Science.gov

Sample records for dispersive mhd waves

  1. Symmetries of the TDNLS equations for weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Brio, M.; Zank, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we consider the symmetries and conservation laws for the TDNLS equations derived by Hada (1993) and Brio, Hunter and Johnson, to describe the propagation of weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves in beta approximately 1 plasmas. The equations describe the interaction of the Alfven and magnetoacoustic modes near the triple umbilic, where the fast magnetosonic, slow magnetosonic and Alfven speeds coincide and a(g)(exp 2) = V(A)(exp 2) where a(g) is the gas sound speed and V(A) is the Alfven speed. We discuss Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations, and similarity solutions for the equations.

  2. Dispersive ducting of MHD waves in the plasma sheet - A source of Pi2 wave bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.; Hughes, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves can be ducted by plasma inhomogeneities such as the plasma sheet. As this ducting is dispersive an impulsive source will give rise to a well-defined, quasi-periodic wave packet with time-scales determined by the width of the inhomogeneity and characteristic speeds in the wave duct and surrounding medium. The duration of the wave packet depends upon the distance from the source. It is argued that an impulsive source in the plasma sheet at substorm onset will produce a wave packet near earth with characteristics similar to pi2 wave bursts and put this idea forward as a mechanism for the generation of pi2 pulsations.

  3. Dispersive Magnetosonic Waves and Turbulence in the Heliosheath: Multi-Fluid MHD Reconstruction of Voyager 2 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, B.; Opher, M.; Toth, G.

    2016-12-01

    Recently we demonstrated that our three-fluid MHD model of the solar wind plasma (where cold thermal solar wind ions, hot pickup ions, and electrons are treated as separate fluids) is able to reconstruct the microstructure of the termination shock observed by Voyager 2 [Zieger et al., 2015]. We constrained the unknown pickup ion abundance and temperature and confirmed the presence of a hot electron population at the termination shock, which has been predicted by a number of previous theoretical studies [e.g. Chasei and Fahr, 2014; Fahr et al., 2014]. We showed that a significant part of the upstream hydrodynamic energy is transferred to the heating of pickup ions and "massless" electrons. As shown in Zieger et al., [2015], three-fluid MHD theory predicts two fast magnetosonic modes, a low-frequency fast mode or solar wind ion (SW) mode and a high-frequency fast mode or pickup ion (PUI) mode. The coupling of the two ion populations results in a quasi-stationary nonlinear mode or oscilliton, which appears as a trailing wave train downstream of the termination shock. In single-fluid plasma, dispersive effects appear on the scale of the Debye length. However, in a non-equilibrium plasma like the solar wind, where solar wind ions and PUIs have different temperatures, dispersive effects become important on fluid scales [see Zieger et al., 2015]. Here we show that the dispersive effects of fast magnetosonic waves are expected on the scale of astronomical units (AU), and dispersion plays an important role producing compressional turbulence in the heliosheath. The trailing wave train of the termination shock (the SW-mode oscilliton) does not extend to infinity. Downstream propagating PUI-mode waves grow until they steepen into PUI shocklets and overturn starting to propagate backward. The upstream propagating PUI-mode waves result in fast magnetosonic turbulence and limit the downstream extension of the oscilliton. The overturning distance of the PUI-mode, where these waves

  4. Employing analogies for ducted MHD waves in dense coronal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1988-01-01

    Analogies of fast MHD waves propagating along a dense coronal structure are exploited to examine how the size and shape of the inhomogeneity affect the properties of the Love- and Pekeris-type waves. The profile's shape determines the dispersive nature of the waves. Excited impulsively, magnetic Love and Pekeris waves give rise to quasi-periodic oscillations with a duration and time scale that depend on the cross-sectional area and strength of the inhomogeneity. More diffuse coronal inhomogeneities support impulsively generated periodic oscillations, with the quasi-periodic signature being absent.

  5. Multi-dimensional MHD simple waves

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G. M.; Ratkiewicz, R.; Brio, M.; Zank, G. P.

    1996-07-20

    In this paper we consider a formalism for multi-dimensional simple MHD waves using ideas developed by Boillat. For simple wave solutions one assumes that all the physical variables (the density {rho}, gas pressure p, fluid velocity u, gas entropy S, and magnetic induction B in the MHD case) depend on a single phase function {phi}(r,t). The simple wave solution ansatz and the MHD equations then require that the phase function {phi} satisfies an implicit equation of the form f({phi})=r{center_dot}n({phi})-{lambda}({phi})t, where n({phi})={nabla}{phi}/|{nabla}{phi}| is the wave normal, {lambda}({phi})={omega}/k=-{phi}{sub t}/|{nabla}{phi}| is the normal speed of the wave front, and f({phi}) is an arbitrary differentiable function of {phi}. The formalism allows for more general simple waves than that usually dealt with in which n({phi}) is a constant unit vector that does not vary along the wave front. The formalism has implications for shock formation and wave breaking for multi-dimensional waves.

  6. Simulation of wave interactions with MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, Donald B; Abla, G; Bateman, Glenn; Bernholdt, David E; Berry, Lee A; Bonoli, P.; Bramley, R; Breslau, J.; Chance, M.; Chen, J.; Choi, M.; Elwasif, Wael R; Fu, GuoYong; Harvey, R. W.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Jardin, S. C.; Jenkins, T; Keyes, David E; Klasky, Scott A; Kruger, Scott; Ku, Long-Poe; Lynch, Vickie E; McCune, Douglas; Ramos, J.; Schissel, D.; Schnack,; Wright, J.

    2008-07-01

    The broad scientific objectives of the SWIM (Simulation of Wave Interaction with MHD) project are twofold: (1) improve our understanding of interactions that both radio frequency (RF) wave and particle sources have on extended-MHD phenomena, and to substantially improve our capability for predicting and optimizing the performance of burning plasmas in devices such as ITER: and (2) develop an integrated computational system for treating multiphysics phenomena with the required flexibility and extensibility to serve as a prototype for the Fusion Simulation Project. The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) has been implemented. Presented here are initial physics results on RF effects on MHD instabilities in tokamaks as well as simulation results for tokamak discharge evolution using the IPS.

  7. Multi-dimensional MHD simple waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Ratkiewicz, R.; Brio, M.; Zank, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we consider a formalism for multi-dimensional simple MHD waves using ideas developed by Boillat. For simple wave solutions one assumes that all the physical variables (the density rho, gas pressure p, fluid velocity V, gas entropy S, and magnetic induction B in the MHD case) depend on a single phase function phi(r,t). The simple wave solution ansatz and the MHD equations then require that the phase function has the form phi = r x n(phi) - lambda(phi)t, where = n(phi) = Delta phi / (absolute value of Delta phi) is the wave normal and lambda(phi) = omega/k = -phi t / (absolute value of Delta phi) is the normal speed of the wave front. The formalism allows for more general simple waves than that usually dealt with in which n(phi) is a constant unit vector that does not vary along the wave front. The formalism has implications for shock formation for multi-dimensional waves.

  8. MHD bending waves in a current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    Transverse MHD bending waves are considered in an isothermal and compressible two-dimensional current sheet of finite thickness in which the magnetic field changes direction and strength. The general form of the wave equation is obtained. It is shown that rotation of the magnetic field across the current sheet prevents the existence of singular points so that continuous spectrum solutions and the concomitant wave decay disappear. Instead, normal modes exist and closed integral solution for arbitrary current sheet structure are found. The results are discussed in terms of small-scale waves on the heliospheric current sheet.

  9. Amplitudes of MHD Waves in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Aimee Ann; Cally, Paul; Baldner, Charles; Kleint, Lucia; Tarbell, Theodore D.; De Pontieu, Bart; Scherrer, Philip H.; Rajaguru, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The conversion of p-modes into MHD waves by strong magnetic fields occurs mainly in the sub-photospheric layers. The photospheric signatures of MHD waves are weak due to low amplitudes at the beta=1 equipartion level where mode-conversion occurs. We report on small amplitude oscillations observed in the photosphere with Hinode SOT/SP in which we analyze time series for sunspots ARs 12186 (11.10.2014) and 12434 (17.10.2015). No significant magnetic field oscillations are recovered in the umbra or penumbra in the ME inversion. However, periodicities in the inclination angle are found at the umbral/penumbral boundary with 5 minute periods. Upward propagating waves are indicated in the intensity signals correlated between HMI and AIA at different heights. We compare SP results with the oscillations observed in HMI data. Simultaneous IRIS data shows transition region brightening above the umbral core.

  10. NONLINEAR MHD WAVES IN A PROMINENCE FOOT

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-10

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ∼ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5–11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5–14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ∼20 km s{sup −1}, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  11. Nonlinear MHD Waves in a Prominence Foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ˜ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5-14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ˜20 km s-1, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  12. Shock Waves in Hall-MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrom, George; Hameiri, Eliezer

    2012-03-01

    Hall-MHD is a partial differential equation of degenerate parabolic type that describes the dynamics of an ideal two fluid plasma with massless electrons. We study shock waves and discontinuities in this system. We characterize planar travelling wave solutions and find solutions with discontinuities in the hydrodynamic variables. These solutions, which correspond to the ion-acoustic wave, arise due to the presence of hydrodynamic real characteristics in Hall-MHD. We demonstrate finite-time discontinuity formation for certain types of initial data with discontinuous derivatives and study the shock structure under different regularizations. We also explore the possible existence of solutions with discontinuous magnetic field. A non-algebraic, non-local set of jump conditions is derived under the assumption of [B]!=0. These conditions are used to study the contact discontinuity and it is shown that massless electrons crossing the surface of discontinuity may enter and leave at different locations. These conditions suggest the possible existence of mathematically novel shocks in Hall-MHD.

  13. Analysis and gyrokinetic simulation of MHD Alfven wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Kevin Derek

    The study of low-frequency turbulence in magnetized plasmas is a difficult problem due to both the enormous range of scales involved and the variety of physics encompassed over this range. Much of the progress that has been made in turbulence theory is based upon a result from incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), in which energy is only transferred from large scales to small via the collision of Alfven waves propagating oppositely along the mean magnetic field. Improvements in laboratory devices and satellite measurements have demonstrated that, while theories based on this premise are useful over inertial ranges, describing turbulence at scales that approach particle gyroscales requires new theory. In this thesis, we examine the limits of incompressible MHD theory in describing collisions between pairs of Alfven waves. This interaction represents the fundamental unit of plasma turbulence. To study this interaction, we develop an analytic theory describing the nonlinear evolution of interacting Alfven waves and compare this theory to simulations performed using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. Gyrokinetics captures a much richer set of physics than that described by incompressible MHD, and is well-suited to describing Alfvenic turbulence around the ion gyroscale. We demonstrate that AstroGK is well suited to the study of physical Alfven waves by reproducing laboratory Alfven dispersion data collected using the LAPD. Additionally, we have developed an initialization alogrithm for use with AstroGK that allows exact Alfven eigenmodes to be initialized with user specified amplitudes and phases. We demonstrate that our analytic theory based upon incompressible MHD gives excellent agreement with gyrokinetic simulations for weakly turbulent collisions in the limit that k⊥rho i << 1. In this limit, agreement is observed in the time evolution of nonlinear products, and in the strength of nonlinear interaction with respect to polarization and scale. We also examine the

  14. Dispersive wave emission from wave breaking.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Matteo; Trillo, Stefano

    2013-10-01

    We show that pulses undergoing wave breaking in nonlinear weakly dispersive fibers radiate, owing to phase-matching (assisted by higher-order dispersion) of linear dispersive waves with the shock-wave front. Our theoretical results perfectly explain the radiation observed recently from pulses propagating in the normal dispersion (i.e., nonsolitonic) regime.

  15. Numerical study of MHD wave propagation in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieyra, M. V.; Schneiter, E. M.; Costa, A.; Esquivel, A.

    2017-07-01

    We present a 2D MHD simulation of wave propagation across the solar atmosphere considering the photosphere-chromosphere temperature and density stratification. The system is forced by typical p-mode perturbations. We reproduce observational results from SDO AIA.

  16. Propagation and Dissipation of MHD Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.

    2006-11-01

    bholadwivedi@gmail.com In view of the landmark result on the solar wind outflow, starting between 5 Mm and 20 Mm above the photosphere in magnetic funnels, we investigate the propagation and dissipation of MHD waves in coronal holes. We underline the importance of Alfvén wave dissipation in the magnetic funnels through the viscous and resistive plasma. Our results show that Alfvén waves are one of the primary energy sources in the innermost part of coronal holes where the solar wind outflow starts. We also consider compressive viscosity and thermal conductivity to study the propagation and dissipation of long period slow longitudinal MHD waves in polar coronal holes. We discuss their likely role in the line profile narrowing, and in the energy budget for coronal holes and the solar wind. We compare the contribution of longitudinal MHD waves with high frequency Alfvén waves.

  17. Linear and Nonlinear MHD Wave Processes in Plasmas. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tataronis, J. A.

    2004-06-01

    This program treats theoretically low frequency linear and nonlinear wave processes in magnetized plasmas. A primary objective has been to evaluate the effectiveness of MHD waves to heat plasma and drive current in toroidal configurations. The research covers the following topics: (1) the existence and properties of the MHD continua in plasma equilibria without spatial symmetry; (2) low frequency nonresonant current drive and nonlinear Alfven wave effects; and (3) nonlinear electron acceleration by rf and random plasma waves. Results have contributed to the fundamental knowledge base of MHD activity in symmetric and asymmetric toroidal plasmas. Among the accomplishments of this research effort, the following are highlighted: Identification of the MHD continuum mode singularities in toroidal geometry. Derivation of a third order ordinary differential equation that governs nonlinear current drive in the singular layers of the Alfvkn continuum modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. Bounded solutions of this ODE implies a net average current parallel to the toroidal equilibrium magnetic field. Discovery of a new unstable continuum of the linearized MHD equation in axially periodic circular plasma cylinders with shear and incompressibility. This continuum, which we named “accumulation continuum” and which is related to ballooning modes, arises as discrete unstable eigenfrequency accumulate on the imaginary frequency axis in the limit of large mode numbers. Development of techniques to control nonlinear electron acceleration through the action of multiple coherent and random plasmas waves. Two important elements of this program aye student participation and student training in plasma theory.

  18. Studying Solar MHD Wave Propagation in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, S. W.; Bogdan, T. J.

    1999-05-01

    We present preliminary results on simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave propagation in a two dimensional stratified model of the upper solar atmosphere. The simulations presented are obtained using the High-Order Godunov scheme of Zachary, Malagoli & Colella (1994). These simulations allow us to analyze quantitatively the coupling, resonances and absorption of MHD waves in a stratified plasma such as that of the Sun. In particular, we are able to observe the dynamic evolution of energy and momentum balances of the model atmosphere in response the wave propagation. In addition, we are able to study the phenomenology of MHD wave passage through particular regions of interest. We will concentrate mostly upon the physical manifestation of MHD waves propagating in ``network'' and ``internetwork'' regions and study the effect on physical parameters and the basic field structure imposed at outset. We believe that such simulations are important in that they compliment the high quality/temporal resolution data currently being acquired by the SOHO and TRACE spacecraft.

  19. Vorticity equation for MHD fast waves in geospace environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The MHD vorticity equation is modified in order to apply it to nonlinear MHD fast waves or shocks when their extent along the magnetic field is limited. Field-aligned current (FAC) generation is also discussed on the basis of this modified vorticity equation. When the wave normal is not aligned to the finite velocity convection and the source region is spatially limited, a longitudinal polarization causes a pair of plus and minus charges inside the compressional plane waves or shocks, generating a pair of FACs. This polarization is not related to the separation between the electrons and ions caused by their difference in mass, a separation which is inherent to compressional waves. The resultant double field-aligned current structure exists both with and without the contributions from curvature drift, which is questionable in terms of its contribution to vorticity change from the viewpoint of single-particle motion.

  20. Vorticity equation for MHD fast waves in geospace environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The MHD vorticity equation is modified in order to apply it to nonlinear MHD fast waves or shocks when their extent along the magnetic field is limited. Field-aligned current (FAC) generation is also discussed on the basis of this modified vorticity equation. When the wave normal is not aligned to the finite velocity convection and the source region is spatially limited, a longitudinal polarization causes a pair of plus and minus charges inside the compressional plane waves or shocks, generating a pair of FACs. This polarization is not related to the separation between the electrons and ions caused by their difference in mass, a separation which is inherent to compressional waves. The resultant double field-aligned current structure exists both with and without the contributions from curvature drift, which is questionable in terms of its contribution to vorticity change from the viewpoint of single-particle motion.

  1. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Feng, Zongcai; Schuster, Gerard

    2017-03-01

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained from Rayleigh waves recorded by vertical-component geophones. Similar to wave-equation traveltime tomography, the complicated surface wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the phase-velocity and frequency domains. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2-D or 3-D S-wave velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is significantly less prone to the cycle-skipping problems of full waveform inversion. The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can approximately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distributions in laterally heterogeneous media if the dispersion curves can be identified and picked. The WD method is easily extended to anisotropic data and the inversion of dispersion curves associated with Love waves.

  2. MHD Wave Modes Resolved in Fine-Scale Chromospheric Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verth, G.; Jess, D. B.

    2016-02-01

    Due to its complex and dynamic fine-scale structure, the chromosphere is a particularly challenging region of the Sun's atmosphere to understand. It is now widely accepted that to model chromospheric dynamics, even on a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) scale, while also calculating spectral line emission, one must realistically include the effects of partial ionization and radiative transfer in a multi-fluid plasma under non-LTE conditions. Accurate quantification of MHD wave energetics must be founded on a precise identification of the actual wave mode being observed. This chapter focuses on MHD kink-mode identification, MHD sausage mode identification, and MHD torsional Alfvén wave identification. It then reviews progress in determining more accurate energy flux estimations of specific MHD wave modes observed in the chromosphere. The chapter finally examines how the discovery of these MHD wave modes has helped us advance the field of chromospheric magnetoseismology.

  3. On nonlinear waves in Hall-MHD plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miteva, R.; Mann, G.

    2008-10-01

    Low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations are observed in space plasmas, e.g. as upstream waves at the Earth's bow shock. Such upstream waves can steepen into very large amplitude wave phenomena, e.g. short large-amplitude magnetic structures (or SLAMS for short), shocklets or discrete wave packets. Such observations motivated us to study the nonlinear behavior of low-frequency and large-amplitude plasma waves in terms of the full nonlinear Hall-MHD framework. In the case of stationary (nonlinear) waves, the Hall-MHD equations can be rewritten in the so-called Sakai-Sonnerup system of equations that describe this plasma state and provide oscillatory and solitary types of solutions. An overall parameter study on the polarization characteristics, together with the magnetic field components and density variations of the different ranges of solutions, is presented here. These results can be further on applied to the theoretical treatment of particle interaction with such waves, e.g. at shocks in space plasmas, possibly leading to particle acceleration.

  4. Numerical Stability Analysis of Linear Wave Propagation in Extended MHD Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yu; Jardin, Stephen

    2006-10-01

    Extended MHD (2-fluid) modeling of fusion plasmas using a split semi-implicit time-advance based on a particular high-order finite element with C^1 continuity has been shown to offer significant advantages in efficiency and accuracy[1,2]. However, the method requires the introduction of several viscosity and hyper-viscosity coefficients to provide robust numerical stability. As a code-validation exercise, we report on a systematic study of the simulation of wave propagation in the linear regime. We initialize the simulation in a stable linear eigenmode of the extended MHD equations and follow the evolution to measure the numerical dispersion relation for the 3 sets of MHD waves. We present results showing how the stability, dispersion and dissipation depend on grid size, time step, and the magnitude of the viscosity and hyper-viscosity coefficients. These linear perturbation tests act as useful benchmarks and guides for numerical stability for nonlinear simulations. [1] S. Jardin, J. Comput. Phys. 200 (2004) 133 [2] S. Jardin and J. Breslau, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056101 (2005)

  5. Mirror force induced wave dispersion in Alfvén waves

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R.

    2013-06-15

    Recent hybrid MHD-kinetic electron simulations of global scale standing shear Alfvén waves along the Earth's closed dipolar magnetic field lines show that the upward parallel current region within these waves saturates and broadens perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field and that this broadening increases with the electron temperature. Using resistive MHD simulations, with a parallel Ohm's law derived from the linear Knight relation (which expresses the current-voltage relationship along an auroral field line), we explore the nature of this broadening in the context of the increased perpendicular Poynting flux resulting from the increased parallel electric field associated with mirror force effects. This increased Poynting flux facilitates wave energy dispersion across field lines which in-turn allows for electron acceleration to carry the field aligned current on adjacent field lines. This mirror force driven dispersion can dominate over that associated with electron inertial effects for global scale waves.

  6. Numerical simulation of propagation of the MHD waves in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parchevsky, K.; Kosovichev, A.; Khomenko, E.; Olshevsky, V.; Collados, M.

    2010-11-01

    We present results of numerical 3D simulation of propagation of MHD waves in sunspots. We used two self consistent magnetohydrostatic background models of sunspots. There are two main differences between these models: (i) the topology of the magnetic field and (ii) dependence of the horizontal profile of the sound speed on depth. The model with convex shape of the magnetic field lines near the photosphere has non-zero horizorntal perturbations of the sound speed up to the depth of 7.5 Mm (deep model). In the model with concave shape of the magnetic field lines near the photosphere Δ c/c is close to zero everywhere below 2 Mm (shallow model). Strong Alfven wave is generated at the wave source location in the deep model. This wave is almost unnoticeable in the shallow model. Using filtering technique we separated magnetoacoustic and magnetogravity waves. It is shown, that inside the sunspot magnetoacoustic and magnetogravity waves are not spatially separated unlike the case of the horizontally uniform background model. The sunspot causes anisotropy of the amplitude distribution along the wavefront and changes the shape of the wavefront. The amplitude of the waves is reduced inside the sunspot. This effect is stronger for the magnetogravity waves than for magnetoacoustic waves. The shape of the wavefront of the magnetogravity waves is distorted stronger as well. The deep model causes bigger anisotropy for both mgnetoacoustic and magneto gravity waves than the shallow model.

  7. Inductive-dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling via MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jiannan; Song, Paul; Vasyliūnas, Vytenis M.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere (M-IT) coupling via MHD waves by numerically solving time-dependent continuity, momentum, and energy equations for ions and neutrals, together with Maxwell's equations (Ampère's and Faraday's laws) and with photochemistry included. This inductive-dynamic approach we use is fundamentally different from those in previous magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling models: all MHD wave modes are retained, and energy and momentum exchange between waves and plasma are incorporated into the governing equations, allowing a self-consistent examination of dynamic M-I coupling. Simulations, using an implicit numerical scheme, of the 1-D ionosphere/thermosphere system responding to an imposed convection velocity at the top boundary are presented to show how magnetosphere and ionosphere are coupled through Alfvén waves during the transient stage when the IT system changes from one quasi steady state to another. Wave reflection from the low-altitude ionosphere plays an essential role, causing overshoots and oscillations of ionospheric perturbations, and the dynamical Hall effect is an inherent aspect of the M-I coupling. The simulations demonstrate that the ionosphere/thermosphere responds to magnetospheric driving forces as a damped oscillator.

  8. Piston Dispersive Shock Wave Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefer, M. A.; Ablowitz, M. J.; Engels, P.

    2008-02-29

    The piston shock problem is a classical result of shock wave theory. In this work, the analogous dispersive shock wave (DSW) problem for a fluid described by the nonlinear Schroedinger equation is analyzed. Asymptotic solutions are calculated for a piston (step potential) moving with uniform speed into a dispersive fluid at rest. In contrast to the classical case, there is a bifurcation of shock behavior where, for large enough piston velocities, the DSW develops a periodic wave train in its wake with vacuum points and a maximum density that remains fixed as the piston velocity is increased further. These results have application to Bose-Einstein condensates and nonlinear optics.

  9. MHD-waves in the geomagnetic tail: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, Anatoliy; Mazur, Vitaliy; Kozlov, Daniil

    2015-03-01

    This article presents the review of experimental and theoretical studies on ultra-lowfrequency MHD oscillations of the geomagnetic tail. We consider the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause, oscillations with a discrete spectrum in the "magic frequencies"range, the ballooning instability of coupled Alfvén and slow magnetosonic waves, and "flapping" oscillations of the current sheet of the geomagnetic tail. Over the last decade, observations from THEMIS, CLUSTER and Double Star satellites have been of great importance for experimental studies. The use of several spacecraft allows us to study the structure of MHD oscillations with high spatial resolution. Due to this, we can make a detailed comparison between theoretical results and those obtained from multi-spacecraft studies. To make such comparisons in theoretical studies, in turn, we have to use the numerical models closest to the real magnetosphere.

  10. Doppler displacements in kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Marcel; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Terradas, Jaume; Verth, Gary; Soler, Roberto

    Doppler displacements in kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes Presenting author: M. Goossens Co-authors: R. Soler, J. Terradas, T. Van Doorsselaere, G. Verth The standard interpretation of the transverse MHD waves observed in the solar atmosphere is that they are non-axisymmetric kink m=1) waves on magnetic flux tubes. This interpretation is based on the fact that axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric fluting waves do not displace the axis of the loop and the loop as a whole while kink waves indeed do so. A uniform transverse motion produces a Doppler displacement that is constant across the magnetic flux tube. A recent development is the observation of Doppler displacements that vary across the loop. The aim of the present contribution is to show that spatial variations of the Doppler displacements across the loop can be caused by kink waves. The motion associated with a kink wave is purely transverse only when the flux tube is uniform and sufficiently thin. Only in that case do the radial and azimuthal components of displacement have the same amplitude and is the azimuthal component a quarter of a period ahead of the radial component. This results in a unidirectional or transverse displacement. When the flux tube is non-uniform and has a non-zero radius the conditions for the generation of a purely transverse motion are not any longer met. In that case the motion in a kink wave is the sum of a transverse motion and a non-axisymmetric rotational motion that depends on the azimuthal angle. It can produce complicated variations of the Doppler displacement across the loop. I shall discuss the various cases of possible Doppler displacenents that can occur depending on the relative sizes of the amplitudes of the radial and azimuthal components of the displacement in the kink wave and on the orientation of the line of sight.

  11. Striae and MHD Waves in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul; Heyer, Mark H.; Yildiz, Umut; Snell, Ronald L.; Falgarone, Edith; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2017-01-01

    The origin of molecular striae aligned along the local magnetic field in the envelope of the Taurus molecular cloud is examined with new observations of 12CO and 13CO J=2-1 emission obtained with the 10m submillimeter telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory. These data identify a periodic pattern of excess blue and redshifted emission that is responsibe for the striae features. For both 12CO and 13CO, spatial variations of the J=2-1 to J=1-0 line ratio are small and are not spatially correlated with the striae locations. A medium comprised of small, unresolved cells of CO emission with a filling factor less than 1 is required to explain the average line ratios and brightness temperatures. We propose that the striae features result from the modulation of the velocities and the beam filling factor of the cells, as a result of magnetosonic waves propagating through the envelope of the Taurus molecular cloud. Such waves are likely a common feature of molecular clouds that are sub-Alfvenic and may explain low column density, cirrus-like features that are observed to be aligned along the magnetic field direction.

  12. Energy exchange and wave action conservation for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in a general, slowly varying medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the solar wind and magnetosphere are propagated in a medium whose velocity is comparable to or greater than the wave velocity and which varies in both space and time. In the approximation where the scales of the time and space variation are long compared with the period and wavelength, the ray-tracing equations can be generalized and then include an additional first-order differential equation that determines the variation of frequency. In such circumstances the wave can exchange energy with the background: wave energy is not conserved. In such processes the wave action theorem shows that the wave action, defined as the ratio of the wave energy to the frequency in the local rest frame, is conserved. In this paper we discuss ray-tracing techniques and the energy exchange relation for MHD waves. We then provide a unified account of how to deal with energy transport by MHD waves in non-uniform media. The wave action theorem is derived directly from the basic MHD equations for sound waves, transverse Alfvén waves, and the fast and slow magnetosonic waves. The techniques described are applied to a number of illustrative cases. These include a sound wave in a medium undergoing a uniform compression, an isotropic Alfvén wave in a steady-state shear layer, and a transverse Alfvén wave in a simple model of the magnetotail undergoing compression. In each case the nature and magnitude of the energy exchange between wave and background is found.

  13. Vorticity equation for MHD fast waves in geospace environment

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Lui, A.T.Y.

    1993-08-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) vorticity equation is modified in order to apply it to nonlinear MHD fast waves or shocks when their extent along the magnetic field is limited. Field-aligned current (FAC) generation is also discussed on the basis of this modified vorticity equation. When the wave normal is not aligned to the finite velocity convection and the source region is spatially limited, a longitudinal polarization (u{sub {perpendicular}}{center_dot}J{sub {perpendicular}}) causes a pair of plus and minus charges inside the compressional plane waves or shocks, generating a pair of FACs. This polarization is not related to the separation between the electrons and ions caused by their difference in mass (i.e., Langmuir mode), a separation which is inherent to compressional waves. The resultant double field-aligned current structure exists both with and without the contributions from curvature drift, which is questionable in terms of its contribution to vorticity change from the viewpoint of single-particle motion. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  14. A semi-implicit Hall-MHD solver using whistler wave preconditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Lukas; Dreher, Jürgen; Grauer, Rainer

    2008-04-01

    The dispersive character of the Hall-MHD solutions, in particular the whistler waves, is a strong restriction to numerical treatments of this system. Numerical stability demands a time step dependence of the form Δt∝( for explicit calculations. A new semi-implicit scheme for integrating the induction equation is proposed and applied to a reconnection problem. It is based on a fix point iteration with a physically motivated preconditioning. Due to its convergence properties, short wavelengths converge faster than long ones, thus it can be used as a smoother in a nonlinear multigrid method.

  15. Is the magnetosphere a lens for MHD waves?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Sharma, A. S.; Valdivia, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    A viewpoint of the magnetosphere as a lens for MHD waves is presented. Using a simple model of the variation of the Alfven speed as proportional to the local magnetic value given by the Earth's dipole field and that due to the magnetopause currents represented by a current loop, it is found that the near-Earth magnetotail, in the range 8-16 R(sub E), is the focus of the magnetospheric lens. This location is found to be quite insensitive to a wide variation of parameters. By using simple diffraction theory analysis it is found that the focal region extends about 1 R(sub E) about the neutral sheet in the north-south plane and 0.2 - 0.5 R(sub E) along the Sun-Earth line. Compressive MHD waves carried by the solar wind or created by the interaction of the wind with the magnetopause can be amplified by a factor of about 100 in the focal region and this has potentially important implications to substorm activity.

  16. Kelvin-Helmholtz Unstable Magnetotail Flow Channels: Deceleration and Radiation of MHD Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkakin, H.; Mann, I. R.; Rankin, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) of magnetotail flow channels associated with burstybulk flows (BBFs) is investigated. MHD oscillations of the channel in both kink and sausage modes areinvestigated for KHI, and both the primary and secondary KHIs are found that drive MHD waves. Theseinstabilities are likely to be important for flow channel braking where the KHI removes energy from the flow.At flow speeds above the peak growth rate, the MHD modes excited by KHI develop from surface modesinto propagating modes leading to the radiation of MHD waves from the flow channel. The coupling ofBBF-driven shear flow instabilities to MHD waves presented here represents a new paradigm to explain BBFexcitation of tail flapping. Our model can also explain, for the first time, the generation mechanism for theobservations of waves propagating toward both flanks and emitted from BBF channels in the magnetotail.

  17. MHD waves and instabilities for gravitating, magnetized configurations in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, Rony; Goedbloed, Hans J. P.

    Seismic probing of equilibrium configurations is of course well-known from geophysics, but has also been succesfully used to determine the internal structure of the Sun to an amazing accuracy. The results of helioseismology are quite impressive, although they only exploit an equilibrium structure where inward gravity is balanced by a pressure gradient in a 1D radial fashion. In principle, one can do the same for stationary, gravitating, magnetized plasma equilibria, as needed to perform MHD seismology in astrophysical jets or accretion disks. The introduction of (sheared) differential rotation does require the important switch from diagnosing static to stationary equilibrium configurations. The theory to describe all linear waves and instabilities in ideal MHD, given an exact stationary, gravitating, magnetized plasma equilibrium, in any dimensionality (1D, 2D, 3D) has been known since 1960, and is governed by the Frieman-Rotenberg equation. The full (mathematical) power of spectral theory governing physical eigenmode determination comes into play when using the Frieman-Rotenberg equation for moving equilibria, as applicable to astrophysical jets, accretion disks, but also solar flux ropes with stationary flow patterns. I will review exemplary seismic studies of flowing equilibrium configurations, covering solar to astrophysical configurations in motion. In that case, even essentially 1D configurations require quantification of the spectral web of eigenmodes, organizing the complex eigenfrequency plane.

  18. Large amplitude MHD waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Smith, C. W.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of large amplitude magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves upstream of Jupiter's bow shock are analyzed. The waves are found to be right circularly polarized in the solar wind frame which suggests that they are propagating in the fast magnetosonic mode. A complete spectral and minimum variance eigenvalue analysis of the data was performed. The power spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations contains several peaks. The fluctuations at 2.3 mHz have a direction of minimum variance along the direction of the average magnetic field. The direction of minimum variance of these fluctuations lies at approximately 40 deg. to the magnetic field and is parallel to the radial direction. We argue that these fluctuations are waves excited by protons reflected off the Jovian bow shock. The inferred speed of the reflected protons is about two times the solar wind speed in the plasma rest frame. A linear instability analysis is presented which suggests an explanation for many of the observed features of the observations.

  19. Heating of solar and stellar chromospheres and coronae by MHD waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.

    1992-01-01

    The two general classes of models that deal with the required heating of stellar chromospheres and coronae assume that outer stellar atmospheres are heated by hydrodynamic or by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and that these waves are generated by turbulent motions in the stellar convection zones. This paper considers the types of MHD waves and the source of these waves in stars like sun, the efficiency of the generation of MHD waves, and the manner of propagation and energy dissipation of MHD waves. It is shown that the basic criteria for the validity of any theory of MHD wave heating must account for the mean level of heating observed in stellar chromospheres and coronae, and for the range of radiative losses observed for a given spectral type. It is also required that the MHD wave heating theory accounts for the existence of inhomogeneities in stellar atmospheres. The results obtained indicate that magnetic tube waves might supply enough energy for the chromospheric and coronal heating and might also account for the observed range of variations of stellar radiative losses for a given spectral type.

  20. QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Yolbaş, Servet; Yıldırım, Ahmet; Düzenci, Deccane; Karakaya, Bülent; Dağlı, Mustafa Necati; Koca, Süleyman Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic disease characterized by widespread pain. Somatic complaints associated with the cardiovascular system, such as chest pain and palpitations, are frequently seen in FM patients. P and QT dispersions are simple and inexpensive measurements reflecting the regional heterogeneity of atrial and ventricular repolarization, respectively. QT dispersion can cause serious ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of the present study was to evaluate QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with FM. Material and Methods The study involved 48 FM patients who fulfilled the established criteria and 32 healthy controls (HC). A standard 12-lead electrocardiogram was performed on all participants. QT dispersion was defined as the difference between the longest and the shortest QT intervals. Similarly, the differences between the shortest and longest P waves were defined as P wave dispersion. Results The QT dispersion and corrected QT dispersion were shorter in the FM group compared with the HC group (p<0.001 for both). In terms of the P wave dispersion value, there was no significant difference between the FM and HC groups (p=0.088). Conclusion Longer QT and P wave dispersions are not problems in patients with FM. Therefore, it may be concluded that fibromyalgia does not include an increased risk of atrial and/or ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:28149660

  1. QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Yolbaş, Servet; Yıldırım, Ahmet; Düzenci, Deccane; Karakaya, Bülent; Dağlı, Mustafa Necati; Koca, Süleyman Serdar

    2016-12-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic disease characterized by widespread pain. Somatic complaints associated with the cardiovascular system, such as chest pain and palpitations, are frequently seen in FM patients. P and QT dispersions are simple and inexpensive measurements reflecting the regional heterogeneity of atrial and ventricular repolarization, respectively. QT dispersion can cause serious ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of the present study was to evaluate QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with FM. The study involved 48 FM patients who fulfilled the established criteria and 32 healthy controls (HC). A standard 12-lead electrocardiogram was performed on all participants. QT dispersion was defined as the difference between the longest and the shortest QT intervals. Similarly, the differences between the shortest and longest P waves were defined as P wave dispersion. The QT dispersion and corrected QT dispersion were shorter in the FM group compared with the HC group (p<0.001 for both). In terms of the P wave dispersion value, there was no significant difference between the FM and HC groups (p=0.088). Longer QT and P wave dispersions are not problems in patients with FM. Therefore, it may be concluded that fibromyalgia does not include an increased risk of atrial and/or ventricular arrhythmias.

  2. Dispersive internal long wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Camassa, R.; Choi, W.; Holm, D.D.; Levermore, C.D.; Lvov, Y.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work is a joint analytical and numerical study of internal dispersive water wave propagation in a stratified two-layer fluid, a problem that has important geophysical fluid dynamics applications. Two-layer models can capture the main density-dependent effects because they can support, unlike homogeneous fluid models, the observed large amplitude internal wave motion at the interface between layers. The authors have derived new model equations using multiscale asymptotics in combination with the method they have developed for vertically averaging velocity and vorticity fields across fluid layers within the original Euler equations. The authors have found new exact conservation laws for layer-mean vorticity that have exact counterparts in the models. With this approach, they have derived a class of equations that retain the full nonlinearity of the original Euler equations while preserving the simplicity of known weakly nonlinear models, thus providing the theoretical foundation for experimental results so far unexplained.

  3. Linear MHD Wave Propagation in Time-Dependent Flux Tube. II. Finite Plasma Beta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-04-01

    The propagation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves is an area that has been thoroughly studied for idealised static and steady state magnetised plasma systems applied to numerous solar structures. By applying the generalisation of a temporally varying background density to an open magnetic flux tube, mimicking the observed slow evolution of such waveguides in the solar atmosphere, further investigations into the propagation of both fast and slow MHD waves can take place. The assumption of a zero-beta plasma (no gas pressure) was applied in Williamson and Erdélyi ( Solar Phys. 2013, doi:10.1007/s11207-013-0366-9, Paper I) is now relaxed for further analysis here. Firstly, the introduction of a finite thermal pressure to the magnetic flux tube equilibrium modifies the existence of fast MHD waves which are directly comparable to their counterparts found in Paper I. Further, as a direct consequence of the non-zero kinetic plasma pressure, a slow MHD wave now exists, and is investigated. Analysis of the slow wave shows that, similar to the fast MHD wave, wave amplitude amplification takes place in time and height. The evolution of the wave amplitude is determined here analytically. We conclude that for a temporally slowly decreasing background density both propagating magnetosonic wave modes are amplified for over-dense magnetic flux tubes. This information can be very practical and useful for future solar magneto-seismology applications in the study of the amplitude and frequency properties of MHD waveguides, e.g. for diagnostic purposes, present in the solar atmosphere.

  4. Plasma wave signatures in the magnetotail reconnection region - MHD simulation and ray tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, Yoshiharu; Green, James L.

    1993-01-01

    An MHD simulation was performed to obtain a self-consistent model of magnetic field and plasma density near the X point reconnection region. The MHD model was used to perform extensive ray tracing calculations in order to clarify the propagation characteristics of the plasma waves near the X point reconnection region. The dynamic wave spectra possibly observed by the Geotail spacecraft during a typical cross-tail trajectory are reconstructed. By comparing the extensive ray tracing calculations with the plasma wave data from Geotail, it is possible to perform a kind of 'remote sensing' to identify the location and structure of potential X point reconnection regions.

  5. Dissipative MHD solutions for resonant Alfven waves in 1-dimensional magnetic flux tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goossens, Marcel; Ruderman, Michail S.; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1995-01-01

    The present paper extends the analysis by Sakurai, Goossens, and Hollweg (1991) on resonant Alfven waves in nonuniform magnetic flux tubes. It proves that the fundamental conservation law for resonant Alfven waves found in ideal MHD by Sakurai, Goossens, and Hollweg remains valid in dissipative MHD. This guarantees that the jump conditions of Sakurai, Goossens, and Hollweg, that connect the ideal MHD solutions for xi(sub r), and P' across the dissipative layer, are correct. In addition, the present paper replaces the complicated dissipative MHD solutions obtained by Sakurai, Goossens, and Hollweg for xi(sub r), and P' in terms of double integrals of Hankel functions of complex argument of order 1/3 with compact analytical solutions that allow a straight- forward mathematical and physical interpretation. Finally, it presents an analytical dissipative MHD solution for the component of the Lagrangian displacement in the magnetic surfaces perpen- dicular to the magnetic field lines xi(sub perpendicular) which enables us to determine the dominant dynamics of resonant Alfven waves in dissipative MHD.

  6. Wave modulation in a nonlinear dispersive medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.C.; Khadra, L.; Powers, E.J.

    1980-11-01

    A model describing the simultaneous amplitude and phase modulation of a carrier wave propagating in a nonlinear dispersive medium is developed in terms of nonlinear wave-wave interactions between the sidebands and a low frequency wave. It is also shown that the asymmetric distribution of sidebands is determined by the wavenumber dependence of the coupling coefficient. Digital complex demodulation techniques are used to study modulated waves in a weakly ionized plasma and the experimental results support the analytical model.

  7. Alfven Wave Generated Electron Time Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletzing, C. A.; Hu, S.

    2001-01-01

    The results from a model of kinetic Alfven waves which includes varying magnetic field and density show that time-dispersed bursts of auroral electrons can be accelerated by Alfven, wave pulses propagating from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. The modeled electron signatures have similar energy range and temporal structure to those observed on sounding rockets and satellites suggesting that electron time dispersion is generated by Alfven waves.

  8. Alfven Wave Generated Electron Time Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletzing, C. A.; Hu, S.

    2001-01-01

    The results from a model of kinetic Alfven waves which includes varying magnetic field and density show that time-dispersed bursts of auroral electrons can be accelerated by Alfven, wave pulses propagating from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. The modeled electron signatures have similar energy range and temporal structure to those observed on sounding rockets and satellites suggesting that electron time dispersion is generated by Alfven waves.

  9. On The Role of MHD Waves in Heating Localised Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, R.; Nelson, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    Satellite and ground-based observations from e.g. SOHO, TRACE, STEREO, Hinode, SDO and IRIS to DST/ROSA, IBIS, CoMP, STT/CRISP have provided a wealth of evidence of waves and oscillations present in a wide range of spatial scales of the magnetised solar atmosphere. Our understanding about localised solar structures has been considerably changed in light of these high spatial and time resolution observations. However, MHD waves not only enable us to perform sub-resolution magneto-seismology of magnetic waveguides but are also potential candidates to carry and damp the necessary non-thermal energy in these localised waveguides. First, we will briefly outline the basic recent developments in MHD wave theory focussing on linear waves. Next, we discuss the role of the most frequently studied wave classes, including the Alfven, and magneto-acoustic kink and sausage waves. The current theoretical (and often difficult) interpretations of the detected solar atmospheric wave and oscillatory phenomena within the framework of MHD will be shown. Last, the latest reported observational findings of potential MHD wave flux, in terms of localised plasma heating, in the solar atmosphere is discussed, bringing us closer to solve the coronal heating problem.

  10. Advances in Simulation of Wave Interaction with Extended MHD Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, Donald B; Abla, Gheni; D'Azevedo, Ed F; Bateman, Glenn; Bernholdt, David E; Berry, Lee A; Bonoli, P.; Bramley, R; Breslau, Joshua; Chance, M.; Chen, J.; Choi, M.; Elwasif, Wael R; Foley, S.; Fu, GuoYong; Harvey, R. W.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Jardin, S. C.; Jenkins, T; Keyes, David E; Klasky, Scott A; Kruger, Scott; Ku, Long-Poe; Lynch, Vickie E; McCune, Douglas; Ramos, J.; Schissel, D.; Schnack,; Wright, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) provides a framework within which some of the most advanced, massively-parallel fusion modeling codes can be interoperated to provide a detailed picture of the multi-physics processes involved in fusion experiments. The presentation will cover four topics: 1) recent improvements to the IPS, 2) application of the IPS for very high resolution simulations of ITER scenarios, 3) studies of resistive and ideal MHD stability in tokamk discharges using IPS facilities, and 4) the application of RF power in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies to control slowly growing MHD modes in tokamaks and initial evaluations of optimized location for RF power deposition.

  11. Advances in Simulation of Wave Interactions with Extended MHD Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, Donald B; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Bateman, Glenn; Bernholdt, David E; Bonoli, P.; Bramley, Randall B; Breslau, Joshua; Elwasif, Wael R; Foley, S.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Jardin, S. C.; Klasky, Scott A; Kruger, Scott E; Ku, Long-Poe; McCune, Douglas; Ramos, J.; Schissel, David P; Schnack, Dalton D

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) provides a framework within which some of the most advanced, massively-parallel fusion modeling codes can be interoperated to provide a detailed picture of the multi-physics processes involved in fusion experiments. The presentation will cover four topics: (1) recent improvements to the IPS, (2) application of the IPS for very high resolution simulations of ITER scenarios, (3) studies of resistive and ideal MHD stability in tokamak discharges using IPS facilities, and (4) the application of RF power in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies to control slowly growing MHD modes in tokamaks and initial evaluations of optimized location for RF power deposition.

  12. Integrated Physics Advances in Simulation of Wave Interactions with Extended MHD Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, Donald B; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Bateman, Glenn; Bernholdt, David E; Berry, Lee A; Bonoli, P.; Bramley, R; Breslau, J.; Chance, M.; Chen, J.; Choi, M.; Elwasif, Wael R; Fu, GuoYong; Harvey, R. W.; Houlberg, Wayne A; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Jardin, S. C.; Keyes, David E; Klasky, Scott A; Kruger, Scott; Ku, Long-Poe; McCune, Douglas; Schissel, D.; Schnack, D.; Wright, J. C.

    2007-06-01

    The broad scientific objectives of the SWIM (Simulation of Wave Interaction with MHD) project are: (A) To improve our understanding of interactions that both RF wave and particle sources have on extended-MHD phenomena, and to substantially improve our capability for predicting and optimizing the performance of burning plasmas in devices such as ITER: and (B) To develop an integrated computational system for treating multi-physics phenomena with the required flexibility and extensibility to serve as a prototype for the Fusion Simulation Project (FSP).

  13. Shock-associated MHD waves - A model for interstellar density fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility that the density fluctuations responsible for radio scintillations could be due to ion-beam-generated MHD waves near interstellar shock waves is discussed. This suggestion is inspired by spacecraft observations which reveal these phenomena near shocks in the solar system. The model quite naturally accounts for the scale on which these fluctuations occur; it is dictated by the wavelength of the unstable waves.

  14. London Dispersion Forces and "The Wave"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, C. Jayne

    1998-10-01

    An analogy is presented likening London dispersion forces to "The Wave", a popular ritual performed by fans attending sports events in large stadia. Similarities between people in the stands and electrons in atoms are emphasized.

  15. Fundamental Studies On Development Of MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) Generator Implement On Wave Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, M. F. M. A.; Apandi, Muhamad Al-Hakim Md; Sabri, M.; Shahril, K.

    2016-02-01

    As increasing of agricultural and industrial activities each year has led to an increasing in demand for energy. Possibility in the future, the country was not able to offer a lot of energy and power demand. This means that we need to focus on renewable energy to supply the demand for energy. Energy harvesting is among a method that can contribute on the renewable energy. MHD power generator is a new way to harvest the energy especially Ocean wave energy. An experimental investigation was conducted to explore performance of MHD generator. The effect of intensity of NaCl Solution (Sea Water), flow rate of NaCl solution, magnetic strength and magnet position to the current produce was analyzed. The result shows that each factor is give a significant effect to the current produce, because of that each factor need to consider on develop of MHD generator to harvest the wave energy as an alternative way to support the demand for energy.

