Science.gov

Sample records for dispersion type fuel

  1. Neutronic double heterogeneity effect in particle dispersed type inert matrix fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akie, H.; Takano, H.

    2006-06-01

    Rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel concept is studied in Japan for effective plutonium burning in light water reactors (LWRs). ROX is a heterogeneous fuel, where Pu containing yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) particles are dispersed in spinel matrix, and similar to the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR) fuel. The effect of such a 'double' heterogeneity (fuel, structure and coolant heterogeneity in reactor core, plus fuel heterogeneity) on HTR neutronic characteristics is important, while the effect was not taken into account in the ROX fueled LWR neutronics calculations. Here, this double heterogeneity effect is estimated for ROX fueled LWR, and compared with the Pu containing YSZ particle fueled HTR. As a result, the heterogeneity effect was negligible in the ROX-LWR system, while it is notable in YSZ-HTR system. The volume fraction of YSZ particle in the fuel region is one of the important parameter to cause the difference.

  2. Post-crash fuel dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.

    1997-03-01

    This paper is a brief overview of work over the last several decades in understanding what occurs to jet fuel stored in aircraft fuel tanks on impact with the ground. Fuel dispersal is discussed in terms of the overall crash dynamics process and impact regimes are identified. In a generic sense, the types of flow regimes which can occur are identified and general descriptions of the processes are given. Examples of engineering level tools, both computational and experimental, which have applicability to analyzing the complex environments are presented. Finally, risk based decision is discussed as a quick means of identifying requirements for development of preventative or mitigation strategies, such as further work on the development of an anti-misting agent.

  3. The use of U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersed in aluminum in plate-type fuel elements for research and test reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.; Hobbs, R.W.; Senn, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    A high-density fuel based on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersed in aluminum has been developed and tested for use in converting plate-type research and test reactors from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low-enriched uranium. Results of preirradiation testing and the irradiation and postirradiation examination of miniature fuel plates and full-sized fuel elements are summarized. Swelling of the U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ fuel particles is a linear function of the fission density in the particle to well beyond the fission density achievable in low-enriched fuels. U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ particle swelling rate is approximately the same as that of the commonly used UAl/sub x/ fuel particle. The presence of minor amounts of U/sub 3/Si or uranium solid solution in the fuel result in greater, but still acceptable, fuel swelling. Blister threshold temperatures are at least as high as those of currently used fuels. An exothermic reaction occurs near the aluminum melting temperature, but the measured energy releases were low enough not to substantially worsen the consequences of an accident. U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-aluminum dispersion fuel with uranium densities up to at least 4.8 Mg/m/sup 3/ is a suitable LEU fuel for typical plate-type research and test reactors. 42 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Effect of in-pile degradation of the meat thermal conductivity on the maximum temperature of the plate-type U-Mo dispersion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel G. Medvedev

    2009-11-01

    Effect of in-pile degradation of thermal conductivity on the maximum temperature of the plate-type research reactor fuels has been assessed using the steady-state heat conduction equation and assuming convection cooling. It was found that due to very low meat thickness, characteristic for this type of fuel, the effect of thermal conductivity degradation on the maximum fuel temperature is minor. For example, the fuel plate featuring 0.635 mm thick meat operating at heat flux of 600 W/cm2 would experience only a 20oC temperature rise if the meat thermal conductivity degrades from 0.8 W/cm-s to 0.3 W/cm-s. While degradation of meat thermal conductivity in dispersion-type U-Mo fuel can be very substantial due to formation of interaction layer between the particles and the matrix, and development of fission gas filled porosity, this simple analysis demonstrates that this phenomenon is unlikely to significantly affect the temperature-based safety margin of the fuel during normal operation.

  5. LMFBR fuel assembly design for HCDA fuel dispersal

    DOEpatents

    Lacko, Robert E.; Tilbrook, Roger W.

    1984-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor having an upper axial blanket region disposed in a plurality of zones within the fuel assembly. The characterization of a zone is dependent on the height of the axial blanket region with respect to the active fuel region. The net effect of having a plurality of zones is to establish a dispersal flow path for the molten materials resulting during a core meltdown accident. Upward flowing molten material can escape from the core region and/or fuel assembly without solidifying on the surface of fuel rods due to the heat sink represented by blanket region pellets.

  6. Dart model for irradiation-induced swelling of dispersion fuel elements including aluminum-fuel interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, J.; Hofman, G.L.

    1997-06-01

    The Dispersion Analysis Research Tool (DART) contains models for fission-gas induced fuel swelling, interaction of fuel with the matrix aluminum, resultant reaction-product swelling, and calculation of the stress gradient within the fuel particle. The effects of an aluminide shell on fuel particle swelling are evaluated. Validation of the model is demonstrated by a comparison of DART calculations of fuel swelling of U{sub 3}SiAl-Al and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al for various dispersion fuel element designs with the data. DART results are compared with data for fuel swelling Of U{sub 3}SiAl-Al in plate, tube, and rod configurations as a function of fission density. Plate and tube calculations were performed at a constant fuel temperature of 373 K and 518 K, respectively. An irradiation temperature of 518 K results in a calculated aluminide layer thickness for the Russian tube that is in the center of the measured range (16 {mu}m). Rod calculations were performed with a temperature gradient across the rod characterized by surface and central temperatures of 373 K and 423 K, respectively. The effective yield stress of irradiated Al matrix material and the aluminide was determined by comparing the results of DART calculations with postirradiation immersion volume measurement of U{sub 3}SiAl plates. The values for the effective yield stress were used in all subsequent simulations. The lower calculated fuel swelling in the rod-type element is due to an assumed biaxial stress state. Fuel swelling in plates results in plate thickness increase only. Likewise, in tubes, only the wall thickness increases. Irradiation experiments have shown that plate-type dispersion fuel elements can develop blisters or pillows at high U-235 burnup when fuel compounds exhibiting breakaway swelling are used at moderate to high fuel volume fractions. DART-calculated interaction layer thickness and fuel swelling follows the trends of the observations. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Effect of hydrocarbon fuel type on fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, E. L.; Bittker, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A modified jet fuel thermal oxidation tester (JFTOT) procedure was used to evaluate deposit and sediment formation for four pure hydrocarbon fuels over the temperature range 150 to 450 C in 316-stainless-steel heater tubes. Fuel types were a normal alkane, an alkene, a naphthene, and an aromatic. Each fuel exhibited certain distinctive deposit and sediment formation characteristics. The effect of aluminum and 316-stainless-steel heater tube surfaces on deposit formation for the fuel n-decane over the same temperature range was investigated. Results showed that an aluminum surface had lower deposit formation rates at all temperatures investigated. By using a modified JFTOT procedure the thermal stability of four pure hydrocarbon fuels and two practical fuels (Jet A and home heating oil no. 2) was rated on the basis of their breakpoint temperatures. Results indicate that this method could be used to rate thermal stability for a series of fuels.

  8. Fission induced swelling of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Jeong, G. Y.; Park, J. M.; Robinson, A. B.

    2015-10-01

    Fission-induced swelling of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel meat was measured using microscopy images obtained from post-irradiation examination. The data of reduced-size plate-type test samples and rod-type test samples were employed for this work. A model to predict the meat swelling of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel was developed. This model is composed of several submodels including a model for interaction layer (IL) growth between U-Mo and Al matrix, a model for IL thickness to IL volume conversion, a correlation for the fission-induced swelling of U-Mo alloy particles, a correlation for the fission-induced swelling of IL, and models of U-Mo and Al consumption by IL growth. The model was validated using full-size plate data that were not included in the model development.

  9. THE EFFECT OF NUCLEAR RADIATION ON DISPERSION FUEL MATERIALS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    performance of the following dispersions is discussed in the report: BeO- UO2 , BeO- UO2 -ThO2, Al2O3- UO2 , MgO- UO2 , UO2 , UC, UC2, and *U, Th)C2 U3O8 glass...and UAl3 dispersed in aluminum; UO2 , UC, and UN dispersed in stainless steel; UO2 and UO2 -Y2O3 dispersed in nickel-chromium alloys; UO2 dispersed in...niobium, UO2 dispersed in molybdenum, UO2 , UN, and UC dispersed in tungsten. The data which is summarized includes percentage of fuel by weight and

  10. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    SciTech Connect

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-06-08

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (sigma*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  11. Highly Dispersed Metal Catalyst for Fuel Cell Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study that will bring industrial catalyst experience to fuel cell research. Specifically, industrial catalysts, such as those used in platforming, utilize precious metal platinum as an active component in a finely dispersed form.

  12. A cellular automaton method to simulate the microstructure and evolution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) U-Mo/Al dispersion type fuel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drera, Saleem S.; Hofman, Gerard L.; Kee, Robert J.; King, Jeffrey C.

    2014-10-01

    Low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel plates for high power materials test reactors (MTR) are composed of nominally spherical uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) particles within an aluminum matrix. Fresh U-Mo particles typically range between 10 and 100 μm in diameter, with particle volume fractions up to 50%. As the fuel ages, reaction-diffusion processes cause the formation and growth of interaction layers that surround the fuel particles. The growth rate depends upon the temperature and radiation environment. The cellular automaton algorithm described in this paper can synthesize realistic random fuel-particle structures and simulate the growth of the intermetallic interaction layers. Examples in the present paper pack approximately 1000 particles into three-dimensional rectangular fuel structures that are approximately 1 mm on each side. The computational approach is designed to yield synthetic microstructures consistent with images from actual fuel plates and is validated by comparison with empirical data on actual fuel plates.

  13. Correlation between annealing and irradiation behavior of dispersion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    Studying the effects of annealing of scaled-down aluminum matrix dispersion fuel plates is an important part of the data base for fuel performance. One of the most critical aspects of fuel performance is the stability of a fuel/matrix dispersion, which is usually measured by volumetric changes of the fuel zone. The preferred response of any fuel under irradiation would be no change in volume or a small, steady predictable change. These volume changes decrease the cooling gap channels and restrict the useful life of an element. Previous studies have defined the degree of volumetric change in current high-loading uranium silicide test reactor fuels. It has been demonstrated that some fuels behave well under irradiation, while others go into a breakaway swelling mode. A correlation has been proposed that fission-induced amorphization is responsible for the instability of the fuel and that such transformations can be predicted by the thermodynamic properties of the fuel. To complement this theory, it is proposed that annealing studies may be used as a screening test for new fuels for which no thermodynamic properties have been measured and/or no irradiation data are available. Irradiation performance could be estimated faster and without the expense of irradiating the fuels under investigation.

  14. Combinations of hydroxy amines and carboxylic dispersants as fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    LeSuer, W.M.

    1983-10-11

    Combinations of certain hydroxy amines, particularly the ''Ethomeens,'' and hydrocarbon-soluble carboxylic dispersants are useful as engine and carburetor detergents for normally liquid fuels. The preferred compositions are those in which the carboxylic dispersants are the reaction products of substituted succinic acids with polar compounds, expecially with amines such as ethylene polyamines.

  15. Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Irradiated U-7Mo/Al-2Si Dispersion Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    J. Gan; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; D. M. Wachs; A. B. Robinson; B. D. Miller; T. R. Allen

    2010-01-01

    The plate-type dispersion fuels, with the atomized U(Mo) fuel particles dispersed in the Al or Al alloy matrix, are being developed for use in research and test reactors worldwide. It is found that the irradiation performance of a plate-type dispersion fuel depends on the radiation stability of the various phases in a fuel plate. Transmission electron microscopy was performed on a sample (peak fuel mid-plane temperature approximately 109 degrees C and fission density approximately 4.5 x 10 27 fm-3) taken from an irradiated U–7Mo dispersion fuel plate with Al–2Si alloy matrix to investigate the role of Si addition in the matrix on the radiation stability of the phase(s) in the U–7Mo fuel/matrix interaction layer. A similar interaction layer that forms in irradiated U–7Mo dispersion fuels with pure Al matrix has been found to exhibit poor irradiation stability, likely as a result of poor fission gas retention. The interaction layer for both U–7Mo/Al–2Si and U–7Mo/Al fuels is observed to be amorphous. However, unlike the latter, the amorphous layer for the former was found to effectively retain fission gases in areas with high Si concentration. When the Si concentration becomes relatively low, the fission gas bubbles agglomerate into fewer large pores. Within the U–7Mo fuel particles, a bubble superlattice ordered as fcc structure and oriented parallel to the bcc metal lattice was observed where the average bubble size and the superlattice constant are approximately 3.5 nm and approximately 7.5 nm, respectively. The estimated fission gas inventory in the bubble superlattice correlates well with the fission density in the fuel.

  16. Fuel dispersal modeling for aircraft-runway impact scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.

    1995-11-01

    A fuel dispersal model for C-141 transport accidents was developed for the Defense Nuclear Agency`s Fuel Fire Technology Base Program to support Weapon System Safety Assessments. The spectrum of accidents resulting from aircraft impact on a runway was divided into three fuel dispersal regimes: low, intermediate, and high-velocity impact. Sufficient data existed in the accident, crash test, and fuel-filled bomb literature to support development of a qualitative framework for dispersal models, but not quantitative models for all regimes. Therefore, a test series at intermediate scale was conducted to generate data on which to base the model for the high-velocity regime. Tests were conducted over an impact velocity range from 12 m/s to 91 m/s and angles of impact from 22.5{degrees} to 67.5{degrees}. Dependent variables were area covered by dispersed fuel, amount of mass in that area, and location of the area relative to the impact line. Test results showed that no liquid pooling occurred for impact velocities greater than 61 m/s, independent of the angle of impact. Some pooling did occur at lower velocities, but in no test was the liquid-layer thickness greater than 5.25 mm.

  17. Development of a Monolithic Research Reactor Fuel Type at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.R.; Briggs, R.J.

    2004-10-06

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has been tasked with the conversion of research reactors from highly enriched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). To convert several high power reactors, monolithic fuel, a new fuel type, is being developed. This fuel type replaces the standard fuel dispersion with a fuel alloy foil, which allows for fuel densities far in excess of that found in dispersion fuel. The single-piece fuel foil also contains a significantly lower interface area between the fuel and the aluminum in the plate than the standard fuel type, limiting the amount of detrimental fuel-aluminum interaction that can occur. Implementation of monolithic fuel is dependant on the development of a suitable fabrication method as traditional roll-bonding techniques are inadequate.

  18. Fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic clad fuel pins

    SciTech Connect

    Zirker, L.R. ); Bottcher, J.H. ); Shikakura, S. ); Tsai, C.L. . Dept. of Welding Engineering); Hamilton, M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    A resistance butt welding procedure was developed and qualified for joining ferritic fuel pin cladding to end caps. The cladding are INCO MA957 and PNC ODS lots 63DSA and 1DK1, ferritic stainless steels strengthened by oxide dispersion, while the end caps are HT9 a martensitic stainless steel. With adequate parameter control the weld is formed without a residual melt phase and its strength approaches that of the cladding. This welding process required a new design for fuel pin end cap and weld joint. Summaries of the development, characterization, and fabrication processes are given for these fuel pins. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. IMPROVED TYPE OF FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Monson, H.O.

    1961-01-24

    A radiator-type fuel block assembly is described. It has a hexagonal body of neutron fissionable material having a plurality of longitudinal equal- spaced coolant channels therein aligned in rows parallel to each face of the hexagonal body. Each of these coolant channels is hexagonally shaped with the corners rounded and enlarged and the assembly has a maximum temperature isothermal line around each channel which is approximately straight and equidistant between adjacent channels.

  20. Shock-Dispersed-Fuel Charges: Combustion in Chambers and Tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-22

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30% of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and, by means of the hot detonation products, the energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum flakes, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or hexosen (sucrose) and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in four different chambers: two cylindrical vessels of 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume with a height-to-diameter ratio of approximately 1, a rectangular chamber of 41 (10.5 x 10.5 x 38.6 cm) and a 299.6 cm long tunnel model with a cross section of 8 x 8 cm (volume 19.21) closed at both ends.

  1. Combustion of Shock-Dispersed Fuels in a Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-23

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30 % of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and - by means of the hot detonation products - energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm3, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum powder, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or sucrose and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in three different chambers of 4-1, 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume. In general, the booster charge was sufficient to initiate burning of the fuel. This modifies the pressure signatures measured with a number of wall gages and increases the quasi-static overpressure level obtained in the chambers. On the one hand the time-scale and the yield of the pressure rise depend on the fuel and its characteristics. On the other hand they also depend on the flow dynamics in the chamber, which is dominated by shock reverberations, and thus on the chamber geometry and volume. The paper gives a survey of the experimental results and discusses the possible influences of some basic parameters.

  2. Pore growth in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Jeong, G. Y.; Sohn, D.-S.; Jamison, L. M.

    2016-09-01

    U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel is currently under development in the DOE's Material Management and Minimization program to convert HEU-fueled research reactors to LEU-fueled reactors. In some demanding conditions in high-power and high-performance reactors, large pores form in the interaction layers between the U-Mo fuel particles and the Al matrix, which pose a potential to cause fuel failure. In this study, comprehension of the formation and growth of these pores was explored. As a product, a model to predict pore growth and porosity increase was developed. The model includes three major topics: fission gas release from the U-Mo and the IL to the pores, stress evolution in the fuel meat, and the effect of amorphous IL growth. Well-characterized in-pile data from reduced-size plates were used to fit the model parameters. A data set from full-sized plates, independent and distinctively different from those used to fit the model parameters, was used to examine the accuracy of the model. The model showed fair agreement with the measured data. The model suggested that the growth of the IL has a critical effect on pore growth, as both its material properties and energetics are favorable to pore formation. Therefore, one area of the current effort, focused on suppressing IL growth, appears to be on the right track to improve the performance of this fuel.

  3. Design and fabrication of high density uranium dispersion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Trybus, C.L.; Meyer, M.K.; Clark, C.R.; Wlencek, T.C.; McGann, D.J.

    1997-11-01

    Twelve different uranium alloys and compounds with uranium densities greater than 13.8 g/cc were fabricated into fuel plates. Sixty-four experimental fuel plates, referred to as microplates, with overall dimensions of 76.2 mm x 22.2 mm x 1.3 mm and elliptical fuel zone of nominal dimensions of 51 mm x 9.5 mm, began irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor on August 23, 1997. The fuel test matrix consists of machined or comminuted (compositions are in weight %) U-10Mo, U-8Mo, U-6Mo, U-4Mo, U-9Nb-3Zr, U-6Nb-4Zr, U-5Nb-3Zr, U-6Mo-1Pt, U6Mo-0.6 Ru, U-10Mo-0.05Sn, U{sub 2}Mo and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} (as a control). The low enriched ({sup 235}U < 20%) fuel materials were cast, powdered, mixed with aluminum dispersant at a volume ratio of 1:3, compacted and hot rolled to form the microplates. Spherical atomized powders of two fuels, U-10Mo and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, were utilized to make microplates and included in the irradiation test as well. The experimental design and fabrication steps employed in the selection and production of the fueled microplates is discussed.

  4. Comparison of irradiation behavior of different uranium silicide dispersion fuel element designs

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, G.L.; Rest, J.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Calculations of fuel swelling of U{sub 3}SiAl-Al and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} were performed for various dispersion fuel element designs. Breakaway swelling criteria in the form of critical fuel volume fractions were derived with data obtained from U{sub 3}SiAl-Al plate irradiations. The results of the analysis show that rod-type elements remain well below the pillowing threshold. However, tubular fuel elements, which behave essentially like plates, will likely develop pillows or blisters at around 90% {sup 235}U burnup. The U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al compounds demonstrate stable swelling behavior throughout the entire burnup range for all fuel element designs.

  5. Laser dispersion and ignition of metal fuel particles.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafez, Ahmed A; Brodt, Matthew W; Carney, Joel R; Lightstone, James M

    2011-06-01

    The development of a laser-shock technique for dispersing Al metal fuel particles at velocities approaching those expected in a detonating explosive is discussed. The technique is described in detail by quantifying how air drag affects the temporal variation of the velocity of the dispersed particle plume. The effect of particle size is incorporated by examining various poly-dispersed commercial Al powders at different dispersion velocities (390-630 m/s). The technique is finally tested within a preliminary study of particle ignition delay and burn time, where the effect of velocity is highlighted for different particle sizes. It was found that plume velocity exhibits a modified exponential temporal profile, where smaller particles are more susceptible to air drag than larger ones. Moreover, larger particles exhibit longer ignition delays and burn times than smaller ones. The velocity of a particle was found to significantly affect its ignition delay, burn time, and combustion temperature, especially for particles in the diffusion-controlled regime. Shorter ignition delays and burn times and lower temperatures were observed at higher particle velocities. The utility of this technique as a combustion screening test for future, novel fuels is discussed.

  6. Fuel oil and dispersant toxicity to the Antarctic sea urchin (Sterechinus neumayeri).

    PubMed

    Alexander, Frances J; King, Catherine K; Reichelt-Brushett, Amanda J; Harrison, Peter L

    2016-11-04

    The risk of a major marine fuel spill in Antarctic waters is increasing, yet there are currently no standard or suitable response methods under extreme Antarctic conditions. Fuel dispersants may present a possible solution; however, little data exist on the toxicity of dispersants or fuels to Antarctic species, thereby preventing informed management decisions. Larval development toxicity tests using 3 life history stages of the Antarctic sea urchin (Sterechinus neumayeri) were completed to assess the toxicity of physically dispersed, chemically dispersed, and dispersant-only water-accommodated fractions (WAFs) of an intermediate fuel oil (IFO 180, BP) and the chemical dispersant Slickgone NS (Dasic International). Despite much lower total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations, physically dispersed fuels contained higher proportions of low-to-intermediate weight carbon compounds and were generally at least an order of magnitude more toxic than chemically dispersed fuels. Based on concentrations that caused 50% abnormality (EC50) values, the embryonic unhatched blastula life stage was the least affected by fuels and dispersants, whereas the larval 4-armed pluteus stage was the most sensitive. The present study is the first to investigate the possible implications of the use of fuel dispersants for fuel spill response in Antarctica. The results indicate that the use of a fuel dispersant did not increase the hydrocarbon toxicity of IFO 180 to the early life stages of Antarctic sea urchins, relative to physical dispersal. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-9. © 2016 SETAC.

  7. Mechanical analysis of UMo/Al dispersion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Gwan Yoon; Kim, Yeon Soo; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2015-11-01

    Deformation of fuel particles and mass transfer from the transverse end of fuel meat toward the meat center was observed. This caused plate thickness peaking at a location between the meat edge and the meat center. The underlying mechanism for this fuel volume transport is believed to be fission induced creep of the U-Mo/Al meat. Fuel meat swelling was measured using optical microscopy images of the cross sections of the irradiated test plates. The time-dependent meat swelling was modeled for use in numerical simulation. A distinctive discrepancy between the predicted and measured meat thickness was found at the meat ends, which was assumed to be due to creep-induced mass relocation from the meat end to the meat center region that was not considered in the meat swelling model. ABAQUS FEA simulation was performed to reproduce the observed phenomenon at the meat ends. Through the simulation, we obtained the effective creep rate constants for the interaction layers (IL) and aluminum matrix. In addition, we obtained the corresponding stress and strain analysis results that can be used to understand mechanical behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel.

  8. Postirradiation analysis of experimental uranium-silicide dispersion fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, G.L.; Neimark, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Low-enriched uranium silicide dispersion fuel plates were irradiated to maximum burnups of 96% of /sup 235/U. Fuel plates containing 33 v/o U/sub 3/Si and U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ behaved very well up to this burnup. Plates containing 33 v/o U/sub 3/Si-Al pillowed between 90 and 96% burnup of the fissile atoms. More highly loaded U/sub 3/Si-Al plates, up to 50 v/o were found to pillow at lower burnups. Plates containing 40 v/o U/sub 3/Si showed an increase swelling rate around 85% burnup. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Thermal conductivity modeling of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Cho, Byoung Jin; Sohn, Dong-Seong; Park, Jong Man

    2015-11-01

    A dataset for the thermal conductivity of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel made available by KAERI was reanalyzed. Using this dataset, an analytical model was obtained by expanding the Bruggeman model. The newly developed model incorporates thermal resistances at the interface between the U-Mo particles and the Al matrix and the defects within the Al matrix (grain boundaries, cracks, and dislocations). The interfacial resistances are expressed as functions of U-Mo particle size and Al grain size obtained empirically by fitting to measured data from KAERI. The model was then validated against an independently measured dataset from ANL.

  10. Irradiation testing of high density uranium alloy dispersion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S.L.; Trybus, C.L.; Meyer, M.K.

    1997-10-01

    Two irradiation test vehicles have been designed, fabricated, and inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Irradiation of these experiments began in August 1997. These irradiation tests were designed to obtain irradiation performance information on a variety of potential new, high-density dispersion fuels. Each of the two irradiation vehicles contains 32 microplates. Each microplate is aluminum clad, having an aluminum matrix phase and containing one of the following compositions as the fuel phase: U-10Mo, U-8Mo, U-6Mo, U-4Mo, U-9Nb-3Zr, U-6Nb-4Zr, U-5Nb-3Zr, U-6Mo-1Pt, U-6Mo-0.6Ru, U-10Mo-0.05Sn, U{sub 2}Mo, or U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. These experiments will be discharged at peak fuel burnups of 40% and 80%. Of particular interest is the fission gas retention/swelling characteristics of these new fuel alloys. This paper presents the design of the irradiation vehicles and the irradiation conditions.

  11. Fuel injection pump of the distribution type

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmori, T.; Sumitani, S.; Tani, T.; Miyaki, M.; Masuda, A.

    1986-07-08

    A distribution type fuel injection pump is described for delivering fuel to each of the combustion chambers in an internal combustion engine consisting of: pump housing means including a pumping head in which a pumping chamber is defined; first fuel supply means for supplying fuel to the pumping chamber; fuel pressurizing means for applying pressure to the fuel in the pumping chamber; distributor means for distributing and delivering the fuel, which has been pressurized in the pumping chamber, to each of the combustion chambers in the engine; control plunger means actuated by the fuel pressure in the pumping chamber and including a control cylinder bore defined in the pumping head and a control plunger fitted into the control cylinder bore, the control cylinder bore being partitioned into a first chamber to which the fuel pressure in the pumping chamber is transmitted and which serves to apply this pressure to one end of the control plunger, and a second chamber defined by the other end of the control plunger; second fuel supply means for supplying an adjusted amount of fuel to the second chamber and including a control passage connected to the second chamber and an electromagnetic valve for opening and closing the control passage; and escaping means for allowing the fuel to escape from the second chamber when the fuel pressure in the second chamber becomes higher than a certain value.

  12. Simulation with PLACA/DPLACA of thermal and mechanical phenomena in monolithic and dispersed fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Soba, Alejandro; Denis, Alicia

    2008-07-15

    The codes PLACA and DPLACA simulate the irradiation behavior of fuels for research reactors under normal operation conditions. They represent, respectively, plate-type fuels of the monolithic and dispersed types. Both codes contain about thirty interconnected and mutually dependent models structured in a modular scheme. This characteristic gives to the codes a large versatility. To simulate U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels, where the growth of an interaction layer can provoke uncontrolled swelling, a diffusion model with two moving boundaries has been developed. It assumes that the kinetics of both layer boundaries is determined by diffusion of U and Al through the layer. The codes make possible a detailed simulation of the evolution of the more relevant physical parameters of a fuel plate during its permanence within a reactor. Both codes were applied to simulate irradiation histories for which experimental data are available. The good quality of the codes predictions reveals the correct performance of the models involved and the appropriate coupling of the ensemble. (author)

  13. Fuel cells - Fundamentals and types: Unique features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selman, J. R.

    An overview of the working principles, thermodynamic efficiencies, types, and engineering aspects of fuel cells is presented. It is noted that fuel cells are distinguished from other direct energy conversion devices by the existence of charge separation at the electrodes involving ions in an electrolyte. The electrical energy produced by a fuel cell is shown to be equal to the change in the free energy of the reactants, and thermodynamic balances of reactions in different fuel cells are provided. The production of electricity in the discharge mode involves a spontaneous reaction of overproduction of electrons at the anode and consumption of the electrons at the cathode, with the total ionic current being equal to the electronic current in the external circuit. Attention is given to the operations and problems of acid, alkaline, molten carbonate, and solid oxide fuel cells, in addition to applications of electro-organic fuel cells.

  14. Far-field dispersal modeling for fuel-air-explosive devices

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, M.W.

    1990-05-01

    A computer model for simulating the explosive dispersal of a fuel agent in the far-field regime is described and is applied to a wide variety of initial conditions to judge their effect upon the resulting fuel/air cloud. This work was directed toward modeling the dispersal process associated with Fuel-Air-Explosives devices. The far-field dispersal regime is taken to be that time after the initial burster charge detonation in which the shock forces no longer dominate the flow field and initial canister and fuel mass breakup has occurred. The model was applied to a low vapor pressure fuel, a high vapor pressure fuel and a solid fuel. A strong dependence of the final cloud characteristics upon the initial droplet size distribution was demonstrated. The predicted fuel-air clouds were highly non-uniform in concentration. 18 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. The effect of fuel type in unsaturated spent fuel tests

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.; Gong, M.; Bates, J.K.; Emery, J.W.; Hoh, J.C.

    1994-04-01

    Two well-characterized types of spent nuclear fuel (ATM-103 and ATM-106) were tested under simulated unsaturated conditions with simulated groundwater at 90{degree}C. The actinides present in the leachate were measured after periods of approximately 60, 120, and 275 days. The vessels were acid stripped after 120 and 275 days. Both colloidal and soluble actinide species were detected in the leachates which had pHs ranging from 4 to 7. Alpha spectroscopy studies of filtered and unfiltered leachates showed that large amounts of actinides may be bound in colloids. The uranium phases identified in the colloids were schoepite and soddyite. The actinide release behavior of the two fuels appears to be different. The ATM-106 fuel began to release actinides later than the ATM-103 fuel, but after 275 days, it had released more. The amount of americium released from the two fuels was a higher percentage of the maximum amount of americium present than was the percentage of the simultaneous amount of uranium released.

  16. Carbon nanotube dispersed conductive network for microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Yamanaka, K.; Ogikubo, H.; Akasaka, H.; Ohtake, N.

    2014-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are promising devices for capturing biomass energy. Although they have recently attracted considerable attention, their power densities are too low for practical use. Increasing their electrode surface area is a key factor for improving the performance of MFC. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which have excellent electrical conductivity and extremely high specific surface area, are promising materials for electrodes. However, CNTs are insoluble in aqueous solution because of their strong intertube van der Waals interactions, which make practical use of CNTs difficult. In this study, we revealed that CNTs have a strong interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. CNTs attach to the cells and are dispersed in a mixture of water and S. cerevisiae, forming a three-dimensional CNT conductive network. Compared with a conventional two-dimensional electrode, such as carbon paper, the three-dimensional conductive network has a much larger surface area. By applying this conductive network to MFCs as an anode electrode, power density is increased to 176 μW/cm2, which is approximately 25-fold higher than that in the case without CNTs addition. Maximum current density is also increased to approximately 8-fold higher. These results suggest that three-dimensional CNT conductive network contributes to improve the performance of MFC by increasing surface area.

  17. Investigation of spray dispersion and particulate formation in diesel fuel flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Bankston, C. P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Bellan, J.; Harstad, K.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study of electrostatical atomized and dispersed diesel fuel jets was conducted at various back pressures to 40 atm. A new electrostatic injection technique was utilized to generate continuous, stable fuel sprays at charge densities of 1.5 to 2.0 C/m3 of fluid at one atm, and about 1.0 C/m3 at 40 atm. Flowrates were varied from 0.5 to 2.5 ml/s and electric potentials to -18 kV. Visual observations showed that significant enhanced dispersion of charged fuel jets occurred at high back pressures compared to aerodynamic breakup and dispersion. The average drop size was about the same as the spray triode orifice diameter, and was between the Kelly theory and the Rayleigh limit. The ignition tests, done only at one atm, indicated stable combustion of the electrostatically dispersed fuel jets.

  18. Electronically controlled distributor type fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, M.; Nozaki, S.; Kobayashi, T.

    1986-05-06

    A distributor type fuel injection pump is described which consists of: a plunger barrel; a plunger received within the plunger barrel for concurrent reciprocating and rotative motion for suction, pressure delivery and distribution of fuel; a pair of cut-off ports formed in the plunger and the plunger barrel at a predetermined axial location and registrable with each other to spill pressurized fuel in the plunger into a zone under lower pressure; a communication passageway communicating a pump working chamber defined by the plunger at one end thereof with the zone under lower pressure; a fuel suction passage extending between the pump working chamber and the zone under lower pressure; the communication passageway extending between the pump working chamber and an intermediate portion of the fuel suction passage; a solenoid valve arranged across the communication passageway for blocking same; and control means for controlling means for controlling the solenoid valve to cause same to selectively assume an open position and a closed position; wherein while the plunger moves toward the pump working chamber, the solenoid valve is closed by the control means to start injection of fuel present in the pump working chamber, and upon registration of the cut-off ports with each other, the fuel injection is terminated; the solenoid valve including a valve body disposed opposite an end face of the one end of the plunger; the control means including means for selectively energizing or deenergizing the solenoid for causing the valve body to selectively assume the closed position or the open position.

  19. TEM CHARACTERIZATION OF IRRADIATED U3SI2/AL DISPERSION FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    J. Gan; B. Miller; D. Keiser; A. Robinson; P. Medvedev; D. Wachs

    2010-10-01

    The silicide dispersion fuel of U3Si2/Al has been recognized as a reasonably good performance fuel for nuclear research and test reactors except that it requires the use of high enrichment uranium. An irradiated U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel (~75% enrichment) from the high flux side of a RERTR-8 (U0R040) plate was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fuel plate was irradiated in the advanced test reactor (ATR) for 105 days. The average irradiation temperature and fission density of the fuel particles for the TEM sample are estimated to be approximately ~110 degrees C and 5.4 x 10-21 f/cm3. The characterization was performed using a 200KV TEM with a LaB6 filament. Detailed microstructural information along with composition analysis is obtained. The results and their implication on the performance of this silicide fuel are discussed.

  20. Dispersion of sound in a combustion duct by fuel droplets and soot particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Raftopoulos, D. D.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersion and attenuation of acoustic plane wave disturbances propagating in a ducted combustion system are studied. The dispersion and attenuation are caused by fuel droplet and soot emissions from a jet engine combustor. The attenuation and dispersion are due to heat transfer and mass transfer and viscous drag forces between the emissions and the ambient gas. Theoretical calculations show sound propagation at speeds below the isentropic speed of sound at low frequencies. Experimental results are in good agreement with the theory.

  1. A model to predict thermal conductivity of irradiated U–Mo dispersion fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Huber, Tanja K.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-05-01

    The Office of Materials Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program continues to develop existing and new research and test reactor fuels to achieve maximum attainable uranium loadings to support the conversion of a number of the world’s remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. The program is focused on assisting with the development and qualification of a fuel design that consists of a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix as one option for reactor conversion. Thermal conductivity is an important consideration in determining the operational temperature of the fuel and can be influenced by interaction layer formation between the dispersed phase and matrix and upon the concentration of the dispersed phase within the matrix. This paper extends the use of a simple model developed previously to study the influence of interaction layer formation as well as the size and volume fraction of fuel particles dispersed in the matrix, Si additions to the matrix, and Mo concentration in the fuel particles on the effective thermal conductivity of the U-Mo/Al composite during irradiation. The model has been compared to experimental measurements recently conducted on U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels at two different fission densities with acceptable agreement. Observations of the modeled results indicate that formation of an interaction layer and subsequent consumption of the matrix reveals a rather significant effect on effective thermal conductivity. The modeled interaction layer formation and subsequent consumption of the high thermal conductivity matrix was sensitive to the average dispersed fuel particle size, suggesting this parameter as one of the most effective in minimizing thermal conductivity degradation of the composite, while the influence of Si additions to the matrix in the model was highly dependent upon irradiation conditions.

  2. Discrete element method study of fuel relocation and dispersal during loss-of-coolant accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govers, K.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-09-01

    The fuel fragmentation, relocation and dispersal (FFRD) during LOCA transients today retain the attention of the nuclear safety community. The fine fragmentation observed at high burnup may, indeed, affect the Emergency Core Cooling System performance: accumulation of fuel debris in the cladding ballooned zone leads to a redistribution of the temperature profile, while dispersal of debris might lead to coolant blockage or to debris circulation through the primary circuit. This work presents a contribution, by discrete element method, towards a mechanistic description of the various stages of FFRD. The fuel fragments are described as a set of interacting particles, behaving as a granular medium. The model shows qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental observations, such as the packing efficiency in the balloon, which is shown to stabilize at about 55%. The model is then applied to study fuel dispersal, for which experimental parametric studies are both difficult and expensive.

  3. Swelling of U(Mo) dispersion fuel under irradiation - Non-destructive analyses of the SELENIUM plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Berghe, S.; Parthoens, Y.; Cornelis, G.; Leenaers, A.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V.; Detavernier, C.

    2013-11-01

    Extensive fuel-matrix interactions leading to plate pillowing have caused a severe impediment on the development of a suitable high density low-enriched uranium dispersion fuel for high power applications in research reactors. Surface engineering of the U(Mo) kernel surfaces, where the interaction occurs, is put forward by SCKṡCEN as a possible solution in the Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium Molybdenum fuel (SELENIUM) program. The project involved the construction of a sputter coater, the coating of U(Mo) kernels, the production of fuel plates, the irradiation and post-irradiation examination of 2 plates. The irradiation of 2 distinct (600 nm Si and 1000 nm ZrN coated) full size, flat fuel plates was performed in the BR2 reactor in 2012. The irradiation conditions were: 470 W/cm2 peak Beginning Of Life (BOL) power, with a ˜70% 235U peak burnup. The plates were successfully irradiated and did not show any pillowing at the end of the irradiation. This paper reports the results and interpretation of the non-destructive post-irradiation examinations that were performed on these fuel plates and derives a law for the fuel swelling evolution with burnup for this fuel type. It further reports additional PIE results obtained on fuel plates irradiated in campaigns in the past in order to allow a complete comparison with all results obtained under similar conditions. The fuel swelling is shown to evolve linearly with the fission density, with an increase in swelling rate around 2.5 × 1021 f/cm3, which is associated with the restructuring of the fuel. A further increase in swelling rate is observed at the highest burnups, which is discussed in this article.

  4. Atmospheric Dispersion of Hypergolic Liquid Rocket Fuels. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    3) 2. Excess Oxidant Reactions ..... .............. .. 37 C. Calctilation of Fireball Size and Quantification of Heat Flux...this hypergolic fuel-oxidizer combustion have been reported in the literature. While the identification and quantification of all such chemical...due to thermal or toxicity considerations. Dimethylnitrosamine (NDMA), for example, is an expected and confirmed product from the nitrogen tetroxide

  5. Effects of temperature and wave conditions on chemical dispersion efficacy of heavy fuel oil in an experimental flow-through wave tank.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengkai; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Boufadel, Michel C; Venosa, Albert D

    2010-09-01

    The effectiveness of chemical dispersants (Corexit 9500 and SPC 1000) on heavy fuel oil (IFO180 as test oil) has been evaluated under different wave conditions in a flow-through wave tank. The dispersant effectiveness was determined by measuring oil concentrations and droplet size distributions. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) model indicated that wave type and temperature significantly (p<0.05) affected the dynamic dispersant effectiveness (DDE). At higher temperatures (16 degrees C), the test IFO180 was effectively dispersed under breaking waves with a DDE of 90% and 50% for Corexit 9500 and SPC 1000, respectively. The dispersion was ineffective under breaking waves at lower temperature (10 degrees C), and under regular wave conditions at all temperatures (10-17 degrees C), with DDE<15%. Effective chemical dispersion was associated with formation of smaller droplets (with volumetric mean diameters or VMD < or = 200 microm), whereas ineffective dispersion produced large oil droplets (with VMD > or = 400 microm).

  6. Analysis of irradiated U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel microstructures using automated image processing

    SciTech Connect

    Collette, R.; King, J.; Buesch, C.; Keiser, Jr., D. D.; Williams, W.; Miller, B. D.; Schulthess, J.

    2016-04-01

    The High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development (HPPRFD) program is responsible for developing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel substitutes for high performance reactors fueled with highly enriched uranium (HEU) that have not yet been converted to LEU. The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel system was selected for this effort. In this study, fission gas pore segmentation was performed on U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel samples at three separate fission densities using an automated image processing interface developed in MATLAB. Pore size distributions were attained that showed both expected and unexpected fission gas behavior. In general, it proved challenging to identify any dominant trends when comparing fission bubble data across samples from different fuel plates due to varying compositions and fabrication techniques. Here, the results exhibited fair agreement with the fission density vs. porosity correlation developed by the Russian reactor conversion program.

  7. Analysis of irradiated U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel microstructures using automated image processing

    DOE PAGES

    Collette, R.; King, J.; Buesch, C.; ...

    2016-04-01

    The High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development (HPPRFD) program is responsible for developing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel substitutes for high performance reactors fueled with highly enriched uranium (HEU) that have not yet been converted to LEU. The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel system was selected for this effort. In this study, fission gas pore segmentation was performed on U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel samples at three separate fission densities using an automated image processing interface developed in MATLAB. Pore size distributions were attained that showed both expected and unexpected fission gas behavior. In general, it proved challenging to identify any dominant trends whenmore » comparing fission bubble data across samples from different fuel plates due to varying compositions and fabrication techniques. Here, the results exhibited fair agreement with the fission density vs. porosity correlation developed by the Russian reactor conversion program.« less

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL-BREEDER FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1962-08-14

    A fuel-breeder fuel element was developed for a nuclear reactor wherein discrete particles of fissionable material are dispersed in a matrix of fertile breeder material. The fuel element combines the advantages of a dispersion type and a breeder-type. (AEC)

  9. Prediction of U-Mo dispersion nuclear fuels with Al-Si alloy using artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Susmikanti, Mike; Sulistyo, Jos

    2014-09-30

    Dispersion nuclear fuels, consisting of U-Mo particles dispersed in an Al-Si matrix, are being developed as fuel for research reactors. The equilibrium relationship for a mixture component can be expressed in the phase diagram. It is important to analyze whether a mixture component is in equilibrium phase or another phase. The purpose of this research it is needed to built the model of the phase diagram, so the mixture component is in the stable or melting condition. Artificial neural network (ANN) is a modeling tool for processes involving multivariable non-linear relationships. The objective of the present work is to develop code based on artificial neural network models of system equilibrium relationship of U-Mo in Al-Si matrix. This model can be used for prediction of type of resulting mixture, and whether the point is on the equilibrium phase or in another phase region. The equilibrium model data for prediction and modeling generated from experimentally data. The artificial neural network with resilient backpropagation method was chosen to predict the dispersion of nuclear fuels U-Mo in Al-Si matrix. This developed code was built with some function in MATLAB. For simulations using ANN, the Levenberg-Marquardt method was also used for optimization. The artificial neural network is able to predict the equilibrium phase or in the phase region. The develop code based on artificial neural network models was built, for analyze equilibrium relationship of U-Mo in Al-Si matrix.

  10. Estimation of 85Kr dispersion from the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan, using an atmospheric dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Iyogi, T; Kawabata, H; Chiang, J H; Suwa, H; Hisamatsu, S

    2015-11-01

    The spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant of Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) located in Rokkasho, Japan, discharged small amounts of (85)Kr into the atmosphere during final tests of the plant with actual spent fuel from 31 March 2006 to October 2008. During this period, the gamma-ray dose rates due to discharged (85)Kr were higher than the background rates measured at the Institute for Environmental Sciences and at seven monitoring stations of the Aomori prefectural government and JNFL. The dispersion of (85)Kr was simulated by means of the fifth-generation Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model and the CG-MATHEW/ADPIC models (ver. 5.0) with a vertical terrain-following height coordinate. Although the simulated gamma-ray dose rates due to discharged (85)Kr agreed fairly well with measured rates, the agreement between the estimated monthly mean (85)Kr concentrations and the observed concentrations was poor. Improvement of the vertical flow of air may lead to better estimation of (85)Kr dispersion.

  11. Distributor-type fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Nozaki, S.

    1987-10-06

    A distributor-type fuel injection pump is described comprising: (a) a pump body including a rear portion and a head portion. The rear portion has a first bore and the head portion has a second bore extending in alignment with the first bore; (b) a drive shaft rotatably mounted in the first bore via at least two bearings; (c) a feed pump disposed in the pump body adjacent to the rear portion and connected in driven relation to the drive shaft, there being defined between the feed pump and the head portion a cam chamber; (d) a plunger slidably mounted in the second bore and defining between the second bore a pump working chamber; (e) a cam disposed in the cam chamber and connecting the drive shaft with the plunger so as to cause the latter to take rotational and reciprocating motions simultaneously, in unision with the rotation of the drive shaft; (f) a magnetic valve disposed on the head portion for opening and closing a fuel passage communicating with the pump working chamber; (g) a pair of oil seals mounted around the drive shaft and disposed on opposite sides of the feed pump; (h) the rear portion further having a first passageway communicating with the first bore between the two bearings for introducing a lubrication oil into a space defined between the first bore, the drive shaft and the bearings; (i) the drive shaft having at least one second oil passageway extending diametrically therethrough and opening at opposite ends to one of the bearings, and a third oil passageway extending axially therein and communicating the second oil passageway with the cam chamber; and (j) a bypass passage bypassing the cam chamber and communicating a discharge side of the feed pump with an inlet side of the fuel passage of the magnetic valve.

  12. Comparison of thermal compatibility between atomized and comminuted U{sub 3}Si dispersion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Woo-Seog; Park, Jong-Man; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kuk, II-Hyun

    1997-08-01

    Thermal compatibility of atomized U{sub 3}Si dispersion fuels were evaluated up to 2600 hours in the temperature range from 250 to 500{degrees}C, and compared with that of comminuted U{sub 3}Si. Atomized U{sub 3}Si showed better performance in terms of volume expansion of fuel meats. The reaction zone of U{sub 3}Si and Al occurred along the grain boundaries and deformation bands in U{sub 3}Si particles. Pores around fuel particles appeared at high temperature or after long-term annealing tests to remain diffusion paths over the trench of the pores. The constraint effects of cladding on fuel rod suppressed the fuel meat, and reduced the volume expansion.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Shock-Dispersed Fuel Charges

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus; Beckner, Vincent; Rendleman, Charles; Kuhl, Allen L.; Neuwald, P.

    2005-06-20

    Successfully attacking underground storage facilities for chemical and biological (C/B) weapons is an important mission area for the Department of Defense. The fate of a C/B agent during an attack depends critically on the pressure and thermal environment that the agent experiences. The initial environment is determined by the blast wave from an explosive device. The byproducts of the detonation provide a fuel source that burn when mixed with oxidizer (after burning). Additional energy can be released by the ignition of the C/B agent as it mixes with the explosion products and the air in the chamber. Hot plumes venting material from any openings in the chamber can provide fuel for additional energy release when mixed with additional oxidizer. Assessment of the effectiveness of current explosives as well as the development of new explosive systems requires a detailed understanding of all of these modes of energy release. Using methodologies based on the use of higher-order Godunov schemes combined with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), implemented in a parallel adaptive framework suited to the massively parallel computer systems provided by the DOD High-Performance Computing Modernization program, we use a suite of programs to develop predictive models for the simulation of the energetics of blast waves, deflagration waves and ejecta plumes. The programs use realistic reaction kinetic and thermodynamic models provided by standard components (such as CHEMKIN) as well as other novel methods to model enhanced explosive devices. The work described here focuses on the validation of these models against a series of bomb calorimetry experiments performed at the Ernst-Mach Institute. In this paper, we present three-dimensional simulations of the experiments, examining the explosion dynamics and the role of subsequent burning on the explosion products on the thermal and pressure environment within the calorimeter. The effects of burning are quantified by comparing two sets of

  14. A model to predict failure of irradiated U–Mo dispersion fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Senor, David J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous global programs are focused on the continued development of existing and new research and test reactor fuels to achieve maximum attainable uranium loadings to support the conversion of a number of the world’s remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. Some of these programs are focused on development and qualification of a fuel design that consists of a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix as one option for reactor conversion. The current paper extends a failure model originally developed for UO2-stainless steel dispersion fuels and used currently available thermal-mechanical property information for the materials of interest in the current proposed design. A number of fabrication and irradiation parameters were investigated to understand the conditions at which failure of the matrix, classified as pore formation in the matrix, might occur. The results compared well with experimental observations published as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR)-6 and -7 mini-plate experiments. Fission rate, a function of the 235U enrichment, appeared to be the most influential parameter in premature failure, mainly as a result of increased interaction layer formation and operational temperature, which coincidentally decreased the yield strength of the matrix and caused more rapid fission gas production and recoil into the surrounding matrix material. Addition of silicon to the matrix appeared effective at reducing the rate of interaction layer formation and can extend the performance of a fuel plate under a certain set of irradiation conditions, primarily moderate heat flux and burnup. Increasing the dispersed fuel particle diameter may also be effective, but only when combined with other parameters, e.g., lower enrichment and increased Si concentration. The model may serve as a valuable tool in initial experimental design.

  15. Integral fast reactor concept. [Pool type; metal fuel; integral fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Sevy, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Key features of the IFR consist of a pool-type plant arrangement, a metal fuel-based core design, and an integral fuel cycle with colocated fuel cycle facility. Both the basic concept and the technology base have been demonstrated through actual integral cycle operation in EBR-II. This paper discusses the inherent safety characteristics of the IFR concept. (DLC)

  16. Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; J. Cahalan

    2009-09-01

    Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance R. Wigeland , Idaho National Laboratory J. Cahalan, Argonne National Laboratory The sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor is currently being evaluated for the efficient transmutation of the highly-hazardous, long-lived, transuranic elements that are present in spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental choices that will be made is the selection of the fuel type for the fast reactor, whether oxide, metal, carbide, nitride, etc. It is likely that a decision on the fuel type will need to be made before many of the related technologies and facilities can be selected, from fuel fabrication to spent fuel reprocessing. A decision on fuel type should consider all impacts on the fast reactor system, including safety. Past work has demonstrated that the choice of fuel type may have a significant impact on the severity of consequences arising from accidents, especially for severe accidents of low probability. In this paper, the response of sodium-cooled fast reactors is discussed for both oxide and metal fuel types, highlighting the similarities and differences in reactor response and accident consequences. Any fast reactor facility must be designed to be able to successfully prevent, mitigate, or accommodate all consequences of potential events, including accidents. This is typically accomplished by using multiple barriers to the release of radiation, including the cladding on the fuel, the intact primary cooling system, and most visibly the reactor containment building. More recently, this has also included the use of ‘inherent safety’ concepts to reduce or eliminate the potential for serious damage in some cases. Past experience with oxide and metal fuel has demonstrated that both fuel types are suitable for use as fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, safety analyses for these two fuel types have also shown that there can be substantial differences in accident consequences due to the neutronic and

  17. Some recent observations on the radiation behavior of uranium silicide dispersion fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    Addition of B{sub 4}C burnable poison results in higher plate swelling in both U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} and U{sub 3}Si-Al dispersion fuel plates and also decreases the blister threshold temperature of these plates. Prolonged annealing of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel plates produced no blister after 696 hours at 400{degrees}C. Blister formation started between 257 hours and 327 hours at 425{degrees}C and between 115 hours and 210 hours at 450{degrees}C. Operation with breached cladding resulted in pillowing of an U{sub 3}Si-Al fuel plate due to reaction of the fuel core with coolant water. 4 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Phatak, Ramkrishna G.

    1986-01-01

    A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine, and which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

  19. Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Phatak, R.G.

    1984-08-31

    A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is disclosed which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

  20. Calculation of Design Parameters for an Equilibrium LEU Core in the NBSR using a U7Mo Dispersion Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

    2014-06-30

    A plan is being developed for the conversion of the NIST research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The LEU fuel may be a monolithic foil (LEUm) of U10Mo (10% molybdenum by weight in an alloy with uranium) or a dispersion of U7Mo in aluminum (LEUd). A previous report provided neutronic calculations for the LEUm fuel and this report presents the neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel. The neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel are compared to those previously obtained for the present HEU fuel and the proposed LEUm fuel. The results show no significant differences between the LEUm and the LEUd other than the LEUd fuel requires slightly less uranium than the LEUm fuel due to less molybdenum being present. The calculations include kinetics parameters, reactivity coefficients, reactivity worths of control elements and abnormal configurations, and power distributions under normal operation and with misloaded fuel elements.

  1. Safety evaluation report related to the evaluation of low-enriched uranium silicide-aluminum dispersion fuel for use in non-power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Low-enriched uranium silicide-aluminum dispersion plate-type fuels have been extensively researched and developed under the international program, Reduced Enrichment in Research and Test Reactors. The international effort was led by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in the United States. This evaluation is based primarily on reports issued by ANL that discuss and summarize the developmental tests and experiments, including postirradiation examinations, of both miniature and full-sized plates of prototypical fuel compositions. This evaluation concludes that plate-type fuels suitable and acceptable for use in research and test reactors can be fabricated with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al dispersion compacts with uranium densities up to 4.8 g/cm/sup 3/. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Autoignition characteristics of aircraft-type fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spadaccini, L. J.; Tevelde, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The ignition delay characteristics of Jet A, JP 4, no. 2 diesel, cetane and an experimental referee broad specification (ERBS) fuel in air at inlet temperatures up to 1000 K, pressures of 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 atm, and fuel air equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 1.0 were mapped. Ignition delay times in the range of 1 to 50 msec at freestream flow velocities ranging from 20 to 100 m/sec were obtained using a continuous flow test apparatus which permitted independent variation and evaluation of the effect of temperature, pressure, flow rate, and fuel/air ratio. The ignition delay times for all fuels tested appeared to correlate with the inverse of pressure and the inverse exponent of temperature. With the exception of pure cetane, which had the shortest ignition delay times, the differences between the fuels tested did not appear to be significant. The apparent global activation energies for the typical gas turbine fuels ranged from 38 to 40 kcal/mole, while the activation energy determined for cetane was 50 kcal/mole. In addition, the data indicate that for lean mixtures, ignition delay times decrease with increasing equivalence ratio. It was also noted that physical (apparatus dependent) phenomena, such as mixing (i.e., length and number of injection sites) and airstream cooling (due to fuel heating, vaporization and convective heat loss) can have an important effect on the ignition delay.

  3. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated UMo dispersion fuel samples

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-09-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an Al-Si matrix has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. In this paper, two irradiated samples containing 53.6 vol% U-7wt% Mo fuel particles dispersed in an Al-2wt% Si matrix were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Measurements revealed three distinct fission gas release events for the samples from 400 to 700 oC, as well as a number of minor fission gas releases below and above this temperature range. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature with exceptional agreement.

  4. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated Usbnd Mo dispersion fuel samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-09-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (Usbnd Mo) alloy dispersed in an Alsbnd Si matrix has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world's highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. In this paper, two irradiated samples containing 53.9 vol% U-7wt% Mo fuel particles dispersed in an Al-2wt% Si matrix were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Measurements revealed three distinct fission gas release events for the samples from 400 to 700 °C, as well as a number of minor fission gas releases below and above this temperature range. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature with exceptional agreement.

  5. Electromagnetically controlled distributor-type fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Levin, M.B.; Dutcher, W.R. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    With the advent of electronic controls and development of electromagnetically controlled fuel injection pumps, the cost of fuel systems using plunger-type pumps was substantially reduced. Further reduction in cost can be achieved if fewer solenoid valves are used. A new type of injection pump combining electromagnetic spill control principle with distributor-type operation is described. A review of the basic concept and operating principles is given, and test results as well as cost considerations are discussed.

