for higher luminosities. Consequently the drift related effects are more pronounced at lower luminosities.

  12. Multidecadal wind-driven shifts in northwest Pacific temperature, salinity, O2, and PO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Eun Young; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Young-Gyu; Park, Young-Hyang; Dunne, John; Chang, Kyung-Il

    2016-11-01

    The North Pacific gyre boundaries are characterized by stark contrasts in physical and biogeochemical properties. Meridional movement of gyre boundaries, influenced by climate change, can therefore exert a large influence not only on marine ecosystems but also on climate. We examine the evidence for wind-driven southward shifts in subsurface temperature, salinity, PO4, and O2 within the northwest Pacific from the 1950s to the 2000s. Gyre boundary shifts can explain 30-60% of temperature and salinity trends zonally averaged in the northwest Pacific and observed PO4 and O2 trends along the 137°E and 144°E meridians. The close tie between the wind-driven shifts in gyre boundaries and the tracer distributions is further supported by results from an eddy-resolving (0.1° × 0.1°) Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory climate model, suggesting that the physical and biogeochemical properties averaged within the northwest Pacific gyre boundaries closely follow the latitude changes of the zero Sverdrup stream function with lags of 0 to 3 years. The gyre shift effect on tracer distribution is poorly represented in a coarse resolution (1° × 1°) model due partly to poor representations of fronts and eddies. This study suggests that future changes in northwest Pacific PO4 and O2 content may depend not only on ocean temperature and stratification but also on the ocean gyre response to winds.

  13. A CME-driven solar wind distrubance observed at both low and high heliographic latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Phillips, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    A solar wind disturbance produced by a fast coronal mass ejection, CME, that departed from the Sun on Feburary 20, 1994 was observed in the ecliptic plane at 1 AU by IMP 8 and at high heliographic latitudes at 3.53 AU by Ulysses. In the ecliptic the disturbance included a strong forward shock but no reverse shock, while at high latitudes the disturbance was bounded by a relatively weak forward-reverse shock pair. It is clear that the disturbance in the ecliptic plane was driven primarily by the relative speed between the CME and a slower ambient solar wind ahead, whereas at higher latitudes the disturbance was driven by expansion of the CME. The combined IMP 8 and Ulysses observations thus provide a graphic illustration of how a single fast CME can produce very different types of solar wind disturbances at low and high heliographic latitudes. Simple numerical simulations help explain observed differences at the two spacecraft. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Impact of (α, n) reactions on weak r-process in neutrino-driven winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, J.; Arcones, A.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.

    2017-05-01

    After a successful core-collapse supernova, a neutrino-driven wind develops where it is possible to synthesize lighter heavy elements (30 < Z < 45). In the early galaxy, the origin of these elements is associated with the r-process and to an additional process. Here we assume that the additional process corresponds to the weak r-process (sometimes referred to as alpha-process) taking place in neutrino-driven winds. Based on a trajectory obtained from hydrodynamical simulations we study the astrophysics and nuclear physics uncertainties of a weak r-process with our main focus on the (α, n) reactions. These reactions are critical to redistribute the matter and allow it to move from light to heavy elements after nuclear statistical equilibrium freezes out. In this first sensitivity study, we vary all (α, n) reactions by given constant factors which are justified based on the uncertainties of the statistical model and its nuclear physics input, mainly alpha optical potentials for weak r-process conditions. Our results show that (α, n) rate uncertainties are indeed crucial to predict abundances. Therefore, further studies will follow to identify individual critical reactions. Since the nucleosynthesis path is close to stability, these reactions can be measured in the near future. Since much of the other nuclear data for the weak r-process are known, the reduction in nuclear physics uncertainties provided by these experiments will allow astronomical observations to directly constrain the astronomical conditions in the wind.

  15. Slotted-wall research with disk and parachute models in the DSMA low-speed wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Van Every, D.; Harris, J.L. )

    1990-06-01

    A test program investigated the effects of wall open area ratio (OAR) and model axial position on the measured drag of disk and parachute models in a low-speed wind tunnel. The data and discussion presented in this report provide new insight into the nature of slotted-wall interference for bluff bodies in steady flow and give the first quantitative information on nonsteady wall interference and airflow response during the inflation of a parachute. The report concludes that a fixed OAR of between 5% and 15% should eliminate wall interference during inflation and greatly reduce steady-flow interference for geometric blockages up to 15%. Preliminary arguments suggest that an optimum OAR may be found that alleviates wall interference for large models at low speeds while providing for acceptable testing of smaller models in the transonic speed range. 10 refs., 36 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Starburst-driven galactic winds - I. Energetics and intrinsic X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, David K.; Stevens, Ian R.

    2000-05-01

    Starburst-driven galactic winds are responsible for the transport of mass, in particular metal-enriched gas, and energy out of galaxies and into the intergalactic medium. These outflows directly affect the chemical evolution of galaxies, and heat and enrich the intergalactic and intercluster medium. Currently, several basic problems preclude quantitative measurements of the impact of galactic winds: the unknown filling factors of, in particular, the soft X-ray-emitting gas prevent accurate measurements of densities, masses and energy content; multiphase temperature distributions of unknown complexity bias X-ray-determined abundances; unknown amounts of energy and mass may reside in hard to observe T~105K and T~107.5K phases; and the relative balance of thermal versus kinetic energy in galactic winds is not known. In an effort to address these problems, we perform an extensive hydrodynamical parameter study of starburst-driven galactic winds, motivated by the latest observation data on the best-studied starburst galaxy M82. We study how the wind dynamics, morphology and X-ray emission depend on the ISM distribution of the host galaxy, the starburst star formation history and strength, and the presence and distribution of mass-loading by dense clouds. We also investigate and discuss the influence of finite numerical resolution on the results of these simulations. We find that the soft X-ray emission from galactic winds comes from low filling factor (η<~2per cent) gas, which contains only a small fraction (<~10per cent) of the mass and energy of the wind, irrespective of whether the wind models are strongly mass-loaded or not. X-ray observations of galactic winds do not directly probe the gas that contains the majority of the energy, mass or metal-enriched gas in the outflow. X-ray emission comes from a complex phase-continuum of gas, covering a wide range of different temperatures and densities. No distinct phases, as are commonly assumed when fitting X-ray spectra

  17. Solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during ejecta and sheath-driven geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllys, M.; Kilpua, E. K. J.; Lavraud, B.; Pulkkinen, T. I.

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the effect of key solar wind driving parameters on solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during sheath and magnetic cloud-driven storms. The particular focus of the study was on the coupling efficiency dependence with Alfvén Mach number (MA). The efficiency has been estimated using the dawn-dusk component of the interplanetary electric field (EY), Newell and Borovsky functions as a proxy for the energy inflow and the polar cap potential (PCN), and auroral electrojet (AE) and SYM-H indices as the measure of the energy output. We have also performed a time delay analysis between the input parameters and the geomagnetic indices. The optimal time lag and smoothing window length depend on the coupling function used and on the solar wind driver. For example, turbulent sheaths are more sensitive to the time shift and the averaging interval than smoother magnetic clouds. The results presented in this study show that the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency depends strongly on the definition used, and it increases with increasing MA. We demonstrate that the PCN index distinctively shows both a Mach number dependent saturation and a Mach number independent saturation, pointing to the existence of at least two underlying physical mechanisms for the saturation of the index. By contrast, we show that the AE index saturates but that the saturation of this index is independent of the solar wind Mach number. Finally, we find that the SYM-H index does not seem to saturate and that the absence of saturation is independent of the Mach number regime. We highlight the difference between the typical MA conditions during sheath regions and magnetic clouds. The lowest MA values are related to the magnetic clouds. As a consequence, sheaths typically have higher solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiencies than magnetic clouds.

  18. Wind driven general circulation of the Mediterranean Sea simulated with a Spectral Element Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molcard, A.; Pinardi, N.; Iskandarani, M.; Haidvogel, D. B.

    2002-05-01

    This work is an attempt to simulate the Mediterranean Sea general circulation with a Spectral Finite Element Model. This numerical technique associates the geometrical flexibility of the finite elements for the proper coastline definition with the precision offered by spectral methods. The model is reduced gravity and we study the wind-driven ocean response in order to explain the large scale sub-basin gyres and their variability. The study period goes from January 1987 to December 1993 and two forcing data sets are used. The effect of wind variability in space and time is analyzed and the relationship between wind stress curl and ocean response is stressed. Some of the main permanent structures of the general circulation (Gulf of Lions cyclonic gyre, Rhodes gyre, Gulf of Syrte anticylone) are shown to be induced by permanent wind stress curl structures. The magnitude and spatial variability of the wind is important in determining the appearance or disappearance of some gyres (Tyrrhenian anticyclonic gyre, Balearic anticyclonic gyre, Ionian cyclonic gyre). An EOF analysis of the seasonal variability indicates that the weakening and strengthening of the Levantine basin boundary currents is a major component of the seasonal cycle in the basin. The important discovery is that seasonal and interannual variability peak at the same spatial scales in the ocean response and that the interannual variability includes the change in amplitude and phase of the seasonal cycle in the sub-basin scale gyres and boundary currents. The Coriolis term in the vorticity balance seems to be responsible for the weakening of anticyclonic structures and their total disappearance when they are close to a boundary. The process of adjustment to winds produces a train of coastally trapped gravity waves which travel around the eastern and western basins, respectively in approximately 6 months. This corresponds to a phase velocity for the wave of about 1 m/s, comparable to an average velocity of

  19. EU Del: exploring the onset of pulsation-driven winds in giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Sloan, G. C.; Lagadec, E.; Johnson, C. I.; Uttenthaler, S.; Jones, O. C.; Smith, C. L.

    2016-03-01

    We explore the wind-driving mechanism of giant stars through the nearby (117 pc), intermediate-luminosity (L ≈ 1600 L⊙) star EU Del (HIP 101810, HD 196610). Atacama Pathfinder Experiment observations of the CO (3-2) and (2-1) transitions are used to derive a wind velocity of 9.51 ± 0.02 km s-1, a 12C/13C ratio of 14^{+9}_{-4} and a mass-loss rate of a few × 10-8 M⊙ yr-1. Analysis of published spectra show the star has a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.27 ± ˜0.30 dex. The star's dusty envelope lacks a clear 10-μm silicate feature, despite the star's oxygen-rich nature. Radiative transfer modelling cannot fit a wind acceleration model which relies solely on radiation pressure on condensing dust. We compare our results to VY Leo (HIP 53449), a star with similar temperature and luminosity, but different pulsation properties. We suggest the much stronger mass-loss from EU Del may be driven by long-period stellar pulsations, due to its potentially lower mass. We explore the implications for the mass-loss rate and wind velocities of other stars.

  20. Fast and slow radiation-driven wind solutions using ZEUS-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, I.; Curé, M.; ud-Doula, A.; Santillán, A.

    2014-10-01

    Currently, the theory of radiation-driven winds of massive stars possess three known solutions for the velocity and density profiles of the stellar winds, namely: the fast, Ω -slow and δ -slow solutions. In order to confirm their stability we use a time-dependent numerical hydrodynamic code called ZEUS-3D, and then we compare their results with the stationary solutions from our numerical hydrodynamic code. ZEUS-3D needs an initial trial solution to start to integrate, for this we use the stationary solution (from our code) or a β-law for the velocity field. In both cases we obtain the same results. Fast and both slow stationary solutions are attained in ZEUS-3D and are all stable. Furthermore, there is a very good agreement with the velocity and density fields from ZEUS-3D and our code, having differences between the terminal velocities lower than 3%. In addition, we found that ZEUS-3D is very sensitive to the boundary conditions (base density and velocity profile), in some cases we obtain kinks in the velocity profiles, similar to the ones obtained by Madura et al. (2007) for stars with high rotation. Such kinks are most likely the result of the wind being mass overloaded, but further investigation is needed to understand its nature better. Currently, we are exploring the effects of small perturbation at the base of the wind in order to study possible transitions or oscillations between δ-slow and fast solutions.

  1. Wind-driven Variability of the Atlantic Water Transport to the Nordic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiayan

    2016-04-01

    The Greenland-Iceland-Scotland Ridge (GISR) is a major barrier for oceanic heat transport from the Atlantic to the Arctic Ocean. The mean transport is believed to be driven by the buoyancy forcing, i.e., the northward transport of the Atlantic Ocean water is drawn into the Nordic Seas to compensate the southward overflow transport across the GISR. Seasonal to decadal variability, however, is strongly affected by the wind stress in both the Atlantic Ocean and the Nordic Seas. In this study, analyses of both in situ and satellite observations, data-assimilated model products and numerical modeling experiments are used to elucidate the key forcing mechanisms and processes. It is found that transport is enhanced when the wind-stress curl is anomalously positive over the GISR area and in the subpolar North Atlantic Basin. The wind-stress curl inside the Nordic Sea also exerts a strong influence on the transport over the GISR through its impacts on the East Greenland Current and on the overflow transport. Our analyses indicate that the wind-stress forcing is a main mechanism for season-to-decadal variability of the transport cross the GISR.