  16. Development of MHD Wave Diagnostic and Models of Coronal Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Thompson, B. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the generation, propagation, and damping of MHD waves in active regions, with the goal to develop a diagnostic tool of active region structure, dynamics, and stability. We used 3D MHD model to study the generation and the propagation of EIT waves in a simple model of an active regions, and the interaction of EIT waves with the active region magnetic field. We model the oscillation of active region loops numerically using the 3D MHD model active regions. Such oscillations have been recently observed by TRACE. We use photospheric magnetograms as the boundary conditions for the magnetic field model, and construct an initial field using force-free extrapolation. Finite plasma temperature, density, and gravity are included in the model. We construct loop density structures in the model, guided by TRACE and EIT observations in the EUV. We demonstrate that by comparing the results of the MHD models of waves in an active region to observations we will be able to construct a diagnostic tool for the physical properties of the active regions, such as magnetic field and density structure.

  17. Weakly relativistic dispersion of Bernstein waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Weakly relativistic effects on the dispersion of Bernstein waves are investigated for waves propagating nearly perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field in a Maxwellian plasma. Attention is focused on those large-wave-vector branches that are either weakly damped or join continuously onto weakly damped branches since these are the modes of most interest in applications. The transition between dispersion at perpendicular and oblique propagation is examined and major weakly relativistic effects can dominate even in low-temperature plasmas. A number of simple analytic criteria are obtained which delimit the ranges of harmonic number and propagation angle within which various types of weakly damped Bernstein modes can exist.

  18. Weakly relativistic dispersion of Bernstein waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Weakly relativistic effects on the dispersion of Bernstein waves are investigated for waves propagating nearly perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field in a Maxwellian plasma. Attention is focused on those large-wave-vector branches that are either weakly damped or join continuously onto weakly damped branches since these are the modes of most interest in applications. The transition between dispersion at perpendicular and oblique propagation is examined and major weakly relativistic effects can dominate even in low-temperature plasmas. A number of simple analytic criteria are obtained which delimit the ranges of harmonic number and propagation angle within which various types of weakly damped Bernstein modes can exist.

  19. Realistic Modeling of Fast MHD Wave Trains in Coronal Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, Leon; Sun, Xudong

    2017-08-01

    Motivated by recent SDO/AIA observations we have developed realistic modeling of quasi-periodic, fast-mode propagating MHD wave trains (QFPs) using 3D MHD model initiated with potential magnetic field extrapolated from the solar coronal boundary. Localized quasi-periodic pulsations associated with C-class flares that drive the waves (as deduced from observations) are modeled with transverse periodic displacement of magnetic field at the lower coronal boundary. The modeled propagating speed and the form of the wave expansions matches the observed fast MHD waves speed >1000 km/s and topology. We study the parametric dependence of the amplitude, propagation, and damping of the waves for a range of key model parameters, such as the background temperature, density, and the location of the flaring site within the active region. We investigate the interaction of multiple QFP wave trains excited by adjacent flaring sources. We use the model results to synthesize EUV intensities in multiple AIA channels and obtain the model parameters that best reproduce the properties of observed QFPs, such as the recent DEM analysis. We discuss the implications of our modeling results for the seismological application of QFPs for the diagnostic of the active region field, flare pulsations, end estimate the energy flux carried by the waves.

  20. Latitudinal amplitude-phase structure of MHD waves: STARE radar and image magnetometer observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Kozyreva, Olga; Fedorov, Evgeniy; Uspenskiy, Mihail; Kauristi, Kirsti

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a numerical model that yields a steady-state distribution of field components of MHD wave in an inhomogeneous plasma box simulating the realistic magnetosphere. The problem of adequate boundary condition at the ionosphere-magnetosphere interface for coupled MHD mode is considered. To justify the model's assumptions, we have derived the explicit inequality showing when the ionospheric inductive Hall effect can be neglected upon the consideration of Alfven wave reflection from the ionospheric boundaries. The model predicts a feature of the ULF spatial amplitude/phase distribution that has not been noticed by the field line resonance theory: the existence of a region with opposite phase delays on the source side of the resonance. This theoretical prediction is supported by the amplitude-phase latitudinal structures of Pc5 waves observed by STARE radar and IMAGE magnetometers. A gradual decrease in azimuthal wave number m at smaller L-shells was observed at longitudinally separated radar beams.

  1. Generation of Alfvén wave energy during magnetic reconnection in Hall MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lingjie; Ma, Zhiwei; Wang, Licheng

    2017-10-01

    The effect of the reconnection rate on the generation of Alfvén wave energy is systematically investigated using Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). It is well known that a decrease in magnetic energy is proportional to the reconnection rate. It is found that an instantaneous increase in Alfvén wave energy in unit Alfvén time is the square dependence on the reconnection rate. The converted Alfvén wave energy is strongly enhanced due to the large increase in the reconnection rate in Hall MHD. For solar-terrestrial plasmas, the maximum converted Alfvén wave energy in unit Alfvén time with the Hall effect can be over 50 times higher than that without the Hall effect during magnetic reconnection.

  2. Kinetic Aspects of Dispersive Scale Alfvén Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, R.; Watt, C.; Lu, J.; Marchand, R.

    2005-12-01

    Ground-based observations and in-situ satellite measurements have firmly established that dispersive scale shear Alfvén waves (SAWs) are associated with electron acceleration on field lines threading the auroral oval. Electron acceleration is attributed to wave-particle interactions involving parallel electric fields in SAWs. In spite of this basic fact, there remains the significant problem of constructing appropriate theory that would explain how parallel electric fields are formed in SAWs across the full range of observed length and timescales. Two-fluid reduced MHD theory provides a conventional approach that is often used. However, it can be shown that at low wave frequencies, the predicted electric field strengths are insufficient to explain precipitation energies of electrons that vary from 100's of eV to several keV. In this paper, we identify the conditions under which two-fluid theory breaks down, and present results of kinetic wave modeling of standing SAWs and propagating SAW pulses. We quantify the conditions under which kinetic theory must be used, and discuss the essential ingredients which are necessary to explain the observed range of electron precipitation energies. Our results are compared with NASA FAST satellite data and data from the Canadian Space Agency rocket experiment GEODESIC

  3. MODE IDENTIFICATION OF MHD WAVES IN AN ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED WITH HINODE/EIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, N.; Yokoyama, T.; Imada, S.; Hara, H.

    2010-09-20

    In order to better understand the possibility of coronal heating by MHD waves, we analyze Fe XII 195.12A data observed with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode. We performed a Fourier analysis of EUV intensity and Doppler velocity time series data in the active region corona. Notable intensity and Doppler velocity oscillations were found for two moss regions out of the five studied, while only small oscillations were found for five apexes of loops. The amplitudes of the oscillations were 0.4%-5.7% for intensity and 0.2-1.2 km s{sup -1} for Doppler velocity. In addition, oscillations of only the Doppler velocity were seen relatively less often in the data. We compared the amplitudes of intensity and those of Doppler velocity in order to identify MHD wave modes and calculated the phase delays between Fourier components of intensity and those of Doppler velocity. The results are interpreted in terms of MHD waves as follows: (1) few kink modes or torsional Alfven mode waves were seen in both moss regions and the apexes of loops, (2) upwardly propagating and standing slow mode waves were found in moss regions, and (3) consistent with previous studies, estimated values of energy flux of the waves were several orders of magnitude lower than that required for heating active regions.

  4. Eigen-Frequencies of MHD Wave Equations in the Presence of Longitudinal Stratification Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Shahriar; Nasiri, Mojtaba; Dadashi, Neda; Safari, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    Coronal Loops oscillations and MHD waves propagating in solar corona and transition region has been observed by TRACE telescope in 1999. In this Study, the MHD mode oscillations of the coronal plasma are studied. The aim is to identify the effect of structuring such as density on the frequencies of oscillations. We modeled the coronal medium as a zero-plasma with longitudinally density stratification. Magnetic flux tube oscillations are categorized into sausage, kink and torsion modes. The MHD equations are reduced and the governing equation are solved numerically using Finite Element Method. Eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions are extracted. The torsional mode is analyzed. By changing the stratification parameter the antinodes move towards the footpoints and we also concluded that in the thin tube approximation, leakage modes are propagated.

  5. Optical carrier wave shocking: detection and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Kinsler, P; Radnor, S B P; Tyrrell, J C A; New, G H C

    2007-06-01

    Carrier wave shocking is studied using the pseudospectral spatial-domain (PSSD) technique. We describe the shock detection diagnostics necessary for this numerical study and verify them against theoretical shocking predictions for the dispersionless case. These predictions show a carrier envelope phase and pulse bandwidth sensitivity in the single-cycle regime. The flexible dispersion management offered by the PSSD enables us to independently control the linear and nonlinear dispersion. Customized dispersion profiles allow us to analyze the development of both carrier self-steepening and shocks. The results exhibit a marked asymmetry between normal and anomalous dispersion, both in the limits of the shocking regime and in the (near) shocked pulse wave forms. Combining these insights, we offer some suggestions on how carrier shocking (or at least extreme self-steepening) might be realized experimentally.

  6. Guided MHD waves as a coronal diagnostic tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    A description is provided of how fast magnetoacoustic waves are ducted along regions of low Alfven velocity (high density) in the corona, exhibiting a distinctive wave signature which may be used as a diagnostic probe of in situ coronal conditions (magnetic field strength, density inhomogeneity, etc.). Some observational knowledge of the start time of the impulsive wave source, possibly a flare, the start and end times of the generated wave event, and the frequency of the pulsations in that event permits a seismological deduction of the physical properties of the coronal medium in which the wave propagated. With good observations the theory offers a new means of probing the coronal atmosphere.

  7. The generation and damping of propagating MHD kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R. J.; Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R.; Hillier, A. E-mail: g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk

    2014-03-20

    The source of the non-thermal energy required for the heating of the upper solar atmosphere to temperatures in excess of a million degrees and the acceleration of the solar wind to hundreds of kilometers per second is still unclear. One such mechanism for providing the required energy flux is incompressible torsional Alfvén and kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which are magnetically dominated waves supported by the Sun's pervasive and complex magnetic field. In particular, propagating MHD kink waves have recently been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere, but, until now, critical details of the transport of the kink wave energy throughout the Sun's atmosphere were lacking. Here, the ubiquity of the waves is exploited for statistical studies in the highly dynamic solar chromosphere. This large-scale investigation allows for the determination of the chromospheric kink wave velocity power spectra, a missing link necessary for determining the energy transport between the photosphere and corona. Crucially, the power spectra contain evidence for horizontal photospheric motions being an important mechanism for kink wave generation in the quiescent Sun. In addition, a comparison with measured coronal power spectra is provided for the first time, revealing frequency-dependent transmission profiles, suggesting that there is enhanced damping of kink waves in the lower corona.

  8. Dispersive radiation induced by shock waves in passive resonators.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Stefania; Conforti, Matteo; Trillo, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    We show that passive Kerr resonators pumped close to zero dispersion wavelengths on the normal dispersion side can develop the resonant generation of linear waves driven by cavity (mixed dispersive-dissipative) shock waves. The resonance mechanism can be successfully described in the framework of the generalized Lugiato-Lefever equation with higher-order dispersive terms. Substantial differences with radiation from cavity solitons and purely dispersive shock waves dispersion are highlighted.

  9. Determining the Importance of Energy Transfer between Magnetospheric Regions via MHD Waves using Constellations of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    This grant was focused on research in two specific areas: (1) development of new techniques and software for assimilation, analysis and visualization of data from multiple satellites making in-situ measurements; and (2) determination of the role of MHD waves in energy transport during storms and substorms. Results were obtained in both areas and presented at national meetings and in publications. The talks and papers that were supported in part or fully by this grant are listed in this paper.

  10. Numerical modelling of MHD waves in the solar chromosphere.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Mats; Bogdan, Thomas J

    2006-02-15

    Acoustic waves are generated by the convective motions in the solar convection zone. When propagating upwards into the chromosphere they reach the height where the sound speed equals the Alfvén speed and they undergo mode conversion, refraction and reflection. We use numerical simulations to study these processes in realistic configurations where the wavelength of the waves is similar to the length scales of the magnetic field. Even though this regime is outside the validity of previous analytic studies or studies using ray-tracing theory, we show that some of their basic results remain valid: the critical quantity for mode conversion is the angle between the magnetic field and the k-vector: the attack angle. At angles smaller than 30 degrees much of the acoustic, fast mode from the photosphere is transmitted as an acoustic, slow mode propagating along the field lines. At larger angles, most of the energy is refracted/reflected and returns as a fast mode creating an interference pattern between the upward and downward propagating waves. In three-dimensions, this interference between waves at small angles creates patterns with large horizontal phase speeds, especially close to magnetic field concentrations. When damping from shock dissipation and radiation is taken into account, the waves in the low-mid chromosphere have mostly the character of upward propagating acoustic waves and it is only close to the reflecting layer we get similar amplitudes for the upward propagating and refracted/reflected waves. The oscillatory power is suppressed in magnetic field concentrations and enhanced in ring-formed patterns around them. The complex interference patterns caused by mode-conversion, refraction and reflection, even with simple incident waves and in simple magnetic field geometries, make direct inversion of observables exceedingly difficult. In a dynamic chromosphere it is doubtful if the determination of mean quantities is even meaningful.

  11. A new approach to low-frequency ``MHD-like'' waves in magnetospheric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, Omar A.; Pellat, René; Coroniti, Ferdinan V.

    1995-10-01

    This paper explores the consequences of enforcing the quasi-neutrality (QN) condition on a magnetotail and auroral plasma. We show that this condition has never been handled correctly in the literature when the bounce motion of particles is involved, for either adiabatic or stochastic ion motion. Correct treatment yields a global electrostatic potential which is constant along the magnetic field line. We describe how the stability results of Hurricane et al. (1995) are modified. We show that the QN condition modifies the classical MHD analysis of symmetric interchange/ballooning modes with respect to low-frequency MHD waves. An additional consequence of the QN condition on MHD-like waves is a modification of the plasma equation of state. More precisely, we show that the plasma remains isothermal during such wave propagation. For antisymmetric modes there is no associated electrostatic potential, but we give the necessary corrections to the standard analysis upon entering a stochastic ion regime. Last, we show how the electrostatic potential couples to the ionosphere, revealing a new understanding of auroral arcs. .

  12. Flare-induced MHD disturbances in the corona - Moreton waves and type 2 shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uchida, Y.

    1973-01-01

    The propagation in the corona of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) disturbance possibly emitted at the explosive stage in the initial phase of a flare is considered. The behavior of the MHD fast-mode wavefront, whose source is located at the flare, is calculated by using eiconal-characteristic method in the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) realistic models of coronal magnetic field and density for the days of some particular flare events. It is shown as the result that the peculiar behavior of Moreton's surface wave and the peculiar appearance in the shape and position of the type 2 burst sources can be consistently understood by considering the refraction, focussing, and formation of shocks of MHD fast-mode disturbance in the actual distribution of Alfven velocity in the corona. Moreton waves seem to appear only when the flare explosion happens to occur at the edge of an active region and faces a low-Alfven-velocity region lying on the surface. The wave, which is initially emitted isotropically is refracted into a direction in which the condition for down-refraction holds to allow chromospheric reentrance of disturbance.

  13. Global MHD modeling of resonant ULF waves: Simulations with and without a plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Wiltberger, M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the plasmaspheric influence on the resonant mode coupling of magnetospheric ultralow frequency (ULF) waves using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. We present results from two different versions of the model, both driven by the same solar wind conditions: one version that contains a plasmasphere (the LFM coupled to the Rice Convection Model, where the Gallagher plasmasphere model is also included) and another that does not (the stand-alone LFM). We find that the inclusion of a cold, dense plasmasphere has a significant impact on the nature of the simulated ULF waves. For example, the inclusion of a plasmasphere leads to a deeper (more earthward) penetration of the compressional (azimuthal) electric field fluctuations, due to a shift in the location of the wave turning points. Consequently, the locations where the compressional electric field oscillations resonantly couple their energy into local toroidal mode field line resonances also shift earthward. We also find, in both simulations, that higher-frequency compressional (azimuthal) electric field oscillations penetrate deeper than lower frequency oscillations. In addition, the compressional wave mode structure in the simulations is consistent with a radial standing wave oscillation pattern, characteristic of a resonant waveguide. The incorporation of a plasmasphere into the LFM global MHD model represents an advance in the state of the art in regard to ULF wave modeling with such simulations. We offer a brief discussion of the implications for radiation belt modeling techniques that use the electric and magnetic field outputs from global MHD simulations to drive particle dynamics.

  14. Global MHD modeling of resonant ULF waves: Simulations with and without a plasmasphere.

    PubMed

    Claudepierre, S G; Toffoletto, F R; Wiltberger, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the plasmaspheric influence on the resonant mode coupling of magnetospheric ultralow frequency (ULF) waves using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. We present results from two different versions of the model, both driven by the same solar wind conditions: one version that contains a plasmasphere (the LFM coupled to the Rice Convection Model, where the Gallagher plasmasphere model is also included) and another that does not (the stand-alone LFM). We find that the inclusion of a cold, dense plasmasphere has a significant impact on the nature of the simulated ULF waves. For example, the inclusion of a plasmasphere leads to a deeper (more earthward) penetration of the compressional (azimuthal) electric field fluctuations, due to a shift in the location of the wave turning points. Consequently, the locations where the compressional electric field oscillations resonantly couple their energy into local toroidal mode field line resonances also shift earthward. We also find, in both simulations, that higher-frequency compressional (azimuthal) electric field oscillations penetrate deeper than lower frequency oscillations. In addition, the compressional wave mode structure in the simulations is consistent with a radial standing wave oscillation pattern, characteristic of a resonant waveguide. The incorporation of a plasmasphere into the LFM global MHD model represents an advance in the state of the art in regard to ULF wave modeling with such simulations. We offer a brief discussion of the implications for radiation belt modeling techniques that use the electric and magnetic field outputs from global MHD simulations to drive particle dynamics.

  15. MHD waves and oscillations in the solar plasma. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Erdélyi, Robert

    2006-02-15

    The Sun's magnetic field is responsible for many spectacularly dynamic and intricate phenomena, such as the 11 year solar activity cycle, the hot and tenuous outer atmosphere called the solar corona, and the continuously expanding stream of solar particles known as the solar wind.Recently, there has been an enormous increase in our understanding of the role of solar magnetism in producing the observed complex atmosphere of the Sun. One such advance has occurred in the detection, by several different high-resolution space instruments on-board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer satellites, of magnetic waves and oscillations in the solar corona. The new subjects of solar atmospheric and coronal seismology are undergoing rapid development. The aim of this Scientific Discussion Meeting was to address the progress made through observational, theoretical and numerical studies of wave phenomena in the magnetic solar plasma. Major theoretical and observational advances were reported by a wide range of international scientists and pioneers in this field, followed by lively discussions and poster sessions on the many intriguing questions raised by the new results. Theoretical and observational aspects of magnetohydrodynamic waves and oscillations in general, and how these wave phenomena differ in various regions of the Sun, including sunspots, the transient lower atmosphere and the corona (in magnetic loops, plumes and prominences), were addressed through invited review papers and selected poster presentations. The results of these deliberations are collected together in this volume.

  16. Interaction of solitary waves in longitudinal magnetic field in two-fluid MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrikov, M. B.; Savelyev, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of solitary waves in a model of two-fluid MHD is studied analytically and numerically in the most general case of waves in cold plasma in longitudinal magnetic field. The distinctive feature of this work is the use of “exact” equations rather than an approximate approach (a model equation). Numerical analysis of the solutions of this system of eight partial differential equations shows that the the interaction of solitary waves found in this case is the same (with great accuracy) as that of solitons, i.e., solitary waves that are solutions of various model equations. The solitary waves considered here transport plasmoids with velocities of the order of the Alfven velocity. The main finite-difference method used here for solving the said equations is a natural generalization of the classical two-step Lax-Wendorff scheme.

  17. Dispersive shock waves and modulation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El, G. A.; Hoefer, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    There is growing physical and mathematical interest in the hydrodynamics of dissipationless/dispersive media. Since G.B. Whitham's seminal publication fifty years ago that ushered in the mathematical study of dispersive hydrodynamics, there has been a significant body of work in this area. However, there has been no comprehensive survey of the field of dispersive hydrodynamics. Utilizing Whitham's averaging theory as the primary mathematical tool, we review the rich mathematical developments over the past fifty years with an emphasis on physical applications. The fundamental, large scale, coherent excitation in dispersive hydrodynamic systems is an expanding, oscillatory dispersive shock wave or DSW. Both the macroscopic and microscopic properties of DSWs are analyzed in detail within the context of the universal, integrable, and foundational models for uni-directional (Korteweg-de Vries equation) and bi-directional (Nonlinear Schrödinger equation) dispersive hydrodynamics. A DSW fitting procedure that does not rely upon integrable structure yet reveals important macroscopic DSW properties is described. DSW theory is then applied to a number of physical applications: superfluids, nonlinear optics, geophysics, and fluid dynamics. Finally, we survey some of the more recent developments including non-classical DSWs, DSW interactions, DSWs in perturbed and inhomogeneous environments, and two-dimensional, oblique DSWs.

  18. Shear wave speed and dispersion measurements using crawling wave chirps.

    PubMed

    Hah, Zaegyoo; Partin, Alexander; Parker, Kevin J

    2014-10-01

    This article demonstrates the measurement of shear wave speed and shear speed dispersion of biomaterials using a chirp signal that launches waves over a range of frequencies. A biomaterial is vibrated by two vibration sources that generate shear waves inside the medium, which is scanned by an ultrasound imaging system. Doppler processing of the acquired signal produces an image of the square of vibration amplitude that shows repetitive constructive and destructive interference patterns called "crawling waves." With a chirp vibration signal, successive Doppler frames are generated from different source frequencies. Collected frames generate a distinctive pattern which is used to calculate the shear speed and shear speed dispersion. A special reciprocal chirp is designed such that the equi-phase lines of a motion slice image are straight lines. Detailed analysis is provided to generate a closed-form solution for calculating the shear wave speed and the dispersion. Also several phantoms and an ex vivo human liver sample are scanned and the estimation results are presented.

  19. Dispersive wave-breaking in coherently driven passive cavities.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Stefania; Bellanca, Gaetano; Trillo, Stefano

    2014-04-15

    We show that the intracavity field evolving in an externally driven passive Kerr resonator subject to weak normal dispersion undergoes wave-breaking, thus forming dispersive shock waves. At variance with the cavity-less propagation, such dispersive wave-breaking turns out to be strongly favored by cavity bistability and coexisting modulational instability.

  20. Dispersive shock wave interactions and asymptotics.

    PubMed

    Ablowitz, Mark J; Baldwin, Douglas E

    2013-02-01

    Dispersive shock waves (DSWs) are physically important phenomena that occur in systems dominated by weak dispersion and weak nonlinearity. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is the universal model for systems with weak dispersion and weak, quadratic nonlinearity. Here we show that the long-time-asymptotic solution of the KdV equation for general, steplike data is a single-phase DSW; this DSW is the "largest" possible DSW based on the boundary data. We find this asymptotic solution using the inverse scattering transform and matched-asymptotic expansions. So while multistep data evolve to have multiphase dynamics at intermediate times, these interacting DSWs eventually merge to form a single-phase DSW at large time.

  1. Wideband dispersion reversal of lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kailiang; Ta, Dean; Hu, Bo; Laugier, Pascal; Wang, Weiqi

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been widely acknowledged as the most promising tools for nondestructive evaluation (NDE). However, because of the multimodal dispersion, the received guided modes usually overlap in both time and frequency, which highly complicates the mode separation and signal interpretation. The time-reversal technique can be used to realize the time recompression of the Lamb waves, but because of the multimode excitation and reception, it still may not be able to remove the mode ambiguity and achieve the pure pulse compression. With the goal of overcoming this limitation, a wideband dispersion reversal (WDR) technique is proposed. The technique makes use of a priori knowledge of the guided dispersion characteristics to synthesize the corresponding dispersion reversal excitations, which are able to selectively excite the self-compensation pure mode pulse. The theoretical basis of the technique is thoroughly described. A two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (2D-FDTD) method is employed to simulate the propagation of two fundamental Lamb modes, the symmetrical S0 and antisymmetrical A0 modes in a steel plate. The proposed method was verified through experimental investigation. Finally, the advantages and potential applications of the method are briefly discussed.

  2. MHD waves on solar magnetic flux tubes - Tutorial review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the highly simplified models that have been developed for solar magnetic flux tubes, which are intense photospheric-level fields confined by external gas pressure but able to vary rapidly with height, are presently discussed with emphasis on the torsional Alfven mode's propagation, reflection, and non-WKB properties. The 'sausage' and 'kink' modes described by the thin flux-tube approximation are noted. Attention is also given to the surface waves and resonance absorption of X-ray-emitting loops, as well as to the results of recent work on the resonant instabilities that occur in the presence of bulk flows.

  3. Ultralow frequency MHD waves in Jupiter's middle magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, Krishan K.; Kivelson, Margaret G.

    1989-01-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) magnetohydrodynamic pulsations (periods between 10 and 20 min) were observed on July 8-11, 1979 as Voyager 2 traveled through the middle magnetosphere of Jupiter between radial distances of 10 R(J) and 35 R(J). The particle and magnetic pressure perturbations associated with the waves were anticorrelated. The electron and ion perturbations on the dayside were in phase. The pressure perturbations occurred both within and outside of the plasma sheet. Perturbations in the transverse components of the magnetic field were associated with the compressional perturbations but the transverse power peaked within the plasma sheet of Jupiter and diminished rapidly outside of it.

  4. MHD waves on solar magnetic flux tubes - Tutorial review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    Some of the highly simplified models that have been developed for solar magnetic flux tubes, which are intense photospheric-level fields confined by external gas pressure but able to vary rapidly with height, are presently discussed with emphasis on the torsional Alfven mode's propagation, reflection, and non-WKB properties. The 'sausage' and 'kink' modes described by the thin flux-tube approximation are noted. Attention is also given to the surface waves and resonance absorption of X-ray-emitting loops, as well as to the results of recent work on the resonant instabilities that occur in the presence of bulk flows.

  5. Adaptive dispersion compensation for guided wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, James S.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2012-05-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves offer the promise of fast and reliable methods for interrogating large, plate-like structures. Distributed arrays of permanently attached, inexpensive piezoelectric transducers have thus been proposed as a cost-effective means to excite and measure ultrasonic guided waves for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Guided wave data recorded from a distributed array of transducers are often analyzed and interpreted through the use of guided wave imaging algorithms, such as conventional delay-and-sum imaging or the more recently applied minimum variance imaging. Both imaging algorithms perform reasonably well using signal envelopes, but can exhibit significant performance improvements when phase information is used. However, the use of phase information inherently requires knowledge of the dispersion relations, which are often not known to a sufficient degree of accuracy for high quality imaging since they are very sensitive to environmental conditions such as temperature, pressure, and loading. This work seeks to perform improved imaging with phase information by leveraging adaptive dispersion estimates obtained from in situ measurements. Experimentally obtained data from a distributed array is used to validate the proposed approach.

  6. Wave dispersion properties of compound finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, Thomas; Thuburn, John

    2017-06-01

    Mixed finite elements use different approximation spaces for different dependent variables. Certain classes of mixed finite elements, called compatible finite elements, have been shown to exhibit a number of desirable properties for a numerical weather prediction model. In two-dimensions the lowest order element of the Raviart-Thomas based mixed element is the finite element equivalent of the widely used C-grid staggering, which is known to possess good wave dispersion properties, at least for quadrilateral grids. It has recently been proposed that building compound elements from a number of triangular Raviart-Thomas sub-elements, such that both the primal and (implied) dual grid are constructed from the same sub-elements, would allow greater flexibility in the use of different advection schemes along with the ability to build arbitrary polygonal elements. Although the wave dispersion properties of the triangular sub-elements are well understood, those of the compound elements are unknown. It would be useful to know how they compare with the non-compound elements and what properties of the triangular sub-grid elements are inherited? Here a numerical dispersion analysis is presented for the linear shallow water equations in two dimensions discretised using the lowest order compound Raviart-Thomas finite elements on regular quadrilateral and hexagonal grids. It is found that, in comparison with the well known C-grid scheme, the compound elements exhibit a more isotropic dispersion relation, with a small over estimation of the frequency for short waves compared with the relatively large underestimation for the C-grid. On a quadrilateral grid the compound elements are found to differ from the non-compound Raviart-Thomas quadrilateral elements even for uniform elements, exhibiting the influence of the underlying sub-elements. This is shown to lead to small improvements in the accuracy of the dispersion relation: the compound quadrilateral element is slightly better for

  7. Numerical simulation of MHD shock waves in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Dryer, M.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of the interplanetary magnetic field on the propagation speed of shock waves through an ambient solar wind are examined by numerical solutions of the time-dependent nonlinear equations of motion. The magnetic field always increases the velocity of strong shocks. Although the field may temporarily slow down weak shocks inside 1 AU, it eventually also causes weak shocks to travel faster than they would without the magnetic field at larger distances. Consistent with the increase in the shock velocity, the gas pressure ratio across a shock is reduced considerably in the presence of the magnetic field. The numerical method is used to simulate (starting at 0.3 AU) the large deceleration of a shock observed in the lower corona by ground-based radio instrumentation and the more gradual deceleration of the shock in the solar wind observed by the Pioneer 9 and Pioneer 10 spacecraft.

  8. Experimental, Numerical and Analytical Studies of the MHD-driven plasma jet, instabilities and waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiang

    This thesis describes a series of experimental, numerical, and analytical studies involving the Caltech magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven plasma jet experiment. The plasma jet is created via a capacitor discharge that powers a magnetized coaxial planar electrodes system. The jet is collimated and accelerated by the MHD forces. We present three-dimensional ideal MHD finite-volume simulations of the plasma jet experiment using an astrophysical magnetic tower as the baseline model. A compact magnetic energy/helicity injection is exploited in the simulation analogous to both the experiment and to astrophysical situations. Detailed analysis provides a comprehensive description of the interplay of magnetic force, pressure, and flow effects. We delineate both the jet structure and the transition process that converts the injected magnetic energy to other forms. When the experimental jet is sufficiently long, it undergoes a global kink instability and then a secondary local Rayleigh-Taylor instability caused by lateral acceleration of the kink instability. We present an MHD theory of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability on the cylindrical surface of a plasma flux rope in the presence of a lateral external gravity. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is found to couple to the classic current-driven instability, resulting in a new type of hybrid instability. The coupled instability, produced by combination of helical magnetic field, curvature of the cylindrical geometry, and lateral gravity, is fundamentally different from the classic magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring at a two-dimensional planar interface. In the experiment, this instability cascade from macro-scale to micro-scale eventually leads to the failure of MHD. When the Rayleigh-Taylor instability becomes nonlinear, it compresses and pinches the plasma jet to a scale smaller than the ion skin depth and triggers a fast magnetic reconnection. We built a specially designed high-speed 3D magnetic probe and

  9. Nonlinear resonant absorption of fast magnetoacoustic waves in strongly anisotropic and dispersive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Clack, Christopher T. M.; Ballai, Istvan

    2009-04-15

    The nonlinear theory of driven magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves in strongly anisotropic and dispersive plasmas, developed for slow resonance by Clack and Ballai [Phys. Plasmas 15, 2310 (2008)] and Alfven resonance by Clack et al. [Astron. Astrophys. 494, 317 (2009)], is used to study the weakly nonlinear interaction of fast magnetoacoustic (FMA) waves in a one-dimensional planar plasma. The magnetic configuration consists of an inhomogeneous magnetic slab sandwiched between two regions of semi-infinite homogeneous magnetic plasmas. Laterally driven FMA waves penetrate the inhomogeneous slab interacting with the localized slow or Alfven dissipative layer and are partly reflected, dissipated, and transmitted by this region. The nonlinearity parameter defined by Clack and Ballai (2008) is assumed to be small and a regular perturbation method is used to obtain analytical solutions in the slow dissipative layer. The effect of dispersion in the slow dissipative layer is to further decrease the coefficient of energy absorption, compared to its standard weakly nonlinear counterpart, and the generation of higher harmonics in the outgoing wave in addition to the fundamental one. The absorption of external drivers at the Alfven resonance is described within the linear MHD with great accuracy.

  10. Generalized dispersive wave emission in nonlinear fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Webb, K E; Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We show that the emission of dispersive waves in nonlinear fiber optics is not limited to soliton-like pulses propagating in the anomalous dispersion regime. We demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, that pulses propagating in the normal dispersion regime can excite resonant dispersive radiation across the zero-dispersion wavelength into the anomalous regime.

  11. Generation of dispersion in nondispersive nonlinear waves in thermal equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonjung; Kovačič, Gregor; Cai, David

    2013-02-26

    In this work, we examine the important theoretical question of whether dispersion relations can arise from purely nonlinear interactions among waves that possess no linear dispersive characteristics. Using two prototypical examples of nondispersive waves, we demonstrate how nonlinear interactions can indeed give rise to effective dispersive-wave-like characteristics in thermal equilibrium. Physically, these example systems correspond to the strong nonlinear coupling limit in the theory of wave turbulence. We derive the form of the corresponding dispersion relation, which describes the effective dispersive structures, using the generalized Langevin equations obtained in the Zwanzig-Mori projection framework. We confirm the validity of this effective dispersion relation in our numerical study using the wavenumber-frequency spectral analysis. Our work may provide insight into an important connection between highly nonlinear turbulent wave systems, possibly with no discernible dispersive properties, and the dispersive nature of the corresponding renormalized waves.

  12. Soliton trapping of dispersive waves in photonic crystal fiber with two zero dispersive wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weibin; Yang, Hua; Tang, Pinghua; Zhao, Chujun; Gao, Jing

    2013-05-06

    Based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we present a numerical study of trapping of dispersive waves by solitons during supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibers pumped with femtosecond pulses in the anomalous dispersion region. Numerical simulation results show that the generated supercontinuum is bounded by two branches of dispersive waves, namely blue-shifted dispersive waves (B-DWs) and red-shifted dispersive waves (R-DWs). We find a novel phenomenon that not only B-DWs but also R-DWs can be trapped by solitons across the zero-dispersion wavelength when the group-velocity matching between the soliton and the dispersive wave is satisfied, which may led to the generation of new spectral components via mixing of solitons and dispersive waves. Mixing of solitons with dispersive waves has been shown to play an important role in shaping not only the edge of the supercontinuum, but also its central part around the higher zero-dispersion wavelength. Further, we show that the phenomenon of soliton trapping of dispersive waves in photonic crystal fibers with two zero-dispersion wavelengths has a very close relationship with pumping power and the interval between two zero-dispersion wavelengths. In order to clearly display the evolution of soliton trapping of dispersive waves, the spectrogram of output pulses is observed using cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating technique (XFROG).

  13. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF PROPAGATION AND SCATTERING OF THE MHD WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parchevsky, K.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Khomenko, E.; Collados, M.

    2009-12-01

    We present comparison of numerical simulation results of MHD wave propagation in two different magnitostatic models of sunspots refferred to as "deep" and "shallow" models. The "deep" model has convex shape of magnetic field lines near the photosphere and non-zero horizorntal perturbations of the sound speed up to the bottom of the model (7.5 Mm). The "shallow" model has concave shape of the magnetic field lines near the photosphere and horizontally uniform sound speed below 2 Mm. Common feature of MHD waves behaviour in these two models is that for weak magnetic field (less than 1kG at the photosphere) waves reduce their amplitude when they reach the center of the sunspot and restore the amplitude when pass the center. For the "deep" model this effect is bigger than for the "shallow" model. The wave amplitude inside sunspots depends on the strength of the magnetic field. For the "shallow" model with photospheric magnetic field of 2.2 kG the wave amplitude inside the sunspot becomes bigger than outside (opposite to the weak magnetic field). The wave amplitude depends on the distance of the source from the sunspot center. For the "shallow" model and source distance of 9 Mm from the sunspot center the wave amplitude at some moment (when the wavefront passes the sunspot center) becomes bigger inside the sunspot than outside. For the source distance of 12 Mm the wave amplitude remains smaller inside the sunspot than outside for all moments of time. Using filtering technique we separated magnetoacoustic and magnetogravity waves. Simulations show that the sunspot changes the shape of the wave front and amplitude of the f-modes significantly stronger than the p-modes. It is shown, that inside the sunspot magnetoacoustic and magnetogravity waves are not spatially separated unlike the case of the horizontally uniform background model. Strong Alfven wave is generated at the wave source location in the "deep" model. This wave exists in the "shallow" model as well, but with

  14. ON THE PROPERTIES OF SLOW MHD SAUSAGE WAVES WITHIN SMALL-SCALE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Freij, N.; Ruderman, M. S.; Erdélyi, R.; Dorotovič, I.; Morton, R. J.; Karlovský, V. E-mail: ivan.dorotovic@suh.sk E-mail: m.s.ruderman@sheffield.ac.uk E-mail: robertus@sheffield.ac.uk

    2016-01-20

    The presence of magnetoacoustic waves in magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere is well-documented. Applying the technique of solar magneto-seismology (SMS) allows us to infer the background properties of these structures. Here, we aim to identify properties of the observed magnetoacoustic waves and study the background properties of magnetic structures within the lower solar atmosphere. Using the Dutch Open Telescope and Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instruments, we captured two series of high-resolution intensity images with short cadences of two isolated magnetic pores. Combining wavelet analysis and empirical mode decomposition (EMD), we determined characteristic periods within the cross-sectional (i.e., area) and intensity time series. Then, by applying the theory of linear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), we identified the mode of these oscillations within the MHD framework. Several oscillations have been detected within these two magnetic pores. Their periods range from 3 to 20 minutes. Combining wavelet analysis and EMD enables us to confidently find the phase difference between the area and intensity oscillations. From these observed features, we concluded that the detected oscillations can be classified as slow sausage MHD waves. Furthermore, we determined several key properties of these oscillations such as the radial velocity perturbation, the magnetic field perturbation, and the vertical wavenumber using SMS. The estimated range of the related wavenumbers reveals that these oscillations are trapped within these magnetic structures. Our results suggest that the detected oscillations are standing harmonics, and this allows us to estimate the expansion factor of the waveguides by employing SMS. The calculated expansion factor ranges from 4 to 12.

  15. On the Properties of Slow MHD Sausage Waves within Small-scale Photospheric Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freij, N.; Dorotovič, I.; Morton, R. J.; Ruderman, M. S.; Karlovský, V.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of magnetoacoustic waves in magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere is well-documented. Applying the technique of solar magneto-seismology (SMS) allows us to infer the background properties of these structures. Here, we aim to identify properties of the observed magnetoacoustic waves and study the background properties of magnetic structures within the lower solar atmosphere. Using the Dutch Open Telescope and Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instruments, we captured two series of high-resolution intensity images with short cadences of two isolated magnetic pores. Combining wavelet analysis and empirical mode decomposition (EMD), we determined characteristic periods within the cross-sectional (i.e., area) and intensity time series. Then, by applying the theory of linear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), we identified the mode of these oscillations within the MHD framework. Several oscillations have been detected within these two magnetic pores. Their periods range from 3 to 20 minutes. Combining wavelet analysis and EMD enables us to confidently find the phase difference between the area and intensity oscillations. From these observed features, we concluded that the detected oscillations can be classified as slow sausage MHD waves. Furthermore, we determined several key properties of these oscillations such as the radial velocity perturbation, the magnetic field perturbation, and the vertical wavenumber using SMS. The estimated range of the related wavenumbers reveals that these oscillations are trapped within these magnetic structures. Our results suggest that the detected oscillations are standing harmonics, and this allows us to estimate the expansion factor of the waveguides by employing SMS. The calculated expansion factor ranges from 4 to 12.

  16. Nonlinear Alfvén wave propagating in ideal MHD plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jugao; Chen, Yinhua; Yu, Mingyang

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of nonlinear Alfvén waves propagating in ideal MHD plasmas is investigated numerically. It is found that in a one-dimensional weakly nonlinear system an Alfvén wave train can excite two longitudinal disturbances, namely an acoustic wave and a ponderomotively driven disturbance, which behave differently for β \\gt 1 and β \\lt 1, where β is the ratio of plasma-to-magnetic pressures. In a strongly nonlinear system, the Alfvén wave train is modulated and can steepen to form shocks, leading to significant dissipation due to appearance of current sheets at magnetic-pressure minima. For periodic boundary condition, we find that the Alfvén wave transfers its energy to the plasma and heats it during the shock formation. In two-dimensional systems, fast magneto-acoustic wave generation due to Alfvén wave phase mixing is considered. It is found that the process depends on the amplitude and frequency of the Alfvén waves, as well as their speed gradients and the pressure of the background plasma.

  17. A global 3-D MHD model of the solar wind with Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usmanov, A. V.

    1995-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional solar wind model that incorporates momentum and heat addition from Alfven waves is developed. The proposed model upgrades the previous one by considering self-consistently the total system consisting of Alfven waves propagating outward from the Sun and the mean polytropic solar wind flow. The simulation region extends from the coronal base (1 R(sub s) out to beyond 1 AU. The fully 3-D MHD equations written in spherical coordinates are solved in the frame of reference corotating with the Sun. At the inner boundary, the photospheric magnetic field observations are taken as boundary condition and wave energy influx is prescribed to be proportional to the magnetic field strength. The results of the model application for several time intervals are presented.

  18. Ultra-High-Resolution Observations of MHD Waves in Photospheric Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, D. B.; Verth, G.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter reviews the recent observations of waves and oscillations manifesting in fine-scale magnetic structures in the solar photosphere, which are often interpreted as the "building blocks' of the magnetic Sun. The authors found, through phase relationships between the various waveforms, that small-scale magnetic bright points (MBPs) in the photosphere demonstrated signatures of specific magnetoacoustic waves, in particular the sausage and kink modes. Modern magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the lower solar atmosphere clearly show how torsional motions can easily be induced in magnetic elements in the photosphere through the processes of vortical motions and/or buffeting by neighboring granules. The authors detected significant power associated with high-frequency horizontal motions, and suggested that these cases may be especially important in the creation of a turbulent environment that efficiently promotes Alfvén wave dissipation.

  19. Stirring Coronal Spaghetti: Exploring Multiple Interactions Between MHD Waves and Density Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2016-05-01

    The solar corona has been revealed in the past few decades to be a highly dynamic nonequilibrium plasma environment. Both the loop-filled coronal base and the extended acceleration region of the solar wind appear to be strongly turbulent, and models that invoke the dissipation of incompressible Alfvenic fluctuations have had some success in explaining the heating. However, many of these models neglect the mounting evidence that density and pressure variations may play an important role in the mass and energy balance of this system. In this presentation I will briefly review observations of both compressible and incompressible MHD fluctuations in the corona and solar wind, and discuss future prospects with DKIST. I will also attempt to outline the many ways that these different fluctuation modes have been proposed to interact with one another -- usually with an eye on finding ways to enhance their dissipation and heating. One under-appreciated type of interaction is the fact that Alfven waves will undergo multiple reflections and refractions in a "background plasma" filled with localized density fluctuations. It is becoming increasingly clear that models must not only include the effects of longitudinal variability (e.g., magnetoacoustic waves and pulse-like jets) but also transverse "striations" that appear naturally in a structured magnetic field with small-scale footpoint variability. Future off-limb observations, such as those with DKIST's Cryo-NIRSP instrument, will be crucial for providing us with a detailed census of MHD waves and their mutual interactions in the corona.

  20. Axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modulated MHD waves in magnetic flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chargeishvili, B. B.; Japaridze, D. R.

    2016-02-01

    Nonlinear modulated both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric MHD wave propagation in magnetic flux tubes is studied. In the cylindrical coordinates, ordinary differential equation with cubic nonlinearity is derived. In both cases of symmetry, the equation has solitary solutions. Modulation stability of the solutions is studied. The results of the study show that the propagation of axisymmetric soliton causes rising of plasma temperature in peripheral regions of a magnetic flux tube. In the non-axisymmetric case, it gives also temperature rising effect. Results of theoretical study are examined on idealized model of chromospheric spicule.

  1. Resonant behaviour of MHD waves on magnetic flux tubes. III - Effect of equilibrium flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goossens, Marcel; Hollweg, Joseph V.; Sakurai, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    The Hollweg et al. (1990) analysis of MHD surface waves in a stationary equilibrium is extended. The conservation laws and jump conditions at Alfven and slow resonance points obtained by Sakurai et al. (1990) are generalized to include an equilibrium flow, and the assumption that the Eulerian perturbation of total pressure is constant is recovered as the special case of the conservation law for an equilibrium with straight magnetic field lines and flow along the magnetic field lines. It is shown that the conclusions formulated by Hollweg et al. are still valid for the straight cylindrical case. The effect of curvature is examined.

  2. Possible signatures of nonlinear MHD waves in the solar wind: UVCS observations and models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Romoli, M.; Davila, J. M.; Poletto, G.; Kohl, J.; Noci, G.

    1997-01-01

    Recent ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer (UVCS) white light channel observations are discussed. These data indicated quasi-periodic variations in the polarized brightness in the polar coronal holes. The Fourier power spectrum analysis showed significant peaks at about six minutes and possible fluctuations on longer time scales. The observations are consistent with the predictions of the nonlinear solitary-like wave model. The purpose of a planned study on plume and inter-plume regions of coronal holes, motivated by the result of a 2.5 magnetohydrodynamic model (MHD), is explained.

  3. Study on evaluation methods for Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shi, L.; Tao, X.; Kayen, R.; Shi, H.; Yan, S.

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic is the key step for detecting S-wave velocity structure. By comparing the dispersion curves directly with the spectra analysis of surface waves (SASW) method, rather than comparing the S-wave velocity structure, the validity and precision of microtremor-array method (MAM) can be evaluated more objectively. The results from the China - US joint surface wave investigation in 26 sites in Tangshan, China, show that the MAM has the same precision with SASW method in 83% of the 26 sites. The MAM is valid for Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic testing and has great application potentiality for site S-wave velocity structure detection.

  4. Increased p wave dispersion in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Puerta, Raimundo Carmona; Aliz, Ebrey Leon; Lopez-Calleja, Magda A Rabassa; Ramirez, Ramiro Ramos; Pena, Gustavo Padron

    2011-05-01

    Few studies have been performed on P wave indices in athletes. The aim of this study was to determine the behaviour of maximum P wave duration (Pmax), minimum P wave duration (Pmin) and P wave dispersion (PWD) in young high performance athletes, as well as the relationship of PWD with training history, heart rate (HR) and echocardiographic parameters. We performed a cross-sectional observational study in 38 athletes of high performance in sports: water polo, distance running and weight lifting compared with 34 sedentary controls. The average age in both groups was 20.6 years. Note that PWD was increased in athletes (57 ± 14 ms vs. 40 ± 12 ms, p <0.001) while Pmin was significantly lower (57 ± 13 ms vs. 72 ± 13 ms, p <0.001), and there was no difference when comparing Pmax (114 ± 9 ms vs. 117 ± 14 ms, p> 0.05). The correlation between the duration of training (r = 0.511) and resting HR (r = 0.461) with PWD was significant (p <0.01). PWD is increased in young athletes of high performance and was positively correlated with duration of training and baseline HR. The increase in PWD was secondary to a significant decrease in Pmin.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Propagation and Transformation of the MHD Waves in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parchevsky, Konstantin; Zhao, J.; Kosovichev, A.