  6. Rotary distributor type fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Klopfer, K.H.; Dordjevic, I.; Higgins, M.C.; Salzgeber, D.E.

    1993-07-20

    In a fuel injection pump having a pump body and distributor rotor in coaxial alignment, the pump body is described having a pumping chamber provided by an annular arrangement of pumping plunger bores with axes extending generally radially outwardly from the axis of the distributor rotor, a pumping plunger mounted in each plunger bore for reciprocation, annular cam means surrounding the annular arrangement of plunger bores for reciprocating the pumping plungers to provide alternating intake and pumping strokes thereof for respectively supplying intake charges of fuel to the pumping chamber and delivering high pressure charges of fuel from the pumping chamber for fuel injection, a distributor head with a plurality of distributor outlets, the distributor rotor being rotatably mounted in the distributor head for distributing the high pressure charges of fuel to the distributor outlets; the improvement wherein the pump body and distributor rotor have a central coaxial bore extending there through and providing a valve bore intersecting the annular arrangement of plunger bores, the pump body providing an annular valve seat around the central bore between one end thereof away from the distributor rotor and the intersection of the valve bore and annular arrangement of plunger bores, an elongated valve member mounted in the valve bore having a sealing head at one end thereof engageable with the annular valve seat and extending from the sealing head toward the other end of the central bore, a fuel supply chamber connected to the one end of the central bore for supplying fuel to the pumping chamber, valve actuating means comprising an electromagnet at the other end of the valve member from the sealing head and operable when energized to shift the valve member in one axial direction thereof to one of its the positions, and means for shifting the valve member in the opposite axial direction thereof to its other position when the electromagnet is deenergized.

  7. Assay method for MTR-type fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, R.; Shea, P.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a calculation procedure that can be used by IAEA inspectors to verify unirradiated MTR-type fuel elements. The procedure is programmable on a small programmable calculator (HP-97). The accuracy of the calculation enables the inspector to determine whether the element contains the correct number of fuel plates of the stated design. 2 refs.

  8. Effect of stress evolution on microstructural behavior in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G. Y.; Kim, Yeon Soo; Jamison, L. M.; Robinson, A. B.; Lee, K. H.; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2017-04-01

    U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel irradiated to high burnup at high power (high fission rate) exhibited microstructural changes including deformation of the fuel particles, pore growth, and rupture of the Al matrix. The driving force for these microstructural changes was meat swelling resulting from a combination of fuel particle swelling and interaction layer (IL) growth. In some cases, pore growth in the interaction layers also contributed to meat swelling. The main objective of this work was to determine the stress distribution within the fuel meat that caused these phenomena. A mechanical equilibrium between the stress generated by fuel meat swelling and the stress relieved by fission-induced creep in the meat constituents (U-Mo particles, Al matrix, and IL) was considered. Test plates with well-recorded fabrication data and irradiation conditions were used, and their post-irradiation examination (PIE) data was obtained. ABAQUS finite element analysis (FEA) was utilized to simulate the microstructural evolution of the plates. The simulation results allowed for the determination of effective stress and hydrostatic stress exerted on the meat constituents. The effects of fabrication and irradiation parameters on the stress distribution that drives microstructural evolutions, such as pore growth in the IL and Al matrix rupture, were investigated.

  9. Design of high density gamma-phase uranium alloys for LEU dispersion fuel applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, G. L.

    1998-10-19

    Uranium alloys are candidates for the fuel phase in aluminum matrix dispersion fuels requiring high uranium loading. Certain uranium alloys have been shown to have good irradiation performance at intermediate burnup. Previous studies have shown that acceptable fission gas swelling behavior and fuel-aluminum interaction is possible only if the fuel alloy can be maintained in the high temperature body-centered-cubic {gamma}-phase during fabrication and irradiation, i.e., at temperatures at which {alpha}-U is the equilibrium phase. Transition metals in Groups V through VIII are known to allow metastable retention of the gamma phase below the equilibrium isotherm. These metals have varying degrees of effectiveness in stabilizing the gamma phase. Certain alloys are metastable for very long times at the relatively low fuel temperatures seen in research reactor operation. In this paper, the existing data on the gamma stability of binary and ternary uranium alloys is analyzed. The mechanism and kinetics of decomposition of the gamma phase are assessed with the help of metal alloy theory. Alloys with the highest possible uranium content, good gamma-phase stability, and good neutronic performance are identified for further metallurgical studies and irradiation tests. Results from theory will be compared with experimentally generated data.

  10. Microstructural characterization of irradiated U-7Mo/Al-5Si dispersion fuel to high fission density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Miller, B. D.; Keiser, D. D.; Robinson, A. B.; Madden, J. W.; Medvedev, P. G.; Wachs, D. M.

    2014-11-01

    The fuel development program for research and test reactors calls for improved knowledge on the effect of microstructure on fuel performance in reactors. This paper summarizes the recent TEM microstructural characterization of an irradiated U-7Mo/Al-5Si dispersion fuel plate (R3R050) in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to 5.2 × 1021 fissions/cm3. While a large fraction of the fuel grains is decorated with large bubbles, there is no evidence showing interlinking of these bubbles at the specified fission density. The attachment of solid fission product precipitates to the bubbles is likely the result of fission product diffusion into these bubbles. The process of fission gas bubble superlattice collapse appears through bubble coalescence. The results are compared with the previous TEM work on the dispersion fuels irradiated to lower fission density from the same fuel plate.

  11. Irradiation behavior study of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel with high energy Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, B.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mo, K.; Yun, D.; Mohamed, W.; Pellin, M.; Fortner, J.; Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G. L.; Yacout, A. M.; Wiencek, T.; Van den Berghe, S.; Leenaers, A.

    2015-09-01

    Irradiation responses of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel have been investigated by irradiation with 84 MeV Xe26+ ions. Dispersion fuels fabricated with uncoated and ZrN-coated fuel particles were irradiated to various doses at ∼350 °C. The highest dose achieved was 2.9 × 1017 ions/cm2 (∼1200 displacement per atom (dpa)). Following the irradiation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments were carried out to characterize the microstructures of the irradiated samples. The post irradiation examinations (PIE) revealed that: (1) crystalline interdiffusion product (UMo)Alx developed at locations where no coating or compromised coating layer is present; (2) intact ZrN coating layers effectively blocked the interdiffusion between U-Mo and Al; (3) SEM-observable Xe bubbles distributed along grain/cell boundaries in U-Mo; and (4) gas bubble interlinkage was observed at a dose of 2.9 × 1017 ions/cm2.

  12. Some Effects of Air and Fuel Oil Temperatures on Spray Penetration and Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelalles, A G

    1930-01-01

    Presented here are experimental results obtained from a brief investigation of the appearance, penetration, and dispersion of oil sprays injected into a chamber of highly heated air at atmospheric pressure. The development of single sprays injected into a chamber containing air at room temperature and at high temperature was recorded by spray photography equipment. A comparison of spray records showed that with the air at the higher temperature, the spray assumed the appearance of thin, transparent cloud, the greatest part of which rapidly disappeared from view. With the chamber air at room temperature, a compact spray with an opaque core was obtained. Measurements of the records showed a decrease in penetration and an increase in the dispersion of the spray injected into the heated air. No ignition of the fuel injected was observed or recorded until the spray particles came in contact with the much hotter walls of the chamber about 0.3 second after the start of injection.

  13. Fire-resistant pits: Reducing the probability of accidental plutonium dispersal from fuel fires

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, D.R.

    1992-03-01

    Reductions in risk of Pu dispersal from hydrocarbon fuel fires were estimated using pool and spill fire data. Improvements in FRP temperature capabilities, on a system-independent basis, lead to the following estimated reductions in risk, using three probabilistic temperature distributions normalized to a temperature capability of 640[degree]C (the melting point of plutonium): 1OOO[degree]C - factor of 3 to 5; 11OO[degree]C - factor of 10 to 13; and 1200[degree]C - factor of 120 to 300. The above values would, of course, vary for a different normalization temperature. These values were derived to be as system-independent as possible. Incorporation of fuel fire durations or of longer time-averaging (than the two minutes employed in this study) would tend to increase these FRP improvement factors. Incorporation of propellant fires, burning metal or of combined impact/fire accidents would tend to decrease them. Further studies of fuel fire durations, particularly of a fuel fire duration model, is recommended, as is an uncertainty analysis of the temperature distributions.

  14. [Alternative type of fuel--biobutanol].

    PubMed

    Tigunova, E A; Shul'ga, S M; Blium, Ia B

    2013-01-01

    Butanol--an alternative fuel that on amid dwindling global (accessible) oil reserves can serve as a source of energy. In the industrial-scale butanol is produced by chemical synthesis, although initially butanol production was due to microbiological synthesis. For cost-efficient production, a strain of microorganisms must have over production of butanol. In the review of butanol synthesis pathway with the help of microorganisms, their regulation, the principles and techniques of increasing the productivity of the most promising strains and producer strains for industrial production.

  15. Evaluation of Annealing Treatments for Producing Si-Rich Fuel/Matrix Interaction Layers in Low-Enriched U-Mo Dispersion Fuel Plates Rolled at a Low Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Nicolas E. Woolstenhulme

    2010-06-01

    During fabrication of U-7Mo dispersion fuels, exposure to relatively high temperatures affects the final microstructure of a fuel plate before it is inserted into a reactor. One impact of this high temperature exposure is a chemical interaction that can occur between dissimilar materials. For U-7Mo dispersion fuels, the U-7Mo particles will interact to some extent with the Al or Al alloy matrix to produce interaction products. It has been observed that the final irradiation behavior of a fuel plate can depend on the amount of interaction that occurs at the U-7Mo/matrix interface during fabrication, along with the type of phases that develop at this interface. For the case where a U-7Mo dispersion fuel has a Si-containing Al alloy matrix and is rolled at around 500°C, a Si-rich interaction product has been observed to form that can potentially have a positive impact on fuel performance during irradiation. This interaction product can exhibit stable irradiation behavior and it can act as a diffusion barrier to additional U-Mo/matrix interaction during irradiation. However, for U-7Mo dispersion fuels with softer claddings that are rolled at lower temperatures (e.g., near 425°C), a significant interaction layer has not been observed to form. As a result, the bulk of any interaction layer that develops in these fuels happens during irradiation, and the layer that forms may not exhibit as stable a behavior as one that is formed during fabrication. Therefore, it may be beneficial to add a heat treatment step during the fabrication of dispersion fuel plates with softer cladding alloys that will result in the formation of a uniform, Si-rich interaction layer that is a few microns thick around the U-Mo fuel particles. This type of layer would have characteristics like the one that has been observed in dispersion fuel plates with AA6061 cladding that are fabricated at 500°C, which may exhibit increased stability during irradiation. This report discusses the result of

  16. Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier; Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A.; Koch, Wolfgang; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Brucher, Wenzel; Steyskal, Michele D.

    2008-03-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively

  17. Study on High Conversion BWR with Island Type Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Takao Kondo; Takaaki Mochida; Junichi Yamashita

    2002-07-01

    High Conversion Boiling Water Reactor (HCBWR) has been studied as one of the next generation BWRs. HCBWR can be improved by the use of Island Type Fuel to have inherently negative void coefficient. The proposed reactor concept also has the sustainability to extend LWR's period by about 180 years, and the compatibility with conventional BWR system that only substitution of fuel bundles and control rods are required. As an example case, High Conversion ABWR-II was evaluated here. (authors)

  18. Dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clobert, J.; Danchin, E.; Dhondt, A.A.; Nichols, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of species to migrate and disperse is a trait that has interested ecologists for many years. Now that so many species and ecosystems face major environmental threats from habitat fragmentation and global climate change, the ability of species to adapt to these changes by dispersing, migrating, or moving between patches of habitat can be crucial to ensuring their survival. This book provides a timely and wide-ranging overview of the study of dispersal and incorporates much of the latest research. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of dispersal at the individual, population, species and community levels are considered. The potential of new techniques and models for studying dispersal, drawn from molecular biology and demography, is also explored. Perspectives and insights are offered from the fields of evolution, conservation biology and genetics. Throughout the book, theoretical approaches are combined with empirical data, and care has been taken to include examples from as wide a range of species as possible.

  19. Preliminary investigation of uncombusted auto fuel vapor dispersion within a residential garage microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Lansari, A.; Streicher, J.J.; Huber, A.H.; Crescenti, G.H.; Zweidinger, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    Evaporative emissions from vehicles in an attached garage may represent a significant source of indoor pollution and human exposure. A pilot field study was undertaken to investigate potential in-house dispersion of evaporative emissions of uncombusted fuels from a vehicle parked inside an attached garage. In a set of experiments using sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas, the multizonal mass balance model, CONTAM88, was used to predict interzonal air flow rates and SF6 concentration distributions within the garage and house. Several experiments were included to evaluate the effect of meteorology and mechanical mixing mechanisms on the dispersion of automobile fuel vapor. Measurements indicated that approximately three percent of the garage maximum concentration was measured in a room adjacent to the garage. The model successfully predicted garage concentrations under well mixed conditions, but underpredicted the measured concentrations within various rooms of the house, in which mixing was incomplete. Multizonal mass balance models such as CONTAM88 may be useful in approximating contaminant concentrations at various locations within the house.

  20. High-temperature Chemical Compatibility of As-fabricated TRIGA Fuel and Type 304 Stainless Steel Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Eric Woolstenhulme; Kurt Terrani; Glenn A. Moore

    2012-09-01

    Chemical interaction between TRIGA fuel and Type-304 stainless steel cladding at relatively high temperatures is of interest from the point of view of understanding fuel behavior during different TRIGA reactor transient scenarios. Since TRIGA fuel comes into close contact with the cladding during irradiation, there is an opportunity for interdiffusion between the U in the fuel and the Fe in the cladding to form an interaction zone that contains U-Fe phases. Based on the equilibrium U-Fe phase diagram, a eutectic can develop at a composition between the U6Fe and UFe2 phases. This eutectic composition can become a liquid at around 725°C. From the standpoint of safe operation of TRIGA fuel, it is of interest to develop better understanding of how a phase with this composition may develop in irradiated TRIGA fuel at relatively high temperatures. One technique for investigating the development of a eutectic phase at the fuel/cladding interface is to perform out-of-pile diffusion-couple experiments at relatively high temperatures. This information is most relevant for lightly irradiated fuel that just starts to touch the cladding due to fuel swelling. Similar testing using fuel irradiated to different fission densities should be tested in a similar fashion to generate data more relevant to more heavily irradiated fuel. This report describes the results for TRIGA fuel/Type-304 stainless steel diffusion couples that were annealed for one hour at 730 and 800°C. Scanning electron microscopy with energy- and wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy was employed to characterize the fuel/cladding interface for each diffusion couple to look for evidence of any chemical interaction. Overall, negligible fuel/cladding interaction was observed for each diffusion couple.

  1. Pyrochlore-type catalysts for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    DOEpatents

    Berry, David A [Morgantown, WV; Shekhawat, Dushyant [Morgantown, WV; Haynes, Daniel [Morgantown, WV; Smith, Mark [Morgantown, WV; Spivey, James J [Baton Rouge, LA

    2012-03-13

    A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A.sub.2-w-xA'.sub.wA''.sub.xB.sub.2-y-zB'.sub.yB''.sub.zO.sub.7-.DELTA.. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H.sub.2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

  2. Amino phenol-detergent/dispersant combinations and fuels and lubricants containing same

    SciTech Connect

    Clason, D.L.; Cohen, J.M.; Pindar, J.F.

    1980-04-29

    Disclosed are combinations of amino phenols, wherein said phenols contain a substantially saturated hydrocarbon substituent of at least 10 aliphatic carbon atoms, and one or more detergent/dispersants selected from the group consisting of (I) neutral or basic metal salts of an organic sulfur acid, phenol or carboxylic acid; (II) hydrocarbyl-substituted amines wherein the hydrocarbyl substituent is substantially aliphatic and contains at least 12 carbon atoms; (III) acylated nitrogen-containing compounds having a substituent of at least 10 aliphatic carbon atoms; and (IV) nitrogen-containing condensates of a phenol, aldehyde and amino compound. Fuels and lubricants containing such combinations as additives are particularly useful in two-cycle (two-stroke) engines.

  3. Improved performance of U-Mo dispersion fuel by Si addition in Al matrix.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y S; Hofman, G L

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to collect in one publication and fit together work fragments presented in many conferences in the multi-year time span starting 2002 to the present dealing with the problem of large pore formation in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel plates first observed in 2002. Hence, this report summarizes the excerpts from papers and reports on how we interpreted the relevant results from out-of-pile and in-pile tests and how this problem was dealt with. This report also provides a refined view to explain in detail and in a quantitative manner the underlying mechanism of the role of silicon in improving the irradiation performance of U-Mo/Al.

  4. Plunger-type fuel pressure regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Koechlein, G.W.; Wizemann, W.O.; Deeds, T.D.

    1991-03-12

    This patent describes improvement in a pressure regulator for use in feeding the output of a relatively high pressure and relatively large liquid volume pump means to a point of use requiring, under some operating conditions, only a relatively small portion of the output volume of the pump means and a substantial reduction of the relatively high pressure, the pressure regulator being of the back pressure diaphragm means operated type, the pressure regulator comprising a body formed with an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber, wall means between the inlet and outlet chambers, and a valve seat formed with a conical sealing surface formed in the wall means. The improvement comprises: a throttling and sealing member in the form of a plunger, the plunger comprising a nose portion defined by a conical surface, the included angle defining the valve seat conical surface being larger than the included angle defining the nose portion conical surface, an O-ring groove formed in the nose portion, an O-ring in the O-ring groove, the shapes and sizes of the O-ring and the O-ring groove being such that the O-ring protrudes beyond the nose portion conical surface in the unsealed condition of the plunger with respect to the valve seat a relatively very small distance, the shapes and sizes of the nose portion and of the valve seat being such that portions of the nose portion contact the valve seat to form the primary seal against flow through the valve seat, and any seal formed between the O-ring and the valve seat is a secondary seal.

  5. Fuel dispersal in high-speed aircraft/soil impact scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Attaway, S.W.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine how the jet fuel contained in aircraft wing tanks disperses on impact with a soft terrain, i.e., soils, at high impact velocities. The approach used in this study is to combine experimental and numerical methods. Tests were conducted with an approximately 1/42 linear-scale mass-model of a 1/4 span section of a C-141 wing impacting a sand/clay mixture. The test results showed that within the uncertainty of the data, the percentage of incident liquid mass remaining in the crater is the same as that qualitatively described in earlier napalm bomb development studies. Namely, the percentage of fuel in the crater ranges from near zero for grazing impacts to 25%--50% for high angles of impact. To support a weapons system safety assessment (WSSA), the data from the current study have been reduced to correlations. The numerical model used in the current study is a unique coupling of a Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method with the transient dynamics finite element code PRONTO. Qualitatively, the splash, erosion, and soil compression phenomena are all numerically predicted. Quantitatively, the numerical method predicted a smaller crater cross section than was observed in the tests.

  6. FABRICATION OF TUBE TYPE FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Loeb, E.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1959-02-01

    A method of fabricating a nuclear reactor fuel element is given. It consists essentially of fixing two tubes in concentric relationship with respect to one another to provide an annulus therebetween, filling the annulus with a fissionablematerial-containing powder, compacting the powder material within the annulus and closing the ends thereof. The powder material is further compacted by swaging the inner surface of the inner tube to increase its diameter while maintaining the original size of the outer tube. This process results in reduced fabrication costs of powdered fissionable material type fuel elements and a substantial reduction in the peak core temperatures while materially enhancing the heat removal characteristics.

  7. Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Analysis of Actinides in Dissolved Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, David

    2015-10-15

    There is an urgent need for an instrument that can quickly measure the concentration of Plutonium and other Actinides mixed with Uranium in liquids containing dissolved spent fuel rods. Parallax Research, Inc. proposes to develop an x-ray spectrometer capable of measuring U, Np and Pu in dissolved nuclear fuel rod material to less than 10 ppm levels to aid in material process control for these nuclear materials. Due to system noise produced by high radioactivity, previous x-ray spectrometers were not capable of low level measurements but the system Parallax proposed has no direct path for undesired radiation to get to the detector and the detector in the proposed device is well shielded from scatter and has very low dark current. In addition, the proposed spectrometer could measure these three elements simultaneously, also measuring background positions with an energy resolution of roughly 100 eV making it possible to see a small amount of Pu that would be hidden under the tail of the U peak in energy dispersive spectrometers. Another nearly identical spectrometer could be used to target Am and Cm if necessary. The proposed spectrometer needs only a tiny sample of roughly 1 micro-liter (1 mm3) and the measurement can be done with the liquid flowing in a radiation and chemical immune quartz capillary protected by a stainless steel rod making it possible to continuously monitor the liquid or to use a capillary manifold to measure other liquid streams. Unlike other methods such as mass spectroscopy where the sample must be taken to a remote facility and might take days for turn-around, the proposed measurement should take less than an hour. This spectrometer could enable near real-time measurement of U, Pu and Np in dilute dissolved spent nuclear fuel rod streams.

  8. Simple test for toxicity of number 2 fuel oil and oil dispersants to embryos of grass shrimp, palaemonetes pugio

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, W.S.; Foss, S.S.

    1993-01-01

    A simple test, using embryos of the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio, was employed to determine the toxicity of two commercial oil dispersants (Corexit 7664 and Corexit 9527) and toxicity of the water soluble fraction of Number 2 fuel oil (WSF oil) prepared with and without the addition of the dispersants. Tests revealed P. pugio embryos were similar to previously measured life stages in their sensitivity to WSF oil prepared without dispersants. They were approximately ten times more sensitive to water soluble fractions of dispersed oil, which may have been due to the approximately ten-fold increases in total hydrocarbons measured analytically. Both temperatures and salinity of the sea water affected toxicity of WSF prepared with dispersants, the most obvious effect being earlier onset of mortalities at higher temperatures. (Copyright (c) 1993 Pergamon Press Ltd.)

  9. Irradiation behavior of the interaction product of U-Mo fuel particle dispersion in an Al matrix.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.S.; Hofman, G.

    2012-06-01

    Irradiation performance of U-Mo fuel particles dispersed in Al matrix is stable in terms of fuel swelling and is suitable for the conversion of research and test reactors from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). However, tests of the fuel at high temperatures and high burnups revealed obstacles caused by the interaction layers forming between the fuel particle and matrix. In some cases, fission gas filled pores grow and interconnect in the interdiffusion layer resulting in fuel plate failure. Postirradiation observations are made to examine the behavior of the interdiffusion layers. The interdiffusion layers show a fluid-like behavior characteristic of amorphous materials. In the amorphous interdiffusion layers, fission gas diffusivity is high and the material viscosity is low so that the fission gas pores readily form and grow. Based on the observations, a pore formation mechanism is proposed and potential remedies to suppress the pore growth are also introduced.

  10. Liquid Fuel Emulsion Jet-in-Crossflow Penetration and Dispersion Under High Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Guillermo Andres

    The current work focuses on the jet-in-crossflow penetration and dispersion behavior of water-in-oil emulsions in a high pressure environment. Both fuel injection strategies of using a water-in-oil emulsion and a jet-in-crossflow have demonstrated unique benefits in improving gas turbine performance from an emissions and efficiency standpoint. A jet-in-crossflow is very practical for use in gas turbine engines, rocket propulsion, and aircraft engines since it utilizes already available crossflow air to atomize fuel. Injecting water into a combustion chamber in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion allows for pollutant emissions reduction while reducing efficiency loses that may result from using a separate water or steam injection circuit. Dispersion effects on oil droplets are expected, therefore investigating the distribution of both oil and water droplets in the crossflow is an objective in this work. Understanding the synchronization and injection behavior of the two strategies is of key interest due to their combined benefits. A water-to-oil ratio and an ambient pressure parameter are developed for emulsion jet-in-crossflow trajectories. To this end, a total of 24 emulsion jet-in-crossflow tests were performed with varying ambient pressures of 2-8 atm and momentum flux ratios of 50, 85, and 120. Sobel edge filtering was applied to each averaged image obtained from a high speed video of each test case. Averaged and filtered images were used to resolve top and bottom edges of the trajectory in addition to the overall peak intensity up to 40 mm downstream of the injection point. An optimized correlation was established and found to differ from literature based correlations obtained under atmospheric pressure conditions. Overall it was found that additional parameters were not necessary for the top edge and peak intensity correlations, but a need for a unique emulsion bottom edge and width trajectory correlation was recognized. In addition to investigating emulsion

  11. High-Energy-Density Fuel Blending Strategies and Drop Dispersion for Fuel Cost Reduction and Soot Propensity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Harstad, K.

    1998-01-01

    The idea that low soot propensity of high-energy-density (HED) liquid sooting fuels and cost reduction of a multicomponent energetic fuel can be achieved by doping a less expensive, less sooting liquid fuel with HED is tested through numerical simulations.

  12. Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis of Fuel/Matrix Interaction Layers in Highly-Irradiated U–Mo Dispersion Fuel Plates with Al and Al–Si Alloy Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Brandon D. Miller; Jian Gan; Adam B. Robinson; Pavel Medvedev; James Madden; Dan Wachs; Mitch Meyer

    2014-04-01

    In order to investigate how the microstructure of fuel/matrix-interaction (FMI) layers change during irradiation, different U–7Mo dispersion fuel plates have been irradiated to high fission density and then characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Specifially, samples from irradiated U–7Mo dispersion fuel elements with pure Al, Al–2Si and AA4043 (~4.5 wt.%Si) matrices were SEM characterized using polished samples and samples that were prepared with a focused ion beam (FIB). Features not observable for the polished samples could be captured in SEM images taken of the FIB samples. For the Al matrix sample, a relatively large FMI layer develops, with enrichment of Xe at the FMI layer/Al matrix interface and evidence of debonding. Overall, a significant penetration of Si from the FMI layer into the U–7Mo fuel was observed for samples with Si in the Al matrix, which resulted in a change of the size (larger) and shape (round) of the fission-gas bubbles. Additionally, solid-fission-product phases were observed to nucleate and grow within these bubbles. These changes in the localized regions of the microstructure of the U–7Mo may contribute to changes observed in the macroscopic swelling of fuel plates with Al–Si matrices.

  13. Pt nanoparticle-dispersed graphene-wrapped MWNT composites as oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Aravind, S S Jyothirmayee; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2012-08-01

    Chemical and electrical synergies between graphite oxide and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) for processing graphene wrapped-MWNT hybrids has been realized by chemical vapor deposition without any chemical functionalization. Potential of the hybrid composites have been demonstrated by employing them as electrocatalyst supports in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The defects present in the polyelectrolyte, which have been wrapped over highly dispersed MWNT, act as anchoring sites for the homogeneous deposition of platinum nanoparticles. Single-cell proton exchange membrane fuel cells show that the power density of the hybrid composite-based fuel cells is higher compared to the pure catalyst-support-based fuel cells, because of enhanced electrochemical reactivity and good surface area of the nanocomposites.

  14. Surface tension of Nanofluid-type fuels containing suspended nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanvir, Saad; Qiao, Li

    2012-04-01

    The surface tension of ethanol and n-decane based nanofluid fuels containing suspended aluminum (Al), aluminum oxide (Al2O3), and boron (B) nanoparticles as well as dispersible multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were measured using the pendant drop method by solving the Young-Laplace equation. The effects of nanoparticle concentration, size and the presence of a dispersing agent (surfactant) on surface tension were determined. The results show that surface tension increases both with particle concentration (above a critical concentration) and particle size for all cases. This is because the Van der Waals force between particles at the liquid/gas interface increases surface free energy and thus increases surface tension. At low particle concentrations, however, addition of particles has little influence on surface tension because of the large distance between particles. An exception is when a surfactant was used or when (MWCNTs) was involved. For such cases, the surface tension decreases compared to the pure base fluid. The hypothesis is the polymer groups attached to (MWCNTs) and the surfactant layer between a particle and the surround fluid increases the electrostatic force between particles and thus reduce surface energy and surface tension.

  15. Thermal conductivities of U/sub 3/Si and U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al dispersion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.K.; Graves, R.S.; Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    Two high density uranium silicides are being evaluated as replacements for the research reactor fuels currently in use. Employing these compounds permits a major reduction in uranium enrichment, and tests have shown that the silicide fuels perform well under irradiation. Thermal conductivity data are required for analysis of these results and for safety calculations. The data show that silicide-Al dispersion fuels have somewhat better thermal conductivities than U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-Al dispersions, but their principal advantage is in their increased uranium content. The differences between the thermal conductivities of U/sub 3/Si and U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersions are small, but the microstructure of the dispersion was found to have a major influence on thermal conductivity. This seems to be associated with the formation of planar porosity defects during the roll bonding process, and differences as large as a factor of four (59 vs. 14 W/m . K) were noted for the samples having equal U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ contents (46 v/o).

  16. Computational sensitivity study of spray dispersion and mixing on the fuel properties in a gas turbine combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosshans, Holger; Cao, Le; Fuchs, Laszlo; Szász, Robert-Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    A swirl stabilized gas turbine burner has been simulated in order to assess the effects of the fuel properties on spray dispersion and fuel–air mixing. The properties under consideration include fuel surface tension, viscosity and density. The turbulence of the gas phase is modeled applying the methodology of large eddy simulation whereas the dispersed liquid phase is described by Lagrangian particle tracking. The exchange of mass, momentum and energy between the two phases is accounted for by two-way coupling. Bag and stripping breakup regimes are considered for secondary droplet breakup, using the Reitz–Diwakar and the Taylor analogy breakup models. Moreover, a model for droplet evaporation is included. The results reveal a high sensitivity of the spray structure to variations of all investigated parameters. In particular, a decrease in the surface tension or the fuel viscosity, or an increase in the fuel density, lead to less stable liquid structures. As a consequence, smaller droplets are generated and the overall spray surface area increases, leading to faster evaporation and mixing. Furthermore, with the trajectories of the small droplets being strongly influenced by aerodynamic forces (and less by their own inertia), the spray is more affected by the turbulent structures of the gaseous phase and the spray dispersion is enhanced.

  17. Effect of aviation fuel type and fuel injection conditions on the spray characteristics of pressure swirl and hybrid air blast fuel injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feddema, Rick

    Feddema, Rick T. M.S.M.E., Purdue University, December 2013. Effect of Aviation Fuel Type and Fuel Injection Conditions on the Spray Characteristics of Pressure Swirl and Hybrid Air Blast Fuel Injectors. Major Professor: Dr. Paul E. Sojka, School of Mechanical Engineering Spray performance of pressure swirl and hybrid air blast fuel injectors are central to combustion stability, combustor heat management, and pollutant formation in aviation gas turbine engines. Next generation aviation gas turbine engines will optimize spray atomization characteristics of the fuel injector in order to achieve engine efficiency and emissions requirements. Fuel injector spray atomization performance is affected by the type of fuel injector, fuel liquid properties, fuel injection pressure, fuel injection temperature, and ambient pressure. Performance of pressure swirl atomizer and hybrid air blast nozzle type fuel injectors are compared in this study. Aviation jet fuels, JP-8, Jet A, JP-5, and JP-10 and their effect on fuel injector performance is investigated. Fuel injector set conditions involving fuel injector pressure, fuel temperature and ambient pressure are varied in order to compare each fuel type. One objective of this thesis is to contribute spray patternation measurements to the body of existing drop size data in the literature. Fuel droplet size tends to increase with decreasing fuel injection pressure, decreasing fuel injection temperature and increasing ambient injection pressure. The differences between fuel types at particular set conditions occur due to differences in liquid properties between fuels. Liquid viscosity and surface tension are identified to be fuel-specific properties that affect the drop size of the fuel. An open aspect of current research that this paper addresses is how much the type of aviation jet fuel affects spray atomization characteristics. Conventional aviation fuel specifications are becoming more important with new interest in alternative

  18. TEM Characterization of U-7Mo/Al-2Si Dispersion Fuel Irradiated to Intermediate and High Fission Densities

    SciTech Connect

    J. Gan; D.D. Keiser, Jr.; B.D. Miller; A.B. Robinson; J-F. Jue; P.G. Medvedev; D.M. Wachs

    2012-05-01

    This paper will discuss the results of TEM analysis that was performed on two samples taken from the low flux and high flux sides of the fuel plate with U-7Mo fuel particles dispersed in U-2Si matrix. The corresponding local fission density of the fuel particles and the peak fuel plate centerline temperature between the low flux and high flux samples are 3.32 x 10{sup 27} f/m{sup 3} and 90 C, and 6.31 x 10{sup 27} f/m{sup 3} and 120 C, respectively. The results of this work showed the presence of a bubble superlattice within the U-7Mo grains that accommodated fission gases (e.g., Xe). The presence of this structure helps the U-7Mo exhibit a stable swelling behavior during irradiation. The Si-rich interaction layers that develop around the fuel particles at the U-7Mo/matrix interface during fuel plate fabrication and irradiation become amorphous during irradiation. The change in bubble distribution at the high fission density suggests that the bubble superlattice is stable as the U-7Mo matrix remains crystalline. It appears that there is a threshold Si content in the fuel particle above which the U-Mo turns to amorphous under irradiation. The threshold Si content is approximately 8 at.% and 4 at.% for low flux and high flux condition, respectively.

  19. Relative neutronic performance of proposed high-density dispersion fuels in water-moderated and D{sub 2}O-reflected research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bretscher, M.M.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1996-12-01

    This paper provides an overview of the neutronic performance of an idealized research reactor using several high density LEU fuels that are being developed by the RERTR program. High-density LEU dispersion fuels are needed for new and existing high-performance research reactors and to extend the lifetime of fuel elements in other research reactors. This paper discusses the anticipated neutronic behavior of proposed advanced fuels containing dispersions of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, UN, U{sub 2}Mo and several uranium alloys with Mo, or Zr and Nb. These advanced fuels are ranked based on the results of equilibrium depletion calculations for a simplified reactor model having a small H{sub 2}O-cooled core and a D{sub 2}O reflector. Plans have been developed to fabricate and irradiate several uranium alloy dispersion fuels in order to test their stability and compatibility with the matrix material and to establish practical loading limits.

  20. Fuel swelling and interaction layer formation in the SELENIUM Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) dispersion fuel plates irradiated at high power in BR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V.; Detavernier, C.

    2015-03-01

    In the framework of the SELENIUM project two full size flat fuel plates were produced with respectively Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) particles and irradiated in the BR2 reactor at SCK•CEN. Non-destructive analysis of the plates showed that the fuel swelling profiles of both SELENIUM plates were very similar to each other and none of the plates showed signs of pillowing or excessive swelling at the end of irradiation at the highest power position (local maximum 70% 235U). The microstructural analysis showed that the Si coated fuel has less interaction phase formation at low burn-up but at the highest burn-ups, defects start to develop on the IL-matrix interface. The ZrN coated fuel, shows a virtual absence of reaction between the U(Mo) and the Al, up to high fission densities after which the interaction layer formation starts and defects develop in the matrix near the U(Mo) particles. It was found and is confirmed by the SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium-Molybdenum) experiment that there are two phenomena at play that need to be controlled: the formation of an interaction layer and swelling of the fuel. As the interaction layer formation occurs at the U(Mo)-matrix interface, applying a diffusion barrier (coating) at that interface should prevent the interaction between U(Mo) and the matrix. The U(Mo) swelling, observed to proceed at an accelerating rate with respect to fission density accumulation, is governed by linear solid state swelling and fission gas bubble swelling due to recrystallization of the fuel. The examination of the SELENIUM fuel plates clearly show that for the U(Mo) dispersion fuel to be qualified, the swelling rate at high burn-up needs to be reduced.

  1. First Results of Scanning Thermal Diffusivity Microscope (STDM) Measurements on Irradiated Monolithic and Dispersion Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    T. K. Huber; M. K. Figg; J. R. Kennedy; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

    2012-07-01

    The thermal conductivity of the fuel material in a reactor before and during irradiation is a sensitive and fundamental parameter for thermal hydraulic calculations that are useds to correctly determine fuel heat fluxes and meat temperatures and to simulate performance of the fuel elements during operation. Several techniques have been developed to measure the thermal properties of fresh fuel to support these calculations, but it is crucial to also investigate the change of thermal properties during irradiation.

  2. The DART dispersion analysis research tool: A mechanistic model for predicting fission-product-induced swelling of aluminum dispersion fuels. User`s guide for mainframe, workstation, and personal computer applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, J.

    1995-08-01

    This report describes the primary physical models that form the basis of the DART mechanistic computer model for calculating fission-product-induced swelling of aluminum dispersion fuels; the calculated results are compared with test data. In addition, DART calculates irradiation-induced changes in the thermal conductivity of the dispersion fuel, as well as fuel restructuring due to aluminum fuel reaction, amorphization, and recrystallization. Input instructions for execution on mainframe, workstation, and personal computers are provided, as is a description of DART output. The theory of fission gas behavior and its effect on fuel swelling is discussed. The behavior of these fission products in both crystalline and amorphous fuel and in the presence of irradiation-induced recrystallization and crystalline-to-amorphous-phase change phenomena is presented, as are models for these irradiation-induced processes.

  3. Effects of Irradiation on the Microstructure of U-7Mo Dispersion Fuel with Al-2Si Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Adam B. Robinson; Pavel Medvedev; Jian Gan; Brandon D. Miller; Daniel M. Wachs; Glenn A. Moore; Curtis R. Clark; Mitchell K. Meyer; M. Ross Finlay

    2012-06-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor program is developing low-enriched uranium U-Mo dispersion fuels for application in research and test reactors around the world. As part of this development, fuel plates have been irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor and then characterized using optical metallography (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the as-irradiated microstructure. To demonstrate the irradiation performance of U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates with 2 wt% Si added to the matrix, fuel plates were tested to medium burnups at intermediate fission rates as part of the RERTR-6 experiment. Further testing was performed to higher fission rates as part of the RERTR-7A experiment, and very aggressive testing (high temperature, high fission density, high fission rate) was performed in the RERTR-9A, RERTR-9B and AFIP-1 experiments. As-irradiated microstructures were compared to those observed after fabrication to determine the effects of irradiation on the microstructure. Based on comparison of the microstructural characterization results for each irradiated sample, some general conclusions can be drawn about how the microstructure evolves during irradiation: there is growth of the fuel/matrix interaction layer (FMI), which was present in the samples to some degree after fabrication, during irradiation; Si diffuses from the FMI layer to deeper depths in the U-7Mo particles as the irradiation conditions are made more aggressive; lowering of the Si content in the FMI layer results in an increase in the size of the fission gas bubbles; as the FMI layer grows during irradiation more Si diffuses from the matrix to the FMI layer/matrix interface, and interlinking of fission gas bubbles in the fuel plate microstructure that may indicate breakaway swelling is not observed.

  4. 14 CFR 26.37 - Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability. 26.37 Section 26.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AIRPLANES Fuel Tank Flammability § 26.37 Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability....

  5. 14 CFR 26.37 - Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability. 26.37 Section 26.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AIRPLANES Fuel Tank Flammability § 26.37 Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability....

  6. 14 CFR 26.35 - Changes to type certificates affecting fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Changes to type certificates affecting fuel..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CONTINUED AIRWORTHINESS AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS FOR TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Fuel Tank Flammability § 26.35 Changes to type certificates affecting fuel tank flammability....

  7. Swelling of U-7Mo/Al-Si dispersion fuel plates under irradiation - Non-destructive analysis of the AFIP-1 fuel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachs, D. M.; Robinson, A. B.; Rice, F. J.; Kraft, N. C.; Taylor, S. C.; Lillo, M.; Woolstenhulme, N.; Roth, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    Extensive fuel-matrix interactions leading to plate pillowing have proven to be a significant impediment to the development of a suitable high density low-enriched uranium molybdenum alloy (U-Mo) based dispersion fuel for high power applications in research reactors. The addition of silicon to the aluminum matrix was previously demonstrated to reduce interaction layer growth in mini-plate experiments. The AFIP-1 project involved the irradiation, in-canal examination, and post-irradiation examination of two fuel plates. The irradiation of two distinct full size, flat fuel plates (one using an Al-2wt%Si matrix and the other an Al-4043 (∼4.8 wt% Si) matrix) was performed in the INL ATR reactor in 2008-2009. The irradiation conditions were: ∼250 W/cm2 peak Beginning Of Life (BOL) power, with a ∼3.5e21 f/cm3 peak burnup. The plates were successfully irradiated and did not show any pillowing at the end of the irradiation. This paper reports the results and interpretation of the in-canal and post-irradiation non-destructive examinations that were performed on these fuel plates. It further compares additional PIE results obtained on fuel plates irradiated in contemporary campaigns in order to allow a complete comparison with all results obtained under similar conditions. Except for a brief indication of accelerated swelling early in the irradiation of the Al-2Si plate, the fuel swelling is shown to evolve linearly with the fission density through the maximum burnup.

  8. Drum dispersion equation for Littrow-type prism spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Sidran, M; Stalzer, H J; Hauptman, M H

    1966-07-01

    A simple analytic procedure has been developed for calibrating the wavelength drum of a Littrow-type prism spectrometer. Only three measured drum readings are required to specify the drum calibration over a broad wavelength range (uv to ir) with an accuracy of the order of the instrumental accuracy. This procedure can be applied to different prism materials for which measurements of refractive index have been performed. It is based on an approximate expression, derived from geometrical optics, relating the drum reading D(lambda) to the calculated refractive index n(lambda): D= A - B(a(2) - n(2))((1/2)). The index n(lambda) is calculated from the appropriate parametric equation. The temperature for the n(lambda) values need not be exactly that of the prism temperature during measurements. This expression was investigated for wavelengths in the range 0.3 micro to 2.25 micro using a sodium chloride prism. Computed drum positions D agreed with measured drum positions to within experimental error. Unknown wavelengths were computed from their measured drum positions to within the accuracy of the measurements.

  9. Accounting for the dispersion in the x ray properties of early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1990-01-01

    The x ray luminosities of early-type galaxies are correlated with their optical (e.g., blue) luminosities (L sub X approx. L sub B exp 1.6), but the x ray luminosities exhibit considerable scatter for a given optical luminosity L sub B. This dispersion in x ray luminosity is much greater than the dispersion of other properties of early-type galaxies (for a given L sub B), such as luminosity scale-length, velocity dispersion, color, and metallicity. Here, researchers consider several possible sources for the dispersion in x ray luminosity. Some of the scatter in x ray luminosity may result from stellar population variations between galaxies with similar L sub B. Since the x ray emitting gas is from accumulated stellar mass loss, the L sub X dispersion may be due to variations in integrated stellar mass loss rates. Another possible cause of the L sub X dispersion may be variations in the amount of cool material in the galaxies; cool gas may act as an energy sink for the hot gas. Infrared emission may be used to trace such cool material, so researchers look for a correlation between the infrared emission and the x ray emission of early-type galaxies at fixed L sub B. Velocity dispersion variations between galaxies of similar L sub B may also contribute to the L sub X dispersion. The most likely a priori source of the dispersion in L sub X is probably the varying amount of ram-pressure stripping in a range of galaxy environments. The hot gaseous halos of early-type galaxies can be stripped in encounters with other galaxies or with ambient cluster gas if the intracluster gas is sufficiently dense. Researchers find that the most likely cause of dispersion in the x ray properties of early type galaxies is probably the ram-pressure stripping of gaseous halos from galaxies. For a sample of 81 early-type galaxies with x ray luminosities or upper limits derived from Einstein Observatory observations (CFT) researchers calculated the cumulative distribution of angular distances

  10. Alternative diesel fuel study on four different types of vegetable oils of Turkish origin

    SciTech Connect

    Oezaktas, T.; Cigizoglu, K.B.; Karaosmanoglu, F.

    1997-02-01

    Four different types of vegetable oils of Turkish origin (sunflower, corn, soybean, and olive oil) were blended with grade 2-D diesel fuel at a ratio of 20/80 (v/v). Blends were investigated in a diesel engine with a precombustion chamber at speeds between 1,200 and 2,100 rpm. Vegetable oils, diesel fuel, and fuel blends were characterized according to standard test methods. It was found that for short-term use, the fuel blends have engine characteristics similar to the baseline diesel fuel. Fuel blends also display less smoke emissions than diesel fuel.

  11. Experimental observation of different soliton types in a net-normal group-dispersion fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhongyao; Rong, Qiangzhou; Qiao, Xueguang; Shao, Zhihua; Su, Dan

    2014-09-20

    Different soliton types are observed in a net-normal group-dispersion fiber laser based on nonlinear polarization rotation for passive mode locking. The proposed laser can deliver a dispersion-managed soliton, typical dissipation solitons, and a quasi-harmonic mode-locked pulse, a soliton bundle, and especially a dark pulse by only appropriately adjusting the linear cavity phase delay bias using one polarization controller at the fixed pump power. These nonlinear waves show different features, including the spectral shapes and time traces. The experimental observations show that the five soliton types could exist in the same laser cavity, which implies that integrable systems, dissipative systems, and dark pulse regimes can transfer and be switched in a passively mode-locked laser. Our studies not only verify the numeral simulation of the different soliton-types formation in a net-normal group-dispersion operation but also provide insight into Ginzburg-Landau equation systems.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of the fission gas bubble superlattice in irradiated U-7 wt%Mo dispersion fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B. D.; Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Robinson, A. B.; Jue, J. F.; Madden, J. W.; Medvedev, P. G.

    2015-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy characterization of irradiated U-7 wt%Mo dispersion fuel were performed on various U-Mo fuel samples to understand the effect of irradiation parameters (fission density, fission rate, and temperature) on the self-organized fission-gas-bubble superlattice that forms in the irradiated U-Mo fuel. The bubble superlattice was seen to form a face centered cubic structure coherent with the host U-7 wt%Mo body-centered cubic structure. At a fission density between 3.0 and 4.5 × 1021 fiss/cm3, the superlattice bubbles appear to have reached a saturation size with additional fission gas associated with increasing burnup predominately accumulating along grain boundaries. At a fission density of ∼4.5 × 1021 fiss/cm3, the U-7 wt%Mo microstructure starts to undergo grain subdivision and can no longer support the ordered bubble superlattice. The sub-divided fuel grains are less than 500 nm in diameter with what appears to be micron-size fission-gas bubbles present on the grain boundaries. Solid fission products typically decorate the inside surface of the micron-sized fission-gas bubbles. Residual superlattice bubbles are seen in areas where fuel grains remain micron sized. Potential mechanisms of the formation and collapse of the bubble superlattice are discussed.

  13. FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION FOR STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF U7MO DISPERSION FUEL PLATES VIA FLUID-THERMAL-STRUCTURAL INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hakan Ozaltun; Herman Shen; Pavel Madvedev

    2010-11-01

    This article presents numerical simulation of dispersion fuel mini plates via fluid–thermal–structural interaction performed by commercial finite element solver COMSOL Multiphysics to identify initial mechanical response under actual operating conditions. Since fuel particles are dispersed in Aluminum matrix, and temperatures during the fabrication process reach to the melting temperature of the Aluminum matrix, stress/strain characteristics of the domain cannot be reproduced by using simplified models and assumptions. Therefore, fabrication induced stresses were considered and simulated via image based modeling techniques with the consideration of the high temperature material data. In order to identify the residuals over the U7Mo particles and the Aluminum matrix, a representative SEM image was employed to construct a microstructure based thermo-elasto-plastic FE model. Once residuals and plastic strains were identified in micro-scale, solution was used as initial condition for subsequent multiphysics simulations at the continuum level. Furthermore, since solid, thermal and fluid properties are temperature dependent and temperature field is a function of the velocity field of the coolant, coupled multiphysics simulations were considered. First, velocity and pressure fields of the coolant were computed via fluidstructural interaction. Computed solution for velocity fields were used to identify the temperature distribution on the coolant and on the fuel plate via fluid-thermal interaction. Finally, temperature fields and residual stresses were used to obtain the stress field of the plates via fluid-thermal-structural interaction.

  14. Dispersant Effectiveness Of Heavy Fuel Oils Using The Baffled Flask Test

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dispersants have been widely used as a primary response measure for marine oil spills around the world. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed an improved laboratory dispersant testing protocol, called the Baffled Flask Test (BFT). The BFT protocol w...

  15. Fuel injection system electromagnetic-valve controlled type

    SciTech Connect

    Oshizawa, H.; Ishikawa, M.

    1989-01-31

    A fuel injection system for an engine is described including: (a) a fuel injection pump having a pump housing, a plunger associated with the pump housing and reciprocatively movable in relation to rotation of a crankshaft of the engine, and a fuel pressurizing chamber associated with the pump housing and variable in volume in response to reciprocative movement of the plunger; (b) supply passage means supplying fuel to the fuel pressurizing chamber, the supply passage means being closed substantially during a forward stroke of the plunger and being opened substantially during a backward stroke of the plunger; (c) forcible-delivery passage means connecting the fuel pressurizing chamber to at least one fuel injection nozzle of the engine; (d) release passage means communicating with the fuel pressurizing chamber.

  16. Impact of dispersed fuel oil on cardiac mitochondrial function in polar cod Boreogadus saida.

    PubMed

    Dussauze, Matthieu; Camus, Lionel; Le Floch, Stéphane; Pichavant-Rafini, Karine; Geraudie, Perrine; Coquillé, Nathalie; Amérand, Aline; Lemaire, Philippe; Theron, Michael

    2014-12-01

    In this study, impact of dispersed oil on cardiac mitochondrial function was assessed in a key species of Arctic marine ecosystem, the polar cod Boreogadus saida. Mature polar cod were exposed during 48 h to dispersed oil (mechanically and chemically) and dispersants alone. The increase observed in ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites in bile indicated no difference in contamination level between fish exposed to chemical or mechanical dispersion of oil. Oil induced alterations of O2 consumption of permeabilised cardiac fibres showing inhibitions of complexes I and IV of the respiratory chain. Oil did not induce any modification of mitochondrial proton leak. Dispersants did not induce alteration of mitochondrial activity and did not increase oil toxicity. These data suggest that oil exposure may limit the fitness of polar cod and consequently could lead to major disruption in the energy flow of polar ecosystem.

  17. Estimating canopy fuel parameters for Atlantic Coastal Plain forest types.

    SciTech Connect

    Parresol, Bernard, R.

    2007-01-15

    Abstract It is necessary to quantify forest canopy characteristics to assess crown fire hazard, prioritize treatment areas, and design treatments to reduce crown fire potential. A number of fire behavior models such as FARSITE, FIRETEC, and NEXUS require as input four particular canopy fuel parameters: 1) canopy cover, 2) stand height, 3) crown base height, and 4) canopy bulk density. These canopy characteristics must be mapped across the landscape at high spatial resolution to accurately simulate crown fire. Currently no models exist to forecast these four canopy parameters for forests of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, a region that supports millions of acres of loblolly, longleaf, and slash pine forests as well as pine-broadleaf forests and mixed species broadleaf forests. Many forest cover types are recognized, too many to efficiently model. For expediency, forests of the Savannah River Site are categorized as belonging to 1 of 7 broad forest type groups, based on composition: 1) loblolly pine, 2) longleaf pine, 3) slash pine, 4) pine-hardwood, 5) hardwood-pine, 6) hardwoods, and 7) cypress-tupelo. These 7 broad forest types typify forests of the Atlantic Coastal Plain region, from Maryland to Florida.

  18. Effect of palladium dispersion on the capture of toxic components from fuel gas by palladium-alumina sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Baltrus, John P.; Granite, Evan J.; Rupp, Erik C.; Stanko, Dennis C.; Howard, Bret; Pennline, Henry W.

    2011-05-01

    The dispersion and location of Pd in alumina-supported sorbents prepared by different methods was found to influence the performance of the sorbents in the removal of mercury, arsine, and hydrogen selenide from a simulated fuel gas. When Pd is well dispersed in the pores of the support, contact interaction with the support is maximized, Pd is less susceptible to poisoning by sulfur, and the sorbent has better long-term activity for adsorption of arsine and hydrogen selenide, but poorer adsorption capacity for Hg. As the contact interaction between Pd and the support is lessened the Pd becomes more susceptible to poisoning by sulfur, resulting in higher capacity for Hg, but poorer long-term performance for adsorption of arsenic and selenium.

  19. Effect of palladium dispersion on the capture of toxic components from fuel gas by palladium-alumina sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Baltrus, J.P.; Granite, E.J.; Rupp, E.C.; Stanko, D.C.; Howard, B.; Pennline, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    The dispersion and location of Pd in alumina-supported sorbents prepared by different methods was found to influence the performance of the sorbents in the removal of mercury, arsine, and hydrogen selenide from a simulated fuel gas. When Pd is well dispersed in the pores of the support, contact interaction with the support is maximized, Pd is less susceptible to poisoning by sulfur. and the sorbent has better long-term activity for adsorption of arsine and hydrogen selenide. but poorer adsorption capacity for Hg. As the contact interaction between Pd and the support is lessened the Pd becomes more susceptible to poisoning by sulfur. resulting in higher capacity for Hg, but poorer long-term performance for adsorption of arsenic and selenium.

  20. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of the fission gas bubble superlattice in irradiated U-7wt% Mo dispersion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Miller; J. Gan; D.D. Keiser Jr.; A.B. Robinson; J.-F. Jue; J.W. Madden; P.G. Medvedev

    2015-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy characterization of irradiated U-7wt% Mo dispersion fuel was performed on various samples to understand the effect of irradiation parameters (fission density, fission rate, and temperature) on the self-organized fission-gas-bubble superlattice that forms in the irradiated U-Mo fuel. The bubble superlattice was seen to form a face-centered cubic structure coherent with the host U-7wt% Mo body centered cubic structure. At a fission density between 3.0 and 4.5 x 1021 fiss/cm3, the superlattice bubbles appear to have reached a saturation size with additional fission gas associated with increasing burnup predominately accumulating along grain boundaries. At a fission density of ~4.5x1021 fiss/cm3, the U-7wt% Mo microstructure undergoes grain subdivision and can no longer support the ordered bubble superlattice. The fuel grains are primarily less than 500 nm in diameter with micron-size fission-gas bubbles present on the grain boundaries. Solid fission products decorate the inside surface of the micron-sized fission-gas bubbles. Residual superlattice bubbles are seen in areas where fuel grains remain micron sized. Potential mechanisms of the formation and collapse of the bubble superlattice are discussed.

  1. A NMR-Based Carbon-Type Analysis of Diesel Fuel Blends From Various Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.

    2013-05-10

    In collaboration with participants of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Advanced Vehicle/Fuels/Lubricants (AVFL) Committee, and project AVFL-19, the characteristics of fuels from advanced and renewable sources were compared to commercial diesel fuels. The main objective of this study was to highlight similarities and differences among the fuel types, i.e. ULSD, renewables, and alternative fuels, and among fuels within the different fuel types. This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of 14 diesel fuel samples. The diesel fuel samples come from diverse sources and include four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels (ULSD), one gas-to-liquid diesel fuel (GTL), six renewable diesel fuels (RD), two shale oil-derived diesel fuels, and one oil sands-derived diesel fuel. Overall, the fuels examined fall into two groups. The two shale oil-derived samples and the oil-sand-derived sample closely resemble the four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesels, with SO1 and SO2 most closely matched with ULSD1, ULSD2, and ULSD4, and OS1 most closely matched with ULSD3. As might be expected, the renewable diesel fuels, with the exception of RD3, do not resemble the ULSD fuels because of their very low aromatic content, but more closely resemble the gas-to-liquid sample (GTL) in this respect. RD3 is significantly different from the other renewable diesel fuels in that the aromatic content more closely resembles the ULSD fuels. Fused-ring aromatics are readily observable in the ULSD, SO, and OS samples, as well as RD3, and are noticeably absent in the remaining RD and GTL fuels. Finally, ULSD3 differs from the other ULSD fuels by having a significantly lower aromatic carbon content and higher cycloparaffinic carbon content. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information regarding the various diesel fuels, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of NMR

  2. In-pile test results of U-silicide or U-nitride coated U-7Mo particle dispersion fuel in Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Park, J. M.; Lee, K. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Ryu, H. J.; Ye, B.