  2. Analytical solutions for radiation-driven winds in massive stars. I. The fast regime

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, I.; Curé, M.; Cidale, L. S.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate mass-loss rate estimates are crucial keys in the study of wind properties of massive stars and for testing different evolutionary scenarios. From a theoretical point of view, this implies solving a complex set of differential equations in which the radiation field and the hydrodynamics are strongly coupled. The use of an analytical expression to represent the radiation force and the solution of the equation of motion has many advantages over numerical integrations. Therefore, in this work, we present an analytical expression as a solution of the equation of motion for radiation-driven winds in terms of the force multiplier parameters. This analytical expression is obtained by employing the line acceleration expression given by Villata and the methodology proposed by Müller and Vink. On the other hand, we find useful relationships to determine the parameters for the line acceleration given by Müller and Vink in terms of the force multiplier parameters.

  3. Trans-dimensional geoacoustic inversion of wind-driven ambient noise.

    PubMed

    Quijano, Jorge E; Dosso, Stan E; Dettmer, Jan; Zurk, Lisa M; Siderius, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This letter applies trans-dimensional Bayesian geoacoustic inversion to quantify the uncertainty due to model selection when inverting bottom-loss data derived from wind-driven ambient-noise measurements. A partition model is used to represent the seabed, in which the number of layers, their thicknesses, and acoustic parameters are unknowns to be determined from the data. Exploration of the parameter space is implemented using the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm with parallel tempering, whereas jumps between parameterizations are controlled by a reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Sediment uncertainty profiles from inversion of simulated and experimental data are presented.

  4. Turbulent aerosol fluxes over the Arctic Ocean: 2. Wind-driven sources from the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E. D.; Rannik, Ü.; Swietlicki, E.; Leck, C.; Aalto, P. P.; Zhou, J.; Norman, M.

    2001-12-01

    An eddy-covariance flux system was successfully applied over open sea, leads and ice floes during the Arctic Ocean Expedition in July-August 1996. Wind-driven upward aerosol number fluxes were observed over open sea and leads in the pack ice. These particles must originate from droplets ejected into the air at the bursting of small air bubbles at the water surface. The source flux F (in 106 m-2 s-1) had a strong dependency on wind speed, log>(F>)=0.20U¯-1.71 and 0.11U¯-1.93, over the open sea and leads, respectively (where U¯ is the local wind speed at about 10 m height). Over the open sea the wind-driven aerosol source flux consisted of a film drop mode centered at ˜100 nm diameter and a jet drop mode centered at ˜1 μm diameter. Over the leads in the pack ice, a jet drop mode at ˜2 μm diameter dominated. The jet drop mode consisted of sea-salt, but oxalate indicated an organic contribution, and bacterias and other biogenic particles were identified by single particle analysis. Particles with diameters less than -100 nm appear to have contributed to the flux, but their chemical composition is unknown. Whitecaps were probably the bubble source at open sea and on the leads at high wind speed, but a different bubble source is needed in the leads owing to their small fetch. Melting of ice in the leads is probably the best candidate. The flux over the open sea was of such a magnitude that it could give a significant contribution to the condensation nuclei (CCN) population. Although the flux from the leads were roughly an order of magnitude smaller and the leads cover only a small fraction of the pack ice, the local source may till be important for the CCN population in Arctic fogs. The primary marine aerosol source will increase both with increased wind speed and with decreased ice fraction and extent. The local CCN production may therefore increase and influence cloud or fog albedo and lifetime in response to greenhouse warming in the Arctic Ocean region.

  5. Local model for angular-momentum transport in accretion disks driven by the magnetorotational instability.

    PubMed

    Pessah, Martin E; Chan, Chi-Kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2006-12-01

    We develop a local model for the exponential growth and saturation of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses in turbulent flows driven by the magnetorotational instability. We first derive equations that describe the effects of the instability on the growth and pumping of the stresses. We highlight the relevance of a new type of correlations that couples the dynamical evolution of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses and plays a key role in developing and sustaining the magnetorotational turbulence. We then supplement these equations with a phenomenological description of the triple correlations that lead to a saturated turbulent state. We show that the steady-state limit of the model describes successfully the correlations among stresses found in numerical simulations of shearing boxes.

  6. Starburst-Driven Winds May Have Created Giant "Lobe" in Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    produced is by a wind of energetic particles driven by an epoch of starburst near the Galactic center. Law speculates that approximately 10 million years ago, there was a furious period of star formation, with many stars being born and quickly dying in a series of supernovae. "At that time, something caused an acceleration of star formation near the very center of our Galaxy that thrust this material out of the plane of the Galaxy. The hot, young stars would have generated a lot of wind, and the supernovae would have contributed more energy," added Law. "This collective energy would have blown a lot of gas out of the disk for an extended period, eventually producing the features we see today." As the hot gas and particles shot out of the plane they would have "shocked" or energized the gas in the interstellar medium, which would have concentrated and amplified the ambient magnetic fields. The magnetic fields would then have accelerated electrons in the interstellar medium, producing the non-thermal radio profiles of the lobe. Earlier work done by other researchers estimates that this feature could contain approximately 5,000,000 solar masses of material, and that -- in the starburst model -- it would take the energy of possibly 10,000 supernovae to eject that amount of material out of the plane of the Galaxy and produce the feature seen in the lobe. In addition to Law and Yusef-Zadeh, the team that conducted the multiwavelength GBT survey included Douglas Roberts and Jack Hewitt of Northwestern University, and William Cotton and Ron Maddalena of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. Additional image without outline is here.

  7. Stochastic Forcing of the North Atlantic Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhak, K. C.; Moore, A. M.; Milliff, R. F.; Branstator, G.; Holland, W. R.; Fisher, M.

    2004-12-01

    At midlatitudes, the magnitude of stochastic wind stress forcing due to atmospheric weather is comparable to that associated with the seasonal cycle. Stochastic forcing is therefore likely to have a significant influence on the ocean circulation. In this work, we examine the influence of the stochastic component of the wind stress forcing on the large-scale, wind-driven circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean. To this end a quasi-geostrophic model of the North Atlantic was forced with estimates of the stochastic component of wind stress curl obtained from the NCAR Community Climate Model. Analysis reveals that much of the stochastically-induced variability in the ocean circulation occurs in the vicinity of the western boundary and some major bathymetric features. Using the ideas of generalized stability theory (GST), we find that the patterns of wind stress curl that are most effective for inducing variability in the model have their largest projection on the most nonnormal eigenmodes of the system. These eigenmodes are confined primarily to the western boundary region and are composed of long Rossby wave packets that are Doppler shifted by the Gulf Stream to have eastward group velocity. Linear interference of these eigenmodes yields transient growth of stochastically-induced perturbations, and it is this process that maintains the variance of the stochastically-induced circulations. By examining the model pseudospectra, we find that the nonnormal nature of the system enhances the transient growth of perturbation enstrophy and therefore elevates and also maintains the variance of the stochastically-induced circulations in the aforementioned regions.

  8. Flight and wind-tunnel measurements showing base drag reduction provided by a trailing disk for high Reynolds number turbulent flow for subsonic and transonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Sheryll Goecke; Huffman, Jarrett K.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The effectiveness of a trailing disk, or trapped vortex concept, in reducing the base drag of a large body of revolution was studied from measurements made both in flight and in a wind tunnel. Pressure data obtained for the flight experiment, and both pressure and force balance data were obtained for the wind tunnel experiment. The flight test also included data obtained from a hemispherical base. The experiment demonstrated the significant base drag reduction capability of the trailing disk to Mach 0.93 and to Reynolds numbers up to 80 times greater than for earlier studies. For the trailing disk data from the flight experiment, the maximum decrease in base drag ranged form 0.08 to 0.07 as Mach number increased from 0.70 to 0.93. Aircraft angles of attack ranged from 3.9 to 6.6 deg for the flight data. For the trailing disk data from the wind tunnel experiment, the maximum decrease in base and total drag ranged from 0.08 to 0.05 for the approximately 0 deg angle of attack data as Mach number increased from 0.30 to 0.82.

  9. Directional microphone arrays: Reducing wind noise without killing your signal or filling up your disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumberge, M. A.; Walker, K. T.; Dewolf, S.; Hedlin, M. A.; Shearer, P. M.; Berger, J.

    2008-12-01

    The bane of infrasound signal detection is the noise generated by the wind. While the physics of the noise is still a subject of investigation, it is clear that sampling pressure at many points over a length scale larger than the spatial coherence length of wind turbulence attenuates the noise. A dense array of microphones can exploit this approach, but this presents different challenges. Two mechanical wind filters using this approach are commonly employed by the nuclear monitoring community (rosette pipe and porous-hoses networks) and attach to a central microphone. To get large wind noise reduction and a low signal detection threshold in the frequency band of interest, these filters require large apertures. However, these wind filters with such large apertures have a poor omnidirectional instrument response for typical infrasound signals because the pressure signal propagates at the speed of sound through the pipes/hoses to the central microphone. A simple, but improved averaging approach would be to instantaneously sample a long length of the infrasound signal wavefront. Optical fiber infrasound sensors (OFIS) are an implementation of this idea. These sensors are compliant sealed tubes wrapped with two optical fibers that integrate pressure change instantaneously along the length of the tube with laser interferometery. Infrasound arrays typically consist of several microbarometers with wind filters separated by distances that provide predictable signal time separations, forming the basis for processing techniques that estimate the phase velocity direction. An analogous approach is to form an array of OFIS arms. The OFIS instrument response is a predictable function of the orientation of the arm with respect to the signal wavefront. An array of many OFIS arms with different azimuths permits at least one OFIS to record any signal without the signal attenuation inherent in equivalently-sized onmi-directional mechanical filters. OFIS arms that are wavefront

  10. Experiments on the stability and transition of wind-driven water surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, Fabrice; Melville, W. Kendall

    2001-11-01

    We present the results of laboratory and field measurements on the stability of wind-driven water surfaces. The laboratory measurements show that when exposed to an increasing wind starting from rest, surface current and wave generation is accompanied by a variety of phenomena that occur over comparable space and time scales. Of particular interest is the generation of small-scale, streamwise vortices, or Langmuir circulations, the clear influence of the circulations on the structure of the growing wave field, and the subsequent transition to turbulence of the surface flow. Following recent work by Melville, Shear & Veron (1998) and Veron & Melville (1999b), we show that the waves that are initially generated by the wind are then strongly modulated by the Langmuir circulations that follow. Direct measurements of the modulated wave variables are qualitatively consistent with geometrical optics and wave action conservation, but quantitative comparison remains elusive. Within the range of parameters of the experiments, both the surface waves and the Langmuir circulations first appear at constant Reynolds numbers of 370 ± 10 and 530 ± 20, respectively, based on the surface velocity and the depth of the laminar shear layer. The onset of the Langmuir circulations leads to a significant increase in the heat transfer across the surface. The field measurements in a boat basin display the same phenomena that are observed in the laboratory. The implications of the measurements for air sea fluxes, especially heat and gas transfer, and sea-surface temperature, are discussed.

  11. Wind-driven evolution of white dwarf binaries to type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Ablimit, Iminhaji; Xu, Xiao-jie; Li, X.-D.

    2014-01-01

    In the single-degenerate scenario for the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a white dwarf rapidly accretes hydrogen- or helium-rich material from its companion star and appears as a supersoft X-ray source. This picture has been challenged by the properties of the supersoft X-ray sources with very low mass companions and the observations of several nearby SNe Ia. It has been pointed out that the X-ray radiation or the wind from the accreting white dwarf can excite winds or strip mass from the companion star, thus significantly influencing the mass transfer processes. In this paper, we perform detailed calculations of the wind-driven evolution of white dwarf binaries. We present the parameter space for the possible SN Ia progenitors and for the surviving companions after the SNe. The results show that the ex-companion stars of SNe Ia have characteristics more compatible with the observations, compared with those in the traditional single-degenerate scenario.

  12. Intensity statistics of very high frequency sound scattered from wind-driven waves.

    PubMed

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of vhf 100-1000 kHz underwater sound with the ocean surface is explored. The bistatic forward scatter of 300 kHz sound is measured in a wind driven wave channel. Fluctuations in arrival amplitude are described by the scintillation index (SI) which is a measure of arrival intensity variance. SI initially increases with wind speed but eventually saturates to a value of 0.5 when the root-mean-square (rms) roughness is 0.5 mm. An adjusted scintillation index (SI*) is suggested that accounts for the multiple arrivals and properly saturates to a value of 1. Fluctuations in arrival time do not saturate and increase proportionately to the dominant surface wave component. Forward scattering is modeled at frequencies ranging from 50 to 2000 kHz using the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral with surface wave realizations derived from wave gauge data. The amplitude and temporal statistics of the simulated scattering agree well with measured data. Intensity saturation occurs at lower wind speeds for higher frequency sound. Both measured and modeled vhf sound is characterized by many surface arrivals at saturation. Doppler shifts associated with wave motion are expected to vary rapidly for vhf sound however further analysis is required.