    2010-05-01

    Direct numerical simulation of propagation of MHD waves in stratified medium in regions with non-uniform magnetic field is very important for understanding of scattering and transformation of waves by sunspots. We present numerical simulations of wave propagation through the sunspot in 3D. We compare results propagation in two different magnitostatic models of sunspots refferred to as "deep" and "shallow" models. The "deep" model has convex shape of magnetic field lines near the photosphere and non-zero horizorntal perturbations of the sound speed up to the bottom of the model. The "shallow" model has concave shape of the magnetic field lines near the photosphere and horizontally uniform sound speed below 2 Mm. Waves reduce their amplitude when they reach the center of the sunspot and estore the amplitude when pass the center. For the "deep" model this effect is bigger than for the "shallow" model. The wave amplitude depends on the distance of the source from the sunspot center. For the "shallow" model and source distance of 9 Mm from the sunspot center the wave amplitude at some moment (when the wavefront passes the sunspot center) becomes bigger inside the sunspot than outside. For the source distance of 12 Mm the wave amplitude remains smaller inside the sunspot than outside for all moments of time. Using filtering technique we separated magnetoacoustic and magnetogravity waves. Simulations show that the sunspot changes the shape of the wave front and amplitude of the f-modes significantly stronger than the p-modes. It is shown, that inside the sunspot magnetoacoustic and magnetogravity waves are not spatially separated unlike the case of the horizontally uniform background model. We compared simulation results with the wave signals (Green's functions) extracted from the SOHO/MDI data for AR9787.

  6. Three-Dimensional MHD Models of Waves and Flows in Coronal Active Region Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T.; Davila, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Recent observations show that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region loops, and are often associated with subsonic up-flows of coronal material. In order to study the relation between up-flows and waves we develop a 3D MHD model of an idealized bi-polar active region with flows in coronal loops. The model is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified isothermal atmosphere. To model the effects of flares, coronal material is injected in small-scale regions at the base of the model active region. The up-flows have sub-sonic speeds of ˜100 km/s and are steady or periodic, producing higher density loops by filling magnetic flux-tubes with injected material. We find that the up-flows produce fast and slow magnetosonic waves that propagate in the coronal loops. We perform a parametric study of up-flow magnitude and periodicity, and the relation with the resulting waves. As expected, we find that the up-flow speed decreases with loop height due to the diverge of the flux tubes, while the slow magnetosonic speed is independent of height. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased above the sound speed, we find that slow shocks are produced in the loops. Using the results of the 3D MHD model we show that observed slow magnetosonic waves in active region loops can be driven by impulsive flare-produced up-flows at the transition region/corona interface of active regions.

  7. Density Wave Dispersion Behavior in Saturn's A Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L. J.

    1999-09-01

    Wave dispersion profiles were generated for approximately 30 spiral density waves observed in the Voyager photopolarimeter stellar occultation data of Saturn's A ring. The majority of these density waves disperse linearly over the bulk of the wave. Some of the strongest density waves, however, do not begin to disperse linearly until well past the resonance location. An algorithm based on an autoregressive power spectral technique, Burg 2, generated the dispersion profiles. The dispersion behavior was then used to calculate local surface mass densities in the vicinity of each wave. Surface mass densities for the strongest density waves, when calculated using the region where the waves begin to disperse linearly, are in good agreement with surface mass densities calculated for nearby, weaker density waves. Some of the Prometheus density waves external to the Encke gap exhibit unusual spectral structure in the first part of the wave as the frequency increases by 60-70 radial interval. The nearby, related second-order resonances may produce density waves that distort the beginning of the first-order density waves. The separation distance between these first- and second-order resonances is only 0.4 to 1.5 km in this region of the rings. When the early part of each wave is systematically omitted in the surface mass density estimates, lower surface mass densities result for all of these density waves. This work was done at JPL/Caltech under contract with NASA.

  8. Overview of the Simulation of Wave Interactions with MHD Project (SWIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Donald

    2010-11-01

    The SWIM center has the scientific objectives of: improving our understanding of interactions that both RF wave and particle sources have on extended-MHD phenomena, improving our capability for predicting and optimizing the performance of burning plasmas, developing an integrated computational system for treating multi-physics phenomena with the required flexibility and extensibility to serve as a prototype for the Fusion Simulation Project, addressing mathematics issues related to the multi-scale, coupled physics of RF waves and extended MHD, and optimizing the integrated system on high performance computers. Our Center has now built an end-to-end computational system that allows existing physics codes to be able to function together in a parallel environment and connects them to utility software components and data management systems. We have used this framework to couple together state-of-the-art fusion energy codes to produce a unique and world-class simulation capability. A physicist's overview of the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) will be given and applications described. For example the IPS is being employed to support ITER with operational scenario studies.

  9. Solitary-wave interaction. [model equation solutions for long waves in dispersive media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bona, J. L.; Pritchard, W. G.; Scott, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction of solitary-wave solutions of a model equation for long waves in dispersive media is examined numerically. It is found that the waves do not emerge from the interaction unscathed. Instead, two new solitary waves, having slightly different amplitudes from the original waves, together with a small dispersive tail are generated as a result of the interaction.

  10. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES AND CORONAL HEATING: UNIFYING EMPIRICAL AND MHD TURBULENCE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Van der Holst, Bart; Oran, Rona; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B. IV; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Downs, Cooper; Roussev, Ilia I.; Evans, Rebekah M.

    2013-02-10

    We present a new global model of the solar corona, including the low corona, the transition region, and the top of the chromosphere. The realistic three-dimensional magnetic field is simulated using the data from the photospheric magnetic field measurements. The distinctive feature of the new model is incorporating MHD Alfven wave turbulence. We assume this turbulence and its nonlinear dissipation to be the only momentum and energy source for heating the coronal plasma and driving the solar wind. The difference between the turbulence dissipation efficiency in coronal holes and that in closed field regions is because the nonlinear cascade rate degrades in strongly anisotropic (imbalanced) turbulence in coronal holes (no inward propagating wave), thus resulting in colder coronal holes, from which the fast solar wind originates. The detailed presentation of the theoretical model is illustrated with the synthetic images for multi-wavelength EUV emission compared with the observations from SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI instruments for the Carrington rotation 2107.

  11. Dispersive Wave Analysis Using the Chirplet Transform

    SciTech Connect

    Kerber, Florian; Luangvilai, Kritsakorn; Kuttig, Helge; Niethammer, Marc; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2007-03-21

    Time-frequency representations (TFR) are a widely used tool to analyze signals of guided waves such as Lamb waves. As a consequence of the uncertainty principle, however, the resolution in time and frequency is limited for all existing TFR methods. Due to the multi-modal and dispersive character of Lamb waves, displacement or energy related quantities can only be allocated to individual modes when they are well-separated in the time-frequency plane.The chirplet transform (CT) has been introduced as a generalization of both the wavelet and Short-time Fourier transform (STFT). It offers additional degrees of freedom to adjust time-frequency atoms which can be exploited in a model-based approach to match the group delay of individual modes. Thus, more exact allocation of quantities of interest is possible.The objective of this research is to use a previously developed adaptive algorithm based on the CT for nondestructive evaluation. Both numerically and experimentally generated data for a single aluminum plate is analyzed to determine the accuracy and robustness of the new method in comparison the classical STFT.

  12. Dispersive shock waves in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Noel F.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation of coherent light with an initial step intensity profile in a nematic liquid crystal is studied using modulation theory. The propagation of light in a nematic liquid crystal is governed by a coupled system consisting of a nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the light beam and an elliptic equation for the medium response. In general, the intensity step breaks up into a dispersive shock wave, or undular bore, and an expansion fan. In the experimental parameter regime for which the nematic response is highly nonlocal, this nematic bore is found to differ substantially from the standard defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation structure due to the effect of the nonlocality of the nematic medium. It is found that the undular bore is of Korteweg-de Vries equation-type, consisting of bright waves, rather than of nonlinear Schrödinger equation-type, consisting of dark waves. In addition, ahead of this Korteweg-de Vries bore there can be a uniform wavetrain with a short front which brings the solution down to the initial level ahead. It is found that this uniform wavetrain does not exist if the initial jump is below a critical value. Analytical solutions for the various parts of the nematic bore are found, with emphasis on the role of the nonlocality of the nematic medium in shaping this structure. Excellent agreement between full numerical solutions of the governing nematicon equations and these analytical solutions is found.

  13. A Finite Difference-Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-21

    ARL-RP-0531 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory A Finite Difference- Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion by...AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory A Finite Difference- Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion by Raymond A Wildman and George...Difference- Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  14. Localization of Dispersive Alfvén Wave in Solar wind plasmas and Turbulent Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Swati; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    Solar wind turbulence at large inertial scales is well known for decades and believed to consist of Alfvén cascade. The inertial range of Solar wind turbulence can be described by a magnetohydrodynamic model. But at small scales the MHD description is not valid. At scales of the order of proton inertial length, Alfvén cascade excites kinetic Alfvén wave or fast wave or whistler wave that carries wave energy to smaller scales. On the other hand, parallel propagating right(R) and left(L) circularly polarized Alfvén/ ion cyclotron wave in the framework of Hall MHD are also thought to be essential ingredients of the solar wind turbulence. Recently, He et.al[1] have used the magnetic field data from the STEREO spacecraft to calculate the magnetic helicities in the solar wind turbulence and reported the possible existence of Alfvén -cyclotron waves and their coexistence with the right handed polarized fluctuations. In the present article we intend to study the right circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave (DAW) and their role in the solar wind turbulence. The inclusion of the Hall term causes the dispersion of the AW which, in the present study, is considered on account of the finite frequency (frequency comparable to ion gyro frequency) of the pump wave. Filamentation instability has been reported to occur for the case of circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave (DAW) propagating parallel to ambient magnetic field. In the present study, the instability arises on account of the transverse density perturbations of the acoustic wave that may couple nonlinearly with the Alfvén wave and the driven ponderomotive force sequentially leads to growth of density perturbations. Numerical simulation involves finite difference method for the time domain and pseudo spectral method for the spatial domain. The power spectrum is investigated which shows a steepening for scales larger than the proton inertial length. These findings have been reported by Alexandrova et al

  15. Single-mode dispersive waves and soliton microcomb dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xu; Yang, Qi-Fan; Zhang, Xueyue; Yang, Ki Youl; Li, Xinbai; Vahala, Kerry

    2017-03-01

    Dissipative Kerr solitons are self-sustaining optical wavepackets in resonators. They use the Kerr nonlinearity to both compensate dispersion and offset optical loss. Besides providing insights into nonlinear resonator physics, they can be applied in frequency metrology, precision clocks, and spectroscopy. Like other optical solitons, the dissipative Kerr soliton can radiate power as a dispersive wave through a process that is the optical analogue of Cherenkov radiation. Dispersive waves typically consist of an ensemble of optical modes. Here, a limiting case is studied in which the dispersive wave is concentrated into a single cavity mode. In this limit, its interaction with the soliton induces hysteresis behaviour in the soliton's spectral and temporal properties. Also, an operating point of enhanced repetition-rate stability occurs through balance of dispersive-wave recoil and Raman-induced soliton-self-frequency shift. The single-mode dispersive wave can therefore provide quiet states of soliton comb operation useful in many applications.

  16. Single-mode dispersive waves and soliton microcomb dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xu; Yang, Qi-Fan; Zhang, Xueyue; Yang, Ki Youl; Li, Xinbai; Vahala, Kerry

    2017-01-01

    Dissipative Kerr solitons are self-sustaining optical wavepackets in resonators. They use the Kerr nonlinearity to both compensate dispersion and offset optical loss. Besides providing insights into nonlinear resonator physics, they can be applied in frequency metrology, precision clocks, and spectroscopy. Like other optical solitons, the dissipative Kerr soliton can radiate power as a dispersive wave through a process that is the optical analogue of Cherenkov radiation. Dispersive waves typically consist of an ensemble of optical modes. Here, a limiting case is studied in which the dispersive wave is concentrated into a single cavity mode. In this limit, its interaction with the soliton induces hysteresis behaviour in the soliton's spectral and temporal properties. Also, an operating point of enhanced repetition-rate stability occurs through balance of dispersive-wave recoil and Raman-induced soliton-self-frequency shift. The single-mode dispersive wave can therefore provide quiet states of soliton comb operation useful in many applications. PMID:28332495

  17. Diffractive wave transmission in dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescarret, Vincent

    The aim of this paper is to study the reflection-transmission of diffractive geometrical optic rays described by semi-linear symmetric hyperbolic systems such as the Maxwell-Lorentz equations with the anharmonic model of polarization. The framework is that of P. Donnat's thesis [P. Donnat, Quelques contributions mathématiques en optique non linéaire, chapters 1 and 2, thèse, 1996] and V. Lescarret [V. Lescarret, Wave transmission in dispersive media, M3AS 17 (4) (2007) 485-535]: we consider an infinite WKB expansion of the wave over long times/distances O(1/ɛ) and because of the boundary, we decompose each profile into a hyperbolic (purely oscillating) part and elliptic (evanescent) part as in M. William [M. William, Boundary layers and glancing blow-up in nonlinear geometric optics, Ann. Sci. École Norm. Sup. 33 (2000) 132-209]. Then to get the usual sublinear growth on the hyperbolic part of the profiles, for every corrector, we consider E, the space of bounded functions decomposing into a sum of pure transports and a "quasi compactly" supported part. We make a detailed analysis on the nonlinear interactions on E which leads us to make a restriction on the set of resonant phases. We finally give a convergence result which justifies the use of "quasi compactly" supported profiles.

  18. A small dispersion limit to the long wave-short wave interaction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muslu, Gulcin M.; Kesici, Emine; Oruc, Goksu

    2017-07-01

    We study the small dispersion limit for the three coupled long wave-short wave interaction (LSI) equations, numerically. For this aim, a numerical scheme combining the Fourier pseudo-spectral method in space and a Runge Kutta method in time is constructed. To understand the small dispersion limit, plane wave and solitary wave solutions of LSI equations are considered.

  19. Heat transfer with thermal radiation on MHD particle-fluid suspension induced by metachronal wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, M. M.; Zeeshan, A.; Ellahi, R.

    2017-09-01

    In this article, effects of heat transfer on particle-fluid suspension induced by metachronal wave have been examined. The influence of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and thermal radiation are also taken into account with the help of Ohm's law and Roseland's approximation. The governing flow problem for Casson fluid model is based on continuity, momentum and thermal energy equation for fluid phase and particle phase. Taking the approximation of long wavelength and zero Reynolds number, the governing equations are simplified. Exact solutions are obtained for the coupled partial differential equations. The impact of all the embedding parameters is discussed with the help of graphs. In particular, velocity profile, pressure rise, temperature profile and trapping phenomena are discussed for all the emerging parameters. It is observed that while fluid parameter enhances the velocity profile, Hartmann number and particle volume fraction oppose the flow.

  20. Amplitude-dependent Lamb wave dispersion in nonlinear plates.

    PubMed

    Packo, Pawel; Uhl, Tadeusz; Staszewski, Wieslaw J; Leamy, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents a perturbation approach for calculating amplitude-dependent Lamb wave dispersion in nonlinear plates. Nonlinear dispersion relationships are derived in closed form using a hyperelastic stress-strain constitutive relationship, the Green-Lagrange strain measure, and the partial wave technique integrated with a Lindstedt-Poincaré perturbation approach. Solvability conditions are derived using an operator formalism with inner product projections applied against solutions to the adjoint problem. When applied to the first- and second-order problems, these solvability conditions lead to amplitude-dependent, nonlinear dispersion corrections for frequency as a function of wavenumber. Numerical simulations verify the predicted dispersion shifts for an example nonlinear plate. The analysis and identification of amplitude-dependent, nonlinear Lamb wave dispersion complements recent research focusing on higher harmonic generation and internally resonant waves, which require precise dispersion relationships for frequency-wavenumber matching.

  1. Hybrid simulations of the interaction of hot gyrokinetic particles with MHD waves

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, E.V.; Denton, R.E.; Hudson, M.K.; Chan, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    A self-consistent study of the interaction of energetic ions with low-frequency MHD waves is performed using hybrid MHD-gyrokinetic particle simulations. In particular, the excitation of magnetospheric hydromagnetic waves by magnetic drift-bounce resonance with energetic ring current ions is investigated. In the model, energetic ions are treated as gyrokinetic particles using fully electromagnetic gyro-center equations, while the cold background plasma is treated as a fluid. The particles are coupled to the fluid equations through their current which appear in the bulk plasma momentum equation: where {rho}{sub b}, V{sub b} and p{sub b} are bulk plasma density, velocity and pressure, n{sub h} and j{sub h} axe hot ion density and current density. Other equations for the bulk plasma axe that of the MHD equations including E = - V{sub b} x B/c. It is assumed that n{sub h} {much_lt} n{sub b}. Spatial gyroaveraging in the gyro-center equations of motion as well as transformation to physical space axe performed by using four or eight point gyroangle distribution, in order to include the finite Larmor radius effects. In test runs, good conservation of the total energy was obtained and the finite Larmor radius effects were well reproduced for k{sub {perpendicular}}{rho}{sub h} {approximately} 1. Since magnetic drift-bounce resonant instability is driven by radial pressure gradients and requires resonance between azimuthal ion drift motion and bounce motion along magnetic field line, 3-D simulations are necessary for its investigation. The use of a multiple spatial scale expansion method enables to separate the equilibrium spatial scale lengths from those of the perturbations. In this case the zero-order ion pressure and magnetic field gradients become input parameters for the 2-D simulation. The 2-D numerical model with fixed background inhomogeneity was developed and it is used to study the drift-bounce resonant instability in 2-D box geometry.

  2. Phase patterns of dispersive waves from moving localized sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirkunov, P. N.; Kalashnik, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    A general approach is proposed within which the phase structure of wave perturbations caused by a moving localized source can be described based on the wave dispersion law alone. Applying this approach, a simple analytical expression for the phase surfaces is obtained. It is used to study the details of phase patterns of gravity-capillary waves, the structure of wave trains in the ocean in the wake of a moving tropical hurricane, and the system of lee waves in Earth's atmosphere.

  3. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL DISPERSANTS AND MINERAL FINES ON CRUDE OIL DISPERSION IN A WAVE TANK UNDER BREAKING WAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on the dispersion of oil and the ...

  4. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL DISPERSANTS AND MINERAL FINES ON CRUDE OIL DISPERSION IN A WAVE TANK UNDER BREAKING WAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on the dispersion of oil and the ...

  5. Nonlinear Dispersion of Magnetostatic Surface Waves on Ferromagnetic Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, D. Boardman; Bao, Jiashan; Wang, Qi; Cai, Yingshi; S, A. Nikitov

    1991-11-01

    The wave equation of nonlinear magnetostatic surface waves (MSSW) on ferromagnetic films is derived and its solution is found. The nonlinear dispersion relation of MSSW is discussed. Our result shows that the wave power has a little effect to the frequency shift of MSSW with lower frequency, but has a considerably larger effect to that with higher frequency within the band.

  6. All-optical observation and reconstruction of spin wave dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yusuke; Daimon, Shunsuke; Iguchi, Ryo; Oikawa, Yasuyuki; Shen, Ka; Sato, Koji; Bossini, Davide; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Satoh, Takuya; Hillebrands, Burkard; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Johansen, Tom H.; Kirilyuk, Andrei; Rasing, Theo; Saitoh, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    To know the properties of a particle or a wave, one should measure how its energy changes with its momentum. The relation between them is called the dispersion relation, which encodes essential information of the kinetics. In a magnet, the wave motion of atomic spins serves as an elementary excitation, called a spin wave, and behaves like a fictitious particle. Although the dispersion relation of spin waves governs many of the magnetic properties, observation of their entire dispersion is one of the challenges today. Spin waves whose dispersion is dominated by magnetostatic interaction are called pure-magnetostatic waves, which are still missing despite of their practical importance. Here, we report observation of the band dispersion relation of pure-magnetostatic waves by developing a table-top all-optical spectroscopy named spin-wave tomography. The result unmasks characteristics of pure-magnetostatic waves. We also demonstrate time-resolved measurements, which reveal coherent energy transfer between spin waves and lattice vibrations. PMID:28604690

  7. All-optical observation and reconstruction of spin wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yusuke; Daimon, Shunsuke; Iguchi, Ryo; Oikawa, Yasuyuki; Shen, Ka; Sato, Koji; Bossini, Davide; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Satoh, Takuya; Hillebrands, Burkard; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Johansen, Tom H.; Kirilyuk, Andrei; Rasing, Theo; Saitoh, Eiji

    2017-06-01

    To know the properties of a particle or a wave, one should measure how its energy changes with its momentum. The relation between them is called the dispersion relation, which encodes essential information of the kinetics. In a magnet, the wave motion of atomic spins serves as an elementary excitation, called a spin wave, and behaves like a fictitious particle. Although the dispersion relation of spin waves governs many of the magnetic properties, observation of their entire dispersion is one of the challenges today. Spin waves whose dispersion is dominated by magnetostatic interaction are called pure-magnetostatic waves, which are still missing despite of their practical importance. Here, we report observation of the band dispersion relation of pure-magnetostatic waves by developing a table-top all-optical spectroscopy named spin-wave tomography. The result unmasks characteristics of pure-magnetostatic waves. We also demonstrate time-resolved measurements, which reveal coherent energy transfer between spin waves and lattice vibrations.

  8. Resonant behaviour of MHD waves on magnetic flux tubes. I - Connection formulae at the resonant surfaces. II - Absorption of sound waves by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, Takashi; Goossens, Marcel; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1991-01-01

    The present method of addressing the resonance problems that emerge in such MHD phenomena as the resonant absorption of waves at the Alfven resonance point avoids solving the fourth-order differential equation of dissipative MHD by recourse to connection formulae across the dissipation layer. In the second part of this investigation, the absorption of solar 5-min oscillations by sunspots is interpreted as the resonant absorption of sounds by a magnetic cylinder. The absorption coefficient is interpreted (1) analytically, under certain simplifying assumptions, and numerically, under more general conditions. The observed absorption coefficient magnitude is explained over suitable parameter ranges.

  9. Ultrabroadband Dispersive Radiation by Spatiotemporal Oscillation of Multimode Waves.

    PubMed

    Wright, Logan G; Wabnitz, Stefan; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Wise, Frank W

    2015-11-27

    In nonlinear dynamical systems, qualitatively distinct phenomena occur depending continuously on the size of the bounded domain containing the system. For nonlinear waves, a multimode waveguide is a bounded three-dimensional domain, allowing observation of dynamics impossible in open settings. Here we study radiation emitted by bounded nonlinear waves: the spatiotemporal oscillations of solitons in multimode fiber generate multimode dispersive waves over an ultrabroadband spectral range. This work suggests routes to sources of coherent electromagnetic waves with unprecedented spectral range.

  10. The Foggy EUV Corona and Coronal Heating by MHD Waves from Explosive Reconnection Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Falconer, David A.

    2008-01-01

    In 0.5 arcsec/pixel TRACE coronal EUV images, the corona rooted in active regions that are at the limb and are not flaring is seen to consist of (1) a complex array of discrete loops and plumes embedded in (2) a diffuse ambient component that shows no fine structure and gradually fades with height. For each of two not-flaring active regions, found that the diffuse component is (1) approximately isothermal and hydrostatic and (2) emits well over half of the total EUV luminosity of the active-region corona. Here, from a TRACE Fe XII coronal image of another not-flaring active region, the large sunspot active region AR 10652 when it was at the west limb on 30 July 2004, we separate the diffuse component from the discrete loop component by spatial filtering, and find that the diffuse component has about 60% of the total luminosity. If under much higher spatial resolution than that of TRACE (e. g., the 0.1 arcsec/pixel resolution of the Hi-C sounding-rocket experiment proposed by J. W. Cirtain et al), most of the diffuse component remains diffuse rather being resolved into very narrow loops and plumes, this will raise the possibility that the EUV corona in active regions consists of two basically different but comparably luminous components: one being the set of discrete bright loops and plumes and the other being a truly diffuse component filling the space between the discrete loops and plumes. This dichotomy would imply that there are two different but comparably powerful coronal heating mechanisms operating in active regions, one for the distinct loops and plumes and another for the diffuse component. We present a scenario in which (1) each discrete bright loop or plume is a flux tube that was recently reconnected in a burst of reconnection, and (2) the diffuse component is heated by MHD waves that are generated by these reconnection events and by other fine-scale explosive reconnection events, most of which occur in and below the base of the corona where they are

  11. Long Distance Dispersal and Accelerating Waves of Disease: Empirical Relationships

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biological invasions have substantial ecological and economic impacts. Classic approaches to modeling biological invasions predict "traveling waves" with invasion fronts of constant velocity that are determined by an organism's reproductive capacity and its dispersal ability. These approaches are ba...

  12. A new approach to low-frequency {open_quotes}MHD-like{close_quotes} waves in magnetospheric plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O.A.; Pellat, R.; Coroniti, F.V.

    1995-10-01

    This paper explores the consequences of enforcing the quasi-neutrality (QN) condition on a magnetotail and auroral plasma. The authors show that this condition has never been handled correctly in the literature when the bounce motion of particles is involved, for either adiabatic or stochastic ion motion. Correct treatment yields a global electrostatic potential which is constant along the magnetic field line. They describe how the stability results of Hurricane et al. are modified. They show that the QN condition modifies the classical MHD analysis of symmetric interchange/ballooning modes with respect to low-frequency MHD waves. An additional consequence of the QN condition on MHD-like waves is a modification of the plasma equation of state. More precisely, the authors show that the plasma remains isothermal during such wave propagation. For antisymmetric modes there is no associated electrostatic potential, but they give the necessary corrections to the standard analysis upon entering a stochastic ion regime. Last, they show how the electrostatic potential couples to the ionosphere, revealing a new understanding of auroral arcs. 15 refs.

  13. Amplitude Dispersion Compensation for Damage Detection Using Ultrasonic Guided Waves

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Huang, Liping; Zhao, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Besides the phase and group velocities, the amplitude of guided wave mode is also frequency dependent. This amplitude dispersion also influences the performance of guided wave methods in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). In this paper, the effects of amplitude dispersion to the spectrum and waveform of a propagating wave-packet are investigated. It is shown that the amplitude dispersion results in distortion in the spectrum of guided wave response, and thus influences the waveform of the wave-packet. To remove these effects, an amplitude dispersion compensation method is established on the basis of Vold–Kalman filter and Taylor series expansion. The performance of that method is then investigated by experimental examples. The results show that with the application of the amplitude dispersion compensation, the time reversibility could be preserved, which ensures the applicability of the time reversal method for damage detection. Besides, through amplitude dispersion compensation, the testing resolution of guided waves could be improved, so that the structural features located in the close proximity may be separately identified. PMID:27706067

  14. Amplitude Dispersion Compensation for Damage Detection Using Ultrasonic Guided Waves.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Huang, Liping; Zhao, Ming

    2016-09-30

    Besides the phase and group velocities, the amplitude of guided wave mode is also frequency dependent. This amplitude dispersion also influences the performance of guided wave methods in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). In this paper, the effects of amplitude dispersion to the spectrum and waveform of a propagating wave-packet are investigated. It is shown that the amplitude dispersion results in distortion in the spectrum of guided wave response, and thus influences the waveform of the wave-packet. To remove these effects, an amplitude dispersion compensation method is established on the basis of Vold-Kalman filter and Taylor series expansion. The performance of that method is then investigated by experimental examples. The results show that with the application of the amplitude dispersion compensation, the time reversibility could be preserved, which ensures the applicability of the time reversal method for damage detection. Besides, through amplitude dispersion compensation, the testing resolution of guided waves could be improved, so that the structural features located in the close proximity may be separately identified.

  15. Ionospheric effects of magneto-acoustic-gravity waves: Dispersion relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. Michael; Ostrovsky, Lev A.; Bedard, Alfred J.

    2017-06-01

    There is extensive evidence for ionospheric effects associated with earthquake-related atmospheric disturbances. Although the existence of earthquake precursors is controversial, one suggested method of detecting possible earthquake precursors and tsunamis is by observing possible ionospheric effects of atmospheric waves generated by such events. To study magneto-acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere, we have derived a general dispersion relation including the effects of the Earth's magnetic field. This dispersion relation can be used in a general atmospheric ray tracing program to calculate the propagation of magneto-acoustic-gravity waves from the ground to the ionosphere. The presence of the Earth's magnetic field in the ionosphere can radically change the dispersion properties of the wave. The general dispersion relation obtained here reduces to the known dispersion relations for magnetoacoustic waves and acoustic-gravity waves in the corresponding particular cases. The work described here is the first step in achieving a generalized ray tracing program permitting propagation studies of magneto-acoustic-gravity waves.

  16. Experimental investigation of two oil dispersion pathways by breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Katz, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    This experimental study focuses on generation and size distribution of airborne and subsurface oil droplets as breaking surface waves interact with a crude oil slick (MC252 surrogate). Experiments in a specialized wave tank investigate the effects of wave height and wave properties (e.g. spilling vs. plunging), as well as drastically reducing the oil-water interfacial tension by orders of magnitude by introducing dispersant (Coexist 9500-A). This dispersant is applied at varying dispersant-to-oil ratios either by premixing or surface spraying, the latter consistent with typical application. The data include high-speed visualizations of processes affecting the entrainment of subsurface oil and bubbles as well as airborne aerosols. High-speed digital holographic cinematography is employed to track the droplet trajectories, and quantify the droplet size distributions above and below the surface. Introduction of dispersants drastically reduces the size of subsurface droplets to micron and even submicron levels. Ahead of the wave, the 25 μm (our present resolution limit) to 2 mm airborne droplet trajectories are aligned with the wave direction. Behind the wave, these droplets reverse their direction, presumably due to the airflow above the wave. Supported by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  17. Rogue waves in a normal-dispersion fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanwei; Zhang, Shumin; Wise, F W

    2015-04-01

    Experimental evidence of rogue-wave formation in a normal-dispersion ytterbium fiber laser is reported. Spectral filtering is a primary component of pulse-shaping in normal-dispersion lasers, and we find that the choice of filter dramatically influences the distribution of noise-pulse energies produced by these lasers. With an interference filter in the cavity, non-Gaussian distributions with pulses as large as 6 times the significant wave height are observed. These correspond to pulse energies as high as ∼50  nJ. To our knowledge, the results presented are not accounted for by existing theoretical models of rogue-wave formation.

  18. Alfven wave dispersion behavior in single- and multicomponent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rahbarnia, K.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.; Ullrich, S.; Sauer, K.

    2010-03-15

    Dispersion relations of driven Alfven waves (AWs) are measured in single- and multicomponent plasmas consisting of mixtures of argon, helium, and oxygen in a magnetized linear cylindrical plasma device VINETA [C. Franck, O. Grulke, and T. Klinger, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3254 (2002)]. The decomposition of the measured three-dimensional magnetic field fluctuations and the corresponding parallel current pattern reveals that the wave field is a superposition of L- and R-wave components. The dispersion relation measurements agree well with calculations based on a multifluid Hall-magnetohydrodynamic model if the plasma resistivity is correctly taken into account.

  19. The dispersion of magnetic-Coriolis waves in planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardsley, O. P.; Davidson, P. A.

    2017-07-01

    We consider the dispersion of waves in a rapidly rotating, Boussinesq fluid which is threaded by a magnetic field and stirred by slowly gravitating buoyant blobs. Motivated by dynamics in the core of the Earth, we focus on the evolution of inertial-Alfvén wave packets radiated from the buoyant anomalies. These waves resemble conventional low-frequency inertial waves, in the sense that energy disperses on the fast timescale of the background rotation rate, though they also exhibit slower Alfvén-like propagation along magnetic field lines. When the magnetic field is uniform, inertial-Alfvén waves automatically focus energy radiation onto the rotation axis, a property they share with conventional low-frequency inertial waves in the hydrodynamic case, and which ensures that they dominate the dispersion pattern. However, the situation changes significantly when the magnetic field, B, is non-uniform. In particular, we show any non-uniformity of B causes inertial-Alfvén waves to evolve into a more general form of magnetic-Coriolis (MC) wave, and that these waves refract, dispersing somewhat off-axis. Moreover, if inertial-Alfvén waves are launched near the equator they can be confined to low latitudes by a critical layer at which the axial group velocity drops to zero. Given that the magnetic field in a planetary core is inevitably non-uniform, we conclude that quasi-geostrophy is most likely achieved through a combination of weakly modified inertial waves and a form of slightly off-axis MC wave in which the inertial and Alfvén frequencies are comparable.

  20. Seismic waves velocity dispersion: An indicator of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rapoport, M.B.; Ryjkov, V.I.

    1994-12-31

    VSP data recorded in eleven wells located in different geological conditions were analyzed for studying the phase velocity dispersion of seismic waves. Strong positive dispersion (velocity increases with rising frequency) with the intensity of between 1.7 and 5.0% was obtained in all productive wells in depths of oil and gas pools. The close correlation between local increasing of velocity dispersion and absorption occurred in most cases. Background level of velocity dispersion with both signs (less then {+-}1.0%) which the authors consider as a level of mistakes was observed outside productive intervals and in ``dry`` wells. Modeling has shown that pseudodispersion caused by layered media may attain {+-}0.5% and, besides, curves of pseudodispersion and pseudoabsorption exhibit no correlation. Analysis of seismic waves dispersion together with the absorption may provide with reliable indicators of hydrocarbon pools.

  1. High resolution surface wave dispersion studies in China

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.E.; Patton, H.J.

    1997-11-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory regional calibration project is actively assembling a database of surface-wave dispersion information for China and surrounding areas. As part of the effort to characterize surface wave dispersion in China, we integrate prior long period results from the University of Colorado with our shorter period dispersion measurements in a high resolution survey of key monitoring areas. Focusing on western China initially, we employ broadband data recorded on CDSN stations, and regional events (m{sub b} 4 and above). Our approach is twofold, employing path specific calibration of key stations and well-recorded reference events, and tomographic inference to provide group velocity curves for regions with sparse station distribution and little seismic activity. Initial dispersion studies at Chinese stations WMQ and LZH show substantial azimuthal variation in dispersion, reinforcing the need for careful determination of source regions for path-specific calibration.

  2. Weight loss and P wave dispersion: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Falchi, Anna Giulia; Grecchi, Ilaria; Muggia, Chiara; Tinelli, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate if therapeutic weight loss reduces P wave dispersion. 20 obese patients (10 males and 10 females), part of a randomized clinical trial, were examined over a 6 month period. They were treated with a diet, aiming at 5% weight loss at the 6th month. After physical examination, they underwent laboratory tests, bioelectrical impedance analysis and a electrocardiogram (ECG). ECGs were transferred to a personal computer via a scanner and then magnified 400 times. We examined at baseline and at the 6th month, maximum and minimum P-wave duration, P-wave dispersion and heart rate. Comparing responders (patients who lost 5% of weight at t6) and not responders (who lost less than 5%), responders showed a significant reduction of P wave dispersion value (-0.38 [SD: 0.35] mm equal to -32.3 [SD: 11.3] % p=0.00001). All responders present a reduction of P wave dispersion, while for not-responders this is no longer evident. Finally, a good degree of correlation (r=0.54) between P wave dispersion difference and the decrease of weight was noticed. Females have a better response in P dispersion reduction strictly connected with their weight loss with a good correlation, (r=0.7, p=0.002), versus a moderate correlation evidenced in males (r=0.5, p=0.011). P wave duration and dispersion are significantly reduced in patients who lost more than 5% of weight and this decrease is highly related to the extent of weight loss. Copyright © 2014 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A test of the Hall-MHD model: Application to low-frequency upstream waves at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Russell, C. T.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.

    1994-01-01

    Early studies suggested that in the range of parameter space where the wave angular frequency is less than the proton gyrofrequency and the plasma beta, the ratio of the thermal to magnetic pressure, is less than 1 magnetohydrodynamics provides an adequate description of the propagating modes in a plasma. However, recently, Lacombe et al. (1992) have reported significant differences between basic wave characteristics of the specific propagation modes derived from linear Vlasov and Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theories even when the waves are only weakly damped. In this paper we compare the magnetic polarization and normalization magnetic compression ratio of ultra low frequency (ULF) upstream waves at Venus with magnetic polarization and normalized magnetic compression ratio derived from both theories. We find that while the 'kinetic' approach gives magnetic polarization and normalized magnetic compression ratio consistent with the data in the analyzed range of beta (0.5 less than beta less than 5) for the fast magnetosonic mode, the same wave characteristics derived from the Hall-MHD model strongly depend on beta and are consistent with the data only at low beta for the fast mode and at high beta for the intermediate mode.

  4. The effect of thermal dispersion on unsteady MHD convective heat transfer through vertical porous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamadien, Ghada F.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of thermal dispersion on unsteady two-dimensional laminar flow is presented. A viscous incompressible conducting fluid in the vicinity of a semi infinite vertical porous through a moving plate in the presence of a magnetic fluid is studied. A cod (FORTRAN) was constructed for numerical computations for the velocity and temperature for various values of the affected parameters were carried out.

  5. Viscous Fluid Conduits as a Prototypical Nonlinear Dispersive Wave Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowman, Nicholas K.

    This thesis is devoted to the comprehensive characterization of slowly modulated, nonlinear waves in dispersive media for physically-relevant systems using a threefold approach: analytical, long-time asymptotics, careful numerical simulations, and quantitative laboratory experiments. In particular, we use this interdisciplinary approach to establish a two-fluid, interfacial fluid flow setting known as viscous fluid conduits as an ideal platform for the experimental study of truly one dimensional, unidirectional solitary waves and dispersively regularized shock waves (DSWs). Starting from the full set of fluid equations for mass and linear momentum conservation, we use a multiple-scales, perturbation approach to derive a scalar, nonlinear, dispersive wave equation for the leading order interfacial dynamics of the system. Using a generalized form of the approximate model equation, we use numerical simulations and an analytical, nonlinear wave averaging technique, Whitham-El modulation theory, to derive the key physical features of interacting large amplitude solitary waves and DSWs. We then present the results of quantitative, experimental investigations into large amplitude solitary wave interactions and DSWs. Overtaking interactions of large amplitude solitary waves are shown to exhibit nearly elastic collisions and universal interaction geometries according to the Lax categories for KdV solitons, and to be in excellent agreement with the dynamics described by the approximate asymptotic model. The dispersive shock wave experiments presented here represent the most extensive comparison to date between theory and data of the key wavetrain parameters predicted by modulation theory. We observe strong agreement. Based on the work in this thesis, viscous fluid conduits provide a well-understood, controlled, table-top environment in which to study universal properties of dispersive hydrodynamics. Motivated by the study of wave propagation in the conduit system, we

  6. P-wave dispersion: What we know till now?

    PubMed

    Okutucu, Sercan; Aytemir, Kudret; Oto, Ali

    2016-01-01

    P-wave dispersion is defined as the difference between the maximum and the minimum P-wave duration recorded from multiple different-surface ECG leads. It has been known that increased P-wave duration and P-wave dispersion reflect prolongation of intraatrial and interatrial conduction time and the inhomogeneous propagation of sinus impulses, which are well-known electrophysiologic characteristics in patients with atrial arrhythmias and especially paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Extensive clinical evaluation of P-wave dispersion has been performed in the assessment of the risk for atrial fibrillation in patients without apparent heart disease, in hypertensives, in patients with coronary artery disease, in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery, in patients with congenital heart diseases, as well as in other groups of patients suffering from various cardiac or non-cardiac diseases. In this paper, we aimed to summarize the measurement methods, current use in different clinical situations, strengths and limitations of the of P-wave dispersion.

  7. P-wave dispersion: What we know till now?

    PubMed Central

    Aytemir, Kudret; Oto, Ali

    2016-01-01

    P-wave dispersion is defined as the difference between the maximum and the minimum P-wave duration recorded from multiple different-surface ECG leads. It has been known that increased P-wave duration and P-wave dispersion reflect prolongation of intraatrial and interatrial conduction time and the inhomogeneous propagation of sinus impulses, which are well-known electrophysiologic characteristics in patients with atrial arrhythmias and especially paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Extensive clinical evaluation of P-wave dispersion has been performed in the assessment of the risk for atrial fibrillation in patients without apparent heart disease, in hypertensives, in patients with coronary artery disease, in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery, in patients with congenital heart diseases, as well as in other groups of patients suffering from various cardiac or non-cardiac diseases. In this paper, we aimed to summarize the measurement methods, current use in different clinical situations, strengths and limitations of the of P-wave dispersion. PMID:27081484

  8. Wave propagation in strongly dispersive superthermal dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Abd El-Razek, H. N.; El-Rahman, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    The attributes of acoustic envelope waves in a collisionless dust ion unmagnetized plasmas model composed of cold ions, superthermal electrons and positive-negative dust grains have been studied. Using the derivative expansion technique in a strong dispersive medium, the system model is reduced to a nonlinearly form of Schrodinger equation (NLSE). Rational solution of NLSE in unstable region is responsible for the creation of large shape waves; namely rogue waves. The subjection of instability regions upon electron superthermality (via κ), carrier wave number and dusty grains charge is discussed.

  9. A fractional calculus model of anomalous dispersion of acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Wharmby, Andrew W

    2016-09-01

    An empirical formula based on viscoelastic analysis techniques that employs concepts from the fractional calculus that was used to model the dielectric behavior of materials exposed to oscillating electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency, terahertz, and infrared bands. This work adapts and applies the formula to model viscoelastic behavior of materials that show an apparent increase of phase velocity of vibration with an increase in frequency, otherwise known as anomalous dispersion. A fractional order wave equation is derived through the application of the classic elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle whose analytical solution is used to describe absorption and dispersion of acoustic waves in the viscoelastic material displaying anomalous dispersion in a specific frequency range. A brief discussion and comparison of an alternative fractional order wave equation recently formulated is also included.

  10. Adiabatic theory of solitons fed by dispersive waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickartz, Sabrina; Bandelow, Uwe; Amiranashvili, Shalva

    2016-09-01

    We consider scattering of low-amplitude dispersive waves at an intense optical soliton which constitutes a nonlinear perturbation of the refractive index. Specifically, we consider a single-mode optical fiber and a group velocity matched pair: an optical soliton and a nearly perfectly reflected dispersive wave, a fiber-optical analog of the event horizon. By combining (i) an adiabatic approach that is used in soliton perturbation theory and (ii) scattering theory from quantum mechanics, we give a quantitative account of the evolution of all soliton parameters. In particular, we quantify the increase in the soliton peak power that may result in the spontaneous appearance of an extremely large, so-called champion soliton. The presented adiabatic theory agrees well with the numerical solutions of the pulse propagation equation. Moreover, we predict the full frequency band of the scattered dispersive waves and explain an emerging caustic structure in the space-time domain.

  11. Particle Scattering off of Right-handed Dispersive Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, C.; Kilian, P.; Spanier, F.

    2017-01-01

    Resonant scattering of fast particles off low frequency plasma waves is a major process determining transport characteristics of energetic particles in the heliosphere and contributing to their acceleration. Usually, only Alfvén waves are considered for this process, although dispersive waves are also present throughout the heliosphere. We investigate resonant interaction of energetic electrons with dispersive, right-handed waves. For the interaction of particles and a single wave a variable transformation into the rest frame of the wave can be performed. Here, well-established analytic models derived in the framework of magnetostatic quasi-linear theory can be used as a reference to validate simulation results. However, this approach fails as soon as several dispersive waves are involved. Based on analytic solutions modeling the scattering amplitude in the magnetostatic limit, we present an approach to modify these equations for use in the plasma frame. Thereby we aim at a description of particle scattering in the presence of several waves. A particle-in-cell code is employed to study wave–particle scattering on a micro-physically correct level and to test the modified model equations. We investigate the interactions of electrons at different energies (from 1 keV to 1 MeV) and right-handed waves with various amplitudes. Differences between model and simulation arise in the case of high amplitudes or several waves. Analyzing the trajectories of single particles we find no microscopic diffusion in the case of a single plasma wave, although a broadening of the particle distribution can be observed.

  12. Nonlinear Dispersive ALFVÉN Waves in Magnetoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.; Stenflo, L.; Bingham, R.

    2008-03-01

    Large amplitude Alfvén waves are frequently found in magnetized space and laboratory plasmas. Our objective here is to discuss the linear and nonlinear properties of dispersive Alfvén waves (DAWs) in a uniform magnetoplasma. We first consider the effects of finite frequency (ω/ωci) and ion gyroradius on inertial and kinetic Alfvén waves, where ωci is the ion gyrofrequency. Next, we focus on nonlinear effects caused by the dispersive Alfvén waves. Such effects include the plasma density enhancement and depression by the Alfvén wave ponderomotive force, nonlinear interactions among the DAWs, the generation of zonal flows by the DAWs, as well as the electron and ion heating due to wave-particle interactions. The relevance of our investigation to the appearance of nonlinear dispersive Alfvén waves in the Earth's auroral acceleration region, in the solar corona, and in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA is discussed.

  13. GENERAL: Periodic folded waves for a (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Hua

    2009-08-01

    A general solution, including three arbitrary functions, is obtained for a (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water-wave (MDWW) equation by means of the WTC truncation method. Introducing proper multiple valued functions and Jacobi elliptic functions in the seed solution, special types of periodic folded waves are derived. In the long wave limit these periodic folded wave patterns may degenerate into single localized folded solitary wave excitations. The interactions of the periodic folded waves and the degenerated single folded solitary waves are investigated graphically and found to be completely elastic.

  14. Magnetostatic Wave Transducers, Resonators and Dispersion Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    propagating at microwave frequencies in magnetically biased, liquid phase epitaxial films of Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) grown on Gadolinium Gallium Garnet... microwave energy for MSSW propagation along the YIG film. A 25 um-thick 3mm- wide YIG film and 15 um-thick Gadolinium Gallium Garnet (GGG) substrate was...stretching. Methods for providing these time delays include an assortment of fixed cables. ferrite loaded cables. surface acoustic wave iSA W) devices

  15. Curvature-Induced Asymmetric Spin-Wave Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otálora, Jorge A.; Yan, Ming; Schultheiss, Helmut; Hertel, Riccardo; Kákay, Attila

    2016-11-01

    In magnonics, spin waves are conceived of as electron-charge-free information carriers. Their wave behavior has established them as the key elements to achieve low power consumption, fast operative rates, and good packaging in magnon-based computational technologies. Hence, knowing alternative ways that reveal certain properties of their undulatory motion is an important task. Here, we show using micromagnetic simulations and analytical calculations that spin-wave propagation in ferromagnetic nanotubes is fundamentally different than in thin films. The dispersion relation is asymmetric regarding the sign of the wave vector. It is a purely curvature-induced effect and its fundamental origin is identified to be the classical dipole-dipole interaction. The analytical expression of the dispersion relation has the same mathematical form as in thin films with the Dzyalonshiinsky-Moriya interaction. Therefore, this curvature-induced effect can be seen as a "dipole-induced Dzyalonshiinsky-Moriya-like" effect.

  16. Refractive phenomena in the shock wave dispersion with variable gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Markhotok, A.; Popovic, S.

    2010-06-15

    In this article the refraction effects in the weak shock wave (SW) dispersion on an interface with a temperature variation between two mediums are described. In the case of a finite-gradient boundary, the effect of the SW dispersion is remarkably stronger than in the case of a step change in parameters. In the former case the vertical component of velocity for the transmitted SW (the refraction effect) must be taken into account. Results of comparative calculations based on the two-dimensional model corrected for the refraction effect show significant differences in the shapes of the dispersed SW fronts.

  17. Mode properties of low-frequency waves: Kinetic theory versus Hall-MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.; Quest, K. B.