    2014-11-01

    U-silicide or U-nitride coated U-Mo particle dispersion fuel in Al (U-Mo/Al) was in-pile tested to examine the effectiveness of the coating as a diffusion barrier between the U-7Mo fuel kernels and Al matrix. This paper reports the PIE data and analyses focusing on the effectiveness of the coating in terms of interaction layer (IL) growth and general fuel performance. The U-silicide coating showed considerable success, but it also provided evidence for additional improvement for coating process. The U-nitride coated specimen showed largely inefficient results in reducing IL growth. From the test, important observations were also made that can be utilized to improve U-Mo/Al fuel performance. The heating process for coating turned out to be beneficial to suppress fuel swelling. The use of larger fuel particles confirmed favorable effects on fuel performance.

  3. Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : technical review and analysis supplement.

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2009-07-01

    This project seeks to provide vital data required to assess the consequences of a terrorist attack on a spent fuel transportation cask. One such attack scenario involves the use of conical shaped charges (CSC), which are capable of damaging a spent fuel transportation cask. In the event of such an attack, the amount of radioactivity that may be released as respirable aerosols is not known with great certainty. Research to date has focused on measuring the aerosol release from single short surrogate fuel rodlets subjected to attack by a small CSC device in various aerosol chamber designs. The last series of three experiments tested surrogate fuel rodlets made with depleted uranium oxide ceramic pellets in a specially designed double chamber aerosol containment apparatus. This robust testing apparatus was designed to prevent any radioactive release and allow high level radioactive waste disposal of the entire apparatus following testing of actual spent fuel rodlets as proposed. DOE and Sandia reviews of the project to date identified a number of issues. The purpose of this supplemental report is to address and document the DOE review comments and to resolve the issues identified in the Sandia technical review.

  4. Method and device for fabricating dispersion fuel comprising fission product collection spaces

    DOEpatents

    Shaber, Eric L; Fielding, Randall S

    2015-05-05

    A method of fabricating a nuclear fuel comprising a fissile material, one or more hollow microballoons, a phenolic resin, and metal matrix. The fissile material, phenolic resin and the one or more hollow microballoons are combined. The combined fissile material, phenolic resin and the hollow microballoons are heated sufficiently to form at least some fissile material carbides creating a nuclear fuel particle. The resulting nuclear fuel particle comprises one or more fission product collection spaces. In a preferred embodiment, the fissile material, phenolic resin and the one or more hollow microballoons are combined by forming the fissile material into microspheres. The fissile material microspheres are then overcoated with the phenolic resin and microballoon. In another preferred embodiment, the fissile material, phenolic resin and the one or more hollow microballoons are combined by overcoating the microballoon with the fissile material, and phenolic resin.

  5. 27 CFR 19.685 - Change in type of alcohol fuel plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Change in type of alcohol fuel plant. 19.685 Section 19.685 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Changes to Permit Information § 19.685 Change in type of alcohol fuel plant. (a) Small plants. If...

  6. Preparation of O/I1-type Emulsions and S/I1-type Dispersions Encapsulating UV-Absorbing Agents.

    PubMed

    Aramaki, Kenji; Kimura, Minami; Masuda, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    Oil-in-cubic phase (O/I1) emulsions encapsulating the cosmetic UV absorbing agents 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC), 2-ethylhexyl 2-cyano-3,3-diphenylacrylate (octocrylene, OCR) and 1-(4-tertbutylphenyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanedione (Avobenzone, TBMP) were prepared by vortex mixing accompanied by a heating-cooling process. A ternary phase diagram in a water/C12EO25/EHMC system at 25°C was constructed and the two-phase equilibrium of an oil phase and an I1 phase, which is necessary to prepare the O/I1-type emulsions, was confirmed. Also, the melting of the I1 phase into a fluid micellar solution phase was confirmed, allowing emulsification by a heating-cooling process. The O/I1-type emulsions were formulated in the ternary system as well as a quaternary system. The four-component system contained an additional cosolvent, isopropyl myristate (IPM). The use of the cosolvent allows the use of reduced amounts of EHMC, which is desirable because EHMC can cause temporary skin irritation. Formulation of the O/I1-type emulsions with other UV absorbing agents (OCR and TBMP) was also possible using the same emulsification method. When IPM was changed to tripalmitin, which has a melting point greater than room temperature, a solid-oil dispersion in I1 phase was formed. We have termed this a "solidin-cubic phase (S/I1) type dispersion". These novel emulsions have not been reported previously. The UV absorbability of the O/I1-type emulsions and S/I1-type dispersions that encapsulate the UV absorbing agents was confirmed by measurement of UV absorption spectra.

  7. Distributor-type fuel injection pump with preliminary injection control device

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, S.; Ishibashi, T.

    1987-01-13

    A distributor-type fuel injection pump is described for an internal combustion engine having at least one cylinder, the fuel injection pump comprising: (a) a housing having a fuel chamber defined therein; (b) fuel supply means for supplying fuel to the fuel chamber under pressure dependent upon engine r.p.m.; (c) a barrel mounted within the housing and having a distribution hole communicating with the engine cylinder; (d) a plunger mounted within the barrel for axial and rotary motion therein and defining jointly with the barrel a pump working chamber communicating with the fuel chamber. The plunger has a main discharge port communicating at one end with the pump working chamber and alignable with the distribution hole for effecting a main fuel injection, and a preliminary discharge port communicating with the pump working chamber and alignable with the distribution hole before the alignment of the main discharge port with the distribution hole, thereby effecting a preliminary fuel injection before the main injection; and (e) means operatively connected with the plunger and actuatable in response to pressure within the fuel chamber, for controlling fuel injection timing. The control means includes a first means, actuatable in response to the pressure within the fuel chamber, for effecting the preliminary fuel injection when the pressure within the fuel chamber is at less than a predetermined value, and a second means, actuatable in response to the pressure within the fuel chamber, for preventing the preliminary fuel injection when the pressure within the fuel chamber is above the predetermined value.

  8. DESIGN OF HYDROGEN-OXYGEN CAPILLARY TYPE FUEL CELL.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    started during the last quarter was delayed for this reason also. The work performed in volved the following: Automatic start-up of the fuel cell package...continued calibration and testing of absolute pressure regulators, testing of solenoid valves and the check out and instal lation of a fuel cell package in a KC 135 air craft for a zero-G flight test. (Author)

  9. Interaction Layer Characteristics in U-xMo Dispersion/Monolithic Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Porter

    2010-11-01

    Published data concerning the interaction layer (IL) formed between U-xMo fuel alloy and aluminum (Al)-based matrix or cladding materials was reviewed, including the effects of silicon (Si) content in the matrix/cladding, molybdenum (Mo) content in the fuel, pre irradiation thermal treatments, irradiation, and test temperature. The review revealed that tests conducted in the laboratory produce results different from those conducted in an irradiation environment. However, the laboratory testing relates well to thermal treatments performed prior to irradiation and helps in understanding the effects that these pre irradiation treatments have on in reactor performance. A pre-formed, Si-enriched IL seems to be important in delaying the onset of rapid growth of fission gas bubbles at low irradaiiation temperatures. Several other conclusions can be drawn: 1. An IL with phases akin to UAl3 is desired for optimum fuel performance, but at low temperatures, and especially in an irradiation atmosphere, the desired (Al+Si)/(U+Mo) ratio of three is difficult to produce. When the fuel operating temperature is low, it is important to create a pre-irradiation IL, enriched in Si. This pre-formed IL is relatively stable, performs well in terms of swelling resistance, and prevents rapid IL growth during irradiation. 2. At higher operating temperatures (>150–170°C), IL formation in reactor may not be so dependent on pre-irradiation IL formation, especially at high burnup; a pre-fabricated IL seems to be less stable at high burnup and high operating temperature. Moreover, the (Al+SI)/(U+Mo) ratio of three occurs more often at higher temperature. For these two reasons, it is important at high operating temperature to also have a matrix with significant Si content to create an IL in reactor with the right characteristics. 3. Out-of-reactor testing seems to indicate that Si in the matrix material is required in some concentration (2%, 5%, ?) to provide for a thin, Si-enriched IL formed

  10. Combustion Enhancement of Liquid Fuels via Nanoparticle Additions: Screening, Dispersion, and Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-04

    affordability of a large variety of nano-sized particles, understanding of nano-sized particle ignition and combustion, and advances in colloidal science of...generate a suitable long-term stable colloidal suspension. 15. SUBJECT TERMS N/A 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...advances in colloidal science of nano-sized metal particle/liquid suspensions, now allow for the development of enhanced nano-fluid fuels. To evaluate

  11. Highly dispersed Pt-Ni nanoparticles on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes for application in direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shujuan; Ma, Yanwen; Tao, Haisheng; Jian, Guoqiang; Wang, Xizhang; Fan, Yining; Zhu, Jianmin; Hu, Zheng

    2010-06-01

    Binary Pt-Ni alloyed nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) have been facilely constructed without pre-modification by making use of the active sites in NCNTs due to the N-participation. So-obtained binary Pt-Ni alloyed nanoparticles have been highly dispersed on the outer surface of the support with the size of about 3-4 nm. The electrochemical properties of the catalysts for methanol oxidation have been systematically evaluated. Binary Pt-Ni alloyed composites with molar ratio (Pt:Ni) of 3:2 and 3:1 present enhanced electrocatalytic activities and improved tolerance to CO poisoning as well as the similar stability, in comparison with the commercial Pt/C catalyst and the monometallic Pt/NCNTs catalysts. These results imply that so-constructed nanocomposite catalysts have the potential for applications in direct methanol fuel cells.

  12. MECHANICALLY-JOINED PLATE-TYPE ALUMINUM-CLAD FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Erwin, J.H.

    1962-12-11

    A method of fabricating MTR-type fuel elements is described wherein dove- tailed joints are used to fasten fuel plates to supporting side members. The method comprises the steps of dove-tailing the lateral edges of the fuel plates, inserting the dove-tailed edges into corresponding recesses which are provided in a pair of supporting side members, and compressing the supporting side members in a direction so as to close the recesses onto the dove-tailed edges. (AEC)

  13. Development of a 200kW multi-fuel type PAFC power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Take, Tetsuo; Kuwata, Yutaka; Adachi, Masahito; Ogata, Tsutomu

    1996-12-31

    Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NFT) has been developing a 200 kW multi-fuel type PAFC power plant which can generate AC 200 kW of constant power by switching fuel from pipeline town gas to liquefied propane gas (LPG) and vice versa. This paper describes the outline of the demonstration test plant and test results of its fundamental characteristics.

  14. Particle emissions from ships: dependence on fuel type.

    PubMed

    Winnes, Hulda; Fridell, Erik

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents the results of field emission measurements that have been carried out on the 4500-kW four-stroke main engine on-board a product tanker. Two fuel qualities--heavy fuel oil (HFO) and marine gas oil (MGO)-have been tested on the same engine for comparable load settings. A fuel switch within the marine sector is approaching and the aim of this study is to draw initial conclusions on the subsequent effects on ship exhaust gas composition and emission factors with a focus on particles. Measurements on exhaust gas concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), total hydrocarbons (HCs), and particulate matter (PM) were conducted. The gases, except SO2, did not show any major differences between the fuels. Specific PM emissions were generally higher for HFO than for MGO; however, for the smallest size-fraction measured containing particles 0.30-0.40 microm in diameter, the opposite is observed. This finding emphasizes that to minimize negative health effects of particles from ships, further regulation may be needed to reduce small-sized particles; a fuel shift to low sulfur fuel alone does not seem to accomplish this reduction. The average of this and previously published data from on-board studies on particle emissions from ships results in emissions factors of 0.33 and 1.34 g/kWh for marine distillate oil (MDO) and HFO, respectively. Accounting for 1 standard deviation in each direction from the average values gives a range of 0.18-0.48 g/kWh for MDO and 0.56-2.12 g/kWh for HFO.

  15. Development of an experiment for determining the autoignition characteristics of aircraft-type fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spadaccini, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental test apparatus was developed to determine the autoignition characteristics of aircraft-type fuels in premixing prevaporizing passages at elevated temperatures and pressures. The experiment was designed to permit independent variation and evaluation of the experimental variables of pressure, temperature, flow rate, and fuel-air ratio. A comprehensive review of the autoignition literature is presented. Performance verification tests consisting of measurements of the ignition delay times for several lean fuel-air mixture ratios were conducted using Jet-A fuel at inlet air temperatures in the range 600 K to 900 K and pressures in the range 9 atm to 30 atm.

  16. Development of a Fast Breeder Reactor Fuel Bundle Deformation Analysis Code - BAMBOO: Development of a Pin Dispersion Model and Verification by the Out-of-Pile Compression Test

    SciTech Connect

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Ukai, Shigeharu

    2004-02-15

    To analyze the wire-wrapped fast breeder reactor fuel pin bundle deformation under bundle/duct interaction conditions, the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute has developed the BAMBOO computer code. This code uses the three-dimensional beam element to calculate fuel pin bowing and cladding oval distortion as the primary deformation mechanisms in a fuel pin bundle. The pin dispersion, which is disarrangement of pins in a bundle and would occur during irradiation, was modeled in this code to evaluate its effect on bundle deformation. By applying the contact analysis method commonly used in the finite element method, this model considers the contact conditions at various axial positions as well as the nodal points and can analyze the irregular arrangement of fuel pins with the deviation of the wire configuration.The dispersion model was introduced in the BAMBOO code and verified by using the results of the out-of-pile compression test of the bundle, where the dispersion was caused by the deviation of the wire position. And the effect of the dispersion on the bundle deformation was evaluated based on the analysis results of the code.

  17. Color dispersion and Milky-Way-like reddening among type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Scolnic, Daniel M.; Riess, Adam G.; Rodney, Steven A.; Brout, Dillon J.; Jones, David O.; Foley, Ryan J.; Rest, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Past analyses of Type Ia supernovae have identified an irreducible scatter of 5%-10% in distance, widely attributed to an intrinsic dispersion in luminosity. Another equally valid source of this scatter is intrinsic dispersion in color. Misidentification of the true source of this scatter can bias both the retrieved color-luminosity relation and cosmological parameter measurements. The size of this bias depends on the magnitude of the intrinsic color dispersion relative to the distribution of colors that correlate with distance. We produce a realistic simulation of a misattribution of intrinsic scatter and find a negative bias in the recovered color-luminosity relation, β, of Δβ ≈ –1.0 (∼33%) and a positive bias in the equation of state parameter, w, of Δw ≈ +0.04 (∼4%). We re-analyze current published datasets with the assumption that the distance scatter is predominantly the result of color. Unlike previous analyses, we find that the data are consistent with a Milky-Way-like reddening law (R{sub V} = 3.1) and that a Milky-Way dust model better predicts the asymmetric color-luminosity trends than the conventional luminosity scatter hypothesis. We also determine that accounting for color variation reduces the correlation between various host galaxy properties and Hubble residuals by ∼20%.

  18. Dispersing V-type asteroids during the planetary instability in the jumping Jupiter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasil, P. I.

    2015-12-01

    V-type asteroids are a particular class of asteroids whose surface mineralogy is associated to a basaltic composition. Currently, the only known source of these asteroids in the Main Belt is (4) Vesta. This asteroid is located in the inner belt (2.1 < a < 2.5 AU), and has associated a dynamical family formed by the impact ejecta of two large craters excavated on its basaltic surface some 2 and 1 Gyr ago, respectively. Thus, many V-type asteroids belong to the Vesta family. However, an increasing number of V-type asteroids is found outside the limits of the family. Some of these asteroids, especially those located in the inner belt, are explained as dynamical fugitives from the family. Others cannot be linked to the Vesta family nor to (4) Vesta, neither dynamically nor mineralogically. The most paradoxal cases are the V-type asteroids found beyond 2.5 AU, in the central (2.5 < a < 2.8 AU) and outer (2.8 < a < 3.2 AU) parts of the Main Belt, where no local source of basaltic material is recognized. In this work, we propose a coherent dynamical mechanism to explain the delivery of V-type asteroids originated in the inner belt to the central and outer belt. This mechanism involves the planetary instability during the epoch when the outer planets were migrating due to their interaction with a disk of planetesimals, some 4 Gyr ago. The instability is caused by mutual planetary encounters in the framework of the jumping Jupiter model with initially five outer planets: Jupiter, Saturn and three ice giants. As a consequence of this instability, an ice giant is temporarily scattered into the asteroid belt and helps to disperse the asteroids in semimajor axis by up to ~0.5 AU. The V-type asteroids dispersed by this mechanism could have originated either in an older cratering event on the surface of (4) Vesta, or in the fragmentation of another basaltic asteroid in the inner belt that likely have existed during the epoch of planetary migration. We tested several

  19. Investigation of Surfactant Type, Dosage and Ultrasonication Temperature Control on Dispersity of Metal-Coated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoning; Li, Wei

    2016-04-01

    We studied the dispersity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) combined with different metal- lic particles (Ni and Fe). An ultrasonic-assisted water-bath dispersion process was used to dis- perse the metal-coated MWNTs in different solutions and the dispersity was measured using an ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The dispersity and morphology of the MWNTs were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) together with digital image processing technology. Effects of dispersant type (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), oleic acid, and polymer (TNEDIS)) and surfactant dosage on the dispersity of the metal-coated MWNTs were investigated under controlled and uncontrolled temperatures and results were compared with those from the untreated MWNTs. The results showed that the negative effects of temperature on the ultrasonic dispersion process could be eliminated through a temperature-controlled system. Moreover, the TNEDIS, SDBS, and oleic acid were arranged in the descending order of the dispersion effect degree. The untreated MWNTs, Ni-coated MWNTs, and Fe-coated MWNTs were arranged in the descending degree of dispersity order. Since the metal coating makes the MWNTs harder and more fragile, the metal-coated MWNTs are more likely to fracture during the ultrasonic dispersion process.

  20. Effects of fuel type, driving cycle, and emission status on in-use vehicle exhaust reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ho, J; Winer, A M

    1998-07-01

    The introduction of reformulated gasolines significantly reduced exhaust hydrocarbon (HC) mass emissions, but few data are available concerning how these new fuels affect exhaust reactivity. Similarly, while it is well established that high-emitting vehicles contribute a significant portion of total mobile source HC mass emissions, it is also important to evaluate the exhaust reactivity from these vehicles. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative influence on in-use vehicle exhaust reactivity of three critical factors: fuel, driving cycle, and vehicle emission status. Nineteen in-use vehicles were tested with seven randomly assigned fuel types and two driving cycles: the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) and the Unified Cycle (UC). Total exhaust reactivity was not statistically different between the FTP and UC cycles but was significantly affected by fuel type. On average, the exhaust reactivity for California Phase 2 fuel was the lowest (16% below the highest fuel type) among the seven fuels tested for cold start emissions. The average exhaust reactivity for high-emitting vehicles was significantly higher for hot stabilized (11%) and hot start (15%) emissions than for low-emitting vehicles. The exhaust reactivities for the FTP and UC cycles for light-end HCs and carbonyls were significantly different for the hot stabilized mode. There was a significant fuel effect on the mean specific reactivity (SR) for the mid-range HCs, but not for light-end HCs or carbonyls, while vehicle emission status affected the mean SR for all three HC compound classes.

  1. The Effect of Fuel Types on Porous Alumina Produced via Soft Combustion Reaction for Implant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Radin Shafinaz; Abdul Razak, Khairunisak; Ahmad, Nurfateen Fakhariah; Mohamad, Hasmaliza

    2012-03-01

    This article describes the effects of fuel types on the porous structure of alumina produced using a soft combustion reaction. There are several combustion parameters that could affect the porous structure of the alumina produced such as fuel-to-oxidizer ratios, ignition temperature, and type of fuels. In this study, the effect of fuel types on alumina properties was studied. Citric acid, glycine, and urea were used as fuels along with aluminum nitrate as an oxidizer. The properties of porous alumina produced using three different fuels were compared to determine the optimum fuel that could produce the best properties for implant applications. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that single-phase alumina powder was obtained in all samples. Morphology observation using scanning electron microscope (SEM) on sintered bodies showed open pores which had potential to be used in implant applications. Porous alumina produced using glycine as fuel (AG) showed the best properties; high surface area of 8.7 m2/g, porosity of 70% and sintered density 1.37 g/cm3.

  2. Current status of the development of high density LEU fuel for Russian research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Vatulin, A.; Dobrikova, I.; Suprun, V.; Trifonov, Y.; Kartashev, E.; Lukichev, V.

    2008-07-15

    One of the main directions of the Russian RERTR program is to develop U-Mo fuel and fuel elements/FA with this fuel. The development is carried out both for existing reactors, and for new advanced designs of reactors. Many organizations in Russia, i.e. 'TVEL', RDIPE, RIAR, IRM, NPCC participate in the work. Two fuels are under development: dispersion and monolithic U-Mo fuel, as well two types of FA to use the dispersion U-Mo fuel: with tubular type fuel elements and with pin type fuel elements. The first stage of works was successfully completed. This stage included out-pile, in-pile and post irradiation examinations of U-Mo dispersion fuel in experimental tubular and pin fuel elements under parameters similar to operation conditions of Russian design pool-type research reactors. The results received both in Russia and abroad enabled to go on to the next stage of development which includes irradiation tests both of full-scale IRT pin-type and tube-type fuel assemblies with U-Mo dispersion fuel and of mini-fuel elements with modified U-Mo dispersion fuel and monolithic fuel. The paper gives a generalized review of the results of U-Mo fuel development accomplished by now. (author)

  3. Asymmetric transmission in prisms using structures and materials with isotropic-type dispersion.

    PubMed

    Gundogdu, Funda Tamara; Serebryannikov, Andriy E; Cakmak, A Ozgur; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2015-09-21

    It is demonstrated that strong asymmetry in transmission can be obtained at the Gaussian beam illumination for a single prism based on a photonic crystal (PhC) with isotropic-type dispersion, as well as for its analog made of a homogeneous material. Asymmetric transmission can be realized with the aid of refraction at a proper orientation of the interfaces and wedges of the prism, whereas neither contribution of higher diffraction orders nor anisotropic-type dispersion is required. Furthermore, incidence toward a prism wedge can be used for one of two opposite directions in order to obtain asymmetry. Thus, asymmetric transmission is a general property of the prism configurations, which can be obtained by using simple geometries and quite conventional materials. The obtained results show that strong asymmetry can be achieved in PhC prisms with (nearly) circular shape of equifrequency dispersion contours, in both cases associated with the index of refraction 01. For the comparison purposes, results are also presented for solid uniform non-magnetic prisms made of a material with the same value of n. It is shown in zero-loss approximation that the PhC prism and the ultralow-index material prism (01. Possible contributions of scattering on the individual rods and diffraction on the wedge to the resulting mechanism are discussed. Analogs of unidirectional splitting and unidirectional deflection regimes, which are known from the studies of PhC gratings, are obtained in PhC prisms and solid uniform prisms, i.e. without higher diffraction orders.

  4. Fuel type characterization and potential fire behavior estimation in Sardinia and Corsica islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciu, V.; Pellizzaro, G.; Santoni, P.; Arca, B.; Ventura, A.; Salis, M.; Barboni, T.; Leroy, V.; Cancellieri, D.; Leoni, E.; Ferrat, L.; Perez, Y.; Duce, P.; Spano, D.

    2012-04-01

    Wildland fires represent a serious threat to forests and wooded areas of the Mediterranean Basin. As recorded by the European Commission (2009), during the last decade Southern Countries have experienced an annual average of about 50,000 forest fires and about 470,000 burned hectares. The factor that can be directly manipulated in order to minimize fire intensity and reduce other fire impacts, such as three mortality, smoke emission, and soil erosion, is wildland fuel. Fuel characteristics, such as vegetation cover, type, humidity status, and biomass and necromass loading are critical variables in affecting wildland fire occurrence, contributing to the spread, intensity, and severity of fires. Therefore, the availability of accurate fuel data at different spatial and temporal scales is needed for fire management applications, including fire behavior and danger prediction, fire fighting, fire effects simulation, and ecosystem simulation modeling. In this context, the main aims of our work are to describe the vegetation parameters involved in combustion processes and develop fire behavior fuel maps. The overall work plan is based firstly on the identification and description of the different fuel types mainly affected by fire occurrence in Sardinia (Italy) and Corsica (France) Islands, and secondly on the clusterization of the selected fuel types in relation to their potential fire behavior. In the first part of the work, the available time series of fire event perimeters and the land use map data were analyzed with the purpose of identifying the main land use types affected by fires. Thus, field sampling sites were randomly identified on the selected vegetation types and several fuel variables were collected (live and dead fuel load partitioned following Deeming et al., (1977), depth of fuel layer, plant cover, surface area-to-volume ratio, heat content). In the second part of the work, the potential fire behavior for every experimental site was simulated using

  5. Near-field dispersal modeling for liquid fuel-air explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, D.R.

    1990-07-01

    The near-field, explosive dispersal of a liquid into air has been explored using a combination of analytical and numerical models. The near-field flow regime is transient, existing only as long as the explosive forces produced by the detonation of the burster charge dominate or are approximately equal in magnitude to the aerodynamic drag forces on the liquid. The near-field model provides reasonable initial conditions for the far-field model, which is described in a separate report. The near-field model consists of the CTH hydrodynamics code and a film instability model. In particular, the CTH hydrodynamics code is used to provide initial temperature, pressure, and velocity fields, and bulk material distribution for the far-field model. The film instability model is a linear stability model for a radially expanding fluid film, and is used to provide a lower bound on the breakup time and an upper and lower bound on the initial average drop diameter for the liquid following breakup. Predictions of the liquid breakup time and the initial arithmetic average drop diameter from the model compare favorably with the sparse experimental data. 26 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Preparation of highly dispersed core/shell-type titania nanocapsules containing a single Ag nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hideki; Kanda, Takashi; Shibata, Hirobumi; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Abe, Masahiko

    2006-04-19

    Core/shell-type titania nanocapsules containing a single Ag nanoparticle were prepared. Ag nanoparticles were prepared using the reduction of silver nitrate with hydrazine in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as protective agent. The sol-gel reaction of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) was used to prepare core/shell-type titania nanocapsules with CTAB-coated Ag nanoparticles as the core. TEM observations revealed that the size of the core (Ag particle) and the thickness of the shell (titania) of the core/shell particles obtained are about 10 nm and 5-10 nm, respectively. In addition, the nanocapsules were found to be dispersed in the medium as individual particles without aggregation. Moreover, titania coating caused the surface plasmon absorption of Ag nanoparticles to shift toward the longer wavelength side.

  7. Electrostatic fuel atomization and spray-dispersal demonstration. Final report, September 1989-January 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, A.J.

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize charged spray plumes, test the validity of existing spray/plume models, provide a basis for evaluating these plumes for gas turbine fuel and ignitor systems service. Plumes generated by a charge injection atomizer in nitrogen (< or = bar, absolute) have been analyzed using an Aerometrics Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA). A 10 bar the outer, small droplet sheath is characterized by a Sauter mean diameter (D32) of about 55 microns, a span of about 0.7 and a number median of about 20 microns. The inner, large droplet core is characterized by D32 about = 110 microns and the same span. These data conform to a predicted overall droplet size distribution exhibiting a polydispersed profile: primary peak at about 105 microns, and secondary peaks at about 85 and 135 microns. The peaks are associated with the core region; the near constant profile below about 85 microns is characteristic of the sheath. Contrary to prediction, D32 increased modestly with pressure in these tests due to two factors: output charge density levels remained fixed with increasing pressure due to shortening of the sprayer caused by droplets stagnating in the test chamber; and, the predictable, lateral plume core expansion to the probe sampling position. A modest air flow over the spray unit corrects these problems.

  8. Comparative analysis of the atomization characteristics of fifteen biodiesel fuel types

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.A.W.; Watts, K.C.

    2000-04-01

    Engine results using biofuels have varied considerably in the reported literature. This article addresses two potential sources of this variation, atomization differences and impurities due to lack of quality control during production. Atomization is the first process encountered during the combustion of fuels in a compression ignition engine and is largely determined by the fuel's viscosity and surface tension. Previous work using five experimentally produced methyl ester biodiesel fuels showed that the viscosity and surface tension could be predicted from their fatty acid ester composition, and the atomization characteristics in turn could be predicted from their viscosity and surface tension. This article utilizes the results of that work to give a quantitative comparison of the atomization characteristics of fifteen biodiesel fuel types using the fuel's viscosity and surface tension, predicted directly from the fatty acid composition of the fuels. Except for coconut and rapeseed biodiesel fuels, all of the rest of the 15 biodiesel fuels had similar atomization characteristics. Since the most likely contaminant in the fuel from the processing was residual glycerides, their effect on viscosity and surface tension was studied experimentally and their effect on the atomization characteristics was computed.

  9. Effect of fuel injector type on performance and emissions of reverse-flow combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    The combustion process in a reverse-flow combustor suitable for a small gas turbine engine was investigated to evaluate the effect of fuel injector type on performance and emissions. Fuel injector configurations using pressure-atomizing, spill-flow, air blast, and air-assist techniques were compared and evaluated on the basis of performance obtained in a full-scale experimental combustor operated at inlet conditions corresponding to takeoff, cruise, low power, and idle and typical of a 16:1-pressure-ratio turbine engine. Major differences in combustor performance and emissions characteristics were experienced with each injector type even though the aerodynamic configuration was common to most combustor models. Performance characteristics obtained with the various fuel injector types could not have been predicted from bench-test injector spray characteristics. The effect of the number of operating fuel injectors on performance and emissions is also presented.

  10. Infrared spectroscopy for the determination of hydrocarbon types in jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchar, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    The concentration of hydrocarbon types in conventional jet fuels and synfuels can be measured using a computerized infrared spectrophotometer. The computerized spectrophotometer is calibrated using a fuel of known aromatic and olefinic content. Once calibration is completed, other fuels can be rapidly analyzed using an analytical program built into the computer. The concentration of saturates can be calculated as 100 percent minus the sum of the aromatic and olefinic concentrations. The analysis of a number of jet fuels produced an average standard deviation of 1.76 percent for aromatic types and one of 3.99 percent for olefinic types. Other substances such as oils and organic mixtures can be analyzed for their hydrocarbon content.

  11. Effect of fuels and domestic heating appliance types on emission factors of selected organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Šyc, Michal; Horák, Jiří; Hopan, František; Krpec, Kamil; Tomšej, Tomáš; Ocelka, Tomáš; Pekárek, Vladimír

    2011-11-01

    This study reports on the first complex data set of emission factors (EFs) of selected pollutants from combustion of five fuel types (lignite, bituminous coal, spruce, beech, and maize) in six different domestic heating appliances of various combustion designs. The effect of fuel as well as the effect of boiler type was studied. In total, 46 combustion runs were performed, during which numerous EFs were measured, including the EFs of particulate matter (PM), carbon monoxide, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), hexachlorobenzene (HxCBz), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/F), etc. The highest EFs of nonchlorinated pollutants were measured for old-type boilers with over-fire and under-fire designs and with manual stoking and natural draft. Emissions of the above-mentioned pollutants from modern-type boilers (automatic, downdraft) were 10 times lower or more. The decisive factor for emission rate of nonchlorinated pollutants was the type of appliance; the type of fuel plays only a minor role. Emissions of chlorinated pollutants were proportional mainly to the chlorine content in fuel, but the type of appliance also influenced the rate of emissions significantly. Surprisingly, higher EFs of PCDD/F from combustion of chlorinated bituminous coal were observed for modern-type boilers (downdraft, automatic) than for old-type ones. On the other hand, when bituminous coal was burned, higher emissions of HxCBz were found for old-type boilers than for modern-type ones.

  12. Microstructural Characterization of a Mg Matrix U-Mo Dispersion Fuel Plate Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to High Fission Density: SEM Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon D.; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam B.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Madden, James W.; Moore, Glenn A.

    2016-06-01

    Low-enriched (U-235 <20 pct) U-Mo dispersion fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. In most cases, fuel plates with Al or Al-Si alloy matrices have been tested in the Advanced Test Reactor to support this development. In addition, fuel plates with Mg as the matrix have also been tested. The benefit of using Mg as the matrix is that it potentially will not chemically interact with the U-Mo fuel particles during fabrication or irradiation, whereas with Al and Al-Si alloys such interactions will occur. Fuel plate R9R010 is a Mg matrix fuel plate that was aggressively irradiated in ATR. This fuel plate was irradiated as part of the RERTR-8 experiment at high temperature, high fission rate, and high power, up to high fission density. This paper describes the results of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of an irradiated fuel plate using polished samples and those produced with a focused ion beam. A follow-up paper will discuss the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Using SEM, it was observed that even at very aggressive irradiation conditions, negligible chemical interaction occurred between the irradiated U-7Mo fuel particles and Mg matrix; no interconnection of fission gas bubbles from fuel particle to fuel particle was observed; the interconnected fission gas bubbles that were observed in the irradiated U-7Mo particles resulted in some transport of solid fission products to the U-7Mo/Mg interface; the presence of microstructural pathways in some U-9.1 Mo particles that could allow for transport of fission gases did not result in the apparent presence of large porosity at the U-7Mo/Mg interface; and, the Mg-Al interaction layers that were present at the Mg matrix/Al 6061 cladding interface exhibited good radiation stability, i.e. no large pores.

  13. 41 CFR 102-34.325 - What type of fuel do I use in Government motor vehicles?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What type of fuel do I... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Motor Vehicle Fueling § 102-34.325 What type of fuel do I use...

  14. NACA Investigation of Fuel Performance in Piston-Type Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Henry C

    1951-01-01

    This report is a compilation of many of the pertinent research data acquired by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics on fuel performance in piston engines. The original data for this compilation are contained in many separate NACA reports which have in the present report been assembled in logical chapters that summarize the main conclusions of the various investigations. Complete details of each investigation are not included in this summary; however, such details may be found, in the original reports cited at the end of each chapter.

  15. Influence of nano-sized LSCF cathode and its firing temperature on electrochemical performance in oxygen-excess-type solid electrolyte (OESE)-based fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieda, Hiroyuki; Mineshige, Atsushi; Saito, Atsushi; Yazawa, Tetsuo; Yoshioka, Hideki; Mori, Ryohei

    2014-12-01

    Dense films of an oxygen-excess-type solid electrolyte (OESE) based on Mg-doped lanthanum silicate (MDLS) were fabricated and applied to electrolyte materials for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). To obtain dense MDLS films on NiO-MDLS porous substrates, a conventional spin-coating technique using the MDLS printable paste, obtained by mixing nano-sized MDLS particles and a dispersant, was employed. The Ni-MDLS anode supported single cells were then fabricated by printing porous cathode layer onto the electrolyte film surface. By optimizing fabrication conditions of an MDLS film and cathode, the highly active cathode/OESE interface (ASR = 0.23 Ω cm2 at 873 K) were successfully obtained, which resulted in high power density of 0.166 W cm-2 at 873 K in the fuel cell test when operated with argon-diluted hydrogen and pure oxygen as the fuel and the cathode gas, respectively.

  16. Charring temperatures are driven by the fuel types burned in a peatland wildfire

    PubMed Central

    Hudspith, Victoria A.; Belcher, Claire M.; Yearsley, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Peatlands represent a globally important carbon store; however, the human exploitation of this ecosystem is increasing both the frequency and severity of fires on drained peatlands. Yet, the interactions between the hydrological conditions (ecotopes), the fuel types being burned, the burn severity, and the charring temperatures (pyrolysis intensity) remain poorly understood. Here we present a post-burn assessment of a fire on a lowland raised bog in Co. Offaly, Ireland (All Saints Bog). Three burn severities were identified in the field (light, moderate, and deeply burned), and surface charcoals were taken from 17 sites across all burn severities. Charcoals were classified into two fuel type categories (either ground or aboveground fuel) and the reflectance of each charcoal particle was measured under oil using reflectance microscopy. Charcoal reflectance shows a positive relationship with charring temperature and as such can be used as a temperature proxy to reconstruct minimum charring temperatures after a fire event. Resulting median reflectance values for ground fuels are 1.09 ± 0.32%Romedian, corresponding to estimated minimum charring temperatures of 447°C ± 49°C. In contrast, the median charring temperatures of aboveground fuels were found to be considerably higher, 646°C ± 73°C (3.58 ± 0.77%Romedian). A mixed-effects modeling approach was used to demonstrate that the interaction effects of burn severity, as well as ecotope classes, on the charcoal reflectance is small compared to the main effect of fuel type. Our findings reveal that the different fuel types on raised bogs are capable of charring at different temperatures within the same fire, and that the pyrolysis intensity of the fire on All Saints Bog was primarily driven by the fuel types burning, with only a weak association to the burn severity or ecotope classes. PMID:25566288

  17. Observations of four types of pulses in a fiber laser with large net-normal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leiran; Liu, Xueming; Gong, Yongkang; Mao, Dong; Duan, Lina

    2011-04-11

    Four different types of pulses are experimentally obtained in one erbium-doped all-fiber laser with large net-normal dispersion. The proposed laser can deliver the rectangular-spectrum (RS), Gaussian-spectrum (GS), broadband-spectrum (BS), and noise-like pulses by appropriately adjusting the polarization states. These kinds of pulses have distinctly different characteristics. The RS pulses can easily be compressed to femtosecond level whereas the pulse energy is restricted by the trend of multi-pulse shaping with excessive pump. The GS and BS pulses always maintain the single-pulse operation with much higher pulse-energy and accumulate much more chirp. After launching the pulses into the photonic-crystal fiber, the supercontinuum can be generated with the bandwidth of >700 nm by the BS pulses and of ~400 nm by the GS pulses, whereas it can hardly be generated by the RS pulses. The physical mechanisms behind the continuum generation are qualitatively investigated relating to different operating regimes. This work could help to a deeper insight of the normal-dispersion pulses.

  18. Mechanistic interpretation of an observed rate dependence of low temperature swelling of irradiated uranium silicide dispersion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, J; Hofman, G L

    1990-06-01

    Recent experimental observations on low temperature swelling of irradiated uranium silicide dispersion fuels have indicated that the growth of fission gas bubbles appears to be affected by fission rate. The swelling curve of the material exhibits a distinct knee'' that shifts to higher fission density with increased fission rate due to higher enrichments. Current state-of-the-art models for fission gas behavior do not predict such a dependence. Indirect evidence from various experiments leads the present authors to speculate that a dense network of subgrain boundaries forms at a dose corresponding to the knee'' in the swelling curve, upon which gas bubbles nucleate and then grow at an accelerated rate compared to those in the bulk material. A theoretical formulation is presented wherein the stored energy in the material is concentrated on a network of crystallization'' sites which diminish with dose due to interaction with radiation produced defects (vacancy-impurity pairs). Recrystallization is induced by statistical fluctuations when the energy per site is high enough such that the creation of grain boundary surfaces is offset by the creation of strain free volumes with a resultant net decrease in the free energy of the material. This formulation is shown to provide a reasonable interpretation of the observed phenomena. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Comparison of three different types of cilostazol-loaded solid dispersion: Physicochemical characterization and pharmacokinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Omer; Kim, Kyung Soo; Shafique, Shumaila; Kim, Dong Shik; Jin, Sung Giu; Seo, Youn Gee; Youn, Yu Seok; Oh, Kyung Taek; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2017-03-09

    The aim of this research was to compare three different types of cilostazol-loaded solid dispersion system including solvent-evaporated, solvent-wetted and surface-attached solid dispersion. The effect of polymers and surfactants on the aqueous solubility of cilostazol was investigated, leading to the selection of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS). Employing a spray-drying technique, numerous surface-attached, solvent-evaporated and solvent-wetted solid dispersions were prepared with various amounts PVP and SLS using water, 90% ethanol and acetone, respectively. Their physicochemical properties, solubility, dissolution and oral bioavailability in rats were assessed compared to the drug powder. Among each solid dispersion system tested, the surface-attached, solvent-evaporated and solvent-wetted solid dispersions composed of cilostazol, PVP and SLS at weight ratios of 3.0 : 0.75 : 1.5, 3.0 : 3.0 : 1.5 and 3.0 : 3.0 : 1.5, respectively, provided the highest drug solubility and dissolution. The solvent-evaporated solid dispersion gave homogeneous and very small spherical particles, in which the drug was changed to an amorphous state. In the solvent-wetted solid dispersion, the amorphous drug was attached to the polymer surface. Conversely, in the surface-attached solid dispersion, the carriers were adhered onto the surface of the unchanged crystalline drug. The solubility, dissolution and oral bioavailability were significantly increased in the order of solvent-evaporated>solvent-wetted>surface-attached>drug powder. Thus, the type of solid dispersion considerably affected the physicochemical properties, aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability. Furthermore, the cilostazol-loaded solvent-evaporated solid dispersion with the highest oral bioavailability would be actively recommended as a practical oral pharmaceutical product.

  20. Efficiency of a hybrid-type plasma-assisted fuel reformation system

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, I.B.; Serbin, S.I.; Lux, S.M.

    2008-12-15

    The major advantages of a new plasma-assisted fuel reformation system are its cost effectiveness and technical efficiency. Applied Plasma Technologies has proposed its new highly efficient hybrid-type plasma-assisted system for organic fuel combustion and gasification. The system operates as a multimode multipurpose reactor in a wide range of plasma feedstock gases and turndown ratios. This system also has convenient and simultaneous feeding of several reagents in the reaction zone such as liquid fuels, coal, steam, and air. A special methodology has been developed for such a system in terms of heat balance evaluation and optimization. This methodology considers all existing and possible energy streams, which could influence the system's efficiency. The developed hybrid-type plasma system could be suitable for combustion applications, mobile and autonomous small- to mid-size liquid fuel and coal gasification modules, hydrogen-rich gas generators, waste-processing facilities, and plasma chemical reactors.

  1. Effect of fuel type on equivalence ratio measurements using chemiluminescence in premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orain, Mikaël; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2010-05-01

    Local temporally-resolved measurements of chemiluminescent intensity from OH ∗, CH ∗ and C ∗2 radicals were obtained in premixed counterflow flames operating with propane and prevaporised fuels (isooctane, ethanol and methanol), for different equivalence ratios and strain rates. The results quantified independently the effects of fuel type, strain rate and equivalence ratio on chemiluminescent emissions from flames. The ability of chemiluminescent intensity from OH ∗, CH ∗ and C ∗2 radicals to indicate heat release rate depends strongly on fuel type. The intensity ratio OH ∗/CH ∗ has a monotonic decrease with equivalence ratio for all fuels and can be used to measure equivalence ratio of the reacting mixture. For propane and isooctane, the OH ∗/CH ∗ ratio remains independent of flame strain rate, whereas some dependence is observed for ethanol and methanol.

  2. Fuel Regression Characteristics of Cascaded Multistage Impinging-Jet (CAMUI) Type Hybrid Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Mitsunori; Maeda, Takenori; Kakikura, Akihito; Kaneko, Yudai; Mori, Kazuhiro; Nakashima, Takuji; Wakita, Masashi; Uematsu, Tsutomu; Totani, Tsuyoshi; Oshima, Nobuyuki; Nagata, Harunori

    A series of lab-scale firing tests was conducted to investigate the fuel regression characteristics of Cascaded Multistage Impinging-jet (CAMUI) type hybrid rocket. The alternative fuel grain used in this rocket consists of a number of cylindrical fuel blocks with two ports, which were aligned along the axis of the combustion chamber with a small gap. The ports are aligned staggered with respect to ones of neighboring blocks so that the combustion gas flow impinges on the forward-end surface of each block. In this fuel grain, forward-end surfaces, back-end surfaces and ports of fuel blocks contribute as burning surfaces. Polyethylene and LOX were used as a propellant, and the tests were conducted at the chamber pressure of 0.5 2MPa and the mass flux of 50 200kg/m2s. Main results obtained in this study are in the followings: The regression rate of each surface was obtained as a function of the propellant mass flux and local equivalent ratio of the combustion gas. At back-end surfaces the regression rate has a high sensitivity on the gap height of neighboring fuel blocks. These fuel regression characteristics will contribute as fundamental data to improve the optimum design of the fuel grain.

  3. Distributor-type fuel injection pump having injection rate control function for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, S.; Ishibashi, T.

    1987-04-07

    This patent describes a distributor-type fuel injection pump for an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinders and a plurality of fuel injection valves for injecting fuel into respective ones of the cylinders. The fuel injection pump includes a plunger arranged for concurrent reciprocating and rotative motion in response to rotation of the engine to perform pressure delivery and distribution of fuel into the cylinders of the engine. The plunger has a first portion and a second portion having different diameters from each other, a first pump working chamber defined by the first portion, and a second pump working chamber defined by the second portion. Fuel delivery passageways are arranged for communication with the first pump working chamber and lead to respective ones of the fuel injection valves of the engine. A communication passageway is arranged for communicating the second pump working chamber with the fuel delivery passageways and a drain passageway is arranged for communicating the communication passageway with a zone under a lower pressure of the pump.

  4. Highly bendable bilayer-type photo-actuators comprising of reduced graphene oxide dispersed in hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dowan; Lee, Heon Sang; Yoon, Jinhwan

    2016-02-11

    To avoid the problem of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) restacking in aqueous solution, the preparation of light-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) incorporating rGO (PNIPAm/rGO) was achieved by the chemical reduction of GO dispersed in the hydrogel matrix. Due to the enhanced photothermal efficiency of the rGO, the prepared PNIPAm/rGO underwent large volume reductions in response to irradiation by visible light of modest intensity. With respect to potential applications, bilayer-type photo-actuators comprising a PNIPAm/rGO active layer and poly(acrylamide) passive layer were fabricated; these achieved a full bending motion upon visible-light exposure. Adjusting the swelling ratio of each layer in the initial state yielded bidirectional photo-actuators that showed the active motion of turning inside out. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the fabricated actuation system would exhibit controlled bending motion in response to solar radiation.

  5. Highly bendable bilayer-type photo-actuators comprising of reduced graphene oxide dispersed in hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dowan; Lee, Heon Sang; Yoon, Jinhwan

    2016-02-01

    To avoid the problem of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) restacking in aqueous solution, the preparation of light-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) incorporating rGO (PNIPAm/rGO) was achieved by the chemical reduction of GO dispersed in the hydrogel matrix. Due to the enhanced photothermal efficiency of the rGO, the prepared PNIPAm/rGO underwent large volume reductions in response to irradiation by visible light of modest intensity. With respect to potential applications, bilayer-type photo-actuators comprising a PNIPAm/rGO active layer and poly(acrylamide) passive layer were fabricated; these achieved a full bending motion upon visible-light exposure. Adjusting the swelling ratio of each layer in the initial state yielded bidirectional photo-actuators that showed the active motion of turning inside out. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the fabricated actuation system would exhibit controlled bending motion in response to solar radiation.

  6. Solid oxide fuel cell stacks using extruded honeycomb type elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzko, M.; Belzner, A.; Rohr, F. J.; Harbach, F.

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack concept is described which comprises "condensed-tubes" like extruded honeycomb sections of ceramic electrolyte (ZrO 2-based) and interconnectors of nickel sheet as key elements. According to this concept, well known and extensively tested construction principles can be realised in a low-cost production. The cells are self-supported with in-plane conduction. A demonstrator model stack of five honeycomb elements and six nickel sheet seals/interconnectors was built and operated for 860 h at 1000°C. Volumetric power densities of 160 kW/m 3 were obtained with H 2 vs. air, of close to 200 kW/m 3 with H 2 vs. O 2.

  7. Fuel cell separator plate with bellows-type sealing flanges

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, George A.

    1986-08-05

    A fuel cell separator includes a rectangular flat plate having two unitary upper sealing flanges respectively comprising opposite marginal edges of the plate folded upwardly and back on themselves and two lower sealing flanges respectively comprising the other two marginal edges of the plate folded downwardly and back on themselves. Each of the sealing flanges includes a flat wall spaced from the plate and substantially parallel thereto and two accordion-pleated side walls, one of which interconnects the flat wall with the plate and the other of which stops just short of the plate, these side walls affording resilient compressibility to the sealing flange in a directiongenerally normal to the plane of the plate. Four corner members close the ends of the sealing flanges. An additional resiliently compressible reinforcing member may be inserted in the passages formed by each of the sealing flanges with the plate.

  8. Fuel cell separator plate with bellows-type sealing flanges

    DOEpatents

    Louis, G.A.

    1984-05-29

    A fuel cell separator includes a rectangular flat plate having two unitary upper sealing flanges respectively comprising opposite marginal edges of the plate folded upwardly and back on themselves and two lower sealing flanges respectively comprising the other two marginal edges of the plate folded downwardly and back on themselves. Each of the sealing flanges includes a flat wall spaced from the plate and substantially parallel thereto and two accordion-pleated side walls, one of which interconnects the flat wall with the plate and the other of which steps just short of the plate, these side walls affording resilient compressibility to the sealing flange in a direction generally normal to the plane of the plate. Four corner members close the ends of the sealing flanges. An additional resiliently compressible reinforcing member may be inserted in the passages formed by each of the sealing flanges with the plate.

  9. Hydrocarbon group type determination in jet fuels by high performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-two jet and diesel fuel samples of varying chemical composition and physical properties were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes. Hydrocarbon types in these samples were determined by a fluorescent indicator adsorption analysis, and the results from three laboratories are presented and compared. Two methods of rapid high performance liquid chromatography were used to analyze some of the samples, and these results are also presented and compared. Two samples of petroleum-based Jet A fuel are similarly analyzed.

  10. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling of 137Cs generated from Nuclear Spent Fuel under Hypothetic Accidental Condition in the BNPP Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongkuk; Lee, Kwan-Hee; Yook, Daesik; Kim, Sung Il; Lee, Byung Soo

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the results of atmosphere dispersion modeling using CALPUFF code that are based on computational simulation to evaluate the environmental characteristics of the Barakah nuclear power plant (BNPP) in west area of UAE. According to meteorological data analysis (2012~2013), the winds from the north(7.68%) and west(9.05%) including NNW(41.63%), NW(28.55%), and WNW(6.31%) winds accounted for more than 90% of the wind directions. East(0.2%) and south(0.6%) direction wind, including ESE(0.31%), SE(0.38%), and SSE(0.38%) were rarely distributed during the simulation period. Seasonal effects were not showed. However, a discrepancy in the tendency between daytime and night-time was observed. Approximately 87% of the wind speed was distributed below 5.4m/s (17%, 47% and 23% between the speeds of 0.5-1.8m/s 1.8-3.3m/s and 3.3-5.4m/s, respectively) during the annual period. Seasonal wind speed distribution results presented very similar pattern of annual distribution. Wind speed distribution of day and night, on the other hand, had a discrepancy with annual modeling results than seasonal distribution in some sections. The results for high wind speed (more than 10.8m/s) showed that this wind blew from the west. This high wind speed is known locally as the 'Shamal', which occurs rarely, lasting one or two days with the strongest winds experienced in association with gust fronts and thunderstorms. Six variations of cesium-137 (137Cs) dispersion test were simulated under hypothetic severe accidental condition. The 137Cs dispersion was strongly influenced by the direction and speed of the main wind. From the test cases, east-south area of the BNPP site was mainly influenced by 137Cs dispersion. A virtual receptor was set and calculated for observation of the 137Cs movement and accumulation. Surface roughness tests were performed for the analysis of topographic conditions. According to the surface condition, there are various surface roughness length. Four types

  11. Group-type hydrocarbon standards for high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of middistillate fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterson, D. A.; Seng, G. T.

    1984-01-01

    A new high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for group-type analysis of middistillate fuels is described. It uses a refractive index detector and standards that are prepared by reacting a portion of the fuel sample with sulfuric acid. A complete analysis of a middistillate fuel for saturates and aromatics (including the preparation of the standard) requires about 15 min if standards for several fuels are prepared simultaneously. From model fuel studies, the method was found to be accurate to within 0.4 vol% saturates or aromatics, and provides a precision of + or - 0.4 vol%. Olefin determinations require an additional 15 min of analysis time. However, this determination is needed only for those fuels displaying a significant olefin response at 200 nm (obtained routinely during the saturated/aromatics analysis procedure). The olefin determination uses the responses of the olefins and the corresponding saturates, as well as the average value of their refractive index sensitivity ratios (1.1). Studied indicated that, although the relative error in the olefins result could reach 10 percent by using this average sensitivity ratio, it was 5 percent for the fuels used in this study. Olefin concentrations as low as 0.1 vol% have been determined using this method.

  12. A simple gamma spectrometry method for evaluating the burnup of MTR-type HEU fuel elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makmal, T.; Aviv, O.; Gilad, E.

    2016-10-01

    A simple method for the evaluation of the burnup of a materials testing reactor (MTR) fuel element by gamma spectrometry is presented. The method was applied to a highly enriched uranium MTR nuclear fuel element that was irradiated in a 5 MW pool-type research reactor for a total period of 34 years. The experimental approach is based on in-situ measurements of the MTR fuel element in the reactor pool by a portable high-purity germanium detector located in a gamma cell. To corroborate the method, analytical calculations (based on the irradiation history of the fuel element) and computer simulations using a dedicated fuel cycle burnup code ORIGEN2 were performed. The burnup of the MTR fuel element was found to be 52.4±8.8%, which is in good agreement with the analytical calculations and the computer simulations. The method presented here is suitable for research reactors with either a regular or an irregular irradiation regime and for reactors with limited infrastructure and/or resources. In addition, its simplicity and the enhanced safety it confers may render this method suitable for IAEA inspectors in fuel element burnup assessments during on-site inspections.

  13. Verifying the Cosmological Utility of Type Ia Supernovae: Implications of a Dispersion in the Ultraviolet Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, Peter E; Ellis, R.S.; Sullivan, M.; Nugent, P.E.; Howell, D.A.; Gal-Yam, A.; Astier, P.; Balam, D.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R.; Conley, A.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Pain, R.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C.J.; Regnault, N.

    2008-02-28

    We analyze the mean rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectrum of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe) and its dispersion using high signal-to-noise ratio Keck-I/LRIS-B spectroscopy for a sample of 36 events at intermediate redshift (z=0.5) discovered by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). We introduce a new method for removing host galaxy contamination in our spectra, exploiting the comprehensive photometric coverage of the SNLS SNe and their host galaxies, thereby providing the first quantitative view of the UV spectral properties of a large sample of distant SNe Ia. Although the mean SN Ia spectrum has not evolved significantly over the past 40percent of cosmic history, precise evolutionary constraints are limited by the absence of a comparable sample of high-quality local spectra. The mean UV spectrum of our z~;;=0.5 SNe Ia and its dispersion is tabulated for use in future applications. Within the high-redshift sample, we discover significant UV spectral variations and exclude dust extinction as the primary cause by examining trends with the optical SN color. Although progenitor metallicity may drive some of these trends, the variations we see are much larger than predicted in recent models and do not follow expected patterns. An interesting new result is a variation seen in the wavelength of selected UV features with phase. We also demonstrate systematic differences in the SN Ia spectral features with SN light curve width in both the UV and the optical. We show that these intrinsic variations could represent a statistical limitation in the future use of high-redshift SNe Ia for precision cosmology. We conclude that further detailed studies are needed, both locally and at moderate redshift where the rest-frame UV can be studied precisely, in order that future missions can confidently be planned to fully exploit SNe Ia as cosmological probes.