  13. Simulations of blanketing sporadic E-layer over the Brazilian sector driven by tidal winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo Resende, Laysa Cristina; Batista, Inez Staciarini; Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Batista, Paulo Prado; Carrasco, Alexander José; Andrioli, Vânia de Fátima; Moro, Juliano

    2017-02-01

    This work presents new results about simulations of blanketing sporadic E-layers, Esb, using a modified version of a theoretical model for the E region (MIRE) for a Brazilian region: Cachoeira Paulista, a low latitude station. MIRE computes the densities of the metallic ions (Fe+ and Mg+) and of the main molecular ions (NO+, O2+, N2+) by solving the continuity and momentum equations for each one of them. Additionally, this model includes the physics of Es layer development driven by tidal winds. In this study, we extend MIRE adding a novel neutral wind model derived from the all-sky meteor radar measurements, which provides more trustworthy results related to the Es layer formation in the Brazilian sector. Afterwards, this new model is validated comparing the computed electron density for the Es layer with the electron density obtained using the blanketing frequency parameter (fbEs) deduced from ionograms in the analyzed region. The results show that the values computed by the extended MIRE are in good agreement with the observational data for the Es layers formed by the wind shear mechanism. Therefore, the extended MIRE presented in this work is the only available model that allows simulating Esb layers with a much higher confidence level for the low-latitude in the Brazilian sector.

  14. Increases in air temperature can promote wind-driven dispersal and spread of plants.

    PubMed

    Kuparinen, Anna; Katul, Gabriel; Nathan, Ran; Schurr, Frank M

    2009-09-07

    Long-distance dispersal (LDD) of seeds and pollen shapes the spatial dynamics of plant genotypes, populations and communities. Quantifying LDD is thus important for predicting the future dynamics of plants exposed to environmental changes. However, environmental changes can also alter the behaviour of LDD vectors: for instance, increasing air temperature may enhance atmospheric instability, thereby altering the turbulent airflow that transports seed and pollen. Here, we investigate temperature effects on wind dispersal in a boreal forest using a 10-year time series of micrometeorological measurements and a Lagrangian stochastic model for particle transport. For a wide range of dispersal and life history types, we found positive relations between air temperature and LDD. This translates into a largely consistent positive effect of +3 degrees C warming on predicted LDD frequencies and spread rates of plants. Relative increases in LDD frequency tend to be higher for heavy-seeded plants, whereas absolute increases in LDD and spread rates are higher for light-seeded plants for which wind is often an important dispersal vector. While these predicted increases are not sufficient to compensate forecasted range losses and environmental changes can alter plant spread in various ways, our results generally suggest that warming can promote wind-driven movements of plant genotypes and populations in boreal forests.

  15. Nucleosynthesis in Neutrino-driven Winds. II. Implications for Heavy Element Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, R. D.; Woosley, S. E.; Qian, Y.-Z.

    1997-06-01

    During the first 20 s of its life, the enormous neutrino luminosity of a neutron star drives appreciable mass loss from its surface. This neutrino-driven wind has been previously identified as a likely site for the r-process. Qian & Woosley have derived, both analytically and numerically, the physical conditions relevant for heavy element synthesis in the wind. These conditions include the entropy (S), the electron fraction (Ye), the dynamic timescale, and the mass loss rate. Here we explore the implications of these conditions for nucleosynthesis. We find that the standard wind models derived in that paper are inadequate to make the r-process, though they do produce some rare species above the iron group. We further determine the general restrictions on the entropy, the electron fraction, and the dynamic timescale that are required to make the r-process. In particular, we derive from nuclear reaction network calculations the conditions required to give a sufficient neutron-to-seed ratio for production of the platinum peak. These conditions range from Ye ~ 0.2 and S <~ 100 baryon-1 for reasonable dynamic timescales of ~0.001-0.1 s, to Ye ~ 0.4-0.495 and S >~ 400 baryon-1 for a dynamic timescale of ~0.1 s. These conditions are also derived analytically to illustrate the physics determining the neutron-to-seed ratio.

  16. Blue crab megalopal influx to Chesapeake Bay: Evidence for a wind-driven mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, David M.; van Montfrans, Jacques; Orth, Robert J.

    1989-09-01

    Field surveys indicate that blue crab larvae and postlarvae develop in shelf waters adjacent to the Chesapeake Bay entrance, and that postlarvae return to the estuary for settlement into nursery areas. The postlarval form is the megalopa, and in the offshore area most of these are found near the surface. However, the surface mean flow at the Bay entrance is seaward. Megalopae must either drop to the bottom to become entrained in the density-driven inflow or employ another transport process in the surface. A potentially important mechanism by which these megalopae can return is through episonic wind-driven exchange, which is a prominent feature of the circulation in this region. Using sea level data, the magnitude of the wind-induced changes in Bay volume can be calculated for any period when these data are available. During 1985-1987, megalopae were collected daily in the York River (a tributary of Chesapeake Bay) from August through November. Their temporal distribution was characterized by pulses of individuals, separated by periods when very few were collected. A total of 12 of 16 observed megalopal pulses occurred during positive volume anomalies. In particular, the largest peak of 1985 occurred during the massive storm surge associated with Hurricane Juan, implying large-scale transport of megalopae from the shelf. Analysis of 28 years of subtidal volume data indicates that an average of 10 major inflow events per year occur during the period when megalopae are present. This indicates that these wind-induced inflow events are not fortuitous but rather are a stable feature of the flow climate at the Bay entrance.

  17. Lidar observations of wind- and wave-driven morphological evolution of coastal foredunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spore, N.; Brodie, K. L.; Kershner, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal foredunes are continually evolving geomorphic features that are slowly built up by wind-blown sand and rapidly eroded during storms by large waves and swash. Landward aeolian transport removes sediment from the active beach and surf-zone, trapping it in the dune, where as coastal erosion both removes sediment from the dune and can decrease the overall fetch and sediment supply available to the dune. Understanding how wave and wind-driven process interact with each other and the dune-beach system itself is a critical component of improving predictions of coastal evolution. To investigate these processes, two 50 m alongshore by 25 m cross-shore patches of dune along an open coast beach fronting the Atlantic Ocean in Duck, NC were scanned with a high resolution terrestrial lidar scanner ( 5000 points per m^2) every three weeks over the last year to observe detailed morphological evolution of the dune and upper beach. Sequential scans were co-registered to each other using fixed objects in the field of view, significantly increasing precision and accuracy of the observations. The north study site featured a 7.5 m tall scarped foredune system, where as the southern study site featured a 6 m tall, hummocky, prograding foredune. Initial analyses show large accretion events on the southern prograding site. For example, during one three week period in February, portions of the site accreted over 40 cm. In contrast, during the same three week period at the northern site (less than 1 km away), response was alongshore variable with erosion and accretion of roughly 10 cm on the foredune face. Further analysis will focus on separating wind vs. wave driven evolution of these sites. Funded by the USACE Coastal Inlets Research Program.

  18. Equilibrium configuration of a stratus floating above accretion disks: Full-disk calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itanishi, Yusuke; Fukue, Jun

    2017-06-01

    We examine floating strati above a luminous accretion disk, supported by the radiative force from the entire disk, and calculate the equilibrium locus, which depends on the disk luminosity and the optical depth of the stratus. Due to the radiative transfer effect (albedo effect), the floating height of the stratus with a finite optical depth generally becomes high, compared with the particle case. In contrast to the case of the near-disk approximation, moreover, the floating height becomes yet higher in the present full-disk calculation, since the intense radiation from the inner disk is taken into account. As a result, when the disk luminosity normalized by the Eddington luminosity is ∼0.3 and the stratus optical depth is around unity, the stable configuration disappears at around r ∼ 50 rg, rg being the Schwarzschild radius, and the stratus would be blown off as a cloudy wind consisting of many strati with appropriate conditions. This luminosity is sufficiently smaller than the Eddington one, and the present results suggest that the radiation-driven cloudy wind can be easily blown off from the sub-Eddington disk, and this can explain various outflows observed in ultra-fast outflow objects as well as in broad-absorption-line quasars.

  19. Comparison of driven and simulated "free" stall flutter in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culler, Ethan; Farnsworth, John; Fagley, Casey; Seidel, Jurgen

    2016-11-01

    Stall flutter and dynamic stall have received a significant amount of attention over the years. To experimentally study this problem, the body undergoing stall flutter is typically driven at a characteristic, single frequency sinusoid with a prescribed pitching amplitude and mean angle of attack offset. This approach allows for testing with repeatable kinematics, however it effectively decouples the structural motion from the aerodynamic forcing. Recent results suggest that this driven approach could misrepresent the forcing observed in a "free" stall flutter scenario. Specifically, a dynamically pitched rigid NACA 0018 wing section was tested in the wind tunnel under two modes of operation: (1) Cyber-Physical where "free" stall flutter was physically simulated through a custom motor-control system modeling a torsional spring and (2) Direct Motor-Driven Dynamic Pitch at a single frequency sinusoid representative of the cyber-physical motion. The time-resolved pitch angle and moment were directly measured and compared for each case. It was found that small deviations in the pitch angle trajectory between these two operational cases generate significantly different aerodynamic pitching moments on the wing section, with the pitching moments nearly 180o out of phase in some cases. This work is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through the Flow Interactions and Control Program and by the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship Program.

  20. A three-dimensional model of wind-driven circulation on the shelf: application to the storm of January 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Alan M.; Kwong, Simon C. M.; Flather, Roger A.

    A three-dimensional hydrodynamic model covering the NorthWest European Continental Shelf is used to examine the wind-induced circulation on the shelf during early January 1993, the time of the oil spill due to the grounding of the tanker Braer on the Shetlands. The model is used to study the response of the wind-driven currents on the shelf to changes in the wind stress which occurred on a number of time scales during this period. The sensitivity of the currents to various formulations of vertical eddy viscosity is considered in detail with particular emphasis on surface currents. Although the prime aim of the calculations is a study of the wind-driven flow over the whole shelf and not a study of oil movement, some of the flow fields in the vicinity of the Shetlands help to explain the movement and eventual fate of the oil in that region.

  1. Proactive monitoring of a wind turbine array with lidar measurements, SCADA data and a data-driven RANS solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, G.; Said, E. A.; Santhanagopalan, V.; Zhan, L.

    2016-12-01

    Power production of a wind farm and durability of wind turbines are strongly dependent on non-linear wake interactions occurring within a turbine array. Wake dynamics are highly affected by the specific site conditions, such as topography and local atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, contingencies through the life of a wind farm, such as turbine ageing and off-design operations, make prediction of wake interactions and power performance a great challenge in wind energy. In this work, operations of an onshore wind turbine array were monitored through lidar measurements, SCADA and met-tower data. The atmospheric wind field investing the wind farm was estimated by using synergistically the available data through five different methods, which are characterized by different confidence levels. By combining SCADA data and the lidar measurements, it was possible to estimate power losses connected with wake interactions. For this specific array, power losses were estimated to be 4% and 2% of the total power production for stable and convective atmospheric regimes, respectively. The entire dataset was then leveraged for the calibration of a data-driven RANS (DDRANS) solver for prediction of wind turbine wakes and power production. The DDRANS is based on a parabolic formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations with axisymmetry and boundary layer approximations, which allow achieving very low computational costs. Accuracy in prediction of wind turbine wakes and power production is achieved through an optimal tuning of the turbulence closure model. The latter is based on a mixing length model, which was developed based on previous wind turbine wake studies carried out through large eddy simulations and wind tunnel experiments. Several operative conditions of the wind farm under examination were reproduced through DDRANS for different stability regimes, wind directions and wind velocity. The results show that DDRANS is capable of achieving a good level of accuracy in prediction

  2. Effect of Schmidt number on mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface in a wind-driven turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Takagaki, Naohisa; Kurose, Ryoichi; Kimura, Atsushi; Komori, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface strongly depends on the Schmidt number. Here we investigate the relationship between mass transfer coefficient on the liquid side, kL, and Schmidt number, Sc, in the wide range of 0.7 ≤ Sc ≤ 1000. We apply a three-dimensional semi direct numerical simulation (SEMI-DNS), in which the mass transfer is solved based on an approximated deconvolution model (ADM) scheme, to wind-driven turbulence with mass transfer across a sheared wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface. In order to capture the deforming gas-liquid interface, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method is employed. Our results show that similar to the case for flat gas-liquid interfaces, kL for the wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface is generally proportional to Sc−0.5, and can be roughly estimated by the surface divergence model. This trend is endorsed by the fact that the mass transfer across the gas-liquid interface is controlled mainly by streamwise vortices on the liquid side even for the wind-driven turbulence under the conditions of low wind velocities without wave breaking. PMID:27841325

  3. Effect of Schmidt number on mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface in a wind-driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagaki, Naohisa; Kurose, Ryoichi; Kimura, Atsushi; Komori, Satoru

    2016-11-01

    The mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface strongly depends on the Schmidt number. Here we investigate the relationship between mass transfer coefficient on the liquid side, kL, and Schmidt number, Sc, in the wide range of 0.7 ≤ Sc ≤ 1000. We apply a three-dimensional semi direct numerical simulation (SEMI-DNS), in which the mass transfer is solved based on an approximated deconvolution model (ADM) scheme, to wind-driven turbulence with mass transfer across a sheared wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface. In order to capture the deforming gas-liquid interface, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method is employed. Our results show that similar to the case for flat gas-liquid interfaces, kL for the wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface is generally proportional to Sc-0.5, and can be roughly estimated by the surface divergence model. This trend is endorsed by the fact that the mass transfer across the gas-liquid interface is controlled mainly by streamwise vortices on the liquid side even for the wind-driven turbulence under the conditions of low wind velocities without wave breaking.