    1994-01-01

    In fluid theory, the ordering of low-frequency modes in a homogeneous plasma is based on the phase velocity, since modes do not intersect each other in dispersion diagrams as a function of wavenumber or other parameters. In linear kinetic theory, modes cross each other. Thus a consistent and useful classification should be based on the physical properties of the modes instead. This paper attempts such a classification by documeting the dispersion and general mode properties of the low-frequency waves (omega much less than (OMEGA(sub ci) OMEGA(sub ce) (exp 1/2)), where OMEGA(sub ci), OMEGA(sub ce) are the cyclotron frequencies of the ions and electrons, respectively) in kinetic theory, and by comparing them to the results of two-fluid theory. Kinetic theory gives a seperate Alfven/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) wave with phase speed Omega/k approximately = v(sub A) cos theta for omega much less than OMEGA(sub ci), where v(sub A) is the Alfven velocity and theta the angle of propagation between wave vector k and background magnetic field B(sub o). For a given wavenumber, the magnetosonic mode is a double-valued solution with a singular point in theta, beta parameter space, where beta is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. It is shown that a branch cut starting at the singular point theta approximately 30 deg, beta approximately 3 and leading to larger beta gives a practical and consitent seperation of this double-valued magnetosonic solution. Selection of this branch cut results in a moderately damped fast/magnetos onic and a heavily damped slow/sound wave. A comprehensive review of the polarization, compressibility and other mode properties is given and shown to be consistent with the selected branch cut. At small wavenumbers, the kinetic mode properties typically start to deviate significantly from their fluid counterparts at beta approximately 0.5. At larger beta, there is no longer a consistent correspondence between the fluid and kinetic modes. Kinetic

  18. Absorption of ultrasound waves during dynamic processes in disperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kol'tsova, I. S.; Khomutova, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of ultrasound wave absorption are conducted at a frequency of 3 MHz in 3% suspensions of starch, gelatin, and lactose. It is shown that the dynamics of the additional ultrasound wave absorption coefficient in the suspensions carries information on the processes of swelling, dissolution, and the phase and structural periods occurring in the interaction of the disperse and dispersoid phases; it also reflects the influence of the temperature field on these processes.

  19. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. L.; Lottes, S. A.; Bouillard, J. X.

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance, and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  20. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-07-01

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  1. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-01-01

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  2. Measurement and modeling of Scholte wave dispersion in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potty, Gopu R.; Miller, James H.

    2012-11-01

    Inversion of Scholte wave is one of the most common methods to estimate the shear speeds in the bottom. This inversion involves running a forward model, with shear speeds in the sediment among the input parameters, and minimizing the data-model mismatch. A numerical model is developed based on the dynamic stiffness matrix approach to model the phase velocity dispersion of Scholte waves in this study. The model is then validated by matching previously published results. Shear speeds in different layers of sediment are also estimated by matching the model predictions to the Scholte wave data collected in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

  3. Partial Wave Dispersion Relations: Application to Electron-Atom Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.; Drachman, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    In this Letter we propose the use of partial wave dispersion relations (DR's) as the way of solving the long-standing problem of correctly incorporating exchange in a valid DR for electron-atom scattering. In particular a method is given for effectively calculating the contribution of the discontinuity and/or poles of the partial wave amplitude which occur in the negative E plane. The method is successfully tested in three cases: (i) the analytically solvable exponential potential, (ii) the Hartree potential, and (iii) the S-wave exchange approximation for electron-hydrogen scattering.

  4. The Gaussian Shear Wave in a Dispersive Medium

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Kevin J.; Baddour, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Within the field of “imaging the biomechanical properties of tissues,” a number of approaches analyze shear wave propagation initiated by a short radiation force push. Unfortunately, it is experimentally observed that the displacement vs. time curves in lossy tissues are rapidly damped and distorted in ways that confound any simple tracking approach. This paper addresses the propagation, decay, and distortion of pulses in lossy and dispersive media, in order to derive closed form analytic expressions for the propagating pulses. The theory identifies key terms that drive the distortion and broadening of the pulse. Furthermore, the approach taken is not dependent on any particular viscoelastic model of tissue, but instead takes a general first order approach to dispersion. Examples with a Gaussian beam pattern and realistic dispersion parameters are given along with general guidelines for identifying the features of the distorting wave that are the most compact. PMID:24412170

  5. Waves of seed propagation induced by delayed animal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Kazimierski, Laila D; Kuperman, Marcelo N; Wio, Horacio S; Abramson, Guillermo

    2017-09-28

    We study a model of seed dispersal that considers the inclusion of an animal disperser moving diffusively, feeding on fruits and transporting the seeds, which are later deposited and capable of germination. The dynamics depends on several population parameters of growth, decay, harvesting, transport, digestion and germination. In particular, the deposition of transported seeds at places away from their collection sites produces a delay in the dynamics, whose effects are the focus of this work. Analytical and numerical solutions of different simplified scenarios show the existence of travelling waves. The effect of zoochory is apparent in the increase of the velocity of these waves. The results support the hypothesis of the relevance of animal mediated seed dispersion when trying to understand the origin of the high rates of vegetable invasion observed in real systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Parametric instabilities of the circularly polarized Alfven waves including dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, H. K.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1986-05-01

    A class of parametric instabilities of large-amplitude, circularly polarized Alfven waves is considered in which finite frequency (dispersive) effects are included. The dispersion equation governing the instabilities is a sixth-order polynomial which is solved numerically. As a function of K identically equal to k/k-sub-0 (where k-sub-0 and k are the wave number of the 'pump' wave and unstable sound wave, respectively), there are three regionals of instability: a modulation instability at K less than 1, a decay instability at K greater than 1, and a relatively weak and narrow instability at K close to squared divided by v-sub-A squared (where c-sub-s and v-sub-A are the sound and Alfven speeds respectively), the modulational instability occurs when beta is less than 1 (more than 1) for left-hand (right-hand) pump waves, in agreement with the previous results of Sakai and Sonnerup (1983). The growth rate of the decay instability of left-hand waves is greater than the modulational instability at all values of beta. Applications to large-amplitude wave observed in the solar wind, in computer simulations, and in the vicinity of planetary and interplanetary collisionless shocks are discussed.

  7. Wave dispersion and propagation in state-based peridynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Sahir N.; Timothy, Jithender J.; Meschke, Günther

    2017-07-01

    Peridynamics is a nonlocal continuum model which offers benefits over classical continuum models in cases, where discontinuities, such as cracks, are present in the deformation field. However, the nonlocal characteristics of peridynamics leads to a dispersive dynamic response of the medium. In this study we focus on the dispersion properties of a state-based linear peridynamic solid model and specifically investigate the role of the peridynamic horizon. We derive the dispersion relation for one, two and three dimensional cases and investigate the effect of horizon size, mesh size (lattice spacing) and the influence function on the dispersion properties. We show how the influence function can be used to minimize wave dispersion at a fixed lattice spacing and demonstrate it qualitatively by wave propagation analysis in one- and two-dimensional models of elastic solids. As a main contribution of this paper, we propose to associate peridynamic non-locality expressed by the horizon with a characteristic length scale related to the material microstructure. To this end, the dispersion curves obtained from peridynamics are compared with experimental data for two kinds of sandstone.

  8. Wave dispersion and attenuation on human femur tissue.

    PubMed

    Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Boulpaep, Frans; van Hemelrijck, Danny; Aggelis, Dimitrios G

    2014-08-15

    Cortical bone is a highly heterogeneous material at the microscale and has one of the most complex structures among materials. Application of elastic wave techniques to this material is thus very challenging. In such media the initial excitation energy goes into the formation of elastic waves of different modes. Due to "dispersion", these modes tend to separate according to the velocities of the frequency components. This work demonstrates elastic wave measurements on human femur specimens. The aim of the study is to measure parameters like wave velocity, dispersion and attenuation by using broadband acoustic emission sensors. First, four sensors were placed at small intervals on the surface of the bone to record the response after pencil lead break excitations. Next, the results were compared to measurements on a bulk steel block which does not exhibit heterogeneity at the same wave lengths. It can be concluded that the microstructure of the tissue imposes a dispersive behavior for frequencies below 1 MHz and care should be taken for interpretation of the signals. Of particular interest are waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, since in the next stage of research the bone specimens will be fractured with concurrent monitoring of acoustic emission.

  9. Measurement of elastic wave dispersion on human femur tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strantza, M.; Louis, O.; Polyzos, D.; Boulpaep, F.; Van Hemelrijck, D.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2014-03-01

    Cortical bone is one of the most complex heterogeneous media exhibiting strong wave dispersion. In such media when a burst of energy goes into the formation of elastic waves the different modes tend to separate according to the velocities of the frequency components as usually occurs in waveguides. In this study human femur specimens were subjected to elastic wave measurements. The main objective of the study is using broadband acoustic emission sensors to measure parameters like wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Additionally, waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, are also examined relatively to the propagation distance as a preparation for acoustic emission monitoring during fracture. To do so, four sensors were placed at adjacent positions on the surface of the cortical bone in order to record the transient response after pencil lead break excitation. The results are compared to similar measurements on a bulk metal piece which does not exhibit heterogeneity at the scale of the propagating wave lengths. It is shown that the microstructure of the tissue imposes a dispersive behavior for frequencies below 1 MHz and care should be taken for interpretation of the signals.

  10. Dispersive Evolution of Nonlinear Fast Magnetoacoustic Wave Trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Goddard, C. R.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2017-10-01

    Quasi-periodic rapidly propagating wave trains are frequently observed in extreme ultraviolet observations of the solar corona, or are inferred by the quasi-periodic modulation of radio emission. The dispersive nature of fast magnetohydrodynamic waves in coronal structures provides a robust mechanism to explain the detected quasi-periodic patterns. We perform 2D numerical simulations of impulsively generated wave trains in coronal plasma slabs and investigate how the behavior of the trapped and leaky components depend on the properties of the initial perturbation. For large amplitude compressive perturbations, the geometrical dispersion associated with the waveguide suppresses the nonlinear steepening for the trapped wave train. The wave train formed by the leaky components does not experience dispersion once it leaves the waveguide and so can steepen and form shocks. The mechanism we consider can lead to the formation of multiple shock fronts by a single, large amplitude, impulsive event and so can account for quasi-periodic features observed in radio spectra.

  11. Dispersion of waves in porous cylinders with patchy saturation Part I. Formulaton and torsional waves

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G; Pride, S R

    2004-07-28

    Laboratory experiments on wave propagation through saturated and partially saturated porous media have often been conducted on porous cylinders that were initially fully saturated and then allowed to dry while continuing to acquire data on the wave behavior. Since it is known that drying typically progresses from outside to inside, a sensible physical model of this process is concentric cylinders having different saturation levels--the simplest example being a fully dry outer cylindrical shell together with a fully wet inner cylinder. We use this model to formulate the equations for wave dispersion in porous cylinders for patchy saturation (i.e. drainage) conditions. In addition to multiple modes of propagation obtained numerically from these dispersion relations, we find two distinct analytical expressions for torsional wave modes. We solve the dispersion relation for torsional waves for two examples: Massillon sandstone and Sierra White granite. The drainage analysis appears to give improved agreement with the data for both these materials.

  12. Modeling Observed Decay-less Oscillations as Resonantly Enhanced Kelvin-Helmholtz Vortices from Transverse MHD Waves and Their Seismological Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, P.; De Moortel, I.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Yokoyama, T.

    2016-10-01

    In the highly structured solar corona, resonant absorption is an unavoidable mechanism of energy transfer from global transverse MHD waves to local azimuthal Alfvén waves. Due to its localized nature, direct detection of this mechanism is extremely difficult. Yet, it is the leading theory explaining the observed fast damping of the global transverse waves. However, at odds with this theoretical prediction are recent observations that indicate that in the low-amplitude regime such transverse MHD waves can also appear decay-less, a still unsolved phenomenon. Recent numerical work has shown that Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (KHI) often accompany transverse MHD waves. In this work, we combine 3D MHD simulations and forward modeling to show that for currently achieved spatial resolution and observed small amplitudes, an apparent decay-less oscillation is obtained. This effect results from the combination of periodic brightenings produced by the KHI and the coherent motion of the KHI vortices amplified by resonant absorption. Such an effect is especially clear in emission lines forming at temperatures that capture the boundary dynamics rather than the core, and reflects the low damping character of the local azimuthal Alfvén waves resonantly coupled to the kink mode. Due to phase mixing, the detected period can vary depending on the emission line, with those sensitive to the boundary having shorter periods than those sensitive to the loop core. This allows us to estimate the density contrast at the boundary.

  13. Multi-instrument observations of a failed flare eruption associated with MHD waves in a loop bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisticò, G.; Polito, V.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Del Zanna, G.

    2017-04-01

    Context. We present observations of a B7.9-class flare that occurred on the 24th January, 2015, using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the X-Ray Telescope of Hinode. The flare triggers the eruption of a dense cool plasma blob as seen in AIA 171 Å, which is unable to completely break out and remains confined within a local bundle of active region loops. During this process, transverse oscillations of the threads are observed. The cool plasma is then observed to descend back to the chromosphere along each loop strand. At the same time, a larger diffuse co-spatial loop observed in the hot wavebands of SDO/AIA and Hinode/XRT is formed, exhibiting periodic intensity variations along its length. Aims: The formation and evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves depend upon the values of the local plasma parameters (e.g. density, temperature and magnetic field), which can hence be inferred by coronal seismology. In this study we aim to assess how the observed MHD modes are affected by the variation of density and temperature. Methods: We combined analysis of EUV/X-ray imaging and spectroscopy using SDO/AIA, Hinode/EIS and XRT. Results: The transverse oscillations of the cool loop threads are interpreted in terms of vertically polarised kink oscillations. The fitting procedure applied to the loop displacement time series gives a period of 3.5 to 4 min, and an amplitude of 5 Mm. The oscillations are strongly damped showing very low quality factor (1.5-2), which is defined as the ratio of the damping time and the oscillation period. The weak variation of the period of the kink wave, which is estimated from the fitting analysis, is in agreement with the density variations due to the presence of the plasma blob inferred from the intensity light curve at 171 Å. The coexisting intensity oscillations along the hot loop are interpreted as a slow MHD wave with a period of 10 min and phase

  14. Effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on crude oil dispersion in a wave tank under breaking waves.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengkai; Kepkay, Paul; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Boufadel, Michel C; Venosa, Albert D

    2007-07-01

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on the dispersion of oil and the formation of oil-mineral-aggregates (OMAs) in natural seawater. Results of ultraviolet spectrofluorometry and gas chromatography flame ionized detection analysis indicated that dispersants and mineral fines, alone and in combination, enhanced the dispersion of oil into the water column. Measurements taken with a laser in situ scattering and transmissometer (LISST-100X) showed that the presence of mineral fines increased the total concentration of the suspended particles from 4 to 10microl l(-1), whereas the presence of dispersants decreased the particle size (mass mean diameter) of OMAs from 50 to 10microm. Observation with an epifluorescence microscope indicated that the presence of dispersants, mineral fines, or both in combination significantly increased the number of particles dispersed into the water.

  15. Three-dimensional, time-dependent, MHD model of a solar flare-generated interplanetary shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, M.; Wu, S. T.; Han, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    A three-dimensional time-dependent MHD model of the propagation of an interplanetary shock wave into an ambient three-dimensional heliospheric solar wind is initialized with a peak velocity of 1000 km/s at the center of a right circular cone of 18 deg included angle at 18 solar radii. Differences from a previous 2-1/2 simulation (Wu et al., 1983; Gislason et al., 1984; Dryer et al., 1984) include diminuation of the solar peak velocity and concentration of the peak density at each radius. The IMF magnitude starts with high-latitude peaks, and helical-like IMF rotation is noted due to a large-amplitude nonlinear Alfven wave in the shocked plasma.

  16. Mode separation of Lamb waves based on dispersion compensation method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kailiang; Ta, Dean; Moilanen, Petro; Wang, Weiqi

    2012-04-01

    Ultrasonic Lamb modes typically propagate as a combination of multiple dispersive wave packets. Frequency components of each mode distribute widely in time domain due to dispersion and it is very challenging to separate individual modes by traditional signal processing methods. In the present study, a method of dispersion compensation is proposed for the purpose of mode separation. This numerical method compensates, i.e., compresses, the individual dispersive waveforms into temporal pulses, which thereby become nearly un-overlapped in time and frequency and can thus be extracted individually by rectangular time windows. It was further illustrated that the dispersion compensation also provided a method for predicting the plate thickness. Finally, based on reversibility of the numerical compensation method, an artificial dispersion technique was used to restore the original waveform of each mode from the separated compensated pulse. Performances of the compensation separation techniques were evaluated by processing synthetic and experimental signals which consisted of multiple Lamb modes with high dispersion. Individual modes were extracted with good accordance with the original waveforms and theoretical predictions.

  17. Computation of plate wave dispersion diagrams and surface wave velocities without explicit boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Laude, Vincent; Assouar, Badreddine; Hou, Zhilin

    2010-07-01

    We discuss the computation of the band structure of plate waves using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method. This method is generally used to formulate eigenvalue problems to compute dispersion diagrams for solid-solid phononic crystals. We show how the free surface boundary condition can be included implicitly in the form of the PWE solution, thus leading to an efficient eigenvalue problem. This generic method for wave dispersion is non-iterative and does not require an initial guess for the solution. Furthermore, surface acoustic wave velocities can be estimated from the slowest wave for large wave vectors. Examples for a single plate and a multilayer plate are given, and extension to piezoelectric materials is discussed.

  18. Dispersion relations for electromagnetic wave propagation in chiral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, M. X.; Guo, B. Peng, L.; Cai, X.

    2014-11-15

    The dispersion relations for electromagnetic wave propagation in chiral plasmas are derived using a simplified method and investigated in detail. With the help of the dispersion relations for each eignwave, we explore how the chiral plasmas exhibit negative refraction and investigate the frequency region for negative refraction. The results show that chirality can induce negative refraction in plasmas. Moreover, both the degree of chirality and the external magnetic field have a significant effect on the critical frequency and the bandwidth of the frequency for negative refraction in chiral plasmas. The parameter dependence of the effects is calculated and discussed.

  19. The energy associated with MHD waves generation in the solar wind plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delaTorre, A.

    1995-01-01

    Gyrotropic symmetry is usually assumed in measurements of electron distribution functions in the heliosphere. This prevents the calculation of a net current perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. Previous theoretical results derived by one of the authors for a collisionless plasma with isotropic electrons in a strong magnetic field have shown that the excitation of MHD modes becomes possible when the external perpendicular current is non-zero. We consider then that any anisotropic electron population can be thought of as 'external', interacting with the remaining plasma through the self-consistent electromagnetic field. From this point of view any perpendicular current may be due to the anisotropic electrons, or to an external source like a stream, or to both. As perpendicular currents cannot be derived from the measured distribution functions, we resort to Ampere's law and experimental data of magnetic field fluctuations. The transfer of energy between MHD modes and external currents is then discussed.

  20. The energy associated with MHD waves generation in the solar wind plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delaTorre, A.

    1995-01-01

    Gyrotropic symmetry is usually assumed in measurements of electron distribution functions in the heliosphere. This prevents the calculation of a net current perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. Previous theoretical results derived by one of the authors for a collisionless plasma with isotropic electrons in a strong magnetic field have shown that the excitation of MHD modes becomes possible when the external perpendicular current is non-zero. We consider then that any anisotropic electron population can be thought of as 'external', interacting with the remaining plasma through the self-consistent electromagnetic field. From this point of view any perpendicular current may be due to the anisotropic electrons, or to an external source like a stream, or to both. As perpendicular currents cannot be derived from the measured distribution functions, we resort to Ampere's law and experimental data of magnetic field fluctuations. The transfer of energy between MHD modes and external currents is then discussed.

  1. Dispersion-Engineered Traveling Wave Kinetic Inductance Parametric Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas (Inventor); Day, Peter K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A traveling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifier comprises a superconducting transmission line and a dispersion control element. The transmission line can include periodic variations of its dimension along its length. The superconducting material can include a high normal state resistivity material. In some instances the high normal state resistivity material includes nitrogen and a metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, niobium and vanadium. The traveling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifier is expected to exhibit a noise temperature below 100 mK/GHz.

  2. Evaluating crude oil chemical dispersion efficacy in a flow-through wave tank under regular non-breaking wave and breaking wave conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengkai; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Boufadel, Michel C; Venosa, Albert D

    2009-05-01

    Testing dispersant effectiveness under conditions similar to that of the open environment is required for improvements in operational procedures and the formulation of regulatory guidelines. To this end, a novel wave tank facility was fabricated to study the dispersion of crude oil under regular non-breaking and irregular breaking wave conditions. This wave tank facility was designed for operation in a flow-through mode to simulate both wave- and current-driven hydrodynamic conditions. We report here an evaluation of the effectiveness of chemical dispersants (Corexit EC9500A and SPC 1000) on two crude oils (Medium South American [MESA] and Alaska North Slope [ANS]) under two different wave conditions (regular non-breaking and plunging breaking waves) in this wave tank. The dispersant effectiveness was assessed by measuring the water column oil concentration and dispersed oil droplet size distribution. In the absence of dispersants, nearly 8-19% of the test crude oils were dispersed and diluted under regular wave and breaking wave conditions. In the presence of dispersants, about 21-36% of the crude oils were dispersed and diluted under regular waves, and 42-62% under breaking waves. Consistently, physical dispersion under regular waves produced large oil droplets (volumetric mean diameter or VMD > or = 300 microm), whereas chemical dispersion under breaking waves created small droplets (VMD < or = 50 microm). The data can provide useful information for developing better operational guidelines for dispersant use and improved predictive models on dispersant effectiveness in the field.

  3. Dispersion of waves in relativistic plasmas with isotropic particle distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.

    2009-03-15

    The dispersion laws of Langmuir and transverse waves are calculated in the relativistic nonmagnetized formalism for several isotropic particle distributions: thermal, power law, relativistic Lorentzian {kappa}, and hybrid {beta}. For Langmuir waves the parameters of superluminal undamped, subluminal damped principal, and higher modes are determined for a range of distribution parameters. The undamped and principal damped modes are found to match smoothly. Principal damped and second damped modes are found not to match smoothly. The presence of maximum wavenumber is discovered above that no longitudinal modes formally exist. The higher damped modes are discovered to be qualitatively different for thermal and certain nonthermal distributions. Consistently with the known results, the Landau damping is calculated to be stronger for nonthermal power-law-like distributions. The dispersion law is obtained for the single undamped transverse mode. The analytic results for the simplest distributions are provided.

  4. Ultrasonic wave velocity in the restructuring of disperse media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltsova, I. S.; Khomutova, A. S.; Deinega, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The ultrasonic wave velocities in the restructuring of disperse media were measured using interference and pulsed techniques and the coefficient of reflection in suspensions of starch, Al2O3, and SiO2 particles, glass bulbs, their porous sediments, and composites of Fe3O4 particles in 10% gelatin aqueous solution at a frequency of 3 MHz. The experiments showed alternating variation in the concentration velocity coefficient during the transition of the dispersed phase concentration from the subpercolation to percolation region. The minimum ultrasonic wave velocity in the region of discrete clusters correlates with the ratio between the particle and matrix densities. The results obtained are explained using the Isakovich, Chaban, Rytov, Biot, Hausdorff, and other theories.

  5. Modeling Gravitational Waves to Test GR Dispersion and Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tso, Rhondale; Chen, Yanbei; Isi, Maximilliano

    2017-01-01

    Given continued observation runs from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory Scientific Collaboration, further gravitational wave (GW) events will provide added constraints on beyond-general relativity (b-GR) theories. One approach, independent of the GW generation mechanism at the source, is to look at modification to the GW dispersion and propagation, which can accumulate over vast distances. Generic modification of GW propagation can also, in certain b-GR theories, impact the polarization content of GWs. To this end, a comprehensive approach to testing the dispersion and polarization content is developed by modeling anisotropic deformations to the waveforms' phase, along with birefringence effects and corollary consequences for b-GR polarizations, i.e., breathing, vector, and longitudinal modes. Such an approach can be mapped to specific theories like Lorentz violation, amplitude birefringence in Chern-Simons, and provide hints at additional theories to be included. An overview of data analysis routines to be implemented will also be discussed.

  6. Optical dispersive shock waves in defocusing colloidal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, X.; Marchant, T. R.; Smyth, N. F.

    2017-03-01

    The propagation of an optical dispersive shock wave, generated from a jump discontinuity in light intensity, in a defocusing colloidal medium is analysed. The equations governing nonlinear light propagation in a colloidal medium consist of a nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the beam and an algebraic equation for the medium response. In the limit of low light intensity, these equations reduce to a perturbed higher order nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Solutions for the leading and trailing edges of the colloidal dispersive shock wave are found using modulation theory. This is done for both the perturbed nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the full colloid equations for arbitrary light intensity. These results are compared with numerical solutions of the colloid equations.

  7. The dispersion relations of dispersive Alfvén waves in superthermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaelzer, Rudi; Ziebell, Luiz F.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of velocity distribution functions (VDFs) that exhibit a power law dependence on the high-energy tail have been the subject of intense research by the space plasma community. Such functions, known as superthermal or kappa distributions, have been found to provide a better fitting to the VDF measured by several spacecraft in the plasma environment of the solar wind. In the literature, the general treatment for waves excited by (bi-)Maxwellian plasmas is well established. However, for kappa distributions, either isotropic or anisotropic, the wave characteristics have been studied mostly for the limiting cases of purely parallel or perpendicular propagation. Contributions for the general case of obliquely propagating waves have been scarcely reported so far. In this work we introduce a mathematical formalism that provides expressions for the dielectric tensor components and subsequent dispersion relations for oblique propagating dispersive Alfvén waves (DAWs) resulting from a kappa VDF. We employ an isotropic distribution, but the methods used here can be easily applied to more general anisotropic distributions, such as the bi-kappa or product-bi-kappa. The effect of the kappa index and thermal corrections on the dispersion relations of DAW is discussed.

  8. Wavemode identification in the dissipation/dispersion range of solar wind turbulence: Kinetic Alfven Waves and/or Whistlers? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, C. S.; Sundkvist, D. J.; Bale, S.

    2009-12-01

    Electromagnetic fluctuations in the inertial range of solar wind MHD turbulence and beyond (up to frequencies of 10Hz) have been studied for the first time using both magnetic field and electric field measurements on Cluster [Bale et al., 2005]. It has been shown that at frequencies above the spectral breakpoint at ~0.4Hz, in the dissipation range, the wave modes become dispersive and are consistent with Kinetic Alfven Waves (KAW). This interpretation, consistent with findings from recent theoretical studies, is based on the simple assumption that the measured frequency spectrum is actually a Doppler shifted wave number spectrum (ω ≈ k Vsw), commonly used in the solar wind and known as Taylor's hypothesis. While Taylor's hypothesis is valid in the inertial range of solar wind turbulence, it may break down in the dissipation range where temporal fluctuations can become important. We recently analyzed the effect of Doppler shift on KAW as well as compressional proton whistler waves [Salem et al., 2009]. The dispersive properties of the KAW and the whistler wave modes, as well as the electric to magnetic field (E/B) ratio, have been determined both analytically and numerically in the plasma and the spacecraft frame, with the goal of directly comparing those analytical/numerical estimates in the spacecraft frame with the data as measured. We revisit here Cluster electric field and magnetic field data in the solar wind using this approach. We focus our analysis on several ambient solar wind intervals with varying plasma parameters, allowing for a statistical study. We show that this technique provides an efficient diagnostics for wave-mode identification in the dissipation/dispersion range of solar wind turbulence.

  9. Electromagnetic cyclotron waves in the solar wind: Wind observation and wave dispersion analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, L. K.; Moya, P. S.; Viñas, A. F.; Stevens, M.

    2016-03-25

    Wind observed long-lasting electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the proton cyclotron frequency on 11 March 2005, in the descending part of a fast wind stream. Bi-Maxwellian velocity distributions are fitted for core protons, beam protons, and α-particles. Using the fitted plasma parameters we conduct kinetic linear dispersion analysis and find ion cyclotron and/or firehose instabilities grow in six of 10 wave intervals. After Doppler shift, some of the waves have frequency and polarization consistent with observation, thus may be correspondence to the cyclotron waves observed.

  10. Electromagnetic Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind: Wind Observation and Wave Dispersion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jian, L. K.; Moya, P. S.; Vinas, A. F.; Stevens, M.

    2016-01-01

    Wind observed long-lasting electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the proton cyclotron frequency on 11 March 2005, in the descending part of a fast wind stream. Bi-Maxwellian velocity distributions are fitted for core protons, beam protons, and alpha-particles. Using the fitted plasma parameters we conduct kinetic linear dispersion analysis and find ion cyclotron and/or firehose instabilities grow in six of 10 wave intervals. After Doppler shift, some of the waves have frequency and polarization consistent with observation, thus may be correspondence to the cyclotron waves observed.

  11. Traveling solitary wave induced by nonlocality in dispersive shock wave generation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Hélène; Odent, Vincent; Louvergneaux, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Shock waves are well-known nonlinear waves, displaying an abrupt discontinuity. Observation can be made in a lot of physical fields, as in water wave, plasma and nonlinear optics. Shock waves can either break or relax through either catastrophic or regularization phenomena. In this work, we restrain our study to dispersive shock waves. This regularization phenomenon implies the emission of dispersive waves. We demonstrate experimentally and numerically the generation of spatial dispersive shock waves in a nonlocal focusing media. The generation of dispersive shock wave in a focusing media is more problematic than in a defocusing one. Indeed, the modulational instability has to be frustrated to observe this phenomenon. In 2010, the dispersive shock wave was demonstrated experimentally in a focusing media with a partially coherent beam [1]. Another way is to use a nonlocal media [2]. The impact of nonlocality is more important than the modulational instability frustration. Here, we use nematic liquid crystals (NLC) as Kerr-like nonlocal medium. To achieve shock formation, we use the Riemann condition as initial spatial condition (edge at the beam entrance of the NLC cell). In these experimental conditions, we generate, experimentally and numerically, shock waves that relax through the emission of dispersive waves. Associated with this phenomenon, we evidence the emergence of a localized wave that travels through the transverse beam profile. The beam steepness, which is a good indicator of the shock formation, is maximal at the shock point position. This latter follows a power law versus the injected power as in [3]. Increasing the injected power, we found multiple shock points. We have good agreements between the numerical simulations and the experimental results. [1] W. Wan, D. V Dylov, C. Barsi, and J. W. Fleischer, Opt. Lett. 35, 2819 (2010). [2] G. Assanto, T. R. Marchant, and N. F. Smyth, Phys. Rev. A - At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 78, 1 (2008). [3] N. Ghofraniha, L. S

  12. Lamb waves dispersion curves for diamond based piezoelectric layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, B. P.; Kvashnin, G. M.; Telichko, A. V.; Novoselov, A. S.; Burkov, S. I.

    2016-03-01

    The presence of spurious peaks in the amplitude-frequency response of diamond based piezoelectric layered structure was shown. Excitation of such peaks results in deterioration of an useful acoustical signal. It was shown that such spurious peaks should be associated with Lamb waves in a layered structure. By means of FEM analysis, the propagation of acoustic waves of different types in the piezoelectric layered structure "Al/AlN/Mo/(100) diamond" has been investigated in detail. By analyzing the elastic displacement patterns at frequencies from 0 up to 250 MHz, a set of all the possible acoustic waves, especially Lamb modes, have been studied, and dispersive curves of phase velocity have been plotted. A revised classification of Lamb modes has been introduced.

  13. Examination of the forces controlling dust dispersion by shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte, O. J.; Houim, R. W.; Oran, E. S.

    2017-07-01

    The interaction between a shock wave and a thin layer of inert dust is studied by solving unsteady, multidimensional Navier-Stokes equations representing the interactions between a compressible gas and incompressible particles. The system studied consists of a layer of densely packed limestone dust containing particles of uniform diameter (40 μ m ) that interact with a shock of strength Ms=1.4 . Particle dispersion is investigated by comparing vertical particle accelerations due to Archimedes, gravitational, intergranular, and aerodynamic drag and lift forces. The simulations show that the shock produces two dust regions: a compacted layer and a dispersed region. The layer compaction, which increases the intergranular particle stress, is produced by drag and Archimedes forces. The dispersed dust is produced by forces that change in time as the shock passes. Initially, the dispersion is caused by intergranular forces. Later it is driven by a tradeoff between lift and drag forces. Eventually, drag forces dominate. Comparisons of the computations to experimental shock-tube data reproduced the observed initial growth of the dispersed dust and later leveled off. Particle agglomeration in the experiments made it difficult to determine a true particle size experimentally, although the computations for 40-μ m particles explain the experimental data.

  14. Observation of Dispersive Shock Waves, Solitons, and Their Interactions in Viscous Fluid Conduits.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Michelle D; Lowman, Nicholas K; Anderson, Dalton V; Schubert, Marika E; Hoefer, Mark A

    2016-04-29

    Dispersive shock waves and solitons are fundamental nonlinear excitations in dispersive media, but dispersive shock wave studies to date have been severely constrained. Here, we report on a novel dispersive hydrodynamic test bed: the effectively frictionless dynamics of interfacial waves between two high viscosity contrast, miscible, low Reynolds number Stokes fluids. This scenario is realized by injecting from below a lighter, viscous fluid into a column filled with high viscosity fluid. The injected fluid forms a deformable pipe whose diameter is proportional to the injection rate, enabling precise control over the generation of symmetric interfacial waves. Buoyancy drives nonlinear interfacial self-steepening, while normal stresses give rise to the dispersion of interfacial waves. Extremely slow mass diffusion and mass conservation imply that the interfacial waves are effectively dissipationless. This enables high fidelity observations of large amplitude dispersive shock waves in this spatially extended system, found to agree quantitatively with a nonlinear wave averaging theory. Furthermore, several highly coherent phenomena are investigated including dispersive shock wave backflow, the refraction or absorption of solitons by dispersive shock waves, and the multiphase merging of two dispersive shock waves. The complex, coherent, nonlinear mixing of dispersive shock waves and solitons observed here are universal features of dissipationless, dispersive hydrodynamic flows.

  15. Observation of Dispersive Shock Waves, Solitons, and Their Interactions in Viscous Fluid Conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiden, Michelle D.; Lowman, Nicholas K.; Anderson, Dalton V.; Schubert, Marika E.; Hoefer, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    Dispersive shock waves and solitons are fundamental nonlinear excitations in dispersive media, but dispersive shock wave studies to date have been severely constrained. Here, we report on a novel dispersive hydrodynamic test bed: the effectively frictionless dynamics of interfacial waves between two high viscosity contrast, miscible, low Reynolds number Stokes fluids. This scenario is realized by injecting from below a lighter, viscous fluid into a column filled with high viscosity fluid. The injected fluid forms a deformable pipe whose diameter is proportional to the injection rate, enabling precise control over the generation of symmetric interfacial waves. Buoyancy drives nonlinear interfacial self-steepening, while normal stresses give rise to the dispersion of interfacial waves. Extremely slow mass diffusion and mass conservation imply that the interfacial waves are effectively dissipationless. This enables high fidelity observations of large amplitude dispersive shock waves in this spatially extended system, found to agree quantitatively with a nonlinear wave averaging theory. Furthermore, several highly coherent phenomena are investigated including dispersive shock wave backflow, the refraction or absorption of solitons by dispersive shock waves, and the multiphase merging of two dispersive shock waves. The complex, coherent, nonlinear mixing of dispersive shock waves and solitons observed here are universal features of dissipationless, dispersive hydrodynamic flows.

  16. Global ULF wave analysis of radial diffusion coefficients using a global MHD model for the 17 March 2015 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao; Hudson, Mary; Paral, Jan; Wiltberger, Michael; Turner, Drew

    2016-07-01

    The 17-18 March 2015 storm is the largest geomagnetic storm in the Van Allen Probes era to date. The Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD model has been run for this event using ARTEMIS data as solar wind input. The ULF wave power spectral density of the azimuthal electric field and compressional magnetic field is analyzed in the 0.5-8.3 mHz range. The lowest three azimuthal modes account for 70% of the total power during quiet times. However, during high activity, they are not exclusively dominant. The calculation of the radial diffusion coefficient is presented. We conclude that the electric field radial diffusion coefficient is dominant over the magnetic field coefficient by one to two orders of magnitude. This result contrasts with the dominant magnetic field diffusion coefficient used in most 3-D diffusion models.

  17. Two-dimensional envelope localized waves in the anomalous dispersion regime.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Stefania; Bellanca, Gaetano; Trillo, Stefano

    2008-05-15

    Narrowband localized wave packets that are nondispersing and nondiffracting in one transverse dimension are characterized in anomalously dispersive media by means of a Fourier approach. Depending on the group velocity, waves with a dispersion relationship characterized by real wavenumbers can be O or X waves, while we also find waves with evanescent wavenumbers.

  18. 1-D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Volker, Arno; Zon, Tim van

    2014-02-18

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently, inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Guided wave tomography has been developed to reconstruct the wall thickness of steel pipes. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Data is collected in a pitch-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. After dispersion correction the data collapses to a short pulse, any residual dispersion indicates wall loss. The phase spectrum is used to invert for the wall thickness profile in the circumferential direction, assuming a Gaussian defect profile. The approach is evaluated on numerically simulated and on measured data. The method is intended for rapid, semi-quantitative screening of pipes.

  19. Magnetopause surface waves triggered by a rotating IMF with the global MHD SWMF/BAT-S-RUS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyas, T.; Spencer, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The solar wind driving of magnetopause surface waves is only partly understood. In particular we do not have a picture of the magnetopause surface wave properties and behavior when a magnetic cloud event, which sometimes involves a rotating IMF, impinges on the magnetosphere. Here we investigate the effect of a twisting or rotational IMF under moderate solar wind velocity (about 500 km/s) upon the magnetosphere with the Global MHD BATS-R-US code. Synthetic solar wind data is constructed to simulate the most important features of a magnetic cloud event, but without including shock features. A sinusoidally varying By component accompanied by a cosinusoidally varying Bz component of the IMF is input into the model with magnitude 10-20 nT. The synthetic data is representative of the magnetic cloud event that occurred on October 3-7 2000. We use the results of the simulation to infer the modes, properties, and particularly the phase speed and wavelength of the surface wave structures.

  20. Dense particle cloud dispersion by a shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellenberger, Mark Douglas

    High-speed particle dispersion research is motivated by the energy release enhancement of explosives containing solid particles. In the initial explosive dispersal, a dense gas-solid flow can exist where the physics of phase interactions are not well understood. A dense particle flow is generated by the interaction of a shock wave with an initially stationary packed granular bed. The initial packed granular bed is produced by compressing loose aluminum oxide powder into a 6.35 mm thick wafer with a particle volume fraction of 0.48. The wafer is positioned inside the shock tube, uniformly filling the entire cross-section. This results in a clean experiment where no flow obstructing support structures are present. Through high-speed shadowgraph imaging and pressure measurements along the length of the channel, detailed information about the particle-shock interaction was obtained. Due to the limited strength of the Mach 2 incident shock wave, no transmitted shock wave is produced. The initial "solid-like" response of the particle wafer acceleration forms a series of compression waves that coalesce to form a shock wave. Breakup is initiated along the periphery of the wafer as the result of shear that forms due to the fixed boundary condition. Particle break-up starts at local failure sites that result in the formation of particle jets that extend ahead of the accelerating, largely intact, wafer core. In a circular tube the failure sites are uniformly distributed along the wafer circumference. In a square channel, the failure sites, and the subsequent particle jets, initially form at the corners due to the enhanced shear. The wafer breakup subsequently spreads to the edges forming a highly non-uniform particle cloud.

  1. Linear guided waves in a hyperbolic planar waveguide. Dispersion relations

    SciTech Connect

    Lyashko, E I; Maimistov, A I

    2015-11-30

    We have theoretically investigated waveguide modes propagating in a planar waveguide formed by a layer of an isotropic dielectric surrounded by hyperbolic media. The case, when the optical axis of hyperbolic media is perpendicular to the interface, is considered. Dispersion relations are derived for the cases of TE and TM waves. The differences in the characteristics of a hyperbolic and a conventional dielectric waveguide are found. In particular, it is shown that in hyperbolic waveguides for each TM mode there are two cut-off frequencies and the number of propagating modes is always limited. (metamaterials)

  2. Dispersion and damping rates of dispersive Alfvén wave in a nonextensive plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. Dai, B.; Xue, T. L.; Liu, S. Q.

    2014-03-15

    The dispersion and landau damping of the dispersive Alfvén waves (DAW) have been studied in the plasma with nonextensive electrons and ions. The conditions for the existence of inertial Alfvén waves (IAW) and kinetic Alfvén waves (KAW) are modified by electrons' nonextensive parameter q{sub e}. For IAW, β{sub q} ≪ m{sub e}/m{sub i}; for KAW, m{sub e}/m{sub i} ≪ β{sub q} ≪ 1, β{sub q} is the ratio of the effective thermal pressure to the magnetic pressure. In the plasma with superthermal particles, the frequency of the IAW and KAW will increase with the increase of q{sub e} when the effective temperature of the plasma systems keeps invariant. Whereas the damping rates of the IAW and KAW vary inversely with respect to q{sub e} for the reason that the phase velocity of KAW is much smaller than the effective thermal velocity, while the phase velocity of IAW is much bigger than the effective thermal velocity.

  3. Lamb Wave Dispersion Characterization Using Multiplexed Two-Wave Mixing Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Feifei; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2003-03-01

    In recent work at Northwestern University, Multiplexed Two-Wave Mixing Interferometers (MTWM) have been developed. These systems are able to perform optical detection of ultrasonic motion over an array of points simultaneously. Optical phase gratings are used to create a detection-array of laser beams that are directed to the specimen. The detection array can be arranged in several ways on the test object. The scattered beams from the detection-array are collected and combined with a single reference beam in a photorefractive crystal to form a multiplexed two-wave mixing configuration. Each of the output beams from the photorefractive crystal is imaged on to a separate element of a photodetector array. The resulting MTWM system is capable of providing simultaneous optical detection (with high spatial resolution and sub-nanometer displacement sensitivities) at several points on a test object. The MTWM system can be used in several modes for laser ultrasonic NDE of flaws and materials characterization. In this paper we present recent advances and applications of this technology. An application of the MTWM system for fast recovery of Lamb wave dispersion curves is presented. We obtain the dispersive time-domain Lamb wave signals at multiple source-to-receiver distances. Following the algorithm of Alleyne and Cawley, these time-position domain signals are transformed to the frequency-wavenumber domain using a 2D FFT technique. The MTWM system enables rapid characterization of Lamb wave dispersion.

  4. Slow-Mode MHD Wave Penetration into a Coronal Null Point due to the Mode Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey N.; Uralov, Arkadiy M.

    2016-11-01

    Recent observations of magnetohydrodynamic oscillations and waves in solar active regions revealed their close link to quasi-periodic pulsations in flaring light curves. The nature of that link has not yet been understood in detail. In our analytical modelling we investigate propagation of slow magnetoacoustic waves in a solar active region, taking into account wave refraction and transmission of the slow magnetoacoustic mode into the fast one. The wave propagation is analysed in the geometrical acoustics approximation. Special attention is paid to the penetration of waves in the vicinity of a magnetic null point. The modelling has shown that the interaction of slow magnetoacoustic waves with the magnetic reconnection site is possible due to the mode transmission at the equipartition level where the sound speed is equal to the Alfvén speed. The efficiency of the transmission is also calculated.

  5. Interpreting Solar EUV Wave Observations from Different Viewing Angles Using an MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoilijoki, S.; Pomoell, J.; Vainio, R.; Palmroth, M.; Koskinen, H. E. J.

    2013-09-01

    We study the effect of projection and line-of-sight integration on the interpretation of the morphology and kinematics of EUV waves. We have performed a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) erupting in an environment that mimics the low solar corona and calculated the resulting emission measure of the event from five different viewing angles. Our study provides more quantitative information about the impact of the viewing angle and projection effect on the properties of EUV waves than previous studies on the subject. Analyzing the emission measure of the lower corona reveals wave-like increases that move away from the eruption site, which we interpret as EUV waves. Behind the EUV wave front we can recognize coronal dimming regions. A comparison of the emission measure and calculated density supports the view that EUV waves are true waves. Our results show that the origin of the observed EUV wave is height-dependent, which means that the measured speed and the morphology depend on the viewing direction. Consequently, care should be taken when EUV observations are used to infer the true propagation speeds of EUV wave fronts.

  6. Radiating dispersive shock waves in non-local optical media

    PubMed Central

    El, Gennady A.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the step Riemann problem for the system of equations describing the propagation of a coherent light beam in nematic liquid crystals, which is a general system describing nonlinear wave propagation in a number of different physical applications. While the equation governing the light beam is of defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation type, the dispersive shock wave (DSW) generated from this initial condition has major differences from the standard DSW solution of the defocusing NLS equation. In particular, it is found that the DSW has positive polarity and generates resonant radiation which propagates ahead of it. Remarkably, the velocity of the lead soliton of the DSW is determined by the classical shock velocity. The solution for the radiative wavetrain is obtained using the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation. It is shown that for sufficiently small initial jumps the nematic DSW is asymptotically governed by a Korteweg–de Vries equation with the fifth-order dispersion, which explicitly shows the resonance generating the radiation ahead of the DSW. The constructed asymptotic theory is shown to be in good agreement with the results of direct numerical simulations. PMID:27118911

  7. Dispersion properties of compressional electromagnetic waves in quantum dusty magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.; Shukla, P.K.

    2006-05-15

    A new dispersion relation for low-frequency compressional electromagnetic waves is derived by employing quantum magnetohydrodynamic model and Maxwell equations in cold quantum dusty magnetoplasmas. The latter is composed of inertialess electrons, mobile ions, and immobile charged dust particulates. The dispersion relation for the low-frequency compressional electromagnetic modes is further analyzed for the waves propagating parallel, perpendicular, and oblique to the external magnetic field direction. It is found theoretically and numerically that the quantum parameter {alpha}{sub q}=(n{sub i0}/n{sub e0})({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sup 2}/(4m{sub e}m{sub i}) affects the real angular frequencies and the phase speeds of the compressional electromagnetic modes. Here, n{sub i0} (n{sub e0}) is the equilibrium number density of the ions (electrons), m{sub e} (m{sub i}) is the electron (ion) mass, and ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) is the Plank constant divided by 2{pi}.

  8. Parametric dispersion and amplification of acoustohelicon waves in piezoelectric semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, A.; Ghosh, S.

    1991-01-01

    Assuming that the origin of the nonlinear interaction lies in the second-order optical susceptibility arising from the nonlinear induced current density and using the coupled-mode theory, the parametric dispersion and amplification of acoustohelicon waves is analytically investigated in a longitudinally magnetized piezoelectric semiconductor of noncentrosymmetric nature. The relevant experiments have not been reported. The threshold value of the pump electric field E0th and its corresponding excitation intensity is obtained. The longitudinal magnetic field decreases the required magnitude of E0th for the excitation of parametric amplification. The phenomenon of self-defocusing of the signal in the prevailing case is found to be a consequence of the negative dispersive characteristics exhibited by the acoustohelicon waves. Numerical analyses are performed for an InSb crystal at 77 K, duly irradiated by frequency-doubled pulsed 10.6-μm CO2 lasers. The parametric gain constant is observed to be maximum when the cyclotron frequency ωc attains the magnitude equal to that of ω0, the incident laser frequency (=1.78×1014 s-1 ).