  14. Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Combustion of Hydrocarbon and Other Types of Chemical Fuels

    DOE Data Explorer

    The central feature of the Combustion Chemistry project at LLNL is the development, validation, and application of detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of hydrocarbon and other types of chemical fuels. For the past 30 years, LLNL's Chemical Sciences Division has built hydrocarbon mechanisms for fuels from hydrogen and methane through much larger fuels including heptanes and octanes. Other classes of fuels for which models have been developed include flame suppressants such as halons and organophosphates, and air pollutants such as soot and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur. Reaction mechanisms have been tested and validated extensively through comparisons between computed results and measured data from laboratory experiments (e.g., shock tubes, laminar flames, rapid compression machines, flow reactors, stirred reactors) and from practical systems (e.g., diesel engines, spark-ignition engines, homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engines). These kinetic models are used to examine a wide range of combustion systems.

  15. Comparison of thermal conversion methods of different biomass types into gaseous fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, O. M.; Sinelshchikov, V. A.; Sytchev, G. A.

    2016-11-01

    Thermal conversion methods of different biomass types into gaseous fuel are considered. The comparison of the gas mixtures characteristics (volume yield, composition and calorific value) that can be produced from the main biomass types by gasification and pyrolysis is presented. The merits and demerits of these methods are discussed. It is shown that the two-stage pyrolysis technology, which consists of the biomass pyrolysis and the consequent high-temperature conversion of pyrolysis gases and vapors into synthesis gas by filtration through a porous carbon medium, allows to achieve both a high degree of biomass conversion into gaseous fuel and a high energy efficiency.

  16. Fuel cells 101

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschenhofer, J.H.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the various types of fuel cells, the importance of cell voltage, fuel processing for natural gas, cell stacking, fuel cell plant description, advantages and disadvantages of the types of fuel cells, and applications. The types covered include: polymer electrolyte fuel cell, alkaline fuel cell, phosphoric acid fuel cell; molten carbonate fuel cell, and solid oxide fuel cell.

  17. 40 CFR 600.209-08 - Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-cycle fuel economy values for a model type. 600.209-08 Section 600.209-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values §...

  18. 40 CFR 600.209-08 - Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-cycle fuel economy values for a model type. 600.209-08 Section 600.209-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values §...

  19. 40 CFR 600.209-08 - Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-cycle fuel economy values for a model type. 600.209-08 Section 600.209-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values...

  20. 40 CFR 600.209-08 - Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-cycle fuel economy values for a model type. 600.209-08 Section 600.209-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Procedures...

  1. A dynamic, dependent type system for nuclear fuel cycle code generation

    SciTech Connect

    Scopatz, A.

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle may be interpreted as a network or graph, thus allowing methods from formal graph theory to be used. Nodes are often idealized as nuclear fuel cycle facilities (reactors, enrichment cascades, deep geologic repositories). With the advent of modern object-oriented programming languages - and fuel cycle simulators implemented in these languages - it is natural to define a class hierarchy of facility types. Bright is a quasi-static simulator, meaning that the number of material passes through a facility is tracked rather than natural time. Bright is implemented as a C++ library that models many canonical components such as reactors, storage facilities, and more. Cyclus is a discrete time simulator, meaning that natural time is tracked through out the simulation. Therefore a robust, dependent type system was developed to enable inter-operability between Bright and Cyclus. This system is capable of representing any fuel cycle facility. Types declared in this system can then be used to automatically generate code which binds a facility implementation to a simulator front end. Facility model wrappers may be used either internally to a fuel cycle simulator or as a mechanism for inter-operating multiple simulators. While such a tool has many potential use cases it has two main purposes: enabling easy performance of code-to-code comparisons and the verification and the validation of user input.

  2. Double dispersant-assisted ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with capillary electrophoresis for the determination of benzophenone-type ultraviolet filters in sunscreen cosmetic product.

    PubMed

    Ma, Teng; Li, Zheng; Niu, Qian; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Weihong

    2015-10-01

    In this work, double dispersant-assisted ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with micellar electrokinetic chromatography was developed to determine four UV filters (benzophenone, 4-hydroxybenzophenone, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone, and 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone). 1-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate was used as the extraction solvent. The main novelty of the present work was that acetonitrile-Triton X-114 was used as double disperser solvent. Parameters affected the extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, enrichment factors were in the range of 25.3-40.5. The limits of detection and quantitation, calculated at a S/N of three and ten, were 3.9-6.7 ng/mL and 13.0-22.3 ng/mL. The linearity of the method was in the range of 0.02-2 μg/mL for 2, 4-dihydroxybenzophenone and 4-hydroxybenzophenone, 0.01-2 μg/mL for benzophenone and 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, with correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9984-0.9991. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of four benzophenone-type UV filters in six kinds of sunscreen cosmetic products, with yielded relative recoveries ranging from 80.2 to 117.7%.

  3. Open-type ferry safety system design for using LNG fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonis, D. N.; Livanos, G.; Theotokatos, G.; Peppa, S.; Themelis, N.

    2016-12-01

    In this feasibility study, we investigate the viability of using Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fuel in an open type Ro-Ro passenger ferry and the associated potential challenges with regard to the vessel safety systems. We recommend an appropriate methodology for converting existing ships to run on LNG fuel, discuss all the necessary modifications to the ship's safety systems, and also evaluate the relevant ship evacuation procedures. We outline the basic requirements with which the ship already complies for each safety system and analyze the additional restrictions that must be taken into consideration for the use of LNG fuel. Appropriate actions are recommended. Furthermore, we carry out a hazard identification study. Overall, we clearly demonstrate the technical feasibility of the investigated scenario. Minimal modifications to the ship's safety systems are required to comply with existing safety rules for this specific type of ship.

  4. Microcalorimeter-type energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Keiichi; Maehata, Keisuke; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y; Ohsaki, Mitsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuaki; Yu, Xiuzhen; Ito, Takuji; Yamanaka, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    A new energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) with a microcalorimeter detector equipped with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been developed for high- accuracy compositional analysis in the nanoscale. A superconducting transition-edge-sensor-type microcalorimeter is applied as the detector. A cryogen-free cooling system, which consists of a mechanical and a dilution refrigerator, is selected to achieve long-term temperature stability. In order to mount these detector and refrigerators on a TEM, the cooling system is specially designed such that these two refrigerators are separated. Also, the detector position and arrangement are carefully designed to avoid adverse affects between the superconductor detector and the TEM lens system. Using the developed EDS system, at present, an energy resolution of 21.92 eV full-width-at-half maximum has been achieved at the Cr K alpha line. This value is about seven times better than that of the current typical commercial Si(Li) detector, which is usually around 140 eV. The developed microcalorimeter EDS system can measure a wide energy range, 1-20 keV, at one time with this high energy resolution that can resolve peaks from most of the elements. Although several further developments will be needed to enable practical use, highly accurate compositional analysis with high energy resolution will be realized by this microcalorimeter EDS system.

  5. 14 CFR 26.37 - Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability. 26.37 Section 26.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CONTINUED AIRWORTHINESS AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS FOR TRANSPORT...

  6. 14 CFR 26.37 - Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability. 26.37 Section 26.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CONTINUED AIRWORTHINESS AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS FOR TRANSPORT...

  7. 14 CFR 26.37 - Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability. 26.37 Section 26.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CONTINUED AIRWORTHINESS AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS FOR TRANSPORT...

  8. The Effect of Pollinator Type and Plant Spatial Structure on Patterns of Pollen-Mediated Gene Dispersal in Aquilegia Coerulea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background/Question/Methods - Direct estimation of pollen dispersal distances from paternity type analyses is often not possible. Therefore, recent emphasis have been on the development of indirect methods relying on the assumed decay with spatial distance in a measure of the genetic structure of p...

  9. Coating-type three-dimensional acetate-driven microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin; Tang, Yulan

    2015-08-01

    This study uses sodium acetate as fuel to construct bioelectricity in coating-type three-dimensional microbial fuel cells anode. The coating-type three-dimensional anode was constructed using iron net as structural support, adhering a layer of carbon felt as primary coating and using carbon powder and 30% PTFE solution mixture as coating. The efficiency of electricity production and wastewater treatment were analyzed for the three-dimensional acetate-fed (C2H3NaO2) microbial fuel cells with the various ratio of the coating mixture. The results showed that the efficiency of electricity production was significantly improved when using the homemade coating-type microbial fuel cells anode compared with the one without coating on the iron net, which the apparent internal resistance was decreased by 59.4% and the maximum power density was increased by 1.5 times. It was found the electricity production was greatly influenced by the ratio of the carbon powder and PTFE in the coating. The electricity production was the highest with apparent internal resistance of 190 Ω, and maximum power density of 5189.4 mW m(-3) when 750 mg of carbon powder and 10 ml of PTFE (i.e., ratio 75:1) was used in the coating. With the efficiency of electricity production, wide distribution and low cost of the raw materials, the homemade acetate-fed microbial fuel cells provides a valuable reference to the development of the composition microbial fuel cell anode production.

  10. Dependence of the radiative forcing of the climate system on fossil fuel type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, L. I.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change mitigation strategies are greatly directed towards the reduction of CO2 emissions and other greenhouse gases from fossil fuel combustion to limit warming to 2º C in this century. For example, the Clean Power Plan aims to reduce CO2 emissions from the power sector by 32% of 2005 levels by 2030 by increasing power plant efficiency but also by switching from coal-fired power plants to natural gas-fired power plants. It is important to understand the impact of such fuel switching on climate change. While all fossil fuels emit CO2, they also emit other pollutants with varying effects on climate, health and agriculture. First, The emission of CO2 per joule of energy produced varies significantly between coal, oil and natural gas. Second, the complexity that the co-emitted pollutants add to the perturbations in the climate system necessitates the detangling of radiative forcing for each type of fossil fuel. The historical (1850-2011) net radiative forcing of climate as a function of fuel type (coal, oil, natural gas and biofuel) is reconstructed. The results reveal the significant dependence of the CO2 and the non-CO2 forcing on fuel type. The CO2 forcing per joule of energy is largest for coal. Radiative forcing from the co-emitted pollutants (black carbon, methane, nitrogen oxides, organic carbon, sulfate aerosols) changes the global mean CO2 forcing attributed to coal and oil significantly. For natural gas, the CO2-only radiative forcing from gas is increased by about 60% when the co-emitted pollutants are included.

  11. The influence of the types of marine fuel over the Energy Efficiency Operational Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acomi, Nicoleta; Acomi, Ovidiu

    2014-05-01

    One of the main concerns of our society is certainly the environment protection. The international efforts for maintaining the environment clean are various and this paper refers to the efforts in the maritime transport field. Marine pollution consists of the water pollution and also the air pollution. Regardless of the delay in recognizing the later type of pollution, it rapidly gains many organizations to argue on it. The first step was including a dedicated annex (Annex VI) in the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, in 1997, which seeks to minimize the airborne emissions from ships. In order to control and minimize the air pollution, the International Maritime Organization has also developed a series of measures for monitoring the emissions. These measures are grouped in three main directions: technical, operational and management related. The subject of our study is the concept of Energy Efficiency Operational Index (EEOI), developed to provide ship-owners with assistance in the process of establishing the emissions from ships in operation, and to suggest the methods for achieving their reduction. As a monitoring tool, EEOI represents the mass of CO2 emitted per unit of transport work. The actual CO2 emission from combustion of fuel on board a ship during each voyage is calculated by multiplying total fuel consumption for each type of fuel (e.g. diesel oil, gas oil, light fuel oil, heavy fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas, liquefied natural gas) with the carbon to CO2 conversion factor for the fuel in question. The performed transport work is calculated by multiplying mass of cargo (tonnes, number of TEU/cars, or number of passengers) with the distance in nautical miles corresponding to the transport work done. Using the software developed by the author it will be emphasized the variation of the EEOI value for one vessel using different types of fuel for the voyage's legs (distance to discharge port, distance to loading port, the

  12. 14 CFR 291.44 - BTS Schedule P-12(a), Fuel Consumption by Type of Service and Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false BTS Schedule P-12(a), Fuel Consumption by... TRANSPORTATION Reporting Rules § 291.44 BTS Schedule P-12(a), Fuel Consumption by Type of Service and Entity. (a) For the purposes of BTS schedule P-12(a), type of service shall be either scheduled service...

  13. 14 CFR 291.44 - BTS Schedule P-12(a), Fuel Consumption by Type of Service and Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false BTS Schedule P-12(a), Fuel Consumption by... TRANSPORTATION Reporting Rules § 291.44 BTS Schedule P-12(a), Fuel Consumption by Type of Service and Entity. (a) For the purposes of BTS schedule P-12(a), type of service shall be either scheduled service...

  14. Comparison of n-type and p-type GaAs oxide growth and its effects on frequency dispersion characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkle, C. L.; Sonnet, A. M.; Milojevic, M.; Aguirre-Tostado, F. S.; Kim, H. C.; Kim, J.; Wallace, R. M.; Vogel, E. M.

    2008-09-15

    The electrical characteristics of n- and p-type gallium arsenide (GaAs) capacitors show a striking difference in the ''accumulation'' capacitance frequency dispersion. This difference has been attributed by some to a variation in the oxide growth, possibly due to photoelectrochemical properties of the two substrates. We show that the oxide growth on n- and p-type GaAs substrates is identical when exposed to identical environmental and chemical conditions while still maintaining the diverse electrical characteristics. The difference in electron and hole trap time constants is suggested as the source of the disparity of the frequency dispersion for n-type versus p-type GaAs devices.

  15. Ceramic anode catalyst for dry methane type molten carbonate fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, T.; Yanase, A.; Goto, S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Kondo, M.

    Oxide catalyst materials for methane oxidation were examined in order to develop the anode electrode for molten carbonate type fuel cell (MCFC). As a primary selection, oxides such as lanthanum (La 2O 3) and samarium (Sm 2O 3) were selected from screening experiments of TPD, TG and tubular reactor. Composite materials of these oxides with titanium fine powder were assembled into a cell unit for MCFC as the anode electrode. Steady-state activities were observed with these anode electrode materials when hydrogen was used as a fuel. When methane was directly charged to anode as a fuel (dry methane operation), a power generation with steady state was observed on both lanthanum and samarium composites after gradual decrease of open circuit electromotive force (OCV) and closed circuit current (CCI). The steady-state activity held as long as 144 h of continuous operation.

  16. Electrostatic Dispersion and Evaporation of Dense and Dilute Clusters of Drops of High-Energy Fuel For Soot Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Harstad, K.

    1997-01-01

    The high-energy-density (HED) fuels developed under U.S. Navy sponsorship as a replacement for conventional liquid fuels, in its missile propulsion systems have the drawback of high soot propensity: this makes misiles visible and thus strategically unacceptabel.

  17. High dispersion spectroscopy of solar-type superflare stars. II. Stellar rotation, starspots, and chromospheric activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, Yuta; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-06-01

    We conducted high dispersion spectroscopic observations of 50 superflare stars with Subaru/HDS. These 50 stars were selected from the solar-type superflare stars that we had discovered from the Kepler data. More than half (34 stars) of these 50 target superflare stars show no evidence of binarity, and we estimated stellar parameters of these 34 stars in our previous study (Notsu et al. 2015, PASJ, 67, 32). According to our previous studies using Kepler data, superflare stars show quasi-periodic brightness variations whose amplitude (0.1%-10%) is much larger than that of the solar brightness variations (0.01%-0.1%) caused by the existence of sunspots on the rotating solar surface. In this study, we investigated whether these quasi-periodic brightness variations of superflare stars are explained by the rotation of a star with fairly large starspots, by using stellar parameters derived in Paper I. First, we confirmed that the value of the projected rotational velocity, v sin i, is consistent with the rotational velocity estimated from the period of the brightness variation. Next, we measured the intensity of Ca II infrared triplet lines and Hα line, good indicators of the stellar chromospheric activity, and compared them with other stellar properties. The intensity of Ca II infrared triplet lines indicates that the mean magnetic field strength () of the target superflare stars can be higher than that of the Sun. A correlation between the amplitude of the brightness variation and the intensity of Ca II triplet line was found. All the targets expected to have large starspots because of their large amplitude of the brightness variation show high chromospheric activities compared to the Sun. These results support the idea that the brightness variation of superflare stars is due to the rotation with large starspots.

  18. A Comparison of Fuel Sprays from Several Types of Injection Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the tests results of a series of tests made of the sprays from 14 fuel injection nozzles of 9 different types, the sprays being injected into air at atmospheric density and at 6 and 14 times atmospheric density. High-speed spark photographs of the sprays from each nozzle at each air density were taken at the rate of 2,000 per second, and from them were obtained the dimensions of the sprays and the rates of spray-tip penetration. The sprays were also injected against plasticine targets placed at different distances from the nozzles, and the impressions made in the plasticine were used as an indication of the distribution of the fuel within the spray. Cross-sectional sketches of the different types of sprays are given showing the relative sizes of the spray cores and envelopes. The characteristics of the sprays are compared and discussed with respect to their application to various types of engines.

  19. Nuclear waste treatment - Studying the mixed ion type effects and concentration on the behaviour of oxide dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Omokanye, Qanitalillahi; Biggs, Simon

    2007-07-01

    In order to gain good control over a particulate dispersion it is necessary to accurately characterise the strength of inter-particle forces that may be operating. Such control is not routinely used, as yet, in the nuclear industry despite the possible benefits. We are investigating the impact of mixed electrolyte systems, for example NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, on the stability of oxide simulant particle dispersions. The electro-acoustic zeta potentials and shear yield stresses for concentrated dispersions have been measured across a range of pH conditions and electrolyte concentrations (0.001 M - 1.0 M). This paper summarizes initial data from these studies showing how the shear yield stress of concentrated aqueous oxide particle dispersions, can be adjusted through regulation of pH and the addition of background electrolytes (salt). The yield stress as a function of pH for these dispersions in mixed electrolytes showed a direct correlation with corresponding measurements of the zeta potential. Changes in the background electrolyte concentration or type were seen to cause a shift in the position of the isoelectric point (iep). Measurements of the shear yield stress showed a maximum at the iep corresponding to the position of maximum instability in the suspension. The consequences of these data for the efficient treatment of solid-liquid systems will be discussed. (authors)

  20. Differences in the effects of fuel oil and oil dispersant, and three polychlorinated biphenyls on fin regeneration in the Gulf Coast killifish, Fundulus grandis

    SciTech Connect

    Fingerman, S.W.

    1980-08-01

    Several environmental pollutants have been found to inhibit growth in animals. As a result of experiments performed in this laboratory on the long range effects of low levels of environmental pollutants on molting and limb regeneration in the fiddler crab, Uca pugilator and because animals in nature are rarely exposed to a single pollutant, a series of experiments was conducted to determine the effects, if any, of a single exposure to several pollutants, singly and in combination, on fin regeneration in the Gulf Coast killifish Fundulus grandis. The pollutants investigated were a fuel oil, an oil dispersant, and three polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

  1. Secondary seed dispersal by dung beetles in an Amazonian forest fragment of Colombia: influence of dung type and edge effect.

    PubMed

    Santos-Heredia, Carolina; Andresen, Ellen; Stevenson, Pablo

    2011-12-01

    Seeds of many plant species are secondarily dispersed by dung beetles, but the outcome of this interaction is highly context-specific. Little is known about how certain anthropogenic disturbances affect this plant-animal interaction. The aims of this study were to assess the effect of dung type on secondary dispersal by dung beetles in a forest fragment, and to determine whether this interaction is affected by edge effects. Using pitfall traps, we captured dung beetles attracted to dung of 2 frugivorous mammals: woolly monkeys and howler monkeys. We found differences between both dung beetle assemblages, but these differences were not consistent in time. Using seeds surrounded by both dung types, we carried out a field experiment using seeds of 2 plant species. We found that the probability of secondary dispersal by dung beetles was higher for seeds placed in woolly monkey dung. Finally, we carried out a field experiment using plastic beads as seed mimics to assess edge effects. We found that secondary seed dispersal by dung beetles was negatively affected by edges. The disruption of plant-animal interactions along anthropogenic forest edges could have long-term negative effects on forest dynamics by affecting processes of regeneration.

  2. Hydrocarbon group type determination in jet fuels by high performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Results are given for the analysis of some jet and diesel fuel samples which were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes. Thirty-two samples of varying chemical composition and physical properties were obtained. Hydrocarbon types in these samples were determined by fluorescent indicator adsorption (FIA) analysis, and the results from three laboratories are presented and compared. Recently, rapid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods have been proposed for hydrocarbon group type analysis, with some suggestion for their use as a replacement of the FIA technique. Two of these methods were used to analyze some of the samples, and these results are also presented and compared. Two samples of petroleum-based Jet A fuel are similarly analyzed.

  3. Electronically controlled distributor type fuel injection pump for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Nozaki, S.; Yamada, K.

    1986-08-12

    A distributor type fuel injection pump is described for an internal combustion engine, comprising: a suction space filled with fuel under pressure variable as a function of the rotational speed of the engine; a plunger driven by the engine for concurrent reciprocating and rotative motion to effect suction of fuel from the suction space into a pump working chamber defined by the plunger at one end thereof, pressure delivery of fuel from the pump working chamber and distribution of the fuel into cylinders of the engine; suction ports formed in the plunger and identical in number with the cylinders of the engine. The suction ports with the pump working chamber; a first communication passageway communicating the suction space with the pump working chamber; a second communication passageway having a restriction therein. The second communication passageway is disposed to sequentially register with the suction ports as the plunger rotates for communicating the suction space with each of the suction ports that registers with the second communication passageway; a solenoid valve disposed to selectively open and close the first communication passageway; a selector valve operable to assume, independently of the opening and closing action of the solenoid valve, a first valve position wherein the first communication passageway is closed and simultaneously the second communication passageway is opened, at the start of the engine, and a second valve position wherein the second communication passageway is closed and simultaneously the first communication passageway is is opened, during operation of the engine other than at the start of the engine; and control means operable in response to operating conditions of the engine to control the solenoid valve to alternately open and close so as to achieve required fuel injection quantity and required injection timing.

  4. The influence of weather and fuel type on the fuel composition of the area burned by forest fires in Ontario, 1996-2006.

    PubMed

    Podur, Justin J; Martell, David L

    2009-07-01

    Forest fires are influenced by weather, fuels, and topography, but the relative influence of these factors may vary in different forest types. Compositional analysis can be used to assess the relative importance of fuels and weather in the boreal forest. Do forest or wild land fires burn more flammable fuels preferentially or, because most large fires burn in extreme weather conditions, do fires burn fuels in the proportions they are available despite differences in flammability? In the Canadian boreal forest, aspen (Populus tremuloides) has been found to burn in less than the proportion in which it is available. We used the province of Ontario's Provincial Fuels Database and fire records provided by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources to compare the fuel composition of area burned by 594 large (>40 ha) fires that occurred in Ontario's boreal forest region, a study area some 430,000 km2 in size, between 1996 and 2006 with the fuel composition of the neighborhoods around the fires. We found that, over the range of fire weather conditions in which large fires burned and in a study area with 8% aspen, fires burn fuels in the proportions that they are available, results which are consistent with the dominance of weather in controlling large fires.

  5. Research on the Influence of the Type of Surfactant and Concentrator in Aqueous Dispersion of Pigments.

    PubMed

    Makarewicz, Edwin; Michalik, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    This work reports tests performed to evaluate the stability of aqueous dispersions of inorganic oxide pigments with different specific surface areas, with the use of anionic and non-ionic surfactants and concentrators. Color mixtures of oxide compounds of blue, green, olive and brown with the unit cell spinel structure were used as pigments. The sodium salt of sulfosuccinic acid monoester, oxyethylenated nonylphenol and ethoxylated derivatives of lauryl alcohol, fatty alcohol and fatty amine were used as surfactants. The concentrators used were: poly(vinyl alcohol), the sodium salt of carboxymethyl cellulose as well as a water-based polyurethane oligomer. The highest dispersion efficiency was found for dispersed systems in which surfactant and concentrator were incorporated in the formula. The one containing the sodium salt of carboxymethyl cellulose or polyurethane oligomer with ethoxylated saturated fatty alcohol or fatty amine was found to be the most efficient. It was discovered that a higher dispersion efficiency corresponds to pigments with larger specific surface. The efficiency is also found to improve when the concentrator is an acrylic polymer or copolymer made up of two acrylic species. In this case, the concentrator interaction with the surfactant is more effective if the value of its boundary viscosity number is higher. This observation confirms the existence of interactions between macro-chains of the concentrator and surfactant molecules forming micelles with the pigment particles.

  6. Dissolution of Danazol Amorphous Solid Dispersions: Supersaturation and Phase Behavior as a Function of Drug Loading and Polymer Type.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Matthew J; Kestur, Umesh S; Hussain, Munir A; Taylor, Lynne S

    2016-01-04

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) are of great interest as enabling formulations because of their ability to increase the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. However, the dissolution of these formulations under nonsink dissolution conditions results in highly supersaturated drug solutions that can undergo different types of phase transitions. The purpose of this study was to characterize the phase behavior of solutions resulting from the dissolution of model ASDs as well as the degree of supersaturation attained. Danazol was chosen as a poorly water-soluble model drug, and three polymers were used to form the dispersions: polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC), and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS). Dissolution studies were carried out under nonsink conditions, and solution phase behavior was characterized using several orthogonal techniques. It was found that liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) occurred following dissolution and prior to crystallization for most of the dispersions. Using flux measurements, it was further observed that the maximum attainable supersaturation following dissolution was equivalent to the amorphous solubility. The dissolution of the ASDs led to sustained supersaturation, the duration of which varied depending on the drug loading and the type of polymer used in the formulation. The overall supersaturation profile observed thus depended on a complex interplay between dissolution rate, polymer type, drug loading, and the kinetics of crystallization.

  7. Fuel cell market applications

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    This is a review of the US (and international) fuel cell development for the stationary power generation market. Besides DOE, GRI, and EPRI sponsorship, the US fuel cell program has over 40% cost-sharing from the private sector. Support is provided by user groups with over 75 utility and other end-user members. Objectives are to develop and demonstrate cost-effective fuel cell power generation which can initially be commercialized into various market applications using natural gas fuel by the year 2000. Types of fuel cells being developed include PAFC (phosphoric acid), MCFC (molten carbonate), and SOFC (solid oxide); status of each is reported. Potential international applications are reviewed also. Fuel cells are viewed as a force in dispersed power generation, distributed power, cogeneration, and deregulated industry. Specific fuel cell attributes are discussed: Fuel cells promise to be one of the most reliable power sources; they are now being used in critical uninterruptible power systems. They need hydrogen which can be generated internally from natural gas, coal gas, methanol landfill gas, or other fuels containing hydrocarbons. Finally, fuel cell development and market applications in Japan are reviewed briefly.

  8. Influence of graphite flake addition to sediment on electrogenesis in a sediment-type fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Lenin Babu, M; Venkata Mohan, S

    2012-04-01

    Graphite flakes at levels of 5%, 15%, 20% and 40% (weight per sediment volume) were added to lake bed sediment and electrogenesis in a sediment-type fuel cell was evaluated. Addition of graphite flakes by 20% to the sediment showed higher electrogenic activity of the fuel cell (578mV; 0.37mW) compared to control (304mV; 0.26mW). Further increment in the graphite loading showed a negative influence on the fuel cell behavior. A higher energy and capacitance were recorded with 20% addition of graphite flakes compared to the control. Increase in the exchange current density and decrease in the Tafel slope and electron transfer coefficient was observed with addition of graphite flakes. Apparent surface coverage analysis also supported the higher performance upon addition of 20% graphite flakes. The relative increase in the conductivity of bed due to addition of graphite flakes might be the reason for observed electrogenic activity. Marginal variation in the substrate utilization ( [Formula: see text] 50-55%) was observed with the addition of graphite flakes. By adding an optimum level of graphite flakes to sediment influences the fuel cell performance.

  9. Installation, maintenance and operating manual for the Lucas-type fuel injection system of the 3 B rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The installation procedure, maintenance, adjustment and operation of a Lucas type fuel injection system for 13B rotary racing engine is outlined. Components of the fuel injection system and installation procedure and notes are described. Maintenance, adjustment, and operation are discussed.

  10. Radiotoxicity and decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of VVER type reactors at long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Radiotoxicity and decay heat power of the spent nuclear fuel of VVER-1000 type reactors are calculated during storage time up to 300,000 y. Decay heat power of radioactive waste (radwaste) determines parameters of the heat removal system for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel. Radiotoxicity determines the radiological hazard of radwaste after its leakage and penetration into the environment.

  11. TRACKING THE EMISSION OF CARBON DIOXIDE BY NATION, SECTOR, AND FUEL TYPE: A TRACE GAS ACCOUNTING SYSTEM (TGAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a new way to estimate an efficient econometric model of global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) by nation, sector, and fuel type. Equations for fuel intensity are estimated for coal, oil, natural gas, electricity, and heat for six sectors: agricultural, indus...

  12. Fuel-air ratio (Lambda) correcting apparatus for a rotor-type carburetor for integral combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, R.

    1988-02-23

    This patent describes a fuel-air ratio correcting apparatus in a rotor-type carburetor for internal combustion engines with spark ignition for producing ingestion air with fuel-air ratios within a predetermined range defined by lean and rich limits matched to the requirements of the various operational points of the internal combustion engine. The rotor-type carburetor has a rotating element including a turbine which is driven by a turbine driving airstream which is induced by the engine and which becomes at least a portion of the ingested air stream, the rotating element containing a centrifugal pump for delivering a quantity of fuel which is in a substantially constant ratio to the rotational velocity of the rotating element. The fuel is delivered to a coaxial atomization means on the rotating element for broad-casting atomized fuel into the driving airstream. The centrifugal pump is sized to deliver a quantity of fuel to the driving airstream to establish a fuel-air ratio at one limit of the predetermined range, and means for sensing one or more parameters(s) affecting operation of the internal combustion engine and for selectively varying the volume of at least one of the constituents of the fuel-air mixture ingested by the engine for establishing a predetermined fuel-air ratio variable over the remainder of the range of fuel-air ratios in dependence on one or more measured operating parameter(s) of the internal combustion engine. The rotor-type carburetor has a rotor driven via an impeller by the ingested air stream, the rotor containing a centrifugal pump for delivering via at least one lateral fuel discharge bore a qantity of fuel which is in a constant ratio to the ingested air and which is dimensioned for a lean mixture.

  13. Microstructure of rapidly solidified Al 2O 3 dispersion strengthened type 316 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megusar, J.; Arnberg, L.; Vander Sande, J. B.; Grant, N. J.

    An aluminum oxide dispersion strengthened 316 stainless steel was developed by surface oxidation. Surface oxidation was chosen as a preferred method in order to minimize formation of less stable chromium oxides. Ultra low C+N 316 stainless steel was alloyed with 1 wt% A1, rapidly solidified to produce fine powders and attrited to approximately 0.5 pm thick flakes to provide for surface oxidation. Oxide particles in the extruded material were identified mostly as A1 oxides, In the preirradiated condition, oxide dispersion retarded crystallization and grain growth and had an effect on room temperature tensile properties. These structural modifications are expected to have an effect on the swelling resistance, structure stability and high temperature strength of austenitic stainless steels (Path A alloys).

  14. Evaluation of weldment sensitization on Type 304 and 304L stainless steel spent-fuel canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Filippio, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Sensitization was evaluated on welded Type 304 and 304L stainless steel canisters produced for the Commercial Waste Spent Fuel Packaging Program (CWSFPP) and the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Program (NNWSP). The canister weldments which were made under conditions having the greatest potential for causing sensitization were examined using metallographic and corrosion test practices described in Specification ASTM A-262, and also by exposure to hypothetical conditions simulating continuous boiling water immersion at the storage sites. When tested to ASTM A-262, the Type 304 weldments displayed classical evidence of sensitization; i.e., loss of corrosion resistance at heat affected zones, but no evidence of sensitizations was uncovered on the Type 304L weldments. Both the Type 304 and 304L weldments were totally unaffected by exposure for 1500 hours under conditions of continuous boiling water immersion, indicating that the CWSFPP and NNWSP canisters have adequate corrosion resistance for the intended applications.

  15. Control system of a dispersed fringe type sensing system of active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yajun; Zhang, Zhenchao; Zhang, Yong

    2010-07-01

    Active optics plays an important part in segmented mirrors of astronomy telescopes. A dispersed fringe sensor(DFS) using a broadband point source is an efficient method for cophasing and is also highly automated and robust. DFS can estimate the piston between segments only through the spectrum formed by the transmissive grating's dispersion and therefore can replace the edge sensors. So we build an system in our lab to experiment the DFS method. The whole control system of DFS is put forward, including control of displacement actuators and control of shifting the optical fiber. Control of displacement actuators consists in industry computer, HY-6120 I/O card, six stepper motor and other parts. Some theoretical analysis and experiment tests reveal that the actuator could be controlled to 5nm and without backlash by this control strategy. The optical fiber could be shifted out of optical path or shifted in part or whole of optical path so that the spectrum formed by the transmissive grating's dispersion could alter. When six actuators are moving, the piston is changing, and the spectrum is also moving and altering. And the whole control of DFS system is constructed now and seems well. Further test and experiment will be carry out.

  16. Types of Pollen Dispersal Units in Orchids, and their Consequences for Germination and Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Pacini, Ettore; Hesse, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The various pollen dispersal units (PDU) found in orchids are discussed together with possible evolutionary trends and the consequences for germination and fertilization. Orchids with monad and tetrad pollen form more complex dispersal units by means of pollenkitt, elastoviscin, a callosic wall, common walls or a combination of these. Evolutionary trends include (1) from pollenkitt to elastoviscin; (2) from monad to tetrads and multiples of tetrads; (3) from partially dehydrated (<30 %) to partially hydrated (>30 %) pollen; and (4) from monad pollen to PDUs with many pollen grains. The biological consequences concern both male and female reproductive systems. Some features of the male side are present in all orchids irrespective of the pollen dispersal unit, whereas other characters are found only in orchids with pollinia; the same applies for the female counterpart. Pollen grains of orchids with pollinia germinate at least 24 h after pollination because the pollen grains/tetrads must swell and make space for the growth of pollen tubes. PMID:12102520

  17. Integral Aircraft Fuel Tank Leak Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    effects of the following parameters on the rate of surface dispersion of fuels were examined: fuel type, leakage rate, surface material, fuel and...ranging from 3.34C to 98 C (38OF to 209’F). The vapor pressure of the fuel at the test temperature has a very pronounced effect on the propensity of the...Fuels and the Effect of Flow Rate 8 Effect of Temperature 14 Effect of Air Flow Rate 14 Effect of Panel Angle of Inclination 19 Effect of Panel

  18. Solitonic supercontinuum of femtosecond mid-IR pulses in W-type index tellurite fibers with two zero dispersion wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedenburg, S.; Steinle, T.; Mörz, F.; Steinmann, A.; Nguyen, D.; Rhonehouse, D.; Zong, J.; Chavez-Pirson, A.; Giessen, H.

    2016-11-01

    We present a detailed experimental parameter study on mid-IR supercontinuum generation in W-type index tellurite fibers, which reveals how the core diameter, pump wavelength, fiber length, and pump power dramatically influence the spectral broadening. As pump source, we use femtosecond mid-IR pulses from a post-amplified optical parametric oscillator tunable between 1.7 μm and 4.1 μm at 43 MHz repetition rate. We are able to generate red-shifted dispersive waves up to a wavelength of 5.1 μm by pumping a tellurite fiber in the anomalous dispersion regime between its two zero dispersion wavelengths. Distinctive soliton dynamics can be identified as the main broadening mechanism resulting in a maximum spectral width of over 2000 nm with output powers of up to 160 mW. We experimentally demonstrated that efficient spectral broadening with considerably improved power proportion in the important first atmospheric transmission window between 3 and 5 μm can be achieved in robust W-type tellurite fibers pumped at long wavelengths by ultra-fast lasers.

  19. Injection timing control device for distributor-type fuel injection pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuranaka, T.

    1986-09-09

    This patent describes an injection timing control device for combination with a fuel injection pump for an internal combustion engine, the pump being of the type having a suction space filled with fuel under pressure variable as a function of the rotational speed of the engine, a pumping and distributing plunger, and a roller holder carrying rollers circumferentially arranged and disposed in camming engagement with the plunger the injection timing control device comprising: a cylinder; a timer piston slidably received within the cylinder. The timer piston is coupled to the roller holder such that displacement thereof causes a corresponding change in the cicumferential position of the roller holder,; a first chamber defined at one end of the timer piston; a second chamber defined at one end of the timer piston; a second chamber defined at an opposite end of the timer piston.

  20. CHARACTERISTICS OF SPILLED OILS, FUELS, AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS: 3A. SIMULATION OF OIL SPILLS AND DISPERSANTS UNDER CONDITIONS OF UNCERTAINTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    At the request of the US EPA Oil Program Center, ERD is developing an oil spill model that focuses on fate and transport of oil components under various response scenarios. This model includes various simulation options, including the use of chemical dispersing agents on oil sli...

  1. Flagellin FliC Phosphorylation Affects Type 2 Protease Secretion and Biofilm Dispersal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Suriyanarayanan, Tanujaa; Periasamy, Saravanan; Lin, Miao-Hsia; Ishihama, Yasushi; Swarup, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation has a major role in controlling the life-cycle and infection stages of bacteria. Proteome-wide occurrence of S/T/Y phosphorylation has been reported for many prokaryotic systems. Previously, we reported the phosphoproteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. In this study, we show the role of S/T phosphorylation of one motility protein, FliC, in regulating multiple surface-associated phenomena of P. aeruginosa PAO1. This is the first report of occurrence of phosphorylation in the flagellar protein, flagellin FliC in its highly conserved N-terminal NDO domain across several Gram negative bacteria. This phosphorylation is likely a well-regulated phenomenon as it is growth phase dependent in planktonic cells. The absence of phosphorylation in the conserved T27 and S28 residues of FliC, interestingly, did not affect swimming motility, but affected the secretome of type 2 secretion system (T2SS) and biofilm formation of PAO1. FliC phosphomutants had increased levels and activities of type 2 secretome proteins. The secretion efficiency of T2SS machinery is associated with flagellin phosphorylation. FliC phosphomutants also formed reduced biofilms at 24 h under static conditions and had delayed biofilm dispersal under dynamic flow conditions, respectively. The levels of type 2 secretome and biofilm formation under static conditions had an inverse correlation. Hence, increase in type 2 secretome levels was accompanied by reduced biofilm formation in the FliC phosphomutants. As T2SS is involved in nutrient acquisition and biofilm dispersal during survival and spread of P. aeruginosa, we propose that FliC phosphorylation has a role in ecological adaptation of this opportunistic environmental pathogen. Altogether, we found a system of phosphorylation that affects key surface related processes such as proteases secretion by T2SS, biofilm formation and dispersal. PMID:27701473

  2. Occurrence and Dispersal of Indicator Bacteria on Cucumbers Grown Horizontally or Vertically on Various Mulch Types.

    PubMed

    Micallef, Shirley A; Callahan, Mary Theresa; Pagadala, Sivaranjani

    2016-10-01

    No data exist on the impact of cultivation practices on food safety risks associated with cucumber. Cucumbers are typically grown horizontally over a mulch cover, with fruit touching the ground, but this vining plant grows well in vertical systems. To assess whether production system affects bacterial dispersal onto plants, field trials were conducted over 2 years. Cucumber cultivar 'Marketmore 76' was grown horizontally on plastic, straw, or bare ground or vertically on trellises installed on bare ground in soil previously amended with raw dairy manure. Fruit, flower, leaf, and soil samples were collected to quantify Escherichia coli , thermotolerant coliforms, and enterococci by direct plating. E. coli isolates were characterized by BOX-PCR to evaluate relatedness among strains. Although thermotolerant coliforms and enterococci were significantly less abundant on fruit in year 1 (P < 0.05), this result was not seen in year 2 when more rain was recorded. Instead, fruit from straw-mulched beds had higher levels of enterococci compared with fruit grown on bare ground (P < 0.05). Leaves on bare ground occasionally had more bacteria than did leaves on plastic mulch beds (P < 0.05). Production system did not impact flower-associated bacterial levels. E. coli isolates (n =127) were genotyped, generating 21 distinct fingerprints. Vertical production did not appear to be a barrier for E. coli dispersal to the crop, as suggested by numerous related isolates from soil and flowers on bare ground, straw-mulched, and trellised beds (subcluster B1). None of the isolates from soil and flowers in this subcluster were related to isolates recovered from fruit, showing that flower colonization does not necessarily lead to fruit colonization. One cluster of isolates contained those from flowers and fruits but not soil, indicating a source other than manure-amended soil. Straw may be a source of E. coli ; a number of closely related E. coli isolates were retrieved from soil and fruits

  3. Assessing photocatalytic power of g-C3N4 for solar fuel production: A first-principles study involving quasi-particle theory and dispersive forces.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Guillén, J M; Espinosa-García, W F; Moyses Araujo, C

    2015-09-07

    First-principles quasi-particle theory has been employed to assess catalytic power of graphitic carbon nitride, g-C3N4, for solar fuel production. A comparative study between g-h-triazine and g-h-heptazine has been carried out taking also into account van der Waals dispersive forces. The band edge potentials have been calculated using a recently developed approach where quasi-particle effects are taken into account through the GW approximation. First, it was found that the description of ground state properties such as cohesive and surface formation energies requires the proper treatment of dispersive interaction. Furthermore, through the analysis of calculated band-edge potentials, it is shown that g-h-triazine has high reductive power reaching the potential to reduce CO2 to formic acid, coplanar g-h-heptazine displays the highest thermodynamics force toward H2O/O2 oxidation reaction, and corrugated g-h-heptazine exhibits a good capacity for both reactions. This rigorous theoretical study shows a route to further improve the catalytic performance of g-C3N4.

  4. Assessing photocatalytic power of g-C3N4 for solar fuel production: A first-principles study involving quasi-particle theory and dispersive forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio-Guillén, J. M.; Espinosa-García, W. F.; Moyses Araujo, C.

    2015-09-01

    First-principles quasi-particle theory has been employed to assess catalytic power of graphitic carbon nitride, g-C3N4, for solar fuel production. A comparative study between g-h-triazine and g-h-heptazine has been carried out taking also into account van der Waals dispersive forces. The band edge potentials have been calculated using a recently developed approach where quasi-particle effects are taken into account through the GW approximation. First, it was found that the description of ground state properties such as cohesive and surface formation energies requires the proper treatment of dispersive interaction. Furthermore, through the analysis of calculated band-edge potentials, it is shown that g-h-triazine has high reductive power reaching the potential to reduce CO2 to formic acid, coplanar g-h-heptazine displays the highest thermodynamics force toward H2O/O2 oxidation reaction, and corrugated g-h-heptazine exhibits a good capacity for both reactions. This rigorous theoretical study shows a route to further improve the catalytic performance of g-C3N4.

  5. Passive approach for the improved dispersion of polyvinyl alcohol-based functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes/Nafion membranes for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Abu Sayeed, M D; Talukdar, Krishan; Kim, Hee Jin; Park, Younjin; Gopalan, A I; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Pill; Choi, Sang-June

    2014-12-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are regarded as ideal fillers for Nafion polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) for fuel cell applications. The highly aggregated properties of MWCNTs can be overcome by the successful cross-linking with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) into the MWCNTs/Nafion membrane. In this study, a series of nanocomposite membranes were fabricated with the PVA-influenced functionalized MWCNTs reinforced into the Nafion polymer matrix by a solution casting method. Several different PVA contents were blended to f-MWCNTs/Nafion nanocomposite membranes followed by successful cross-linking by annealing. The surface morphologies and the inner structures of the resulting PVA-MWCNTs/Nafion nanocomposite membranes were then observed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate the dispersion of MWCNTs into the PVA/Nafion composite membranes. After that, the nanocomposite membranes were characterized by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) to observe the thermal enhancement caused by effective cross-linking between the f-MWCNTs with the composite polymer matrixes. Improved water uptake with reduced methanol uptake revealed the successful fabrication of PVA-blended f-MWCNTs/Nafion membranes. In addition, the ion exchange capacity (IEC) was evaluated for PEM fuel cell (PEMFC) applications.

  6. Physics concept on the constellation type fissile fuels and its application to the prospective Th-{sup 233}U reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jiahua Zhange

    1994-12-31

    In contrast with the conventional nuclear reactor which usually fuelled with one single fissile nuclide, a constellation type fissile fuels reactor consists of a parent nuclide such as {sup 232}Th or {sup 238}U and its whole family of neutron generated daughter nuclides. All of them are regarded as fissile fuels but of quite different fission ability. The concentration of each daughter nuclide is determined by its saturate concentration ratio with the parent nuclide. In such fuel system, the whole fuel consumed by neutron reaction almost completely results in fission production. In this article, some interesting properties of such fuel system, determination of the saturate concentration of each daughter nuclide and applicability to Th-{sup 233}U reactor will be discussed.

  7. Wild boars as spore dispersal agents of ectomycorrhizal fungi: consequences for community composition at different habitat types.

    PubMed

    Livne-Luzon, Stav; Avidan, Yael; Weber, Gil; Migael, Hen; Bruns, Thomas; Ovadia, Ofer; Shemesh, Hagai

    2017-04-01

    The success of dispersal events depend on the organism's ability to reach and establish in a new habitat. In symbiotic organisms, establishment also depends on the presence of their symbiont partner in the new habitat. For instance, the establishment of obligate ectomycorrhizal (EM) trees outside the forest is largely limited by the presence of EM fungi in soil. Wild boars (Sus scrofa) are important dispersal agents of EM fungal spores, particularly in the moderately dry Mediterranean region. The aim of this study was to explore how EM fungal spores dispersed by wild boars influence the EM fungal community associated with the roots of Pinus halepensis seedlings at different habitat types. Using a greenhouse bioassay, we grew pine seedlings in two soil types: old-field and forest soils mixed with either natural or autoclaved wild boar feces. In both soils, we observed a community dominated by a few EM fungal species. Geopora (85 %) and Suillus (68 %) species dominated the forest and old-field soils, respectively. The addition of natural wild boar feces increased the abundance of Tuber species in both EM fungal communities. However, this effect was more pronounced in pots with old-field soil, leading to a more even community, equally dominated by both Tuber and Suillus species. In forest soil, Geopora maintained dominance, but decreased in abundance (67 %), due to the addition of Tuber species. Our findings indicate that wild boar feces can be an important source for EM inoculum, especially in habitats poor in EM fungi such as old-fields.

  8. 40 CFR 600.207-93 - Calculation of fuel economy values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculation of fuel economy values for... AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Procedures for Calculating Fuel...

  9. 40 CFR 600.207-86 - Calculation of fuel economy values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculation of fuel economy values for... AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Procedures for Calculating Fuel...

  10. Relevance of GaAs(001) surface electronic structure for high frequency dispersion on n-type accumulation capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, T. W.; Chen, W. S.; Lin, Y. H.; Cheng, Y. T.; Wei, G. J.; Lin, K. Y.; Cheng, C.-P.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the origin of long-puzzled high frequency dispersion on the accumulation region of capacitance-voltage characteristics in an n-type GaAs-based metal-oxide-semiconductor. Probed adatoms with a high Pauling electronegativity, Ag and Au, unexpectedly donate charge to the contacted As/Ga atoms of as-grown α2 GaAs(001)-2 × 4 surfaces. The GaAs surface atoms behave as charge acceptors, and if not properly passivated, they would trap those electrons accumulated at the oxide and semiconductor interface under a positive bias. The exemplified core-level spectra of the Al2O3/n-GaAs(001)-2 × 4 and the Al2O3/n-GaAs(001)-4 × 6 interfaces exhibit remnant of pristine surface As emission, thereby causing high frequency dispersion in the accumulation region. For the p-type GaAs, electrons under a negatively biased condition are expelled from the interface, thereby avoiding becoming trapped.

  11. Effects of patch size and type of coffee matrix on ithomiine butterfly diversity and dispersal in cloud-forest fragments.

    PubMed

    Muriel, Sandra B; Kattan, Gustavo H

    2009-08-01

    Determining the permeability of different types of landscape matrices to animal movement is essential for conserving populations in fragmented landscapes. We evaluated the effects of habitat patch size and matrix type on diversity, isolation, and dispersal of ithomiine butterflies in forest fragments surrounded by coffee agroecosystems in the Colombian Andes. Because ithomiines prefer a shaded understory, we expected the highest diversity and abundance in large fragments surrounded by shade coffee and the lowest in small fragments surrounded by sun coffee. We also thought shade coffee would favor butterfly dispersal and immigration into forest patches. We marked 9675 butterflies of 39 species in 12 forest patches over a year. Microclimate conditions were more similar to the forest interior in the shade-coffee matrix than in the sun-coffee matrix, but patch size and matrix type did not affect species richness and abundance in forest fragments. Furthermore, age structure and temporal recruitment patterns of the butterfly community were similar in all fragments, independent of patch size or matrix type. There were no differences in the numbers of butterflies flying in the matrices at two distances from the forest patch, but their behavior differed. Flight in the sun-coffee matrix was rapid and directional, whereas butterflies in shade-coffee matrix flew slowly. Seven out of 130 recaptured butterflies immigrated into patches in the shade-coffee matrix, and one immigrated into a patch surrounded by sun coffee. Although the shade-coffee matrix facilitated movement in the landscape, sun-coffee matrix was not impermeable to butterflies. Ithomiines exhibited behavioral plasticity in habitat use and high mobility. These traits favor their persistence in heterogeneous landscapes, opening opportunities for their conservation. Understanding the dynamics and resource requirements of different organisms in rural landscapes is critical for identifying management options that

  12. Constraints on Neutrino Masses from the Lensing Dispersion of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Ryuichiro; Futamase, Toshifumi

    2016-09-01

    We investigate how accurately the total mass of neutrinos is constrained from the magnitude dispersion of SNe Ia due to the effects of gravitational lensing. For this purpose, we use the propagation equation of light bundles in a realistic inhomogeneous universe and propose a sample selection for supernovae to avoid difficulties associated with small-scale effects such as strong lensing or shear effects. With a fitting formula for the nonlinear matter power spectrum taking account of the effects of massive neutrinos, we find that in our model it is possible to obtain the upper limit {{Σ }}{m}ν ≃ 1.0[{{eV}}] for future optical imaging surveys with the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Furthermore, we discuss how far we need to observe SNe Ia and to what extent we have to reduce the magnitude error except for lensing in order to realize the current tightest limit {{Σ }}{m}ν \\lt 0.2[{{eV}}].

  13. Reactivity of atomically dispersed Pt(2+) species towards H2: model Pt-CeO2 fuel cell catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lykhach, Yaroslava; Figueroba, Alberto; Camellone, Matteo Farnesi; Neitzel, Armin; Skála, Tomáš; Negreiros, Fabio R; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Tsud, Nataliya; Prince, Kevin C; Fabris, Stefano; Neyman, Konstantin M; Matolín, Vladimír; Libuda, Jörg

    2016-03-21

    The reactivity of atomically dispersed Pt(2+) species on the surface of nanostructured CeO2 films and the mechanism of H2 activation on these sites have been investigated by means of synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant photoemission spectroscopy in combination with density functional calculations. Isolated Pt(2+) sites are found to be inactive towards H2 dissociation due to high activation energy required for H-H bond scission. Trace amounts of metallic Pt are necessary to initiate H2 dissociation on Pt-CeO2 films. H2 dissociation triggers the reduction of Ce(4+) cations which, in turn, is coupled with the reduction of Pt(2+) species. The mechanism of Pt(2+) reduction involves reverse oxygen spillover and formation of oxygen vacancies on Pt-CeO2 films. Our calculations suggest the existence of a threshold concentration of oxygen vacancies associated with the onset of Pt(2+) reduction.

  14. Wildfire frequency varies with the size and shape of fuel types in southeastern France: implications for environmental management.

    PubMed

    Curt, Thomas; Borgniet, Laurent; Bouillon, Christophe

    2013-03-15

    Characterizing time intervals between successive fires in the recent history is of main interest for fire hazard prevention and sustainable environmental management as it indicates what the typical fire return interval for each type of ecosystem is. We tested the extent to which fire return intervals (FRIs) depend on fuel type and age, and we compared FRI values between two fire-prone areas of south-eastern France (Provence). These areas had similar weather and roughly similar fuel types but fuels occurred in patches with different sizes and shapes in the landscape. We built a fire database (1960-2010) and we fitted Weibull distributions of FRI in order to compute the probability density function and the hazard of burning. Our results indicate maximal probability of burning again for shrublands (garrigues and maquis), and minimal values for mixed broadleaf-conifer forests and broadleaved forests. Most fuel types of Provence showed no effect of fuel age on the probability of burning again. Only the unmanaged maquis showed a linear increase of fire hazard in time due to a rapid postfire fuel build up. Rather long fire-free intervals and low age-dependency for most forest fuels of Provence suggest that reducing their biomass may not be sufficient to reduce fire risk. In contrast, the flammable shrublands have rather short fire return intervals and represent a high fire hazard for the whole study area. The two areas had statistically significant difference of fire return intervals for a same fuel type (e.g. 18-22 years for shrublands, 20-24 years for pine forests, and 24-27 years for oak forests). This suggested that size, shape and connectivity of fuels play a major role in the probability of burning again and should be taken into account for fire management. The present policy of fire prevention puts efforts into public information and prevention, and preferential management of fuels at risk in the vicinity of roads and wildland-urban interfaces where fires occur

  15. Fog dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Christensen, L. S.; Collins, F. G.; Camp, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A study of economically viable techniques for dispersing warm fog at commercial airports is presented. Five fog dispersion techniques are examined: evaporation suppression, downwash, mixing, seeding with hygroscopic material, thermal techniques, and charged particle techniques. Thermal techniques, although effective, were found to be too expensive for routine airport operations, and detrimental to the environment. Seeding or helicopter downwash are practical for small-scale or temporary fog clearing, but are probably not useful for airport operations on a routine basis. Considerable disagreement exists on the capability of charged particle techniques, which stems from the fact that different assumptions and parameter values are used in the analytical models. Recommendations resulting from the review of this technique are listed, and include: experimental measurements of the parameters in question; a study to ascertain possible safety hazards, such as increased electrical activity or fuel ignition during refueling operations which could render charged particle techniques impractical; and a study of a single charged particle generator.

  16. High dispersion spectroscopy of solar-type superflare stars. I. Temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and vsin i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, Yuta; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-06-01

    We conducted high-dispersion spectroscopic observations of 50 superflare stars with Subaru High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS), and measured the stellar parameters of them. These 50 targets were selected from the solar-type (G-type main sequence) superflare stars that we had discovered from the Kepler photometric data. As a result of these spectroscopic observations, we found that more than half (34) of our 50 targets have no evidence of binary systems. We then estimated the effective temperature (Teff), surface gravity (log g), metallicity ([Fe/H]), and projected rotational velocity (vsin i) of these 34 superflare stars on the basis of our spectroscopic data. The accuracy of our estimations is higher than that of the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) values, and the differences between our values and KIC values [(ΔTeff)rms ˜ 219 K, (Δlog g)rms ˜ 0.37 dex, and (Δ[Fe/H])rms ˜ 0.46 dex] are comparable to the large uncertainties and systematic differences of KIC values reported by the previous researchers. We confirmed that the estimated Teff and log g values of the 34 superflare stars are roughly in the range of solar-type stars. In particular, these parameters and the brightness variation period (P0) of nine of the stars are in the range of "Sun-like" stars (5600 ≤ Teff ≤ 6000 K, log g ≥ 4.0, and P0 > 10 d). Five of the 34 target stars are fast rotators (vsin i ≥ 10 km s-1), while 22 stars have relatively low vsin i values (vsin i < 5 km s-1). These results suggest that stars that have spectroscopic properties similar to the Sun can have superflares, and this supports the hypothesis that the Sun might cause a superflare.