  4. Effect of Schmidt number on mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface in a wind-driven turbulence.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, Naohisa; Kurose, Ryoichi; Kimura, Atsushi; Komori, Satoru

    2016-11-14

    The mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface strongly depends on the Schmidt number. Here we investigate the relationship between mass transfer coefficient on the liquid side, kL, and Schmidt number, Sc, in the wide range of 0.7 ≤ Sc ≤ 1000. We apply a three-dimensional semi direct numerical simulation (SEMI-DNS), in which the mass transfer is solved based on an approximated deconvolution model (ADM) scheme, to wind-driven turbulence with mass transfer across a sheared wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface. In order to capture the deforming gas-liquid interface, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method is employed. Our results show that similar to the case for flat gas-liquid interfaces, kL for the wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface is generally proportional to Sc(-0.5), and can be roughly estimated by the surface divergence model. This trend is endorsed by the fact that the mass transfer across the gas-liquid interface is controlled mainly by streamwise vortices on the liquid side even for the wind-driven turbulence under the conditions of low wind velocities without wave breaking.

  5. Dynamics and predictability of a low-order wind-driven ocean - atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of a low order coupled wind-driven Ocean-Atmosphere (OA) system is investigated with emphasis on its predictability properties. The low-order coupled deterministic system is composed of a baroclinic atmosphere for which 12 dominant dynamical modes are only retained (Charney and Straus, 1980) and a wind-driven, quasi-geostrophic and reduced-gravity shallow ocean whose field is truncated to four dominant modes able to reproduce the large scale oceanic gyres (Pierini, 2011). The two models are coupled through mechanical forcings only. The analysis of its dynamics reveals first that under aperiodic atmospheric forcings only dominant single gyres (clockwise or counterclockwise) appear. This feature is expected to be related with the specific domain choice over which the coupled system is defined. Second the dynamical quantities characterizing the short-term predictability (Lyapunov exponents, Lyapunov dimension, Kolmogorov-Sinaï (KS) entropy) displays a complex dependence as a function of the key parameters of the system, namely the coupling strength and the external thermal forcing. In particular, the KS-entropy is increasing as a function of the coupling in most of the experiments, implying an increase of the rate of loss of information about the localization of the system on his attractor. Finally the dynamics of the error is explored and indicates, in particular, a rich variety of short term behaviors of the error in the atmosphere depending on the (relative) amplitude of the initial error affecting the ocean, from polynomial (at2 + bt3 + ct4) up to purely exponential evolutions. These features are explained and analyzed in the light of the recent findings on error growth (Nicolis et al, 2009). References Charney J G, Straus DM (1980) Form-Drag Instability, Multiple Equilibria and Propagating Planetary Waves in Baroclinic, Orographically Forced, Planetary Wave Systems. J Atmos Sci 37: 1157-1176. Nicolis C, Perdigao RAP, Vannitsem S (2009) Dynamics of

  6. Coupling the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and Large Eddy Simulations with Actuator Disk Model: predictions of wind farm power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cartagena, Edgardo Javier; Santoni, Christian; Ciri, Umberto; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Leonardi, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    A large-scale wind farm operating under realistic atmospheric conditions is studied by coupling a meso-scale and micro-scale models. For this purpose, the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is coupled with an in-house LES solver for wind farms. The code is based on a finite difference scheme, with a Runge-Kutta, fractional step and the Actuator Disk Model. The WRF model has been configured using seven one-way nested domains where the child domain has a mesh size one third of its parent domain. A horizontal resolution of 70 m is used in the innermost domain. A section from the smallest and finest nested domain, 7.5 diameters upwind of the wind farm is used as inlet boundary condition for the LES code. The wind farm consists in six-turbines aligned with the mean wind direction and streamwise spacing of 10 rotor diameters, (D), and 2.75D in the spanwise direction. Three simulations were performed by varying the velocity fluctuations at the inlet: random perturbations, precursor simulation, and recycling perturbation method. Results are compared with a simulation on the same wind farm with an ideal uniform wind speed to assess the importance of the time varying incoming wind velocity. Numerical simulations were performed at TACC (Grant CTS070066). This work was supported by NSF, (Grant IIA-1243482 WINDINSPIRE).

  7. The wind and thermally driven circulation of the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Part II: the Baroclinic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanotte-Rizzoli, Paola; Bergamasco, Andrea

    1991-04-01

    Compared with other interesting parts of the World Ocean, little is known of the eastern Mediterranean and major issues of the Mediterranean circulation are still unsolved. Among them, the most crucial one is: what is the dominant driving mechanism of the eastern Mediterranean general circulation: (1) the wind stress; (2) the thermohaline surface fluxes; (3) the inflow forcing at the Sicily Straits? What is the relative importance of these three forcing functions? Is it the same in the different sub-basins comprising the eastern Mediterranean? What modelling factors are important for the simulation of the seasonal cycle and is the general circulation overall dominated by the annual mean or seasonal signal? To answer the above questions we have carried out an extensive and thorough series of numerical experiments using a multilevel model of the circulation, suitable for coarse-resolution studies but endowed with active thermodynamics and allowing for realistic geometry (coastlines, islands, bottom relief). The model is used in a three-level version as the minimum one capable of simulating the vertical superposition of different water masses observed in the eastern Mediterranean. The climatological monthly averages of wind-stress, thermal and evaporative fluxes and inflow at Sicily are used to drive the model. In Part I of the present study it was shown that the seasonal cycle present in the wind-stress curl induces a strongly seasonal barotropic circulation comprising the entire eastern Mediterranean. This seasonal gyre reverses from being cyclonic in winter to anticyclonic in summer. The inclusion of baroclinicity, however, profoundly modifies the purely wind-driven, barotropic circulation, eliminating the strong seasonality and the winter-to-summer reversal. The first important result is that the general circulation pattern now consists of a succession of sub-basin-scale gyres, with a seasonal modulation emphasizing the cyclonic centres in winter and the

  8. A Data-Driven Diagnostic Framework for Wind Turbine Structures: A Holistic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bogoevska, Simona; Spiridonakos, Minas; Chatzi, Eleni; Dumova-Jovanoska, Elena; Höffer, Rudiger

    2017-01-01

    The complex dynamics of operational wind turbine (WT) structures challenges the applicability of existing structural health monitoring (SHM) strategies for condition assessment. At the center of Europe’s renewable energy strategic planning, WT systems call for implementation of strategies that may describe the WT behavior in its complete operational spectrum. The framework proposed in this paper relies on the symbiotic treatment of acting environmental/operational variables and the monitored vibration response of the structure. The approach aims at accurate simulation of the temporal variability characterizing the WT dynamics, and subsequently at the tracking of the evolution of this variability in a longer-term horizon. The bi-component analysis tool is applied on long-term data, collected as part of continuous monitoring campaigns on two actual operating WT structures located in different sites in Germany. The obtained data-driven structural models verify the potential of the proposed strategy for development of an automated SHM diagnostic tool. PMID:28358346

  9. A Data-Driven Diagnostic Framework for Wind Turbine Structures: A Holistic Approach.

    PubMed

    Bogoevska, Simona; Spiridonakos, Minas; Chatzi, Eleni; Dumova-Jovanoska, Elena; Höffer, Rudiger

    2017-03-30

    The complex dynamics of operational wind turbine (WT) structures challenges the applicability of existing structural health monitoring (SHM) strategies for condition assessment. At the center of Europe's renewable energy strategic planning, WT systems call for implementation of strategies that may describe the WT behavior in its complete operational spectrum. The framework proposed in this paper relies on the symbiotic treatment of acting environmental/operational variables and the monitored vibration response of the structure. The approach aims at accurate simulation of the temporal variability characterizing the WT dynamics, and subsequently at the tracking of the evolution of this variability in a longer-term horizon. The bi-component analysis tool is applied on long-term data, collected as part of continuous monitoring campaigns on two actual operating WT structures located in different sites in Germany. The obtained data-driven structural models verify the potential of the proposed strategy for development of an automated SHM diagnostic tool.

  10. Analytical solution for the wind-driven circulation in a lake containing an island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Gedney, R. T.

    1971-01-01

    An analysis was carried out to determine analytically the effect of an island on the wind driven currents in a shallow lake (or sea). A general analysis is developed that can be applied to a large class of lake and island geometries and bottom topographies. Detailed numerical results are obtained for a circular island located eccentrically or concentrically in a circular lake with a logarithmic bottom topography. It is shown that an island can produce volume flow (vertically integrated velocities) gyres that are completely different from those produced by a normal basin without an island. These gyres in the neighborhood of the island will produce different velocity patterns, which include the acceleration of flow near the island shore.

  11. Evaluation of the Influence of Wind-Driven Rain on Moisture in Cellular Concrete Wall Boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsabry, A.; Nikitsin, V. I.; Kofanov, V. A.; Backiel-Brzozowska, B.

    2017-08-01

    The non-stationary moisture level of a cellular concrete wall board in a heated utility building located in the northern part of the town of Brest (Belarus), depending on the climatic influence, was assessed in this work. The results were obtained both in a calculation experiment and a physical test. It was observed that the main reason for the high moisture levels in cellular concrete is wind-driven rain intensifying the process of free capillary moisture transfer. A comparative analysis of the results of the physical test and the calculation experiment showed that the THSS software elaborated by the authors was able to predict the actual moisture levels of the shielding structure under study accurately enough when precise data concerning the thermal and physical characteristics of the materials as well as the occurring climatic influences were submitted.

  12. Detecting ozone- and greenhouse gas-driven wind trends with observational data.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sukyoung; Feldstein, Steven B

    2013-02-01

    Modeling studies suggest that Antarctic ozone depletion and, to a lesser degree, greenhouse gas (GHG) increase have caused the observed poleward shift in the westerly jet during the austral summer. Similar studies have not been performed previously with observational data because of difficulties in separating the two contributions. By applying a cluster analysis to daily ERA-Interim data, we found two 7- to 11-day wind clusters, one resembling the models' responses to GHG forcing and the other resembling ozone depletion. The trends in the clusters' frequency of occurrence indicate that the ozone contributed about 50% more than GHG toward the jet shift, supporting the modeling results. Moreover, tropical convection apparently plays an important role for the GHG-driven trend.

  13. Preliminary Dynamic Feasibility and Analysis of a Spherical, Wind-Driven (Tumbleweed), Martian Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flick, John J.; Toniolo, Matthew D.

    2005-01-01

    The process and findings are presented from a preliminary feasibility study examining the dynamics characteristics of a spherical wind-driven (or Tumbleweed) rover, which is intended for exploration of the Martian surface. The results of an initial feasibility study involving several worst-case mobility situations that a Tumbleweed rover might encounter on the surface of Mars are discussed. Additional topics include the evaluation of several commercially available analysis software packages that were examined as possible platforms for the development of a Monte Carlo Tumbleweed mission simulation tool. This evaluation lead to the development of the Mars Tumbleweed Monte Carlo Simulator (or Tumbleweed Simulator) using the Vortex physics software package from CM-Labs, Inc. Discussions regarding the development and evaluation of the Tumbleweed Simulator, as well as the results of a preliminary analysis using the tool are also presented. Finally, a brief conclusions section is presented.

  14. Application of order cyclostationary demodulation to damage detection in a direct-driven wind turbine bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Bo, Lin; Peng, Chang

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a method of fault detection and isolation for a direct-driven wind turbine (DWT) bearing. Computed order tracking is employed to convert the non-stationary envelope signal in the time domain into a quasi-stationary signal in the angular domain by even-angle resampling. Cyclostationary demodulation is then utilized to expose the orders related to fault characteristics in the demodulation spectrum. In order to realize the automatic fault diagnosis and emit a stable alarm about bearing damage, the peak value of the demodulation spectrum is scaled and compared to a defined threshold. The significant advantage of the proposed method is the implementation of an automatic algorithm for DWT bearing diagnostics under randomly varying speed and highly alternating load. Practical applications are provided to show that the proposed approach is able to achieve reliable failure warning in the bearing condition monitoring of a DWT.

  15. The HEAO-2 Guest Investigator Program: Non-linear growth of instabilities in line-driven stellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, G. B.