  9. Wave velocity dispersion and attenuation in media exhibiting internal oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Steeb, Holger; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the dynamical and acoustical behavior of porous and heterogeneous rocks is of great importance in geophysics, e.g. earthquakes, and for various seismic engineering applications, e.g. hydrocarbon exploration. Within a heterogeneous medium oscillations with a characteristic resonance frequency, depending on the mass and internal length of the heterogeneity, can occur. When excited, heterogeneities can self-oscillate with their natural frequency. Another example of internal oscillations is the dynamical behavior of non-wetting fluid blobs or fluid patches in residually saturated pore spaces. Surface tension forces or capillary forces act as the restoring force that drives the oscillation. Whatever mechanism is involved, an oscillatory phenomena within a heterogeneous medium will have an effect on acoustic or seismic waves propagating through such a medium, i.e. wave velocity dispersion and frequency-dependent attenuation. We present two models for media exhibiting internal oscillations and discuss the frequency-dependent wave propagation mechanism. Both models give similar results: (1) The low-frequency (i.e. quasi-static) limit for the phase velocity is identical with the Gassmann-Wood limit and the high-frequency limit is larger than this value and (2) Around the resonance frequency a very strong phase velocity change and the largest attenuation occurs. (1) Model for a homogeneous medium exhibiting internal oscillations We present a continuum model for an acoustic medium exhibiting internal damped oscillations. The obvious application of this model is water containing oscillating gas bubbles, providing the material and model parameters for this study. Two physically based momentum interaction terms between the two inherent constituents are used: (1) A purely elastic term of oscillatory nature that scales with the volume of the bubbles and (2) A viscous term that scales with the specific surface of the bubble. The model is capable of taking into account

  10. Crustal structure of North Dakota from joint inversion of surface wave dispersion and teleseismic P-wave reciever functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Braden Michael

    Studying and determining crustal structure of the Earth is important for understanding the interior of the Earth. Using methods like receiver functions and surface wave dispersion allows the determination of differences in structure and composition through the crust. Jointly inverting receiver functions and surface wave dispersion reduces the error and over-interpretation of the crustal structure estimation. Receiver functions and surface wave dispersion invert well together because receiver functions are very sensitive to velocity contrasts and vertical travel times, and surface wave dispersion is sensitive to average velocity and insensitive to sharp velocity contrasts. By jointly inverting receiver functions and surface wave dispersion, shear wave velocity profiles can be created to determine the properties of the crustal structure and velocity contrasts. With the use of IRIS Transportable Array stations data throughout the United States, this thesis takes a closer look at the crustal structure of North Dakota through the joint inversion of surface wave dispersion and teleseismic P-wave receiver functions. The receiver functions in North Dakota show shallow sediment effects that affect the joint inversion process. In western North Dakota the Williston basin and in eastern North Dakota the Red River Valley cause ringing effects in the receiver functions. The shallow sediments in North Dakota control and overpower the rest of the crustal signal in the receiver functions, and thus affect the ability of determining the crustal shear wave velocity structure of North Dakota through the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion, thus the use of background geology is necessary.

  11. Increased P-wave dispersion a risk for atrial fibrillation in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ertuğrul, İlker; Akgül, Sinem; Derman, Orhan; Karagöz, Tevfik; Kanbur, Nuray

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that a prolonged P-wave dispersion is a risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to evaluate P-wave dispersion in adolescents with anorexia nervosa at diagnosis. We evaluated electrocardiographic findings, particularly the P-wave dispersion, at initial assessment in 47 adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Comparison of P-wave dispersion between adolescents with anorexia nervosa and controls showed a statistically significant higher P-wave dispersion in patients with anorexia nervosa (72 ± 16.3 msec) when compared to the control group (43.8 ± 9.5 msec). Percent of body weight lost, lower body mass index, and higher weight loss rate in the patients with anorexia nervosa had no effect on P-wave dispersion. Due to the fact that anorexia nervosa has a high mortality rate we believe that cardiac pathologies such as atrial fibrillation must also be considered in the medical evaluation.

  12. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  13. The Magnetic Coupling of Chromospheres and Winds From Late Type Evolved Stars: Role of MHD Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Leake, James; Carpenter, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    Stellar chromospheres and winds represent universal attributes of stars on the cool portion of H-R diagram. In this paper we derive observational constrains for the chromospheric heating and wind acceleration from cool evolved stars and examine the role of Alfven waves as a viable source of energy dissipation and momentum deposition. We use a 1.5D magnetohydrodynamic code with a generalized Ohm's law to study propagation of Alfven waves generated along a diverging magnetic field in a stellar photosphere at a single frequency. We demonstrate that due to inclusion of the effects of ion-neutral collisions in magnetized weakly ionized chromospheric plasma on resistivity and the appropriate grid resolution, the numerical resistivity becomes 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than the physical resistivity. The motions introduced by non-linear transverse Alfven waves can explain non-thermally broadened and non-Gaussian profiles of optically thin UV lines forming in the stellar chromosphere of α Tau and other late-type giant and supergiant stars. The calculated heating rates in the stellar chromosphere model due to resistive (Joule) dissipation of electric currents on Pedersen resistivity are consistent with observational constraints on the net radiative losses in UV lines and the continuum from α Tau. At the top of the chromosphere, Alfven waves experience significant reflection, producing downward propagating transverse waves that interact with upward propagating waves and produce velocity shear in the chromosphere. Our simulations also suggest that momentum deposition by non-linear Alfven waves becomes significant in the outer chromosphere within 1 stellar radius from the photosphere that initiates a slow and massive winds from red giants and supergiants.

  14. Multiwavelength Studies of MHD Waves in the Solar Chromosphere. An Overview of Recent Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, D. B.; Morton, R. J.; Verth, G.; Fedun, V.; Grant, S. D. T.; Giagkiozis, I.

    2015-07-01

    The chromosphere is a thin layer of the solar atmosphere that bridges the relatively cool photosphere and the intensely heated transition region and corona. Compressible and incompressible waves propagating through the chromosphere can supply significant amounts of energy to the interface region and corona. In recent years an abundance of high-resolution observations from state-of-the-art facilities have provided new and exciting ways of disentangling the characteristics of oscillatory phenomena propagating through the dynamic chromosphere. Coupled with rapid advancements in magnetohydrodynamic wave theory, we are now in an ideal position to thoroughly investigate the role waves play in supplying energy to sustain chromospheric and coronal heating. Here, we review the recent progress made in characterising, categorising and interpreting oscillations manifesting in the solar chromosphere, with an impetus placed on their intrinsic energetics.

  15. Dispersion energy analysis of Rayleigh and Love waves in non-layered earth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, B.; Xia, J.; Shen, C.

    2016-12-01

    Surface-wave analysis methods have been effectively and widely used to determine shear (S) wave velocity. Dispersive curves extracted according to the dispersion energy are the basis for surface-wave analysis. The traditional surface-wave analysis method is a 1D approach because the inverted S-wave velocity profiles from surface waves are based on the assumption of horizontally layered earth model. In 2D environments, it can cause perturbations on the observed phase velocity of surface waves if the wave path is horizontally heterogeneous. In the real world applications of surface waves for the lateral variation reconstruction, it is very important to assess the errors of phase velocities that could be introduced because of the presence of lateral variations. We analyze the dispersion energy of Rayleigh and Love waves in non-layered earth models with a fault or a slope based on finite-difference modeling. Synthetic multichannel records are simulated with a finite-difference method for the non-layered earth models and dispersion images are generated by the high-resolution linear Radon transformation (LRT). We compare the dispersion energy with theoretical dispersion curves calculated by the Knopoff method. Errors of phase velocities with different receiver spread lengths are analyzed quantitatively. Results demonstrate that the extracted dispersion curve is an average result of the subsurface covered by the receiver spread length. To select the optimal receiver spread length is imperative for the investigation of lateral variation with surface-wave methods.

  16. An inversion scheme for shear wave speed using Scholte wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giard, Jennifer L.

    Acoustic propagation in littoral waters is greatly affected by seafloor sediment properties. Shear properties of sediments are also directly related to the strength of sediments for geotechnical applications. These factors emphasize the importance of estimating shear wave speeds in semi-consolidated shallow water sediments. One of the most promising approaches to estimate shear speed is to invert the shear speed profile using the dispersion of seismo-acoustic interface (Scholte) waves that travel along the water-sediment boundary. The propagation speed and attenuation of Scholte waves are closely related to the shear wave speed and attenuation over a depth of 1-2 wavelengths into the seabed. Based on this concept, the University of Rhode Island Ocean Engineering Department has developed a geophone-hydrophone system for the measurement of these interface waves, along with an inversion scheme that would invert the dispersion data for sediment shear speed profiles. The objective of this research was to investigate the validity of the system in estimating the shear speed of surface waves at the water-sediment interface. This geophone-hydrophone system was tested at Davisville, RI and the results obtained from this test will be presented. These results will also be compared to correlated values of shear speed from existing boring log data at the site to validate the inversion scheme. The data collected was processed using the Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) method and inverted using an inversion scheme based around the Godin-Chapman forward model. The inverted shear speed profile was consistent with the shear speed profiles related to sand and silt, which coincides with the types of sediment encountered in the boring logs. The validity of the inversion scheme will be addressed and future improvements and work will be discussed.

  17. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-01-26

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wave intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10⁻³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.

  18. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes.

    PubMed

    Hartley, D P; Chen, Y; Kletzing, C A; Denton, M H; Kurth, W S

    2015-02-01

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1-0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wave intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10(-3) nT(2), using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.

  19. 1D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Volker, Arno; Zon, Tim van; Enthoven, Daniel; Verburg, Wesley

    2015-03-31

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Guided wave tomography has been developed to reconstruct the wall thickness. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Data is collected in a pit-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. The phase spectrum is used to invert for a wall thickness profile in the circumferential direction, assuming a Gaussian defect profile. An EMAT sensor design has been made to measure at the 12 o'clock position of a pipe. The concept is evaluated on measured data, showing good sizing capabilities on a variety simple defect profiles.

  20. 1D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; van Zon, Tim; Hsu, Mick; Boogert, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Guided waves are propagated around the circumference of a pipe. In case of wall loss, the phase of the signal changes which is used to estimate the local wall thickness profile. A special EMAT sensor has been developed, which works in a pit-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. In order to improve the sensitivity, an inversion in performed on multiple orders of circumferential passes. Experimental results are presented on different pipes containing artificial and real defects.

  1. Correlation of P-wave dispersion with insulin sensitivity in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sert, Ahmet; Aslan, Eyup; Buyukınan, Muammer; Pirgon, Ozgur

    2017-03-01

    P-wave dispersion is a new and simple electrocardiographic marker that has been reported to be associated with inhomogeneous and discontinuous propagation of sinus impulses. In the present study, we evaluated P-wave dispersion in obese adolescents and investigated the relationship between P-wave dispersion, cardiovascular risk factors, and echocardiographic parameters. We carried out a case-control study comparing 150 obese adolescents and 50 healthy controls. Maximum and minimum P-wave durations were measured using a 12-lead surface electrocardiogram, and P-wave dispersion was calculated as the difference between these two measures. Echocardiographic examination was also performed for each subject. Multivariate linear regression analysis with stepwise variable selection was used to evaluate parameters associated with increased P-wave dispersion in obese subjects. Maximum P-wave duration and P-wave dispersion were significantly higher in obese adolescents than control subjects (143±19 ms versus 117±20 ms and 49±15 ms versus 29±9 ms, p<0.0001 for both). P-wave dispersion was positively correlated with body mass index, waist and hip circumferences, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, total cholesterol, serum levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin, homoeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance score, left ventricular mass, and left atrial dimension. P-wave dispersion was negatively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. By multiple stepwise regression analysis, left atrial dimension (β: 0.252, p=0.008) and homoeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (β: 0.205; p=0.009) were independently associated with increased P-wave dispersion in obese adolescents. Insulin resistance is a significant, independent predictor of P-wave dispersion in obese adolescents.

  2. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    DOE PAGES

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; ...

    2015-01-26

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wavemore » intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10⁻³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.« less

  3. Rossby wave energy dispersion from tropical cyclone in zonal basic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenli; Fei, Jianfang; Huang, Xiaogang; Liu, Yudi; Ma, Zhanhong; Yang, Lu

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates tropical cyclone energy dispersion under horizontally sheared flows using a nonlinear barotropic model. In addition to common patterns, unusual features of Rossby wave trains are also found in flows with constant vorticity and vorticity gradients. In terms of the direction of the energy dispersion, the wave train can rotate clockwise and elongate southwestward under anticyclonic circulation (ASH), which contributes to the reenhancement of the tropical cyclone (TC). The wave train even splits into two obvious wavelike trains in flows with a southward vorticity gradient (WSH). Energy dispersed from TCs varies over time, and variations in the intensity of the wave train components typically occur in two stages. Wave-activity flux diagnosis and ray tracing calculations are extended to the frame that moves along with the TC to reveal the concrete progress of wave propagation. The direction of the wave-activity flux is primarily determined by the combination of the basic flow and the TC velocity. Along the flux, the distribution of pseudomomentum effectively illustrates the development of wave trains, particularly the rotation and split of wave propagation. Ray tracing involves the quantitative tracing of wave features along rays, which effectively coincide with the wave train regimes. Flows of a constant shear (parabolic meridional variation) produce linear (nonlinear) wave number variations. For the split wave trains, the real and complex wave number waves move along divergent trajectories and are responsible for different energy dispersion ducts.

  4. MHD Modeling of Coronal Large-Amplitude Waves Related to CME Lift-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomoell, J.; Vainio, R.; Kissmann, R.

    2008-12-01

    We have employed a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation code to study mass motions and large-amplitude coronal waves related to the lift-off of a coronal mass ejection (CME). The eruption of the filament is achieved by an artificial force acting on the plasma inside the flux rope. By varying the magnitude of this force, the reaction of the ambient corona to CMEs with different acceleration profiles can be studied. Our model of the ambient corona is gravitationally stratified with a quadrupolar magnetic field, resulting in an ambient Alfvén speed that increases as a function of height, as typically deduced for the low corona. The results of the simulations show that the erupting flux rope is surrounded by a shock front, which is strongest near the leading edge of the erupting mass, but also shows compression near the solar surface. For rapidly accelerating filaments, the shock front forms already in the low corona. Although the speed of the driver is less than the Alfvén speed near the top of the atmosphere, the shock survives in this region as well, but as a freely propagating wave. The leading edge of the shock becomes strong early enough to drive a metric type II burst in the corona. The speed of the weaker part of the shock front near the surface is lower, corresponding to the magnetosonic speed there. We analyze the (line-of-sight) emission measure of the corona during the simulation and recognize a wave receding from the eruption site, which strongly resembles EIT waves in the low corona. Behind the EIT wave, we clearly recognize a coronal dimming, also observed during CME lift-off. We point out that the morphology of the hot downstream region of the shock would be that of a hot erupting loop, so care has to be taken not to misinterpret soft X-ray imaging observations in this respect. Finally, the geometry of the magnetic field around the erupting mass is analyzed in terms of precipitation of particles accelerated in the eruption complex. Field

  5. Dispersion analysis of passive surface-wave noise generated during hydraulic-fracturing operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Willis, Mark; Snieder, Roel; Haines, Seth S.; Behura, Jyoti; Batzle, Mike; Davidson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Surface-wave dispersion analysis is useful for estimating near-surface shear-wave velocity models, designing receiver arrays, and suppressing surface waves. Here, we analyze whether passive seismic noise generated during hydraulic-fracturing operations can be used to extract surface-wave dispersion characteristics. Applying seismic interferometry to noise measurements, we extract surface waves by cross-correlating several minutes of passive records; this approach is distinct from previous studies that used hours or days of passive records for cross-correlation. For comparison, we also perform dispersion analysis for an active-source array that has some receivers in common with the passive array. The active and passive data show good agreement in the dispersive character of the fundamental-mode surface-waves. For the higher mode surface waves, however, active and passive data resolve the dispersive properties at different frequency ranges. To demonstrate an application of dispersion analysis, we invert the observed surface-wave dispersion characteristics to determine the near-surface, one-dimensional shear-wave velocity.

  6. Wave Tank Studies On Formation And Transport Of OMA From The Chemically Dispersed Oil

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on dispersion of oil, formation ...

  7. Wave Tank Studies On Formation And Transport Of OMA From The Chemically Dispersed Oil

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on dispersion of oil, formation ...

  8. Simulated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Increases P-Wave Duration and P-Wave Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Wons, Annette M.; Rossi, Valentina; Bratton, Daniel J.; Schlatzer, Christian; Schwarz, Esther I.; Camen, Giovanni; Kohler, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Background A high P-wave duration and dispersion (Pd) have been reported to be a prognostic factor for the occurrence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), a condition linked to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We tested the hypothesis of whether a short-term increase of P-wave duration and Pd can be induced by respiratory manoeuvres simulating OSA in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Methods 12-lead-electrocardiography (ECG) was recorded continuously in 24 healthy subjects and 33 patients with PAF, while simulating obstructive apnea (Mueller manoeuvre, MM), obstructive hypopnea (inspiration through a threshold load, ITH), central apnea (AP), and during normal breathing (BL) in randomized order. The P-wave duration and Pd was calculated by using dedicated software for ECG-analysis. Results P-wave duration and Pd significantly increased during MM and ITH compared to BL in all subjects (+13.1ms and +13.8ms during MM; +11.7ms and +12.9ms during ITH; p<0.001 for all comparisons). In MM, the increase was larger in healthy subjects when compared to patients with PAF (p<0.05). Conclusion Intrathoracic pressure swings through simulated obstructive sleep apnea increase P-wave duration and Pd in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Our findings imply that intrathoracic pressure swings prolong the intra-atrial and inter-atrial conduction time and therefore may represent an independent trigger factor for the development for PAF. PMID:27071039

  9. Are There Optical Solitary Wave Solutions in Linear Media with Group Velocity Dispersion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhonghao; Zhou, Guosheng

    1996-01-01

    A generalized exact optical bright solitary wave solution in a three dimensional dispersive linear medium is presented. The most interesting property of the solution is that it can exist in the normal group-velocity-dispersion (GVD) region. In addition, another peculiar feature is that it may achieve a condition of 'zero-dispersion' to the media so that a solitary wave of arbitrarily small amplitude may be propagated with no dependence on is pulse width.

  10. Interference between wave modes may contribute to the apparent negative dispersion observed in cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christian C.; Marutyan, Karen R.; Holland, Mark R.; Wear, Keith A.; Miller, James G.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work has shown that ultrasonic waves propagating through cancellous bone often exhibit a linear-with-frequency attenuation coefficient, but a decrease in phase velocity with frequency (negative dispersion) that is inconsistent with the causality-imposed Kramers–Kronig relations. In the current study, interfering wave modes similar to those observed in bone are shown to potentially contribute to the observed negative dispersion. Biot theory, the modified Biot–Attenborogh model, and experimental results are used to aid in simulating multiple-mode wave propagation through cancellous bone. Simulations entail constructing individual wave modes exhibiting a positive dispersion using plausible velocities and amplitudes, and then summing the individual modes to create mixed-mode output wave forms. Results of the simulations indicate that mixed-mode wave forms can exhibit negative dispersion when analyzed conventionally under the assumption that only one wave is present, even when the individual interfering waves exhibit positive dispersions in accordance with the Kramers–Kronig relations. Furthermore, negative dispersion is observed when little or no visual evidence of interference exists in the time-domain data. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the observed negative dispersion could aid in determining the true material properties of cancellous bone, as opposed to the apparent properties measured using conventional data analysis techniques. PMID:19045668

  11. A reshaped excitation regenerating and mapping method for waveform correction in Lamb waves dispersion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhi; Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Hua, Jiadong

    2017-02-01

    Dispersion effect of Lamb wave will cause wave-packets to spread out in space and time, making received signals hard to be interpreted. Though the conventional dispersion compensation method can restrain dispersion effect, waveform deformation still remains in the compensated results. To eliminate dispersion effect completely, a reshaped excitation dispersion compensation method is proposed in this paper. The method compensates the dispersed signal to the same shape as the original excitation by generating a reshaped excitation and then mapping the received signal from time domain to distance domain. Simulations and experiments are conducted for the validation of the waveform correction of the reshaped excitation dispersion compensation method. Applied in the traditional delay-and-sum algorithm, the new dispersion compensation method can effectively enhance the resolution of the damage imaging.

  12. Do dispersive waves play a role in collisionless magnetic reconnection?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Daughton, W.; Li, H.; Karimabadi, H.; Peter Gary, S.

    2014-02-15

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we demonstrate that the properly normalized reconnection rate is fast ∼0.1 for guide fields up to 80× larger than the reconnecting field and is insensitive to both the system size and the ion to electron mass ratio. These results challenge conventional explanations of reconnection based on fast dispersive waves, which are completely absent for sufficiently strong guide fields. In this regime, the thickness of the diffusion layer is set predominantly by the electron inertial length with an inner sublayer that is controlled by finite gyro-radius effects. As the Alfvén velocity becomes relativistic for very strong guide fields, the displacement current becomes important and strong deviations from charge neutrality occur, resulting in the build-up of intense electric fields which absorb a portion of the magnetic energy release. Over longer time scales, secondary magnetic islands are generated near the active x-line while an electron inertial scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is driven within the outflow. These secondary instabilities give rise to time variations in the reconnection rate but do not alter the average value.

  13. Sparse and Dispersion-Based Matching Pursuit for Minimizing the Dispersion Effect Occurring When Using Guided Wave for Pipe Inspection

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Javad; Tse, Peter W. T.; Fang, Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave is an effective tool for structural health monitoring of structures for detecting defects. In practice, guided wave signals are dispersive and contain multiple modes and noise. In the presence of overlapped wave-packets/modes and noise together with dispersion, extracting meaningful information from these signals is a challenging task. Handling such challenge requires an advanced signal processing tool. The aim of this study is to develop an effective and robust signal processing tool to deal with the complexity of guided wave signals for non-destructive testing (NDT) purpose. To achieve this goal, Sparse Representation with Dispersion Based Matching Pursuit (SDMP) is proposed. Addressing the three abovementioned facts that complicate signal interpretation, SDMP separates overlapped modes and demonstrates good performance against noise with maximum sparsity. With the dispersion taken into account, an overc-omplete and redundant dictionary of basic atoms based on a narrowband excitation signal is designed. As Finite Element Method (FEM) was used to predict the form of wave packets propagating along structures, these atoms have the maximum resemblance with real guided wave signals. SDMP operates in two stages. In the first stage, similar to Matching Pursuit (MP), the approximation improves by adding, a single atom to the solution set at each iteration. However, atom selection criterion of SDMP utilizes the time localization of guided wave reflections that makes a portion of overlapped wave-packets to be composed mainly of a single echo. In the second stage of the algorithm, the selected atoms that have frequency inconsistency with the excitation signal are discarded. This increases the sparsity of the final representation. Meanwhile, leading to accurate approximation, as discarded atoms are not representing guided wave reflections, it simplifies extracting physical meanings for defect detection purpose. To verify the effectiveness of SDMP for

  14. Sparse and Dispersion-Based Matching Pursuit for Minimizing the Dispersion Effect Occurring when Using Guided Wave for Pipe Inspection.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Javad; Tse, Peter W T; Fang, Zhou

    2017-06-06

    Ultrasonic guided wave is an effective tool for structural health monitoring of structures for detecting defects. In practice, guided wave signals are dispersive and contain multiple modes and noise. In the presence of overlapped wave-packets/modes and noise together with dispersion, extracting meaningful information from these signals is a challenging task. Handling such challenge requires an advanced signal processing tool. The aim of this study is to develop an effective and robust signal processing tool to deal with the complexity of guided wave signals for non-destructive testing (NDT) purpose. To achieve this goal, Sparse Representation with Dispersion Based Matching Pursuit (SDMP) is proposed. Addressing the three abovementioned facts that complicate signal interpretation, SDMP separates overlapped modes and demonstrates good performance against noise with maximum sparsity. With the dispersion taken into account, an overc-omplete and redundant dictionary of basic atoms based on a narrowband excitation signal is designed. As Finite Element Method (FEM) was used to predict the form of wave packets propagating along structures, these atoms have the maximum resemblance with real guided wave signals. SDMP operates in two stages. In the first stage, similar to Matching Pursuit (MP), the approximation improves by adding, a single atom to the solution set at each iteration. However, atom selection criterion of SDMP utilizes the time localization of guided wave reflections that makes a portion of overlapped wave-packets to be composed mainly of a single echo. In the second stage of the algorithm, the selected atoms that have frequency inconsistency with the excitation signal are discarded. This increases the sparsity of the final representation. Meanwhile, leading to accurate approximation, as discarded atoms are not representing guided wave reflections, it simplifies extracting physical meanings for defect detection purpose. To verify the effectiveness of SDMP for

  15. Simple Dispersion Equation Based on Lamb-Wave Model for Propagating Pulsive Waves in Human Heart Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Naoaki; Shintani, Seine A.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the Rayleigh-Lamb-type equation for propagating pulsive waves excited by aortic-valve closure at end-systole in the human heart wall. We theoretically investigate the transcendental dispersion equation of pulsive waves for the asymmetrical zero-order mode of the Lamb wave. We analytically find a simple dispersion equation with a universal constant for a small Lamb wavenumber. We show that the simple dispersion equation can qualitatively explain the myocardial noninvasive measurements in vivo of pulsive waves in the human heart wall. We can also consistently estimate the viscoelastic constant of the myocardium in the human heart wall using the simple dispersion equation for a small Lamb wavenumber instead of using a complex nonlinear optimization.

  16. Time domain characteristics of wave motion in dispersive and anisotropic continuum acoustic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-12-01

    The authors study the wave propagation in continuum acoustic metamaterials whose all or not all of the principal elements of the mass tensor or the scalar compressibility can be negative due to wave dispersion. Their time-domain wave characteristics are particularly investigated by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, in which algorithms for the Drude and Lorentz dispersion pertinent to acoustic metamaterials are provided necessarily. Wave propagation nature of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials with all admissible material parameters are analyzed in a general manner. It is found that anomalous negative refraction phenomena can appear in several dispersion regimes, and their unique time-domain signatures have been discovered by the FDTD modeling. It is further proposed that two different metamaterial layers with specially assigned dispersions could comprise a conjugate pair that permits wave propagation only at specific points in the wave vector space. The time-domain pulse simulation verifies that acoustic directive radiation capable of modulating radiation angle with the wave frequency can be realized with this conjugate pair. The study provides the detailed analysis of wave propagation in anisotropic and dispersive acoustic mediums, which makes a further step toward dispersion engineering and transient wave control through acoustic metamaterials.

  17. Striations in the Taurus molecular cloud: Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or MHD waves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, M.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Yıldız, U. A.; Snell, R. L.; Falgarone, E.; Pineda, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    The origin of striations aligned along the local magnetic field direction in the translucent envelope of the Taurus molecular cloud is examined with new observations of 12CO and 13CO J = 2-1 emission obtained with the 10-m Submillimeter Telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory. These data identify a periodic pattern of excess blue and redshifted emission that is responsible for the striations. For both 12CO and 13CO, spatial variations of the J = 2-1 to J = 1-0 line ratio are small and are not spatially correlated with the striation locations. A medium comprised of unresolved CO emitting substructures (cells) with a beam area filling factor less than unity at any velocity is required to explain the average line ratios and brightness temperatures. We propose that the striations are generated from the modulation of velocities and beam filling factor of the cells as a result of either the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or magnetosonic waves propagating through the envelope of the Taurus molecular cloud. Both processes are likely common features in molecular clouds that are sub-Alfvénic and may explain low column density, cirrus-like features similarly aligned with the magnetic field observed throughout the interstellar medium in far-infrared surveys of dust emission.

  18. Experimental investigation of the dispersion of Scholte-Stoneley waves on a periodically corrugated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfei; Declercq, Nico F.

    2016-12-01

    The dispersion of the phase velocities of the Scholte-Stoneley waves on a periodically corrugated interface is experimentally investigated and presented. The Scholte-Stoneley waves are generated through diffraction of the incident bulk longitudinal waves in water on a solid-fluid (brass-water) interface with one-dimensional grooves. The diffractions resulting from both the incident longitudinal waves and the generated Scholte-Stoneley waves are experimentally detected in a polar scan. The extracted velocity-frequency curves first confirm that the incident bulk wave is not dispersive and further show that the Scholte-Stoneley wave generated on the periodic interface is also not dispersive, although the velocity-frequency curves have oscillatory features.

  19. Observation of spin-wave dispersion in Nd-Fe-B magnets using neutron Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, K. Inami, N.; Saito, K.; Takeichi, Y.; Kawana, D.; Yokoo, T.; Itoh, S.; Yano, M.; Shoji, T.; Manabe, A.; Kato, A.; Kaneko, Y.

    2014-05-07

    The low-energy spin-wave dispersion in polycrystalline Nd-Fe-B magnets was observed using neutron Brillouin scattering (NBS). Low-energy spin-wave excitations for the lowest acoustic spin-wave mode were clearly observed. From the spin-wave dispersion, we were able to determine the spin-wave stiffness constant D{sub sw} (100.0 ± 4.9 meV.Å{sup 2}) and the exchange stiffness constant A (6.6 ± 0.3 pJ/m)

  20. Dispersion and energy conservation relations of surface waves in semi-infinite plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, V.

    1981-04-01

    The hydrodynamic theory of surface wave propagation in semiinfinite homogeneous isotropic plasma is considered. Explicit linear surface wave solutions are given for the electric and magnetic fields, charge and current densities. These solutions are used to obtain the well-known dispersion relations and, together with the general energy conservation equation, to find appropriate definitions for the energy and the energy flow densities of surface waves. These densities are associated with the dispersion relation and the group velocity by formulae similar to those for bulk waves in infinite plasmas. Both cases of high-frequency and low-frequency surface waves are considered.

  1. Dispersive Nature of High Mach Number Collisionless Plasma Shocks: Poynting Flux of Oblique Whistler Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundkvist, David; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Bale, S. D.; Schwartz, S. J.; Soucek, J.; Mozer, F.

    2012-01-01

    Whistler wave trains are observed in the foot region of high Mach number quasiperpendicular shocks. The waves are oblique with respect to the ambient magnetic field as well as the shock normal. The Poynting flux of the waves is directed upstream in the shock normal frame starting from the ramp of the shock. This suggests that the waves are an integral part of the shock structure with the dispersive shock as the source of the waves. These observations lead to the conclusion that the shock ramp structure of supercritical high Mach number shocks is formed as a balance of dispersion and nonlinearity.

  2. Transverse wave propagation in photonic crystal based on holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Fuh, Andy Ying-Guey; Li, Ming Shian; Wu, Shing Trong

    2011-07-04

    This study investigates the transversely propagating waves in a body-centered tetragonal photonic crystal based on a holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal film. Rotating the film reveals three different transverse propagating waves. Degeneracy of optical Bloch waves from reciprocal lattice vectors explains their symmetrical distribution.

  3. Generalized semi-analytical finite difference method for dispersion curves calculation and numerical dispersion analysis for Lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Packo, Pawel; Uhl, Tadeusz; Staszewski, Wieslaw J

    2014-09-01

    The paper presents an efficient and accurate method for dispersion curve calculation and analysis of numerical models for guided waves. The method can be used for any arbitrarily selected anisotropic material. The proposed approach utilizes the wave equation and through-thickness-only discretization of anisotropic, layered plates to obtain the Lamb wave characteristics. Thus, layered structures, such as composites, can be analyzed in a straightforward manner. A general framework for the proposed analysis is given, along with application examples. Although these examples are based on the local interaction simulation approach for elastic waves propagation, the proposed methodology can be easily adopted for other methods (e.g., finite elements). The method can be also used to study the influence of discretization parameters on dispersion curves estimates.

  4. Nonreciprocal dispersion of spin waves in ferromagnetic thin films covered with a finite-conductivity metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mruczkiewicz, M.; Krawczyk, M.

    2014-03-01

    We study the effect of one-side metallization of a uniform ferromagnetic thin film on its spin-wave dispersion relation in the Damon-Eshbach geometry. Due to the finite conductivity of the metallic cover layer on the ferromagnetic film, the spin-wave dispersion relation may be nonreciprocal only in a limited wave-vector range. We provide an approximate analytical solution for the spin-wave frequency, discuss its validity, and compare it with numerical results. The dispersion is analyzed systematically by varying the parameters of the ferromagnetic film, the metal cover layer and the value of the external magnetic field. The conclusions drawn from this analysis allow us to define a structure based on a 30 nm thick CoFeB film with an experimentally accessible nonreciprocal dispersion relation in a relatively wide wave-vector range.

  5. Inversion of Surface-wave Dispersion Curves due to Low-velocity-layer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.; Xia, J.; Mi, B.

    2016-12-01

    A successful inversion relies on exact forward modeling methods. It is a key step to accurately calculate multi-mode dispersion curves of a given model in high-frequency surface-wave (Rayleigh wave and Love wave) methods. For normal models (shear (S)-wave velocity increasing with depth), their theoretical dispersion curves completely match the dispersion spectrum that is generated based on wave equation. For models containing a low-velocity-layer, however, phase velocities calculated by existing forward-modeling algorithms (e.g. Thomson-Haskell algorithm, Knopoff algorithm, fast vector-transfer algorithm and so on) fail to be consistent with the dispersion spectrum at a high frequency range. They will approach a value that close to the surface-wave velocity of the low-velocity-layer under the surface layer, rather than that of the surface layer when their corresponding wavelengths are short enough. This phenomenon conflicts with the characteristics of surface waves, which results in an erroneous inverted model. By comparing the theoretical dispersion curves with simulated dispersion energy, we proposed a direct and essential solution to accurately compute surface-wave phase velocities due to low-velocity-layer models. Based on the proposed forward modeling technique, we can achieve correct inversion for these types of models. Several synthetic data proved the effectiveness of our method.

  6. Assessment of chemical dispersant effectiveness in a wave tank under regular non-breaking and breaking wave conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengkai; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Boufadel, Michel C; Venosa, Albert D

    2008-05-01

    Current chemical dispersant effectiveness tests for product selection are commonly performed with bench-scale testing apparatus. However, for the assessment of oil dispersant effectiveness under real sea state conditions, test protocols are required to have hydrodynamic conditions closer to the natural environment, including transport and dilution effects. To achieve this goal, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) designed and constructed a wave tank system to study chemical dispersant effectiveness under controlled mixing energy conditions (regular non-breaking, spilling breaking, and plunging breaking waves). Quantification of oil dispersant effectiveness was based on observed changes in dispersed oil concentrations and oil-droplet size distribution. The study results quantitatively demonstrated that total dispersed oil concentration and breakup kinetics of oil droplets in the water column were strongly dependent on the presence of chemical dispersants and the influence of breaking waves. These data on the effectiveness of dispersants as a function of sea state will have significant implications in the drafting of future operational guidelines for dispersant use at sea.

  7. MHD waveguides in space plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, N. G.; Fedorov, E. N.; Pilipenko, V. A.

    2010-07-15

    The waveguide properties of two characteristic formations in the Earth's magnetotail-the plasma sheet and the current (neutral) sheet-are considered. The question of how the domains of existence of different types of MHD waveguide modes (fast and slow, body and surface) in the (k, {omega}) plane and their dispersion properties depend on the waveguide parameters is studied. Investigation of the dispersion relation in a number of particular (limiting) cases makes it possible to obtain a fairly complete qualitative pattern of all the branches of the dispersion curve. Accounting for the finite size of perturbations across the wave propagation direction reveals new additional effects such as a change in the critical waveguide frequencies, the excitation of longitudinal current at the boundaries of the sheets, and a change in the symmetry of the fundamental mode. Knowledge of the waveguide properties of the plasma and current sheets can explain the occurrence of preferred frequencies in the low-frequency fluctuation spectra in the magnetotail. In satellite observations, the type of waveguide mode can be determined from the spectral properties, as well as from the phase relationships between plasma oscillations and magnetic field oscillations that are presented in this paper.

  8. Increased P-wave dispersion in patients with newly diagnosed lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Musa; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Simsek, Hakki; Akdag, Serkan; Akyol, Aytac; Gumrukcuoglu, Hasan Ali; Yaman, Mehmet; Bayram, Yasemin; Karadag, Ayse Serap

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune mucocutaneous disease. Recent research has emphasized the strong association between inflammation and both P-wave dispersion and dyslipidemia. The difference between the maximum and minimum P-wave durations on an electrocardiogram is defined as P-wave dispersion. The prolongation of P-wave dispersion has been demonstrated to be an independent risk factor for developing atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to investigate P-wave dispersion in patients with lichen planus. METHODS: Fifty-eight patients with lichen planus and 37 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. We obtained electrocardiographic recordings from all participants and used them to calculate the P-wave variables. We also assessed the levels of highly sensitive C-reactive protein, which is an inflammatory marker, and the lipid levels for each group. The results were reported as the means ± standard deviations and percentages. RESULTS: The P-wave dispersion was significantly higher in lichen planus patients than in the control group. Additionally, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in lichen planus patients compared to the controls. There was a significant positive correlation between highly sensitive C-reactive protein and P-wave dispersion (r = 0.549, p<0.001) in lichen planus patients. CONCLUSIONS: P-wave dispersion increased on the surface electrocardiographic measurements of lichen planus patients. This result may be important in the early detection of subclinical cardiac involvement. Increased P-wave dispersion, in terms of the tendency for atrial fibrillation, should be considered in these patients. PMID:23778479

  9. Spin waves on chains of YIG particles: dispersion relations, Faraday rotation, and power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Nicholas A.; Stroud, David

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the dispersion relations for spin waves on a periodic chain of spherical or cylindrical Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) particles. We use the quasistatic approximation, appropriate when kd ≪ 1, where k is the wave number and d the interparticle spacing. In this regime, because of the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between the localized magnetic excitations on neighboring particles, dispersive spin waves can propagate along the chain. The waves are analogous to plasmonic waves generated by electric dipole-dipole interactions between plasmons on neighboring metallic particles. The spin waves can be longitudinal (L), transverse (T), or elliptically polarized. We find that a linearly polarized spin wave undergoes a Faraday rotation as it propagates along the chain. The amount of Faraday rotation can be tuned by varying the off-diagonal component of the permeability tensor. We also discuss the possibility of wireless power transmission along the chain using these coupled spin waves.

  10. Sparse recovery of the multimodal and dispersive characteristics of Lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Harley, Joel B; Moura, José M F

    2013-05-01

    Guided waves in plates, known as Lamb waves, are characterized by complex, multimodal, and frequency dispersive wave propagation, which distort signals and make their analysis difficult. Estimating these multimodal and dispersive characteristics from experimental data becomes a difficult, underdetermined inverse problem. To accurately and robustly recover these multimodal and dispersive properties, this paper presents a methodology referred to as sparse wavenumber analysis based on sparse recovery methods. By utilizing a general model for Lamb waves, waves propagating in a plate structure, and robust l1 optimization strategies, sparse wavenumber analysis accurately recovers the Lamb wave's frequency-wavenumber representation with a limited number of surface mounted transducers. This is demonstrated with both simulated and experimental data in the presence of multipath reflections. With accurate frequency-wavenumber representations, sparse wavenumber synthesis is then used to accurately remove multipath interference in each measurement and predict the responses between arbitrary points on a plate.

  11. Improving the accurate assessment of a layered shear-wave velocity model using joint inversion of the effective Rayleigh wave and Love wave dispersion curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, X.; Xia, J.; Xu, H.

    2016-12-01

    Rayleigh and Love waves are two types of surface waves that travel along a free surface.Based on the assumption of horizontal layered homogenous media, Rayleigh-wave phase velocity can be defined as a function of frequency and four groups of earth parameters: P-wave velocity, SV-wave velocity, density and thickness of each layer. Unlike Rayleigh waves, Love-wave phase velocities of a layered homogenous earth model could be calculated using frequency and three groups of earth properties: SH-wave velocity, density, and thickness of each layer. Because the dispersion of Love waves is independent of P-wave velocities, Love-wave dispersion curves are much simpler than Rayleigh wave. The research of joint inversion methods of Rayleigh and Love dispersion curves is necessary. (1) This dissertation adopts the combinations of theoretical analysis and practical applications. In both lateral homogenous media and radial anisotropic media, joint inversion approaches of Rayleigh and Love waves are proposed to improve the accuracy of S-wave velocities.A 10% random white noise and a 20% random white noise are added to the synthetic dispersion curves to check out anti-noise ability of the proposed joint inversion method.Considering the influences of the anomalous layer, Rayleigh and Love waves are insensitive to those layers beneath the high-velocity layer or low-velocity layer and the high-velocity layer itself. Low sensitivities will give rise to high degree of uncertainties of the inverted S-wave velocities of these layers. Considering that sensitivity peaks of Rayleigh and Love waves separate at different frequency ranges, the theoretical analyses have demonstrated that joint inversion of these two types of waves would probably ameliorate the inverted model.The lack of surface-wave (Rayleigh or Love waves) dispersion data may lead to inaccuracy S-wave velocities through the single inversion of Rayleigh or Love waves, so this dissertation presents the joint inversion method of

  12. Structures of the low frequency Alfven continuous spectrum and their consequences on MHD and micro-turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zonca, F.; Chen, L.

    2008-11-01

    We briefly discuss the unified theoretical framework that allows explaining a variety of experimental observations with one single 'fishbone-like' dispersion relation. We also point out the relationship of MHD and shear Alfven waves in the kinetic thermal ion frequency gap with microturbulence, Zonal Flows and Geodesic Acoustic Modes, emphasizing its importance in determining long time scale dynamic behaviors in burning plasmas.

  13. A rapid, fully non-contact, hybrid system for generating Lamb wave dispersion curves.

    PubMed

    Harb, M S; Yuan, F G

    2015-08-01

    A rapid, fully non-contact, hybrid system which encompasses an air-coupled transducer (ACT) and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is presented for profiling A0 Lamb wave dispersion of an isotropic aluminum plate. The ACT generates ultrasonic pressure incident upon the surface of the plate. The pressure waves are partially refracted into the plate. The LDV is employed to measure the out-of-plane velocity of the excited Lamb wave mode at some distances where the Lamb waves are formed in the plate. The influence of the ACT angle of incidence on Lamb wave excitation is investigated and Snell's law is used to directly compute Lamb wave dispersion curves including phase and group velocity dispersion curves in aluminum plates from incident angles found to generate optimal A0 Lamb wave mode. The measured curves are compared to results obtained from a two-dimensional (2-D) Fast Fourier transform (FFT), Morlet wavelet transform (MWT) and theoretical predictions. It was concluded that the experimental results obtained using Snell's law concept are well in accordance with the theoretical solutions. The high degree of accuracy in the measured data with the theoretical results proved a high sensitivity of the air-coupled and laser ultrasound in characterizing Lamb wave dispersion in plate-like structures. The proposed non-contact hybrid system can effectively characterize the dispersive relation without knowledge of neither the materials characteristics nor the mathematical model.

  14. P-wave dispersion: a possible warning sign of hypertension in children.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Elibet; González, Emilio; Llanes, María del Carmen; Garí, Merlin; García, Yosvany; García, Julieta; Fernández, Elizabet

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension and obesity in adults have been linked to increased EKG P-wave dispersion; the association has been shown in relation to hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and atrial enlargement. Though studies in children have linked P-wave dispersion to left ventricular hypertrophy, scant pediatric literature relates P-wave dispersion to hypertension and obesity. Assess the association of P-wave dispersion with blood pressure and nutritional status in a pediatric population. This cross-sectional study is part of the PROCDEC II project for pediatric hypertension diagnosis and control in Santa Clara, Cuba. Twelve-lead EKG and four blood pressure readings were conducted on a sample of 656 children aged 8-11 years. Blood pressure <90th percentile for age, sex and height was considered normal; 90th-95th percentile, prehypertension; and >95th percentile, hypertension. The main study variables were P-wave dispersion and systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Secondary variables were sex, height, weight, and body mass index. Comparisons of means, analysis of variance and linear correlations were done. Mean P-wave dispersion differed significantly (p ≤0.05) among normotensive (30.10 ms), prehypertensive (32.99 ms) and hypertensive children (39.14 ms), as did mean MAP (p <0.05). P-wave dispersion and MAP were significantly correlated in prehypertensive and hypertensive children. Most overweight and obese children with high P-wave dispersion were prehypertensive or hypertensive. Associations observed between P-wave dispersion and MAP in normotensive, prehypertensive and hypertensive children suggest potential for early detection of EKG patterns showing vulnerability. Given the relationship between increased P-wave dispersion and hypertension already described in adults, use of P-wave dispersion could be a simple, economical and noninvasive method of predicting risk of hypertensive cardiomyopathy in prehypertensive and hypertensive children; this in

  15. Minimizing influence of multi-modes and dispersion of electromagnetic ultrasonic lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Guofu; Jiang, Tao; Kang, Lei; Wang, Shujuan

    2010-12-01

    Electromagnetic ultrasonic (EMU) Lamb waves excited by electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) possess many advantages in NDT. However, their characteristic multi-modes and dispersion are disadvantageous for inspection and restrict further improvements in their real applications. By deducing the excitation equation of EMU Lamb waves, the primary design parameters of EMATs and the characteristic equation of Lamb waves are combined, and excitation curves based on the excitation equation are plotted to aid the design of EMATs. The excitation characteristic of EMU Lamb waves on different thickness of plates is analyzed according to the excitation curves. The influence of multi-modes of EMU Lamb waves is minimized by choosing reasonable operating points and operating zones to excite a single-mode Lamb wave or multi-mode Lamb waves with identical or approximate propagation velocities. The influence of dispersion is minimized by searching corresponding points whose slope of group velocity tends to zero. The validity of the proposed method is verified by experiments.

  16. Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy imaging and mode separating by high-resolution linear Radon transform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.; Xia, J.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) has been increasingly used for obtaining vertical shear-wave velocity profiles within near-surface materials. MASW uses a multichannel recording approach to capture the time-variant, full-seismic wavefield where dispersive surface waves can be used to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The technique consists of (1) acquisition of broadband, high-frequency ground roll using a multichannel recording system; (2) efficient and accurate algorithms that allow the extraction and analysis of 1D Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves; (3) stable and efficient inversion algorithms for estimating S-wave velocity profiles; and (4) construction of the 2D S-wave velocity field map.

  17. Wave Grouping of a Meandering Spiral Induced by Doppler Effects and Oscillatory Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hui-Min; Zhou, Lu-Qun; Zhang, Chun-Xia; Ouyang, Qi

    2005-12-01

    A new type of meandering spiral pattern, in which the dense waves form groups while the sparse waves keep evenly spaced, is observed in a spatial open reactor using a ferroin-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. Such a phenomenon is related to both the Doppler effect of a meandering spiral and the oscillatory dispersion relation of the system. Simulation in the two-dimensional Oregonator reaction-diffusion model with an oscillatory dispersion relation gives very similar results.

  18. Wave dispersion in a counterstreaming, cold, magnetized, electron-positron plasma.

    PubMed

    Verdon, M W; Melrose, D B

    2008-04-01

    The dispersion equation is analyzed for waves in a strongly magnetized, electron-positron plasma in which counterstreaming electrons are cold in their respective rest frames. For propagation parallel to the magnetic field the dispersion equation factorizes into equations for two longitudinal modes and four transverse modes. Instabilities occur in both longitudinal and transverse modes, with the most notable being at low wave numbers where a longitudinal branch has purely imaginary frequency. For oblique propagation at small angles, the modes reconnect at points where the parallel modes intersect, either deviating away from each another, or being separated by a pair of complex modes. In addition, intrinsically oblique branches of the dispersion equation appear. The results are applied to an oscillating model for a pulsar magnetosphere, in which the oscillations are purely temporal with a frequency well below relevant wave frequencies, and in which the counterstreaming becomes highly relativistic. We assume that the medium may be treated as time stationary in treating the wave dispersion and wave growth. The wave properties, including the wave frequency, vary periodically with the phase of the oscillations. The fastest growing instability is when the counterstreaming is nonrelativistic or mildly relativistic. A given wave can experience bursts of growth over many oscillations. Mode coupling associated with the cyclotron resonance may be effective in generating the observed orthogonally polarized modes at phases of the oscillation where the (relativistic) cyclotron and wave frequencies are comparable.

  19. Elliptically polarised cnoidal waves in a medium with spatial dispersion of cubic nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Vladimir A; Perezhogin, I A; Petnikova, V M; Potravkin, N N; Shuvalov, Vladimir V

    2012-02-28

    We present new specific analytic solutions of a system of nonlinear Schroedinger equations, corresponding to elliptically polarised cnoidal waves in an isotropic gyrotropic medium with spatial dispersion of cubic nonlinearity and second-order frequency dispersion under the conditions of formation of the waveguides of the same type for each of the circularly polarised components of the light field.