  17. Fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, has supported and managed a fuel cell research and development (R and D) program since 1976. Responsibility for implementing DOE's fuel cell program, which includes activities related to both fuel cells and fuel cell systems, has been assigned to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The total United States effort of the private and public sectors in developing fuel cell technology is referred to as the National Fuel Cell Program (NFCP). The goal of the NFCP is to develop fuel cell power plants for base-load and dispersed electric utility systems, industrial cogeneration, and on-site applications. To achieve this goal, the fuel cell developers, electric and gas utilities, research institutes, and Government agencies are working together. Four organized groups are coordinating the diversified activities of the NFCP. The status of the overall program is reviewed in detail.

  18. {High dispersion spectroscopy of solar-type superflare stars with Subaru/HDS†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, Yuta; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    We carried out spectroscopic observations with Subaru/HDS of 50 solar-type superflare stars found from Kepler data. More than half (34 stars) of the target stars show no evidence of the binary system, and we confirmed atmospheric parameters of these stars are roughly in the range of solar-type stars. We then conducted the detailed analyses for these 34 stars. First, the value of the ``v sin i'' (projected rotational velocity) measured from spectroscopic results is consistent with the rotational velocity estimated from the brightness variation. Second, there is a correlation between the amplitude of the brightness variation and the intensity of Ca II IR triplet line. All the targets expected to have large starspots because of their large amplitude of the brightness variation show high chromospheric activities compared with the Sun. These results support that the brightness variation of superflare stars is explained by the rotation of a star with large starspots.

  19. Cryogenic distillation: a fuel enrichment system for near-term tokamak-type D-T fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, B.; Davis, J.F.

    1980-02-01

    The successful operation and economic viability of deuterium-tritium- (D-T-) fueled tokamak-type commercial power fusion reactors will depend to a large extent on the development of reliable tritium-containment and fuel-recycle systems. Of the many operating steps in the fuel recycle scheme, separation or enrichment of the isotropic species of hydrogen by cryogenic distillation is one of the most important. A parametric investigation was carried out to study the effects of the various operating conditions and the composition of the spent fuel on the degree of separation. A computer program was developed for the design and analysis of a system of interconnected distillation columns for isotopic separation such that the requirements of near-term D-T-fueled reactors are met. The analytical results show that a distillation cascade consisting of four columns is capable of reprocessing spent fuel varying over a wide range of compositions to yield reinjection-grade fuel with essentially unlimited D/T ratio.

  20. High Dispersion Spectroscopy of Solar-Type Superflare Stars With Subaru/HDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, Yuta; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Namekata, Kosuke; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2016-07-01

    Superflares are flares that release total energy 10-104times greater than that of the biggest solar flares ( 1032 erg). Recent Kepler-space-telescope observations found more than 1000superflares on a few hundred solar-type stars (Maehara et al. 2012, Nature; Shibayama et al. 2013, ApJS, Maehara et al. 2015 EPS).Suchsuperflare stars show quasi-periodicbrightnessvariations with the typical period of from one to a few tens of days. Such variations are thought to be caused by the rotation of the star with large starspots (Notsu et al. 2013, ApJ). However, spectroscopic observations are needed in order to confirm whether the variation is really due to the rotation and whether superflares can occur on ordinary single stars similar to our Sun.Then we have carried out spectroscopic observations for 50 solar-type superflare stars with Subaru/HDS (Notsu et al. 2015a&b, PASJ). As a result, more than half (34 stars) of the targetstars show no evidence of binarity, and the atmospheric parameters of these stars are in the range of solar-type stars.The detailed analyses for these 34 stars show that (1) the projected rotational velocities (v sin i) are consistent with the rotational velocities estimated from the brightness variations, (2)there is a correlation between the brightness variation amplitude and the intensity of Ca II IR triplet line. These results support that the brightness variation discussed above is explained bythe rotation of a star with large starspots. (The contents of this poster were already summarized in the proceeding of IAU Symposium S320 (Notsu et al. 2016 IAUS in press, arXiv:1510.08143))

  1. Spreading speeds and traveling waves for a nonlocal dispersal equation with convolution-type crossing-monostable nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Bao; Ma, Ruyun

    2014-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the traveling wave solutions and the spreading speeds for a nonlocal dispersal equation with convolution-type crossing-monostable nonlinearity, which is motivated by an age-structured population model with time delay. We first prove the existence of traveling wave solution with critical wave speed c = c*. By introducing two auxiliary monotone birth functions and using a fluctuation method, we further show that the number c = c* is also the spreading speed of the corresponding initial value problem with compact support. Then, the nonexistence of traveling wave solutions for c < c* is established. Finally, by means of the (technical) weighted energy method, we prove that the traveling wave with large speed is exponentially stable, when the initial perturbation around the wave is relatively small in a weighted norm.

  2. 40 CFR 600.207-86 - Calculation of fuel economy values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Calculation of fuel economy values for... AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values for 1977 and Later...

  3. 40 CFR 600.207-93 - Calculation of fuel economy values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Calculation of fuel economy values for... AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values for 1977 and Later...

  4. 14 CFR 26.35 - Changes to type certificates affecting fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Applicability. This section applies to holders and applicants for approvals of the following design changes to any airplane subject to 14 CFR 26.33(a): (1) Any fuel tank designed to be Normally Emptied if the fuel... December 26, 2008; (2) Any fuel tank designed to be Normally Emptied if an application for a...

  5. 14 CFR 26.35 - Changes to type certificates affecting fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Applicability. This section applies to holders and applicants for approvals of the following design changes to any airplane subject to 14 CFR 26.33(a): (1) Any fuel tank designed to be Normally Emptied if the fuel... December 26, 2008; (2) Any fuel tank designed to be Normally Emptied if an application for a...

  6. 14 CFR 26.35 - Changes to type certificates affecting fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Applicability. This section applies to holders and applicants for approvals of the following design changes to any airplane subject to 14 CFR 26.33(a): (1) Any fuel tank designed to be Normally Emptied if the fuel... December 26, 2008; (2) Any fuel tank designed to be Normally Emptied if an application for a...

  7. 14 CFR 26.35 - Changes to type certificates affecting fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Applicability. This section applies to holders and applicants for approvals of the following design changes to any airplane subject to 14 CFR 26.33(a): (1) Any fuel tank designed to be Normally Emptied if the fuel... December 26, 2008; (2) Any fuel tank designed to be Normally Emptied if an application for a...

  8. Fuel Character Effects on Current, High Pressure Ratio, Can-Type Turbine Combustion Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    out (’ LCF low cycle fatigue TLR fuel lower heating value, MJ/kg Mach number MS Gulf mineral seal oil, fuel additive NO oxides of nitrogen K P...fuel properties are presented in Subsections C (single variable) and D ( multipla variables). Projections of combustor and turtine hardware life based

  9. High performance liquid chromatographic hydrocarbon group-type analyses of mid-distillates employing fuel-derived fractions as standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, G. T.; Otterson, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Two high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods have been developed for the determination of saturates, olefins and aromatics in petroleum and shale derived mid-distillate fuels. In one method the fuel to be analyzed is reacted with sulfuric acid, to remove a substantial portion of the aromatics, which provides a reacted fuel fraction for use in group type quantitation. The second involves the removal of a substantial portion of the saturates fraction from the HPLC system to permit the determination of olefin concentrations as low as 0.3 volume percent, and to improve the accuracy and precision of olefins determinations. Each method was evaluated using model compound mixtures and real fuel samples.

  10. High dispersion spectroscopy of solar-type superflare stars with Subaru/HDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, Yuta; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    Superflares are very large flares that release total energy 10-104 times greater than that of the biggest solar flares with energy of ~1032 erg. Recent Kepler-space-telescope observations found more than 1000 superflares on a few hundred solar-type stars (Maehara et al. 2012, Nature, 485, 478; Shibayama et al. 2013, ApJS, 209, 5). Such superflare stars show quasi-periodic brightness variations with the typical period of from one to a few tens of days . Such variations are thought to be caused by the rotation of the star with large starspots (Notsu et al. 2013, ApJ, 771, 127). However, spectroscopic observations are needed in order toconfirm whether the variation is really due to the rotation and whether superflares can occur on ordinary single stars similar to our Sun.We have carried out spectroscopic observations for 50 solar-type superflare stars with Subaru/HDS. As a result, more than half (34 stars) of the target stars show no evidence of the binary system, and we confirmed stellar atmospheric parameters of these stars are roughly in the range of solar-type stars on the basis of our spectroscopic data.We then conducted the detailed analyses for these 34 stars. First, the value of the "v sin i" (projected rotational velocity) measured from spectroscopic results is consistent with the rotational velocity estimated from the brightness variation. Second, there is a correlation between the amplitude of the brightness variation and the intensity of Ca II IR triplet line. All the targets expected to have large starspots because of their large amplitude of the brightness variation show high chromospheric activities compared to the Sun. These support that the brightness variation discussed above is explained by the rotation of a star with large starspots.Reference:Notsu et al. 2015a & 2015b, PASJ in press (arXiv:1412.8243, 1412.8245)Nogami et al. 2014, PASJ, 66, L4Notsu et al. 2013, PASJ, 65, 112

  11. 40 CFR 600.209-12 - Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for a model type. 600.209-12 Section 600.209-12 Protection of... EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values § 600.209-12 Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for...

  12. 40 CFR 600.209-12 - Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for a model type. 600.209-12 Section 600.209-12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust...

  13. 40 CFR 600.209-12 - Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-cycle fuel economy and CO2 emission values for a model type. 600.209-12 Section 600.209-12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust...

  14. 40 CFR 600.208-08 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-based fuel economy values for a model type. 600.208-08 Section 600.208-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values...

  15. 40 CFR 600.208-08 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-based fuel economy values for a model type. 600.208-08 Section 600.208-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values §...

  16. 40 CFR 600.208-08 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-based fuel economy values for a model type. 600.208-08 Section 600.208-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values §...

  17. 40 CFR 600.208-08 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy values for a model type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-based fuel economy values for a model type. 600.208-08 Section 600.208-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Procedures...

  18. Microstructural Characterization and Wear Behavior of Nano-Boride Dispersed Coating on AISI 304 Stainless Steel by Hybrid High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spraying Laser Surface Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prashant; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2015-07-01

    The current study concerns the detailed microstructural characterization and investigation of wear behavior of nano-boride dispersed coating developed on AISI 304 stainless steel by high velocity oxy-fuel spray deposition of nickel-based alloy and subsequent laser melting. There is a significant refinement and homogenization of microstructure with improvement in microhardness due to laser surface melting (1200 VHN as compared to 945 VHN of as-sprayed and 250 VHN of as-received substrate). The high temperature phase stability of the as-coated and laser melted surface has been studied by differential scanning calorimeter followed by detailed phase analysis at room and elevated temperature. There is a significant improvement in wear resistance of laser melted surface as compared to as-sprayed and the as-received one due to increased hardness and reduced coefficient of friction. The mechanism of wear has been investigated in details. Corrosion resistance of the coating in a 3.56 wt pct NaCl solution is significantly improved (4.43 E-2 mm/year as compared to 5 E-1 mm/year of as-sprayed and 1.66 mm/year of as-received substrate) due to laser surface melting as compared to as-sprayed surface.

  19. [Development of a low-cost single chamber microbial fuel cell type BOD sensor].

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Liu, Zhi; Zhou, Ben; Zhou, Shun-gui; Rao, Li-qun; Wang, Yue-qiang

    2010-07-01

    The principle of the detector is based on the effect of microbial toxicity of water sample on the electricity generation in microbial fuel cell (MFC). The performance of the MFC-type biotoxicity detector was evaluated with the synthetic water containing heavy metals of Cd2+ and Cu2+. The experimental results demonstrated that: (1) relative to the conventional methods, the MFC-type detector is easy to operate, and suitable for on-line measurements with high sensitivity; (2) it only requires 4 h to complete measurements, and can get ready for next measurement within 4 h; (3) there is a significant linear correlation between the concentration of toxic metal(s) and inhibition ratios in Coulombic yields of MFC. As the IC20 (concentration causing 20% inhibition) of Cd2+, Cu2+ and mixed metals (Cd2+ and Cu2+) were 0.6, 0.8 and 0.25 mg/L, the regression coefficients were shown to be 0.9960, 0.9744 and 0.9907.

  20. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE STUDIES OF NEARBY TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: THE MEAN MAXIMUM LIGHT ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AND ITS DISPERSION

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Jeff; Ellis, Richard S.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Ofek, Eran O.; Quimby, Robert M.; Sullivan, Mark; Nugent, Peter; Howell, D. Andrew; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Lidman, Chris; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Law, Nicholas M.

    2011-02-01

    We present the first results of an ongoing campaign using the STIS spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), whose primary goal is the study of near-ultraviolet (UV) spectra of local Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Using events identified by the Palomar Transient Factory and subsequently verified by ground-based spectroscopy, we demonstrate the ability to locate and classify SNe Ia as early as 16 days prior to maximum light. This enables us to trigger HST in a non-disruptive mode to obtain near UV spectra within a few days of maximum light for comparison with earlier equivalent ground-based spectroscopic campaigns conducted at intermediate-redshifts, z-bar {approx_equal}0.5. We analyze the spectra of 12 SNe Ia located in the Hubble flow with 0.01 < z < 0.08. Although a fraction of our eventual sample, these data, together with archival data, already provide a substantial advance over that previously available. Restricting samples to those of similar phase and stretch, the mean UV spectrum agrees reasonably closely with that at intermediate redshift, although some differences are found in the metallic absorption features. A larger sample will determine whether these differences reflect possible biases or are a genuine evolutionary effect. Significantly, the wavelength-dependent dispersion, which is larger in the UV, follows similar trends to those observed at intermediate redshift and is driven, in part, by differences in the various metallic features. While the origin of the UV dispersion remains uncertain, our comparison suggests that it may reflect compositional variations among our sample rather than being predominantly an evolutionary effect.

  1. The effects of a liquid dispersing agent and a microcrystalline additive on the physical properties of type IV gypsum.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, M R; Johnston, W M; Reisbick, M H; Campagni, W V

    1988-11-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a liquid dispersing agent (LDA) and a microcrystalline additive (MCA) on selected physical properties of type IV gypsum. Working consistency, setting time, setting expansion, and compressive strength (1 hour and 7 days) were determined, following ADA Specification No. 25, on a standard, LDA (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mL), MCA (21.1, 24.1, and 27.1 gm), and combination (LDA 0.75 mL + MCA 12.05 gm) mixes per 300 gm of gypsum. Results indicate that the additives affect the consistency of the mix, but consistency can be kept close to that of the standard by lowering the water/powder ratio. Statistical analysis of the data indicated that the additives significantly affected the setting time, setting expansion, and both the 1-hour and the 7-day compressive strengths. SEM examination of fractured surfaces of test mixes indicated improved crystal packing. The properties of type IV gypsum can be improved by optimizing the amount of LDA and MCA additives.

  2. 14 CFR 291.44 - BTS Schedule P-12(a), Fuel Consumption by Type of Service and Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false BTS Schedule P-12(a), Fuel Consumption by Type of Service and Entity. 291.44 Section 291.44 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... possession; (3) International operations are flight stages with one or both terminals outside the 50...

  3. Preparation of carbide-type, advanced LMFBR fuel pellets for irradiation testing

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, R.L.; Herbst, R.J.

    1980-06-01

    A carbothermic reduction process was established to fabricate single- and two-phase uranium-plutonium carbide fuel on a production basis. Sintering temperatures of 1550 and 1800/sup 0/C were used to prepare fuel densities of 98, 87, and 81% of theoretical.

  4. Composition and distribution of internal resistance in three types of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Fan, Ming-Zhi; Cao, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Cheng

    2007-12-01

    High internal resistance is a key problem limiting the power output of the microbial fuel cell (MFC). Therefore, more knowledge about the internal resistance is essential to enhance the performance of the MFC. However, different methods are used to determine the internal resistance, which makes the comparison difficult. In this study, three different types of MFCs were constructed to study the composition and distribution of internal resistance. The internal resistance (R(i)) is partitioned into anodic resistance (R(a)), cathodic resistance (R(c)), and ohmic resistance (R(Omega)) according to their origin and the design of the MFCs. These three resistances were then evaluated by the "current interrupt" method and the "steady discharging" method based on the proposed equivalent circuits for MFCs. In MFC-A, MFC-B, and MFC-C, the R(i) values were 3.17, 0.35, and 0.076 Omega m(2), the R(Omega) values were 2.65, 0.085, and 0.008 Omega m(2), the R(a) values were 0.055, 0.115, and 0.034 Omega m(2), and the R(c) values were 0.466, 0.15, and 0.033 Omega m(2), respectively. For MFC-B and MFC-C, the remarkable decrease in R(i) compared with the two-chamber MFC was mainly ascribed to the decline in R(Omega) and R(c). In MFC-C, the membrane electrodes' assembly lowered the ohmic resistance and facilitated the mass transport through the anode and cathode electrodes, resulting in the lowest R(i) among the three types.

  5. The influence of fuel type on the cooling system heat exchanger parameters in heavy-duty engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsztynowicz, B.

    2016-09-01

    The paper discuses the problem of selection of cooling systems for heavy-duty engines fitted in city buses. Aside from diesel engines, engine manufacturers also have in their portfolio engines fueled with natural gas, whose design is based on that of a conventional diesel engine. Based on the parameters of the engines from this type-series (the same displacement and rated power) an analysis has been performed of the influence of the applied fuel on the heat flows directed to the radiators and charge air coolers, hence, their size and space necessary for their proper installation. A replacement of a diesel engine with a natural gas fueled engine of the same operating parameters results in an increased amount of heat released to the coolant and a reduced heat from the engine charging system. This forces a selection of different heat exchangers that require more space for installation. A universal cooling module for different engines is not an optimal solution.

  6. THE GEMINI SPECTRAL LIBRARY OF NEAR-IR LATE-TYPE STELLAR TEMPLATES AND ITS APPLICATION FOR VELOCITY DISPERSION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Winge, Claudia

    2009-11-01

    We present a spectroscopic library of late spectral type stellar templates in the near-IR range 2.15-2.42 {mu}m, at R = 5300-5900 resolution, oriented to support stellar kinematics studies in external galaxies, such as the direct determination of the masses of supermassive black holes in nearby active (or non-active) galaxies. The combination of high spectral resolution and state-of-the-art instrumentation available in 8 m class telescopes has made the analysis of circumnuclear stellar kinematics using the near-IR CO band heads one of the most used techniques for such studies, and this library aims to provide the supporting data sets required by the higher spectral resolution and larger spectral coverage currently achieved with modern near-IR spectrographs. Examples of the application for kinematical analysis are given for data obtained with two Gemini instruments, but the templates can be easily adjusted for use with other near-IR spectrographs at similar or lower resolution. The example data sets are also used to revisit the 'template mismatch' effect and the dependence of the velocity dispersion values obtained from the fitting process with the characteristics of the stellar templates. The library is available in electronic form from the Gemini Web pages.

  7. Thermodynamic stability of perovskite and lanthanum nickelate-type cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Deniz

    The need for cleaner and more efficient alternative energy sources is becoming urgent as concerns mount about climate change wrought by greenhouse gas emissions. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are one of the most efficient options if the goal is to reduce emissions while still operating on fossil energy resources. One of the foremost problems in SOFCs that causes efficiency loss is the polarization resistance associated with the oxygen reduction reaction(ORR) at the cathodes. Hence, improving the cathode design will greatly enhance the overall performance of SOFCs. Lanthanum nickelate, La2NiO4+delta (LNO), is a mixed ionic and electronic conductor that has competitive surface oxygen exchange and transport properties and excellent electrical conductivity compared to perovskite-type oxides. This makes it an excellent candidate for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. It has been previously shown that composites of LNO with Sm0.2Ce0.8O2-delta (SDC20) as cathode materials lead to higher performance than standalone LNO. However, in contact with lanthanide-doped ceria, LNO decomposes resulting in free NiO and ceria with higher lanthanide dopant concentration. In this study, the aforementioned instability of LNO has been addressed by compositional tailoring of LNO: lanthanide doped ceria (LnxCe 1-xO2,LnDC)composite. By increasing the lanthanide dopant concentration in the ceria phase close to its solubility limit, the LNO phase has been stabilized in the LNO:LnDC composites. Electrical conductivity of the composites as a function of LNO volume fraction and temperature has been measured, and analyzed using a resistive network model which allows the identification of a percolation threshold for the LNO phase. The thermomechanical compatibility of these composites has been investigated with SOFC systems through measurement of the coefficients of thermal expansion. LNO:LDC40 composites containing LNO lower than 50 vol%and higher than 40 vol% were identified as being

  8. Oxygen transport in perovskite-type solid oxide fuel cell materials: insights from quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-García, Ana B; Ritzmann, Andrew M; Pavone, Michele; Keith, John A; Carter, Emily A

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: Global advances in industrialization are precipitating increasingly rapid consumption of fossil fuel resources and heightened levels of atmospheric CO2. World sustainability requires viable sources of renewable energy and its efficient use. First-principles quantum mechanics (QM) studies can help guide developments in energy technologies by characterizing complex material properties and predicting reaction mechanisms at the atomic scale. QM can provide unbiased, qualitative guidelines for experimentally tailoring materials for energy applications. This Account primarily reviews our recent QM studies of electrode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a promising technology for clean, efficient power generation. SOFCs presently must operate at very high temperatures to allow transport of oxygen ions and electrons through solid-state electrolytes and electrodes. High temperatures, however, engender slow startup times and accelerate material degradation. SOFC technologies need cathode and anode materials that function well at lower temperatures, which have been realized with mixed ion-electron conductor (MIEC) materials. Unfortunately, the complexity of MIECs has inhibited the rational tailoring of improved SOFC materials. Here, we gather theoretically obtained insights into oxygen ion conductivity in two classes of perovskite-type materials for SOFC applications: the conventional La1-xSrxMO3 family (M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co) and the new, promising class of Sr2Fe2-xMoxO6 materials. Using density functional theory + U (DFT+U) with U-J values obtained from ab initio theory, we have characterized the accompanying electronic structures for the two processes that govern ionic diffusion in these materials: (i) oxygen vacancy formation and (ii) vacancy-mediated oxygen migration. We show how the corresponding macroscopic oxygen diffusion coefficient can be accurately obtained in terms of microscopic quantities calculated with first-principles QM. We find that the

  9. The technique and preliminary results of LEU U-Mo full-size IRT type fuel testing in the MIR reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Izhutov, A.L.; Starkov, V.A.; Pimenov, V.V.; Fedoseev, V.Ye.; Dobrikova, I.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Suprun, V.B.; Kartashov, Ye.F.; Lukichev, V.A.; Troyanov, V.M.; Enin, A.A.; Tkachev, A.A.

    2008-07-15

    In March 2007 in-pile testing of LEU U-Mo full-size IRT type fuel elements was started in the MIR reactor. Four prototype fuel elements for Uzbekistan WWR SM reactor are being tested simultaneously - two of tube type design and two of pin type design. The dismountable irradiation devices were constructed for intermediate reloading and inspection of fuel elements during reactor testing. The objective of the test is to obtain the experimental results for determination of more reliable design and licensing fuel elements for conversion of the WWR SM reactor. The heat power of fuel elements is measured on-line by thermal balance method. The distribution of fission density and burn-up of uranium in the volume of elements are calculated by using the MIR reactor MCU code (Monte-Carlo) model. In this paper the design of fuel elements, the technique, main parameters and preliminary results are described. (author)

  10. CHARACTERISTICS OF SPILLED OILS, FUELS, AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS: 2A. DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS DATA FOR A SUITE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS - THE EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE, VOLATILIZATION, AND ENERGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical dispersants are used in oil spill response operations to enhance the dispersion of oil slicks at sea as small oil droplets in the water column. To assess the impacts of dispersant usage on oil spills, US EPA is developing a simulation model called the EPA Research Object...

  11. Outward electron transfer by Saccharomyces cerevisiae monitored with a bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell-type activity sensor.

    PubMed

    Ducommun, Raphaël; Favre, Marie-France; Carrard, Delphine; Fischer, Fabian

    2010-03-01

    A Janus head-like bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell was constructed to monitor the electron transfer from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to a woven carbon anode. The experiments were conducted during an ethanol cultivation of 170 g/l glucose in the presence and absence of yeast-peptone medium. First, using a basic fuel-cell type activity sensor, it was shown that yeast-peptone medium contains electroactive compounds. For this purpose, 1% solutions of soy peptone and yeast extract were subjected to oxidative conditions, using a microbial fuel cell set-up corresponding to a typical galvanic cell, consisting of culture medium in the anodic half-cell and 0.5 M K(3)Fe(CN)(6) in the cathodic half-cell. Second, using a bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell, it was shown that electrons were transferred from yeast cells to the carbon anode. The participation of electroactive compounds in the electron transport was separated as background current. This result was verified by applying medium-free conditions, where only glucose was fed, confirming that electrons are transferred from yeast cells to the woven carbon anode. Knowledge about the electron transfer through the cell membrane is of importance in amperometric online monitoring of yeast fermentations and for electricity production with microbial fuel cells.

  12. Chitosan and alginate types of bio-membrane in fuel cell application: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaari, N.; Kamarudin, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    The major problems of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell technology that need to be highlighted are fuel crossovers (e.g., methanol or hydrogen leaking across fuel cell membranes), CO poisoning, low durability, and high cost. Chitosan and alginate-based biopolymer membranes have recently been used to solve these problems with promising results. Current research in biopolymer membrane materials and systems has focused on the following: 1) the development of novel and efficient biopolymer materials; and 2) increasing the processing capacity of membrane operations. Consequently, chitosan and alginate-based biopolymers seek to enhance fuel cell performance by improving proton conductivity, membrane durability, and reducing fuel crossover and electro-osmotic drag. There are four groups of chitosan-based membranes (categorized according to their reaction and preparation): self-cross-linked and salt-complexed chitosans, chitosan-based polymer blends, chitosan/inorganic filler composites, and chitosan/polymer composites. There are only three alginate-based membranes that have been synthesized for fuel cell application. This work aims to review the state-of-the-art in the growth of chitosan and alginate-based biopolymer membranes for fuel cell applications.

  13. Ultramassive dense early-type galaxies: Velocity dispersions and number density evolution since z = 1.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, A.; Saracco, P.; Tamburri, S.; Lonoce, I.; Ciocca, F.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We investigate the stellar mass assembly history of ultramassive (M⋆ ≳ 1011M⊙) dense (Σ = M⋆/2πRe2> 2500M⊙ pc-2) early-type galaxies (ETGs, elliptical and spheroidal galaxies) selected on basis of visual classification over the last 9 Gyr. Methods: We traced the evolution of the comoving number density ρ of ultramassive dense ETGs and compared their structural (effective radius Re and stellar mass M⋆) and dynamical (velocity dispersion σe) parameters over the redshift range 0 < z < 1.6. We derived the number density ρ at 1.6 dispersion measurements are available. For four of these ETGs (plus one at z = 1.91), we present previously unpublished estimates of velocity dispersion, based on optical VLT-FORS2 spectra. We probe the intermediate redshift range (0.2 ≲ z ≲ 0.9) and the local Universe with different ETGs samples. Results: We find that the comoving number density of ultramassive dense ETGs evolves with z as ρ(z) ∝ (1 + z)0.3 ± 0.8 implying a decrease of ~25% of the population of ultramassive dense ETGs since z = 1.6. By comparing the structural and dynamical properties of high-z ultramassive dense ETGs over the range 0 ≲ z < 1.6 in the [Re, M⋆, σe] plane, we find that all of the ETGs of the high-z sample have counterparts with similar properties in the local Universe. This implies either that the majority (~70%) of ultramassive dense ETGs already completed the assembly and shaping at ⟨ z ⟩ = 1.4, or that, if a significant portion of dense ETGs evolves in size, new

  14. Criticality Analysis for Proposed Maximum Fuel Loading in a Standardized SNF Canister with Type 1a Baskets

    SciTech Connect

    Chad Pope; Larry L. Taylor; Soon Sam Kim

    2007-02-01

    This document represents a summary version of the criticality analysis done to support loading SNF in a Type 1a basket/standard canister combination. Specifically, this engineering design file (EDF) captures the information pertinent to the intact condition of four fuel types with different fissile loads and their calculated reactivities. These fuels are then degraded into various configurations inside a canister without the presence of significant moderation. The important aspect of this study is the portrayal of the fuel degradation and its effect on the reactivity of a single canister given the supposition there will be continued moderation exclusion from the canister. Subsequent analyses also investigate the most reactive ‘dry’ canister in a nine canister array inside a hypothetical transport cask, both dry and partial to complete flooding inside the transport cask. The analyses also includes a comparison of the most reactive configuration to other benchmarked fuels using a software package called TSUNAMI, which is part of the SCALE 5.0 suite of software.

  15. The effects of fuel type in synthesis of NiFe2O4 nanoparticles by microwave assisted combustion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcıoğlu Karakaş, Zeynep; Boncukçuoğlu, Recep; Karakaş, İbrahim H.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, it was investigated the effects of the used fuels on structural, morphological and magnetic properties of nanoparticles in nanoparticle synthesis with microwave assisted combustion method with an important method in quick, simple and low cost at synthesis of the nanoparticles. In this aim, glycine, urea and citric acid were used as fuel, respectively. The synthesised nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmet-Teller surface area (BET), and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) techniques. We observed that fuel type is quite effective on magnetic properties and surface properties of the nanoparticles. X-ray difractograms of the obtained nanoparticles were compared with standard powder diffraction cards of NiFe2O4 (JCPDS Card Number 54-0964). The results demonstrated that difractograms are fully compatible with standard reflection peaks. According to the results of the XRD analysis, the highest crystallinity was observed at nanoparticles synthesized with glycine. The results demonstrated that the nanoparticles prepared with urea has the highest surface area. The micrographs of SEM showed that all of the nanoparticles have nano-crystalline behaviour and particles indication cubic shape. VSM analysis demonstrated that the type of fuel used for synthesis is highly effective a parameter on magnetic properties of nanoparticles.

  16. Degree of vaporization using an airblast type fuel injector for a premixed-prevaporized combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Vaporization data are presented which could be useful in designing premixed-prevaporized fuel preparation systems for gas turbine combustors. Lean, premixed-prevaporized combustion systems are being developed because they operate with low flame temperatures and, therefore, produce low levels of nitrogen oxides. Parametric tests of the effect of inlet air temperature, length (residence time), reference velocity, pressure and fuel-air ratio on the degree of vaporization are reported. Jet A and Diesel no. 2 fuel were tested. A formula is provided which shows the effect of inlet air temperature, residence time, reference velocity, and pressure on the degree of vaporization for a constant fuel-air ratio of 0.020. The results of the effect of inlet air temperature on the degree of vaporization using Jet A and Diesel no. 2 are nearly identical.

  17. Enhanced air/fuel mixing for automotive stirling engine turbulator-type combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Riecke, George T.; Stotts, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    The invention relates to the improved combustion of fuel in a combustion chamber of a stirling engine and the like by dividing combustion into primary and secondary combustion zones through the use of a diverter plate.

  18. Airfoil cooling hole plugging by combustion gas impurities of the type found in coal derived fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The plugging of airfoil cooling holes by typical coal-derived fuel impurities was evaluated using doped combustion gases in an atmospheric pressure burner rig. Very high specific cooling air mass flow rates reduced or eliminated plugging. The amount of flow needed was a function of the composition of the deposit. It appears that plugging of film-cooled holes may be a problem for gas turbines burning coal-derived fuels.

  19. Hydrocarbon type analysis of jet fuels by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.; Hunter, P.M.

    1981-05-01

    This report describes the application of NMR spectroscopy to the chemical characterization without prior chromatographic separation of jet fuels and various fuel blends containing varying amounts of paraffinic and aromatic constituents. Equations are derived by which the total percent paraffins and aromatics as well as percent monoaromatics and diaromatics can be calculated. Computer programs for the various calculations are included. The results obtained by NMR are compared to those obtained by MS.

  20. Verifying the Cosmological Utility of Type Ia Supernovae:Implications of a Dispersion in the Ultraviolet Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.S.; Sullivan, M.; Nugent, P.E.; Howell, D.A.; Gal-Yam,A.; Astier, P.; Balam, D.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R.G.; Conley,A.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Pain, R.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C.J.; Regnault, N.

    2007-11-02

    We analyze the mean rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectrum ofType Ia Supernovae(SNe) and its dispersion using high signal-to-noiseKeck-I/LRIS-B spectroscopyfor a sample of 36 events at intermediateredshift (z=0.5) discoveredby the Canada-France-Hawaii TelescopeSupernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). Weintroduce a new method for removinghost galaxy contamination in our spectra,exploiting the comprehensivephotometric coverage of the SNLS SNe and theirhost galaxies, therebyproviding the first quantitative view of the UV spectralproperties of alarge sample of distant SNe Ia. Although the mean SN Ia spectrumhas notevolved significantly over the past 40 percent of cosmic history,preciseevolutionary constraints are limited by the absence of acomparable sample ofhigh quality local spectra. The mean UV spectrum ofour z 0.5 SNe Ia and itsdispersion is tabulated for use in futureapplications. Within the high-redshiftsample, we discover significant UVspectral variations and exclude dust extinctionas the primary cause byexamining trends with the optical SN color. Although progenitormetallicity may drive some of these trends, the variations we see aremuchlarger than predicted in recent models and do not follow expectedpatterns.An interesting new result is a variation seen in the wavelengthof selected UVfeatures with phase. We also demonstrate systematicdifferences in the SN Iaspectral features with SN lightcurve width inboth the UV and the optical. Weshow that these intrinsic variations couldrepresent a statistical limitation in thefuture use of high-redshift SNeIa for precision cosmology. We conclude thatfurther detailed studies areneeded, both locally and at moderate redshift wherethe rest-frame UV canbe studied precisely, in order that future missions canconfidently beplanned to fully exploit SNe Ia as cosmological probes.

  1. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Method for calculating a negative-dispersion resonator-type multilayer mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholokhonova, Polina A.; Erg, G. V.

    2005-11-01

    A method is proposed for the calculation of negative-dispersion mirrors with resonator cavities. The mirror optimisation algorithm combines the capabilities of the gradient method and the random search method. A multilayer mirror structure with a reflectivity R>99.9% and a group delay dispersion of -60±10 fs2 in the 930-1070 nm wavelength range was calculated. The sensitivity of the obtained structure to random variations of layer thicknesses was analysed.

  2. Cellulosic fuel ethanol: alternative fermentation process designs with wild-type and recombinant Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Lawford, Hugh G; Rousseau, Joyce D

    2003-01-01

    Iogen (Canada) is a major manufacturer of industrial cellulase and hemicellulase enzymes for the textile, pulp and paper, and poultry feed industries. Iogen has recently constructed a 40 t/d biomass-to-ethanol demonstration plant adjacent to its enzyme production facility. The integration of enzyme and ethanol plants results in significant reduction in production costs and offers an alternative use for the sugars generated during biomass conversion. Iogen has partnered with the University of Toronto to test the fermentation performance characteristics of metabolically engineered Zymomonas mobilis created at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This study focused on strain AX101, a xylose- and arabinose-fermenting stable genomic integrant that lacks the selection marker gene for antibiotic resistance. The "Iogen Process" for biomass depolymerization consists of a dilute-sulpfuric acid-catalyzed steam explosion, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. This work examined two process design options for fermentation, first, continuous cofermentation of C5 and C6 sugars by Zm AX101, and second, separate continuous fermentations of prehydrolysate by Zm AX101 and cellulose hydrolysate by either wildtype Z. mobilis ZM4 or an industrial yeast commonly used in the production of fuel ethanol from corn. Iogen uses a proprietary process for conditioning the prehydrolysate to reduce the level of inhibitory acetic acid to at least 2.5 g/L. The pH was controlled at 5.5 and 5.0 for Zymomonas and yeast fermentations, respectively. Neither 2.5 g/L of acetic acid nor the presence of pentose sugars (C6:C5 = 2:1) appreciably affected the high-performance glucose fermentation of wild-type Z. mobilis ZM4. By contrast, 2.5 g/L of acetic acid significantly reduced the rate of pentose fermentation by strain AX101. For single-stage continuous fermentation of pure sugar synthetic cellulose hydrolysate (60 g/L of glucose), wild-type Zymomonas exhibited a four-fold higher volumetric productivity

  3. Laboratory measurements of trace gas emissions from biomass burning of fuel types from the Southeastern and Southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burling, I. R.; Yokelson, R. J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Veres, P.; Roberts, J. M.; Warneke, C.; Urbanski, S. P.; Reardon, J.; Weise, D. R.; Hao, W. M.; de Gouw, J.

    2010-07-01

    Vegetation commonly managed by prescribed burning was collected from five southeastern and southwestern US military bases and burned under controlled conditions at the US Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The smoke emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometer for measurement of gas-phase species. The OP-FTIR detected and quantified 19 gas-phase species in these fires: CO2, CO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C3H6, HCHO, HCOOH, CH3OH, CH3COOH, furan, H2O, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3, HCN, HCl, and SO2. Emission factors for these species are presented for each vegetation type burned. Gas-phase nitrous acid (HONO), an important OH precursor, was detected in the smoke from all fires. The HONO emission factors ranged from 0.15 to 0.60 g kg-1 and were higher for the southeastern fuels. The fire-integrated molar emission ratios of HONO (relative to NOx) ranged from approximately 0.03 to 0.20, with higher values also observed for the southeastern fuels. The majority of non-methane organic compound (NMOC) emissions detected by OP-FTIR were oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) with the total identified OVOC emissions constituting 61±12% of the total measured NMOC on a molar basis. These OVOC may undergo photolysis or further oxidation contributing to ozone formation. Elevated amounts of gas-phase HCl and SO2 were also detected during flaming combustion, with the amounts varying greatly depending on location and vegetation type. The fuels with the highest HCl emission factors were all located in the coastal regions, although HCl was also observed from fuels farther inland. Emission factors for HCl were generally higher for the southwestern fuels, particularly those found in the chaparral biome in the coastal regions of California.

  4. Laboratory measurements of trace gas emissions from biomass burning of fuel types from the southeastern and southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burling, I. R.; Yokelson, R. J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Veres, P.; Roberts, J. M.; Warneke, C.; Urbanski, S. P.; Reardon, J.; Weise, D. R.; Hao, W. M.; de Gouw, J.

    2010-11-01

    Vegetation commonly managed by prescribed burning was collected from five southeastern and southwestern US military bases and burned under controlled conditions at the US Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The smoke emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometer for measurement of gas-phase species. The OP-FTIR detected and quantified 19 gas-phase species in these fires: CO2, CO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C3H6, HCHO, HCOOH, CH3OH, CH3COOH, furan, H2O, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3, HCN, HCl, and SO2. Emission factors for these species are presented for each vegetation type burned. Gas-phase nitrous acid (HONO), an important OH precursor, was detected in the smoke from all fires. The HONO emission factors ranged from 0.15 to 0.60 g kg-1 and were higher for the southeastern fuels. The fire-integrated molar emission ratios of HONO (relative to NOx) ranged from approximately 0.03 to 0.20, with higher values also observed for the southeastern fuels. The majority of non-methane organic compound (NMOC) emissions detected by OP-FTIR were oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) with the total identified OVOC emissions constituting 61 ± 12% of the total measured NMOC on a molar basis. These OVOC may undergo photolysis or further oxidation contributing to ozone formation. Elevated amounts of gas-phase HCl and SO2 were also detected during flaming combustion, with the amounts varying greatly depending on location and vegetation type. The fuels with the highest HCl emission factors were all located in the coastal regions, although HCl was also observed from fuels farther inland. Emission factors for HCl were generally higher for the southwestern fuels, particularly those found in the chaparral biome in the coastal regions of California.

  5. Stochastic gradient boosting classification trees for forest fuel types mapping through airborne laser scanning and IRS LISS-III imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirici, G.; Scotti, R.; Montaghi, A.; Barbati, A.; Cartisano, R.; Lopez, G.; Marchetti, M.; McRoberts, R. E.; Olsson, H.; Corona, P.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents an application of Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) data in conjunction with an IRS LISS-III image for mapping forest fuel types. For two study areas of 165 km2 and 487 km2 in Sicily (Italy), 16,761 plots of size 30-m × 30-m were distributed using a tessellation-based stratified sampling scheme. ALS metrics and spectral signatures from IRS extracted for each plot were used as predictors to classify forest fuel types observed and identified by photointerpretation and fieldwork. Following use of traditional parametric methods that produced unsatisfactory results, three non-parametric classification approaches were tested: (i) classification and regression tree (CART), (ii) the CART bagging method called Random Forests, and (iii) the CART bagging/boosting stochastic gradient boosting (SGB) approach. This contribution summarizes previous experiences using ALS data for estimating forest variables useful for fire management in general and for fuel type mapping, in particular. It summarizes characteristics of classification and regression trees, presents the pre-processing operation, the classification algorithms, and the achieved results. The results demonstrated superiority of the SGB method with overall accuracy of 84%. The most relevant ALS metric was canopy cover, defined as the percent of non-ground returns. Other relevant metrics included the spectral information from IRS and several other ALS metrics such as percentiles of the height distribution, the mean height of all returns, and the number of returns.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of controlling emissions for various alternative-fuel vehicle types, with vehicle and fuel price subsidies estimated on the basis of monetary values of emission reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.Q.

    1993-12-31

    Emission-control cost-effectiveness is estimated for ten alternative-fuel vehicle (AFV) types (i.e., vehicles fueled with reformulated gasoline, M85 flexible-fuel vehicles [FFVs], M100 FFVs, dedicated M85 vehicles, dedicated M100 vehicles, E85 FFVS, dual-fuel liquefied petroleum gas vehicles, dual-fuel compressed natural gas vehicles [CNGVs], dedicated CNGVs, and electric vehicles [EVs]). Given the assumptions made, CNGVs are found to be most cost-effective in controlling emissions and E85 FFVs to be least cost-effective, with the other vehicle types falling between these two. AFV cost-effectiveness is further calculated for various cases representing changes in costs of vehicles and fuels, AFV emission reductions, and baseline gasoline vehicle emissions, among other factors. Changes in these parameters can change cost-effectiveness dramatically. However, the rank of the ten AFV types according to their cost-effectiveness remains essentially unchanged. Based on assumed dollars-per-ton emission values and estimated AFV emission reductions, the per-vehicle monetary value of emission reductions is calculated for each AFV type. Calculated emission reduction values ranged from as little as $500 to as much as $40,000 per vehicle, depending on AFV type, dollar-per-ton emission values, and baseline gasoline vehicle emissions. Among the ten vehicle types, vehicles fueled with reformulated gasoline have the lowest per-vehicle value, while EVs have the highest per-vehicle value, reflecting the magnitude of emission reductions by these vehicle types. To translate the calculated per-vehicle emission reduction values to individual AFV users, AFV fuel or vehicle price subsidies are designed to be equal to AFV emission reduction values. The subsidies designed in this way are substantial. In fact, providing the subsidies to AFVs would change most AFV types from net cost increases to net cost decreases, relative to conventional gasoline vehicles.

  7. Rapid method for hydrocarbon-type analysis of heavy oils and synthetic fuels by pyrolysis thin layer chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.A.; George, A.E.

    1982-09-01

    This work describes a rapid method for hydrocargon-type analysis applying thin layer chromatography (TLC) to the pentane-soluble fraction *malthenes) of the petroleum and synthetic fuels boiling above 200/sup 0/C. The principal component types encountered in this paper are saturates (SA), aromatics (AR), (mono and di together) polynuclear aromatics (PNA) and polar material (PO). The method uses a Iatroscan TLC pyrolyzer which combines the resolution capabilities of TLC with the possibility of quantification by using a flame-ionization detector (FID). Comparison of the results with those obtained by the API-60 procedure is presented.

  8. 40 CFR Table C-2 to Subpart C of... - Default CH4 and N2O Emission Factors for Various Types of Fuel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...− 04 Biomass Fuels—Solid (All fuel types in Table C-1, except wood and wood residuals) 3.2 × 10− 02 4.2 × 10− 03 Wood and wood residuals 7.2 × 10− 03 3.6 × 10− 03 Biomass Fuels—Gaseous (All fuel types in Table C-1) 3.2 × 10− 03 6.3 × 10− 04 Biomass Fuels—Liquid (All fuel types in Table C-1) 1.1 × 10− 03...

  9. The effect of Cu2O nanoparticle dispersion on the thermoelectric properties of n-type skutterudites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battabyal, M.; Priyadarshini, B.; Sivaprahasam, D.; Karthiselva, N. S.; Gopalan, R.

    2015-11-01

    We report the thermoelectric properties of Ba0.4Co4Sb12 and Sn0.4Ba0.4Co4Sb12 skutterudites dispersed with Cu2O nanoparticles. The samples were synthesized by ball milling and consolidated by spark plasma sintering. Dispersion of Cu2O is found to significantly influence the electrical resistivity and thermopower at high temperatures with a more pronounced effect on the electrical resistivity due to the energy filtering effect at the interface between Cu2O nanoparticles and a Ba0.4Co4Sb12 and Sn0.4Ba0.4Co4Sb12 matrix. At 573 K, the electrical resistivity of Ba0.4Co4Sb12 decreases from 5.01  ×  10-5 Ωm to 2.98  ×  10-5 Ωm upon dispersion of Cu2O. The dispersion of Cu2O reduces the thermal conductivity of the samples from 300 K and above by increasing the phonon scattering. The lowest observed thermal conductivity at 573 K is found to be 2.001 W mK-1 in Cu2O dispersed Ba0.4Co4Sb12 while it is 2.91 W mK-1 in the Ba0.4Co4Sb12 sample without Cu2O dispersion. Hence Cu2O dispersion plays a significant role in the thermoelectric properties and a maximum figure of merit (ZT ) ~ 0.92 is achieved in Cu2O dispersed Ba0.4Co4Sb12 at 573 K which is more than 200% compared to the pure Ba0.4Co4Sb12 sample. The results from nanoindentation experiments show that the Cu2O dispersed sample (Cu2O  +  Sn0.4Ba0.4Co4Sb11.6) has a higher reduced Young’s modulus (~139 GPa) than the pure Sn0.4Ba0.4Co4Sb11.6 sample (~128 GPa).

  10. Pu-Zr alloy for high-temperature foil-type fuel

    DOEpatents

    McCuaig, Franklin D.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron reflux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

  11. Preliminary Photomicrographic Studies of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W; Spencer, Robert C

    1932-01-01

    Photomicrographs were taken of fuel sprays injected into air at various densities for the purpose of studying the spray structure and the stages in the atomization of the fuel. The photomicrographs were taken at magnifying powers of 2.5, 3.25, and 10, using a spark discharge of very short duration for illumination. The results indicate that the theory advanced by Dr. R. A. Castleman, Jr., on the atomization of fuel in carburetors may also be applied to the atomization of fuel sprays of the solid-injection type. The fuel leaves the nozzle as a solid column, is ruffled and then torn into small, irregular ligaments by the action of the air. These ligaments are then quickly broken up into drops by the surface tension of the fuel. The photomicrographs also show that the dispersion of a fuel spray at a given distance from the nozzle increases with an increase in the jet velocity or an increase in the air density. The first portions of fuel sprays injected from an automatic injection valve into air at atmospheric density have a much greater dispersion than the later portions, but this difference decreases rapidly as the air density is increased.

  12. Ab initio study of perovskite type oxide materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh-Lin

    2011-12-01

    Perovskite type oxides form a family of materials of significant interest for cathodes and electrolytes of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). These perovskites not only are active catalysts for surface oxygen reduction (OR) reactions but also allow incorporating the spilt oxygen monomers into their bulk, an unusual and poorly understood catalytic mechanism that couples surface and bulk properties. The OR mechanisms can be influenced strongly by defects in perovskite oxides, composition, and surface defect structures. This thesis work initiates a first step in developing a general strategy based on first-principles calculations for detailed control of oxygen vacancy content, transport rates of surface and bulk oxygen species, and surface/interfacial reaction kinetics. Ab initio density functional theory methods are used to model properties relevant for the OR reactions on SOFC cathodes. Three main research thrusts, which focus on bulk defect chemistry, surface defect structures and surface energetics, and surface catalytic properties, are carried to investigate different level of material chemistry for improved understanding of key physics/factors that govern SOFC cathode OR activity. In the study of bulk defect chemistry, an ab initio based defect model is developed for modeling defect chemistry of LaMnO 3 under SOFC conditions. The model suggests an important role for defect interactions, which are typically excluded in previous defect models. In the study of surface defect structures and surface energetics, it is shown that defect energies change dramatically (1˜2 eV lower) from bulk values near surfaces. Based on the existing bulk defect model with the calculated ab initio surface defect energetics, we predict the (001) MnO 2 surface oxygen vacancy concentration of (La0.9Sr0.1 )MnO3 is about 5˜6 order magnitude higher than that of the bulk under typical SOFC conditions. Finally, for surface catalytic properties, we show that area specific resistance, oxygen

  13. RERTR Fuel Developmemt and Qualification Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Wachs

    2007-01-01

    In late 2003 it became evident that U-Mo aluminum fuels under development exhibited significant fuel performance problems under the irradiation conditions required for conversion of most high-powered research reactors. Solutions to the fuel performance issue have been proposed and show promise in early testing. Based on these results, a Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program strategy has been mapped to allow generic fuel qualification to occur prior to the end of FY10 and reactor conversion to occur prior to the end of FY14. This strategy utilizes a diversity of technologies, test conditions, and test types. Scoping studies using miniature fuel plates will be completed in the time frame of 2006-2008. Irradiation of larger specimens will occur in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in the United States, the Belgian Reactor-2 (BR2) reactor in Belgium, and in the OSIRIS reactor in France in 2006-2009. These scoping irradiation tests provide a large amount of data on the performance of advanced fuel types under irradiation and allow the down selection of technology for larger scale testing during the final stages of fuel qualification. In conjunction with irradiation testing, fabrication processes must be developed and made available to commercial fabricators. The commercial fabrication infrastructure must also be upgraded to ensure a reliable low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel supply. Final qualification of fuels will occur in two phases. Phase I will obtain generic approval for use of dispersion fuels with density less than 8.5 g-U/cm3. In order to obtain this approval, a larger scale demonstration of fuel performance and fabrication technology will be necessary. Several Materials Test Reactor (MTR) plate-type fuel assemblies will be irradiated in both the High Flux Reactor (HFR) and the ATR (other options include the BR2 and Russian Research Reactor, Dmitrovgrad, Russia [MIR] reactors) in 2008-2009. Following postirradiation examination, a report

  14. Comparison of perovskite and hexaaluminate-type catalysts for CO/H{sub 2}-fueled gas turbine combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Cristiani, C.; Groppi, G.; Forzatti, P.

    1996-12-31

    In this work the results of catalytic activity tests in CH{sub 4}, CO and H{sub 2} combustion over perovskite (LaCoO{sub 3}, LaMnO{sub 3} and LaFeO{sub 3}) and hexaaluminate-type (BaMnAl{sub 11}O{sub 19}, Sr{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.2}MnAl{sub 11}O{sub 19}, and BaFeAl{sub 11}O{sub 19}) systems are compared in order to investigate the potential of such materials as catalysts for syngas fueled combustors for gas turbines. Perovskites-type catalysts are shown to be the most active systems in the combustion of all the investigated fuels but to suffer from thermal stability problems that constrain their use in high temperature applications. Mn-substituted hexaaluminates have been shown to be more active by orders of magnitude in CO-H{sub 2} combustion than in CH{sub 4} combustion. Scale up of the activity data by mathematical modelling has demonstrated the potential of such catalysts in meeting the operating requirements of syngas fueled catalytic combustors.

  15. Carbon-Type Analysis and Comparison of Original and Reblended FACE Diesel Fuels (FACE 2, FACE 4, and FACE 7)

    SciTech Connect

    Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.; O'Hagan, Molly J.

    2012-10-01

    This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) diesel blends, FD-2B, FD 4B, and FD-7B, and makes comparison of the new blends with the original FACE diesel blends, FD 2A, FD 4A, and FD-7A, respectively. Generally, FD-2A and FD-2B are more similar than the A and B blends of FD-4 and FD-7. The aromatic carbon content is roughly equivalent, although the new FACE blends have decreased monoaromatic content and increased di- and tri-cycloaromatic content, as well as a higher overall aromatic content, than the original FACE blends. The aromatic components of the new FACE blends generally have a higher alkyl substitution with longer alkyl substituents. The naphthenic and paraffinic contents remained relatively consistent. Based on aliphatic methyl and methylene carbon ratios, cetane numbers for FD-2A and -2B, and FD-7A and -7B are predicted to be consistent, while the cetane number for FD-4B is predicted to be higher than FD-4A. Overall, the new FACE fuel blends are fairly consistent with the original FACE fuel blends, but there are observable differences. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information on reformulated FACE diesel blends, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of the team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in the use of NMR spectroscopy for the detailed characterization and comparison of fuels and fuel blends.

  16. Rational design of Ni nanoparticles on N-rich ultrathin carbon nanosheets for high-performance supercapacitor materials: embedded- versus anchored-type dispersion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Zhong, Yiren; Su, Liwei; Wei, Jinping; Zhou, Zhen

    2014-04-22

    Highly dispersed Ni nanoparticles (NPs) and abundant functional N-species were integrated into ultrathin carbon nanosheets by using a facile and economical sol-gel route. Embedded- and anchored-type configurations were achieved for the dispersion of Ni NPs in/on N-rich carbon nanosheets. The anchored-type composite exhibited outstanding pseudocapacitance of 2200 F g(-1) at 5 A g(-1) with unusual rate capability and extraordinary cyclic stability over 20 000 cycles with little capacitance decay. Aqueous asymmetric supercapacitors fabricated with this composite cathode demonstrated a high energy density of 51.3 Wh kg(-1) at a relatively large power density of 421.6 W kg(-1) , along with outstanding cyclic stability. This approach opens an attractive direction for enhancing the electrochemical performances of metal-based supercapacitors and can be generalized to design high-performance energy-storage devices.

  17. Correlation between annealing and irradiation behavior of dispersion fuels: Final report. [U/sub 3/Si/sub x/, U/sub 6/Mn, U/sub 3/SiAl, U/sub 6/Fe, U/sub 75/Ga/sub 10/Si/sub 15/, U/sub 75/Ga/sub 15/Ge/sub 10/

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.