    1985-01-01

    The linear instability of line-driven stellar winds to take proper account of the dynamical effect of scattered radiation were analyzed. It is found that: (1) the drag effect of the mean scattered radiation does greatly reduce the contribution of scattering lines to the instability at the very base of the wind, but the instability growth rate associated with such lines rapidly increases as the flow moves outward from the base, reaching more than 50% of the growth rate for pure absorption lines within a stellar radius of the surface, and eventually reaching 80% of that rate at large radii; (2) perturbations in the scattered radiation field may be important for the propagation of wind disturbances, but they have little effect on the wind instability; and (3) the contribution of strongly shadowed lines to the wind instability is often reduced compared to that of unshadowed lines, but their overall effect is not one of damping in the outer parts of the wind. It is concluded that, even when all scattering effects are taken into account, the bulk of the flow in a line-driven stellar wind is still highly unstable.

  16. Evaluation of nano- and submicron particle penetration through ten nonwoven fabrics using a wind-driven approach.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pengfei; Jaques, Peter A; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Shepherd, Angie; Eimer, Benjamin C; Yang, Mengshi; Miller, Adam; Gupta, Bhupender; Shaffer, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Existing face mask and respirator test methods draw particles through materials under vacuum to measure particle penetration. However, these filtration-based methods may not simulate conditions under which protective clothing operates in the workplace, where airborne particles are primarily driven by wind and other factors instead of being limited to a downstream vacuum. This study was focused on the design and characterization of a method simulating typical wind-driven conditions for evaluating the performance of materials used in the construction of protective clothing. Ten nonwoven fabrics were selected, and physical properties including fiber diameter, fabric thickness, air permeability, porosity, pore volume, and pore size were determined. Each fabric was sealed flat across the wide opening of a cone-shaped penetration cell that was then housed in a recirculation aerosol wind tunnel. The flow rate naturally driven by wind through the fabric was measured, and the sampling flow rate of the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer used to measure the downstream particle size distribution and concentrations was then adjusted to minimize filtration effects. Particle penetration levels were measured under different face velocities by the wind-driven method and compared with a filtration-based method using the TSI 3160 automated filter tester. The experimental results show that particle penetration increased with increasing face velocity, and penetration also increased with increasing particle size up to about 300 to 500 nm. Penetrations measured by the wind-driven method were lower than those obtained with the filtration method for most of the fabrics selected, and the relative penetration performances of the fabrics were very different due to the vastly different pore structures.

  17. Effect of wind-driven rain on deterioration of a tall building: Numerical modeling and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei

    Wind-driven rain is an important factor in determining the extent of calcareous stone erosion and the patterns of surface soiling on buildings. In this study, both numerical modeling and field measurements have been employed to investigate the effect of wind-driven rain on building walls. The work has been conducted at the Cathedral of Learning, a 42-story Indiana limestone building on the University of Pittsburgh campus in Pittsburgh, PA. The numerical method utilizes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques and comprises three steps: (a) using the Re-Normalization Group (RNG) k-epsilon model to calculate the airflow field around the building, (b) simulating raindrop trajectories in the flow field by solving the force balance equations, and (c) estimating driving rain fluxes on building walls by combining raindrop trajectory results and meteorological data. To validate the model, wind-driven rain fluxes have been measured at the Cathedral for a 21-month period. Comparison of model estimates and field measurements for 94 rain events show reasonably good agreement, suggesting that the numerical method is effective in predicting driving rain fluxes on building surfaces. Both model and measurement results show that wind-driven rain is strongly influenced by rainfall intensity, wind speed, wind direction, and building geometry. Qualitative comparisons of the observed soiling patterns with the modeled and measured driving rain fluxes show that white eroded areas on the building surfaces generally receive more driving rain than soiled but less eroded areas. The current soiling patterns are most likely due to the non-uniform distribution of wind-driven rain as a result of long-term trends in wind and rain that interact with the building. This work will enhance the understanding of processes involved in the erosion of buildings by providing a quantitative tool for studying the impact of wind-driven rain on building surfaces. This tool will be useful for the selection

  18. A forecasting model of the magnetosphere driven by an optimal solar wind coupling function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganenko, N. A.; Andreeva, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    A new empirical magnetospheric magnetic field model is described, driven by interplanetary parameters including a coupling function by Newell et al. (2007), termed henceforth as "N index." The model uses data from Polar, Geotail, Cluster, and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellites, obtained in 1995-2013 at distances 3-60 RE. The model magnetopause is based on Lin et al. (2010) boundary driven by the solar wind pressure, IMF Bz, and the geodipole tilt. The model field includes contributions from the symmetric ring current (SRC), partial ring current (PRC) with associated Region 2 field-aligned currents (R2 FAC), tail, Region 1 (R1) FAC, and a penetrated IMF. Increase in the N index results in progressively larger magnitudes of all the field sources, the most dramatic and virtually linear growth being found for the PRC and R1 FAC. The solar wind dynamic pressure Pdyn affects the model magnetotail current in proportion to the factor [Pdyn/] ζ, where the exponent ζ on the order of 0.4-0.6 steadily decreases with increasing N index. The PRC peaks near midnight at N ˜ 0 but turns duskward with growing N. At ionospheric altitudes, both R1 and R2 FAC expand equatorward with growing N and Pdyn, and the R2 zone rotates westward. Larger values of N result in a more efficient penetration of the IMF into the magnetosphere and larger magnetic flux connection across the magnetopause. Growing dipole tilt is accompanied by a persistent and significant decrease of the total current in all magnetospheric field sources.

  19. The OSMOSIS Model of the Wind-Driven Ocean Surface Boundary Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, A. L.; Belcher, S. E.; Pearson, B.; Polton, J.

    2016-02-01

    In the wind-driven ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL) the vertical velocity variance is observed to be larger than in shear driven turbulence. The observed variances are consistent with the results from large-eddy simulations (LES) which parametrize the interaction between the Stokes drift of the surface waves and vorticity. The resulting flow is known as Langmuir turbulence and the close connection between winds and waves suggests that Langmuir turbulence is common in the OSBL. This poster describes a model of the OSBL, developed as part of the OSMOSIS project, in which mixing is by Langmuir turbulence. The transports of momentum, heat and salinity are represented by a first-order closure scheme with flux-gradient relationships that include non-gradient contributions. In this the model is similar to the KPP scheme which uses flux-gradient relationships with non-gradient contributions to represent scalar transports. The flux-gradient relationships are derived from an analysis of the turbulent flux budgets of momentum and scalars (heat) obtained from LES. The non-gradient terms represent the contributions to the turbulent flux by the terms in the turbulent flux budget that represent the effects of the Stokes shear, buoyancy and turbulent transport. The eddy viscosity, diffusivities and non-gradient components are represented by similarity profiles. The depth of the boundary layer is determined by a prognostic equation, which represents the time variation of the boundary layer depth in both unstable and stable conditions. It is based on the equation for the depth integrated potential energy combined with a parametrization of the turbulent kinetic energy budget. The use of the prognostic equation allows the effects of Langmuir turbulence on boundary layer depth to be explicitly represented in the model. Comparison with the results from LES of the diurnal cycle of the OSBL are presented as a test for the model.

  20. Impact of Wind Driven Pond Expansion on Landloss in the Mississippi River Delta Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, A. C.; Edmonds, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Wetlands of the Mississippi River Delta Plain (MRDP) have been disappearing over the past century due to decreased sediment load, anthropogenic management, increased subsidence, and accelerating eustatic sea-level rise. These effects can cause landloss by submergence of the wetland surface or by lateral erosion of the edges. Given the economic and ecological importance of the MRDP, it is vital to quantify the relative contribution of each process. Using three year Landsat composites, we created a 33 year time series of land-water maps for the Atchafalaya-Vermillion, Terrebonne, and Barataria watersheds. These three watersheds represent the range of MRDP conditions and anthropogenic impacts. The composite images are the per-pixel 50% average across all bands for all non-cloudy pixels over three years to minimize effects of poor image quality, limited number of images, and bias from floating vegetation on water bodies. The land-water binary images are created using dynamic thresholding based off modified normal difference water index with all land and water bodies smaller than 8 pixels (7,200 m2) removed. On each binary composite image we select and track the 444 ponds that: 1) appear in every composite; 2) have a simple shape; and 3) are expanding. Remarkably, in all basins these ponds show expansion in the south-south-west direction. In particular, Atchafalaya-Vermillion shows expansion to the SSW, WSW, and NNW while Barataria shows expansion in WSW and NNW. We hypothesize that this expansion is caused by enhanced edge erosion from wind-driven waves because pond expansion directions are consistent with wind direction data. The large wind events (10-15 m/s) come from the north and the most frequent wind events (5-10 m/s) come from the south and east. Furthermore, we show a correlation between pond size and magnitude of expansion, which is also consistent with models for pond expansion by wind-waves. We suggest that land loss by edge erosion on the MRDP may be more

  1. Accretion, Outflows, and Winds of Magnetized Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, Marina M.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2015-10-01

    Many types of stars have strong magnetic fields that can dynamically influence the flow of circumstellar matter. In stars with accretion disks, the stellar magnetic field can truncate the inner disk and determine the paths that matter can take to flow onto the star. These paths are different in stars with different magnetospheres and periods of rotation. External field lines of the magnetosphere may inflate and produce favorable conditions for outflows from the disk-magnetosphere boundary. Outflows can be particularly strong in the propeller regime, wherein a star rotates more rapidly than the inner disk. Outflows may also form at the disk-magnetosphere boundary of slowly rotating stars, if the magnetosphere is compressed by the accreting matter. In isolated, strongly magnetized stars, the magnetic field can influence formation and/or propagation of stellar wind outflows. Winds from low-mass, solar-type stars may be either thermally or magnetically driven, while winds from massive, luminous O and B type stars are radiatively driven. In all of these cases, the magnetic field influences matter flow from the stars and determines many observational properties. In this chapter we review recent studies of accretion, outflows, and winds of magnetized stars with a focus on three main topics: (1) accretion onto magnetized stars; (2) outflows from the disk-magnetosphere boundary; and (3) winds from isolated massive magnetized stars. We show results obtained from global magnetohydrodynamic simulations and, in a number of cases compare global simulations with observations.

  2. Radiation-driven winds of hot luminous stars. XI - Frictional heating in a multicomponent stellar wind plasma and decoupling of radiatively accelerated ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springmann, U. W. E.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.

    1992-09-01

    It is shown that the usual assumption of regarding radiatively driven winds of hot stars as a one-component fluid is wrong under certain circumstances. A detailed investigation of the mechanism of momentum transfer from radiatively accelerated ions to the bulk matter of a stellar wind plasma via Coulomb collisions shows that, at least for thin winds, the one-fluid description is not justified. Instead, for objects with thin winds (candidates are late OV and early BV stars, central stars of planetary nebulae, and subdwarf O-stars) a multicomponent model is required because ionic decoupling occurs, which leads to a 'runaway mechanism' for the accelerated ions and hence terminates the momentum transfer from ions to the bulk matter of the wind (e.g. H and He). As a consequence the predicted one-fluid terminal wind velocities are significantly reduced. This is shown for the late main sequence O-star Tau Scorpii (O9.5V). Furthermore, the collisionally induced momentum transfer is inevitably accompanied by the production of entropy in the form of frictional heating, which dominates the energy balance in the case of thin winds and thus enhances the runaway mechanism.

  3. Wind-driven circulation patterns in a shallow estuarine lake: St Lucia, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, Julia H.; Stretch, Derek D.; Tirok, Katrin

    2014-06-01

    The spatiotemporal structure of wind-driven circulation patterns and associated water exchanges or residence times can drive important bio-hydrodynamic interactions in shallow lakes and estuaries. The St Lucia estuarine lake in South Africa is an example of such a system. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and RAMSAR wetland of international importance but no detailed research on its circulation patterns has previously been undertaken. In this study, a hydrodynamic model was used to investigate the structure of these circulations to provide insights into their role in transport and water exchange processes. A strong diurnal temporal pattern of wind speeds, together with directional switching between two dominant directions, drives intermittent water exchanges and mixing between the lake basins. “High speed flows in shallow nearshore areas with slower upwind counter-flows in deeper areas, linked by circulatory gyres, are key features of the circulation”. These patterns are strongly influenced by the complex geometry of St Lucia and constrictions in the system. Water exchange time scales are non-homogeneous with some basin extremities having relatively long residence times. The influence of the circulation patterns on biological processes is discussed.

  4. Performance Analysis of a Wind Turbine Driven Swash Plate Pump for Large Scale Offshore Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhagiar, D.; Sant, T.

    2014-12-01

    This paper deals with the performance modelling and analysis of offshore wind turbine-driven hydraulic pumps. The concept consists of an open loop hydraulic system with the rotor main shaft directly coupled to a swash plate pump to supply pressurised sea water. A mathematical model is derived to cater for the steady state behaviour of entire system. A simplified model for the pump is implemented together with different control scheme options for regulating the rotor shaft power. A new control scheme is investigated, based on the combined use of hydraulic pressure and pitch control. Using a steady-state analysis, the study shows how the adoption of alternative control schemes in a the wind turbine-hydraulic pump system may result in higher energy yields than those from a conventional system with an electrical generator and standard pitch control for power regulation. This is in particular the case with the new control scheme investigated in this study that is based on the combined use of pressure and rotor blade pitch control.