  20. Dirac cone dispersion of acoustic waves in plates without phononic crystals (L).

    PubMed

    Maznev, A A

    2014-02-01

    Lamb waves in elastic plates exhibit Dirac-like cone dispersion at zero wavevector at the points of accidental degeneracy between longitudinal and transverse thickness resonances. The Lamb mode dispersion can be fine-tuned to yield a conical point by coating a plate with a layer of a different material and varying the thickness of the latter. Similarities and differences with respect to Dirac-like cone dispersion in phononic crystals and possible observable effects are discussed.

  1. Dispersive matched filtering of ultrasonic guided waves for improved sparse array damage localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luppescu, Gregory C.; Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2016-02-01

    Although bulk waves have served as the industry standard in nondestructive evaluation for many years, guided waves (Lamb waves in plates) have become the focus of many current research efforts because they are able to interrogate larger areas of a structure in less time. Despite this advantage, guided waves also have characteristics that obfuscate data interpretation. The first property of guided waves that complicates analysis is their dispersive nature: their wave speed is a function of frequency. The second is that they are multimodal: they propagate as multiple symmetric and antisymmetric modes. Using pulse-compression techniques and a priori calculations of theoretical dispersion curves, the dispersive matched filter attempts to take advantage of these otherwise undesirable characteristics by maximizing the autocorrelation for only one mode, ideally increasing both the signal-to-noise ratio and time-resolution of ultrasonic guided wave measurements. In this research, the responses from broadband chirp excitations are recorded from a sparse transducer array after propagation through an aluminum plate containing no damage and simulated damage. Dispersive matched filtering is applied to the measurements and localization images are generated using the delay-and-sum method. Imaging results are compared to those obtained with narrowband tone burst excitations in terms of their ability to detect and localize the different scatterers. Results show that the dispersive matched filter notably improves the quality of the localization images.

  2. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonjae Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.; Angus, J. R.

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  3. Formation of wave packets in the Ostrovsky equation for both normal and anomalous dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Grimshaw, Roger; Stepanyants, Yury; Alias, Azwani

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the Ostrovsky equation with normal dispersion does not support steady solitary waves. An initial Korteweg–de Vries solitary wave decays adiabatically through the radiation of long waves and is eventually replaced by an envelope solitary wave whose carrier wave and envelope move with different velocities (phase and group velocities correspondingly). Here, we examine the same initial condition for the Ostrovsky equation with anomalous dispersion, when the wave frequency increases with wavenumber in the limit of very short waves. The essential difference is that now there exists a steady solitary wave solution (Ostrovsky soliton), which in the small-amplitude limit can be described asymptotically through the solitary wave solution of a nonlinear Schrödinger equation, based at that wavenumber where the phase and group velocities coincide. Long-time numerical simulations show that the emergence of this steady envelope solitary wave is a very robust feature. The initial Korteweg–de Vries solitary wave transforms rapidly to this envelope solitary wave in a seemingly non-adiabatic manner. The amplitude of the Ostrovsky soliton strongly correlates with the initial Korteweg–de Vries solitary wave. PMID:26997887

  4. Formation of wave packets in the Ostrovsky equation for both normal and anomalous dispersion.

    PubMed

    Grimshaw, Roger; Stepanyants, Yury; Alias, Azwani

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the Ostrovsky equation with normal dispersion does not support steady solitary waves. An initial Korteweg-de Vries solitary wave decays adiabatically through the radiation of long waves and is eventually replaced by an envelope solitary wave whose carrier wave and envelope move with different velocities (phase and group velocities correspondingly). Here, we examine the same initial condition for the Ostrovsky equation with anomalous dispersion, when the wave frequency increases with wavenumber in the limit of very short waves. The essential difference is that now there exists a steady solitary wave solution (Ostrovsky soliton), which in the small-amplitude limit can be described asymptotically through the solitary wave solution of a nonlinear Schrödinger equation, based at that wavenumber where the phase and group velocities coincide. Long-time numerical simulations show that the emergence of this steady envelope solitary wave is a very robust feature. The initial Korteweg-de Vries solitary wave transforms rapidly to this envelope solitary wave in a seemingly non-adiabatic manner. The amplitude of the Ostrovsky soliton strongly correlates with the initial Korteweg-de Vries solitary wave.

  5. Effects of various velocity drivers on MHD wave propagation in the partially ionized solar atmosphere from 2D multi-fluid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Yana; Alvarez Laguna, Alejandro; Lani, Andrea; Poedts, Stefaan

    2017-04-01

    Partial ionization effects related to electron-neutral and ion-neutral interactions play an important role in the weakly ionized solar chromosphere, where the number density of neutrals vastly exceeds the number density of protons. The interactions between the magnetized plasma and the neutral particles can significantly change the resistivity of the plasma and lead to additional heating. Such multi-species interactions cannot be described within the simple MHD single fluid models and the non-equilibrium partial ionization effects cannot be properly captured even when generalized MHD models including Ambipolar diffusion terms are taken into account. A more detailed approach to describe these processes in the solar chromosphere is to use multi-fluid numerical simulations where the neutrals and the plasma species are described as separate fluids, coupled through the chemical reactions, additional currents, friction and resistivity terms. In this study we have elaborate on our previous results and perform 2D two-fluid simulations with an electron-proton fluid and a separate neutral fluid using an improved model where the density and temperature dependence of the plasma viscosities and heat conduction for the neutrals is assumed. Previously we have investigated the chromospheric propagation of fast and slow waves generated by a fixed photospheric foot-point velocity driver. In this study we have varied the velocity driver's frequency and location. We have also distinguished between the types of drivers which excite pure slow/Alfvén waves or a mixture of slow and fast waves. Finally, we have studied the non-uniform heating caused by the waves.

  6. Density functional calculations of spin-wave dispersion curves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, Leonard; Niu, Qian

    1998-03-01

    Extending the density functional method of Kubler et al( J. Kubler et al, J. Phys. F 18, 469 (1983) and J. Phys. Condens. Matter 1, 8155 (1989). ) for calcuating spin density wave ground states (but not making their atomic sphere approximation which requires a constant spin polarization direction in each WS sphere) we dicuss the calculation of frozen spin-wave eigenfunctions and their total energies. From these and the results of Niu's talk, we describe the calculation of spin-wave frequencies.

  7. Parametric forcing of waves with a nonmonotonic dispersion relation: Domain structures in ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Raitt, D.; Riecke, H.

    1997-05-01

    Surface waves on ferrofluids exposed to a dc magnetic field exhibit a nonmonotonic dispersion relation. The effect of a parametric driving on such waves is studied within suitable coupled Ginzburg-Landau equations. Due to the nonmonotonicity the neutral curve for the excitation of standing waves can have up to three minima. The stability of the waves with respect to long-wave perturbations is determined via a phase-diffusion equation. It shows that the band of stable wave numbers can split up into two or three subbands. The resulting competition between the wave numbers corresponding to the respective subbands leads quite naturally to patterns consisting of multiple domains of standing waves which differ in their wave number. The coarsening dynamics of such domain structures is addressed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. On the dissipation and dispersion of entropy waves in heat transferring channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, A.; Hosseinalipour, S. M.; Karimi, N.

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the hydrodynamic and heat transfer effects on the dissipation and dispersion of entropy waves in non-reactive flows. These waves, as advected density inhomogeneities downstream of unsteady flames, may decay partially or totally before reaching the exit nozzle, where they are converted into sound. Attenuation of entropy waves dominates the significance of the subsequent acoustic noise generation. Yet, the extent of this decay process is currently a matter of contention and the pertinent mechanisms are still largely unexplored. To resolve this issue, a numerical study is carried out by compressible large eddy simulation of the wave advection in a channel subject to convective and adiabatic thermal boundary conditions. The dispersion, dissipation, and spatial correlation of the wave are evaluated by post-processing of the numerical results. This includes application of the classical coherence function as well as development of nonlinear quantitative measures of wave dissipation and dispersion. The analyses reveal that the high frequency components of the entropy wave are always strongly damped. The survival of the low frequency components heavily depends on the turbulence intensity and thermal boundary conditions of the channel. In general, high turbulence intensities and particularly heat transfer intensify the decay and destruction of the spatial coherence of entropy waves. In some cases, they can even result in the complete annihilation of the wave. The current work can therefore resolve the controversies arising over the previous studies of entropy waves with different thermal boundary conditions.

  9. Effects of temperature and wave conditions on chemical dispersion efficacy of heavy fuel oil in an experimental flow-through wave tank.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengkai; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Boufadel, Michel C; Venosa, Albert D

    2010-09-01

    The effectiveness of chemical dispersants (Corexit 9500 and SPC 1000) on heavy fuel oil (IFO180 as test oil) has been evaluated under different wave conditions in a flow-through wave tank. The dispersant effectiveness was determined by measuring oil concentrations and droplet size distributions. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) model indicated that wave type and temperature significantly (p<0.05) affected the dynamic dispersant effectiveness (DDE). At higher temperatures (16 degrees C), the test IFO180 was effectively dispersed under breaking waves with a DDE of 90% and 50% for Corexit 9500 and SPC 1000, respectively. The dispersion was ineffective under breaking waves at lower temperature (10 degrees C), and under regular wave conditions at all temperatures (10-17 degrees C), with DDE<15%. Effective chemical dispersion was associated with formation of smaller droplets (with volumetric mean diameters or VMD < or = 200 microm), whereas ineffective dispersion produced large oil droplets (with VMD > or = 400 microm).

  10. The dominance of dispersion in the evolution of bed material waves in gravel-bed rivers

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. Lisle; Yantao Cui; Gary Parker; James E. Pizzuto; Annjanette M. Dodd

    2001-01-01

    Abstract - Bed material waves are temporary zones of sediment accumulation created by large sediment inputs. Recent theoretical, experimental and field studies examine factors in fluencing dispersion and translation of bed material waves in quasi-uniform, gravel-bed channels. Exchanges of sediment between a channel and its floodplain are...

  11. Anomalous negative dispersion in bone can result from the interference of fast and slow waves.

    PubMed

    Marutyan, Karen R; Holland, Mark R; Miller, James G

    2006-11-01

    The goal of this work was to show that the apparent negative dispersion of ultrasonic waves propagating in bone can arise from interference between fast and slow longitudinal modes, each exhibiting positive dispersion. Simulations were carried out using two approaches: one based on the Biot-Johnson model and one independent of that model. Results of the simulations are mutually consistent and appear to account for measurements from many laboratories that report that the phase velocity of ultrasonic waves propagating in cancellous bone decreases with increasing frequency (negative dispersion) in about 90% of specimens but increases with frequency in about 10%.

  12. Supercontinuum generation using continuous-wave multiwavelength pumping and dispersion management.

    PubMed

    Sylvestre, Thibaut; Vedadi, Armand; Maillotte, Hervé; Vanholsbeeck, Frédérique; Coen, Stéphane

    2006-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that continuous-wave supercontinuum generation in optical fibers can be significantly enhanced by using both multiwavelength pumping and dispersion management. We show by detailed spectral analysis that continuum enhancement is achieved mainly through a combination of Raman-assisted modulation instabilities, soliton compression, and dispersive wave generation. With this technique, an 800 nm wide (from 1.2 to 2.0 microm) 2 W supercontinuum source is reported that uses a three-wavelength pump and a dispersion-tailored four-optical fibers arrangement.

  13. Dispersion Relation of Electromagnetic Waves in One-Dimensional Plasma Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojo, Hitoshi; Mase, Atsushi

    The dispersion relation of electromagnetic waves in one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals is studied. The plasma photonic crystal is a periodic array composed of alternating thin plasma and dielectric material. The dispersion relation is obtained by solving a Maxwell wave equation using a method analogous to Kronig-Penny’s problem in quantum mechanics, and it is found that the frequency gap and cut-off appear in the dispersion relation. The frequency gap is shown to become larger with the increase of the plasma density as well as plasma width.

  14. Rayleigh-Wave Dispersion Technique for Rapid Subsurface Exploration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-04-01

    23 Preceding page blank V CONVEJSION FACrOR3, BRITISH To METHIC UNITS OF MEASUREMENT British units of measurement used in this report can...soil layering, P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, anid density of the media can be made. These param- eters can be determined by borehole sampling

  15. Using dispersion equation for orthotropic media to model antiplane coherent wave propagation in cracked solids.

    PubMed

    Caleap, Mihai; Aristégui, Christophe; Poncelet, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Attention is focused on the propagation of antiplane coherent wave obliquely incident on mutually parallel and randomly distributed cracks. A fundamental question in this study concerns the ability of describing the coherent wave propagation in all directions from the knowledge of the effective material properties along the effective principal directions, only. Its relevance is illustrated by considering two cases of coherent wave propagation: homogeneous and inhomogeneous waves. For both cases, the effective phase slownesses approximated from the dispersion equation specific for orthotropic homogeneous media are compared to reference results obtained from a direct calculation considering waves obliquely incident on cracks. This work reveals that the effective stiffnesses of this dispersion equation have to be dependent on the propagation direction of the incident wave in order to make this equation consistent.

  16. Strongly nonlinear evolution of low-frequency wave packets in a dispersive plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Bernard J.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of strongly nonlinear, strongly modulated wave packets is investigated in a dispersive plasma using a hybrid numerical code. These wave packets have amplitudes exceeding the strength of the external magnetic field, along which they propagate. Alfven (left helicity) wave packets show strong steepening for p < 1, while fast (fight heIicity) wave packets hardly steepen for any beta. Substantial regions of opposite helicity form on the leading side of steepened Alfven wave packets. This behavior differs qualitatively from that exhibited by the solutions to the derivative nonlinear Schrodinger (DNLS) equation.

  17. Tsunami waveform inversion including dispersive waves: the 2004 earthquake off Kii Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Tatsuhiko; Satake, Kenji; Furumura, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    Long waves are often assumed to model tsunamis, but the wavelength of the initial water height distribution produced by a large submarine earthquake, particularly in the direction perpendicular to the fault strike, is sometimes not much greater than the water depth. The resulting tsunami may have a dispersive character that cannot be simulated based on a conventional long-wave approximation. The 2004 earthquake off Kii Peninsula (M 7.4) on the southern coast of Japan indeed produced a dispersive tsunami that was recorded at two stations located off Shikoku. For the foreshock (M 7.1), on the contrary, a dominant dispersive tsunami was not recognized at these stations. Because dispersive waves show strong directional dependence with respect to the fault strike, the above difference indicates that the strikes of the main shock and the foreshock were different. We conducted a tsunami waveform inversion analysis based on the dispersive tsunami equations to estimate the initial water height distribution of the main shock. The estimated initial water height distribution overlapped with the aftershock region, suggesting that the fault strike was perpendicular to the trough axis, and the total displaced water volume was 1.7-2.0 × 109 m3. When we used the conventional long-wave approximation, the estimated initial water height distribution extended considerably from the aftershock area, because artificial sources were needed outside the aftershock area to reproduce the observed dispersive waves.

  18. Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy imaging using a high-resolution linear radon transform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Liu, J.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) analysis is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear-wave profile. One of the key steps in the MASW method is to generate an image of dispersive energy in the frequency-velocity domain, so dispersion curves can be determined by picking peaks of dispersion energy. In this paper, we propose to image Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy by high-resolution linear Radon transform (LRT). The shot gather is first transformed along the time direction to the frequency domain and then the Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy can be imaged by high-resolution LRT using a weighted preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm. Synthetic data with a set of linear events are presented to show the process of generating dispersive energy. Results of synthetic and real-world examples demonstrate that, compared with the slant stacking algorithm, high-resolution LRT can improve the resolution of images of dispersion energy by more than 50%. ?? Birkhaueser 2008.

  19. The selection of field acquisition parameters for dispersion images from multichannel surface wave data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, S.X.; Chan, L.S.; Xia, J.

    2004-01-01

    The accuracy and resolution of surface wave dispersion results depend on the parameters used for acquiring data in the field. The optimized field parameters for acquiring multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) dispersion images can be determined if preliminary information on the phase velocity range and interface depth is available. In a case study on a fill slope in Hong Kong, the optimal acquisition parameters were first determined from a preliminary seismic survey prior to a MASW survey. Field tests using different sets of receiver distances and array lengths showed that the most consistent and useful dispersion images were obtained from the optimal acquisition parameters predicted. The inverted S-wave velocities from the dispersion curve obtained at the optimal offset distance range also agreed with those obtained by using direct refraction survey.

  20. Pulse compression and dispersion compensation for high- resolution Lamb wave inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, J.; Lin, J.; Zeng, L.

    2015-07-01

    The dispersion of ultrasonic guided waves causes the energy of a signal to spread out in space and time as it propagates, which decreases the performance for damage detection significantly. A lot of signal processing methods have been proposed to reduce the effect of dispersion for this reason. In this paper, with the aim of developing an efficient methodology for high resolution Lamb wave inspection, a pulse compression and dispersion compensation method is established. In this method, broadband excitation and pulse compression technique are introduced to reconstruct the transform function with a high SNR. Subsequently, a scheme is established to alleviate the dispersion effects by performing compensation on the original narrowband excitation signals, and thus the time duration of received wave packet can be compressed during the extracting process. Finally, Numerical simulation and experiment are carried on aluminum specimens to investigate the behavior of the proposed method.

  1. Evaluating Crude Oil Chemical Dispersion Efficacy In A Flow-Through Wave Tank Under Regular Non-Breaking Wave And Breaking Wave Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing dispersant effectiveness under conditions similar to that of the open environment is required for improvements in operational procedures and the formulation of regulatory guidelines. To this end, a novel wave tank facility was fabricated to study the dispersion of crude ...

  2. Evaluating Crude Oil Chemical Dispersion Efficacy In A Flow-Through Wave Tank Under Regular Non-Breaking Wave And Breaking Wave Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing dispersant effectiveness under conditions similar to that of the open environment is required for improvements in operational procedures and the formulation of regulatory guidelines. To this end, a novel wave tank facility was fabricated to study the dispersion of crude ...

  3. Photon polarizability and its effect on the dispersion of plasma waves

    DOE PAGES

    Dodin, I. Y.; Ruiz, D. E.

    2017-03-06

    High-frequency photons travelling in plasma exhibit a linear polarizability that can influence the dispersion of linear plasma waves. We present a detailed calculation of this effect for Langmuir waves as a characteristic example. Here, two alternative formulations are given. In the first formulation, we calculate the modified dispersion of Langmuir waves by solving the governing equations for the electron fluid, where the photon contribution enters as a ponderomotive force. In the second formulation, we provide a derivation based on the photon polarizability. Then, the calculation of ponderomotive forces is not needed, and the result is more general.

  4. Effect of Spatial Dispersion on Surface Waves Propagating Along Graphene Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Diaz, Juan Sebastian; Mosig, Juan R.; Perruisseau-Carrier, Julien

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the propagation of surface waves along a spatially dispersive graphene sheet, including substrate effects. The proposed analysis derives the admittances of an equivalent circuit of graphene able to handle spatial dispersion, using a non-local model of graphene conductivity. Similar to frequency selective surfaces, the analytical admittances depend on the propagation constant of the waves traveling along the sheet. Dispersion relations for the supported TE and TM modes are then obtained by applying a transverse resonance equation. Application of the method demonstrates that spatial dispersion can dramatically affect the propagation of surface plasmons, notably modifying their mode confinement and increasing losses, even at frequencies where intraband transitions are the dominant contribution to graphene conductivity. These results show the need for correctly assessing spatial dispersion effects in the development of plasmonic devices at the low THz band.

  5. Non-monotonic wave dispersion in one-dimensional spiral track of cardiac cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Yun; Kwon, Okyu; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2009-03-01

    Alternans, periodic cardiac beat-to-beat alternation, is an important precursor to cardiac fibrillation. The underlying mechanism for this phenomenon has been discussed mostly based on the electro-chemical kinetics of constituent cells (myocytes) that comprise the heart system. An important unexplored aspect of this phenomenon is the role of wave dispersion that reflects the cell-to-cell coupling as well as the local kinetic properties. A recent modeling study in fact suggests that a non-monotonic wave dispersion can be a source for alternans. We have designed and built very long (˜ 15 cm) in vitro quasi-one dimensional tracks of rat ventricular cells for elucidating the instability responsible for the transition to alternans. One dimensional tracks are favorable, since it excludes the effect of local wave curvature. Systematic investigations based on S1-S2 stimulation protocols are carried out and here we present some preliminary evidence of non-monotonicity in cardiac wave dispersion.

  6. Effect of electron inertia on dispersive properties of Alfvén waves in cold plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Sayanee; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2017-10-01

    The effect of electron inertia on Alfvén wave propagation is investigated in the framework of the two-fluid theory in a compressible magnetized plasma. The linear analysis of the governing equations manifests the dispersion relation of the circularly polarized Alfvén waves where the electron inertia is found to act as a source of dispersion. In the finite amplitude limit, the nonlinear Alfvén wave may be described by the Derivative Nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DNLSE) modified by third order dispersion arising due to finite electron inertia. The derived equation seems to be novel with respect to what exists in the literature of Alfvén wave dynamics. We have shown that this electron inertia modified DNLSE is completely integrable and an analytical solution is demonstrated with vanishing boundary conditions. The results are expected to be of special importance in the context of space and laboratory plasmas.

  7. Extending dispersive waves theory to use in semi-open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakova, Lyubov; Rosales, Ruben; Rzeznik, Andrew; Tabak, Esteban

    2015-11-01

    In the classical linear dispersive wave theory the sinusoidal waves e i (kx - ωt) carry energy with the group speed cg = dω / dk . This concept is limited to the case where both the frequency ω (k) and the wavenumber k are real. On the other hand, semi-open dispersive systems allow more than just sinusoidal solutions: they can have exponentially blowing up and/or decaying solutions as well. In this talk I will address the questions of what is direction and the speed of the energy propagation for these exponential waves, extend the classical concept of group velocity, and use this theory to construct radiation boundary conditions for semi-open dispersive systems. This approach will be demonstrated on an example of dry hydrostatic troposphere which experiences effective damping due to gravity waves propagating into the stratosphere. RSE, Scottish government.

  8. Transmission and Reflection of Dispersive Alfven Waves in the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, B. H.; Delamere, P. A.; Damiano, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    The motion of Io through Jupiter's magnetosphere generates dispersive Alfven waves that constitute an excellent case study of magntosphere/ionosphere (MI) coupling. Wave formation begins with mass loading as Io passes through the plasma torus. Io's atmosphere acts as an obstacle to flow as pickup ions are added to the plasma, generating an aniostropic distribution (perpendicular temperature greater than parallel temperature). Alfven wave formation begins as momentum is transferred from the magnetosphere to accelerate the new plasma to corotation with the torus. In addition, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves form as a result of the temperature anisotropy. The latitudinal density gradient of the plasma torus is a dispersive factor for the generated waves. We investigate the transmission and reflection of dispersive Alfven waves using a hybrid (kinetic ion/fluid electron) plasma simulation with a physically realistic density gradient. In one dimension, we investigate the power transmission and the spectral character of the waves at higher latitudes. We also investigate the propagation of kinetic Alfven waves in two dimesions at a reduced scale. We couple our results to a gyrokinetic fluid model to examine the propagation of the waves in the rarefied plasma at high latitudes.

  9. Measurement of viscoelastic properties of in vivo swine myocardium using lamb wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (LDUV).

    PubMed

    Urban, Matthew W; Pislaru, Cristina; Nenadic, Ivan Z; Kinnick, Randall R; Greenleaf, James F

    2013-02-01

    Viscoelastic properties of the myocardium are important for normal cardiac function and may be altered by disease. Thus, quantification of these properties may aid with evaluation of the health of the heart. Lamb wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (LDUV) is a shear wave-based method that uses wave velocity dispersion to measure the underlying viscoelastic material properties of soft tissue with plate-like geometries. We tested this method in eight pigs in an open-chest preparation. A mechanical actuator was used to create harmonic, propagating mechanical waves in the myocardial wall. The motion was tracked using a high frame rate acquisition sequence, typically 2500 Hz. The velocities of wave propagation were measured over the 50-400 Hz frequency range in 50 Hz increments. Data were acquired over several cardiac cycles. Dispersion curves were fit with a viscoelastic, anti-symmetric Lamb wave model to obtain estimates of the shear elasticity, μ(1), and viscosity, μ(2) as defined by the Kelvin-Voigt rheological model. The sensitivity of the Lamb wave model was also studied using simulated data. We demonstrated that wave velocity measurements and Lamb wave theory allow one to estimate the variation of viscoelastic moduli of the myocardial walls in vivo throughout the course of the cardiac cycle.

  10. Measurement of viscoelastic properties of in vivo swine myocardium using Lamb Wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV)

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Matthew W.; Pislaru, Cristina; Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Kinnick, Randall R.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Viscoelastic properties of the myocardium are important for normal cardiac function and may be altered by disease. Thus, quantification of these properties may aid with evaluation of the health of the heart. Lamb Wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV) is a shear wave-based method that uses wave velocity dispersion to measure the underlying viscoelastic material properties of soft tissue with plate-like geometries. We tested this method in eight pigs in an open-chest preparation. A mechanical actuator was used to create harmonic, propagating mechanical waves in the myocardial wall. The motion was tracked using a high frame rate acquisition sequence, typically 2500 Hz. The velocities of wave propagation were measured over the 50–400 Hz frequency range in 50 Hz increments. Data were acquired over several cardiac cycles. Dispersion curves were fit with a viscoelastic, anti-symmetric Lamb wave model to obtain estimates of the shear elasticity, μ1, and viscosity, μ2 as defined by the Kelvin-Voigt rheological model. The sensitivity of the Lamb wave model was also studied using simulated data. We demonstrated that wave velocity measurements and Lamb wave theory allow one to estimate the variation of viscoelastic moduli of the myocardial walls in vivo throughout the course of the cardiac cycle. PMID:23060325

  11. DTWT (Dispersive Tsunami Wave Tool): a new tool for computing the complete dispersion of tsunami travel time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reymond, Dominique

    2017-04-01

    We present a tool for computing the complete arrival times of the dispersed wave-train of a tsunami. The calculus is made using the exact formulation of the tsunami dispersion (and without approximations), at any desired periods between one hour or more (concerning the gravity waves propagation) until 10s (the highly dispersed mode). The computation of the travel times is based on the a summation of the necessary time for a tsunami to cross all the elementary blocs of a grid of bathymetry following a path between the source and receiver at a given period. In addition the source dimensions and the focal mechanism are taken into account to adjust the minimum travel time to the different possible points of emission of the source. A possible application of this tool is to forecast the arrival time of late arrivals of tsunami waves that could produce the resonnance of some bays and sites at higher frequencies than the gravity mode. The theoretical arrival times are compared to the observed ones and to the results obtained by TTT (P. Wessel, 2009) and the ones obtained by numerical simulations. References: Wessel, P. (2009). Analysis of oberved and predicted tsunami travel times for the Pacic and Indian oceans. Pure Appl. Geophys., 166:301-324.

  12. Effects Of Relative Strength Of Dispersion On The Formation Of Nonlinear Waves In Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.; Yap, S. L.

    2009-07-07

    In this paper, we studied the effect of strength of dispersion on the formation of solitons and shock waves in un-magnetized dusty plasma using the reductive perturbative technique. Different relational forms of strength parameter epsilon were chosen such a way that it altered the stretching of space, x and time, t variables, thereby leading to different nonlinearities. First, we considered the form zeta = sq root(epsilon(x-v{sub 0}t)) and tau = sq root(epsilont), where v{sub 0} is the phase velocity, with 0dispersion. We obtained the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for un-modulated dust acoustic wave with solitary wave-type solution. The effect of dissipation on the wave propagation was analyzed with coordinate transformations zeta epsilon(x-v{sub 0}t) and tau = epsilon{sup 2}t, with 0wave-type solution. From this study, we concluded that when the dissipation effect is negligible in comparison with dispersion, dust charge fluctuations can only change the amplitude of solitary wave, as observed in the KdV case. However, when the system is not sufficiently dispersive, the dissipation due to dust charge fluctuations can play dominant role and eventually leads to the formation of dust-acoustic shock wave.

  13. Non-linear Inversion of Probability Density Functions of Surface Wave Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucler, E.; Drilleau, M.; Gaudot, I.; Mocquet, A.; Bodin, T.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2016-12-01

    A commonly used approach for inferring 3D shear wave velocity structure from surface wave measurements relies on regionalization of group (or phase) velocity curves at different frequencies as an intermediate step before inversion at depth for each grid point. This choice relies on tracking the maximum energy in the dispersion diagram in order to get a unique dispersion curve and the estimate of associated measurement uncertainties usually depends on ad hoc user's criteria. We present an alternative by directly inverting the waveform, once it is converted into probability density functions of dispersion, in order to obtain a posterior probability of 1D shear wave structure integrated along the ray path. For each 1D S-wave velocity trial model, the corresponding group velocity curve is compared to the dispersion diagram. The goodness of fit is then directly measured by the likelihood. Different type of parameterizations for the S-wave velocity structure can be chosen, we use here Bézier curves in order to ensure smooth variations and a fast forward problem. For each depth of the 1D shear wave posterior probabilities, path averaged velocities can be regionalized using classical least-squares criterion. We show inversion results of cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise in a regional context and at global scale of multiple orbit surface wave trains. This latter approach can be used for planetary purposes in the event of deployment of one seismic station on another planet such as the InSight mission.

  14. Tuning of acoustic wave dispersion in ferroelectrics—A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wontae

    2017-02-01

    Tuning of acoustic wave dispersion in ferroelectrics due to its electrostrictive effect is theoretically investigated. As the acoustic wave is excited electrically in ferroelectrics, the elastic stiffness tensor can be modified by both the linear piezoelectric and nonlinear electrostrictive electromechanical couplings depending on the wave excitation direction of the crystal, where the linear piezoelectric modification has been well characterized and extensively used for the application of piezoelectric-based acoustic wave devices over the past 50 years, but the nonlinear electrostrictive modification, determining the tuning of acoustic wave dispersion in the medium, is still too premature to use the properties in application. For the tuning application, it is essential to know how the electrostrictive strain actually tunes the propagation and displacement of the ferroelectrically active acoustic waves, and this information is currently unavailable. In this paper, the ferroelectrically active acoustic wave propagation and displacement in conjunction with the nonlinear electrostrictive modification are calculated using the plane wave expansion method, and the tunable wave properties associated with the propagation and displacement, are discussed. The electrically excited acoustic wave properties in ferroelectrics are largely modified from the electrostrictive effect, e.g., tuned, excited, vanished, coupled, decoupled, etc., and this should be taken into account in the development of ferroelectric-based acoustic wave devices.

  15. Numerical schemes for a model for nonlinear dispersive waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bona, J. L.; Pritchard, W. G.; Scott, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    A description is given of a number of numerical schemes to solve an evolution equation (Korteweg-deVries) that arises when modelling the propagation of water waves in a channel. The discussion also includes the results of numerical experiments made with each of the schemes. It is suggested, on the basis of these experiments, that one of the schemes may have (discrete) solitary-wave solutions.

  16. Fluid simulation of dispersive and nondispersive ion acoustic waves in the presence of superthermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotekar, Ajay; Kakad, Amar; Kakad, Bharati

    2016-10-01

    One-dimensional fluid simulation is performed for the unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold fluid ions and superthermal electrons. Such a plasma system supports the generation of ion acoustic (IA) waves. A standard Gaussian type perturbation is used in both electron and ion equilibrium densities to excite the IA waves. The evolutionary profiles of the IA waves are obtained by varying the superthermal index and the amplitude of the initial perturbation. This simulation demonstrates that the amplitude of the initial perturbation and the superthermal index play an important role in determining the time evolution and the characteristics of the generated IA waves. The initial density perturbation in the system creates charge separation that drives the finite electrostatic potential in the system. This electrostatic potential later evolves into the dispersive and nondispersive IA waves in the simulation system. The density perturbation with the amplitude smaller than 10% of the equilibrium plasma density evolves into the dispersive IA waves, whereas larger density perturbations evolve into both dispersive and nondispersive IA waves for lower and higher superthermal index. The dispersive IA waves are the IA oscillations that propagate with constant ion plasma frequency, whereas the nondispersive IA waves are the IA solitary pulses (termed as IA solitons in the stability region) that propagate with the constant wave speed. The characteristics of the stable nondispersive IA solitons are found to be consistent with the nonlinear fluid theory. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first fluid simulation study that has considered the superthermal distributions for the plasma species to model the electrostatic solitary waves.

  17. Soliton's eigenvalue based analysis on the generation mechanism of rogue wave phenomenon in optical fibers exhibiting weak third order dispersion.

    PubMed

    Weerasekara, Gihan; Tokunaga, Akihiro; Terauchi, Hiroki; Eberhard, Marc; Maruta, Akihiro

    2015-01-12

    One of the extraordinary aspects of nonlinear wave evolution which has been observed as the spontaneous occurrence of astonishing and statistically extraordinary amplitude wave is called rogue wave. We show that the eigenvalues of the associated equation of nonlinear Schrödinger equation are almost constant in the vicinity of rogue wave and we validate that optical rogue waves are formed by the collision between quasi-solitons in anomalous dispersion fiber exhibiting weak third order dispersion.

  18. Exchange Coulomb interaction in nanotubes: Dispersion of Langmuir waves

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, P. A. Ivanov, A. Yu.

    2015-07-15

    The microscopic derivation of the Coulomb exchange interaction for electrons located on the nanotubes is presented. The derivation is based on the many-particle quantum hydrodynamic method. We demonstrate the effect of curvature of the nanocylinders on the force of exchange interaction. We calculate corresponding dispersion dependencies for electron oscillations on the nanotubes.

  19. Dispersion durations of P-wave and QT interval in children treated with a ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Doksöz, Önder; Güzel, Orkide; Yılmaz, Ünsal; Işgüder, Rana; Çeleğen, Kübra; Meşe, Timur

    2014-04-01

    Limited data are available on the effects of a ketogenic diet on dispersion duration of P-wave and QT-interval measures in children. We searched for the changes in these measures with serial electrocardiograms in patients treated with a ketogenic diet. Twenty-five drug-resistant patients with epilepsy treated with a ketogenic diet were enrolled in this study. Electrocardiography was performed in all patients before the beginning and at the sixth month after implementation of the ketogenic diet. Heart rate, maximum and minimum P-wave duration, P-wave dispersion, and maximum and minimum corrected QT interval and QT dispersion were manually measured from the 12-lead surface electrocardiogram. Minimum and maximum corrected QT and QT dispersion measurements showed nonsignificant increase at month 6 compared with baseline values. Other previously mentioned electrocardiogram parameters also showed no significant changes. A ketogenic diet of 6 months' duration has no significant effect on electrocardiogram parameters in children. Further studies with larger samples and longer duration of follow-up are needed to clarify the effects of ketogenic diet on P-wave dispersion and corrected QT and QT dispersion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Observation of Self-Cavitating Envelope Dispersive Shock Waves in Yttrium Iron Garnet Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janantha, P. A. Praveen; Sprenger, Patrick; Hoefer, Mark A.; Wu, Mingzhong

    2017-07-01

    The formation and properties of envelope dispersive shock wave (DSW) excitations from repulsive nonlinear waves in a magnetic film are studied. Experiments involve the excitation of a spin wave step pulse in a low-loss magnetic Y3Fe5O12 thin film strip, in which the spin wave amplitude increases rapidly, realizing the canonical Riemann problem of shock theory. Under certain conditions, the envelope of the spin wave pulse evolves into a DSW that consists of an expanding train of nonlinear oscillations with amplitudes increasing from front to back, terminated by a black soliton. The onset of DSW self-cavitation, indicated by a point of zero power and a concomitant 180° phase jump, is observed for sufficiently large steps, indicative of the bidirectional dispersive hydrodynamic nature of the DSW. The experimental observations are interpreted with theory and simulations of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  1. On shallow water waves in a medium with time-dependent dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, Hamdy I; Osman, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we studied the progression of shallow water waves relevant to the variable coefficient Korteweg-de Vries (vcKdV) equation. We investigated two kinds of cases: when the dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients are proportional, and when they are not linearly dependent. In the first case, it was shown that the progressive waves have some geometric structures as in the case of KdV equation with constant coefficients but the waves travel with time dependent speed. In the second case, the wave structure is maintained when the nonlinearity balances the dispersion. Otherwise, water waves collapse. The objectives of the study are to find a wide class of exact solutions by using the extended unified method and to present a new algorithm for treating the coupled nonlinear PDE's.

  2. On shallow water waves in a medium with time-dependent dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Gawad, Hamdy I.; Osman, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the progression of shallow water waves relevant to the variable coefficient Korteweg–de Vries (vcKdV) equation. We investigated two kinds of cases: when the dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients are proportional, and when they are not linearly dependent. In the first case, it was shown that the progressive waves have some geometric structures as in the case of KdV equation with constant coefficients but the waves travel with time dependent speed. In the second case, the wave structure is maintained when the nonlinearity balances the dispersion. Otherwise, water waves collapse. The objectives of the study are to find a wide class of exact solutions by using the extended unified method and to present a new algorithm for treating the coupled nonlinear PDE’s. PMID:26199750

  3. Observation of Self-Cavitating Envelope Dispersive Shock Waves in Yttrium Iron Garnet Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Janantha, P A Praveen; Sprenger, Patrick; Hoefer, Mark A; Wu, Mingzhong

    2017-07-14

    The formation and properties of envelope dispersive shock wave (DSW) excitations from repulsive nonlinear waves in a magnetic film are studied. Experiments involve the excitation of a spin wave step pulse in a low-loss magnetic Y_{3}Fe_{5}O_{12} thin film strip, in which the spin wave amplitude increases rapidly, realizing the canonical Riemann problem of shock theory. Under certain conditions, the envelope of the spin wave pulse evolves into a DSW that consists of an expanding train of nonlinear oscillations with amplitudes increasing from front to back, terminated by a black soliton. The onset of DSW self-cavitation, indicated by a point of zero power and a concomitant 180° phase jump, is observed for sufficiently large steps, indicative of the bidirectional dispersive hydrodynamic nature of the DSW. The experimental observations are interpreted with theory and simulations of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  4. Wave-packet formation at the zero-dispersion point in the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, A. J.; Johnson, E. R.

    2015-05-01

    The long-time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual emergence of a coherent, steadily propagating, nonlinear wave packet. There is currently no entirely satisfactory explanation as to why these wave packets form. Here the initial value problem is considered within the context of the Gardner-Ostrovsky, or rotation-modified extended Korteweg-de Vries, equation. The linear Gardner-Ostrovsky equation has maximum group velocity at a critical wave number, often called the zero-dispersion point. It is found here that a nonlinear splitting of the wave-number spectrum at the zero-dispersion point, where energy is shifted into the modulationally unstable regime of the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation, is responsible for the wave-packet formation. Numerical comparisons of the decay of a solitary wave in the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation and a derived nonlinear Schrödinger equation at the zero-dispersion point are used to confirm the spectral splitting.

  5. Measurement of the dispersion and attenuation of cylindrical ultrasonic guided waves in long bone.

    PubMed

    Ta, Dean; Wang, Weiqi; Wang, YuanYuan; Le, Lawrence H; Zhou, Yuqing

    2009-04-01

    Osteoporotic bones are likely to have less cortical bone than healthy bones. The velocities of guided waves propagating in a long cylindrical bone are very sensitive to bone properties and cortical thickness (CTh). This work studies the dispersion and attenuation of ultrasonic guided waves propagating in long cylindrical bone. A hollow cylinder filled with a viscous liquid was used to model the long bone and then to calculate the theoretical phase and group velocities, as well as the attenuation of the waves. The generation and selection of guided wave modes were based on theoretical dispersive curves. The phase velocity and attenuation of cylindrical guided wave modes, such as L(0,1), L(0,2) and L(0,3), were measured in bovine tibia using angled beam transducers at various propagation distances ranging from 75 to 160 mm. The results showed that the phase velocity of the L(0,2) guided wave mode decreased with an increase in CTh. The attenuation of the low cylindrical guided wave modes was a nonlinear function that increased with propagation distance and mode order. The L(0,2) mode had a different attenuation for each CTh. The experimental results were in good agreement with the predicted values. Cylindrical guided waves of low-frequency and low-order have been shown to demonstrate more dispersion and less attenuation and should, therefore, be used to evaluate long bone.

  6. Wave-packet formation at the zero-dispersion point in the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, A J; Johnson, E R

    2015-05-01

    The long-time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual emergence of a coherent, steadily propagating, nonlinear wave packet. There is currently no entirely satisfactory explanation as to why these wave packets form. Here the initial value problem is considered within the context of the Gardner-Ostrovsky, or rotation-modified extended Korteweg-de Vries, equation. The linear Gardner-Ostrovsky equation has maximum group velocity at a critical wave number, often called the zero-dispersion point. It is found here that a nonlinear splitting of the wave-number spectrum at the zero-dispersion point, where energy is shifted into the modulationally unstable regime of the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation, is responsible for the wave-packet formation. Numerical comparisons of the decay of a solitary wave in the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation and a derived nonlinear Schrödinger equation at the zero-dispersion point are used to confirm the spectral splitting.

  7. Modulation theory, dispersive shock waves and Gerald Beresford Whitham

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minzoni, A. A.; Smyth, Noel F.

    2016-10-01

    Gerald Beresford (GB) Whitham, FRS, (13th December, 1927-26th January, 2014) was one of the leading applied mathematicians of the twentieth century whose work over forty years had a profound, formative impact on research on wave motion across a broad range of areas. Many of the ideas and techniques he developed have now become the standard tools used to analyse and understand wave motion, as the papers of this special issue of Physica D testify. Many of the techniques pioneered by GB Whitham have spread beyond wave propagation into other applied mathematics areas, such as reaction-diffusion, and even into theoretical physics and pure mathematics, in which Whitham modulation theory is an active area of research. GB Whitham's classic textbook Linear and Nonlinear Waves, published in 1974, is still the standard reference for the applied mathematics of wave motion. In honour of his scientific achievements, GB Whitham was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1959 and a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1965. He was awarded the Norbert Wiener Prize for Applied Mathematics in 1980.

  8. Higher order dispersion in the propagation of a gravity wave packet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, K. C.; Dong, B.

    1989-01-01

    To the first order of approximation, the complex amplitude of a wave packet in an anisotropic and dispersive medium is convected with the group of velocity. However, a gravity wave is a vector wave. Its wave packet must be formed by superposition of various wave numbers with corresponding frequencies, as is the case for scalar waves, and additionally by superposing many eigenmodes which also depend on the wave number. To represent the vector wave packet self-consistently, it is found that a gradient term must be included in the expansion. For a Guassian wave packet, this gradient term is shown to have important implications on the velocity vector as represented by its hodograph. Numerical results show that the hodograph is influenced by the location of the relative position of interest from the center of a Gaussian pulse. Higher order expansion shows that an initial Gaussian wave packet will retain its Gaussian shape as it propagates, but the pulse will spread in all directions with its major axis undergoing a rotation. Numerical results indicate that these higher order dispersive effects may be marginally observable in the atmosphere.

  9. Dispersion characteristics of the electromagnetic waves in a relativistic electron beam guided by the ion channel

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Ghasemi, Maede; Sedaghat, Zeinab; Mahdian, Zeinab

    2010-05-15

    In this article, the dispersion characteristics of the paraxial (near axis) electromagnetic (EM) waves in a relativistic electron beam guided by the ion channel are investigated. Equilibrium fields such as ion-channel electrostatic field and self-fields of relativistic electron beam are included in this formalism. In accordance with the equilibrium field structure, radial and azimuthal waves are selected as base vectors for EM waves. It is shown that the dispersion of the radially polarized EM and space charge waves are influenced by the equilibrium fields, but azimuthally polarized wave remain unaffected. In some wave number domains, the radially polarized EM and fast space charge waves are coupled. In these regions, instability is analyzed as a function of equilibrium structure. It is shown that the total equilibrium radial force due to the ion channel and electron beam and also relativistic effect play a key role in the coupling of the radially polarized EM wave and space charge wave. Furthermore, some asymptotic behaviors such as weak and strong ion channel, nonrelativistic case and cutoff frequencies are discussed. This instability could be used as an amplification mechanism for radially polarized EM waves in a beam-plasma system where a relativistic electron beam is guided by the ion channel.

  10. Finite element method for non-linear dispersive wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jung-Yu; Kawahara, Mutsuto

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the finite element method for the analysis of the short wave problem expressed by the Boussinesq equation. The Boussinesq equation considers the effect of wave crest curvature. The standard Galerkin finite element method is employed for the spatial discretization using the triangular finite element based on the linear interpolation function. The combination of the explicit and the quasi-explicit schemes-- i.e., the explicit scheme for the continuum equation and the quasi-explicit scheme for the momentum equation--is employed for the discretization in time. To show the applicability of the present method to the practical problem, the simulation of wave propagation in one-dimensional and two-dimensional channel flows is carried out. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental results being. The practical example for Miyako Bay is presented.

  11. Theory and evidence that the Madden-Julian Oscillation is a dispersive, convectively coupled moisture wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adames, Á. F.; Kim, D.

    2015-12-01

    A linear wave theory for the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), previously developed by Sobel and Maloney, is extended upon in this study. Using column-integrated moisture as a prognostic variable, a dispersion relation is derived that solely depends on the convective adjustment timescale, a parameter that indicates the amount of moisture available for propagation and the distance that free Kelvin waves are able to travel in the presence of dissipation. The dispersion relation adequately describes the MJO's signal in the wavenumber-frequency spectrum and defines the MJO as a dispersive equatorial moist wave with a westward group velocity. On the basis of linear regression analysis of the time varying field of outgoing longwave radiation, it is estimated that that the MJO's group velocity is 2/5 as large as its eastward phase speed. This dispersion is the result of the anomalous winds in the Kelvin and Rossby wave responses modulating the mean distribution of moisture such that the moisture anomaly propagates eastward while wave energy propagates westward. Additionally, it is found that cloud-radiation feedbacks cause growth of the moist wave to be largest at the planetary scales. It is hypothesized that this scale selection mechanism is the result of upper-level cloudiness exhibiting a larger zonal extent than precipitation. The longwave radiative heating from these upper-level clouds causes an expansion of the region of ascent under weak-temperature gradient balance.

  12. Optical gyroscope with controllable dispersion in four wave mixing regime.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy; Wolfe, Owen; Du, Shuangli; Rochester, Simon; Budker, Dmitry; Novikova, Irina

    2016-05-01

    We present our work towards realization of the fast-light gyroscope prototype, in which the sensitivity enhancement (compared to a regular laser gyroscopes) is achieved by adjusting the intra-cavity dispersion. We discuss schematics and underlying nonlinear effects leading to the negative dispersion in Rb vapor: level structure, optically addressed transitions, and configuration of the resonant cavity. We investigate dependence of the pulling factor (i.e., the ratio of the lasing frequency shift with the change of the cavity length to the equivalent resonance frequency shift in the empty cavity) on pump lasers detunings, power, and density of the atomic vapor. The observation of the pulling factor exceeding unity implies the gyroscope sensitivity improvement over the regular system This work is supported by Naval Air Warfare Center STTR program N68335-11-C-0428.

  13. Microscopic Models for Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Highly Dispersive Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-18

    rotations, the effects of pressure and temperature and to show the classes of density fluctuations in I which give spatial dispersion, ie, the k- dependance ...complex plane the response e (co, Q) lives on some Riemann surface which is determined by the k- dependance . 2. Talks and Publications Three talks were...sources of 1- dependance (k- dependance in Fourier transform variables) have been identified. One is bubbles or cavitation which scatter the propagating

  14. Magnetic field effects on nonlocal wave dispersion characteristics of size-dependent nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Barati, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, wave propagation analysis of functionally graded size-dependent nanobeams embedded in elastic foundation exposed to a longitudinal magnetic field is conducted based on nonlocal elasticity theory. Material properties of nanobeam change gradually according to the sigmoid function. Applying an analytical solution, the acoustical and optical dispersion relations are explored for various wave number, nonlocality parameter, material composition, elastic foundation constants and magnetic field intensity. It is found that frequency and phase velocity of waves propagating in S-FGM nanobeam are significantly affected by these parameters. Also the presence of cutoff and escape frequencies in wave propagation analysis of embedded S-FGM nanobeams is investigated.