    1987-06-01

    Studying the effects of annealing of scaled-down dispersion fuel plates is an important part of the data base for fuel performance. One of the most critical aspects of fuel performance is the stability of a fuel/matrix dispersion which is usually measured by volumetric changes of the fuel zone. A correlation has been proposed that fission-induced amorphization is responsible for the instability of the fuel and that such transformations can be predicted by the thermodynamic properties of the fuel. It is proposed that annealing studies may be used as a screening test for new fuels for which no thermodynamic properties have been measured and/or no irradiation data are available. Estimations of irradiation performance could be obtained faster and without the expense of irradiating the fuels under investigation. Miniature fuel plates were fabricated by standard procedures and annealed at 400/sup 0/C for up to 1981 hrs in a resistance wound furnace. At periodic intervals the plates were removed and the fuel zone volumes were calculated based on immersion density measurement data. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  18. An application of LANDSAT digital technology to forest fire fuel type mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtz, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    The role of digital classifications suitable as fuel maps was examined. A Taylor enhancement was produced for an 8 million hectare fire control region showing water, muskeg, coniferous, deciduous and mixed stands, clearcut logging, burned areas, regeneration areas, nonforested areas and large forest roads. Use of the map by fire control personnel demonstrated its usefulness for initial attack decision making.

  19. Transport dynamics of a high-power-density matrix-type hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Hagedorn, N. H.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental transport dynamics tests were made on a space power fuel cell of current design. Various operating transients were introduced and transport-related response data were recorded with fluidic humidity sensing instruments. Also, sampled data techniques were developed for measuring the cathode-side electrolyte concentration during transient operation.

  20. Electricity generation by two types of microbial fuel cells using nitrobenzene as the anodic or cathodic reactants.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Luo, Yong; Zhang, Cuiping; Li, Mingchen

    2010-06-01

    The effect of nitrobenzene (NB) on electricity generation and simultaneous biodegradation of NB were studied with two types of microbial fuel cells (MFCs): a ferricyanide-cathode MFC with NB as the anodic reactant and a NB-cathode MFC. Compared to controls without NB, the presence of NB in the anode of the first MFC decreased maximum voltage outputs, maximum power densities and Coulombic efficiencies. No electricity was generated from the first MFC using NB as the sole fuel; however, the second MFC using NB as the electron acceptor generated electricity successfully with a maximum voltage of 400mV. NB was degraded completely within 24h in both anode and cathode chambers. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles demonstrated that the presence of NB caused changes in relative abundance of the dominant bacterial species and emergence of new bacteria on the anodes.

  1. Direct conversion of solid hydrocarbons in a molten carbonate fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predtechensky, M. R.; Varlamov, Yu. D.; Ul'Yankin, S. N.; Dubov, Yu. D.

    2009-12-01

    Electrical characteristics of a molten carbonate fuel cell allowing direct electrochemical oxidation of dispersed hydrocarbons have been examined. As the fuel, graphite, anthracite, and cannel coal samples were used. Data illustrating the effect of electrolyte temperature, fuel type and dispersion, and also reactant gas mixture composition on the performance characteristics of the fuel cell, were obtained. Correlation between the specific characteristics of the fuel cell and the hydrogen content of fuel material was established. The maximum current-density values were achieved with hydrogen-rich cannel coal. For dispersed fuel samples, interparticle contact losses were found to have influence on the cell-generated voltage. The maximum cell opencircuit voltage was reached with stoichiometric oxygen-carbon dioxide mixture blown into the cathode. Yet, the largest current-density values were obtained when carbon dioxide lean mixtures were used. Even at zero carbon dioxide concentration the range of cathode polarizations was less than that observed with stoichiometric mixture. The processes proceeding in the cathode and anode packs of the fuel cell are believed to be interrelated processes. In a model fuel cell fueled with dispersed coal, current densities up to 140 mA/cm2 and specific powers up to 70 mW/cm2 were achieved.

  2. Fuels for research and test reactors, status review: July 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, D.

    1982-12-01

    A thorough review is provided on nuclear fuels for steady-state thermal research and test reactors. The review was conducted to provide a documented data base in support of recent advances in research and test reactor fuel development, manufacture, and demonstration in response to current US policy on availability of enriched uranium. The review covers current fabrication practice, fabrication development efforts, irradiation performance, and properties affecting fuel utilization, including thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, thermal expansion, corrosion, phase stability, mechanical properties, and fission-product release. The emphasis is on US activities, but major work in Europe and elsewhere is included. The standard fuel types discussed are the U-Al alloy, UZrH/sub x/, and UO/sub 2/ rod fuels. Among new fuels, those given major emphasis include H/sub 3/Si-Al dispersion and UO/sub 2/ caramel plate fuels.

  3. Innovative concepts for fuel plate fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Thresh, H.R.

    1987-10-01

    A number of fabrication concepts have been and are being explored at ANL. Although specific processes were addressed with silicide fuels in mind, most are applicable to fabrication with any fuel type. Processes include improved comminution procedures for converting U-Si alloy ingots to powder using a roll crusher and an impact mill. Aluminizing of core compacts by ion vapor deposition techniques in vacuum offers prospects for improved plate quality. Other items examined include the possible use of coatings on fuel particles, matrices different from pure Al, and ductile fuel alloys which might be used to produce fuel plates with uranium loadings higher than possible with conventional dispersed-phase powder metallurgy technology.

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1-mediated syncytium formation is compatible with adenovirus replication and facilitates efficient dispersion of viral gene products and de novo-synthesized virus particles.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Haviv, Y S; Derdeyn, C A; Lam, J; Coolidge, C; Hunter, E; Curiel, D T; Blackwell, J L

    2001-12-10

    Conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) vectors are designed for specific oncolytic replication in tumor tissues with concomitant sparing of normal cells. As such, CRAds offer an unprecedented level of anticancer potential for malignancies that have been refractory to previous cancer gene therapy interventions. CRAd efficacy may, however, be compromised by inefficient dispersion of the replicating vector within the tumor tissue. To address this issue, we evaluated the utility of a fusogenic membrane glycoprotein (FMG), which induces the fusion of neighboring cellular membranes to form multinucleated syncytia. We hypothesized that the FMG-mediated syncytia would facilitate dispersion of the adenovirus (Ad) gene products and viral progeny. To test this, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins, which induce syncytia in the presence of CD4+ target cells, were expressed by an Ad (Ad5HIVenv) in permissive (CD4-positive) and nonpermissive (CD4-negative) cell lines. After validating this Ad-FMG model, the efficiency of Ad replication in the presence or absence of syncytia was evaluated. The results demonstrated that syncytium formation was compatible with Ad replication and dramatically increased the dispersion of virus gene products within the cytoplasm of the syncytia as well as viral particles in the nuclei of the syncytial mass. Moreover, progeny virions were released more efficiently from syncytia compared with nonsyncytial cells. These data demonstrate the utility of FMGs as a dispersion agent and suggest that FMGs can improve the efficacy of CRAd gene therapy.

  5. 40 CFR Table C-2 to Subpart C - Default CH4 and N2O Emission Factors for Various Types of Fuel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Coke Oven Gas 4.8 × 10−04 1.0 × 10−04 Biomass Fuels—Solid (All fuel types in Table C-1) 3.2 × 10−02 4.2 × 10−03 Biogas 3.2 × 10−03 6.3 × 10−04 Biomass Fuels—Liquid (All fuel types in Table C-1) 1.1 × 10−03 1... “Energy Industry” or “Manufacturing Industries and Construction”. In all fuels except for coal the...

  6. 40 CFR Table C-2 to Subpart C - Default CH4 and N2O Emission Factors for Various Types of Fuel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Coke Oven Gas 4.8 × 10−04 1.0 × 10−04 Biomass Fuels—Solid (All fuel types in Table C-1) 3.2 × 10−02 4.2 × 10−03 Biogas 3.2 × 10−03 6.3 × 10−04 Biomass Fuels—Liquid (All fuel types in Table C-1) 1.1 × 10−03 1... “Energy Industry” or “Manufacturing Industries and Construction”. In all fuels except for coal the...

  7. Essential data and techniques for conducting microbial fuel cell and other types of bioelectrochemical system experiments.

    PubMed

    Logan, Bruce E

    2012-06-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and other bioelectrochemical systems are new technologies that require expertise in a variety of technical areas, ranging from electrochemistry to biological wastewater treatment. There are certain data and critical information that should be included in every MFC study, such as specific surface area of the electrodes, solution conductivity, and power densities normalized to electrode surface area and volumes. Electrochemical techniques such as linear sweep voltammetry can be used to understand the performance of the MFC, but extremely slow scans are required for these biological systems compared to more traditional fuel cells. In this Minireview, the critical information needed for MFC studies is provided with examples of how results can be better conveyed through a full description of materials, the use of proper controls, and inclusion of a more complete electrochemical analysis.

  8. Thermal Hydraulic Characteristics of Fuel Defects in Plate Type Nuclear Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bodey, Isaac T

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent flow coupled with heat transfer is investigated for a High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel plate. The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Models are used for fluid dynamics and the transfer of heat from a thermal nuclear fuel plate using the Multi-physics code COMSOL. Simulation outcomes are compared with experimental data from the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop. The computational results for the High Flux Isotope Reactor core system provide a more physically accurate simulation of this system by modeling the turbulent flow field in conjunction with the diffusion of thermal energy within the solid and fluid phases of the model domain. Recommendations are made regarding Nusselt number correlations and material properties for future thermal hydraulic modeling efforts

  9. Study of the Effect of Hydrocarbon Type Biodegradation on Fuel Specification Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    34. Growth of bacteria in different concentrations of DiEGME. Figure 35. Growth Effect of Percentage Levels of Biodiesel in Jet A Figure 36. Growth...Effect of Low Level Biodiesel in Jet A Figure 37. Degradation of FAME Biodiesel by P. aeruginosa Figure 38. Acinetobacter cells (marked by the...that it is crucial for DLA, the AF and DoD to further investigate the effects of biodiesel in fuel even when this biofuel might be present at trace

  10. Analysis of steam explosions in plate-type, uranium-aluminum fuel test reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P. )

    1989-01-01

    The concern over steam explosions in nuclear reactors can be traced to prompt critical nuclear excursions in aluminum-clad/fueled test reactors, as well as to explosive events in aluminum, pulp, and paper industries. The Reactor Safety Study prompted an extensive analytical and experimental effort for over a decade. This has led to significant improvements in their understanding of the steam explosion issue for commercial light water reactors. However, little progress has been made toward applying the lessons learned from this effort to the understanding and modeling of steam explosion phenomena in aluminum-clad/fueled research and test reactors. The purposes of this paper are to (a) provide a preliminary analysis of the destructive events in test reactors, based on current understandings of steam explosions; (b) provide a proposed approach for determining the likelihood of a steam explosion event under scenarios in which molten U-Al fuel drops into a water-filled cavity; and (c) present a benchmarking study conducted to estimate peak pressure pulse magnitudes.

  11. Enrichment of microbial community generating electricity using a fuel-cell-type electrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, B H; Park, H S; Kim, H J; Kim, G T; Chang, I S; Lee, J; Phung, N T

    2004-02-01

    A fuel cell was used to enrich a microbial consortium generating electricity, using organic wastewater as the fuel. Within 30 days of enrichment the maximum current of 0.2 mA was generated with a resistance of 1 kOhms. Current generation was coupled to a fall in chemical oxygen demand from over 1,700 mg l(-1) down to 50 mg l(-1). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis showed a different microbial population in the enriched electrode from that in the sludge used as the inoculum. Electron microscopic observation showed a biofilm on the electrode surface and microbial clumps. Nanobacteria-like particles were present on the biofilm surface. Metabolic inhibitors and electron acceptors inhibited the current generation. 16S ribosomal RNA gene analysis showed a diverse bacterial population in the enrichment culture. These findings demonstrate that an electricity-generating microbial consortium can be enriched using a fuel cell and that the electrochemical activity is a form of anaerobic electron transfer.

  12. Theoretical nitric oxide production incidental to autoignition and combustion of several fuels homogeneously dispersed in air under some typical hypersonic flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahn, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    A reaction package of 100 chemical reactions and attendant reaction rate constants defined for the autoignition and combustion of four carbonaceous fuels, CH4, CH3OH, C2H6, and C2H5OH. Definition of the package was made primarily by means of comparison between trial calculations and experimental data for the autoignition of CH4. Autoignition and combustion of each of these four fuels was calculated under three sets of conditions realistic for hypersonic flight applications, for comparison to hydrogen fuel, particularly with respect to formation of nitric oxide. Results show that, for all of the fuels including hydrogen, if NO production is a significant problem, compromise must be made between approaching equilibrium heat release and approaching equilibrium NO concentration.

  13. Development of the fuel cell power generation technology, 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-02-01

    NEDO arranged results of the research on the development of the fuel cell power generation technology during fiscal 1981 to 1987. During 1981 to 1983, research and development were made on a dispersed generation type fuel cell power generation system using phosphoric acid fuel cells (low temperature/pressure type) and a thermal power plant substitution type fuel cell power generation system (high temperature/pressure type). During 1984 to 1986, in addition to the above, research was made on a total system of phosphoric acid fuel cells, trial operation of a molten carbonate fuel cell power plant (matrix electrolyte method, paste electrolyte method) and a total system. In 1987, as to molten carbonate fuel cells, researches were made on stacks and a peripheral system, support, and a total system. As a comprehensive technology development of phosphoric acid fuel cells, researches were made on a fuel cell power generation system for isolated island use and a fuel cell power generation system for business use.

  14. Effect of polymer type and drug dose on the in vitro and in vivo behavior of amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Matthias Manne; Chourak, Nabil; Khan, Fauzan; Wendelboe, Johan; Langguth, Peter; Rades, Thomas; Holm, René

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the non-sink in vitro dissolution behavior and in vivo performance in rats of celecoxib (CCX) amorphous solid dispersions with polyvinyl acetate (PVA), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) at different drug doses. Both in vitro and in vivo, the amorphous solid dispersions with the hydrophilic polymers PVP and HPMC led to higher areas under both, the in vitro dissolution and the plasma concentration-time curves (AUC) compared to crystalline and amorphous CCX for all doses. In contrast, the amorphous solid dispersion with the hydrophobic polymer PVA showed a lower AUC both in vitro and in vivo than crystalline CCX. For crystalline CCX and CCX:PVA, the in vitro AUC was limited by the low solubility of the drug and the slow release of the drug from the hydrophobic polymer, respectively. For the supersaturating formulations, amorphous CCX, CCX:PVP and CCX:HPMC, the in vitro performance was mainly dependent on the dissolution rate and precipitation/crystallization inhibition of the polymer. As expected, the crystallization tendency increased with increasing dose, and therefore the in vitro AUCs did not increase proportionally with dose. Even though the in vivo AUC for all formulations increased with increasing dose, the relative bioavailability decreased significantly, indicating that the supersaturating formulations also crystallized in vivo and that the absorption of CCX was solubility-limited. These findings underline the importance of evaluating relevant in vitro doses, in order to rationally assess the performance of amorphous solid dispersions and avoid confusion in early in vivo studies.

  15. Preliminary performance appraisal of Navy V/STOL transport and search-type airplanes using hydrogen fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    First-cut estimates are given of the performance advantages of liquid-hydrogen-fueled, ejector wing, V/STOL aircraft designed for shipboard delivery and search-type missions. Results indicate that the use of LH2 could reduce gross weights 30 percent, empty weights 15 percent, and energy consumption 10 percent for a fixed payload and mission. If gross weight is fixed, the delivery range could be increased about 60 percent or the hover time during a search mission doubled. No analysis or discussion of the economic and operational disadvantages is presented.

  16. Bioelectrochemical sensing of promethazine with bamboo-type multiwalled carbon nanotubes dispersed in calf-thymus double stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Primo, Emiliano N; Oviedo, M Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G; Rubianes, María D; Rivas, Gustavo A

    2014-10-01

    We report the quantification of promethazine (PMZ) using glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) modified with bamboo-like multi-walled carbon nanotubes (bCNT) dispersed in double stranded calf-thymus DNA (dsDNA) (GCE/bCNT-dsDNA). Cyclic voltammetry measurements demonstrated that PMZ presents a thin film-confined redox behavior at GCE/bCNT-dsDNA, opposite to the irreversibly-adsorbed behavior obtained at GCE modified with bCNT dispersed in ethanol (GCE/bCNT). Differential pulse voltammetry-adsorptive stripping with medium exchange experiments performed with GCE/bCNT-dsDNA and GCE modified with bCNTs dispersed in single-stranded calf-thymus DNA (ssDNA) confirmed that the interaction between PMZ and bCNT-dsDNA is mainly hydrophobic. These differences are due to the intercalation of PMZ within the dsDNA that supports the bCNTs, as evidenced from the bathochromic displacement of UV-Vis absorption spectra of PMZ and quantum dynamics calculations at DFTB level. The efficient accumulation of PMZ at GCE/bCNT-dsDNA made possible its sensitive quantification at nanomolar levels (sensitivity: (3.50±0.05)×10(8) μA·cm(-2)·M(-1) and detection limit: 23 nM). The biosensor was successfully used for the determination of PMZ in a pharmaceutical product with excellent correlation.

  17. Characterization of char derived from various types of solid wastes from the standpoint of fuel recovery and pretreatment before landfilling.

    PubMed

    Hwang, I H; Matsuto, T; Tanaka, N; Sasaki, Y; Tanaami, K

    2007-01-01

    Carbonization is a kind of pyrolysis process to produce char from organic materials under an inert atmosphere. In this work, chars derived from various solid wastes were characterized from the standpoint of fuel recovery and pretreatment of waste before landfilling. Sixteen kinds of municipal and industrial solid wastes such as residential combustible wastes, non-combustible wastes, bulky wastes, construction and demolition wastes, auto shredder residue, and sludges were carbonized at 500 degrees C for 1h under nitrogen atmosphere. In order to evaluate the quality of char as fuel, proximate analysis and heating value were examined. The composition of raw waste had a significant influence on the quality of produced char. The higher the ratio of woody biomass in waste, the higher heating value of char produced. Moreover, an equation to estimate heating value of char was developed by using the weight fraction of fixed carbon and volatile matter in char. De-ashing and chlorine removal were performed to improve the quality of char. The pulverization and sieving method seems to be effective for separation of incombustibles such as metal rather than ash. Most char met a 0.5 wt% chlorine criterion for utilization as fuel in a shaft blast furnace after it was subjected to repeated water-washing. Carbonization could remove a considerable amount of organic matter from raw waste. In addition, the leaching of heavy metals such as chrome, cadmium, and lead appears to be significantly suppressed by carbonization regardless of the type of raw waste. From these results, carbonization could be considered as a pretreatment method for waste before landfilling, as well as for fuel recovery.

  18. Frequency dispersion reduction and bond conversion on n-type GaAs by in situ surface oxide removal and passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, C. L.; Sonnet, A. M.; Vogel, E. M.; McDonnell, S.; Hughes, G. J.; Milojevic, M.; Lee, B.; Aguirre-Tostado, F. S.; Choi, K. J.; Kim, J.; Wallace, R. M.

    2007-10-01

    The method of surface preparation on n-type GaAs, even with the presence of an amorphous-Si interfacial passivation layer, is shown to be a critical step in the removal of accumulation capacitance frequency dispersion. In situ deposition and analysis techniques were used to study different surface preparations, including NH4OH, Si-flux, and atomic hydrogen exposures, as well as Si passivation depositions prior to in situ atomic layer deposition of Al2O3. As-O bonding was removed and a bond conversion process with Si deposition is observed. The accumulation capacitance frequency dispersion was removed only when a Si interlayer and a specific surface clean were combined.

  19. Physical properties, evaporation and combustion characteristics of nanofluid-type fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanvir, Saad

    Nanofluids are liquids with stable suspension of nanoparticles. Limited studies in the past have shown that both energetic and catalytic nanoparticles once mixed with traditional liquid fuels can be advantageous in combustion applications, e.g., increased energy density and shortened ignition delay. Contradictions in existing literature, scarcity of experimental data and lack of understanding on how the added nanoparticles affect the physical properties as well as combustion characteristics of the resulting fuel motivated us to launch a detailed experimental and theoretical investigation. The surface tension of ethanol and n-decane based nanofluid fuels containing suspended nanoparticles were measured using the pendant drop method by solving the Young-Laplace equation. The results show that surface tension increases both with particle concentration (above a critical concentration) and particle size. This is because the Van der Waals forces between particles at the liquid/gas interface increases surface free energy that overcomes any electrostatic repulsion between the particles and increases surface tension. This present work also reports experimental analysis of the latent heat of vaporization ( Hfg) of nanofluids. Results show that the addition of Ag and Fe nanoparticles in water results is a substantial reduction in Hfg. On the contrary Al addition slightly increases Hfg. Similar observations are made for ethanol based nanofluids. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that the strength of bonding between particles and the fluid molecules is the governing factor in the variation of Hfg upon particle addition. The thermal conductivity was measured using KD2-Pro from Decagon Devices based on the transient line heat source method. The rheological properties of the ethanol and ethanol/nanoparticles suspensions are measured using a StresstechRTM rotational rheometer. Both properties increased with increasing particle concentration. Trends are found to be consistent

  20. A Study of the Effect of Heat-Treatment on the Morphology of Nafion Ionomer Dispersion for Use in the Passive Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC)

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ting; Zhang, Haifeng; Zou, Zhiqing; Khatun, Sufia; Akins, Daniel; Adam, Yara; Suarez, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Aggregation in heat-treated Nafion ionomer dispersion and 117 membrane are investigated by 1H and 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra, spin-lattice relaxation time, and self-diffusion coefficient measurements. Results demonstrate that heat-treatment affects the average Nafion particle size in aqueous dispersions. Measurements on heat-treated Nafion 117 membrane show changes in the 1H isotropic chemical shift and no significant changes in ionic conductivity. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of prepared cathode catalyst layer containing the heat-treated dispersions reveals that the surface of the electrode with the catalyst ink that has been pretreated at ca. 80 °C exhibits a compact and uniform morphology. The decrease of Nafion ionomer’s size results in better contact between catalyst particles and electrolyte, higher electrochemically active surface area, as well as significant improvement in the DMFC’s performance, as verified by electrochemical analysis and single cell evaluation. PMID:24958431

  1. Fuel elements of research reactor CM

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A.V.; Morozov, A.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Ershov, S.A.

    2013-07-01

    In 1961 the CM research reactor was commissioned at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad, Russia), it was intended to carry on investigations and the production of transuranium nuclides. The reactor is of a tank type. Original fuel assembly contained plate fuels that were spaced with vanes and corrugated bands. Nickel was used as a cladding material, fuel meat was produced from UO{sub 2} + electrolytic nickel composition. Fuel plates have been replaced by self-spacing cross-shaped dispersion fuels clad in stainless steel. In 2005 the reactor was updated. The purpose of this updating was to increase the quantity of irradiation channels in the reactor core and to improve the neutron balance. The updating was implemented at the expense of 20 % reduction in the quantity of fuel elements in the core which released a space for extra channels and decreased the mass of structural materials in the core. The updated reactor is loaded with modified standard fuel elements with 20 % higher uranium masses. At the same time stainless steel in fuel assembly shrouds was substituted by zirconium alloy. Today in progress are investigations and work to promote the second stage of reactor updating that involve developments of cross-shaped fuel elements having low neutron absorption matrix materials. This article gives an historical account of the design and main technical changes that occurred for the CM reactor since its commissioning.

  2. The OSU Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility: Standard Fuel Element Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wade R. Marcum; Brian G. Woods; Ann Marie Phillips; Richard G. Ambrosek; James D. Wiest; Daniel M. Wachs

    2001-10-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are currently collaborating on a test program which entails hydro-mechanical testing of a generic plate type fuel element, or standard fuel element (SFE), for the purpose of qualitatively demonstrating mechanical integrity of uranium-molybdenum monolithic plates as compared to that of uranium aluminum dispersion, and aluminum fuel plates due to hydraulic forces. This test program supports ongoing work conducted for/by the fuel development program and will take place at OSU in the Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility (HMFTF). Discussion of a preliminary test matrix, SFE design, measurement and instrumentation techniques, and facility description are detailed in this paper.

  3. Orthogonal array design for the optimization of ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of benzophenone-type UV filters.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Liu, Juanjuan; Yang, Xin; Peng, Yan; Xu, Li

    2011-03-01

    In the present study, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) using an ionic liquid (IL) as the extractant was successfully developed to extract four benzophenone-type UV filters from the different water matrices. Orthogonal array experimental design (OAD), based on five factors and four levels (L(16)(4(5))), was employed to optimize IL-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction procedure. The five factors included pH of sample solution, the volume of IL and methanol addition, extraction time and the amount of salt added. The optimal extraction condition was as follows. Sample solution was at a pH of 2.63 in the presence of 60 mg/mL sodium chloride; 30 μL IL and 15 μL methanol were used as extractant and disperser solvent, respectively; extraction was achieved by vortexing for 4 min. Using high-performance liquid chromatography-UV analysis, the limits of detection of the target analytes ranged between 1.9 and 6.4 ng/mL. The linear ranges were between 10 or 20 ng/mL and 1000 ng/mL. This procedure afforded a convenient, fast and cost-saving operation with high extraction efficiency for the model analytes. Spiked waters from two rivers and one lake were examined by the developed method. For the swimming pool water, the standard addition method was employed to determine the actual concentrations of the UV filters.

  4. Discrimination of source reactor type by multivariate statistical analysis of uranium and plutonium isotopic concentrations in unknown irradiated nuclear fuel material.

    PubMed

    Robel, Martin; Kristo, Michael J

    2008-11-01

    The problem of identifying the provenance of unknown nuclear material in the environment by multivariate statistical analysis of its uranium and/or plutonium isotopic composition is considered. Such material can be introduced into the environment as a result of nuclear accidents, inadvertent processing losses, illegal dumping of waste, or deliberate trafficking in nuclear materials. Various combinations of reactor type and fuel composition were analyzed using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLSDA) of the concentrations of nine U and Pu isotopes in fuel as a function of burnup. Real-world variation in the concentrations of (234)U and (236)U in the fresh (unirradiated) fuel was incorporated. The U and Pu were also analyzed separately, with results that suggest that, even after reprocessing or environmental fractionation, Pu isotopes can be used to determine both the source reactor type and the initial fuel composition with good discrimination.

  5. Highly-dispersed Ta-oxide catalysts prepared by electrodeposition in a non-aqueous plating bath for polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathodes.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeongsuk; Cha, Dongkyu; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari

    2012-09-18

    The Ta-oxide cathode catalysts were prepared by electrodeposition in a non-aqueous solution. These catalysts showed excellent catalytic activity and have an onset potential of 0.92 V(RHE) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The highly-dispersed Ta species at the nanometer scale on the carbon black was an important contributor to the high activity.

  6. Fuel Consumption and Fire Emissions Estimates in Siberia: Impact of Vegetation Types, Meteorological Conditions, Forestry Practices and Fire Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukavskaya, Elena; Conard, Susan; Ivanova, Galina; Buryak, Ludmila; Soja, Amber; Zhila, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    Boreal forests play a crucial role in carbon budgets with Siberian carbon fluxes and pools making a major contribution to the regional and global carbon cycle. Wildfire is the main ecological disturbance in Siberia that leads to changes in forest species composition and structure and in carbon storage, as well as direct emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols to the atmosphere. At present, the global scientific community is highly interested in quantitative and accurate estimates of fire emissions. Little research on wildland fuel consumption and carbon emission estimates has been carried out in Russia until recently. From 2000 to 2007 we conducted a series of experimental fires of varying fireline intensity in light-coniferous forest of central Siberia to obtain quantitative and qualitative data on fire behavior and carbon emissions due to fires of known behavior. From 2009 to 2013 we examined a number of burned logged areas to assess the potential impact of forest practices on fire emissions. In 2013-2014 burned areas in dark-coniferous and deciduous forests were examined to determine fuel consumption and carbon emissions. We have combined and analyzed the scarce data available in the literature with data obtained in the course of our long-term research to determine the impact of various factors on fuel consumption and to develop models of carbon emissions for different ecosystems of Siberia. Carbon emissions varied drastically (from 0.5 to 40.9 tC/ha) as a function of vegetation type, weather conditions, anthropogenic effects and fire behavior characteristics and periodicity. Our study provides a basis for better understanding of the feedbacks between wildland fire emissions and changing anthropogenic disturbance patterns and climate. The data obtained could be used by air quality agencies to calculate local emissions and by managers to develop strategies to mitigate negative smoke impacts on the environmentand human health.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL COMPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Thurber, W.C.

    1961-01-10

    Uranium-aluminum alloys in which boron is homogeneously dispersed by adding it as a nickel boride are described. These compositions have particular utility as fuels for neutronic reactors, boron being present as a burnable poison.

  8. Factors affecting the performance of a single-chamber microbial fuel cell-type biological oxygen demand sensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gai-Xiu; Sun, Yong-Ming; Kong, Xiao-Ying; Zhen, Feng; Li, Ying; Li, Lian-Hua; Lei, Ting-Zhou; Yuan, Zhen-Hong; Chen, Guan-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit microorganisms as biocatalysts to degrade organic matter or sludge present in wastewater (WW), and thereby generate electricity. We developed a simple, low-cost single-chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC)-type biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensor using carbon felt (anode) and activated sludge, and demonstrated its feasibility in the construction of a real-time BOD measurement system. Further, the effects of anodic pH and organic concentration on SCMFC performance were examined, and the correlation between BOD concentration and its response time was analyzed. Our results demonstrated that the SCMFC exhibited a stable voltage after 132 min following the addition of synthetic WW (BOD concentration: 200 mg/L). Notably, the response signal increased with an increase in BOD concentration (range: 5-200 mg/L) and was found to be directly proportional to the substrate concentration. However, at higher BOD concentrations (>120 mg/L) the response signal remained unaltered. Furthermore, we optimized the SCMFC using synthetic WW, and tested it with real WW. Upon feeding real WW, the BOD values exhibited a standard deviation from 2.08 to 8.3% when compared to the standard BOD5 method, thus demonstrating the practical applicability of the developed system to real treatment effluents.

  9. Laboratory measurements of trace gas emissions from biomass burning of fuel types from the southeastern and southwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Burling, Ian; Yokelson, Robert J.; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Veres, Patrick; Roberts, J.; Warneke, Carsten; Urbanski, Shawn; Reardon, James; Weise, David; Hao, WeiMin; Gouw, Joost de

    2010-11-25

    Fuels commonly managed by prescribed burning were collected from five Department of Defense (DoD) bases in the southeast and southwest U.S. and burned under controlled conditions at the USFS Firelab in Missoula, MT. The smoke emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation. A key instrument used in the measurement of the gas-phase species in smoke was an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP FTIR) spectrometer. The OP FTIR detected and quantified 19 gas-phase species in these fires - CO2, CO, H2O, NO2, NO, HONO, NH3, HCl, SO2, CH4, CH3OH, HCHO, HCOOH, C2H2, C2H4, CH3COOH, HCN, C3H6 and C4H4O. Of particular interest, gas-phase nitrous acid (HONO) was detected in the smoke from all fires. The HONO emission factor ranged from 0.15 to 0.60 g kg 1 and was higher for the southeast fuels. Similarly, the fire-integrated molar emission ratios (relative to NOx) ranged from approximately 0.03 to 0.20, with higher values observed for the southeast fuels. HONO is an important precursor in the production of OH, the primary oxidizing species in the atmosphere but there exists little previous data documenting HONO emissions from either wild or prescribed fires. The detected non-methane organic compound (NMOC) emissions were dominated by oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) with total identified molar OVOC emissions ranging from 39 to 79% of the total identified molar non-methane organic compounds (NMOC). Emitted NMOC can undergo further oxidation and photolysis in the case of OVOC and thus involved in secondary aerosol formation. Elevated amounts of gas-phase HCl and SO2 were also detected in the smoke, with the amounts varying depending on location and vegetation type. Emission factors for HCl were typically much higher for the southwest fuels, particularly those found in the chaparral biome in the coastal regions of California.

  10. Variation of power generation at different buffer types and conductivities in single chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Kyeong-Ho; Shin, Hang-Sik; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are operated with solutions containing various chemical species required for the growth of electrochemically active microorganisms including nutrients and vitamins, substrates, and chemical buffers. Many different buffers are used in laboratory media, but the effects of these buffers and their inherent electrolyte conductivities have not been examined relative to current generation in MFCs. We investigated the effect of several common buffers (phosphate, MES, HEPES, and PIPES) on power production in single chambered MFCs compared to a non-buffered control. At the same concentrations the buffers produced different solution conductivities which resulted in different ohmic resistances and power densities. Increasing the solution conductivities to the same values using NaCl produced comparable power densities for all buffers. Very large increases in conductivity resulted in a rapid voltage drop at high current densities. Our results suggest that solution conductivity at a specific pH for each buffer is more important in MFC studies than the buffer itself given relatively constant pH conditions. Based on our analysis of internal resistance and a set neutral pH, phosphate and PIPES are the most useful buffers of those examined here because pH was maintained close to the pK(a) of the buffer, maximizing the ability of the buffer to contribute to increase current generation at high power densities.

  11. Temperature modeling for analysis and design of the sintering furnance in HTR fuel type of ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saragi, Elfrida; Setiadji, Moch

    2013-09-01

    One of the factors that determine the safety of the operation of the sintering furnace fuel HTR ball is the temperature distribution in the ceramic tube furnace. The temperature distribution must be determined at design stage. The tube has a temperature of 1600 °C at one end and about 40 °C at the other end. The outside of the tube was cooled by air through natural convection. The tube is a furnace ceramic tube which its geometry are 0.08, 0.09 and 0.5 m correspondingly for the inner tube diameter, outer tube diameter and tube length. The temperature distribution of the tube is determined by the natural convection coefficient (NCF), which is difficult to be calculated manually. The determination of NCF includes the Grasshoff, Prandtl, and Nusselt numbers which is a function of the temperature difference between the surrounding air with the ceramic tube. If the temperature vary along the tube, the complexity of the calculations increases. Thus the proposed modeling was performed to determine the temperature distribution along the tube and heat transfer coefficient using a self-developed software which permit the design process easier.

  12. Temperature modeling for analysis and design of the sintering furnance in HTR fuel type of ball

    SciTech Connect

    Saragi, Elfrida; Setiadji, Moch

    2013-09-09

    One of the factors that determine the safety of the operation of the sintering furnace fuel HTR ball is the temperature distribution in the ceramic tube furnace. The temperature distribution must be determined at design stage. The tube has a temperature of 1600 °C at one end and about 40 °C at the other end. The outside of the tube was cooled by air through natural convection. The tube is a furnace ceramic tube which its geometry are 0.08, 0.09 and 0.5 m correspondingly for the inner tube diameter, outer tube diameter and tube length. The temperature distribution of the tube is determined by the natural convection coefficient (NCF), which is difficult to be calculated manually. The determination of NCF includes the Grasshoff, Prandtl, and Nusselt numbers which is a function of the temperature difference between the surrounding air with the ceramic tube. If the temperature vary along the tube, the complexity of the calculations increases. Thus the proposed modeling was performed to determine the temperature distribution along the tube and heat transfer coefficient using a self-developed software which permit the design process easier.

  13. Gas-Fast Reactor Fuel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Randall Fielding; Mitchell Meyer; Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Jim Miller; Sean McDeavitt

    2005-11-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor is a high temperature helium cooled Generation IV reactor concept. Operating parameters for this type of reactor are well beyond those of current fuels so a novel fuel must be developed. One fuel concept calls for UC particles dispersed throughout a SiC matrix. This study examines a hybrid reaction bonding process as a possible fabrication route for this fuel. Processing parameters are also optimized. The process combines carbon and SiC powders and a carbon yielding polymer. In order to obtain dense reaction bonded SiC samples the porosity to carbon ratio in the preform must be large enough to accommodate SiC formation from the carbon present in the sample, however too much porosity reduces mechanical integrity which leads to poor infiltration properties . The porosity must also be of a suitable size to allow silicon transport throughout the sample but keep residual silicon to a minimum.

  14. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  15. Preparation and characterization of dipyridamole solid dispersions for stabilization of supersaturation: effect of precipitation inhibitors type and molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Vora, Chintan; Patadia, Riddhish; Mittal, Karan; Mashru, Rajashree

    2016-11-01

    Dipyridamole (DPL) is a weakly basic BCS class II drug which precipitates upon entering into intestine leading to pH dependant and variable absorption. Thus, research envisaged focuses on developing formulations that maintain supersaturation following upon acid to neutral pH transition. In an endeavor to accomplish the objective, solid dispersion (SD) with hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared by a quench cooling method. The three molecular weight grades of HPMC (HPMC E5, HPMC E15 and HPMC E50) and two molecular weight grades of PVP (PVP K30 and PVP K90) were investigated to observe effect of increasing molecular weight on stabilizing DPL supersaturated solutions. Equilibrium solubility studies revealed increase in solubility with both HPMC and PVP with greater benefit from HPMC. In vitro supersaturated dissolution results demonstrated that HPMC formulations provided greater degree and extent of supersaturation as compared to PVP formulations. The formulation with HPMC E50 provided maximum stabilization to supersaturation upon acid to neutral pH transition. Moreover, the effect of increase in molecular weight was more pronounced in HPMC rather than PVP. Stronger interactions were observed for DPL with HPMC, while no interaction was observed with PVP which was evident from Fourier transform infra-red studies. Differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction studies revealed the amorphous state of DPL in SD.

  16. Biodegradation pattern of hydrocarbons from a fuel oil-type complex residue by an emulsifier-producing microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Nievas, M L; Commendatore, M G; Esteves, J L; Bucalá, V

    2008-06-15

    The biodegradation of a hazardous waste (bilge waste), a fuel oil-type complex residue from normal ship operations, was studied in a batch bioreactor using a microbial consortium in seawater medium. Experiments with initial concentrations of 0.18 and 0.53% (v/v) of bilge waste were carried out. In order to study the biodegradation kinetics, the mass of n-alkanes, resolved hydrocarbons and unresolved complex mixture (UCM) hydrocarbons were assessed by gas chromatography (GC). Emulsification was detected in both experiments, possibly linked to the n-alkanes depletion, with differences in emulsification start times and extents according to the initial hydrocarbon concentration. Both facts influenced the hydrocarbon biodegradation kinetics. A sequential biodegradation of n-alkanes and UMC was found for the higher hydrocarbon content. Being the former growth associated, while UCM biodegradation was a non-growing process showing enzymatic-type biodegradation kinetics. For the lower hydrocarbon concentration, simultaneous biodegradation of n-alkanes and UMC were found before emulsification. Nevertheless, certain UCM biodegradation was observed after the medium emulsification. According to the observed kinetics, three main types of hydrocarbons (n-alkanes, biodegradable UCM and recalcitrant UCM) were found adequate to represent the multicomponent substrate (bilge waste) for future modelling of the biodegradation process.

  17. Effect of separator and inoculum type on electricity generation and microbial community in single-chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jaecheul; Park, Younghyun; Lee, Taeho

    2014-04-01

    Single-chamber microbial fuel cell (SMFC)-I consisted of 4 separator-electrode assemblies (SEAs) with two types of cation exchange membrane (CEM: Nafion and CMI 7000) and an anion exchange membrane (AEM: AMI 7001). SMFC-II consisted of 4 SEAs with Nafion and three types of nonwoven fabric. SMFC-I and -II were inoculated with anaerobic digested and activated sludge, respectively, and operated under fed-batch mode. In SMFC I, AEM-SEA showed a maximum power density (PDmax). Nafion-SEA showed a PDmax in SMFC II, which was similar to that of Nafion-SEA of SMFC I. Although different bacteria were developed in SMFC-I (Deltaproteobacteria and Firmicutes) and SMFC-II (Gammaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes), the inoculum type little affects electricity generation. Variations of pH and oxygen in biofilm have influenced microbial community structure and electricity generation according to the electrode and separator material. Although the electricity generation of non-woven fabric-SEA was less than that of Nafion-SEA, the use of non-woven fabrics is expected to reduce the construction and operating costs of MFCs.

  18. 14 CFR 26.33 - Holders of type certificates: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in the Airworthiness Limitations Section (ALS) of the ICA required by 14 CFR 25.1529 or paragraph (f... 27, 2010, holders of type certificates affected by this section must establish an ALS of the... submit it to the FAA Oversight Office for approval. The ALS must include a section that contains...

  19. 14 CFR 26.33 - Holders of type certificates: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... in the Airworthiness Limitations Section (ALS) of the ICA required by 14 CFR 25.1529 or paragraph (f... 27, 2010, holders of type certificates affected by this section must establish an ALS of the... submit it to the FAA Oversight Office for approval. The ALS must include a section that contains...

  20. 14 CFR 26.33 - Holders of type certificates: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... in the Airworthiness Limitations Section (ALS) of the ICA required by 14 CFR 25.1529 or paragraph (f... 27, 2010, holders of type certificates affected by this section must establish an ALS of the... submit it to the FAA Oversight Office for approval. The ALS must include a section that contains...

  1. 14 CFR 26.33 - Holders of type certificates: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in the Airworthiness Limitations Section (ALS) of the ICA required by 14 CFR 25.1529 or paragraph (f... 27, 2010, holders of type certificates affected by this section must establish an ALS of the... submit it to the FAA Oversight Office for approval. The ALS must include a section that contains...

  2. 14 CFR 26.33 - Holders of type certificates: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... in the Airworthiness Limitations Section (ALS) of the ICA required by 14 CFR 25.1529 or paragraph (f... 27, 2010, holders of type certificates affected by this section must establish an ALS of the... submit it to the FAA Oversight Office for approval. The ALS must include a section that contains...

  3. Particulate and trace gas emissions from prescribed burns in southeastern U.S. fuel types: Summary of a 5-year project

    SciTech Connect

    Weise, David; Johnson, Timothy J.; Reardon, James

    2015-03-04

    Management of smoke from prescribed fires requires knowledge of fuel quantity and the amount and composition of the smoke produced by the fire to minimize adverse impacts on human health. A five-year study produced new emissions information for more than 100 trace gases and particulate matter in smoke for fuel types found in the southern United States of America using state-of-the-art instrumentation in both laboratory and field experiments. Emission factors for flaming, smoldering, and residual smoldering were developed. Agreement between laboratory and field-derived emission factors was generally good in most cases. Reference spectra of over 50 wildland fire gas-phase smoke components were added to a publicly-available database to support identification via infrared spectroscopy. Fuel loading for the field experiments was similar to previously measured fuels. This article summarizes the results of a five-year study to better understand the composition of smoke during all phases of burning for such forests.

  4. 40 CFR Table C-2 to Subpart C of... - Default CH4 and N2O Emission Factors for Various Types of Fuel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....2 × 10−05 1.0 × 10−04 Coke Oven Gas 4.8 × 10−04 1.0 × 10−04 Biomass Fuels—Solid (All fuel types in Table C-1) 3.2 × 10−02 4.2 × 10−03 Biogas 3.2 × 10−03 6.3 × 10−04 Biomass Fuels—Liquid (All fuel types... IPCC definitions of the “Energy Industry” or “Manufacturing Industries and Construction”. In all...

  5. An Exploratory Study of the Effect of Enclosed Structure on Type Design with Fixation Dispersion: Evidence from Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Min-Yuan; Chuang, Hsien-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Type design is the process of re-organizing visual elements and their corresponding meanings into a new organic entity, particularly for the highly logographic Chinese characters whose intrinsic features are retained even after re-organization. Due to this advantage, designers believe that such a re-organization process will not affect Chinese…

  6. Assessing photocatalytic power of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} for solar fuel production: A first-principles study involving quasi-particle theory and dispersive forces

    SciTech Connect

    Osorio-Guillén, J. M.; Espinosa-García, W. F.; Moyses Araujo, C.

    2015-09-07

    First-principles quasi-particle theory has been employed to assess catalytic power of graphitic carbon nitride, g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, for solar fuel production. A comparative study between g-h-triazine and g-h-heptazine has been carried out taking also into account van der Waals dispersive forces. The band edge potentials have been calculated using a recently developed approach where quasi-particle effects are taken into account through the GW approximation. First, it was found that the description of ground state properties such as cohesive and surface formation energies requires the proper treatment of dispersive interaction. Furthermore, through the analysis of calculated band-edge potentials, it is shown that g-h-triazine has high reductive power reaching the potential to reduce CO{sub 2} to formic acid, coplanar g-h-heptazine displays the highest thermodynamics force toward H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2} oxidation reaction, and corrugated g-h-heptazine exhibits a good capacity for both reactions. This rigorous theoretical study shows a route to further improve the catalytic performance of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}.

  7. Irradiation Performance of U-Mo Alloy Based ‘Monolithic’ Plate-Type Fuel – Design Selection

    SciTech Connect

    A. B. Robinson; G. S. Chang; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; D. M. Wachs; D. L. Porter

    2009-08-01

    A down-selection process has been applied to the U-Mo fuel alloy based monolithic plate fuel design, supported by irradiation testing of small fuel plates containing various design parameters. The irradiation testing provided data on fuel performance issues such as swelling, fuel-cladding interaction (interdiffusion), blister formation at elevated temperatures, and fuel/cladding bond quality and effectiveness. U-10Mo (wt%) was selected as the fuel alloy of choice, accepting a somewhat lower uranium density for the benefits of phase stability. U-7Mo could be used, with a barrier, where the trade-off for uranium density is critical to nuclear performance. A zirconium foil barrier between fuel and cladding was chosen to provide a predictable, well-bonded, fuel-cladding interface, allowing little or no fuel-cladding interaction. The fuel plate testing conducted to inform this selection was based on the use of U-10Mo foils fabricated by hot co-rolling with a Zr foil. The foils were subsequently bonded to Al-6061 cladding by hot isostatic pressing or friction stir bonding.

  8. Corrosion Evaluation of RERTR Uranium Molybdenum Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    A K Wertsching

    2012-09-01

    As part of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) mandate to replace the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel for low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, research into the development of LEU fuel for research reactors has been active since the late 1970’s. Originally referred to as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program the new effort named Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is nearing the goal of replacing the standard aluminum clad dispersion highly enriched uranium aluminide fuel with a new LEU fuel. The five domestic high performance research reactors undergoing this conversion are High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR), Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reactor, Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor II (MITR-II). The design of these reactors requires a higher neutron flux than other international research reactors, which to this point has posed unique challenges in the design and development of the new mandated LEU fuel. The new design utilizes a monolithic fuel configuration in order to obtain sufficient 235U within the LEU stoichoimetry to maintain the fission reaction within the domestic test reactors. The change from uranium aluminide dispersion fuel type to uranium molybdenum (UMo) monolithic configuration requires examination of possible corrosion issues associated with the new fuel meat. A focused analysis of the UMo fuel under potential corrosion conditions, within the ATR and under aqueous storage indicates a slow and predictable corrosion rate. Additional corrosion testing is recommended for the highest burn-up fuels to confirm observed corrosion rate trends. This corrosion analysis will focus only on the UMo fuel and will address corrosion of ancillary components such as cladding only in terms of how it affects the fuel. The calculations and corrosion scenarios are weighted with a conservative bias to

  9. Optimization of matrix solid-phase dispersion for the rapid determination of salicylate and benzophenone-type UV absorbing substances in marketed fish.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Dung-Ying; Chen, Chien-Liang; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2014-07-01

    A simple and effective method for the rapid determination of five salicylate and benzophenone-type UV absorbing substances in marketed fish is described. The method involves the use of matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) prior to their determination by on-line silylation gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The parameters that affect the extraction efficiency were optimized using a Box-Behnken design method. The optimal extraction conditions involved dispersing 0.5g of freeze-dried powdered fish with 1.0g of Florisil using a mortar and pestle. This blend was then transferred to a solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge containing 1.0g of octadecyl bonded silica (C18), as the clean-up co-sorbent. The target analytes were then eluted with 7mL of acetonitrile. The extract was derivatized on-line in the GC injection-port by reaction with a trimethylsilylating (TMS) reagent. The TMS-derivatives were then identified and quantitated by GC-MS/MS. The limits of quantitation (LOQs) were less than 0.1ng/g.

  10. Up-and-down shaker-assisted ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of benzophenone-type ultraviolet filters.

    PubMed

    Ku, Yu-Chien; Leong, Mei-I; Wang, Wan-Ting; Huang, Shang-Da

    2013-04-01

    Sun protection is an important part of our lives. UV filters are widely used to absorb solar radiation in sunscreens. However, excess UV filters constitute persistent groups of organic micropollutants present in the environment. An environmentally friendly ionic-liquid-based up-and-down shaker-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction device combined with ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode-array detection has been developed to preconcentrate three UV filters (benzophenone, 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone) from field water samples. In this method, the optimal conditions for the proposed extraction method were: 40 μL [C8MIM][PF6 ] as extraction solvent and 200 μL methanol as disperser solvent were used to extract the UV filters. After up-and-down shaking for 3 min, the aqueous solution was centrifuged at 5000 rpm speed, then using microtube to collect the settled extraction solvent and using ultra-performance liquid chromatography for further analysis. Quantification results indicated that the linear range was 2-1000 ng/mL. The LOD of this method was in the range 0.2-1.3 ng/mL with r(2) ≥ 0.9993. The relative recovery in studies of different types of field water samples was in the range 92-120%, and the RSD was 2.3-7.1%. The proposed method was also applied to the analysis of field samples.

  11. SPECTRAL TYPING OF LATE-TYPE STELLAR COMPANIONS TO YOUNG STARS FROM LOW-DISPERSION NEAR-INFRARED INTEGRAL FIELD UNIT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Lewis C.; Beichman, Charles A.; Burruss, Rick; Ligon, E. Robert; Lockhart, Thomas G.; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Shao, Michael; Rice, Emily L.; Brenner, Douglas; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Crepp, Justin R.; Dekany, Richard G.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Hinkley, Sasha; King, David; Parry, Ian R.; Metchev, Stanimir; Pueyo, Laurent; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Remi; and others

    2012-07-15

    We used the Project 1640 near-infrared coronagraph and integral field spectrograph to observe 19 young solar-type stars. Five of these stars are known binary stars and we detected the late-type secondaries and were able to measure their JH spectra with a resolution of R {approx} 30. The reduced, extracted, and calibrated spectra were compared to template spectra from the IRTF spectral library. With this comparison, we test the accuracy and consistency of spectral-type determination with the low-resolution near-infrared spectra from P1640. Additionally, we determine effective temperature and surface gravity of the companions by fitting synthetic spectra calculated with the PHOENIX model atmosphere code. We also present several new epochs of astrometry of each of the systems. Together, these data increase our knowledge and understanding of the stellar make up of these systems. In addition to the astronomical results, the analysis presented helps validate the Project 1640 data reduction and spectral extraction processes and the utility of low-resolution, near-infrared spectra for characterizing late-type companions in multiple systems.

  12. A photon counting and a squeezing measurement method by the exact absorption and dispersion spectrum of Λ-type Atoms.

    PubMed

    Naeimi, Ghasem; Alipour, Samira; Khademi, Siamak

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the master equations for the interaction of two-mode photons with a three-level Λ-type atom are exactly solved for the coherence terms. In this paper the exact absorption spectrum is applied for the presentation of a non-demolition photon counting method, for a few number of coupling photons, and its benefits are discussed. The exact scheme is also applied where the coupling photons are squeezed and the photon counting method is also developed for the measurement of the squeezing parameter of the coupling photons.

  13. Ocular dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light interferometry (SRWLI) was used to measure the wavelength dependence of refractive index (i.e., dispersion) for various ocular components. The accuracy of the technique was assessed by measurement of fused silica and water, the refractive indices of which have been measured at several different wavelengths. The dispersion of bovine and rabbit aqueous and vitreous humor was measured from 400 to 1100 nm. Also, the dispersion was measured from 400 to 700 nm for aqueous and vitreous humor extracted from goat and rhesus monkey eyes. For the humors, the dispersion did not deviate significantly from water. In an additional experiment, the dispersion of aqueous and vitreous humor that had aged up to a month was compared to freshly harvested material. No difference was found between the fresh and aged media. An unsuccessful attempt was also made to use the technique for dispersion measurement of bovine cornea and lens. Future refinement may allow measurement of the dispersion of cornea and lens across the entire visible and near-infrared wavelength band. The principles of white- light interferometry including image analysis, measurement accuracy, and limitations of the technique, are discussed. In addition, alternate techniques and previous measurements of ocular dispersion are reviewed.

  14. Relationships of dead downed woody fuels to site and stand characteristics within the Thuja plicata/Pachistima myrsinites habitat type of northern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Nalley, R.N

    1982-01-01

    Relationships were investigated between naturally-occurring downed woody fuel loadings and commonly measured site and stand characteristics in forest stands within the T. plicata/P. myrsinites habitat type on the Clearwater National Forest in northern Idaho. The primary study goal was to develop models capable of predicting downed woody fuel loadings from site and stand attributes. A secondary objective was to ascertain if defoliation caused by the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) could be correlated with, or used as a predictor of, downed woody fuel loadings. Site and stand characteristics and downed woody fuel loadings were measured in 28 stands. These stands averaged 45 acres (18.3 ha) in size and encompassed altitudes between 2800 and 5200 feet (840 and 1585 m), slopes between 15 and 82%, stand ages between 30 and 350 years, budworm defoliation intensities from low to high, successional development stages from early seral to climax, all major aspects, and a broad range of additional site and stand characteristics. Predictive fuel models were developed using stepwise regression analyses for fuel size classes of 0.25-0.99 inches (0.63-2.51 cm), 1.00-2.99 inches (2.54-7.59 cm), and 3.00 inches (7.60 cm) and larger sound material, and for duff depth and total downed woody fuel loading. In the latter model, variables describing stand altitude and the stand's present stage of successional development explained 82% of the total variation. Defoliation by the western spruce budworm was not found to be a significant predictive variable of downed woody fuel in any size class; however, a significant positive linear correlation of defoliation with altitude, and significant negative linear correlations of defoliation with basal area, stand age, and crown competition factor (CCF) were found.

  15. Microwave-assisted synthesis of water-dispersed CdTe/CdSe core/shell type II quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sai, Li-Man; Kong, Xiang Yang

    2011-05-27

    A facile synthesis of mercaptanacid-capped CdTe/CdSe (core/shell) type II quantum dots in aqueous solution by means of a microwave-assisted approach is reported. The results of X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that the as-prepared CdTe/CdSe quantum dots had a core/shell structure with high crystallinity. The core/shell quantum dots exhibit tunable fluorescence emissions by controlling the thickness of the CdSe shell. The photoluminescent properties were dramatically improved through UV-illuminated treatment, and the time-resolved fluorescence spectra showed that there is a gradual increase of decay lifetime with the thickness of CdSe shell.

  16. Charcoal morphometry for paleoecological analysis: The effects of fuel type and transportation on morphological parameters1

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Alastair J.; Belcher, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Charcoal particles preserved in sediments are used as indicators of paleowildfire. Most research focuses on abundance as an indicator of fire frequency, but charcoals also convey information about the vegetation from which they are derived. One potential source of information is their morphology, which is influenced by the parent material, the nature of the fire, and subsequent transportation and burial. • Methods: We charcoalified 26 materials from a range of plant taxa, and subjected them to simulated fluvial transport by tumbling them with water and gravel. We photographed the resulting particles, and used image analysis software to measure morphological parameters. • Results: Leaf charcoal displayed a logarithmic decrease in area, and a logarithmic increase in circularity, with transportation time. Trends were less clear for stem or wood charcoal. Grass charcoal displayed significantly higher aspect ratios than other charcoal types. • Conclusions: Leaf charcoal displays more easily definable relationships between morphological parameters and degree of breakdown than stem or wood charcoal. The aspect ratios of fossil mesocharcoal can indicate the broad botanical source of an assemblage. Coupled to estimates of charcoal abundance, this will improve understanding of the variation in flammability of ancient ecosystems. PMID:25202644

  17. Fabrication and Preliminary Evaluation of Metal Matrix Microencapsulated Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Kiggans, Jim; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    The metal matrix microencapsulated (M3) fuel concept for light water reactors (LWRs), consisting of coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix, is introduced. Fabrication of M3 fuels by hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, or extrusion methodologies has been demonstrated over the temperature range 800-1050 C. Various types of coated fuel particles with outermost layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, ZrC, and TiN have been incorporated into the zirconium metal matrix. Mechanical particle-particle and chemical particle-matrix interactions have been observed during the preliminary characterization of as-fabricated M3 specimens. Irradiation of three M3 rodlets with surrogate coated fuel particles was carried out at mean rod temperature of 400 C to 4.6 dpa in the zirconium metal matrix. Due to absence of texture in the metal matrix no irradiation growth strain (<0.09%) was detected during the post-irradiation examination.