  5. Exact Solutions for Wind-Driven Coastal Upwelling and Downwelling over Sloping Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choboter, P.; Duke, D.; Horton, J.; Sinz, P.

    2009-12-01

    The dynamics of wind-driven coastal upwelling and downwelling are studied using a simplified dynamical model. Exact solutions are examined as a function of time and over a family of sloping topographies. Assumptions in the two-dimensional model include a frictionless ocean interior below the surface Ekman layer, and no alongshore dependence of the variables; however, dependence in the cross-shore and vertical directions is retained. Additionally, density and alongshore momentum are advected by the cross-shore velocity in order to maintain thermal wind. The time-dependent initial-value problem is solved with constant initial stratification and no initial alongshore flow. An alongshore pressure gradient is added to allow the cross-shore flow to be geostrophically balanced far from shore. Previously, this model has been used to study upwelling over flat-bottom and sloping topographies, but the novel feature in this work is the discovery of exact solutions for downwelling. These exact solutions are compared to numerical solutions from a primitive-equation ocean model, based on the Princeton Ocean Model, configured in a similar two-dimensional geometry. Many typical features of the evolution of density and velocity during downwelling are displayed by the analytical model.

  6. Depth dependence of wind-driven, broadband ambient noise in the Philippine Sea.

    PubMed

    Barclay, David R; Buckingham, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, as part of PhilSea09, the instrument platform known as Deep Sound was deployed in the Philippine Sea, descending under gravity to a depth of 6000 m, where it released a drop weight, allowing buoyancy to return it to the surface. On the descent and ascent, at a speed of 0.6 m/s, Deep Sound continuously recorded broadband ambient noise on two vertically aligned hydrophones separated by 0.5 m. For frequencies between 1 and 10 kHz, essentially all the noise was found to be downward traveling, exhibiting a depth-independent directional density function having the simple form cos θ, where θ ≤ 90° is the polar angle measured from the zenith. The spatial coherence and cross-spectral density of the noise show no change in character in the vicinity of the critical depth, consistent with a local, wind-driven surface-source distribution. The coherence function accurately matches that predicted by a simple model of deep-water, wind-generated noise, provided that the theoretical coherence is evaluated using the local sound speed. A straightforward inversion procedure is introduced for recovering the sound speed profile from the cross-correlation function of the noise, returning sound speeds with a root-mean-square error relative to an independently measured profile of 8.2 m/s.

  7. INSTABILITIES DRIVEN BY THE DRIFT AND TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY OF ALPHA PARTICLES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu

    2013-08-20

    We investigate the conditions under which parallel-propagating Alfven/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) waves and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) waves are driven unstable by the differential flow and temperature anisotropy of alpha particles in the solar wind. We focus on the limit in which w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} {approx}> 0.25v{sub A}, where w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} is the parallel alpha-particle thermal speed and v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. We derive analytic expressions for the instability thresholds of these waves, which show, e.g., how the minimum unstable alpha-particle beam speed depends upon w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}}/v{sub A}, the degree of alpha-particle temperature anisotropy, and the alpha-to-proton temperature ratio. We validate our analytical results using numerical solutions to the full hot-plasma dispersion relation. Consistent with previous work, we find that temperature anisotropy allows A/IC waves and FM/W waves to become unstable at significantly lower values of the alpha-particle beam speed U{sub {alpha}} than in the isotropic-temperature case. Likewise, differential flow lowers the minimum temperature anisotropy needed to excite A/IC or FM/W waves relative to the case in which U{sub {alpha}} = 0. We discuss the relevance of our results to alpha particles in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  8. Effects of large-scale wind driven turbulence on sound propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, John M.; Bass, Henry E.; Raspet, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Acoustic measurements made in the atmosphere have shown significant fluctuations in amplitude and phase resulting from the interaction with time varying meteorological conditions. The observed variations appear to have short term and long term (1 to 5 minutes) variations at least in the phase of the acoustic signal. One possible way to account for this long term variation is the use of a large scale wind driven turbulence model. From a Fourier analysis of the phase variations, the outer scales for the large scale turbulence is 200 meters and greater, which corresponds to turbulence in the energy-containing subrange. The large scale turbulence is assumed to be elongated longitudinal vortex pairs roughly aligned with the mean wind. Due to the size of the vortex pair compared to the scale of the present experiment, the effect of the vortex pair on the acoustic field can be modeled as the sound speed of the atmosphere varying with time. The model provides results with the same trends and variations in phase observed experimentally.

  9. Development of Solar Wind Model Driven by Empirical Heat Flux and Pressure Terms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Edward C., Jr.; Ofman, L.; Selwa, M.; Kramar, M.

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a time stationary self-consistent 2D MHD model of the solar corona and solar wind as suggested by Sittler et al. (2003). Sittler & Guhathakurta (1999) developed a semiempirical steady state model (SG model) of the solar wind in a multipole 3-streamer structure, with the model constrained by Skylab observations. Guhathakurta et al. (2006) presented a more recent version of their initial work. Sittler et al. (2003) modified the SG model by investigating time dependent MHD, ad hoc heating term with heat conduction and empirical heating solutions. Next step of development of 2D MHD models was performed by Sittler & Ofman (2006). They derived effective temperature and effective heat flux from the data-driven SG model and fit smooth analytical functions to be used in MHD calculations. Improvements of the Sittler & Ofman (2006) results now show a convergence of the 3-streamer topology into a single equatorial streamer at altitudes > 2 R(sub S). This is a new result and shows we are now able to reproduce observations of an equatorially confined streamer belt. In order to allow our solutions to be applied to more general applications, we extend that model by using magnetogram data and PFSS model as a boundary condition. Initial results were presented by Selwa et al. (2008). We choose solar minimum magnetogram data since during solar maximum the boundary conditions are more complex and the coronal magnetic field may not be described correctly by PFSS model. As the first step we studied the simplest 2D MHD case with variable heat conduction, and with empirical heat input combined with empirical momentum addition for the fast solar wind. We use realistic magnetic field data based on NSO/GONG data, and plan to extend the study to 3D. This study represents the first attempt of fully self-consistent realistic model based on real data and including semi-empirical heat flux and semi-empirical effective pressure terms.

  10. Reconnection-Driven Coronal-Hole Jets with Gravity and Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Pariat, E.

    2017-01-01

    Coronal-hole jets occur ubiquitously in the Sun's coronal holes, at EUV and X-ray bright points associated with intrusions of minority magnetic polarity. The embedded-bipole model for these jets posits that they are driven by explosive, fast reconnection between the stressed closed field of the embedded bipole and the open field of the surrounding coronal hole. Previous numerical studies in Cartesian geometry, assuming uniform ambient magnetic field and plasma while neglecting gravity and solar wind, demonstrated that the model is robust and can produce jet-like events in simple configurations. We have extended these investigations by including spherical geometry, gravity, and solar wind in a nonuniform, coronal hole-like ambient atmosphere. Our simulations confirm that the jet is initiated by the onset of a kink-like instability of the internal closed field, which induces a burst of reconnection between the closed and external open field, launching a helical jet. Our new results demonstrate that the jet propagation is sustained through the outer corona, in the form of a traveling nonlinear Alfvén wave front trailed by slower-moving plasma density enhancements that are compressed and accelerated by the wave. This finding agrees well with observations of white-light coronal-hole jets, and can explain microstreams and torsional Alfvén waves detected in situ in the solar wind. We also use our numerical results to deduce scaling relationships between properties of the coronal source region and the characteristics of the resulting jet, which can be tested against observations.

  11. Solar r-process-constrained actinide production in neutrino-driven winds of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goriely, S.; Janka, H.-Th.

    2016-07-01

    Long-lived radioactive nuclei play an important role as nucleo-cosmochronometers and as cosmic tracers of nucleosynthetic source activity. In particular, nuclei in the actinide region like thorium, uranium, and plutonium can testify to the enrichment of an environment by the still enigmatic astrophysical sources that are responsible for the production of neutron-rich nuclei by the rapid neutron-capture process (r-process). Supernovae and merging neutron-star (NS) or NS-black hole binaries are considered as most likely sources of the r-nuclei. But arguments in favour of one or the other or both are indirect and make use of assumptions; they are based on theoretical models with remaining simplifications and shortcomings. An unambiguous observational determination of a production event is still missing. In order to facilitate searches in this direction, e.g. by looking for radioactive tracers in stellar envelopes, the interstellar medium or terrestrial reservoirs, we provide improved theoretical estimates and corresponding uncertainty ranges for the actinide production (232Th, 235, 236, 238U, 237Np, 244Pu, and 247Cm) in neutrino-driven winds of core-collapse supernovae. Since state-of-the-art supernova models do not yield r-process viable conditions - but still lack, for example, the effects of strong magnetic fields - we base our investigation on a simple analytical, Newtonian, adiabatic and steady-state wind model and consider the superposition of a large number of contributing components, whose nucleosynthesis-relevant parameters (mass weight, entropy, expansion time-scale, and neutron excess) are constrained by the assumption that the integrated wind nucleosynthesis closely reproduces the Solar system distribution of r-process elements. We also test the influence of uncertain nuclear physics.

  12. Reconnection-Driven Coronal-Hole Jets with Gravity and Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, J. T.; Devore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Pariat, E.

    2017-01-01

    Coronal-hole jets occur ubiquitously in the Sun's coronal holes, at EUV and X-ray bright points associated with intrusions of minority magnetic polarity. The embedded-bipole model for these jets posits that they are driven by explosive, fast reconnection between the stressed closed field of the embedded bipole and the open field of the surrounding coronal hole. Previous numerical studies in Cartesian geometry, assuming uniform ambient magnetic field and plasma while neglecting gravity and solar wind, demonstrated that the model is robust and can produce jet-like events in simple configurations. We have extended these investigations by including spherical geometry,gravity, and solar wind in a nonuniform, coronal hole-like ambient atmosphere. Our simulations confirm that the jet is initiated by the onset of a kink-like instability of the internal closed field, which induces a burst of reconnection between the closed and external open field, launching a helical jet. Our new results demonstrate that the jet propagation is sustained through the outer corona, in the form of a traveling nonlinear Alfven wave front trailed by slower-moving plasma density enhancements that are compressed and accelerated by the wave. This finding agrees well with observations of white-light coronal-hole jets, and can explain microstreams and torsional Alfven waves detected in situ in the solar wind. We also use our numerical results to deduce scaling relationships between properties of the coronal source region and the characteristics of the resulting jet, which can be tested against observations.

  13. Revealing the location and structure of the accretion disk wind in PDS 456

    SciTech Connect

    Gofford, J.; Reeves, J. N.; Nardini, E.; Costa, M. T.; Matzeu, G. A.; Braito, V.; O'Brien, P.; Ward, M.; Turner, T. J.; Miller, L.

    2014-03-20

    We present evidence for the rapid variability of the high-velocity iron K-shell absorption in the nearby (z = 0.184) quasar PDS 456. From a recent long Suzaku observation in 2013 (∼1 Ms effective duration), we find that the equivalent width of iron K absorption increases by a factor of ∼5 during the observation, increasing from <105 eV within the first 100 ks of the observation, toward a maximum depth of ∼500 eV near the end. The implied outflow velocity of ∼0.25 c is consistent with that claimed from earlier (2007, 2011) Suzaku observations. The absorption varies on timescales as short as ∼1 week. We show that this variability can be equally well attributed to either (1) an increase in column density, plausibly associated with a clumpy time-variable outflow, or (2) the decreasing ionization of a smooth homogeneous outflow which is in photo-ionization equilibrium with the local photon field. The variability allows a direct measure of absorber location, which is constrained to within r = 200-3500 r {sub g} of the black hole. Even in the most conservative case, the kinetic power of the outflow is ≳ 6% of the Eddington luminosity, with a mass outflow rate in excess of ∼40% of the Eddington accretion rate. The wind momentum rate is directly equivalent to the Eddington momentum rate which suggests that the flow may have been accelerated by continuum scattering during an episode of Eddington-limited accretion.

  14. Time-dependent models of radiatively driven stellar winds. I - Nonlinear evolution of instabilities for a pure absorption model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.; Castor, John I.; Rybicki, George B.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in radiatively driven stellar winds have been performed. The results show a strong tendency for the unstable flow to form rather sharp rarefactions in which the highest speed material has very low density. The qualitative features of the model agree well with the reqirements of displaced narrow absorption components in UV lines.