  15. Dispersive tsunami wave modeling by parallel computation with variable nested-grids in spherical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BABA, T.; Takahashi, N.; Kaneda, Y.; Ando, K.; Matsuoka, D.; Kato, T.

    2013-12-01

    Due to development of offshore tsunami observation technologies, frequency dispersion on tsunami propagation has been often observed in the recent tsunamis such as the 2004 Indian Ocean and 2011 Tohoku tsunamis. The dispersive propagation of tsunamis can be simulated with the Boussinesq model, but which demands a lot of computation resources. On the other hand, rapid progress is being made in parallel computing technology. In this study, we investigated a parallelized approach using OpenMP and MPI for dispersive tsunami wave modeling. Our new parallel code solves either the linear or nonlinear Boussinesq-type dispersive water equations in spherical coordinates. A variable nested-grid scheme was employed to increase spatial resolution in the target region. Tsunami inundation on land can be also predicted with the code. This new code was named 'JAGURS'. JAGURS stands for that the 'JA'MSTEC improved the former code developed by 'G'eoscience Australia and 'UR'S Corporation (Jakeman et al., 2011) which uses 'S'atake (2002)'s kernel. By applying JAGURS, the dispersive tsunami modeling was implemented for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. The finest topographic grid interval was 0.22 arc-second (about 5m) along the longitude and latitude directions in coastal area. A good agreement was shown between the dispersive wave modeling and the tsunami waveforms observed in offshore. The dispersive model predicted the similar inundation area with that derived from the non-dispersive model.

  16. Anisotropic S-wave velocity structure from joint inversion of surface wave group velocity dispersion: A case study from India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Dey, S.; Siddartha, G.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-12-01

    We estimate 1-dimensional path average fundamental mode group velocity dispersion curves from regional Rayleigh and Love waves sampling the Indian subcontinent. The path average measurements are combined through a tomographic inversion to obtain 2-dimensional group velocity variation maps between periods of 10 and 80 s. The region of study is parametrised as triangular grids with 1° sides for the tomographic inversion. Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves from each node point is subsequently extracted and jointly inverted to obtain a radially anisotropic shear wave velocity model through global optimisation using Genetic Algorithm. The parametrization of the model space is done using three crustal layers and four mantle layers over a half-space with varying VpH , VsV and VsH. The anisotropic parameter (η) is calculated from empirical relations and the density of the layers are taken from PREM. Misfit for the model is calculated as a sum of error-weighted average dispersion curves. The 1-dimensional anisotropic shear wave velocity at each node point is combined using linear interpolation to obtain 3-dimensional structure beneath the region. Synthetic tests are performed to estimate the resolution of the tomographic maps which will be presented with our results. We envision to extend this to a larger dataset in near future to obtain high resolution anisotrpic shear wave velocity structure beneath India, Himalaya and Tibet.

  17. Nonlinear acoustics in a dispersive continuum: Random waves, radiation pressure, and quantum noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabot, M. A.

    The nonlinear interaction of sound with sound is studied using dispersive hydrodynamics which derived from a variational principle and the assumption that the internal energy density depends on gradients of the mass density. The attenuation of sound due to nonlinear interaction with a background is calculated and is shown to be sensitive to both the nature of the dispersion and decay bandwidths. The theoretical results are compared to those of low temperature helium experiments. A kinetic equation which described the nonlinear self-inter action of a background is derived. When a Deybe-type cutoff is imposed, a white noise distribution is shown to be a stationary distribution of the kinetic equation. The attenuation and spectrum of decay of a sound wave due to nonlinear interaction with zero point motion is calculated. In one dimension, the dispersive hydrodynamic equations are used to calculate the Langevin and Rayleigh radiation pressures of wave packets and solitary waves.

  18. A Dispersive Estimate for the Linearized Water-Waves Equations in Finite Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoît, Mésognon-Gireau

    2017-09-01

    We prove a dispersive estimate for the solutions of the linearized Water-Waves equations in dimension {d=1} and {d=2} in presence of a flat bottom. Adapting the proof from Aynur (An optimal decay estimate for the linearized water wave equation in 2d. arXiv:1411.0963, 2014) in the case of infinite depth, we prove a decay with respect to time t of order {\\vert t \\vert^{-d/3}} for solutions with initial data {\\varphi} such that {\\vert\\varphi\\vert_{H^1}}, {\\vert x\\varphi\\vert_{H^1}} are bounded. We also give variants to this result with different decays for a more convenient use of the dispersive estimate. We then give an existence result for the full Water-Waves equations in weighted spaces for practical uses of the proven dispersive estimates.

  19. Universal ultrasonic goniometer for Rayleigh and surface skimming longitudinal wave dispersion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, M.; Küttner, M.; Köhler, B.; Bamberg, J.; Baron, H.-U.

    2012-05-01

    There are several approaches for determining the Rayleigh wave dispersion of surface treated materials. Most of them are based either on ultrasonic probes in contact technique or on laser excitation or detection of ultrasound. Disadvantages of these methods for in-service use are coupling problems (contact methods) and very high device costs (laser based methods). The paper presents an immersion technique trying to avoid the disadvantages of the previous approaches for practical use. The High precision Ultrasound Goniometer (HUGO) allows to vary both: the sound beam angles and the distance between the excitation and detection sound beams. Thus, the Rayleigh wave velocity and its dispersion can be determined by two independent methods: by the drop in the reflexion coefficient at the Rayleigh angle and by change in travel time for a given change in travel distance. The dispersion can also be determined for surface skimming longitudinal waves. The application for stress determination in surface treated aero-engine materials is discussed.

  20. FAST TRACK PAPER: The interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin method for elastic wave propagation: grid dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Basabe, Jonás D.; Sen, Mrinal K.; Wheeler, Mary F.

    2008-10-01

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in applying the discontinuous Galerkin method (DGM) to wave propagation. In this work, we investigate the applicability of the interior penalty DGM to elastic wave propagation by analysing it's grid dispersion properties, with particular attention to the effect that different basis functions have on the numerical dispersion. We consider different types of basis functions that naturally yield a diagonal mass matrix. This is relevant to seismology because a diagonal mass matrix is tantamount to an explicit and efficient time marching scheme. We find that the Legendre basis functions that are traditionally used in the DGM introduce numerical dispersion and anisotropy. Furthermore, we find that using Lagrange basis functions along with the Gauss nodes has attractive advantages for numerical wave propagation.

  1. Dispersion relations with crossing symmetry for {pi}{pi} D- and F-wave amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, R.

    2011-04-01

    A set of once subtracted dispersion relations with imposed crossing symmetry condition for the {pi}{pi} D- and F-wave amplitudes is derived and analyzed. An example of numerical calculations in the effective two-pion mass range from the threshold to 1.1 GeV is presented. It is shown that these new dispersion relations impose quite strong constraints on the analyzed {pi}{pi} interactions and are very useful tools to test the {pi}{pi} amplitudes. One of the goals of this work is to provide a complete set of equations required for easy use. Full analytical expressions are presented. Along with the well-known dispersion relations successful in testing the {pi}{pi} S- and P-wave amplitudes, those presented here for the D and F waves give a complete set of tools for analyses of the {pi}{pi} interactions.

  2. Integration of SH seismic reflection and Love-wave dispersion data for shear wave velocity determination over quick clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comina, Cesare; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Polom, Ulrich; Socco, Laura Valentina

    2017-09-01

    Quick clay is a water-saturated formation originally formed through flocculation and deposition in a marine to brackish environment. It is subsequently leached to low salinity by freshwater flow. If its strength decreases, then the flocculated structure collapses leading to landslides of varying destructiveness. Leaching can result in a reduction of the undisturbed shear strength of these clays and suggestions exist that a reduction in shear wave velocities is also possible. Integration of SH seismic reflection and Love-wave dispersion data was undertaken, in an area near the Göta River in southwest Sweden, to evaluate the potential of shear wave velocity imaging for detecting quick clays. Seismic reflection processing evidenced several geologically interesting interfaces related to the probable presence of quick clays (locally confirmed by boreholes) and sand-gravelly layers strongly contributing to water circulation within them. Dispersion data were extracted with a Gaussian windowing approach and inverted with a laterally constrained inversion using a priori information from the seismic reflection imaging. The inversion of dispersion curves has evidenced the presence of a low velocity layer (lvl, with a velocity reduction of ca. 30 per cent) probably associable to quick clays. This velocity reduction is enough to produce detectable phase-velocity differences in the field data and to achieve a better velocity resolution if compared to reflection seismic velocity analyses. The proposed approach has the potential of a comprehensive determination of the shear wave velocity distribution in the shallow subsurface. A sensitivity analysis of Love-wave dispersion data is also presented underlining that, despite limited dispersion of the data set and the velocity-reducing effect of quick-clay leaching, the proposed interpretation procedure arises as a valuable approach in quick clay and other lvl identification.

  3. Mid-infrared dispersive waves generation in a birefringent fluorotellurite microstructured fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chuanfei; Zhao, Zhipeng; Jia, Zhixu; Li, Qing; Hu, Minglie; Qin, Guanshi; Ohishi, Yasutake; Qin, Weiping

    2016-09-01

    Tunable mid-infrared dispersive waves are generated in a birefringent fluorotellurite microstructured fiber (FTMF) pumped by a 1560 nm femtosecond fiber laser. The FTMF have two zero-dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs) for each polarization axis. The second ZDWs for the fast and slow axes of the FTMF are 2224 and 2042 nm, respectively. As the pump laser is polarized along the fast (or slow) axis of the FTMF, tunable mid-infrared dispersive waves from 2680 to 2725 nm (or from 2260 to 2400 nm) are generated in the FTMF when the Raman soliton meets the second zero-dispersion wavelength of the fast (or slow) axis with increasing the pump power. Our results show that the designed FTMFs are promising nonlinear media for generating tunable mid-infrared light sources.

  4. An effective absorbing boundary condition for linear long-wave and linear dispersive-wave tsunami simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Tsushima, Hiroaki; Furumura, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    We numerically simulated the propagation of tsunami waves with finite difference methods by using perfectly matched layer (PML) boundary conditions to effectively eliminate artificial reflections from model boundaries. The PML method damps the tsunami height and velocity of seawater only in directions perpendicular to the boundary. Although the additional terms required to implement the PML conditions make the use of the PML technique difficult for linear dispersive tsunami waves, we have proposed an empirical extension of the PML method for modeling dispersive tsunami waves. Even for heterogeneous, realistic bathymetries, numerical tests demonstrated that the PML boundary condition dramatically decreased artificial reflections from model boundaries compared to the use of traditional boundary conditions. The use of PML boundary conditions for numerical modeling of tsunamis is especially useful because it facilitates use of the later phases of tsunamis that would otherwise be compromised by artifacts caused by reflections from model boundaries.

  5. Broadband surface wave dispersion measurements across North America from ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensen, G. D.; Shapiro, N. M.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Campillo, M.; Stehly, L.

    2005-05-01

    Ambient seismic noise contains a significant component of Rayleigh wave energy that appears to be excited by oceanic microseisms and atmospheric forcing. These signals constitute a wavefield in which the phase is randomized by a multiplicity of sources and by scattering. Cross- correlations of the ambient wavefield between pairs of receivers can be used to extract the Rayleigh wave part of Green's function and, therefore, provide a new source of surface wave information that is particularly useful in the context of arrays of broadband seismometers such as PASSCAL experiments, the emerging USArray, or other national deployments. The method produces numerous inter-station measurements that are not sampled by traditional observational methods based on earthquake waves. The method to extract surface wave dispersion measurements from ambient noise was first applied systematically to records from USArray Transportable Array stations in California. These observations were used to construct high-resolution short-period (7-18 s) surface wave dispersion maps and to image the principal crustal geological units. In addition, it has been previously shown that reliable dispersion meausurements can be obtained at intermediate to long periods (20 - 100 sec). In particular, cross-correlations of several months of ambient seismic noise observed at several station-pairs across North America result in coherent broadband waveforms with dispersion characteristics similar to Rayleigh-wave tomography maps constructed using earthquakes waves. We extend this work by computing cross-correlations and obtaining intermediate and long period surface wave group velocity measurements for paths connecting about one hundred permanent broadband stations in North America many of which constitute the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS). We discuss the promise and limitations of the method to improve information about the crust and upper mantle across North America.

  6. Pseudospectral modeling and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, K.; Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Chen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) is one of the most widely used techniques in environmental and engineering geophysics to determine shear-wave velocities and dynamic properties, which is based on the elastic layered system theory. Wave propagation in the Earth, however, has been recognized as viscoelastic and the propagation of Rayleigh waves presents substantial differences in viscoelastic media as compared with elastic media. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out numerical simulation and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media to better understand Rayleigh-wave behaviors in the real world. We apply a pseudospectral method to the calculation of the spatial derivatives using a Chebyshev difference operator in the vertical direction and a Fourier difference operator in the horizontal direction based on the velocity-stress elastodynamic equations and relations of linear viscoelastic solids. This approach stretches the spatial discrete grid to have a minimum grid size near the free surface so that high accuracy and resolution are achieved at the free surface, which allows an effective incorporation of the free surface boundary conditions since the Chebyshev method is nonperiodic. We first use an elastic homogeneous half-space model to demonstrate the accuracy of the pseudospectral method comparing with the analytical solution, and verify the correctness of the numerical modeling results for a viscoelastic half-space comparing the phase velocities of Rayleigh wave between the theoretical values and the dispersive image generated by high-resolution linear Radon transform. We then simulate three types of two-layer models to analyze dispersive-energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that the phase velocity of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media is relatively higher than in elastic media and the fundamental mode increases by 10-16% when the frequency is above 10. Hz due to the velocity dispersion of P

  7. Impact of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2007-01-01

    Effect of the ring current ions in the real part of electromagnetic ion Cyclotron wave dispersion relation is studied on global scale. Recent Cluster observations by Engebretson et al. showed that although the temperature anisotropy of is energetic (> 10 keV) ring current protons was high during the entire 22 November 2003 perigee pass, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves were observed only in conjunction with intensification of the ion fluxes below 1 keV by over an order of magnitude. To study the effect of the ring current ions on the wave dispersive properties and the corresponding global wave redistribution, we use a self-consistent model of interacting ring current and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows: First, the plasma density enhancement in the night MLT sector during the main and recovery storm phases is mostly caused by injection of suprathermal plasma sheet H + (approximately < 1 keV), which dominate the thermal plasma density. Second, during the recovery storm phases, the ring current modification of the wave dispersion relation leads to a qualitative change of the wave patterns in the postmidnight-dawn sector for L > 4.75. This "new" wave activity is well organized by outward edges of dense suprathermal ring current spots, and the waves are not observed if the ring current ions are not included in the real part of dispersion relation. Third, the most intense wave-induced ring current precipitation is located in the night MLT sector and caused by modification of the wave dispersion relation. The strongest precipitating fluxes of about 8 X 10(exp 6)/ (cm(exp 2) - s X st) are found near L=5.75, MLT=2 during the early recovery phase on 4 May. Finally, the nightside precipitation is more intense than the dayside fluxes, even if there are less intense waves, because the convection field moves ring current ions into the loss cone on the nightside, but drives

  8. Relationship between P wave dispersion, left ventricular mass index and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Elibet; González, Emilio; Llanes, María Del C; Garí, Merlin; García, Yosvany; García Sáez, Julieta

    2013-06-01

    The study of arterial hypertension risk factors in children guarantees the establishment of health policies to avoid complications associated with this illness in the future. The highest values of P-wave dispersion during sinus rhythm are pointed as predictors of atrial fibrillation in adulthood since there is an association between arterial hypertension, P-wave dispersion and left ventricular hypertrophy. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between blood pressure, left ventricular mass index and P-wave dispersion in the pediatric population. In the frame of the PROCDEC II project, children from 8 to 11 years old, without known heart conditions were studied. Arterial blood pressure was measured in all the children; a 12-lead surface ECG and an echocardiogram were done as well. Left ventricular mass index mean values for normotensive (25.21 ± 5.96 g/m²) and hypertensive (30.38 ± 7.39 g/m²) children showed significant differences (p= 0.000). The mean value of the left atrial area was significantly different (p= 0.000) when comparing prehypertensive (10.98 ± 2.23 cm2) and hypertensive (12.21 ± 1.27 cm²) children to normotensive ones (10.66 ± 2.38 cm²). The correlation of P-wave dispersion and the left ventricular mass index showed an r= 0.87 and p= 0.000. P-wave dispersion is increased in pre- and hypertensive children compared to normotensive ones. A dependence of the P-wave dispersion of the left ventricular mass index was found in hypertensive children.

  9. Deciphering Lower Mantle Structure With the Dispersion of Core-Diffracted Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, G. G.; Wysession, M. E.; Aleqabi, G. I.; Shore, P. J.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate lateral variations of the D'' region beneath the West Coast of North America using the dispersion signatures of Pdiff and Sdiff waves originating from the Western Pacific Rim. Data come from large earthquakes recorded by over 50 3-component broadband seismic stations stretched across North America as part of seismic networks including the IRIS Global Seismograph Network, U.S. National Seismic Network, Canadian National Seismic Network, and the IRIS PASSCAL Florida-to-Edmonton Seismic Experiment. All data were obtained from the IRIS DMC, resampled at a constant sample rate (20 sps), converted to displacements, and had the instrument responses removed. When the seismic energy of core-diffracted waves occupies a wide frequency band, the structure at the base of the mantle is sampled differently by the energy at various frequencies. The higher-frequency waves stay closer to the core-mantle boundary, while the longer-frequency waves sample more of the lower mantle. This creates dispersion because of the differences in mantle velocities as a function of depth. Using dispersion slowness curves derived from diffracted body waves sampling the thermal and chemical boundary layer region at the base of the mantle, lateral structural variations can not only be resolved but also their nature may be inferred through comparison with synthetic seismic modeling. For this study, the determination of slownesses of incoming diffracted body waves at periods ranging from 150 to 5 seconds was facilitated by an iterative multiple cross-correlation algorithm. Typical results in our calculation of slownesses show r-squared correlations between arrival times and distances above 0.999. We find that dispersion overall causes the slowness to decrease with shorter periods (also found in the synthetic models) and that the dispersion curves we found for different paths resemble the dispersion curves from several different synthetic structural models of D'', thus quantifying the

  10. Wave dispersion in a counterstreaming, relativistic thermal, magnetized, electron-positron plasma.

    PubMed

    Verdon, M W; Melrose, D B

    2011-05-01

    The dispersion equation is analyzed for waves in a strongly magnetized, electron-positron plasma in which counterstreaming electrons and positrons have a relativistic thermal distribution in their respective rest frames, for propagation parallel to the magnetic field. We derive the response tensor for the medium, demonstrate the dispersion curves for different temperatures, and discuss the differences from the cold-plasma case. Application to the case of pulsar magnetospheres is discussed. © 2011 American Physical Society

  11. Density Waves in Saturn's Rings: Non-linear Dispersion and Moon Libration Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, Miodrag; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.

    2008-05-01

    We analyze strong spiral density waves in stellar occultations by Saturn's A ring observed with the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and find that waves dispersion relation exhibits a clear deviation from the linear trend. All waves examined here reveal an intrinsic quadratic radial dependence on the wavenumber. We provide evidence that the deviation from the linear trend is caused by the ring's pressure term acting against the self-gravity of the ring particles. From the observed dispersion relation and using the theory of Goldreich and Tremaine (1978, 1979, ApJ) where the pressure is parameterized as p=σ c2, we measure the velocity dispersion c=2-5 mm/s in the A ring. Additionally, in all first order Pandora waves the dispersion relation exhibits a wiggly structure. Comparing 60 stellar UVIS occultations between 2004 and 2008 we infer that this wavenumber oscillation propagates away from the resonance location with a period of about 600 days. This inferred period is consistent with the 3:2 near corotation resonance between Pandora and Mimas (French et al., 2003, Icarus). The observed libration in wavenumber allows us to accurately measure the group velocity in the rings and obtain independent estimates of both surface density and velocity dispersion of the rings.

  12. MHD Model Estimates of the Contribution of Driven, Linear, Non-Plane Wave Dissipation to Chromospheric Heating Using a Complete Electrical Conductivity Tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    Analytic solutions of an MHD model that includes an anisotropic, inhomogeneous electrical conductivity tensor containing Hall, Pedersen, and Spitzer conductivities are used to compute resistive heating rates as a function of height z from the photosphere to the lower corona due to dissipation of driven, linear, non- plane waves. The background state of the atmosphere is assumed to be an FAL atmosphere. This state is linearly perturbed by a harmonic perturbation of frequency ν. The height dependence of the perturbation in the presence of the inhomogeneous background state is determined by solving the MHD equations given the harmonic, horizontal, driving magnetic field Bx1 at the photosphere, the constant vertical magnetic field Bz, and the magnetic field strength Bcond(z) that enters the electrical conductivity tensor. The variation of the heating rates per unit volume and mass with ν, Bx1, and Bcond(0) are determined. The heating rates are found to be ∝ Bcond(0)2 Bx12, and to increase with ν. The Pedersen resistivity is ∝ Bcond(0)2. It is several orders of magnitude greater than the Spitzer resistivity in the chromosphere, and determines the rate of heating by Pedersen current dissipation in the chromosphere. The Pedersen current is essentially a proton current in the chromosphere. The onset of Pedersen current dissipation rates large enough to balance the net radiative loss from the chromosphere occurs near the height of the FAL temperature minimum, and is triggered by the product of the electron and proton magnetizations first exceeding unity. The magnetizations and heating rate increase rapidly with height beginning near the temperature minimum. For the special case of Bz = 200 G, Bx1=140 G, and 400 ≤ Bcond(0) ≤ 1500 G the driver frequency for which the period averaged chromospheric heating flux FCh = 5 × 106 ergs-cm-2-sec-1 has the corresponding range of 91 ≥ ν ≥ 25 mHz. Larger magnetic field strengths correspond to lower frequencies for a

  13. Seismic wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in UAE carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunsami, Abdulwaheed Remi

    Interpreting the seismic property of fluids in hydrocarbon reservoirs at low frequency scale has been a cherished goal of petroleum geophysics research for decades. Lately, there has been tremendous interest in understanding attenuation as a result of fluid flow in porous media. Although interesting, the emerging experimental and theoretical information still remain ambiguous and are practically not utilized for reasons not too obscure. Attenuation is frequency dependent and hard to measure in the laboratory at low frequency. This thesis describes and reports the results of an experimental study of low frequency attenuation and velocity dispersion on a selected carbonate reservoir samples in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). For the low frequency measurements, stress-strain method was used to measure the moduli from which the velocity is derived. Attenuation was measured as the phase difference between the applied stress and the strain. For the ultrasonic component, the pulse propagation method was employed. To study the fluid effect especially at reservoir in situ conditions, the measurements were made dry and saturated with liquid butane and brine at differential pressures of up to 5000 psi with pore pressure held constant at 500 psi. Similarly to what has been documented in the literatures for sandstone, attenuation of the bulk compressibility mode dominates the losses in these dry and somewhat partially saturated carbonate samples with butane and brine. Overall, the observed attenuation cannot be simply said to be frequency dependent within this low seismic band. While attenuation seems to be practically constant in the low frequency band for sample 3H, such conclusion cannot be made for sample 7H. For the velocities, significant dispersion is observed and Gassmann generally fails to match the measured velocities. Only the squirt model fairly fits the velocities, but not at all pressures. Although the observed dispersion is larger than Biot's prediction, the fact

  14. Acoustic Wave Dispersion and Scattering in Complex Marine Sediment Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    summary of the work completed is listed below: • Improvement of Viscous Grain Shearing (VGS) model [1] in collaboration with Mike Buckingham. We show...RESULTS The Viscous Grain Shearing model developed by Mike Buckingham [1] predicts the frequency dependence of compressional and wave speeds...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 assumed to be shearing at the grain -to- grain contacts and fluid flow around

  15. On compression and rarefaction waves in a dispersed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplitskii, Yu. S.; Kovenskii, V. I.

    2008-11-01

    Mathematical modeling of nonstationary filtration regimes with instantaneous reduction (increase) in the pressure at entry into the granular bed has been carried out within the framework of the two-temperature approximation. The regularities of transmission of rarefaction and compression waves have been investigated. Equations for calculation of the minimum and maximum temperature of the heat-transfer agent in criterial form and of the time of reaching a new stationary state have been obtained.

  16. Extension of a spectral time-stepping domain decomposition method for dispersive and dissipative wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Botts, Jonathan; Savioja, Lauri

    2015-04-01

    For time-domain modeling based on the acoustic wave equation, spectral methods have recently demonstrated promise. This letter presents an extension of a spectral domain decomposition approach, previously used to solve the lossless linear wave equation, which accommodates frequency-dependent atmospheric attenuation and assignment of arbitrary dispersion relations. Frequency-dependence is straightforward to assign when time-stepping is done in the spectral domain, so combined losses from molecular relaxation, thermal conductivity, and viscosity can be approximated with little extra computation or storage. A mode update free from numerical dispersion is derived, and the model is confirmed with a numerical experiment.

  17. MnO spin-wave dispersion curves from neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Keen, David A.

    2007-02-15

    We describe a model-independent approach for the extraction of spin-wave dispersion curves from powder neutron total scattering data. Our approach is based on a statistical analysis of real-space spin configurations to calculate spin-dynamical quantities. The RMCPROFILE implementation of the reverse Monte Carlo refinement process is used to generate a large ensemble of supercell spin configurations from MnO powder diffraction data collected at 100 K. Our analysis of these configurations gives spin-wave dispersion curves for MnO that agree well with those determined independently using neutron triple-axis spectroscopic techniques.

  18. Signal Construction-Based Dispersion Compensation of Lamb Waves Considering Signal Waveform and Amplitude Spectrum Preservation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jian; Yuan, Shenfang; Wang, Tongguang

    2016-12-23

    The results of Lamb wave identification for the aerospace structures could be easily affected by the nonlinear-dispersion characteristics. In this paper, dispersion compensation of Lamb waves is of particular concern. Compared with the similar research works on the traditional signal domain transform methods, this study is based on signal construction from the viewpoint of nonlinear wavenumber linearization. Two compensation methods of linearly-dispersive signal construction (LDSC) and non-dispersive signal construction (NDSC) are proposed. Furthermore, to improve the compensation effect, the influence of the signal construction process on the other crucial signal properties, including the signal waveform and amplitude spectrum, is considered during the investigation. The linear-dispersion and non-dispersion effects are firstly analyzed. Then, after the basic signal construction principle is explored, the numerical realization of LDSC and NDSC is discussed, in which the signal waveform and amplitude spectrum preservation is especially regarded. Subsequently, associated with the delay-and-sum algorithm, LDSC or NDSC is employed for high spatial resolution damage imaging, so that the adjacent multi-damage or quantitative imaging capacity of Lamb waves can be strengthened. To verify the proposed signal construction and damage imaging methods, the experimental and numerical validation is finally arranged on the aluminum plates.

  19. Dispersion of Lamb waves in a honeycomb composite sandwich panel.

    PubMed

    Baid, Harsh; Schaal, Christoph; Samajder, Himadri; Mal, Ajit

    2015-02-01

    Composite materials are increasingly being used in advanced aircraft and aerospace structures. Despite their many advantages, composites are often susceptible to hidden damages that may occur during manufacturing and/or service of the structure. Therefore, safe operation of composite structures requires careful monitoring of the initiation and growth of such defects. Ultrasonic methods using guided waves offer a reliable and cost effective method for defects monitoring in advanced structures due to their long propagation range and their sensitivity to defects in their propagation path. In this paper, some of the useful properties of guided Lamb type waves are investigated, using analytical, numerical and experimental methods, in an effort to provide the knowledge base required for the development of viable structural health monitoring systems for composite structures. The laboratory experiments involve a pitch-catch method in which a pair of movable transducers is placed on the outside surface of the structure for generating and recording the wave signals. The specific cases considered include an aluminum plate, a woven composite laminate and an aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel. The agreement between experimental, numerical and theoretical results are shown to be excellent in certain frequency ranges, providing a guidance for the design of effective inspection systems.

  20. Breakup of an oil slick mixed with dispersants by breaking wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Holser, Anne; Katz, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    After oil spill, coherent oil slick are entrained by breaking ocean waves together with air, which produces a complicated three-phase flow, involving a wide range of length and time scales. The oil droplet size distribution is a crucial factor affecting the physical and chemical dispersion of oil spills, but little is known about oil droplet formation mechanism and droplet size distributions during and immediately after the impact of breaking waves. In our experimental study, we investigate the breakup of an oil slick in a specialized wave tank. The widely used dispersant Coexist 9500-A at different dispersant to oil ratio is used for varying the surface tension of crude oil (MC252 surrogate) in the 10 - 1 to 10 mN/m range. The dispersant is applied either by premixing or surface spraying, the latter consistent with typical application. The results include high-speed images of the oil and bubbles' entrainment, showing the resulting formation of a series of droplet clouds during multiple ``plunges'' associated with a single propagating breaking wave. High-speed inline digital holographic cinematography is employed to quantify the oil droplet size distribution, and the impact of droplet-bubble interactions on the entrainment process for varying Weber numbers, and wave properties, from spilling to plunging breakers. Supported by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  1. Observation of dispersive shock waves, solitons, and their interactions in viscous fluid conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Dalton; Maiden, Michelle; Lowman, Nicholas; Schubert, Marika; Hoefer, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Dispersive shock waves (DSWs) and solitons are fundamental structures in dispersive hydrodynamics, but studies have been severely constrained. Here we report on a novel testbed called the conduit system where one fluid is moved through another via a fluid pipe with virtually no mass diffusion. The interfacial dynamics of this pipe are conservative and are modeled by a scalar, nonlinear, dispersive wave equation, similar to those describing a superfluid. Resultantly, the interfacial waves are effectively dissipationless, which enables high fidelity observations of coherent phenomena such as large amplitude DSWs. Experiments involving solitons, wavebreaking leading to DSWs, and their interactions will be presented. The results include the refraction and absorption of a soliton by a DSW and the refraction of a DSW by a second DSW, resulting in two-phase behavior. Excellent agreement between nonlinear wave averaging, numerics, and laboratory experiments will be presented. The nonlinear wave dynamics observed in this model system have implications for a broad range of other conservative dispersive hydrodynamic systems. NSF.

  2. Observation of dispersive shock waves developing from initial depressions in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trillo, S.; Klein, M.; Clauss, G. F.; Onorato, M.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate surface gravity waves in a shallow water tank, in the limit of long wavelengths. We report the observation of non-stationary dispersive shock waves rapidly expanding over a 90 m flume. They are excited by means of a wave maker that allows us to launch a controlled smooth (single well) depression with respect to the unperturbed surface of the still water, a case that contains no solitons. The dynamics of the shock waves are observed at different levels of nonlinearity equivalent to a different relative smallness of the dispersive effect. The observed undulatory behavior is found to be in good agreement with the dynamics described in terms of a Korteweg-de Vries equation with evolution in space, though in the most nonlinear cases the description turns out to be improved over the quasi linear trailing edge of the shock by modeling the evolution in terms of the integro-differential (nonlocal) Whitham equation.

  3. What do we know about shear wave dispersion in normal and steatotic livers?

    PubMed

    Parker, Kevin J; Partin, Alexander; Rubens, Deborah J

    2015-05-01

    A number of new approaches to measure the viscoelastic properties of the liver are now available to clinicians, many involving shear waves. However, we are at an early stage in understanding the physical processes that govern shear wave propagation in normal liver, with more unknowns added when pathologies such as steatosis are present. This technical note focuses on what is known about the characterization of normal and steatotic (or fatty) livers, with a particular focus on dispersion. Some studies in phantoms and mouse livers support the hypothesis that, starting with a normal liver, increasing accumulations of micro- and macrosteatosis will increase the lossy viscoelastic properties of shear waves in a medium. This results in an increased dispersion (or slope) of shear wave speed and attenuation in the steatotic livers. Theoretical and empirical findings across a number of studies are summarized.

  4. Exact time-dependent nonlinear dispersive wave solutions in compressible magnetized plasmas exhibiting collapse.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Maity, Chandan; Schamel, Hans

    2011-04-08

    Compressional waves in a magnetized plasma of arbitrary resistivity are treated with the lagrangian fluid approach. An exact nonlinear solution with a nontrivial space and time dependence is obtained with boundary conditions as in Harris' current sheet. The solution shows competition among hydrodynamic convection, magnetic field diffusion, and dispersion. This results in a collapse of density and the magnetic field in the absence of dispersion. The dispersion effects arrest the collapse of density but not of the magnetic field. A possible application is in the early stage of magnetic star formation.

  5. A study of disperse structures in metals and alloys exposed to powerful shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zel'dovich, V. I.; Khomskaya, I. V.; Frolova, N. Yu.

    2008-11-01

    The structure of iron-base steels and alloys loaded with plane and spherical shock waves and of copper and titanium after dynamic angular channel pressing is considered. It is shown that shock wave loading (alone or in combination with other methods of treatment) yields disperse structures in metals and alloys, including nanocrystalline ones, due to very rapid straining processes and phase transformations that occur with a great number of nucleation centers.

  6. Military jet pilots have higher p-wave dispersions compared to the transport aircraft aircrew.

    PubMed

    Çakar, Mustafa; Metin, Süleyman; Balta, Şevket; Öztürk, Cengiz; Demirkol, Sait; Çakmak, Tolga; İnal, Satılmış; Çelik, Turgay; İyisoy, Atilla; Ünlü, Murat; Şen, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    For the purpose of flight safety military aircrew must be healthy. P-wave dispersion (PWD) is the p-wave length difference in an electrocardiographic (ECG) examination and represents the risk of developing atrial fibrillation. In the study we aimed at investigating PWD in healthy military aircrew who reported for periodical examinations. Seventy-five asymptomatic military aircrew were enrolled in the study. All the subjects underwent physical, radiologic and biochemical examinations, and a 12-lead electrocardiography. P-wave dispersions were calculated. The mean age of the study participants was 36.15±8.97 years and the mean p-wave duration was 100.8±12 ms in the whole group. Forty-seven subjects were non-pilot aircrew, and 28 were pilots. Thirteen study subjects were serving in jets, 49 in helicopters, and 13 were transport aircraft pilots. Thirty-six of the helicopter and 11 of the transport aircraft aircrew were non-pilot aircrew. P-wave dispersion was the lowest in the transport aircraft aircrew, and the highest in jet pilots. P-wave dispersions were similar in the pilots and non-pilot aircrew. Twenty-three study subjects were overweight, 19 had thyroiditis, 26 had hepatosteatosis, 4 had hyperbilirubinemia, 2 had hypertension, and 5 had hyperlipidemia. The PWD was significantly associated with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. Serum uric acid levels were associated with p-wave durations. Serum TSH levels were the most important predictor of PWD. When TSH levels were associated with PWD, uric acid levels were associated with p-wave duration in the military aircrew. The jet pilots had higher PWDs. These findings reveal that military jet pilots may have a higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation, and PWD should be recorded during periodical examinations. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  7. Effect of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  8. Are Ring Current Ions Lost in Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  9. Are Ring Current Ions Lost in Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  10. Effect of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  11. Lamb Wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV) Method for Quantifying Mechanical Properties of Viscoelastic Solids

    PubMed Central

    Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Urban, Matthew W.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is the inability of the left ventricle to supply sufficient stroke volumes under normal physiological conditions and is often accompanied by stiffening of the left-ventricular myocardium. A noninvasive technique capable of quantifying viscoelasticity of the myocardium would be beneficial in clinical settings. Our group has been investigating the use of Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV), a noninvasive ultrasound based method for quantifying viscoelasticity of soft tissues. The primary motive of this study is the design and testing of viscoelastic materials suitable for validation of the Lamb wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV), an SDUV-based technique for measuring viscoelasticity of tissues with plate-like geometry. We report the results of quantifying viscoelasticity of urethane rubber and gelatin samples using LDUV and an embedded sphere method. The LDUV method was used to excite antisymmetric Lamb waves and measure the dispersion in urethane rubber and gelatin plates. An antisymmetric Lamb wave model was fitted to the wave speed dispersion data to estimate elasticity and viscosity of the materials. A finite element model of a viscoelastic plate submerged in water was used to study the appropriateness of the Lamb wave dispersion equations. An embedded sphere method was used as an independent measurement of the viscoelasticity of the urethane rubber and gelatin. The FEM dispersion data were in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. Viscoelasticity of the urethane rubber and gelatin obtained using the LDUV and embedded sphere methods agreed within one standard deviation. LDUV studies on excised porcine myocardium sample were performed to investigate the feasibility of the approach in preparation for open-chest in vivo studies. The results suggest that the LDUV technique can be used to quantify mechanical properties of soft tissues with a plate-like geometry. PMID:21403186

  12. Dispersion in Nb microstrip transmission lines at submillimeter wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, H. H. S.; Mcgrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; Leduc, H. G.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured the effects of dispersion on the resonant mode frequencies of open-ended Nb-SiO(x)-Nb microstrip transmission lines over a frequency range from 50 to 800 GHz. Submicron Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb Josephson junctions were used as both voltage-controlled oscillators and detectors to sample the high order modes of the resonators. The resonator modes are equally spaced up to about 550 GHz where the mode spacing start to decrease gradually to a minimum above the gap frequency of about 700 GHz and then increases. Results are in good agreement with the expected theoretical behavior based on the Mattis-Bardeen conductivity of the superconductor line.

  13. Dispersion in Nb microstrip transmission lines at submillimeter wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, H. H. S.; Mcgrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; Leduc, H. G.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured the effects of dispersion on the resonant mode frequencies of open-ended Nb-SiO(x)-Nb microstrip transmission lines over a frequency range from 50 to 800 GHz. Submicron Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb Josephson junctions were used as both voltage-controlled oscillators and detectors to sample the high order modes of the resonators. The resonator modes are equally spaced up to about 550 GHz where the mode spacing start to decrease gradually to a minimum above the gap frequency of about 700 GHz and then increases. Results are in good agreement with the expected theoretical behavior based on the Mattis-Bardeen conductivity of the superconductor line.

  14. 1D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; Brandenburg, Martijn

    2017-02-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Last year an approach was presented using a phase inversion of guided waves that propagated around the circumference of a pipe. This approach works well for larger corrosion spots, but shows significant under-sizing of small spots due to lack of sufficient phase rotation. In this paper the use of arrival time and amplitude loss of higher order circumferential passes is evaluated. Using higher order passes increases sensitivity for sizing smaller defects. Different defect profiles are assumed and the change in arrival time and amplitude loss are calculated using a wave equation based approach for different defect widths and depths. This produces a differential travel time and amplitude change map as function of defect depth and defect width. The actually measured travel time change and amplitude change produces two contours in these maps. Calculating the intersection point gives the defect dimensions. The contours for amplitude loss and travel time change are quite orthogonal, this yields a good discrimination between deep and shallow defects. The approach is evaluated using experimental data from different pipes contain artificial and real defects.

  15. Propagation and dispersion of whistler waves generated by fast reconnection onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    2013-02-01

    The role of whistler mode during the onset of magnetic reconnection (MR) has been widely suggested, but the manifestations of its highly dispersive and anisotropic propagation properties in reconnection events remain largely unclear. Comparing results from a recently developed theoretical model for reconnection in terms of whistler's dispersive behavior with those reported from laboratory experiments on fast spontaneous magnetic reconnection, we demonstrate that the onset of fast reconnection in electron current layers (ECLs) emits whistler wave packets. The time scale of the explosively fast reconnection events are inversely related to the whistler mode frequencies at the lower end of the whistler frequency band. The wave packets in this frequency band have a characteristic angular dispersion, which marks the initial opening of the reconnection exhaust angle. The multidimensional propagation of the whistler for the reconnection with a strong guide magnetic field is investigated, showing that the measured propagation velocities of the reconnection electric field along the guide field in the Versatile Toroidal Facility at MIT quantitatively compare with the group velocities of the whistler wave packets. The whistler mode dispersive properties measured in laboratory experiments without a guide magnetic field in the magnetic reconnection experiments at Princeton also compare well with the theoretically predicted dispersion of the wave packets depending on the ECL width. Fast normalized reconnection rates extending to ˜0.35 at the MR onset in thin ECLs imply whistler wave propagation away from the onset location. We also present evidences for the whistler wave packets being emitted from reconnection diffusion region as seen in simulations and satellite observations.

  16. Surface wave dispersion across Tibet: Direct evidence for radial anisotropy in the crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duret, F.; Shapiro, N. M.; Cao, Z.; Levin, V. L.; Molnar, P. H.; Roecker, S.

    2010-12-01

    We analyze broadband records of May 12, 2008 Sichuan earthquake aftershocks from stations in western Tibet, to develop an average 1D shear-wave velocity model of the Tibetan crust. Previous study (Shapiro et al. (2004)) has revealed 10% to 20% radial anisotropy throughout the middle crust, suggesting that the Tibetan plateau has been deformed consistent with the notion of channel flow within the crust. However, this result was based on using a data set sampling large areas outside Tibet. In our study, we use records of selected strong aftershocks from May 12, 2008 Sichuan earthquake by seismic stations of an ongoing western Tibet PASSCAL experiment. This dataset samples exclusively the Tibetan plateau along an area extending ˜1500 km East-West, and ˜300 km North-South. We selected a set of 60 traces for Rayleigh waves and 53 traces for Love waves and applied the Frequency-Time Analysis to measure surface wave group velocities between 10 and 100 s, and combined them together to obtain average Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity dispersion curves, and their standard deviation. Rayleigh waves exhibit a clear Airy phase, with a marked minimum at ˜35 s, suggesting that the vertically polarized S-wave velocities in upper and middle crust are relatively low. Such minimum is not observed for Love waves, implying that horizontally polarized S-waves propagate faster than vertically polarized ones, and therefore suggesting that radial anisotropy characterizes the Tibetan plateau. We simultaneously inverted Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves using a Monte-Carlo method, to deduce an average 1D shear-wave velocity profile of the Tibetan crust and upper-mantle. When we did not introduce radial anisotropy, we found a relatively thick crust, with the Moho at ˜65 km, but were unable to fit both Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves within their error bars. Predicted Rayleigh waves were systematically faster than measured, and Love waves slower. To resolve this

  17. Application of particle swarm optimization to interpret Rayleigh wave dispersion curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xianhai; Tang, Li; Lv, Xiaochun; Fang, Hongping; Gu, Hanming

    2012-09-01

    Rayleigh waves have been used increasingly as an appealing tool to obtain near-surface shear (S)-wave velocity profiles. However, inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves is challenging for most local-search methods due to its high nonlinearity and to its multimodality. In this study, we proposed and tested a new Rayleigh wave dispersion curve inversion scheme based on particle swarm optimization (PSO). PSO is a global optimization strategy that simulates the social behavior observed in a flock (swarm) of birds searching for food. A simple search strategy in PSO guides the algorithm toward the best solution through constant updating of the cognitive knowledge and social behavior of the particles in the swarm. To evaluate calculation efficiency and stability of PSO to inversion of surface wave data, we first inverted three noise-free and three noise-corrupted synthetic data sets. Then, we made a comparative analysis with genetic algorithms (GA) and a Monte Carlo (MC) sampler and reconstructed a histogram of model parameters sampled on a low-misfit region less than 15% relative error to further investigate the performance of the proposed inverse procedure. Finally, we inverted a real-world example from a waste disposal site in NE Italy to examine the applicability of PSO on Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. Results from both synthetic and field data demonstrate that particle swarm optimization can be used for quantitative interpretation of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. PSO seems superior to GA and MC in terms of both reliability and computational efforts. The great advantages of PSO are fast in locating the low misfit region and easy to implement. Also there are only three parameters to tune (inertia weight or constriction factor, local and global acceleration constants). Theoretical results exist to explain how to tune these parameters.

  18. Long-distance dispersal and accelerating waves of disease: empirical relationships.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Christopher C; Sackett, Kathryn E; Wallace, LaRae D; Cowger, Christina; Dudley, Joseph P

    2009-04-01

    Classic approaches to modeling biological invasions predict a "traveling wave" of constant velocity determined by the invading organism's reproductive capacity, generation time, and dispersal ability. Traveling wave models may not apply, however, for organisms that exhibit long-distance dispersal. Here we use simple empirical relationships for accelerating waves, based on inverse power law dispersal, and apply them to diseases caused by pathogens that are wind dispersed or vectored by birds: the within-season spread of a plant disease at spatial scales of <100 m in experimental plots, historical plant disease epidemics at the continental scale, the unexpectedly rapid spread of West Nile virus across North America, and the transcontinental spread of avian influenza strain H5N1 in Eurasia and Africa. In all cases, the position of the epidemic front advanced exponentially with time, and epidemic velocity increased linearly with distance; regression slopes varied over a relatively narrow range among data sets. Estimates of the inverse power law exponent for dispersal that would be required to attain the rates of disease spread observed in the field also varied relatively little (1.74-2.36), despite more than a fivefold range of spatial scale among the data sets.

  19. Prolonged P-Wave and QT Dispersion in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Remission.

    PubMed

    Bornaun, Helen Aghdasi; Yılmaz, Nuh; Kutluk, Günsel; Dedeoğlu, Reyhan; Öztarhan, Kazım; Keskindemirci, Gonca; Tulunoğlu, Aras; Şap, Fatih

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) with unclear underlying aetiologies. Severe cardiac arrhythmias have been emphasised in a few studies on adult IBD patients. This study aimed to investigate the alteration of the P-wave and QT interval dispersion parameters to assess the risk of atrial conduction and ventricular repolarisation abnormalities in pediatric IBD patients. Patients and Methods. Thirty-six IBD patients in remission (UC: 20, CD: 16) aged 3-18 years and 36 age- and sex-matched control patients were enrolled in the study. Twelve-lead electrocardiograms were used to determine durations of P-wave, QT, and corrected QT (QTc) interval dispersion. Transthoracic echocardiograms and 24-hour rhythm Holter recordings were obtained for both groups. Results. The P-wave dispersion, QT dispersion, and QTc interval dispersion (Pdisp, QTdisp, and QTcdisp) were significantly longer in the patient group. The mean values of Pminimum, Pmaximum, and QTcminimum were significantly different between the two groups. The echocardiography and Holter monitoring results were not significantly different between the groups. Furthermore, no differences in these parameters were detected between the CD and UC groups. Conclusion. Results suggest that paediatric IBD patients may carry potential risks for serious atrial and ventricular arrhythmias over time even during remission.