  18. Residential Fuel Cell Demonstration Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrero, E.; McClelland, R.

    2002-07-01

    This report is a guide for rural electric cooperatives engaged in field testing of equipment and in assessing related application and market issues. Dispersed generation and its companion fuel cell technology have attracted increased interest by rural electric cooperatives and their customers. In addition, fuel cells are a particularly interesting source because their power quality, efficiency, and environmental benefits have now been coupled with major manufacturer development efforts. The overall effort is structured to measure the performance, durability, reliability, and maintainability of these systems, to identify promising types of applications and modes of operation, and to assess the related prospect for future use. In addition, technical successes and shortcomings will be identified by demonstration participants and manufacturers using real-world experience garnered under typical operating environments.

  19. Large area quantitative X-ray mapping of (U,Pu)O 2 nuclear fuel pellets using wavelength dispersive electron probe microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brémier, S.; Haas, D.; Somers, J.; Walker, C. T.

    2003-04-01

    The work presented is an example of how large area compositional mapping (≥1 mm 2) can be used to provide quantitative information on element distribution and specimen homogeneity. High-resolution was accomplished by producing a collage of X-ray maps acquired using classical conditions; magnification ×400, spatial resolution 256×256 pixels. The individual images, each measuring roughly 250×250 μm, were converted to quantitative maps using the HIMAX® software package and the XMAS® matrix correction from SAMx. The quantitative gray-level large area X-ray picture was pieced together using the 'Multiple Image Alignment' function of the ANALYSIS® image processing software. This software was also used to convert the gray-level pictures to false color images. The specimens investigated were transverse sections of MOX fuel pellets. Results are presented for the distribution of Pu by area fraction and cumulative area fraction, the size distribution of regions of high Pu concentration and average separation of these regions.

  20. Self-recovery of Pd nanoparticles that were dispersed over La(Sr)Fe(Mn)O3 for intelligent oxide anodes of solid-oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Tae Ho; Okamoto, Yohei; Ida, Shintaro; Ishihara, Tatsumi

    2012-09-10

    Self-recovery is one of the most-desirable properties for functional materials. Recently, oxide anodes have attracted significant attention as alternative anode materials for solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that can overcome reoxidation, deactivation, and coke-deposition. However, the electrical conductivity and surface activity of the most-widely used oxide anodes remain unsatisfactory. Herein, we report the synthesis of an "intelligent oxide anode" that exhibits self-recovery from power-density degradation in the redox cycle by using a Pd-doped La(Sr)Fe-(Mn)O(3) cell as an oxide anode for the SOFCs. We investigated the anodic performance and oxidation-tolerance of the cell by using Pd-doped perovskite as an anode and fairly high maximum power densities of 0.5 and 0.1 W cm(-2) were achieved at 1073 and 873 K, respectively, despite using a 0.3 mm-thick electrolyte. Long-term stability was also examined and the power density was recovered upon exposure of the anode to air. This recovery of the power density can be explained by the formation of Pd nanoparticles, which were self-recovered through reoxidation and reduction. In addition, the self-recovery of the anode by oxidation was confirmed by XRD and SEM and this process was effective for improving the durability of SOFC systems when they were exposed to severe operating conditions.

  1. 14 CFR 291.44 - BTS Schedule P-12(a), Fuel Consumption by Type of Service and Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS CARGO OPERATIONS IN INTERSTATE AIR...) Each air carrier shall maintain records for each station showing the computation of fuel inventories... other than Jet A fuel, a footnote shall be added indicating the number of gallons and applicable...

  2. Enhanced Absorption of Insulin Aspart as the Result of a Dispersed Injection Strategy Tested in a Randomized Trial in Type 1 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Julia K.; Birngruber, Thomas; Korsatko, Stefan; Deller, Sigrid; Köhler, Gerd; Boysen, Susanne; Augustin, Thomas; Mautner, Selma I.; Sinner, Frank; Pieber, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We investigated the impact of two different injection strategies on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of insulin aspart in vivo in an open-label, two-period crossover study and verified changes in the surface-to-volume ratio ex vivo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Before the clinical trial, insulin aspart was injected ex vivo into explanted human abdominal skin flaps. The surface-to-volume ratio of the subcutaneous insulin depot was assessed by microfocus computed tomography that compared 1 bolus of 18 IU with 9 dispersed boluses of 2 IU. These two injection strategies were then tested in vivo, in 12 C-peptide–negative type 1 diabetic patients in a euglycemic glucose clamp (glucose target 5.5 ± 1.1 mmol/L) for 8 h after the first insulin administration. RESULTS The ex vivo experiment showed a 1.8-fold higher mean surface-to-volume ratio for the dispersed injection strategy. The maximum glucose infusion rates (GIR) were similar for the two strategies (10 ± 4 vs. 9 ± 4; P = 0.5); however, times to reach maximum GIR and 50% and 10% of the maximum GIR were significantly reduced by using the 9 × 2 IU strategy (68 ± 33 vs. 127 ± 93 min; P = 0.01; 38 ± 9 vs. 49 ± 16 min; P < 0.01; 23 ± 6 vs. 30 ± 10 min; P < 0.05). For 9 × 2 IU, the area under the GIR curve was greater during the first 60 min (219 ± 89 vs. 137 ± 75; P < 0.01) and halved until maximum GIR (242 ± 183 vs. 501 ± 396; P < 0.01); however, it was similar across the whole study period (1,361 ± 469 vs. 1,565 ± 527; P = 0.08). CONCLUSIONS A dispersed insulin injection strategy enhanced the effect of a fast-acting insulin analog. The increased surface-to-volume ratio of the subcutaneous insulin depot can facilitate insulin absorption into the vascular system. PMID:23193211

  3. Advanced Diesel Oil Fuel Processor Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Fuel Cell Power Plants ," EPRI Report EM-2686, Octobe: 1982. 4. R. G. Minet and D. Warren, "Evaluation of Hybrid TER-1,TR Fuel Processor," EPRI Report ...EM-2096, October 1981. 5. R. G. Minet and D. Warren, "Assessment of Fuel Processing aysiems for Dispersed Fuel Cell Power Plants ,’ EPRI Report EM...34Fuel Processor Development for !i.- MW Fuel Cell Power Plants ,4 EPRI Report EM-1123, July 1985. 9. M. HI. Hyman, "Simulate Methane Reformer

  4. Investigation of Ignition Characteristics of AN-F-32 and Two An-f-58a Fuels in Single Can-type Turbojet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayle, Warren D; Douglass, Howard W

    1950-01-01

    Ignition characteristics of AN-F-32 and two AN-F-58a fuels were studied in a single can-type turbojet combustor under air-flow conditions representing engine speeds of 1600, 2500, and 4000 rpm, altitudes from sea level to 30,000 feet, ambient temperatures at sea level from 90 degrees to minus 36 degrees F, and flight Mach numbers of 0 and 0.6. Critical fuel-flow rates for ignition increased with increase in preignition engine speed, with increase in altitude, or with decrease in sea-level ambient temperature. This flow rate appears to increase in a direct relation to decrease in fuel volatility as indicated by the 10-percent-evaporated temperature.

  5. FUEL ASSAY REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, B.I.; Sandmeier, H.A.; Martens, F.H.

    1962-12-25

    A reactor having maximum sensitivity to perturbations is described comprising a core consisting of a horizontally disposed, rectangular, annular fuel zone containing enriched uranium dioxide dispersed in graphite, the concentration of uranium dioxide increasing from the outside to the inside of the fuel zone, an internal reflector of graphite containing an axial test opening disposed within the fuel zone, an external graphite reflector, means for changing the neutron spectrum in the test opening, and means for measuring perturbations in the neutron flux caused by the introduction of different fuel elements into the test opening. (AEC)

  6. Effect of surface groups on the electrocatalytic behaviour of Pt-Fe-Co alloy-dispersed carbon electrodes in the phosphoric acid fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyun, Su-Il; Lee, Seung-Bok

    Effect of surface group on the electrocatalytic behaviour of 10 wt.% Pt-Fe-Co alloy-dispersed carbon (Pt-Fe-Co/C) electrode has been investigated as functions of applied potential and duration in 85% H 3PO 4 solution of 145°C, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, combined with ac-impedance spectroscopy, potentiostatic current transient technique, and potentiodynamic polarization experiment. It was shown from FTIR spectra that surface group formed in this work mainly comprises carboxyl group and that the formation potential of carboxyl group lies between 600 and 700 mV RHE. From increase of charge transfer resistance ( Rct), and decrease of electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction with immersion time, it is suggested that above the formation potential of carboxyl group, further formation of carboxyl group on the carbon support around the catalyst particle reduces active surface area of the catalyst particle with immersion time. On the other hand, below the formation potential, dissolution of carboxyl group previously formed on the carbon support raises active surface area of the catalyst particle. In the present study, relationship between electrocatalytic aspect of the electrode, and the amount of carboxyl group formed on the carbon support around the catalyst particle was well discussed with a schematic illustration. The illustrative representation is underlain by formation on and dissolution from the catalyst particle of carboxyl group which cause the rise and fall in circumferential coverage of carboxyl group, respectively and hence the reduction and elevation in active surface area of the catalyst particle.

  7. Physical parameters of late M-type members of Chamaeleon I and TW Hydrae Association: dust settling, age dispersion and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayo, A.; Barrado, D.; Allard, F.; Henning, T.; Comerón, F.; Morales-Calderón, M.; Rajpurohit, A. S.; Peña Ramírez, K.; Beamín, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    Although mid-to-late type M dwarfs are the most common stars in our stellar neighbourhood, our knowledge of these objects is still limited. Open questions include the evolution of their angular momentum, internal structures, dust settling in their atmospheres and age dispersion within populations. In addition, at young ages, late-type Ms have masses below the hydrogen burning limit and therefore are key objects in the debate on the brown dwarf mechanism of formation. In this work, we determine and study in detail the physical parameters of two samples of young, late M-type sources belonging to either the Chamaeleon I dark cloud or the TW Hydrae Association and compare them with the results obtained in the literature for other young clusters and also for older, field, dwarfs. We used multiwavelength photometry to construct and analyse SEDs to determine general properties of the photosphere and disc presence. We also used low-resolution optical and near-infrared spectroscopy to study activity, accretion, gravity and effective temperature sensitive indicators. We propose a Virtual Observatory-based spectral index that is both temperature and age sensitive. We derived physical parameters using independent techniques confirming the already common feature/problem of the age/luminosity spread. In particular, we highlight two brown dwarfs showing very similar temperatures but clearly different surface gravity (explained invoking extreme early accretion). We also show how, despite large improvement in the dust treatment in theoretical models, there is still room for further progress in the simultaneous reproduction of the optical and near-infrared features of these cold young objects.

  8. Linear relation between H I circular velocity and stellar velocity dispersion in early-type galaxies, and slope of the density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Paolo; Oosterloo, Tom; Cappellari, Michele; den Heijer, Milan; Józsa, Gyula I. G.

    2016-08-01

    We report a tight linear relation between the H I circular velocity measured at 6 Re and the stellar velocity dispersion measured within 1 Re for a sample of 16 early-type galaxies with stellar mass between 1010 and 1011 M⊙. The key difference from previous studies is that we only use spatially resolved vcirc(H I) measurements obtained at large radius for a sizeable sample of objects. We can therefore link a kinematical tracer of the gravitational potential in the dark-matter dominated outer regions of galaxies with one in the inner regions, where baryons control the distribution of mass. We find that vcirc(H I)= 1.33 σe with an observed scatter of just 12 per cent. This indicates a strong coupling between luminous and dark matter from the inner- to the outer regions of early-type galaxies, analogous to the situation in spirals and dwarf irregulars. The vcirc(H I)-σe relation is shallower than those based on vcirc measurements obtained from stellar kinematics and modelling at smaller radius, implying that vcirc declines with radius - as in bulge-dominated spirals. Indeed, the value of vcirc(H I) is typically 25 per cent lower than the maximum vcirc derived at ˜0.2 Re from dynamical models. Under the assumption of power-law total density profiles ρ ∝ r-γ, our data imply an average logarithmic slope <γ> = 2.18 ± 0.03 across the sample, with a scatter of 0.11 around this value. The average slope and scatter agree with recent results obtained from stellar kinematics alone for a different sample of early-type galaxies.

  9. POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Dwyer, O.E.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

  10. Assessment of Nuclear Fuels using Radiographic Thickness Measurement Method

    SciTech Connect

    Muhammad Abir; Fahima Islam; Hyoung Koo Lee; Daniel Wachs

    2014-11-01

    The Convert branch of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) focuses on the development of high uranium density fuels for research and test reactors for nonproliferation. This fuel is aimed to convert low density high enriched uranium (HEU) based fuel to high density low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel for high performance research reactors (HPRR). There are five U.S. reactors that fall under the HPRR category, including: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR), the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR), the Missouri University Research Reactor (UMRR), the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). U-Mo alloy fuel phase in the form of either monolithic or dispersion foil type fuels, such as ATR Full-size In center flux trap Position (AFIP) and Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR), are being designed for this purpose. The fabrication process1 of RERTR is susceptible to introducing a variety of fuel defects. A dependable quality control method is required during fabrication of RERTR miniplates to maintain the allowable design tolerances, therefore evaluating and analytically verifying the fabricated miniplates for maintaining quality standards as well as safety. The purpose of this work is to analyze the thickness of the fabricated RERTR-12 miniplates using non-destructive technique to meet the fuel plate specification for RERTR fuel to be used in the ATR.

  11. Simultaneous acid red 27 decolourisation and bioelectricity generation in a (H-type) microbial fuel cell configuration using NAR-2.

    PubMed

    Kardi, Seyedeh Nazanin; Ibrahim, Norahim; Rashid, Noor Aini Abdul; Darzi, Ghasem Najafpour

    2016-02-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent one of the most attractive and eco-friendly technologies that convert chemical bond energy derived from organic matter into electrical power by microbial catabolic activity. This paper presents the use of a H-type MFC involving a novel NAR-2 bacterial consortium consisting of Citrobacter sp. A1, Enterobacter sp. L17 and Enterococcus sp. C1 to produce electricity whilst simultaneously decolourising acid red 27 (AR27) as a model dye, which is also known as amaranth. In this setup, the dye AR27 is mixed with modified P5 medium (2.5 g/L glucose and 5.0 g/L nutrient broth) in the anode compartment, whilst phosphate buffer solution (PBS) pH 7 serves as a catholyte in the cathode compartment. After several electrochemical analyses, the open circuit voltage (OCV) for 0.3 g/L AR27 with 24-h retention time at 30 °C was recorded as 0.950 V, whereas (93%) decolourisation was achieved in 220-min operation. The maximum power density was reached after 48 h of operation with an external load of 300 Ω. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis revealed the surface morphology of the anode and the bacterial adhesion onto the electrode surface. The results of this study indicate that the decolourisation of AR27 dye and electrical power generation was successfully achieved in a MFC operated by a bacterial consortium. The consortium of bacteria was able to utilise AR27 in a short retention time as an electron acceptor and to shuttle the electrons to the anode surface for bioelectricity generation.

  12. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA DISTANCE MODULUS BIAS AND DISPERSION FROM K-CORRECTION ERRORS: A DIRECT MEASUREMENT USING LIGHT CURVE FITS TO OBSERVED SPECTRAL TIME SERIES

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, C.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Childress, M.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Kim, A. G.; Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J.; Baltay, C.; Buton, C.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.; and others

    2015-02-10

    We estimate systematic errors due to K-corrections in standard photometric analyses of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae. Errors due to K-correction occur when the spectral template model underlying the light curve fitter poorly represents the actual supernova spectral energy distribution, meaning that the distance modulus cannot be recovered accurately. In order to quantify this effect, synthetic photometry is performed on artificially redshifted spectrophotometric data from 119 low-redshift supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory, and the resulting light curves are fit with a conventional light curve fitter. We measure the variation in the standardized magnitude that would be fit for a given supernova if located at a range of redshifts and observed with various filter sets corresponding to current and future supernova surveys. We find significant variation in the measurements of the same supernovae placed at different redshifts regardless of filters used, which causes dispersion greater than ∼0.05 mag for measurements of photometry using the Sloan-like filters and a bias that corresponds to a 0.03 shift in w when applied to an outside data set. To test the result of a shift in supernova population or environment at higher redshifts, we repeat our calculations with the addition of a reweighting of the supernovae as a function of redshift and find that this strongly affects the results and would have repercussions for cosmology. We discuss possible methods to reduce the contribution of the K-correction bias and uncertainty.

  13. High-resolution Brillouin spectroscopy with angular dispersion-type Fabry-Perot interferometer and its application to a quartz crystal.

    PubMed

    Ike, Y; Tsukada, S; Kojima, S

    2007-07-01

    Although the multichannel Brillouin spectroscopy with an angular dispersion-type Fabry-Perot interferometer (ADFPI) becomes a powerful tool for quick measurements, its resolution and contrast are not enough for the study of single crystals. A highly sensitive multichannel detector enables the ADFPI to use a solid etalon with high reflectivity (99.5%); hence, the high resolution and the high contrast of a spectrum are achieved. The finesse, the inverse of the resolution, reaches 100 with a 10 mm diameter of aperture size. The highest finesse of 140 is obtained by using a smaller diameter of 2 mm. The accuracy is examined by the measurement of a quartz crystal. The improvement in the resolution and contrast enables investigations of weak attenuation in a quartz crystal. The elastic anomaly of the alpha-beta transition of a quartz crystal is clearly observed both in sound velocity and attenuation. From the elastic constant c(11), the critical parameter K=0.76 is determined.

  14. Fuel Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the theories, construction, operation, types, and advantages of fuel cells developed by the American space programs. Indicates that the cell is an ideal small-scale power source characterized by its compactness, high efficiency, reliability, and freedom from polluting fumes. (CC)

  15. Optimization of dispersive micro solid-phase extraction for the rapid determination of benzophenone-type ultraviolet absorbers in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wu-Hsun; Tzing, Shin-Hwa; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2015-09-11

    A solvent-free method for the rapid analysis of six benzophenone-type UV absorbers in water samples is described. The method involves the use of dispersive micro solid-phase extraction (DmSPE) followed by the simultaneous silylation and thermal desorption (SSTD) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operating in the selected-ion-storage (SIS) mode. A Plackett-Burman design was used for screening and a central composite design (CCD) for optimizing the significant factors was applied. The optimal experimental conditions involved immersing 1.5mg of the Oasis HLB adsorbent in a 10mL portion of water sample. After vigorous shaking for 1min, the adsorbents were transferred to a micro-vial, and were dried at 122°C for 3.5min, after cooling, 2μL of the BSTFA silylating reagent was added. For SSTD, the injection-port temperature was held at 70°C for 2.5min for derivatization, and the temperature was then rapidly increased to 340°C to allow the thermal desorption of the TMS-derivatives into the GC for 5.7min. The limits of quantitation (LOQs) were determined to be 1.5-5.0ng/L. Precision, as indicated by relative standard deviations (RSDs), was equal or less than 11% for both intra- and inter-day analysis. Accuracy, expressed as the mean extraction recovery, was between 87% and 95%. A preliminary analysis of the municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) effluent and river water samples revealed that 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone (BP-3) was the most common benzophenone-type UV absorber present. Using a standard addition method, the total concentrations of these compounds ranged from 5.1 to 74.8ng/L.

  16. Doped CeO2-LaFeO3 composite oxide as an active anode for direct hydrocarbon-type solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Tae Ho; Ida, Shintaro; Ishihara, Tatsumi

    2011-12-07

    Direct utilization of hydrocarbon and other renewable fuels is one of the most important issues concerning solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Mixed ionic and electronic conductors (MIECs) have been explored as anode materials for direct hydrocarbon-type SOFCs. However, electrical conductivity of the most often reported MIEC oxide electrodes is still not satisfactory. As a result, mixed-conducting oxides with high electrical conductivity and catalytic activity are attracting considerable interest as an alternative anode material for noncoke depositing anodes. In this study, we examine the oxide composite Ce(Mn,Fe)O(2)-La(Sr)Fe(Mn)O(3) for use as an oxide anode in direct hydrocarbon-type SOFCs. High performance was demonstrated for this composite oxide anode in direct hydrocarbon-type SOFCs, showing high maximum power density of approximately 1 W cm(-2) at 1073 K when propane and butane were used as fuel. The high power density of the cell results from the high electrical conductivity of the composite oxide in hydrocarbon and the high surface activity in relation to direct hydrocarbon oxidation.

  17. Contrasting Geographic Distribution Profiles of the Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 BgOL and BgKL Variants in Japan Suggest Dispersion and Replacement▿

    PubMed Central

    Eda, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Shigeru; Yoshino, Kamesaburo; Yanagi, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    Thelifelong latent infection-reactivation mode of infection of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) transmitted by close contact has allowed a diversity of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) variations to accumulate in human populations. Whether and how the variants of the HSV-1 that is ubiquitous worldwide spread to different human populations is not clear. In our previous study the geographically gradient distribution of the HSV-1 BgKL variant, which is a good marker for the BgKL:SaCFJM:SaGHM:SaD/EL:KpMS variant, suggested that BgKL dispersed geographically. Southern hybridization analyses showed that in BgKL the BglII cleavage site between the BglII K and small “Q/#13” fragments is lost, the SalI cleavage sites between the SalI J and C and between SalI F and J fragments are lost, and the SalI E fragment is abnormally large (SaEL variation). The RFLP and geographic distribution of one more HSV-1 RFLP variant, BgOL, were comparatively analyzed. The BglII cleavage site between the BglII O and Q/#13 fragments is lost in BgOL. BgOL clinical isolates were not associated with any of the SaCFJM, SaEL, SaGHM, or KpMS variations, whereas one-fourth of the non-BgOL:non-BgKL isolates was associated with SaCFJM and SaGHM, indicating that BgKL and BgOL are distant in terms of diversification. BgOL is distributed highly in the northeastern region and the southwestern island of Kyushu but is rare between the two regions in Japan, in a remarkable contrast to BgKL. These are the first epidemiologic data to show contrasting geographic distribution profiles of two HSV-1 variants and suggest the gradual dispersion and replacement of HSV-1 variants. PMID:17215348

  18. Dispersion Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiansky, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses the need for more accurate and complete input data and field verification of the various models of air pollutant dispension. Consideration should be given to changing the form of air quality standards based on enhanced dispersion modeling techniques. (Author/RE)

  19. Fuel development activities of the US RERTR Program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in the development and irradiation testing of high-density fuels for use with low-enriched uranium in research and test reactors is reported. Swelling and blister-threshold temperature data obtained from the examination of miniature fuel plates containing UAl/sub x/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, or U/sub 3/Si dispersed in an aluminum matrix are presented. Combined with the results of metallurgical examinations, these data show that these four fuel types will perform adequately to full burnup of the /sup 235/U contained in the low-enriched fuel. The exothermic reaction of the uranium-silicide fuels with aluminum has been found to occur at about the same temperature as the melting of the aluminum matrix and cladding and to be essentially quenched by the melting endotherm. A new series of miniature fuel plate irradiations is also discussed.

  20. Nuclear forensics techniques for attributing material used in a radiological dispersal device event

    SciTech Connect

    Knepper, P. L.; Eberhardt, Ariane Sibylle,; Leibrecht, E. A.; Ross, J. L.; Scott, M. R.; Epresi, K.; Giannangeli, D.; Charlton, W. S.

    2004-01-01

    If a radiological dispersal device (RDD) is detonated in the U.S. or near U.S. interests overseas, it will be crucial that the actors involved in the event can be identified quickly. Law enforcement officials will need information concerning the material used in the device, specifically what type of material it was and from where it originated. This information will then be used to help identify the specific individuals who manufactured the device and perpetrated the event. Texas A&M University and Los Alamos National Laboratory are collaborating on the development of a technique for identifying the material used in a radiological dispersal device. This methodology is currently focused on radiological dispersal devices that make use of spent nuclear fuel as the source material. The methodology developed makes use of both a forward model and an inverse model to identify specific spent fuel characteristics using isotopic composition of RDD debris. The forward model is based on sophisticated reactor physics calculations for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic compositions as a function of fuel type (e.g., PWR, BWR, CANDU, RBMK, etc.), fuel burnup (in MWd/MTHM), fuel age (in years since permanent discharge from the reactor), and operating characteristics (e.g., operating power level, time at power, etc.). These reactor physics calculations are benchmarked to measured data to establish their accuracy in predicting isotopic compositions. The inverse model makes use of a Bayesian inverse method to identify the specific spent fuel assembly (or assemblies) used based on measurements of actinide and fission product isotopic ratios in the RDD debris. A description of both the forward and inverse models, accuracies of the technique, and the results to date are given.

  1. Effect of Fuel Composition, Engine Operating Variables, and Spark-Plug Type and Condition on Preignition-Limited Performance of an R-2800 Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfender, John F.

    1946-01-01

    The preignition characteristics of the R-2800 cylinder, as effected by fuel consumption, engine operating variables, and spark plug type and condition, were evaluated. The effects on preignition-limited performance of various percentages of aromatics (benzene, toluene, cumene, xylene) in a base fuel of triptane were investigated. Two paraffins (triptane and S + 6.0 ml TEL/gal) and two refinery blends (28-R and 33-R) were preignition rated. The effect of changes in the following engine operating variables on preignition limit was determined: inlet-air temperature, rear spark plug gasket temperature, engine speed, spark advance, tappet clearance, and oil consumption. Preignition limits of the R-2800 cylinder using Champion C34S and C35S and AC-LS86, LS87, and LS88 spark plugs were established and the effect of spark plug deterioration was investigated. No definite trends in preignition-limited indicated mean effective pressure were indicated for aromatics as a class when increased percentages of different aromatics were added to a base fuel of triptane. Three types of fuel (aromatics, paraffins, and refinery blends) showed a preignition range for this cylinder from 65 to 104 percent when based on the performance of S plus 6.0 ml TEL per gallon as 100 percent. The R-2800 cylinder is therefore relatively insensitive to fuel composition when compared to a CFR F-4 engine, which had a pre-ignition range from 72 to 100 percent for the same fuels. Six engine operating variables were investigated with the following results: preignition-limited indicated mean effective pressure decreased, with increases in engine speed, rear spark plug gasket temperature, inlet-air temperature, and spark advance beyond 20 F B.T.C. and was unaffected by rate of oil consumption or by tappet clearance. Spark plugs were rated over a range of preignition-limited indicated mean effective pressure from 200 to 390 pounds per square inch at a fuel-air ratio of 0.07 in the following order of increased

  2. Thermal compatibility studies of unirradiated uranium silicide dispersed in aluminum. [Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.; Thresh, H.R.

    1984-09-01

    Powder metallurgy dispersions of uranium silicides in an aluminum matrix have been developed by the international Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program as a new generation of proliferation-resistant fuels. A major issue of concern is the compatibility of the fuel with the matrix material and the dimensional stability of this fuel type. A total of 45 miniplate-type fuel plates were annealed at 400/sup 0/C for up to 1981 hours. A data base for the thermal compatibility of unirradiated uranium silicide dispersed in aluminum was established. No modification tested of a standard fuel plate showed any significant reduction of the plate swelling. The cause of the thermal growth of silicide fuel plates was determined to be a two-step process: (1) the reaction of the uranium silicide with aluminum to form U(AlSi)/sub 3/ and (2) the release of hydrogen and subsequent creep and pillowing of the fuel plate. 9 references, 4 figures, 6 tables.

  3. Fuel injector system

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Bertrand D.; Leonard, Gary L.

    1988-01-01

    A fuel injection system particularly adapted for injecting coal slurry fuels at high pressures includes an accumulator-type fuel injector which utilizes high-pressure pilot fuel as a purging fluid to prevent hard particles in the fuel from impeding the opening and closing movement of a needle valve, and as a hydraulic medium to hold the needle valve in its closed position. A fluid passage in the injector delivers an appropriately small amount of the ignition-aiding pilot fuel to an appropriate region of a chamber in the injector's nozzle so that at the beginning of each injection interval the first stratum of fuel to be discharged consists essentially of pilot fuel and thereafter mostly slurry fuel is injected.

  4. COMPOSITE FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Hurford, W.J.; Gordon, R.B.; Johnson, W.A.

    1962-12-25

    A sandwich-type fuel element for a reactor is described. This fuel element has the shape of an elongated flat plate and includes a filler plate having a plurality of compartments therein in which the fuel material is located. The filler plate is clad on both sides with a thin cladding material which is secured to the filler plate only to completely enclose the fuel material in each compartment. (AEC)

  5. SEM and TEM Characterization of As-Fabricated U-7Mo Disperson Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Keiser, Jr.; B. Yao; E. Perez; Y. H. Sohn

    2009-11-01

    The starting microstructure of a dispersion fuel plate can have a dramatic impact on the overall performance of the plate during irradiation. To improve the understanding of the as-fabricated microstructures of dispersion fuel plates, SEM and TEM analysis have been performed on RERTR-9A archive fuel plates, which went through an additional hot isostatic procsssing (HIP) step during fabrication. The fuel plates had depleted U-7Mo fuel particles dispersed in either Al-2Si or 4043 Al alloy matrix. For the characterized samples, it was observed that a large fraction of the ?-phase U-7Mo alloy particles had decomposed during fabrication, and in areas near the fuel/matrix interface where the transformation products were present significant fuel/matrix interaction had occurred. Relatively thin Si-rich interaction layers were also observed around the U-7Mo particles. In the thick interaction layers, (U)(Al,Si)3 and U6Mo4Al43 were identified, and in the thin interaction layers U(Al,Si)3, U3Si3Al2, U3Si5, and USi1.88-type phases were observed. The U3Si3Al2 phase contained some Mo. Based on the results of this work, exposure of dispersion fuel plates to relatively high temperatures during fabrication impacts the overall microstructure, particularly the nature of the interaction layers around the fuel particles. The time and temperature of fabrication should be carefully controlled in order to produce the most uniform Si-rich layers around the U-7Mo particles.

  6. Mathematical model of water transport in Bacon and alkaline matrix-type hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Easter, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Based on general mass continuity and diffusive transport equations, a mathematical model was developed that simulates the transport of water in Bacon and alkaline-matrix fuel cells. The derived model was validated by using it to analytically reproduce various Bacon and matrix-cell experimental water transport transients.

  7. Development and validation of capabilities to measure thermal properties of layered monolithic U-Mo alloy plate-type fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Andrew M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Pool, Karl N.; Smith, Frances N.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2014-07-19

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of thermal conductivity behavior of the fuel system as a function of temperature and expected irradiation conditions. The purpose of this paper is to verify and validate the functionality of equipment methods installed in hot cells for eventual measurements on irradiated uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) monolithic fuel specimens, procedures to operate the equipment, and models to extract the desired thermal properties. The results presented here demonstrate the adequacy of the equipment, procedures and models that have been developed for this purpose based on measurements conducted on surrogate depleted uranium-molybdenum (DU-Mo) alloy samples containing a zirconium diffusion barrier and clad in aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061). The results are in excellent agreement with thermal property data reported in the literature for similar U-Mo alloys as a function of temperature.

  8. Personality-dependent dispersal cancelled under predation risk.

    PubMed

    Cote, Julien; Fogarty, Sean; Tymen, Blaise; Sih, Andrew; Brodin, Tomas

    2013-12-22

    Dispersal is a fundamental life-history trait for many ecological processes. Recent studies suggest that dispersers, in comparison to residents, display various phenotypic specializations increasing their dispersal inclination or success. Among them, dispersers are believed to be consistently more bold, exploratory, asocial or aggressive than residents. These links between behavioural types and dispersal should vary with the cause of dispersal. However, with the exception of one study, personality-dependent dispersal has not been studied in contrasting environments. Here, we used mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) to test whether personality-dependent dispersal varies with predation risk, a factor that should induce boldness or sociability-dependent dispersal. Corroborating previous studies, we found that dispersing mosquitofish are less social than non-dispersing fish when there was no predation risk. However, personality-dependent dispersal is negated under predation risk, dispersers having similar personality types to residents. Our results suggest that adaptive dispersal decisions could commonly depend on interactions between phenotypes and ecological contexts.

  9. FUEL ELEMENT CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-08-01

    Fuel elements having a solid core of fissionable material encased in a cladding material are described. A conversion material is provided within the cladding to react with the fission products to form stable, relatively non- volatile compounds thereby minimizing the migration of the fission products into the coolant. The conversion material is preferably a metallic fluoride, such as lead difluoride, and may be in the form of a coating on the fuel core or interior of the cladding, or dispersed within the fuel core. (AEC)

  10. Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    NETL

    2004-11-01

    Provides an overview of fuel cell technology and research projects. Discusses the basic workings of fuel cells and their system components, main fuel cell types, their characteristics, and their development status, as well as a discussion of potential fuel cell applications.

  11. Integrated fuel management system

    SciTech Connect

    Barbeau, D.E.

    1987-09-29

    An aircraft fuel management system to regulate fuel from an airframe reservoir is described. The system comprises: an aircraft turbine engine having a combustor providing propulsion for the aircraft; a fuel pump receiving fuel from the reservoir and supplying fuel to the turbine engine; a motor controlling the pump so as to provide fuel to the turbine engine; means for sensing at least one engine condition; means responsive to the sensing means for controlling fuel flow to the turbine engine, and wherein the pump and the motor are of the constant speed type and further comprising valve means for controlling the fuel flow rate to the turbine engine and wherein the controlling means modulates the position of the valve means.

  12. Ultrasonic Dispersion of Particulate High Density Fuels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    Percent Finer than 0.4 Micron ..... ........... 31 X Pycnometric Determination (Formula A Before and After Ultrasonic Activation...t ueasuretienrts on the slurry could not be made. All of the 32 Table X PYCNOMETRIC DETERMINATION Formula A Before and After Ultrasonic Activation

  13. Sustainable power generation in continuous flow microbial fuel cell treating actual wastewater: influence of biocatalyst type on electricity production.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zainab Z; Jaeel, Ali Jwied

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have the potential to simultaneously treat wastewater for reuse and to generate electricity. This study mainly considers the performance of an upflow dual-chambered MFC continuously fueled with actual domestic wastewater and alternatively biocatalyzed with aerobic activated sludge and strain of Bacillus Subtilis. The behavior of MFCs during initial biofilm growth and characterization of anodic biofilm were studied. After 45 days of continuous operation, the biofilms on the anodic electrode were well developed. The performance of MFCs was mainly evaluated in terms of COD reductions and electrical power output. Results revealed that the COD removal efficiency was 84% and 90% and the stabilized power outputs were clearly observed achieving a maximum value of 120 and 270 mW/m(2) obtained for MFCs inoculated with mixed cultures and Bacillus Subtilis strain, respectively.

  14. Sustainable Power Generation in Continuous Flow Microbial Fuel Cell Treating Actual Wastewater: Influence of Biocatalyst Type on Electricity Production

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Zainab Z.; Jaeel, Ali Jwied

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have the potential to simultaneously treat wastewater for reuse and to generate electricity. This study mainly considers the performance of an upflow dual-chambered MFC continuously fueled with actual domestic wastewater and alternatively biocatalyzed with aerobic activated sludge and strain of Bacillus Subtilis. The behavior of MFCs during initial biofilm growth and characterization of anodic biofilm were studied. After 45 days of continuous operation, the biofilms on the anodic electrode were well developed. The performance of MFCs was mainly evaluated in terms of COD reductions and electrical power output. Results revealed that the COD removal efficiency was 84% and 90% and the stabilized power outputs were clearly observed achieving a maximum value of 120 and 270 mW/m2 obtained for MFCs inoculated with mixed cultures and Bacillus Subtilis strain, respectively. PMID:24453893

  15. High performance of SDC and GDC core shell type composite electrolytes using methane as a fuel for low temperature SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Irshad, Muneeb; Siraj, Khurram E-mail: khurram.uet@gmail.com; Javed, Fayyaz; Ahsan, Muhammad; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Raza, Rizwan E-mail: khurram.uet@gmail.com; Shakir, Imran

    2016-02-15

    Nanocomposites Samarium doped Ceria (SDC), Gadolinium doped Ceria (GDC), core shell SDC amorphous Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (SDCC) and GDC amorphous Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (GDCC) were synthesized using co-precipitation method and then compared to obtain better solid oxide electrolytes materials for low temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFCs). The comparison is done in terms of structure, crystallanity, thermal stability, conductivity and cell performance. In present work, XRD analysis confirmed proper doping of Sm and Gd in both single phase (SDC, GDC) and dual phase core shell (SDCC, GDCC) electrolyte materials. EDX analysis validated the presence of Sm and Gd in both single and dual phase electrolyte materials; also confirming the presence of amorphous Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in SDCC and GDCC. From TGA analysis a steep weight loss is observed in case of SDCC and GDCC when temperature rises above 725 °C while SDC and GDC do not show any loss. The ionic conductivity and cell performance of single phase SDC and GDC nanocomposite were compared with core shell GDC/amorphous Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and SDC/ amorphous Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} nanocomposites using methane fuel. It is observed that dual phase core shell electrolytes materials (SDCC, GDCC) show better performance in low temperature range than their corresponding single phase electrolyte materials (SDC, GDC) with methane fuel.

  16. On the theory of type I X-ray bursts - The energetics of bursts and the nuclear fuel reservoir in the envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.; Sztajno, Mirek; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Van Paradijs, Jan

    1987-01-01

    A comparison is made between the observed properties of type I X-ray bursts from 4U/MXB 1636-53 and those of models of thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars. Possible explanations of variations in the burst recurrence properties without an apparent correlation with accretion rate are discussed. The strongest bursts with photospheric expansion are described well by current spherically symmetric models. The observed weak bursts suggest a mechanism that can promote the inward propagation and heating of accreted fuel so as to give rise to thermonuclear runaways much earlier than expected from spherical models. A sufficient amount of fuel to feed the weak bursts can be stored in the outer layers for neutron stars with radii greater than 8 km. The proposed mechanism and fuel storage can resolve the longstanding problem of bursts in rapid succession with intervals shorter than about 10 minutes. The proposed model explains the variation of burst peak fluxes observed from 4U/MSB 1636-53.

  17. The MASSIVE Survey - V. Spatially resolved stellar angular momentum, velocity dispersion, and higher moments of the 41 most massive local early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Melanie; Ma, Chung-Pei; Thomas, Jens; Greene, Jenny E.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Walsh, Jonelle; Ito, Jennifer; Blakeslee, John P.; Janish, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    We present spatially resolved two-dimensional stellar kinematics for the 41 most massive early-type galaxies (ETGs; MK ≲ -25.7 mag, stellar mass M* ≳ 1011.8 M⊙) of the volume-limited (D < 108 Mpc) MASSIVE survey. For each galaxy, we obtain high-quality spectra in the wavelength range of 3650-5850 Å from the 246-fibre Mitchell integral-field spectrograph at McDonald Observatory, covering a 107 arcsec × 107 arcsec field of view (often reaching 2 to 3 effective radii). We measure the 2D spatial distribution of each galaxy's angular momentum (λ and fast or slow rotator status), velocity dispersion (σ), and higher order non-Gaussian velocity features (Gauss-Hermite moments h3 to h6). Our sample contains a high fraction (˜80 per cent) of slow and non-rotators with λ ≲ 0.2. When combined with the lower mass ETGs in the ATLAS3D survey, we find the fraction of slow rotators to increase dramatically with galaxy mass, reaching ˜50 per cent at MK ˜ -25.5 mag and ˜90 per cent at MK ≲ -26 mag. All of our fast rotators show a clear anticorrelation between h3 and V/σ, and the slope of the anticorrelation is steeper in more round galaxies. The radial profiles of σ show a clear luminosity and environmental dependence: the 12 most luminous galaxies in our sample (MK ≲ -26 mag) are all brightest cluster/group galaxies (except NGC 4874) and all have rising or nearly flat σ profiles, whereas five of the seven `isolated' galaxies are all fainter than MK = -25.8 mag and have falling σ. All of our galaxies have positive average h4; the most luminous galaxies have average h4 ˜ 0.05, while less luminous galaxies have a range of values between 0 and 0.05. Most of our galaxies show positive radial gradients in h4, and those galaxies also tend to have rising σ profiles. We discuss the implications for the relationship among dynamical mass, σ, h4, and velocity anisotropy for these massive galaxies.

  18. Fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gheysens, J.L.G.

    1990-11-27

    This patent describes a composition for the improvement of hydrocarbon fuels exhibiting a boiling range of gasoline being suitable for use in spark ignition-type engines. It comprises an aromatic amine; a polyaminated detergent; a catalyst comprising a colloidal suspension or amine salt of transition/alkali/alkaline earth metal organic coordinations having at least one metal oxidehydroxide linked to an alkyl chain via a carboxyl group; and a solvent comprising an alkanol-aliphatic ether oxygenated hydrocarbon.

  19. Experimental results with fuel cell start-up and shut-down. Impact of type of carbon for cathode catalyst support

    DOE PAGES

    Lottin, Olivier; Dillet, Jerome; Maranzana, Gael; ...

    2015-09-14

    Separate testing protocols for fuel cell startups and shutdowns were developed to distinguish between their effects on reverse currents and CO2 evolution. The internal currents and the local potentials were measured with different membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs): we examined the influence of the type of carbon for cathode catalyst support as well as the mitigating effect of low anode Pt loading. In conclusion, significant differences were observed and the experiments also confirmed previous results that the evolved CO2 accounts for less than 25% of the total exchanged charge.

  20. Experimental results with fuel cell start-up and shut-down. Impact of type of carbon for cathode catalyst support

    SciTech Connect

    Lottin, Olivier; Dillet, Jerome; Maranzana, Gael; Abbou, Sofyane; Didierjean, Sophie; Lamibrac, Adrien; Borup, Rodney L.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Spernjak, Dusan

    2015-09-14

    Separate testing protocols for fuel cell startups and shutdowns were developed to distinguish between their effects on reverse currents and CO2 evolution. The internal currents and the local potentials were measured with different membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs): we examined the influence of the type of carbon for cathode catalyst support as well as the mitigating effect of low anode Pt loading. In conclusion, significant differences were observed and the experiments also confirmed previous results that the evolved CO2 accounts for less than 25% of the total exchanged charge.

  1. Dispersion suppressors with bending

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    Dispersion suppressors of two main types are usually used. In one the cell quadrupole focussing structure is the same as in normal cells but some of the dipoles are replaced by drifts. In the other, the quadrupole strengths and/or spacings are different from those of the normal cells, but the bending is about the same as it is in the cells. In SSC designs to date, dispersion suppressors of the former type have been used, consisting of two cells with bending equivalent to one. In this note a suppressor design with normal bending and altered focussing is presented. The advantage of this scheme is that circumference is reduced. The disadvantages are that additional special quadrupoles must be provided (however, they need not be adjustable), and the maximum beta values within them are about 30% higher than the cell maxima.

  2. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  3. Particulate and Trace Gas Emissions from Prescribed Burns in Southeastern U.S. fuel types: Summary of a 5-year Project

    SciTech Connect

    Weise, David; Johnson, Timothy J.; Reardon, James

    2015-05-01

    Prescribed burning is an accepted practice to manage biomass in the United States and throughout the world. It is a particularly important practice in pine forests throughout the world, many of which have evolved in the presence of fire [1]. A recent survey [2] of prescribed fire use reported that 2.62 x 106 ha of forest land in the southeastern U.S. (defined by the National Association of State Foresters) burned in 2011 for silvicultural purposes such as hazardous fuel reduction, wildlife habitat improvement, and forest regeneration. Earlier surveys reported 0.9 to 1.7 x 106 ha of prescribed burning in the southern U.S. [3–5] using different survey techniques. While it is not possible to determine confidence intervals on these estimates, it is clear that the use of prescribed burning has increased since the first published estimate of 1 x 106 ha we were able to locate or the recent survey captured more information. Smoke is an important consequence of prescribed burning that must be managed, [6] and a great deal of research has been performed since the 1970s trying to characterize the composition, production, and transport of smoke from such fires. A recent review of the state of science behind estimation of the contribution of wildland fire to greenhouse gases and black carbon in the U.S. identified several areas of research that must be performed [7]. In particular, two areas of knowledge that still need improvement are fuel characterization and smoke emissions, and the correlation(s) between the two. While many fuel types in the southeastern U.S. have been described for fire behavior and fire danger prediction, characterization of fuel bed components important for smoke production is more limited. Emissions characterization, both chemical and particulate, is needed to determine potential impacts of prescribed burning on nutrient cycling, planetary albedo, human health, and highway visibility [e.g. 8–10].

  4. Thermal breeder fuel enrichment zoning

    DOEpatents

    Capossela, Harry J.; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Luce, Robert G.; McCoy, Daniel F.; Merriman, Floyd C.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the performance of a thermal breeder reactor having regions of higher than average moderator concentration are disclosed. The fuel modules of the reactor core contain at least two different types of fuel elements, a high enrichment fuel element and a low enrichment fuel element. The two types of fuel elements are arranged in the fuel module with the low enrichment fuel elements located between the high moderator regions and the high enrichment fuel elements. Preferably, shim rods made of a fertile material are provided in selective regions for controlling the reactivity of the reactor by movement of the shim rods into and out of the reactor core. The moderation of neutrons adjacent the high enrichment fuel elements is preferably minimized as by reducing the spacing of the high enrichment fuel elements and/or using a moderator having a reduced moderating effect.

  5. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Korton, George

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure

  6. Bilayer dispersion-flattened waveguides with four zero-dispersion wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuhao; Jafari, Zeinab; Agarwal, Anu M; Kimerling, Lionel C; Li, Guifang; Michel, Jurgen; Zhang, Lin

    2016-11-01

    We propose a new type of bilayer dispersion-flattened waveguides that have four zero-dispersion wavelengths. Low and flat dispersion can be achieved by using two different material combinations, with a much smaller index contrast as compared to the previously proposed slot-assisted dispersion-flattened waveguides. Without using a nano-slot, dispersion becomes less sensitive to waveguide dimensions, which is highly desirable for high-yield device fabrication. Ultra-low dispersion, high nonlinearity, and fabrication-friendly design would make it promising for practical implementation of nonlinear photonic functions. The proposed waveguide configuration deepens our understanding of the dispersion flattening principle.

  7. Preparation of organic sulfur adsorbent from coal for adsorption of dibenzothiophene-type compounds in diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cigdem Shalaby; Xiaoliang Ma; Anning Zhou; Chunshan Song

    2009-05-15

    High-performance organic sulfur adsorbents (OSA) have been prepared from coal by chemical activation for selective adsorption of the refractory sulfur compounds, such as 4-methyl dibenzothiophene and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, in diesel fuel. The performance of the prepared OSAs for adsorptive desulfurization (ADS) was evaluated in batch and flow adsorption systems at room temperature using a model diesel fuel. It was found that coal rank and preparation conditions, including activation agents (NaOH, KOH, and NaOH + KOH) and their ratio to coal, activation temperature, and time have significant impacts on the yield and ADS performance of the OSAs. The high-performance OSAs can be prepared from different ranks of coal by using NaOH + KOH as an activation agent with an activating-agent-to-coal ratio of 3.5. The yield of OSA increased in the order of lignite < high volatile bituminous coal < medium volatile bituminous coal < anthracite. The OSA-A, which was derived from an anthracite with the highest yield (68 wt %) by the activation at 650{sup o}C for 1 h, gave the best ADS performance among the OSAs from all coal samples tested. The sulfur adsorption capacity of OSA-A reached 0.281 mmol-S/g-A at an equilibrium sulfur concentration of 50 ppmw in the model diesel fuel, which was 155% higher than a commercial coal-derived activated carbon and 35% higher than the best commercial activated carbon among all commercial activated carbons examined in our laboratory. The higher ADS capacity of OSA-A can be attributed to its significantly higher density (2.77 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}) of the adsorption sites on the surface as determined by Langmuir adsorption isotherm, which is related to its oxygen-containing functional groups on the carbonaceous surface as revealed by temperature-programmed desorption analysis. 57 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Results of a Survey of Residential Home Heating Fuel and Stove Type and Use in the Shiprock Area of the Navajo Nation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, Joseph E.; Garcia, Linda V.

    2008-01-01

    For many Navajo people, coal provides an affordable and convenient means of home heating. However, coal combustion results in the formation and mobilization of materials that are known risk factors for respiratory and other diseases. The level of respiratory morbidity among the Navajo people is higher than can be explained by usual epidemiological risk factors. The Shiprock area of the Navajo Nation is somewhat unique in that atmospheric thermal inversions trap air pollution low to the ground, especially in winter. There are two large mine mouth coal-fired power plants located in the vicinity, with a third plant in the planning stages. Both of the existing power plants are exempt from regulation under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act due to their age. The purpose of this survey was to assess the fuel and stove type and use, and document other household characteristics that might be related to the exposure of potentially toxic coal combustion products. A total of 137 surveys was conducted in English and Navajo to ascertain and document fuel usage and the type, size and conditions of heating stoves used in both traditional and modern homes. Results have been presented to the community at the Shiprock Chapter in the Navajo language. To increase public awareness, ways to properly use and store coal and to improve stove function and ventilation were also shared.

  9. The Bacterial Flagellar Type III Export Gate Complex Is a Dual Fuel Engine That Can Use Both H+ and Na+ for Flagellar Protein Export.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V; Hara, Noritaka; Aldridge, Phillip D; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-03-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) to transport flagellar proteins to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure for self-assembly. The transmembrane export gate complex is a H+-protein antiporter, of which activity is greatly augmented by an associated cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Here, we report that the export gate complex can use sodium motive force (SMF) in addition to PMF across the cytoplasmic membrane to drive protein export. Protein export was considerably reduced in the absence of the ATPase complex and a pH gradient across the membrane, but Na+ increased it dramatically. Phenamil, a blocker of Na+ translocation, inhibited protein export. Overexpression of FlhA increased the intracellular Na+ concentration in the presence of 100 mM NaCl but not in its absence, suggesting that FlhA acts as a Na+ channel. In wild-type cells, however, neither Na+ nor phenamil affected protein export, indicating that the Na+ channel activity of FlhA is suppressed by the ATPase complex. We propose that the export gate by itself is a dual fuel engine that uses both PMF and SMF for protein export and that the ATPase complex switches this dual fuel engine into a PMF-driven export machinery to become much more robust against environmental changes in external pH and Na+ concentration.

  10. The Bacterial Flagellar Type III Export Gate Complex Is a Dual Fuel Engine That Can Use Both H+ and Na+ for Flagellar Protein Export

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Hara, Noritaka; Aldridge, Phillip D.; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) to transport flagellar proteins to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure for self-assembly. The transmembrane export gate complex is a H+–protein antiporter, of which activity is greatly augmented by an associated cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Here, we report that the export gate complex can use sodium motive force (SMF) in addition to PMF across the cytoplasmic membrane to drive protein export. Protein export was considerably reduced in the absence of the ATPase complex and a pH gradient across the membrane, but Na+ increased it dramatically. Phenamil, a blocker of Na+ translocation, inhibited protein export. Overexpression of FlhA increased the intracellular Na+ concentration in the presence of 100 mM NaCl but not in its absence, suggesting that FlhA acts as a Na+ channel. In wild-type cells, however, neither Na+ nor phenamil affected protein export, indicating that the Na+ channel activity of FlhA is suppressed by the ATPase complex. We propose that the export gate by itself is a dual fuel engine that uses both PMF and SMF for protein export and that the ATPase complex switches this dual fuel engine into a PMF-driven export machinery to become much more robust against environmental changes in external pH and Na+ concentration. PMID:26943926

  11. Fuel performance in water storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, A.P.; Scott, J.G.; Shelton-Davis, C.V.; McDannel, G.E.

    1993-11-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Department of Energy (DOE). A variety of different types of fuels have been stored there since the 1950`s prior to reprocessing for uranium recovery. In April of 1992, the DOE decided to end fuel reprocessing, changing the mission at ICPP. Fuel integrity in storage is now viewed as long term until final disposition is defined and implemented. Thus, the condition of fuel and storage equipment is being closely monitored and evaluated to ensure continued safe storage. There are four main areas of fuel storage at ICPP: an original underwater storage facility (CPP-603), a modern underwater storage facility (CPP-666), and two dry fuel storage facilities. The fuels in storage are from the US Navy, DOE (and its predecessors the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Atomic Energy Commission), and other research programs. Fuel matrices include uranium oxide, hydride, carbide, metal, and alloy fuels. In the underwater storage basins, fuels are clad with stainless steel, zirconium, and aluminum. Also included in the basin inventory is canned scrap material. The dry fuel storage contains primarily graphite and aluminum type fuels. A total of 55 different fuel types are currently stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The corrosion resistance of the barrier material is of primary concern in evaluating the integrity of the fuel in long term water storage. The barrier material is either the fuel cladding (if not canned) or the can material.

  12. Fuel cells for commercial energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppmann, Gerhard; Weisse, Eckart; Bischoff, Manfred

    1990-04-01

    The development of various types of fuel cells is described. Advantges and drawbacks are considered for alkaline fuel cells, phosphoric acid fuel cells, and molten carbonate fuel cells. It is shown that their modular construction is particularly adapted to power heat systems. A comparison which is largely in favor of fuel cells, is made between coal, oil, natural gas power stations, and fuel cells. Safety risks in operation are also compared with those of conventional power stations. Fuel cells are particularly suited for dwellings, shopping centers, swimming pools, other sporting installations, and research facilities, whose high current and heat requirements can be covered by power heat coupling.

  13. Performance and microbial diversity of microbial fuel cells coupled with different cathode types during simultaneous azo dye decolorization and electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bin; Hu, Yongyou; Sun, Jian

    2012-05-01

    To study the effect of cathode type on performance and microbial diversity of the MFC, aerobic biocathode and air-cathode were incorporated into microbial fuel cells (MFCs) which were explored for simultaneous azo dye decolorization and electricity generation. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results demonstrated that the catalytic activity of the microorganisms on the biocathode surface was comparable with that of the platinum coated on the air-cathode. The power density achieved by using biocathode was lower than air-cathode, but the biocathode could greatly improve the Congo red decolorization rate. By using the biocathode, 96.4% decolorization of Congo red was obtained within 29 h, whereas, about 107 h was required to achieve the same decolorization efficiency with the air-cathode. 16S rRNA sequencing analysis demonstrated a phylogenetic diversity in the communities of the anode biofilm and showed clear differences between the anode-attached populations in the MFCs with a different cathode type.

  14. Biomonitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in pregnant women in Trujillo, Peru — Comparison of different fuel types used for cooking☆

    PubMed Central

    Adetona, Olorunfemi; Li, Zheng; Sjödin, Andreas; Romanoff, Lovisa C.; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Needham, Larry L.; Hall, Daniel B.; Cassidy, Brandon E.; Naeher, Luke P.