  15. Wind-driven Circulation and Freshwater Fluxes off Sri Lanka: 4D-Sampling with Autonomous Gliders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    of Bengal – Arabian Sea system. • The processes that govern Indian Ocean circulation . • How upper- ocean processes, in particular sub-mesoscale...and salty water masses in and out of the Bay, playing a major role in the Indian Ocean Circulation . The Seaglider surveys allow us to understand how...Wind-driven circulation and freshwater fluxes

  16. INSTABILITY-DRIVEN LIMITS ON HELIUM TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY IN THE SOLAR WIND: OBSERVATIONS AND LINEAR VLASOV ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Maruca, Bennett A.; Kasper, Justin C.; Gary, S. Peter

    2012-04-01

    Kinetic microinstabilities in the solar wind arise when the plasma deviates too far from thermal equilibrium. Previously published work has provided strong evidence that the cyclotron, mirror, and parallel and oblique firehose instabilities limit proton (i.e., ionized hydrogen) temperature anisotropy. However, few studies have thoroughly explored whether a less-abundant ion species can also trigger these instabilities. This study considered the possibility of similar instability-driven limits on {alpha}-particle (i.e., fully ionized helium) temperature anisotropy. Linear Vlasov analysis was used to derive the expected threshold conditions for instabilities driven by {alpha}-particle temperature anisotropy. Measurements in situ of {alpha}-particle temperature anisotropy from the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups were found to be consistent with the limits imposed by these instability thresholds. This strongly suggests that {alpha}-particles, which only constitute {approx}5% of ions in the solar wind, can drive an instability if their temperature anisotropy becomes sufficiently extreme.

  17. Time-dependent models of radiatively driven stellar winds. I - Nonlinear evolution of instabilities for a pure absorption model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.; Castor, John I.; Rybicki, George B.

    1988-12-01

    The authors describe results of numerical radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in radiatively driven stellar winds. The wind is idealized as a spherically symmetric, isothermal flow driven by pure absorption of stellar radiation in a fixed ensemble of spectral lines. The simulations indicate that there is a strong tendency for the unstable flow to form rather sharp rarefactions in which the highest speed material has very low density. The growth of wave perturbations thus remains nearly exponential well beyond the linear regime, until the waves are kinematically steepened into strong shocks. The strongest shocks here are reverse shocks that arise to decelerate high-speed, rarefied flow as it impacts slower material that has been compressed into dense shells. The subsequent wind evolution shows a slow decay of the shocks and the gradual thermal decompression and interaction of the dense shells.

  18. High resolution modelling and observation of wind-driven surface currents in a semi-enclosed estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, S.; Hartnett, M.; McKinstry, A.; Ragnoli, E.; Nagle, D.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrodynamic circulation in estuaries is primarily driven by tides, river inflows and surface winds. While tidal and river data can be quite easily obtained for input to hydrodynamic models, sourcing accurate surface wind data is problematic. Firstly, the wind data used in hydrodynamic models is usually measured on land and can be quite different in magnitude and direction from offshore winds. Secondly, surface winds are spatially-varying but due to a lack of data it is common practice to specify a non-varying wind speed and direction across the full extents of a model domain. These problems can lead to inaccuracies in the surface currents computed by three-dimensional hydrodynamic models. In the present research, a wind forecast model is coupled with a three-dimensional numerical model of Galway Bay, a semi-enclosed estuary on the west coast of Ireland, to investigate the effect of surface wind data resolution on model accuracy. High resolution and low resolution wind fields are specified to the model and the computed surface currents are compared with high resolution surface current measurements obtained from two high frequency SeaSonde-type Coastal Ocean Dynamics Applications Radars (CODAR). The wind forecast models used for the research are Harmonie cy361.3, running on 2.5 and 0.5km spatial grids for the low resolution and high resolution models respectively. The low-resolution model runs over an Irish domain on 540x500 grid points with 60 vertical levels and a 60s timestep and is driven by ECMWF boundary conditions. The nested high-resolution model uses 300x300 grid points on 60 vertical levels and a 12s timestep. EFDC (Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code) is used for the hydrodynamic model. The Galway Bay model has ten vertical layers and is resolved spatially and temporally at 150m and 4 sec respectively. The hydrodynamic model is run for selected hindcast dates when wind fields were highly energetic. Spatially- and temporally-varying wind data is provided by

  19. Global eddy-resolving ocean simulations driven by 1985-1995 atmospheric winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltrud, Mathew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Semtner, Albert J.; Malone, Robert C.

    1998-12-01

    Results are presented from a high-resolution global ocean model that is driven through three decadal cycles of increasingly realistic prescribed atmospheric forcing from the period 1985-1995. The model used (the Parallel Ocean Program) is a z level primitive equation model with active thermohaline dynamics based on the formulation of Bryan [1969] rewritten for massively parallel computers. Improvements to the model include an implicit free-surface formulation of the barotropic mode [Dukowicz and Smith, 1994] and the use of pressure averaging for increasing the numerical time step. This study extends earlier 0.5° simulations of Semtner and Chervin [1992] to higher horizontal resolution with improved treatments of ocean geometry and surface forcing. The computational grid is a Mercator projection covering the global ocean from 77°N to 77°S and has 20 vertical levels. Three successive simulations have been performed on the CM-5 Connection Machine system at Los Alamos using forcing fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The first run uses monthly wind stresses for 1985-1995 and restoring of surface temperature and salinity to the Levitus [1982] seasonal climatology. The second run is the same but with 3 day-averaged rather than monthly averaged wind stress fields, and the third is the same as the second but uses the monthly climatological ECMWF heat fluxes of Barnier et al. [1995] instead of restoring to climatological sea surface temperatures. Many features of the wind-driven circulation are well represented in the model solutions, such as the overall current patterns, the numerous regions of hydrodynamic instability which correspond to those observed by satellite altimetry, and the filamented structure of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. However, some features such as the separation points of the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio and the transport through narrow passages such as the Florida Straits are clearly inaccurate and indicate

  20. Effects of internal loading on phosphorus distribution in the Taihu Lake driven by wind waves and lake currents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Fang, Hongwei; He, Guojian; Jiang, Helong; Wang, Changhui

    2016-12-01

    Wind-driven sediment resuspension exerts significant effects on the P behavior in shallow lake ecosystems. In this study, a comprehensive dynamic phosphorus (P) model that integrates hydrodynamic, wind wave and sediment transport is proposed to assess the importance of internal P cycling due to sediment resuspension on water column P levels. The primary contribution of the model is detailed modeling and rigorous coupling of sediment and P dynamics. The proposed model is applied to predict the P behavior in the shallow Taihu Lake, which is the third largest lake in China, and quantitatively estimate the effects of wind waves and lake currents on P release and distribution. Both the prevailing southeast winds in summer and northwest winds in winter are applied for the simulation, and different wind speeds of 5 m/s and 10 m/s are also considered. Results show that sediment resuspension and the resulting P release have a dominant effect on P levels in Taihu Lake, and likely similar shallow lakes. Wind-driven waves at higher wind speeds significantly enhance sediment resuspension and suspended sediment concentration (SSC). Total P concentration in the water column is also increased but not in proportion to the SSC. The different lake circulations resulting from the different prevailing wind directions also affect the distribution of suspended sediment and P around the lake ultimately influencing where eutrophication is likely to occur. The proposed model demonstrates that internal cycling in the lake is a dominant factor in the lake P and must be considered when trying to manage water quality in this and similar lakes. The model is used to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of remediation of an area where historical releases have led to P accumulation on overall lake quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Control of a wind-driven self-excited induction generator water-pumping system for maximum utilization efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Alghuwainem, S.M.

    1998-07-01

    This paper analyzes a stand-alone water-pumping system consisting of a motor-pump set supplied by a wind-driven self-excited induction generator. In order to achieve maximum utilization efficiency, the system designer is interested in optimally matching the system components together so that maximum energy available from the wind is absorbed and utilized all the time. Unfortunately, this optimal matching is speed-dependent and hence no single matching is valid for all wind speeds. Therefore the operating point of the system must vary with wind speed. In this paper, a control strategy is formulated which properly adjust the operating point of the system to coincide with the maximum power operating condition. The self-excited induction generator (SEIG) is basically an induction machine which is driven by a prime mover such as a wind turbine while a capacitor is connected across its stator terminals. The SEIG supplies an induction motor which is coupled to a water pump. The system need not operate continuously and water can be used directly for drinking and irrigation or it can be collected in a storage tank for later use. Due to the high cost of the wind turbine and equipment, the system designer is interested in maximizing the amount of pumped water per day. This can be achieved by proper selection and matching of the system components. However, proper matching of the system components together is not sufficient to guarantee maximum utilization since matching is dependent on wind speed. Therefore, certain system components must be controlled according to wind speed, such that matching is achieved all the time. This paper presents a control strategy to control the excitation capacitance of the induction generator such that its generated terminal voltage, which is applied to the induction motor, is kept constant as the rotor speed varies with wind speed.

  2. The steady state solutions of radiatively driven stellar winds for a non-Sobolev, pure absorption model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. H.; Owocki, S. P.; Castor, J. I.

    1990-01-01

    The steady state solution topology for absorption line-driven flows is investigated for the condition that the Sobolev approximation is not used to compute the line force. The solution topology near the sonic point is of the nodal type with two positive slope solutions. The shallower of these slopes applies to reasonable lower boundary conditions and realistic ion thermal speed v(th) and to the Sobolev limit of zero of the usual Castor, Abbott, and Klein model. At finite v(th), this solution consists of a family of very similar solutions converging on the sonic point. It is concluded that a non-Sobolev, absorption line-driven flow with a realistic values of v(th) has no uniquely defined steady state. To the extent that a pure absorption model of the outflow of stellar winds is applicable, radiatively driven winds should be intrinsically variable.

  3. Proactive monitoring of an onshore wind farm through lidar measurements, SCADA data and a data-driven RANS solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Camarri, Simone; Ciri, Umberto; El-Asha, Said; Leonardi, Stefano; Rotea, Mario A.; Santhanagopalan, Vignesh; Viola, Francesco; Zhan, Lu

    2016-11-01

    Site conditions, such as topography and local climate, as well as wind farm layout strongly affect performance of a wind power plant. Therefore, predictions of wake interactions and their effects on power production still remain a great challenge in wind energy. For this study, an onshore wind turbine array was monitored through lidar measurements, SCADA and met-tower data. Power losses due to wake interactions were estimated to be approximately 4% and 2% of the total power production under stable and convective conditions, respectively. This dataset was then leveraged for the calibration of a data driven RANS (DDRANS) solver, which is a compelling tool for prediction of wind turbine wakes and power production. DDRANS is characterized by a computational cost as low as that for engineering wake models, and adequate accuracy achieved through data-driven tuning of the turbulence closure model. DDRANS is based on a parabolic formulation, axisymmetry and boundary layer approximations, which allow achieving low computational costs. The turbulence closure model consists in a mixing length model, which is optimally calibrated with the experimental dataset. Assessment of DDRANS is then performed through lidar and SCADA data for different atmospheric conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under the I/UCRC WindSTAR, NSF Award IIP 1362033.

  4. Wind-driven interannual variability of sea ice algal production in the western Arctic Chukchi Borderland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, E.; Onodera, J.; Harada, N.; Aita, M. N.; Ishida, A.; Kishi, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal and interannual variability in the biogenic particle sinking flux was recorded using multi-year bottom-tethered sediment trap mooring systems in the Northwind Abyssal Plain (Station NAP: 75° N, 162° W, 1975 m water depth) of the western Arctic Chukchi Borderland. Trapped particle flux at a median depth of 184 m had an obvious peak and dominance of sea ice-related diatom assemblages in August 2011. The observed particle flux was considerably suppressed throughout summer 2012. In the present study, the response of ice algal production and biomass to wind-driven changes in the physical environment was addressed using a pan-Arctic sea ice-ocean modeling approach. A sea ice ecosystem with ice algae was newly incorporated into the lower-trophic marine ecosystem model, which was previously coupled with a high-resolution (i.e., 5 km horizontal grid size) sea ice-ocean general circulation model. Seasonal model experiments covering 2-year mooring periods indicated that primary productivity of ice algae around the Chukchi Borderland depended on basin-scale wind patterns via various processes. Easterly winds in the southern part of a distinct Beaufort High supplied nutrient-rich water for euphotic zones of the NAP region via both surface Ekman transport of Chukchi shelf water and vertical turbulent mixing with underlying nutricline water in 2011. In contrast, northwesterly winds flowing in the northern part of an extended Siberian High transported oligotrophic water within the Beaufort Gyre circulation toward the NAP region in 2012. The modeled ice algal biomass during summer reflected the differences in nutrient distribution. The modeled sinking flux of particulate organic nitrogen (PON) was comparable with the time series obtained from sediment trap data in summer 2011. In contrast, lateral advection of ice algal patches of shelf origin during a great cyclone event may have caused a modeled PON flux bias in 2012. Sensitivity experiments revealed several

  5. Formation and Growth of Wind-Driven Waves on Titan's Hydrocarbon Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Hayes, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    Titan’s hydrocarbon seas are an exotic and appealing aspect of that world, yet so far no wind-driven waves have been identified: radar backscatter, altimetry data and near-IR glints show liquid surfaces to be as flat as a millpond. Yet there are shoreline geomorphological indications of wave action. As we move into northern summer, Global Circulation Models predict winds in the north, home to the large seas Kraken and Ligeia, will freshen. Will Cassini observe waves? First, an analysis of onset and growth mechanisms of capillary-gravity waves on Titan (Hayes et al., submitted) reveals liquid viscosity, surface tension, and density to be significant factors. Methane-rich liquids may begin growing with windspeeds U10=0.4m/s. On the other hand, waves may not form at all in more viscous ethane-rich compositions (likely for the large seas) until U10=0.7m/s, a much less frequent occurrence. Once waves form, the dense Titan atmosphere causes them to grow. A model of gravity wave growth (Lorenz and Hayes, submitted) shows that Titan’s dense atmosphere causes growth rather faster than previously predicted by Ghafoor et al. (2000) but that the limiting (‘fully-developed’) significant wave height (SWH) is similar, and is ~0.2U10^2/g - thus 1m/s winds lead to 0.2m waves. SWH is the average of the highest one third of wave heights: individual heights typically follow a Rayleigh distribution. Thus in a 3 month period one wave with a height of 2.7 times the SWH might be expected to appear. Combined with GCM predictions (in which there may be calm days even in the windy season), these statistical models can be used to estimate the wave/tide balance of shoreline processes. These wind-wave models suggest that even in the windy summer, observable waves might not always be present - even with the most sensitive techniques of glint and altimetry - and thus any interpretation of Cassini observations to refine or validate windspeed models should be done probabilistically.