    2016-01-01

    Women and children in developing countries are often exposed to high levels of air pollution including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which may negatively impact their health, due to household combustion of biomass fuel for cooking and heating. We compared creatinine adjusted hydroxy-PAH (OH-PAH) concentrations in pregnant women in Trujillo, Peru who cook with wood to levels measured in those who cook with kerosene, liquefied petroleum gas or a combination of fuels. Seventy-nine women were recruited for the study between May and July 2004 in the first trimester of their pregnancy. Urine samples were collected from the subjects in the first, second and third trimesters for OH-PAH analyses. The concentrations of the OH-PAHs were compared across the type of fuel used for cooking and pregnancy trimesters. The relationships between OH-PAHs levels in the first trimester and concurrently measured personal exposures to PM2.5, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide together with their indoor and outdoor air concentrations were also investigated. Women cooking with wood or kerosene had the highest creatinine adjusted OH-PAH concentrations compared with those using gas, coal briquette or a combination of fuels. Concentrations of creatinine adjusted 2-hydroxy-fluorene, 3-hydroxy-fluorene, 1-hydroxy-fluorene, 2-hydroxy-phenanthrene and 4-hydroxy-phenanthrene were significantly higher (p<0.05) in women who used wood or kerosene alone compared with women who used liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), coal briquette or a combination of fuels. An increase in the concentrations of creatinine adjusted 9-hydroxy-fluorene, 1-hydroxy-phenanthrene, 2-hydroxy-phenanthrene, 4-hydroxy-phenanthrene and 1-hydroxy-pyrene in the third trimesters was also observed. Weak positive correlation (Spearman correlation coefficient, ρ<0.4; p<0.05) was observed between all first trimester creatinine adjusted OH-PAHs and indoor (kitchen and living room), and personal 48-h TWA PM2.5. Women who cooked

  15. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel tanks. 238.423 Section 238.423 Transportation....423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator for Safety upon a showing that the fuel tank provides a level of safety at...

  16. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fuel tanks. 238.423 Section 238.423 Transportation....423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator for Safety upon a showing that the fuel tank provides a level of safety at...

  17. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fuel tanks. 238.423 Section 238.423 Transportation....423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator for Safety upon a showing that the fuel tank provides a level of safety at...

  18. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fuel tanks. 238.423 Section 238.423 Transportation....423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator for Safety upon a showing that the fuel tank provides a level of safety at...

  19. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fuel tanks. 238.423 Section 238.423 Transportation....423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator for Safety upon a showing that the fuel tank provides a level of safety at...

  20. Fuels from Biomass: Integration with Food and Materials Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipinsky, E. S.

    1978-01-01

    The development of fuels from biomass can lead naturally to dispersed facilities that incorporate food or materials production (or both) with fuel production. The author analyzes possible systems based on sugarcane, corn, and guayule. (Author/MA)

  1. Adsorption and removal of graphene dispersants.

    PubMed

    Irin, Fahmida; Hansen, Matthew J; Bari, Rozana; Parviz, Dorsa; Metzler, Shane D; Bhattacharia, Sanjoy K; Green, Micah J

    2015-05-15

    We demonstrate three different techniques (dialysis, vacuum filtration, and spray drying) for removal of dispersants from liquid-exfoliated graphene. We evaluate these techniques for elimination of dispersants from both the bulk liquid phase and from the graphene surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms dispersant removal by these treatments. Vacuum filtration (driving by convective mass transfer) is the most effective method of dispersant removal, regardless of the type of dispersant, removing up to ∼95 wt.% of the polymeric dispersant with only ∼7.4 wt.% decrease in graphene content. Dialysis also removes a significant fraction (∼70 wt.% for polymeric dispersants) of un-adsorbed dispersants without disturbing the dispersion quality. Spray drying produces re-dispersible, crumpled powder samples and eliminates much of the unabsorbed dispersants. We also show that there is no rapid desorption of dispersants from the graphene surface. In addition, electrical conductivity measurements demonstrate conductivities one order of magnitude lower for graphene drop-cast films (where excess dispersants are present) than for vacuum filtered films, confirming poor inter-sheet connectivity when excess dispersants are present.

  2. Liquid fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Soloveichik, Grigorii L

    2014-01-01

    The advantages of liquid fuel cells (LFCs) over conventional hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells include a higher theoretical energy density and efficiency, a more convenient handling of the streams, and enhanced safety. This review focuses on the use of different types of organic fuels as an anode material for LFCs. An overview of the current state of the art and recent trends in the development of LFC and the challenges of their practical implementation are presented.

  3. Liquid fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary The advantages of liquid fuel cells (LFCs) over conventional hydrogen–oxygen fuel cells include a higher theoretical energy density and efficiency, a more convenient handling of the streams, and enhanced safety. This review focuses on the use of different types of organic fuels as an anode material for LFCs. An overview of the current state of the art and recent trends in the development of LFC and the challenges of their practical implementation are presented. PMID:25247123

  4. Evaluation of Erosion of the Dummy “EE” Plate 19 in YA Type ATR Fuel Element During Reactor PALM Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, Jeffrey O.; Glazoff, Michael V.; Eiden, Thomas J.; Rezvoi, Aleksey V.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 153B-1 was a 14-day, high-power, powered axial locator mechanism (PALM) operating cycle that completed on April 12, 2013. Cycle 153B-1 was a typical operating cycle for the ATR and did not result in any unusual plant transients. ATR was started up and shut down as scheduled. The PALM drive physically moves the selected experiments into and out of the core to simulate reactor startup and heat up, and shutdown and cooldown transients, while the reactor remains in steady state conditions. However, after the cycle was over, when the fuel elements were removed from the core and inspected, several thousand flow-assisted erosion pits and “horseshoeing” defects were readily observed on the surface of the several YA-type fuel elements (these are aluminum “dummy” plates that contain no fuel). In order to understand these erosion phenomena a thermal-hydraulic model of coolant channel 20 on a YA-M fuel element was generated. The boundaries of the model were the aluminum EE plate of a YA-M fuel element and a beryllium reflector block with 13 horizontal saw cuts which represented regions of zero flow. The heat generated in fuel plates 1 through 18 was modeled to be passing through the aluminum EE plate. The coolant channel 20 width was set at 0.058 in. (58 mils). It was established that the horizontal saw cuts had a significant effect on the temperature of the coolant. The flow, which was expected to vary linearly with gradual heating of the coolant as it passed through the channel, was extremely turbulent. The temperature rise, which was expected to be a smooth “S” curve, was represented by a series temperature rise “humps,” which occurred at each horizontal saw cut in the beryllium reflector block. Each of the 13 saw cuts had a chamfered edge which resulted in the coolant flow being re-directed as a jet across the coolant channel into the surface of the EE plate, which explained the temperature rise and the observed scalloping

  5. Preparation of main-chain-type and side-chain-type sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) membranes for direct methanol fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Jie-Cheng; Lin, Chien-Kung

    Novel main-chain-type and side-chain-type sulphonated poly(ether ether ketone)s (MS-SPEEKs) are synthesised by reacting the sulphonic acid groups of pristine SPEEKs with 2-aminoethanesulphonic acid to improve the nano-phase separated morphology of the material. 1H NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy are employed to determine the structure and composition of main-chain-type and side-chain-type sulphonated polymers. Flexible and tough membranes with reasonable thermal properties are obtained. The MS-SPEEKs show good hydrolytic stability, and water uptake values ranging from 15% to 30% are observed. Compared to Nafion 117 ®, the methanol permeability of the MS-SPEEKs is dramatically reduced to 8.83 × 10 -8 cm 2 s -1 to 3.31 × 10 -7 cm 2 s -1. The proton conductivity increases with increasing temperature, reaching 0.013-0.182 S cm -1. A maximum power density and open circuit voltage of 115 mW cm -2 and 0.830 V are obtained at 80 °C, respectively, which is significantly greater than the values generated with Nafion 117 ®. The introduction of pendent side-chain-type sulphonic acid groups increases the single-cell performance by more than approximately 20%; thus, the lower water diffusivity, methanol permeability, electro-osmotic drag coefficient and high cell performance indicated that MS-SPEEK is a promising candidate for DMFC applications.

  6. CAMUI Type Hybrid Rocket as Small Scale Ballistic Flight Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Harunori; Uematsu, Tsutomu; Ito, Kenichi

    The authors have been developing CAMUI (Cascaded Multistage Impinging-jet) type hybrid rockets, explosive-flee small rocket motors. This is to downsize the scale of suborbital flight experiments on space related technology development. A key idea is a new fuel grain design to increase gasification rates of a solid fuels. By the new fuel grain design, the combustion gas repeatedly impinges on fuel surfaces to hasten the heat transfer to the fuel. Suborbital flight experiments by sounding rockets provide variety of test beds to accumulate basic technologies common to the next step of space development in Japan. By using hybrid rockets one can take the cost advantage of small-scale rocket experiments. This cost advantage improves robustness of space technology development projects by dispersion of risk.

  7. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1963-06-11

    A fuel plate is designed for incorporation into control rods of the type utilized in high-flux test reactors. The fuel plate is designed so that the portion nearest the poison section of the control rod contains about one-half as much fissionable material as in the rest of the plate, thereby eliminating dangerous flux peaking in that portion. (AEC)

  8. Diesel fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1986-04-22

    A fuel injection pump is described of the multiple plunger spill port type for an automotive type internal combustion engine, the pump including at least four axially spaced engine camshaft driven pump plungers grouped in pairs and sequentially and in succession moved in one direction through a fuel pumping stroke and oppositely through a fuel intake stroke. A fuel pressurization/supply chamber is contiquous to the end of each plunger for pressurization of the fuel therein or supply of fuel thereto from a supply passage upon coordinate movement of the plunger, fill/spill passage means connected to a single fuel return spill port and in parallel flow relationship to each of the plunger bores as a function of the position of the plungers, each plunger having a pair of internal passages connected at all times to its chamber and alternately alignable with the supply or fill/spill passage means as a function of the position of the plunger. A fuel discharge passage is operatively connecting each of the chambers to an individual engine cylinder, a single spill port control valve movable to block or permit the spill of fuel through the spill port to a return line to control the pressurization of fuel in all of the fuel chambers and associated discharge passages, a single solenoid connected to the spill control valve for moving it to block or unblock the spill port, and a single shuttle valve operatively associated with all of the fill/spill passage means and spill port reciprocably movable between positions to sequentially connect the plunger chambers one at a time in succession to the spill port during the pumping pressurization stroke of its plunger for the injection of fuel to an individual cylinder while the other chambers are in various stages of being refilled with fuel and preparing for pressurization upon successive actuation of the plungers by the camshaft.

  9. Alternative Fuels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  10. Effect of fuel and kiln type on the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in smoked shrimp, a Beninese food condiment.

    PubMed

    Kpoclou, Euloge Yénoukounmè; Anihouvi, Victor Bienvenu; Azokpota, Paulin; Soumanou, Mohamed Mansourou; Douny, Caroline; Brose, François; Hounhouigan, Djidjoho Joseph; Scippo, Marie-Louise

    2014-01-01

    Smoked shrimp is a food condiment widely used in Beninese local cooking practices. A previous study revealed that this product is highly contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The present study explored possibilities to reduce PAH levels in shrimp smoked using cottage industry smoking techniques with barrel and chorkor kilns, by replacing wood by charcoal from Acacia auriculiformis and Mangifera indica, as fuels. Results showed that only shrimp smoked using acacia charcoal in a chorkor kiln had PAH levels (benzo[a]pyrene = 5 µg kg(-1) and sum of benzo[a]pyrene, chrysene, benzo[a]anthracene and benzo[b]fluoranthene = 28 µg kg(-1)) in accordance with a European standard of 5 and 30 µg kg(-1), respectively, and suitable physicochemical characteristics for good storage (moisture content = 11.9% ± 1.5%; water activity = 0.46 ± 0.03). However, further investigations still needs to be done to reduce the duration of product contact with combustion gasses in order to reduce the PAH content of smoked shrimp to safer levels, largely below standards.

  11. Evaluation of electricity generation from ultrasonic and heat/alkaline pretreatment of different sludge types using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang-Eun; Yoon, Joung Yee; Gurung, Anup; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of different sludge pretreatment methods (ultrasonic vs. combined heat/alkali) with varied sources of municipal sewage sludge (primary sludge (PS), secondary excess sludge (ES), anaerobic digestion sludge (ADS)) on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Introduction of ultrasonically pretreated sludge (PS, ES, ADS) to MFCs generated maximum power densities of 13.59, 9.78 and 12.67mW/m(2) and soluble COD (SCOD) removal efficiencies of 87%, 90% and 57%, respectively. The sludge pretreated by combined heat/alkali (0.04N NaOH at 120°C for 1h) produced maximum power densities of 10.03, 5.21 and 12.53mW/m(2) and SCOD removal efficiencies of 83%, 75% and 74% with PS, ES and ADS samples, respectively. Higher SCOD by sludge pretreatment enhanced performance of the MFCs and the electricity generation was linearly proportional to the SCOD removal, especially for ES.

  12. Alternate Fuels Combustion Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    AFWAL-TR-83-2057 AD A13 8 5 7 5 ALTERNATE FUELS COMBUSTION RESEARCH PHASE RI ’~*~~4 & IWITEY CMAAA * ’s~t:Uwz, ONTARIO October 1983 I•oerls Report...83-2057 P_______________ C TITLE (mod ,,--tt-) 5. TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED Alternate Fuels ioahusticn Research Interim Report for Period Phase...I$. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse sirte it necessear and identify by block number) FUELS ALTERNATE FUELS GAS TURBINE COMBUSTION EXHAUST EMISSIONS 0

  13. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.F.; Tellefson, D.R.; Shimazaki, T.T.

    1962-04-10

    A plate type fuel element which is particularly useful for organic cooled reactors is described. Generally, the fuel element comprises a plurality of fissionable fuel bearing plates held in spaced relationship by a frame in which the plates are slidably mounted in grooves. Clearance is provided in the grooves to allow the plates to expand laterally. The plates may be rigidly interconnected but are floatingly supported at their ends within the frame to allow for longi-tudinal expansion. Thus, this fuel element is able to withstand large temperature differentials without great structural stresses. (AEC)

  14. Energy: Reimagine Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lemmon, John P.

    2015-09-24

    New types of fuel cell on the horizon could eliminate the need for such trade-offs and ease the integration of renewables into the grid. Currently, fuel cells are used to generate only electricity and heat. They can be modified to store energy and produce liquid fuels such as methanol, thanks to breakthroughs in materials and designs. Developing fuel cells with a battery mode is one focus of the programme I direct at the US Advanced Research Projects Agency–Energy (ARPA-E). I lead 13 projects across academia, industry and national laboratories.

  15. Fuel cell arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1987-05-12

    A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber.

  16. Fuel cell arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1987-05-12

    A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber. 3 figs.

  17. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Leggett, Robert D.; Baker, Ronald B.

    1989-01-01

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  18. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  19. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Leggett, Robert D.; Baker, Ronald B.

    1989-10-03

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  20. Handbook of fuel cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, T.G.; Camara, E.H.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1980-05-01

    The intent of this document is to provide a description of fuel cells, their performances and operating conditions, and the relationship between fuel processors and fuel cells. This information will enable fuel cell engineers to know which fuel processing schemes are most compatible with which fuel cells and to predict the performance of a fuel cell integrated with any fuel processor. The data and estimates presented are for the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells because they are closer to commercialization than other types of fuel cells. Performance of the cells is shown as a function of operating temperature, pressure, fuel conversion (utilization), and oxidant utilization. The effect of oxidant composition (for example, air versus O/sub 2/) as well as fuel composition is examined because fuels provided by some of the more advanced fuel processing schemes such as coal conversion will contain varying amounts of H/sub 2/, CO, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/O, and sulfur and nitrogen compounds. A brief description of fuel cells and their application to industrial, commercial, and residential power generation is given. The electrochemical aspects of fuel cells are reviewed. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is discussed, including how it is affected by operating conditions; and the molten carbonate fuel cell is discussed. The equations developed will help systems engineers to evaluate the application of the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells to commercial, utility, and industrial power generation and waste heat utilization. A detailed discussion of fuel cell efficiency, and examples of fuel cell systems are given.

  1. Fuel pump

    SciTech Connect

    Bellis, P.D.; Nesselrode, F.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes a fuel pump. It includes: a fuel reservoir member, the fuel reservoir member being formed with fuel chambers, the chambers comprising an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber, means to supply fuel to the inlet chamber, means to deliver fuel from the outlet chamber to a point of use, the fuel reservoir member chambers also including a bypass chamber, means interconnecting the bypass chamber with the outlet chamber; the fuel pump also comprising pump means interconnecting the inlet chamber and the outlet chamber and adapted to suck fuel from the fuel supply means into the inlet chamber, through the pump means, out the outlet chamber, and to the fuel delivery means; the bypass chamber and the pump means providing two substantially separate paths of fuel flow in the fuel reservoir member, bypass plunger means normally closing off the flow of fuel through the bypass chamber one of the substantially separate paths including the fuel supply means and the fuel delivery means when the bypass plunger means is closed, the second of the substantially separate paths including the bypass chamber when the bypass plunger means is open, and all of the chambers and the interconnecting means therebetween being configured so as to create turbulence in the flow of any fuel supplied to the outlet chamber by the pump means and bypassed through the bypass chamber and the interconnecting means.

  2. Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-03-01

    Flexible Fuel vehicles are able to operate using more than one type of fuel. FFVs can be fueled with unleaded gasoline, E85, or any combination of the two. Today more than 7 million vehicles on U.S. highways are flexible fuel vehicles. The fact sheet discusses how E85 affects vehicle performance, the costs and benefits of using E85, and how to find E85 station locations.

  3. Properties of Aircraft Fuels and Related Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    type analyses:, Antistatic additives ;’ Fuel ~o5 aiants / Modified fuels; Corrosion inhibitors.oý V , Fuel composition. - aim ~ " me ~ GOA"fl 15 ft"’k...97 2. Effects of Fuel Corrosion Inhibitor Additives on the Electrical Conductivity of Fuels Containing Antistatic Additives ...determine level of trace metals which had caused thermal insta- bility; to determine the interactive effects of fuel additives ; and to aid in solving

  4. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Default CO2 Emission Factors and High Heat Values for Various Types of Fuel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .../gallon kg CO2/mmBtu Distillate Fuel Oil No. 1 0.139 73.25 Distillate Fuel Oil No. 2 0.138 73.96 Distillate Fuel Oil No. 4 0.146 75.04 Residual Fuel Oil No. 5 0.140 72.93 Residual Fuel Oil No. 6 0.150 75.10 Used Oil 0.138 74.00 Kerosene 0.135 75.20 Liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) 1 0.092 61.71 Propane 1...

  5. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Default CO2 Emission Factors and High Heat Values for Various Types of Fuel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Biodiesel (100%) 0.128 73.84 Rendered Animal Fat 0.125 71.06 Vegetable Oil 0.120 81.55 1 Use of this default.../gallon kg CO2/mmBtu Distillate Fuel Oil No. 1 0.139 73.25 Distillate Fuel Oil No. 2 0.138 73.96 Distillate Fuel Oil No. 4 0.146 75.04 Residual Fuel Oil No. 5 0.140 72.93 Residual Fuel Oil No. 6 0.150...

  6. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C - Default CO2 Emission Factors and High Heat Values for Various Types of Fuel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Biodiesel (100%) 0.128 73.84 Rendered Animal Fat 0.125 71.06 Vegetable Oil 0.120 81.55 1 Use of this default... mmBtu/gallon kg CO2/mmBtu Distillate Fuel Oil No. 1 0.139 73.25 Distillate Fuel Oil No. 2 0.138 73.96 Distillate Fuel Oil No. 4 0.146 75.04 Residual Fuel Oil No. 5 0.140 72.93 Residual Fuel Oil No. 6 0.150...

  7. World wide IFC phosphoric acid fuel cell implementation

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.M. Jr

    1996-04-01

    International Fuel Cells, a subsidary of United technologies Corporation, is engaged in research and development of all types of fuel cell technologies and currently manufactures alkaline fuel cell power plants for the U.S. manned space flight program and natural gas fueled stationary power plants using phosphoric acid fuel cells. This paper describes the phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants.

  8. Fuel Cells for Electric Utility and Transportation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, S.

    1980-01-01

    This review encompasses the following topics: (1) historical, (2) types of fuel cells, (3) thermodynamic and electrode kinetic aspects of fuel cells, (4) overview of present status of fuel cell research and development, (5) electrocatalysis of fuel cell reactions, (6) fuel cell/battery hybrid vehicles, and (7) regenerative hydrogen-halogen fuel cells for energy storage. (WHK)

  9. Modeling the archetype cysteine protease reaction using dispersion corrected density functional methods in ONIOM-type hybrid QM/MM calculations; the proteolytic reaction of papain.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Attila; Komáromi, István

    2016-12-07

    A proteolytic reaction of papain with a simple peptide model substrate N-methylacetamide has been studied. Our aim was twofold: (i) we proposed a plausible reaction mechanism with the aid of potential energy surface scans and second geometrical derivatives calculated at the stationary points, and (ii) we investigated the applicability of the dispersion corrected density functional methods in comparison with the popular hybrid generalized gradient approximations (GGA) method (B3LYP) without such a correction in the QM/MM calculations for this particular problem. In the resting state of papain the ion pair and neutral forms of the Cys-His catalytic dyad have approximately the same energy and they are separated by only a small barrier. Zero point vibrational energy correction shifted this equilibrium slightly to the neutral form. On the other hand, the electrostatic solvation free energy corrections, calculated using the Poisson-Boltzmann method for the structures sampled from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories, resulted in a more stable ion-pair form. All methods we applied predicted at least a two elementary step acylation process via a zwitterionic tetrahedral intermediate. Using dispersion corrected DFT methods the thioester S-C bond formation and the proton transfer from histidine occur in the same elementary step, although not synchronously. The proton transfer lags behind (or at least does not precede) the S-C bond formation. The predicted transition state corresponds mainly to the S-C bond formation while the proton is still on the histidine Nδ atom. In contrast, the B3LYP method using larger basis sets predicts a transition state in which the S-C bond is almost fully formed and the transition state can be mainly featured by the Nδ(histidine) to N(amid) proton transfer. Considerably lower activation energy was predicted (especially by the B3LYP method) for the next amide bond breaking elementary step of acyl-enzyme formation. Deacylation appeared to

  10. N-type Cu2O doped activated carbon as catalyst for improving power generation of air cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Li, Kexun; Yan, Pengyu; Liu, Ziqi; Pu, Liangtao

    2015-01-01

    A novel n-type Cu2O doped activated carbon (AC) air cathode (Cu/AC) was developed as an alternative to Pt electrode for oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The maximum power density of MFCs using this novel air cathode was as high as 1390±76mWm(-2), almost 59% higher than the bare AC air cathode. Specifically, the resistance including total resistance and charge transfer resistance significantly decreased comparing to the control. Tafel curve also showed the faster electro-transfer kinetics of Cu/AC with exchange current density of 1.03×10(-3)Acm(-2), which was 69% higher than the control. Ribbon-like Cu2O was deposited on the surface of AC with the mesopore surface area increasing. Cubic Cu2O crystals exclusively expose (111) planes with the interplanar crystal spacing of 2.48Å, which was the dominate active sites for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). N-type Cu2O with oxygen vacancies played crucial roles in electrochemical catalytic activity.

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds for photovoltaic applications and solar energy conversion of carbon dioxide to fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Vaidyanathan; Murugesan, Sankaran

    2014-04-29

    The present invention relates to formation of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds, such as bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, via a hydrothermal synthesis process, with the resulting compound(s) having multifunctional properties such as being useful in solar energy conversion, environmental remediation, and/or energy storage, for example. In one embodiment, a hydrothermal method is disclosed that transforms nanoparticles of TiO.sub.2 to bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, optionally loaded with palladium nanoparticles. The method includes reacting titanium dioxide nanotubes with a bismuth salt in an acidic bath at a temperature sufficient and for a time sufficient to form bismuth titanate crystals, which are subsequently annealed to form bismuth titanate nanocubes. After annealing, the bismuth titanate nanocubes may be optionally loaded with nano-sized metal particles, e.g., nanosized palladium particles.

  12. Investigation of Fuel Oil/Lube Oil Spray Fires On Board Vessels. Volume 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    of the double bottom diesel oil tank in the engine room, the self-closing valve of the short sounding pipe in the vicinity of the lower floor was...left open. The inflammable gas generated from the fuel oil occupied the lower floor space, came into contact with a source of fire and ignited...strainer (H type duplex strainer) for the main engine in the lower floor , dispersed, came in contact with the high temperature parts of the main engine

  13. IRRADIATION TESTING OF THE RERTR FUEL MINIPLATES WITH BURNABLE ABSORBERS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    I. Glagolenko; D. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G. Chang; B. Rabin; C. Clark; T. Wiencek

    2010-10-01

    Based on the results of the reactor physics assessment, conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) can be potentially accomplished in two ways, by either using U-10Mo monolithic or U-7Mo dispersion type plates in the ATR fuel element. Both designs, however, would require incorporation of the burnable absorber in several plates of the fuel element to compensate for the excess reactivity and to flatten the radial power profile. Several different types of burnable absorbers were considered initially, but only borated compounds, such as B4C, ZrB2 and Al-B alloys, were selected for testing primarily due to the length of the ATR fuel cycle and fuel manufacturing constraints. To assess and compare irradiation performance of the U-Mo fuels with different burnable absorbers we have designed and manufactured 28 RERTR miniplates (20 fueled and 8 non-fueled) containing fore-mentioned borated compounds. These miniplates will be tested in the ATR as part of the RERTR-13 experiment, which is described in this paper. Detailed plate design, compositions and irradiations conditions are discussed.

  14. High loading uranium fuel plate

    DOEpatents

    Wiencek, Thomas C.; Domagala, Robert F.; Thresh, Henry R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pair of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat having a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process.

  15. Spent fuel data for waste storage programs

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, E M

    1980-09-01

    Data on LWR spent fuel were compiled for dissemination to participants in DOE-sponsored waste storage programs. Included are mechanical descriptions of the existing major types of LWR fuel assemblies, spent LWR fuel fission product inventories and decay heat data, and inventories of LWR spent fuel currently in storage, with projections of future quantities.

  16. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Default CO2 Emission Factors and High Heat Values for Various Types of Fuel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Biodiesel 0.128 73.84 Biodiesel (100%) 0.128 73.84 Rendered Animal Fat 0.125 71.06 Vegetable Oil 0.120 81.55... Petroleum products mmBtu/gallon kg CO2/mmBtu Distillate Fuel Oil No. 1 0.139 73.25 Distillate Fuel Oil No. 2 0.138 73.96 Distillate Fuel Oil No. 4 0.146 75.04 Residual Fuel Oil No. 5 0.140 72.93 Residual...

  17. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of a novel immune-type receptor from Ictalurus punctatus and phasing by selenium anomalous dispersion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrov, David A. Hernández Prada, José A.; Haire, Robert N.; Magis, Andrew T.; Bailey, Kate; Litman, Gary W.

    2007-12-01

    A highly diversified novel immune-type receptor from catfish, NITR10, was crystallized to reveal novel mechanisms of immune recognition. X-ray diffraction data from crystals of a novel immune-type receptor (NITR10 from the catfish Ictalurus punctatus) were collected to 1.65 Å resolution and reduced to the primitive hexagonal lattice. Native and selenomethionine derivatives of NITR10 crystallized under different conditions yielded P3{sub 1}21 crystals. SeMet NITR10 was phased to a correlation coefficient of 0.77 by SAD methods and experimental electron-density maps were calculated to 1.65 Å. Five NITR10 molecules are predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit based on the Matthews coefficient.

  18. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Platinum sintering on phosphoric acid fuel cell cathodes is discussed. The cathode of the phosphoric acid fuel cell uses a high surface area platinum catalyst dispersed on a conductive carbon support to minimize both cathode polarization and fabrication costs. During operation, however, the active surface area of these electrodes decreases, which in turn leads to decreased cell performance. This loss of active surface area is a major factor in the degradation of fuel cell performance over time.

  19. Antibodies against the majority subunit of Type IV pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Laura A.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Ward, Michael O.; Jordan, Zachary B.; Goodman, Steven D.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual ‘top-down’ dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT, and delivered via a non-invasive transcutaneous immunization route, induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization, and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI. PMID:25597921

  20. Antibodies against the majority subunit of type IV Pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ward, Michael O; Jordan, Zachary B; Goodman, Steven D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2015-04-01

    Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual 'top-down' dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT and delivered via a noninvasive transcutaneous immunization route induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI.

  1. Superclone Expansion, Long-Distance Clonal Dispersal and Local Genetic Structuring in the Coral Pocillopora damicornis Type β in Reunion Island, South Western Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Gélin, Pauline; Fauvelot, Cécile; Mehn, Vincent; Bureau, Sophie; Rouzé, Héloïse; Magalon, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    The scleractinian coral Pocillopora damicornis type β is known to present a mixed reproduction mode: through sexual reproduction, new genotypes are created, while asexual reproduction insures their propagation. In order to investigate the relative proportion of each reproduction mode in P. damicornis type β populations from Reunion Island, Indian Ocean, clonal propagation along the west coast was assessed through four sampling sites with increasing geographical distance between sites. Coral colonies were sampled either exhaustively, randomly or haphazardly within each site, and genotypic diversity was assessed using 13 microsatellite loci over a total of 510 P. damicornis type β determined a posteriori from their mtDNA haplotype (a 840 bp sequenced fragment of the Open Reading Frame). Overall, 47% of all the sampled colonies presented the same multi-locus genotype (MLG), a superclone, suggesting that asexual propagation is extremely important in Reunion Island. Within each site, numerous MLGs were shared by several colonies, suggesting local clonal propagation through fragmentation. Moreover, some of these MLGs were found to be shared among several sites located 40 km apart. While asexual reproduction by fragmentation seems unlikely over long distances, our results suggest a production of parthenogenetic larvae. Despite shared MLGs, two differentiated clusters were enclosed among populations of the west coast of Reunion Island, revealing the necessity to set up appropriate managing strategies at a local scale. PMID:28068406

  2. Dispersion-compensated Fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, K.C.

    1992-11-03

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4[times]10[sup [minus]5] inch and a profile width of at least 10[sup [minus]3] inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight. 10 figs.

  3. Dispersion-compensated fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Kenneth C.

    1992-01-01

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4.multidot.10.sup.-5 inch and a profile width of at least 10.sup.-3 inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight.

  4. Highly dispersive slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yue, Yang; Xiao-Li, Yinying; Beausoleil, Raymond G; Willner, Alan E

    2009-04-27

    We propose a slot-waveguide with high dispersion, in which a slot waveguide is coupled to a strip waveguide. A negative dispersion of up to -181520 ps/nm/km is obtained due to a strong interaction of the slot and strip modes. A flat and large dispersion is achievable by cascading the dispersive slot-waveguides with varied waveguide thickness or width for dispersion compensation and signal processing applications. We show - 31300 ps/nm/km dispersion over 147-nm bandwidth with <1% variance.

  5. Determination of effects of turbulence flow in a cathode environment on electricity generation using a tidal mud-based cylindrical-type sediment microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    An, Junyeong; Lee, Soo-Jin; Ng, How Yong; Chang, In Seop

    2010-12-01

    We examined the possibility of harvesting electricity from the surface of a tidal mud flat using a cylindrical-type sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC), a marine mud battery (MMB), which can be applied in a sea environment where the ebb and flow occur due to tidal difference. In addition, we indirectly investigated the influence of ebb and flow in a lab, using aeration, argon gassing, and by agitating the cathodic solution. The MMBs consisted of cylindrical acrylic compartments containing a nylon membrane, an anode, and a cathode in a single body. The MMBs were stuck vertically into an artificial tidal mud flat such that the anode electrode was in direct contact with the tidal mud surface. As a result, the maximum current and power density generated were 35 mA/m(2) and 9 mW/m(2), respectively, thus verifying that it is possible to harvest electricity from the surface of a tidal mud flat using an MMB without burying the anode electrode in the tidal mud. Furthermore, the results of tests using an artificial turbulence flow showed the flow induced by the tidal ebb and flow could allow the performance of MMBs to be enhanced.

  6. The performance and long-term stability of low-cost separators in single-chamber bottle-type microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kondaveeti, Sanath; Kakarla, Ramesh; Kim, Hong Suck; Kim, Byung-Goon; Min, Booki

    2017-03-21

    This study evaluates long-term stability of low-cost separators in single-chamber bottle-type microbial fuel cells with domestic wastewater. Low-cost separators tested in this study were nonwoven fabrics (NWF) of polypropylene (PP80, PP100), textile fabrics of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), sulfonated polyphenylene sulfide (SPPS), and cellulose esters. NWF PP80 separator generated the highest power density of 280 mW/m(2), which was higher than with ion-exchange membranes (cation exchange membrane; CEM = 271 mW/m(2), cation exchange membrane; CMI = 196 mW/m(2), Nafion = 260 mW/m(2)). MFC operations with other size-selective separators such as SPPS, PPS, and cellulose esters exhibited power densities of 261, 231, and 250 mW/m(2), respectively. During a 280-day operation, initial power density of PP80 (278 mW/m(2)) was decreased to 257 mW/m(2), but this decrease was smaller than with others (Nafion: 265-230 mW/m(2); PP100: 220-126 mW/m(2)). The anode potential of around -430 mV did not change much with all separators in the long-term operation, but the initial cathode potential gradually decreased. Fouling analysis suggested that the presence of carbonaceous substance on Nafion and PP80 after 280 days of operation and Nafion was subject to be more biofouling.

  7. Nanostructured Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-26

    tailorable surface properties. Recently, OMC as support for metal nanocatalysts for electrode materials in low-temperature fuel cells has been attracting much...b), the Pt nanocatalysts were well-dispersed inside the vertical channel network assembled by carbon rods of TFC support. Fig. 2. TEM images of

  8. Synthetic Fuel

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

    2016-07-12

    Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

  9. Synthetic Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

    2008-03-26

    Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

  10. TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

    2008-10-01

    This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of “debonds” and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

  11. Altitude Performance of Annular Combustor Type Turbojet Engine with JFC-2 Fuel /james W. Useller, James L. Harp, Jr. and Zelmar Barson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Useller, James W; Harp, James L JR; Barson, Zelmar

    1952-01-01

    An investigation was made comparing the performance of JFC-2 fuel and unleaded, clear gasoline in a 3000-pound-thrust turbojet engine. The JFC-2 fuel was a blend of percent diesel fuel and 25 percent aviation gasoline. Engine combustion efficiency was equal to that obtained with gasoline at rated engine speed and altitudes up to 35,000 feet, but at lower engine speeds or at higher altitudes the JFC-2 fuel gave lower combustion efficiency. No discernible difference was obtained in starting or low-speed combustiion blow-out characteristics of the two fuels. Turbine-discharge radial temperature profiles were nearly the same at altitudes up to 35,000 feet.

  12. Study of diffusion bond development in 6061 aluminum and its relationship to future high density fuels fabrication.

    SciTech Connect

    Prokofiev, I.; Wiencek, T.; McGann, D.

    1997-10-07

    Powder metallurgy dispersions of uranium alloys and silicides in an aluminum matrix have been developed by the RERTR program as a new generation of proliferation-resistant fuels. Testing is done with miniplate-type fuel plates to simulate standard fuel with cladding and matrix in plate-type configurations. In order to seal the dispersion fuel plates, a diffusion bond must exist between the aluminum coverplates surrounding the fuel meat. Four different variations in the standard method for roll-bonding 6061 aluminum were studied. They included mechanical cleaning, addition of a getter material, modifications to the standard chemical etching, and welding methods. Aluminum test pieces were subjected to a bend test after each rolling pass. Results, based on 400 samples, indicate that at least a 70% reduction in thickness is required to produce a diffusion bond using the standard rollbonding method versus a 60% reduction using the Type II method in which the assembly was welded 100% and contained open 9mm holes at frame corners.

  13. Future Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-04

    tactical ground mobility and increasing operational reach • Identify, review, and assess – Technologies for reducing fuel consumption, including...T I O N S A C T I O N S TOR Focus - Tactical ground mobility - Operational reach - Not A/C, Ships, or troops Hybrid Electric Vehicle Fuel Management...Fuel Management During Combat Operations Energy Fundamentals • Energy Density • Tactical Mobility • Petroleum Use • Fuel Usage (TWV) • TWV OP TEMPO TOR

  14. Aviation turbine fuels, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, E.M.; Dickson, C.L.

    1983-03-01

    Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1982 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1982 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 14 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 90 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and HP-5, and commercial type Jet A.

  15. Alternatives to traditional transportation fuels: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report presents the first compilation by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of information on alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuel. The purpose of the report is: (1) to provide background information on alternative transportation fuels and replacement fuels compared with gasoline and diesel fuel, and (2) to furnish preliminary estimates of alternative transportation fuels and alternative fueled vehicles as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), Title V, Section 503, ``Replacement Fuel Demand Estimates and Supply Information.`` Specifically, Section 503 requires the EIA to report annually on: (1) the number and type of alternative fueled vehicles in existence the previous year and expected to be in use the following year, (2) the geographic distribution of these vehicles, (3) the amounts and types of replacement fuels consumed, and (4) the greenhouse gas emissions likely to result from replacement fuel use. Alternative fueled vehicles are defined in this report as motorized vehicles licensed for on-road use, which may consume alternative transportation fuels. (Alternative fueled vehicles may use either an alternative transportation fuel or a replacement fuel.) The intended audience for the first section of this report includes the Secretary of Energy, the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the automobile manufacturing industry, the transportation fuel manufacturing and distribution industries, and the general public. The second section is designed primarily for persons desiring a more technical explanation of and background for the issues surrounding alternative transportation fuels.

  16. Fossil Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

  17. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  18. A review of dispersion modelling and its application to the dispersion of particles: An overview of different dispersion models available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, N. S.; Morawska, L.

    This paper provides the first review of the application of atmospheric models for particle dispersion. The different types of dispersion models available, from simple box type models to complex fluid dynamics models are outlined and the suitability of the different approaches to dispersion modelling within different environments, in regards to scale, complexity of the environment and concentration parameters is assessed. Finally, several major commercial and non-commercial particle dispersion packages are reviewed, detailing which processes are included and advantages and limitations of their use to modelling particle dispersion. The models reviewed included: Box models (AURORA, CPB and PBM), Gaussian models (CALINE4, HIWAY2, CAR-FMI, OSPM, CALPUFF, AEROPOL, AERMOD, UK-ADMS and SCREEN3), Lagrangian/Eulerian Models (GRAL, TAPM, ARIA Regional), CFD models (ARIA Local, MISKAM, MICRO-CALGRID) and models which include aerosol dynamics (GATOR, MONO32, UHMA, CIT, AERO, RPM, AEROFOR2, URM-1ATM, MADRID, CALGRID and UNI-AERO).

  19. Method and apparatus for controlled size distribution of gel microspheres formed from aqueous dispersions. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Ryon, A.D.; Haas, P.A.; Vavruska, J.S.

    1982-01-19

    The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for making a population of dense, closely size-controlled microspheres by sol-gel procedures wherein said microspheres are characterized by a significant percentage of said population being within a predetermined, relatively narrow size range. This is accomplished by subjecting aqueous dispersions of a sol, within a water-immiscible organic liquid to a turbulent flow. Microsphere populations thus provided are useful in vibratory-packed processes for nuclear fuels to be irradiated in LWR- and FBR-type nuclear reactors.

  20. Magnetic particle dispersion in polymer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Kwang Seoung

    Magnetic particle dispersions were prepared in order to observe the effect of particle surface properties, concentration and functional group of binder, milling time, and solvent on dispersion properties. Rheology and transverse susceptibility measurements were used to characterize the dispersion quality of the magnetic paints macroscopically and microscopically, respectively. In this study, by applying the acid-base concept, methods to optimize magnetic dispersions were established. Initially, interaction between acid-base sites on particles and binder was investigated by poisoning the sites with chemicals, then quantifying each type of adsorption (hydrogen and chemical adsorption) using thermogravimetric analysis. With this fundamental information, effects of typical dispersion parameters were investigated. The acid base interaction between binder solution and particles was related to the magnetic and rheological properties of magnetic inks. The results have significant implications for high density particulate media where dispersion will become increasingly important.

  1. Emissions of metals and polychlorinated dibenzo(p)dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs) from Portland cement manufacturing plants: inter-kiln variability and dependence on fuel-types.

    PubMed

    Zemba, Stephen; Ames, Michael; Green, Laura; Botelho, Maria João; Gossman, David; Linkov, Igor; Palma-Oliveira, José

    2011-09-15

    Emissions from Portland cement manufacturing facilities may increase health risks in nearby populations and are thus subject to stringent regulations. Direct testing of pollutant concentrations in exhaust gases provides the best basis for assessing the extent of these risks. However, these tests (i) are often conducted under stressed, rather than typical, operating conditions, (ii) may be limited in number and duration, and (iii) may be influenced by specific fuel-types and attributes of individual kilns. We report here on the results of more than 150 emissions-tests conducted of two kilns at a Portland cement manufacturing plant in Portugal. The tests measured various regulated metals and polychlorinated dibenzo(p)dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs). Stack-gas concentrations of pollutants were found to be highly variable, with standard deviations on the order of mean values. Emission rates of many pollutants were higher when coal was used as the main kiln fuel (instead of petroleum coke). Use of various supplemental fuels, however, had little effect on stack emissions, and few statistically significant differences were observed when hazardous waste was included in the fuel mix. Significant differences in emissions for some pollutants were observed between the two kilns despite their similar designs and uses of similar fuels. All measured values were found to be within applicable regulatory limits.

  2. Neutronic performance of high-density LEU fuels in water-moderated and water-reflected research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bretscher, M.M.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-09-01

    At the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) meeting in September 1994, Durand reported that the maximum uranium loading attainable with U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel is about 6.0 g U/cm{sup 3}. The French Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique (CEA) plan to perform irradiation tests with 5 plates at this loading. Compagnie pour L`Etude et La Realisation de Combustibles Atomiques (CERCA) has also fabricated a few uranium nitride (UN) plates with a uranium density in the fuel meat of 7.0 g/cm{sup 3} and found that UN is compatible with the aluminum matrix at temperatures below 500 C. High density dispersion fuels proposed for development include U-Zr(4 wt%)-Nb(2 wt%), U-Mo(5 wt%), and U-Mo(9 wt%). The purpose of this note is to examine the relative neutronic behavior of these high density fuels in a typical light water-reflected and water-moderated MTR-type research reactor. The results show that a dispersion of the U-Zr-Nb alloy has the most favorable neutronic properties and offers the potential for uranium densities greater than 8.0 g/cm{sup 3}. On the other hand, UN is the least reactive fuel because of the relatively large {sup 14}N(n,p) cross section. For a fixed value of k{sub eff}, the required {sup 235}U loading per fuel element is least for the U-Zr-Nb fuel and steadily increases for the U-Mo(5%), U-Mo(9%), and UN fuels. Because of volume fraction limitations, the UO{sub 2} dispersions are only useful for uranium densities below 5.0 g/cm{sup 3}. In this density range, however, UO{sub 2} is more reactive than U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}.

  3. Dispersion y dinamica poblacional

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal behavior of fruit flies is appetitive. Measures of dispersion involve two different parameter: the maximum distance and the standard distance. Standard distance is a parameter that describes the probalility of dispersion and is mathematically equivalent to the standard deviation around ...

  4. New developments in RTR fuel recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Lelievre, F.; Brueziere, J.; Domingo, X.; Valery, J.F.; Leroy, J.F.; Tribout-Maurizi, A.

    2013-07-01

    As most utilities in the world, Research and Test Reactors (RTR) operators are currently facing two challenges regarding the fuel, in order to comply with local safety and waste management requirements as well as global non-proliferation obligation: - How to manage used fuel today, and - How fuel design changes that are currently under development will influence used fuel management. AREVA-La-Hague plant has a large experience in used fuel recycling, including traditional RTR fuel (UAl). Based on that experience and deep knowledge of RTR fuel manufacturing, AREVA is currently examining possible options to cope with both challenges. This paper describes the current experience of AREVA-La-Hague in UAl used fuels recycling and its plan to propose recycling for various types of fuels such as U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel or UMo fuel on an industrial scale. (authors)

  5. Alternative fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J. S.; Butze, H. F.; Friedman, R.; Antoine, A. C.; Reynolds, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    Potential problems related to the use of alternative aviation turbine fuels are discussed and both ongoing and required research into these fuels is described. This discussion is limited to aviation turbine fuels composed of liquid hydrocarbons. The advantages and disadvantages of the various solutions to the problems are summarized. The first solution is to continue to develop the necessary technology at the refinery to produce specification jet fuels regardless of the crude source. The second solution is to minimize energy consumption at the refinery and keep fuel costs down by relaxing specifications.

  6. 1990 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains author prepared short resumes of the presentations at the 1990 Fuel Cell Seminar held November 25-28, 1990 in Phoenix, Arizona. Contained herein are 134 short descriptions organized into topic areas entitled An Environmental Overview, Transportation Applications, Technology Advancements for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells, Technology Advancements for Solid Fuel Cells, Component Technologies and Systems Analysis, Stationary Power Applications, Marine and Space Applications, Technology Advancements for Acid Type Fuel Cells, and Technology Advancement for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

  7. Comparing hydrogen and hydrocarbon booster fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.

    1988-01-01

    The present evaluation of the consequences of hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels as the basis of launch vehicle booster rocket-stage performance notes that hydrocarbon fuels lead to lower vehicle dry mass, for low-velocity requirements, while hydrogen fuel furnishes lower dry mass. Vehicles employing both types of fuel attempt to take advantage of the low intercept and slope of hydrocarbon fuel at low velocity, and subsequently, of the slope of the hydrogen curves at higher velocities.

  8. Fuel Cell Handbook, Fifth Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Energy and Environmental Solutions

    2000-10-31

    Progress continues in fuel cell technology since the previous edition of the Fuel Cell Handbook was published in November 1998. Uppermost, polymer electrolyte fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and solid oxide fuel cells have been demonstrated at commercial size in power plants. The previously demonstrated phosphoric acid fuel cells have entered the marketplace with more than 220 power plants delivered. Highlighting this commercial entry, the phosphoric acid power plant fleet has demonstrated 95+% availability and several units have passed 40,000 hours of operation. One unit has operated over 49,000 hours. Early expectations of very low emissions and relatively high efficiencies have been met in power plants with each type of fuel cell. Fuel flexibility has been demonstrated using natural gas, propane, landfill gas, anaerobic digester gas, military logistic fuels, and coal gas, greatly expanding market opportunities. Transportation markets worldwide have shown remarkable interest in fuel cells; nearly every major vehicle manufacturer in the U.S., Europe, and the Far East is supporting development. This Handbook provides a foundation in fuel cells for persons wanting a better understanding of the technology, its benefits, and the systems issues that influence its application. Trends in technology are discussed, including next-generation concepts that promise ultrahigh efficiency and low cost, while providing exceptionally clean power plant systems. Section 1 summarizes fuel cell progress since the last edition and includes existing power plant nameplate data. Section 2 addresses the thermodynamics of fuel cells to provide an understanding of fuel cell operation at two levels (basic and advanced). Sections 3 through 8 describe the six major fuel cell types and their performance based on cell operating conditions. Alkaline and intermediate solid state fuel cells were added to this edition of the Handbook. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed

  9. Dispersion in the Surfzone: Tracer Dispersion Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    objective is to improve understanding and modeling of dispersion of tracers (pol­ lution, fecal indicator bacteria, fine sediments) within the...discussed further here. Stochastic Particle Simulation for Surfzone Dispersion Drifter-derived diffusivities are time-dependent. In an unbounded...diffusion. Here HB06 particle trajectories are stochastically simulated with the Langevin equations with a shoreline boundary to explain the observed

  10. Development of an advanced JP-8 fuel. Final report, August 1990-January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Biddle, T.B.

    1993-12-01

    Technical effort was directed at increasing the design limit of current JP-8 fuel from 325 deg F (163 deg C) to 425 deg F (218 deg C) at the fuel nozzle. The objective was to accomplish this near-term thermal stability goal solely through the use of a fuel soluble additive package. JP-Thermally stable fuel was considered the thermal stability target since it has the high-temperature properties sought from the significantly more economical JP-8 + 100 formulation. The additives were evaluated in an additive-free Jet A considered typical of fuel most likely to be encountered in the field. DuPont JFA-5, currently the only accepted thermally stability improving additive, was considered state of the art and used as a bench mark. Additive manufacturers were surveyed and solicited for candidate additives that had potential for improving fuel thermal oxidative stability. Test methods were developed and/or refined for use in screening additives. Using the Hot Liquid Process Simulator (HLPS) in conjunction with a LECO Carbon Determinator, 152 additives were screened. Additive performance was ranked based on surface carbon and differential pressure. Additional screening was performed using the Isothermal Corrosion Oxidation Test (ICOT). Additives screened included oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen-type antioxidants; dispersants; detergents; metal deactivators; antifoulants; and proprietary thermal stability improvers. Twenty-seven experimental blends comprised of various additive combinations were tested. Five baseline fuels were evaluated.

  11. Theory of dispersive microlenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B.; Gal, George

    1993-01-01

    A dispersive microlens is a miniature optical element which simultaneously focuses and disperses light. Arrays of dispersive mircolenses have potential applications in multicolor focal planes. They have a 100 percent optical fill factor and can focus light down to detectors of diffraction spot size, freeing up areas on the focal plane for on-chip analog signal processing. Use of dispersive microlenses allows inband color separation within a pixel and perfect scene registration. A dual-color separation has the potential for temperature discrimination. We discuss the design of dispersive microlenses and present sample results for efficient designs.

  12. Fully ceramic nuclear fuel and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Venneri, Francesco; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-03-29

    Various embodiments of a nuclear fuel for use in various types of nuclear reactors and/or waste disposal systems are disclosed. One exemplary embodiment of a nuclear fuel may include a fuel element having a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix. An exemplary method of manufacturing a nuclear fuel is also disclosed. The method may include providing a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles, mixing the plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles with silicon carbide powder to form a precursor mixture, and compacting the precursor mixture at a predetermined pressure and temperature.

  13. 78 FR 23832 - Labeling Requirements for Alternative Fuels and Alternative Fueled Vehicles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... include fuel type, operating costs, fuel availability, performance, convenience, energy security, energy... ( 560902-00008); Baker, Michael ( 560902-00005); Clean Energy Fuels Corp. ( 560902-00011); General Motors... and gasoline driving ranges.\\13\\ Clean Energy noted that the absence of an alternative fuel...

  14. Hybrid two fuel system nozzle with a bypass connecting the two fuel systems

    DOEpatents

    Varatharajan, Balachandar [Cincinnati, OH; Ziminsky, Willy Steve [Simpsonville, SC; Yilmaz, Ertan [Albany, NY; Lacy, Benjamin [Greer, SC; Zuo, Baifang [Simpsonville, SC; York, William David [Greer, SC

    2012-05-29

    A hybrid fuel combustion nozzle for use with natural gas, syngas, or other types of fuels. The hybrid fuel combustion nozzle may include a natural gas system with a number of swozzle vanes and a syngas system with a number of co-annular fuel tubes.

  15. Experimental study of the E( m, λ)/ E( m, 1064) ratio as a function of wavelength, fuel type, height above the burner and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejaoui, S.; Lemaire, R.; Desgroux, P.; Therssen, E.

    2014-08-01

    The optical properties of soot have been studied for many years with a particular attention focused on refractive index. In the present study, the two-excitation wavelength laser-induced incandescence technique has been applied to determine the ratio of the soot absorption function as a function of the wavelength. The advantage of this technique is to provide the determination of the E( m) ratio using a non-intrusive laser-based method without being disturbed by scattering. Measurements have been carried out in a methane premixed flat flame and in a diesel turbulent spray one. Four pairs of wavelength have been used to evaluate the spectral behavior of E( m) ratios from ultraviolet (UV) to near infrared (NIR). The two-excitation wavelength LII method implies heating soot the same way using two different laser excitations. Particular operating conditions must be selected to insure the equality of the LII signals, such an equality being necessary to derive the E( m) ratio. A laser excitation at 1064 nm has been chosen as a reference, and the obtained results have been compared with those issued from the use of UV and visible wavelengths of 266, 355, 532 and 660 nm. Results show a significant decrease of the E( m) ratio from UV to visible while it tends to become constant from 532 nm to NIR. The use of different experimental conditions allows to analyze the dependence of the E( m) ratios with the height above the burner, the fuel type and the soot temperature. No significant influence of these parameters has been pointed out on the relative E( m) values determined in the flame conditions investigated here.

  16. Residual Fuel Expulsion from a Simulated 50,000 Pound Thrust Liquid-Propellant Rocket Engine Having a Continuous Rocket-Type Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messing, Wesley E.

    1959-01-01

    Tests have been conducted to determine the starting characteristics of a 50,000-pound-thrust rocket engine with the conditions of a quantity of fuel lying dormant in the simulated main thrust chamber. Ignition was provided by a smaller rocket firing rearwardly along the center line. Both alcohol-water and anhydrous ammonia were used as the residual fuel. The igniter successfully expelled the maximum amount of residual fuel (3 1/2 gal) in 2.9 seconds when the igniter.was equipped with a sonic discharge nozzle operating at propellant flow rates of 3 pounds per second. Lesser amounts of residual fuel required correspondingly lower expulsion times. When the igniter was equipped with a supersonic exhaust nozzle operating at a flow of 4 pounds per second, a slightly less effective expulsion rate was encountered.

  17. 14 CFR 23.967 - Fuel tank installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Syphoning of fuel (other than minor spillage) or collapse of bladder fuel cells may not result from improper.... A bladder-type fuel cell, if used, must have a retaining shell at least equivalent to a metal fuel... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank installation. 23.967 Section...

  18. 14 CFR 23.967 - Fuel tank installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Syphoning of fuel (other than minor spillage) or collapse of bladder fuel cells may not result from improper.... A bladder-type fuel cell, if used, must have a retaining shell at least equivalent to a metal fuel... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel tank installation. 23.967 Section...

  19. 14 CFR 23.967 - Fuel tank installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Syphoning of fuel (other than minor spillage) or collapse of bladder fuel cells may not result from improper.... A bladder-type fuel cell, if used, must have a retaining shell at least equivalent to a metal fuel... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel tank installation. 23.967 Section...

  20. Options for fuel management

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, L.D. Jr.; Chance, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The key to cofiring wood or other biomass with coal in existing power stations is fuel management. Fuel management includes the procurement, receiving, processing, storage, and blending of the biomass with coal. Procurement options may include the purchase of lower cost biomass fuels, receipt of subsidies to make capital modifications to cofire biomass {open_quotes}waste{close_quotes} fuels or receive tipping fees where biomass waste disposal options for a particular area are expensive. Biomass receiving options include delivery methods, unloading, measurement, and inspection. Processing options are associated with screen types, drying systems, final particle size required, and associated questions of fuel supply reliability. Issues include the ability of the coal yard to accept this processing operation, handling convenience, traffic patterns, staffing requirements, and ultimately the cost of fuel at the burner. Issues associated with storage include locating the facility, managing dust, managing moisture pick-up, and managing runoff. Blending options include pre-blending or designing a system to blend the fuels as they are transported from the coal yard to the bunkers. This paper reviews the major decisions that have to be made, and discusses some of the options available. It draws upon existing experience in cofiring systems to achieve a low cost, high reliability system to use biomass at coal-fired electricity generating stations.