  6. Strain Driven Shape Evolution of Stacked (In,Ga)N Quantum Disks Embedded in GaN Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Bartolomé, Javier; Hanke, Michael; van Treeck, David; Trampert, Achim

    2017-08-09

    The fabrication of nanowires with axial multiquantum wells or disks presenting a homogeneous size and shape distribution along the whole stack is still an unresolved challenge, despite being essential for narrowing their light emission bandwidth. In this work we demonstrate that the commonly observed change in the shape of the disks along the stacking direction proceeds in a systematic, predictable way. High- resolution transmission electron microscopy of stacked (In,Ga)N quantum discs embedded in GaN nanowires with diameters of ∼40 nm and lengths of ∼700 nm and finite element method calculations show that, contrary to what is normally assumed, this change is not related to the radial growth of the nanowires, which is shown to be negligible, but to the strain relaxation of the whole active region. A simple model is proposed to account for the experimental observations. The model assumes that each disk reaches an equilibrium shape that minimizes the overall energy of the system, given by the sum of the surface and strain energies of the disk itself and the barrier below. The strain state of the barrier is affected by the presence of the disk buried directly below in a way that depends on its shape. This gives rise to a cumulative process, which makes the aspect ratio of each quantum disk to be smaller compared to the disk grown just before, in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The obtained results imply that strain relaxation is an important factor to bear in mind for the design of multiquantum disks with controlled shape along the stacking direction in any lattice mismatched nanowire system.

  7. Stochastic description of salt-marsh inundation from mixed astronomical-wind driven tides, with implications for macrophyte growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, S. M.; Furbish, D. J.; Morris, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    Sea-level rise and sedimentation interact to control productivity on coastal salt marshes since the mean sea level influences flood frequency. Irregularly flooded marshes are inundated during spring and storm tides and during extended periods of north-easterly winds. The weak and irregular inundation in marshes may effect rates of decomposition, organic matter accumulation, and the vertical distribution of marsh vegetation. Whereas astronomical tides are predictable, wind driven tides depend on the strength and direction of the wind. Because these systems are stochastic, a non-hydrodynamic approach is used to describe the tides and determine the distribution of water depths. Here we present a description of salt-marsh inundation from mixed astronomical-wind driven tides that removes the astronomical forcing from water level records to determine the role of wind, storms, and forecasting of stochastic platform wetting. Using a 3 year record of water level and wind from sites in Carteret County, North Carolina, we calculate the mean high water (MHW) level and the ratio of inundation for a given elevation and corresponding macrophyte. The frequency of inundation or marsh platform wetting will vary from the frequency of MHW level, yet it is this stochastic wetting process that determines productivity and plant distribution since infrequent flooding may cause stress or hypersaline conditions. An ARIMA model is used to describe this higher order structure of the inundation signal. Wind can be described as an AR1 and a transfer function model is used to determine the dynamic response of the effect of noise and sustained winds on water levels. Harmonic analysis is also performed for comparison of predicted water levels using various tidal constituents to determine the phases and amplitudes and to explore model simplification.

  8. Dynamics and predictability of a low-order wind-driven ocean-atmosphere coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2014-04-01

    The dynamics of a low-order coupled wind-driven ocean-atmosphere system is investigated with emphasis on its predictability properties. The low-order coupled deterministic system is composed of a baroclinic atmosphere for which 12 dominant dynamical modes are only retained (Charney and Straus in J Atmos Sci 37:1157-1176, 1980) and a wind-driven, quasi-geostrophic and reduced-gravity shallow ocean whose field is truncated to four dominant modes able to reproduce the large scale oceanic gyres (Pierini in J Phys Oceanogr 41:1585-1604, 2011). The two models are coupled through mechanical forcings only. The analysis of its dynamics reveals first that under aperiodic atmospheric forcings only dominant single gyres (clockwise or counterclockwise) appear, while for periodic atmospheric solutions the double gyres emerge. In the present model domain setting context, this feature is related to the level of truncation of the atmospheric fields, as indicated by a preliminary analysis of the impact of higher wavenumber ("synoptic" scale) modes on the development of oceanic gyres. In the latter case, double gyres appear in the presence of a chaotic atmosphere. Second the dynamical quantities characterizing the short-term predictability (Lyapunov exponents, Lyapunov dimension, Kolmogorov-Sinaï (KS) entropy) displays a complex dependence as a function of the key parameters of the system, namely the coupling strength and the external thermal forcing. In particular, the KS-entropy is increasing as a function of the coupling in most of the experiments, implying an increase of the rate of loss of information about the localization of the system on its attractor. Finally the dynamics of the error is explored and indicates, in particular, a rich variety of short term behaviors of the error in the atmosphere depending on the (relative) amplitude of the initial error affecting the ocean, from polynomial ( at 2 + bt 3 + ct 4) up to exponential-like evolutions. These features are explained

  9. A Wind-Driven, Hybrid Latent and Sensible Heat Coastal Polynya at Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, D.; Fukamachi, Y.; Watanabe, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Mahoney, A. R.; Eicken, H.; Shimizu, D.; Ohshima, K. I.; Tamura, T.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of the Barrow Coastal Polynya (BCP) formed off the Alaska Coast in winter is examined using mooring data (temperature, salinity, and ocean current), atmospheric re-analysis data (ERA-Interim), and AMSR-E-derived sea-ice concentration and production data (Iwamoto et al., 2014). Previously, the BCP has been considered to be a latent heat polynya formed by predominantly offshore winds resulting in sea-ice divergence. Recently, it has been suggested that the sea-ice production rate in the BCP is suppressed by warm Pacific- or Atlantic-origin waters distributed beneath the BCP (e.g. Itoh et al., 2012). In this study, we focus on the oceanographic conditions such as water mass distribution and ocean current structure beneath the BCP, which have not been fully documented. A mooring was deployed off Barrow, Alaska in the northeast Chukchi Sea (71.23°N, 157.65°W, water depth 55 m) from August 2009 to July 2010. During the freeze-up period from December to May, five BCP events occurred in the same manner; 1) dominant wind parallel to Barrow Canyon, with an offshore component near Barrow, 2) high sea-ice production followed by sudden cessation of ice growth, 3) upwelling of warm (>2 K above freezing point) and saline (>34) Atlantic Water (AW) beneath the BCP, 4) strong up-canyon flow (>100cm/s) associated with density fluctuations. A baroclinic current structure, established after the upwelling, resulted in enhanced vertical shear, promoting vertical mixing. The mixing event and open water formation occurred simultaneously, once sea-ice production had stopped. Thus, mixing events accompanied by ocean heat flux from AW into the surface layer were likely to form/maintain the open water area that is a sensible heat polynya. The transition from a latent to a sensible heat polynya was well reproduced by a pan-Arctic ice-ocean model (COCO). We propose that the BCP is a hybrid latent and sensible heat polynya, with both processes driven by the same offshore wind.

  10. Agglomeration of a comprehensive model for the wind-driven sand transport at the Belgian Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strypsteen, Glenn; Rauwoens, Pieter

    2016-04-01

    Although a lot of research has been done in the area of Aeolian transport, it is only during the last years that attention has been drawn to Aeolian transport in coastal areas. In these areas, the physical processes are more complex, due to a large number of transport limiting parameters. In this PhD-project, which is now in its early stage, a model will be developed which relates the wind-driven sand transport at the Belgian coast with physical parameters such as the wind speed, humidity and grain size of the sand, and the slope of beach and dune surface. For the first time, the interaction between beach and dune dynamics is studied at the Belgian coast. The Belgian coastline is only 67km long, but densely populated and therefore subject to coastal protection and safety. The coast mostly consists of sandy beaches and dikes. Although, still 33km of dunes exist, whose dynamics are far less understood. The overall research approach consists of three pathways: (i) field measurements, (ii) physical model tests, and (iii) numerical simulations. Firstly and most importantly, several field campaigns will provide accurate data of meteo-marine conditions, morphology, and sand transport events on a wide beach at the Belgian Coastline. The experimental set-up consists of a monitoring station, which will provide time series of vegetation cover, shoreline position, fetch distances, surficial moisture content, wind speed and direction and transport processes. The horizontal and vertical variability of the event scale Aeolian sand transport is analyzed with 8 MWAC sand traps. Two saltiphones register the intensity and variations of grain impacts over time. Two meteo-masts, each with four anemometers and one wind vane, provide quantitative measurements of the wind flow at different locations on the beach. Surficial moisture is measured with a moisture sensor. The topography measurements are typically done with laser techniques. To start, two sites are selected for measurement

  11. SUSTAINING STAR FORMATION RATES IN SPIRAL GALAXIES: SUPERNOVA-DRIVEN TURBULENT ACCRETION DISK MODELS APPLIED TO THINGS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, Bernd; Leroy, Adam K.

    2011-01-15

    Gas disks of spiral galaxies can be described as clumpy accretion disks without a coupling of viscosity to the actual thermal state of the gas. The model description of a turbulent disk consisting of emerging and spreading clumps contains free parameters, which can be constrained by observations of molecular gas, atomic gas, and the star formation rate for individual galaxies. Radial profiles of 18 nearby spiral galaxies from THINGS, HERACLES, SINGS, and GALEX data are used to compare the observed star formation efficiency, molecular fraction, and velocity dispersion to the model. The observed radially decreasing velocity dispersion can be reproduced by the model. In the framework of this model, the decrease in the inner disk is due to the stellar mass distribution which dominates the gravitational potential. Introducing a radial break in the star formation efficiency into the model improves the fits significantly. This change in the star formation regime is realized by replacing the free-fall time in the prescription of the star formation rate with the molecule formation timescale. Depending on the star formation prescription, the break radius is located near the transition region between the molecular-gas-dominated and atomic-gas-dominated parts of the galactic disk or closer to the optical radius. It is found that only less massive galaxies (log M(M{sub sun}) {approx}< 10) can balance gas loss via star formation by radial gas accretion within the disk. These galaxies can thus access their gas reservoirs with large angular momentum. On the other hand, the star formation of massive galaxies is determined by the external gas mass accretion rate from a putative spherical halo of ionized gas or from satellite accretion. In the absence of this external accretion, star formation slowly exhausts the gas within the optical disk within the star formation timescale.

  12. Herniated disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disk. This may place pressure on nearby nerves or the spinal cord. ... Lumbar radiculopathy; Cervical radiculopathy; Herniated ... LBP - herniated disk; Sciatica - herniated disk; Herniated disk

  13. Laser experiments to simulate coronal mass ejection driven magnetospheres and astrophysical plasma winds on compact magnetized stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Ditmire, T.; Zakharov, Yu. P.

    2010-06-01

    Laboratory experiments using a plasma wind generated by laser-target interaction are proposed to investigate the creation of a shock in front of the magnetosphere and the dynamo mechanism for creating plasma currents and voltages. Preliminary experiments are shown where measurements of the electron density gradients surrounding the obstacles are recorded to infer the plasma winds. The proposed experiments are relevant to understanding the electron acceleration mechanisms taking place in shock-driven magnetic dipole confined plasmas surrounding compact magnetized stars and planets. Exploratory experiments have been published [P. Brady, T. Ditmire, W. Horton, et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 043112 (2009)] with the one Joule Yoga laser and centimeter sized permanent magnets.

  14. Characteristics of heat flux and electromagnetic electron-cyclotron instabilities driven by solar wind electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-01-01

    In-situ observations reveal the existence of electron velocity distribution function in the solar wind, where the net distribution can be modeled by a combination of core, halo and strahl. These components often possess a relative drift and with respective temperature anisotropies. The relative drift between the core and halo components leads to heat flux (HF) instability, while temperature anisotropies drive electromagnetic electron-cyclotron (EMEC) instability. These instabilities have been separately studied in the literature, but for the first time, the present study combines both unstable modes in the presence of two free energy sources, namely, excessive parallel pressure and excessive perpendicular temperature. Heat flux instability (which is a left-hand circularly polarized mode) is effectively similar to e