  20. Prolonged P-Wave and QT Dispersion in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Nuh; Kutluk, Günsel; Dedeoğlu, Reyhan; Öztarhan, Kazım; Tulunoğlu, Aras; Şap, Fatih

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) with unclear underlying aetiologies. Severe cardiac arrhythmias have been emphasised in a few studies on adult IBD patients. This study aimed to investigate the alteration of the P-wave and QT interval dispersion parameters to assess the risk of atrial conduction and ventricular repolarisation abnormalities in pediatric IBD patients. Patients and Methods. Thirty-six IBD patients in remission (UC: 20, CD: 16) aged 3–18 years and 36 age- and sex-matched control patients were enrolled in the study. Twelve-lead electrocardiograms were used to determine durations of P-wave, QT, and corrected QT (QTc) interval dispersion. Transthoracic echocardiograms and 24-hour rhythm Holter recordings were obtained for both groups. Results. The P-wave dispersion, QT dispersion, and QTc interval dispersion (Pdisp, QTdisp, and QTcdisp) were significantly longer in the patient group. The mean values of Pminimum, Pmaximum, and QTcminimum were significantly different between the two groups. The echocardiography and Holter monitoring results were not significantly different between the groups. Furthermore, no differences in these parameters were detected between the CD and UC groups. Conclusion. Results suggest that paediatric IBD patients may carry potential risks for serious atrial and ventricular arrhythmias over time even during remission. PMID:28316985

  1. Nonlinear Acoustics in a Dispersive Continuum: Random Waves, Radiation Pressure, and Quantum Noise.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Karpman , Nonlinear Waves in Dispersive Media, Pergamon Press, New York, 1975, p. 76. 26. R. Beyers, Nonlinear Acoustics, U.S. Government Printing...20301 U. S. Army Research nffice 2 copies Box 12211 Research Triangle Park tlorth Carolina 27709 Defense Technical Information Center 12 copies Cameron

  2. A study on Rayleigh wave dispersion in bone according to Mindlin's Form II gradient elasticity.

    PubMed

    Vavva, Maria G; Gergidis, Leonidas N; Protopappas, Vasilios C; Charalambopoulos, Antonios; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2014-05-01

    The classical elasticity cannot effectively describe bone's mechanical behavior since only homogeneous media and local stresses are assumed. Additionally, it cannot predict the dispersive nature of the Rayleigh wave which has been reported in experimental studies and was also demonstrated in a previous computational study by adopting Mindlin's Form II gradient elasticity. In this work Mindlin's theory is employed to analytically determine the dispersion of Rayleigh waves in a strain gradient elastic half-space. An isotropic semi-infinite space is considered with properties equal to those of bone and dynamic behavior suffering from microstructural effects. Microstructural effects are considered by incorporating four intrinsic parameters in the stress analysis. The results are presented in the form of group and phase velocity dispersion curves and compared with existing computational results and semi-analytical curves calculated for a simpler case of Rayleigh waves in dipolar gradient elastic half-spaces. Comparisons are also performed with the velocity of the first-order antisymmetric mode propagating in a dipolar plate so as to observe the Rayleigh asymptotic behavior. It is shown that Mindlin's Form II gradient elasticity can effectively describe the dispersive nature of Rayleigh waves. This study could be regarded as a step toward the ultrasonic characterization of bone.

  3. Rotation induced nonlinear dispersive dust drift waves can be the progenitors of spokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Rizvi, H.; Hasnain, H.; Haque, Q.

    2012-03-01

    Rotation induced dispersive dust drift waves are suggested as the possible cause of the formation of spokes in the Saturn's B ring. Using the plasma parameters found in the Saturn's B ring, it has been shown that the theoretically predicted spatio-temporal scalelengths agree well with the satellites and Hubble Space telescope observations of the spokes.

  4. Water depth and surface current retrievals from airborne optical measurements of surface gravity wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, J. P.; Piotrowski, C. C.; Williams, J. Z.

    2001-08-01

    Visible images of nearshore ocean waves obtained from an aircraft have been utilized to estimate the surface currents and water depth below the waves. A digital framing camera was mounted in a motion-stabilized turret and used to obtain temporal sequences of high-quality optical images of shoaling ocean waves. Data on the position and attitude of the camera/turret were used to map the image data to a rectilinear coordinate system at the level of the surface, effectively separating the spatial and temporal modulations due to the waves. The resulting three-dimensional (3-D) space-time data sets were Fourier transformed to obtain frequency-wave number spectra of these modulations. These spectra contain information on the propagation characteristics of the waves, such as their wavelengths and frequencies, and their directions and speeds of propagation. The water depth and current vector have been estimated by choosing these parameters so that a "best" fit is obtained between the theoretical dispersion relation for linear gravity waves and these 3-D wave spectra. Image data sets were acquired during the Shoaling Waves Experiment (SHOWEX) along the quasi-linear coastline in the vicinity of the Army Corps of Engineers' Field Research Facility (FRF) near Duck on the North Carolina Outer Banks. Summary wave parameters and bathymetry and current retrievals are typically within 10% of contemporaneous in situ measurements, though outliers occur.

  5. Dispersion Relation and Numerical Simulation of Hydrodynamic Waves In Mar's Topside Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.-S.; Nielsen, E.

    The dispersion relation for hydrodynamic waves in an ionosphere with at most a weak magnetic field shows, hydrodynamic hybrid waves may be excited in the topside iono- sphere of Mars and Venus owing to fluctuations in the solar wind pressure. The hy- brid waves result from coupling between two different hydrodynamic wave modes: the classic acoustic-gravity wave(AGW) and the newly developed background gradi- ent wave(BGW). Numerical simulations show that these waves will cause wave-like structures in the altitude profiles of the ionospheric plasma density. The wavelength and frequency are various but their prevailing values in Martian ionosphere are about 60km and 0.001-0.0001Hz, respectively. The amplitudes of the plasma density vari- ations decrease nearly exponentially with increasing altitude, and are of the same or- der of the magnitude as the uncertainty on all the previous measurements of Mar- tian ionospheric electron densities. Radio occultation observations at Mars and Venus show electron density fluctuations in the high altitude ionosphere. The fluctuations are mainly noise, but they may in part be caused by hydrodynamic wave activity. To verify wave activity more detailed measurements are required, and may be obtained with the low frequency radar planned for the Mars Express mission.

  6. Asymmetric spin-wave dispersion in ferromagnetic nanotubes induced by surface curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otálora, Jorge A.; Yan, Ming; Schultheiss, Helmut; Hertel, Riccardo; Kákay, Attila

    2017-05-01

    We present a detailed analytical derivation of the spin wave (SW) dispersion relation in magnetic nanotubes with magnetization along the azimuthal direction. The obtained formula can be used to calculate the dispersion relation for any longitudinal and azimuthal mode. The obtained dispersion is asymmetric for all azimuthal modes traveling along the axial direction. As reported in our recent publication [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 227203 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.227203], the asymmetry is a curvature-induced effect originating from the dipole-dipole interaction. Here, we discuss the asymmetry of the dispersion for azimuthal modes by analyzing the SW asymmetry Δ f (kz) =fn(kz) -fn(-kz) , where fn(kz) is the eigenfrequency of a magnon with a longitudinal and azimuthal wave vectors, kz and n , respectively; and the dependence of the maximum asymmetry with the nanotube radius R . The analytical results are in perfect agreement with micromagnetic simulations. Furthermore, we show that the dispersion relation simplifies to the thin-film dispersion relation with in-plane magnetization when analyzing the three limiting cases: (i) kz=0 , (ii) kz≫1 /R , and (iii) kz≪1 /R . In the first case, for the zeroth-order modes the thin-film Kittel formula is obtained. For modes with higher order the dispersion relation for the Backward-Volume geometry is recovered. In the second case, for the zeroth-order mode the exchange dominated dispersion relation for SW in Damon-Esbach configuration is obtained. For the case kz≪1 /R , we find that the dispersion relation can be reduced to a formula similar to the Kalinikos-Slavin [J. Phys. C: Sol. State Phys. 19, 7013 (1986), 10.1088/0022-3719/19/35/014] type.

  7. Dispersive wave in the modulation instability spectrum in the presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Song, Zhangqi; Meng, Zhou

    2015-04-01

    We present the dispersive wave (DW) in the dispersion-shifted fibre (DSF) based on numerical simulations, which causes the symmetry-breaking of the modulation instability (MI) spectrum. It is demonstrated that the DW power is related to both pump power and three-order dispersion (TOD). It is found in particular that different levels of noise also have relations with the generation of a DW, which essentially results from the fact that MI is initiated from noise and there exists power transfer between the MI (soliton) and DW. Furthermore, we study the spectral autocorrelation within the Stokes and anti-Stokes bands in the presence of the DW, which show the property of very weak autocorrelation for a continuous wave (CW) or quasi-CW. The results provide further understanding of the symmetry and correlation of the MI spectrum.

  8. Three octave spanning supercontinuum by red-shifted dispersive wave in photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mohit; Konar, S.

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a three-layer index guided lead silicate (SF57) photonic crystal fiber which simultaneously promises to yield large effective optical nonlinear coefficient and low anomalous dispersion that makes it suitable for supercontinuum (SC) generation. At an operating wavelength 1550 nm, the typical optimized value of anomalous dispersion and effective nonlinear coefficient turns out to be ~4 ps/km/nm and ~1078 W-1km-1, respectively. Through numerical simulation, it is realized that the designed fiber promises to exhibit three octave spanning SC from 900 to 7200 nm using 50 fs 'sech' optical pulses of 5 kW peak power. Due to the cross-phase modulation and four-wave mixing processes, a long range of red-shifted dispersive wave generated, which assists to achieve such large broadening. In addition, we have investigated the compatibility of SC generation with input pulse peak power increment and briefly discussed the impact of nonlinear processes on SC generation.

  9. Parametric instabilities of the circularly polarized Alfven waves including dispersion. [for solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. K.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    A class of parametric instabilities of large-amplitude, circularly polarized Alfven waves is considered in which finite frequency (dispersive) effects are included. The dispersion equation governing the instabilities is a sixth-order polynomial which is solved numerically. As a function of K identically equal to k/k-sub-0 (where k-sub-0 and k are the wave number of the 'pump' wave and unstable sound wave, respectively), there are three regionals of instability: a modulation instability at K less than 1, a decay instability at K greater than 1, and a relatively weak and narrow instability at K close to squared divided by v-sub-A squared (where c-sub-s and v-sub-A are the sound and Alfven speeds respectively), the modulational instability occurs when beta is less than 1 (more than 1) for left-hand (right-hand) pump waves, in agreement with the previous results of Sakai and Sonnerup (1983). The growth rate of the decay instability of left-hand waves is greater than the modulational instability at all values of beta. Applications to large-amplitude wave observed in the solar wind, in computer simulations, and in the vicinity of planetary and interplanetary collisionless shocks are discussed.

  10. Planetary waves in rotating ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Khantadze, A. G.; Jandieri, V. G.; Jandieri, G. V.

    2008-06-15

    The problem of propagation of ultralong planetary waves in the Earth's upper atmosphere is considered. A new exact solution to the MHD equations for the ionosphere is obtained in spherical coordinates with allowance for the geomagnetic field and Earth's rotation. A general dispersion relation is derived for planetary waves in the ionospheric E and F regions, and the characteristic features of their propagation in a weakly ionized ionospheric plasma are discussed.

  11. Second law analysis of a plate heat exchanger with an axial dispersive wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Das, Sarit; Roetzel, Wilfried

    A second law analysis is presented for thermally dispersive flow through a plate heat exchanger. It is well known that in plate or plate fin type heat exchangers the backmixing and other deviations from plug flow contribute significantly to the inefficiency of the heat exchanger, which is of importance to heat exchangers working in the cryogenic regime. The conventional axial heat dispersion model which is used so far is found to be better than `plug flow' model but still unsatisfactory where the timescale related to heat transfer is comparable with the thermal relaxation time for the propagation of dispersion. The present work therefore considers dispersion as a wave phenomenon propagating with a finite velocity. The study discusses the nature of variation of different contributions to total exergy loss in the heat exchanger with respect to dispersion parameters of the Peclet number and propagation velocity of the dispersive wave. The practical example of the single-pass plate heat exchanger demonstrates how a second law optimization can be carried out for heat transfer equipment under such conditions.

  12. Parallel Implementation of Dispersive Tsunami Wave Modeling with a Nesting Algorithm for the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Toshitaka; Takahashi, Narumi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki; Ando, Kazuto; Matsuoka, Daisuke; Kato, Toshihiro

    2015-12-01

    Because of improvements in offshore tsunami observation technology, dispersion phenomena during tsunami propagation have often been observed in recent tsunamis, for example the 2004 Indian Ocean and 2011 Tohoku tsunamis. The dispersive propagation of tsunamis can be simulated by use of the Boussinesq model, but the model demands many computational resources. However, rapid progress has been made in parallel computing technology. In this study, we investigated a parallelized approach for dispersive tsunami wave modeling. Our new parallel software solves the nonlinear Boussinesq dispersive equations in spherical coordinates. A variable nested algorithm was used to increase spatial resolution in the target region. The software can also be used to predict tsunami inundation on land. We used the dispersive tsunami model to simulate the 2011 Tohoku earthquake on the Supercomputer K. Good agreement was apparent between the dispersive wave model results and the tsunami waveforms observed offshore. The finest bathymetric grid interval was 2/9 arcsec (approx. 5 m) along longitude and latitude lines. Use of this grid simulated tsunami soliton fission near the Sendai coast. Incorporating the three-dimensional shape of buildings and structures led to improved modeling of tsunami inundation.

  13. Joint inversion of surface wave dispersion and receiver functions for crustal structure in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hao

    The surge in seismicity in Oklahoma starting in 2008 raises questions about the actual locations of the earthquakes in the upper crust. The key to answering this is an improved crustal model that explains as many observations as possible. Love and Rayleigh wave dispersion, teleseismic P-wave receiver functions and some unique transverse motions observed at distances less than 100 km that are characteristics of rays reverberating in a basin provide data to derive the crustal model. The surface wave dispersion data set consists of over 300,000 Love/Rayleigh phase/group values obtained from ambient noise cross-correlation of BH channels of the 133 Transportable Array (TA) stations of Earthscope to periods as short as 2 seconds. Station coverage is dense enough to perform the tomography on a 25*25 km grid that should be able to image shallow geological structures. In addition, receiver functions were obtained using teleseismic data recorded from 3 US Geological Survey Networks (GS) stations and 6 Oklahoma Seismic Network (OK) stations from 2011 to 2014. The 1-D S-wave velocity models derived by the joint inversion of surface wave dispersion and receiver functions with geological constraints are tested by fitting the independent transverse seismograms. This test also provides constraints on the earthquake depths in relation to the geological structure.

  14. A simple and accurate model for Love wave based sensors: Dispersion equation and mass sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiansheng

    2014-07-01

    Dispersion equation is an important tool for analyzing propagation properties of acoustic waves in layered structures. For Love wave (LW) sensors, the dispersion equation with an isotropic-considered substrate is too rough to get accurate solutions; the full dispersion equation with a piezoelectric-considered substrate is too complicated to get simple and practical expressions for optimizing LW-based sensors. In this work, a dispersion equation is introduced for Love waves in a layered structure with an anisotropic-considered substrate and an isotropic guiding layer; an intuitive expression for mass sensitivity is also derived based on the dispersion equation. The new equations are in simple forms similar to the previously reported simplified model with an isotropic substrate. By introducing the Maxwell-Weichert model, these equations are also applicable to the LW device incorporating a viscoelastic guiding layer; the mass velocity sensitivity and the mass propagation loss sensitivity are obtained from the real part and the imaginary part of the complex mass sensitivity, respectively. With Love waves in an elastic SiO2 layer on an ST-90°X quartz structure, for example, comparisons are carried out between the velocities and normalized sensitivities calculated by using different dispersion equations and corresponding mass sensitivities. Numerical results of the method presented in this work are very close to those of the method with a piezoelectric-considered substrate. Another numerical calculation is carried out for the case of a LW sensor with a viscoelastic guiding layer. If the viscosity of the layer is not too big, the effect on the real part of the velocity and the mass velocity sensitivity is relatively small; the propagation loss and the mass loss sensitivity are proportional to the viscosity of the guiding layer.

  15. Fast wave dispersion, damping, and electron current drive in the Irvine torus

    SciTech Connect

    Platt, R.C.; McWilliams, R.

    1987-09-01

    Fast waves with frequencies near the mean gyrofrequency were excited in a toroidal magnetized plasma. Experimental measurements of wave dispersion were found to be in good agreement with predictions from cold plasma theory. Experimental measurements of wave damping lengths have been made. Measured damping lengths were found to be anomalously short when compared to predictions for electron Landau-damping, transit-time magnetic pumping and collisional damping. Unidirectional fast waves drove steady-state electron currents. Peak efficiencies up to eta = InR/P = 6 x 10/sup -2/ A/W(10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/)m were observed with up to 14% of the wave energy converted to poloidal magnetic field energy.

  16. Error in estimates of tissue material properties from shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2009-04-01

    Shear wave velocity measurements are used in elasticity imaging to find the shear elasticity and viscosity of tissue. A technique called shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) has been introduced to use the dispersive nature of shear wave velocity to locally estimate the material properties of tissue. Shear waves are created using a multifrequency ultrasound radiation force, and the propagating shear waves are measured a few millimeters away from the excitation point. The shear wave velocity is measured using a repetitive pulse-echo method and Kalman filtering to find the phase of the harmonic shear wave at 2 different locations. A viscoelastic Voigt model and the shear wave velocity measurements at different frequencies are used to find the shear elasticity (mu(1)) and viscosity (mu(2)) of the tissue. The purpose of this paper is to report the accuracy of the SDUV method over a range of different values of mu(1) and mu(2). A motion detection model of a vibrating scattering medium was used to analyze measurement errors of vibration phase in a scattering medium. To assess the accuracy of the SDUV method, we modeled the effects of phase errors on estimates of shear wave velocity and material properties while varying parameters such as shear stiffness and viscosity, shear wave amplitude, the distance between shear wave measurements (delta r), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the ultrasound pulse-echo method, and the frequency range of the measurements. We performed an experiment in a section of porcine muscle to evaluate variation of the aforementioned parameters on the estimated shear wave velocity and material property measurements and to validate the error prediction model. The model showed that errors in the shear wave velocity and material property estimates were minimized by maximizing shear wave amplitude, pulse-echo SNR, delta r, and the bandwidth used for shear wave measurements. The experimental model showed optimum performance could be obtained

  17. Error in Estimates of Tissue Material Properties from Shear Wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Shear wave velocity measurements are used in elasticity imaging to find the shear elasticity and viscosity of tissue. A technique called shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) has been introduced to use the dispersive nature of shear wave velocity to locally estimate the material properties of tissue. Shear waves are created using a multifrequency ultrasound radiation force, and the propagating shear waves are measured a few millimeters away from the excitation point. The shear wave velocity is measured using a repetitive pulse-echo method and Kalman filtering to find the phase of the harmonic shear wave at 2 different locations. A viscoelastic Voigt model and the shear wave velocity measurements at different frequencies are used to find the shear elasticity (μ1) and viscosity (μ2) of the tissue. The purpose of this paper is to report the accuracy of the SDUV method over a range of different values of μ1 and μ2. A motion detection model of a vibrating scattering medium was used to analyze measurement errors of vibration phase in a scattering medium. To assess the accuracy of the SDUV method, we modeled the effects of phase errors on estimates of shear wave velocity and material properties while varying parameters such as shear stiffness and viscosity, shear wave amplitude, the distance between shear wave measurements (Δr), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the ultrasound pulse-echo method, and the frequency range of the measurements. We performed an experiment in a section of porcine muscle to evaluate variation of the aforementioned parameters on the estimated shear wave velocity and material property measurements and to validate the error prediction model. The model showed that errors in the shear wave velocity and material property estimates were minimized by maximizing shear wave amplitude, pulse-echo SNR, Δr, and the bandwidth used for shear wave measurements. The experimental model showed optimum performance could be obtained for Δr = 3-6 mm

  18. ON THE DISPERSION AND SCATTERING OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES BY LONGITUDINALLY STRATIFIED FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Andries, J.; Cally, P. S. E-mail: paul.cally@monash.edu

    2011-12-20

    We provide a fairly general analytic theory for the dispersion and scattering of magnetohydrodynamic waves by longitudinally stratified flux tubes. The theory provides a common framework for, and synthesis of, many previous studies of flux tube oscillations that were carried out under various simplifying assumptions. The present theory focuses on making only a minimal number of assumptions. As a result it thus provides an analytical treatment of several generalizations of existing tube oscillation models. The most important practical cases are inclusion of plasma pressure and possibly buoyancy effects in models of straight non-diverging tubes as applied in coronal seismology, and relaxation of the 'thin tube' approximation in oscillation models of diverging tubes as applied both in the context of p-mode scattering and coronal seismology. In particular, it illustrates the unifying theoretical framework underlying both the description of waves scattered by flux tubes and the dispersion of waves carried along flux tubes.

  19. Measurements of Finite Dust Temperature Effects in the Dispersion Relation of the Dust Acoustic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snipes, Erica; Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-04-01

    A dusty plasma is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of these charged microparticles gives rise to new plasma wave modes, including the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements [1, 2] of the dispersion relationship for the dust acoustic wave in a glow discharge have shown that finite temperature effects are observed at higher values of neutral pressure. Other work [3] has shown that these effects are not observed at lower values of neutral pressure. We present the results of ongoing work examining finite temperature effects in the dispersion relation as a function of neutral pressure. [4pt] [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [0pt] [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [0pt] [3] T. Trottenberg, D. Block, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 13, 042105 (2006).

  20. Rovibrational Wave-Packet Dispersion during Femtosecond Laser Filamentation in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Odhner, J. H.; Romanov, D. A.; Levis, R. J.

    2009-08-14

    An impulsive, femtosecond filament-based Raman technique producing high quality Raman spectra over a broad spectral range (1554.7-4155 cm{sup -1}) is presented. The temperature of gas phase molecules can be measured by temporally resolving the dispersion of impulsively excited vibrational wave packets. Application to laser-induced filamentation in air reveals that the initial rovibrational temperature is 300 K for both N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. The temperature-dependent wave-packet dynamics are interpreted using an analytic anharmonic oscillator model. The wave packets reveal a 1/e dispersion time of 3.9 ps for N{sub 2} and 2.8 ps for O{sub 2}. Pulse self-compression of temporal features to 8 fs within the filament is directly measured by impulsive vibrational excitation of H{sub 2}.

  1. Experimental Determination of Whistler Wave Dispersion Relation in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stansby, D.; Horbury, T. S.; Chen, C. H. K.; Matteini, L.

    2016-09-01

    The origins and properties of large-amplitude whistler wavepackets in the solar wind are still unclear. In this Letter, we utilize single spacecraft electric and magnetic field waveform measurements from the ARTEMIS mission to calculate the plasma frame frequency and wavevector of individual wavepackets over multiple intervals. This allows direct comparison of experimental measurements with theoretical dispersion relations to identify the observed waves as whistler waves. The whistlers are right-hand circularly polarized, travel anti-sunward, and are aligned with the background magnetic field. Their dispersion is strongly affected by the local electron parallel beta in agreement with linear theory. The properties measured are consistent with the electron heat flux instability acting in the solar wind to generate these waves.

  2. An investigation into the dispersion of ocean surface waves in sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Clarence Olin; Rogers, William Erick; Lund, Björn

    2016-12-01

    This investigation considers theoretical models and empirical studies related to the dispersion of ocean surface gravity waves propagating in ice covered seas. In theory, wave dispersion is related to the mechanical nature of the ice. The change of normalized wavenumber is shown for four different dispersion models: the mass-loading model, an elastic plate model, an elastic plate model extended to include dissipation, and a viscous-layer model. For each dispersion model, model parameters are varied showing the dependence of deviation from open water dispersion on ice thickness, elasticity, and viscosity. In all cases, the deviation of wavenumber from the open water relation is more pronounced for higher frequencies. The effect of mass loading, a component of all dispersion models, tends to shorten the wavelength. The Voigt model of dissipation in an elastic plate model does not change the wavelength. Elasticity in the elastic plate model and viscosity in the viscous-layer model tend to increase the wavelength. The net effect, lengthening or shortening, is a function of the particular combination of ice parameters and wave frequency. Empirical results were compiled and interpreted in the context of these theoretical models of dispersion. A synopsis of previous measurements is as follows: observations in a loose pancake ice in the marginal ice zone, often, though not always, showed shortened wavelengths. Both lengthening and shortening have been observed in compact pancakes and pancakes in brash ice. Quantitative matches to the flexural-gravity model have been found in Arctic interior pack ice and sheets of fast ice.

  3. An investigation into the dispersion of ocean surface waves in sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Clarence Olin; Rogers, William Erick; Lund, Björn

    2017-02-01

    This investigation considers theoretical models and empirical studies related to the dispersion of ocean surface gravity waves propagating in ice covered seas. In theory, wave dispersion is related to the mechanical nature of the ice. The change of normalized wavenumber is shown for four different dispersion models: the mass-loading model, an elastic plate model, an elastic plate model extended to include dissipation, and a viscous-layer model. For each dispersion model, model parameters are varied showing the dependence of deviation from open water dispersion on ice thickness, elasticity, and viscosity. In all cases, the deviation of wavenumber from the open water relation is more pronounced for higher frequencies. The effect of mass loading, a component of all dispersion models, tends to shorten the wavelength. The Voigt model of dissipation in an elastic plate model does not change the wavelength. Elasticity in the elastic plate model and viscosity in the viscous-layer model tend to increase the wavelength. The net effect, lengthening or shortening, is a function of the particular combination of ice parameters and wave frequency. Empirical results were compiled and interpreted in the context of these theoretical models of dispersion. A synopsis of previous measurements is as follows: observations in a loose pancake ice in the marginal ice zone, often, though not always, showed shortened wavelengths. Both lengthening and shortening have been observed in compact pancakes and pancakes in brash ice. Quantitative matches to the flexural-gravity model have been found in Arctic interior pack ice and sheets of fast ice.

  4. Format transparent, wide range and independent dispersion monitoring method based on four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Sheng; He, Sheng; Sun, Simin; Ke, Changjian; Liu, Deming

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we propose an improved all optical chromatic dispersion (CD) monitoring method based on highly nonlinear power transfer function (PTF) provided by four-wave mixing (FWM) in highly nonlinear fibers (HNLFs). This method can be applied for various modulation formats, including on-off keying and advanced multi-level modulation formats, without necessitating any changes of the hardware or software. Furthermore, it can expand the CD monitoring range beyond the limitation of Talbot effects and is insensitive to optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) and polarization mode dispersion (PMD). These improvements are achieved by optimizing the profile of the PTF curve and utilizing a sweeping tunable dispersion compensator (TDC) in combination with an extremely simple digital signal processing (DSP) to find the zero residual dispersion point. Numerical simulations are then used to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method.

  5. Generalized dispersion relation for electron Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Deeba, F.; Ahmad, Zahoor; Murtaza, G.

    2010-10-15

    A generalized dielectric constant for the electron Bernstein waves using non-Maxwellian distribution functions is derived in a collisionless, uniform magnetized plasma. Using the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions, we can derive the dispersion relations for both kappa and the generalized (r,q) distributions in a straightforward manner. The dispersion relations now become dependent upon the spectral indices {kappa} and (r,q) for the kappa and the generalized (r,q) distribution, respectively. Our results show how the non-Maxwellian dispersion curves deviate from the Maxwellian depending upon the values of the spectral indices chosen. It may be noted that the (r,q) dispersion relation is reduced to the kappa distribution for r=0 and q={kappa}+1, which, in turn, is further reducible to the Maxwellian distribution for {kappa}{yields}{infinity}.

  6. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Characterization of Wave Dispersion in Viscoelastic Cellular Assemblies by Doublet Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yan-Fang; Xiong, Chun-Yang; Fang, Jing; Ferrari, Mauro

    2009-08-01

    Using the Voigt model, we analyze wave propagation in viscoelastic granular media with a monatomic lattice, planar simple cubic package and cubical—tetrahedral assembly within the context of doublet mechanics. Microstrains of elongation between the doublet particles are considered in the models. Wave dispersive relations are derived from dynamic equations of the particles involved in the media, and phase velocities and attenuations of the dispersive waves are obtained for the different assemblies. Variations in these dispersion characteristics are analyzed with the changes of cell interval, modulus, and wave frequency. The relations between micro-constants and macro-parameters are presented under the condition of non-scale continuity of the media.

  7. MHD turbulent processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, David

    1988-01-01

    Three areas of study in MHD turbulence are considered. These are the turbulent relaxation of the toroidal Z pinch, density fluctuations in MHD fluids, and MHD cellular automata. A Boolean computer game that updates a cellular representation in parallel and that has macroscopic averages converging to solutions of the two-dimensional MHD equations is discussed.

  8. Dispersion of low frequency plasma waves upstream of the quasi-perpendicular terrestrial bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, A. P.; Balikhin, M. A.; Walker, S. N.; Pope, S. A.

    2013-08-01

    Low frequency waves in the foot of a supercritical quasi-perpendicular shock front have been observed since the very early in situ observations of the terrestrial bow shock (Guha et al., 1972). The great attention that has been devoted to these type of waves since the first observations is explained by the key role attributed to them in the processes of energy redistribution in the shock front by various theoretical models. In some models, these waves play the role of the intermediator between the ions and electrons. It is assumed that they are generated by plasma instability that exist due to the counter-streaming flows of incident and reflected ions. In the second type of models, these waves result from the evolution of the shock front itself in the quasi-periodic process of steepening and overturning of the magnetic ramp. However, the range of the observed frequencies in the spacecraft frame are not enough to distinguish the origin of the observed waves. It also requires the determination of the wave vectors and the plasma frame frequencies. Multipoint measurements within the wave coherence length are needed for an ambiguous determination of the wave vectors. In the main multi-point missions such as ISEE, AMPTE, Cluster and THEMIS, the spacecraft separation is too large for such a wave vector determination and therefore only very few case studies are published (mainly for AMPTE UKS AMPTE IRM pair). Here we present the observations of upstream low frequency waves by the Cluster spacecraft which took place on 19 February 2002. The spacecraft separation during the crossing of the bow shock was small enough to determine the wave vectors and allowed the identification of the plasma wave dispersion relation for the observed waves. Presented results are compared with whistler wave dispersion and it is shown that contrary to previous studies based on the AMPTE data, the phase velocity in the shock frame is directed downstream. The consequences of this finding for both

  9. Modeling and inversion of dispersion curves of surface waves in shallow site investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Donghong

    2007-12-01

    The shallow S-wave velocity structure is very important for the seismic design of engineered structures and facilities, seismic hazard evaluation of a region, comprehensive earthquake preparedness, development of the national seismic hazard map, and seismic-resistant design of buildings. The use of surface waves for the characterization of the shallow subsurface involves three steps: (a) acquisition of high-frequency broadband seismic surface wave records generated either by active sources or passive ambient noise (microtremors or microseisms), (b) extraction of phase dispersion curves from the recorded seismic signals, and (c) derivation of S-wave velocity profiles either using inversion algorithms or manually error and trial forward modeling. The first two steps have been successfully achieved by several techniques. However, the third step (inversion) needs more improvements. An accurate and automatic inversion method is needed to generate shallow S-wave velocity profiles. With the achievement of a fast forward modeling method, this study focuses on the inversion of phase velocity dispersion curves of surface waves contained in ambient seismic noise for a one dimensional, flat-layered S-wave velocity structure. For the forward modeling, we present a new more efficient algorithm, called the fast generalized R/T (reflection and transmission) coefficient method, to calculate the phase velocity of surface waves for a layered earth model. The fast method is based on but is more efficient than the traditional ones. The improvements by this study include (1) computation of the generalized reflection and transmission coefficients without calculation of the modified reflection and transmission coefficients; (2) presenting an analytic solution for the inverse of the 4X4 layer matrix E. Compared with traditional R/T methods, the fast generalized R/T coefficient method, when applied on Rayleigh waves, significantly improves the speed of computation, cutting the computational

  10. Rayleigh Wave Numerical Dispersion in a 3D Finite-Difference Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, L. A.; Aldridge, D. F.

    2010-12-01

    A Rayleigh wave propagates laterally without dispersion in the vicinity of the plane stress-free surface of a homogeneous and isotropic elastic halfspace. The phase speed is independent of frequency and depends only on the Poisson ratio of the medium. However, after temporal and spatial discretization, a Rayleigh wave simulated by a 3D staggered-grid finite-difference (FD) seismic wave propagation algorithm suffers from frequency- and direction-dependent numerical dispersion. The magnitude of this dispersion depends critically on FD algorithm implementation details. Nevertheless, proper gridding can control numerical dispersion to within an acceptable level, leading to accurate Rayleigh wave simulations. Many investigators have derived dispersion relations appropriate for body wave propagation by various FD algorithms. However, the situation for surface waves is less well-studied. We have devised a numerical search procedure to estimate Rayleigh phase speed and group speed curves for 3D O(2,2) and O(2,4) staggered-grid FD algorithms. In contrast with the continuous time-space situation (where phase speed is obtained by extracting the appropriate root of the Rayleigh cubic), we cannot develop a closed-form mathematical formula governing the phase speed. Rather, we numerically seek the particular phase speed that leads to a solution of the discrete wave propagation equations, while holding medium properties, frequency, horizontal propagation direction, and gridding intervals fixed. Group speed is then obtained by numerically differentiating the phase speed with respect to frequency. The problem is formulated for an explicit stress-free surface positioned at two different levels within the staggered spatial grid. Additionally, an interesting variant involving zero-valued medium properties above the surface is addressed. We refer to the latter as an implicit free surface. Our preliminary conclusion is that an explicit free surface, implemented with O(4) spatial FD

  11. [P wave dispersion increased in childhood depending on blood pressure, weight, height, and cardiac structure and function].

    PubMed

    Chávez-González, Elibet; González-Rodríguez, Emilio; Llanes-Camacho, María Del Carmen; Garí-Llanes, Merlin; García-Nóbrega, Yosvany; García-Sáez, Julieta

    2014-01-01

    Increased P wave dispersion are identified as a predictor of atrial fibrillation. There are associations between hypertension, P wave dispersion, constitutional and echocardiographic variables. These relationships have been scarcely studied in pediatrics. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between P wave dispersion, blood pressure, echocardiographic and constitutional variables, and determine the most influential variables on P wave dispersion increases in pediatrics. In the frame of the PROCDEC II project, children from 8 to 11 years old, without known heart conditions were studied. Arterial blood pressure was measured in all the children; a 12-lead surface electrocardiogram and an echocardiogram were done as well. Left ventricular mass index mean values for normotensive (25.91±5.96g/m(2.7)) and hypertensive (30.34±8.48g/m(2.7)) showed significant differences P=.000. When we add prehypertensive and hypertensive there are 50.38% with normal left ventricular mass index and P wave dispersion was increased versus 13.36% of normotensive. Multiple regression demonstrated that the mean blood pressure, duration of A wave of mitral inflow, weight and height have a value of r=0.88 as related to P wave dispersion. P wave dispersion is increased in pre- and hypertensive children compared to normotensive. There are pre- and hypertensive patients with normal left ventricular mass index and increased P wave dispersion. Mean arterial pressure, duration of the A wave of mitral inflow, weight and height are the variables with the highest influence on increased P wave dispersion. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. RESEARCH NOTE : Shear-wave velocity in marine sediments on young oceanic crust: constraints from dispersion analysis of Scholte waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz-Essen, H.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Herber, Rolf; Weigel, Wilfried

    1998-01-01

    An experiment with a newly developed implosive source, located about 1 m above the seafloor at 3665 m depth, revealed a slow interface wave. This wave is attributed to S waves in a soft sediment layer covering the hard rock sub-bottom. Dispersion analysis by means of the multiple-filter technique yields the group velocity as a function of frequency. Model calculations showed that the observed dispersion curve can be reproduced by considering a steep gradient of S velocity within the sediment layer. Nearly perfect agreement of experimental and model data could be achieved with a sediment layer thickness of 21.5 m, an S speed of 225 m s- 1 at the water-sediment interface and an increase by 23 s- 1 within the layer. These values are relatively high compared to data from the literature. However, previous estimates of in situ S-wave velocity have been obtained on old oceanic crust in the vicinity of continents or islands, while our experiment was carried out on young Pacific crust. Therefore, we suggest two mechanisms which could support a relatively high S speed in sediments: (1) the input of hydrothermally generated metalliferous sediments from the adjacent spreading axis; and (2) post-depositional diagenesis which has accelerated the induration of sediments.

  13. Wave-speed dispersion associated with an attenuation obeying a frequency power law.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    An attenuation scaling as a power of frequency, |ω|(β), over an infinite bandwidth is neither analytic nor square-integrable, thus calling into question the application of the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations for determining the frequency dependence of the associated phase speed. In this paper, three different approaches are developed, all of which return the dispersion formula for the wavenumber, K(ω). The first analysis relies on the properties of generalized functions and the causality requirement that the impulse response, k(t), the inverse Fourier transform of -iK(ω), must vanish for t < 0. Second, a wave equation is introduced that yields the phase-speed dispersion associated with a frequency-power-law attenuation. Finally, it is shown that, with minor modification, the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations with no subtractions (the Plemelj formulas) do in fact hold for an attenuation scaling as |ω|(β), yielding the same dispersion formula as the other two derivations. From this dispersion formula, admissible values of the exponent β are established. Physically, the inadmissible values of β, which include all the integers, correspond to attenuation-dispersion pairs whose Fourier components cannot combine in such a way as to make the impulse response, k(t), vanish for t < 0. There is no upper or lower limit on the value that β may take.

  14. Hybrid dispersive media with controllable wave propagation: A new take on smart materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bergamini, Andrea E.; Zündel, Manuel; Flores Parra, Edgar A.; Ermanni, Paolo; Delpero, Tommaso; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2015-10-21

    In this paper, we report on the wave transmission characteristics of a hybrid one dimensional (1D) medium. The hybrid characteristic is the result of the coupling between a 1D mechanical waveguide in the form of an elastic beam, supporting the propagation of transverse waves and a discrete electrical transmission line, consisting of a series of inductors connected to ground through capacitors. The capacitors correspond to a periodic array of piezoelectric patches that are bonded to the beam and that couple the two waveguides. The coupling leads to a hybrid medium that is characterized by a coincidence condition for the frequency/wavenumber value corresponding to the intersection of the branches of the two waveguides. In the frequency range centered at coincidence, the hybrid medium features strong attenuation of wave motion as a result of the energy transfer towards the electrical transmission line. This energy transfer, and the ensuing attenuation of wave motion, is alike the one obtained through internal resonating units of the kind commonly used in metamaterials. However, the distinct shape of the dispersion curves suggests how this energy transfer is not the result of a resonance and is therefore fundamentally different. This paper presents the numerical investigation of the wave propagation in the considered media, it illustrates experimental evidence of wave transmission characteristics and compares the performance of the considered configuration with that of internal resonating metamaterials. In addition, the ability to conveniently tune the dispersion properties of the electrical transmission line is exploited to adapt the periodicity of the domain and to investigate diatomic periodic configurations that are characterized by a richer dispersion spectrum and broader bandwidth of wave attenuation at coincidence. The medium consisting of mechanical, piezoelectric, and analog electronic elements can be easily interfaced to digital devices to offer a novel

  15. Hybrid dispersive media with controllable wave propagation: A new take on smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamini, Andrea E.; Zündel, Manuel; Flores Parra, Edgar A.; Delpero, Tommaso; Ruzzene, Massimo; Ermanni, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we report on the wave transmission characteristics of a hybrid one dimensional (1D) medium. The hybrid characteristic is the result of the coupling between a 1D mechanical waveguide in the form of an elastic beam, supporting the propagation of transverse waves and a discrete electrical transmission line, consisting of a series of inductors connected to ground through capacitors. The capacitors correspond to a periodic array of piezoelectric patches that are bonded to the beam and that couple the two waveguides. The coupling leads to a hybrid medium that is characterized by a coincidence condition for the frequency/wavenumber value corresponding to the intersection of the branches of the two waveguides. In the frequency range centered at coincidence, the hybrid medium features strong attenuation of wave motion as a result of the energy transfer towards the electrical transmission line. This energy transfer, and the ensuing attenuation of wave motion, is alike the one obtained through internal resonating units of the kind commonly used in metamaterials. However, the distinct shape of the dispersion curves suggests how this energy transfer is not the result of a resonance and is therefore fundamentally different. This paper presents the numerical investigation of the wave propagation in the considered media, it illustrates experimental evidence of wave transmission characteristics and compares the performance of the considered configuration with that of internal resonating metamaterials. In addition, the ability to conveniently tune the dispersion properties of the electrical transmission line is exploited to adapt the periodicity of the domain and to investigate diatomic periodic configurations that are characterized by a richer dispersion spectrum and broader bandwidth of wave attenuation at coincidence. The medium consisting of mechanical, piezoelectric, and analog electronic elements can be easily interfaced to digital devices to offer a novel

  16. Complex dispersion relation of surface acoustic waves at a lossy metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwan, Logan; Geslain, Alan; Romero-García, Vicente; Groby, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The complex dispersion relation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) at a lossy resonant metasurface is theoretically and experimentally reported. The metasurface consists of the periodic arrangement of borehole resonators in a rigid substrate. The theoretical model relies on a boundary layer approach that provides the effective metasurface admittance governing the complex dispersion relation in the presence of viscous and thermal losses. The model is experimentally validated by measurements in the semi-anechoic chamber. The complex SAW dispersion relation is experimentally retrieved from the analysis of the spatial Laplace transform of the pressure scanned along a line at the metasurface. The geometrical spreading of the energy from the speaker is accounted for, and both the real and imaginary parts of the SAW wavenumber are obtained. The results show that the strong reduction of the SAW group velocity occurs jointly with a drastic attenuation of the wave, leading to the confinement of the field close to the source and preventing the efficient propagation of such slow-sound surface modes. The method opens perspectives to theoretically predict and experimentally characterize both the dispersion and the attenuation of surface waves at structured surfaces.

  17. Full 3D dispersion curve solutions for guided waves in generally anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando Quintanilla, F.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Craster, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    Dispersion curves of guided waves provide valuable information about the physical and elastic properties of waves propagating within a given waveguide structure. Algorithms to accurately compute these curves are an essential tool for engineers working in non-destructive evaluation and for scientists studying wave phenomena. Dispersion curves are typically computed for low or zero attenuation and presented in two or three dimensional plots. The former do not always provide a clear and complete picture of the dispersion loci and the latter are very difficult to obtain when high values of attenuation are involved and arbitrary anisotropy is considered in single or multi-layered systems. As a consequence, drawing correct and reliable conclusions is a challenging task in the modern applications that often utilize multi-layered anisotropic viscoelastic materials. These challenges are overcome here by using a spectral collocation method (SCM) to robustly find dispersion curves in the most complicated cases of high attenuation and arbitrary anisotropy. Solutions are then plotted in three-dimensional frequency-complex wavenumber space, thus gaining much deeper insight into the nature of these problems. The cases studied range from classical examples, which validate this approach, to new ones involving materials up to the most general triclinic class for both flat and cylindrical geometry in multi-layered systems. The apparent crossing of modes within the same symmetry family in viscoelastic media is also explained and clarified by the results. Finally, the consequences of the centre of symmetry, present in every crystal class, on the solutions are discussed.

  18. Study on measurement of dispersive characteristics of higher order mode Lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Fan, Li; Gan, Changming; Xu, Boling; Zhu, Zhemin

    2006-12-22

    The dispersive characteristics of higher order mode Lamb waves (HOMLW) excited by interdigital transducers (IDT) are measured and analyzed, which are necessary for designing micro-sensor in ultrahigh frequency (UHF). A measurement system is set up, in which dispersive characteristics of HOMLW are obtained by the method of transform between frequency and time domains. The characteristics of amplitude-frequency and phase-frequency of Lamb wave are auto-measured by the system. By IFFT, the pulse response of the IDT device was obtained. Different modes were separated in time domain and dispersive curve of each mode is calculated by FFT. The best mode is chosen to design the micro-sensor in UHF. The phase velocity of HOMLW is greater than the surface wave (SAW) velocity and an oscillator in higher frequency can be made, so the absolute sensitivity of micro-sensor can be increased. In this paper, the dispersive characteristics of HOMLW excited by an IDT in a 127.86 degrees rotated Y-cut, X propagating lithium niobate plate is analyzed. An oscillator using a(13) mode is made, the phase velocity of which is measured about 19,652 m/s when h/lambda=0.94 (h=plate thickness, lambda=wavelength).

  19. Dispersion relations of short surface gravity waves over vertically sheared currents from stereo-video measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peureux, Charles; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    The stereo-video reconstuction method [Leckler et al. 2015] allows now for the full reconstruction of 3D frequency-wavenumber spectra of short waves. A new field campaign in 2013 on the Katsiveli platform (Black Sea) provided such spectra in various wind and waves conditions, and particularly a stormy event, after which very mature waves had been generated. The short waves energies are found to be mostly located around a dispersion relation of the form, () ° ----------- ω ⃗k = gktanh(kH)+ ⃗kṡ ⃗Ueff The effective advection velocity [Kirby and Chen 1989] ⃗Ueff(k) integrates contributions from both the Stokes drift and quasi-eulerian current [Groeneweg and Klopman 1998]. We find that the effective drift velocity has a very weak wavenumber dependancy, as a result the eulerian current must be vertically sheared. This shear is relevant to the breaking of small scale waves [Banner and Phillips 1974]. It is possible that in field conditions the wind drift is much less important than in the laboratory. Bibliography Banner, M. L. and Phillips, O. M., On the incipient breaking of small scale waves, J. Fluid Mech., 1974, 65, 647. Groeneweg, J. and Klopman, G., Changes of the mean velocity profiles in the combined wave-current motion described in a GLM formulation, J. Fluid Mech., 1998, 370, 271-296. Kirby, J. T. and Chen, T. M., Surface waves on vertically sheared flows : Approximate dispersion relations, J. Geophys. Res., 1989, 94, 1013. Leckler, F., Ardhuin, F., Peureux, C.,Benetazzo, A., Bergamasco, F. and Dulov, V., Analysis and interpretation of frequency-wavenumber spectra of young wind-waves, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 2015, 45, 2484-2496.

  20. The influence of the directional energy distribution on the nonlinear dispersion relation in a random gravity wave field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, N. E.; Tung, C.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the directional distribution of wave energy on the dispersion relation is calculated numerically using various directional wave spectrum models. The results indicate that the dispersion relation varies both as a function of the directional energy distribution and the direction of propagation of the wave component under consideration. Furthermore, both the mean deviation and the random scatter from the linear approximation increase as the energy spreading decreases. Limited observational data are compared with the theoretical results. The agreement is favorable.

  1. The influence of the directional energy distribution on the nonlinear dispersion relation in a random gravity wave field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, N. E.; Tung, C.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the directional distribution of wave energy on the dispersion relation is calculated numerically using various directional wave spectrum models. The results indicate that the dispersion relation varies both as a function of the directional energy distribution and the direction of propagation of the wave component under consideration. Furthermore, both the mean deviation and the random scatter from the linear approximation increase as the energy spreading decreases. Limited observational data are compared with the theoretical results. The agreement is favorable.

  2. Imaging ultrasonic dispersive guided wave energy in long bones using linear radon transform.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tho N H T; Nguyen, Kim-Cuong T; Sacchi, Mauricio D; Le, Lawrence H

    2014-11-01

    Multichannel analysis of dispersive ultrasonic energy requires a reliable mapping of the data from the time-distance (t-x) domain to the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) or frequency-phase velocity (f-c) domain. The mapping is usually performed with the classic 2-D Fourier transform (FT) with a subsequent substitution and interpolation via c = 2πf/k. The extracted dispersion trajectories of the guided modes lack the resolution in the transformed plane to discriminate wave modes. The resolving power associated with the FT is closely linked to the aperture of the recorded data. Here, we present a linear Radon transform (RT) to image the dispersive energies of the recorded ultrasound wave fields. The RT is posed as an inverse problem, which allows implementation of the regularization strategy to enhance the focusing power. We choose a Cauchy regularization for the high-resolution RT. Three forms of Radon transform: adjoint, damped least-squares, and high-resolution are described, and are compared with respect to robustness using simulated and cervine bone data. The RT also depends on the data aperture, but not as severely as does the FT. With the RT, the resolution of the dispersion panel could be improved up to around 300% over that of the FT. Among the Radon solutions, the high-resolution RT delineated the guided wave energy with much better imaging resolution (at least 110%) than the other two forms. The Radon operator can also accommodate unevenly spaced records. The results of the study suggest that the high-resolution RT is a valuable imaging tool to extract dispersive guided wave energies under limited aperture. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of phononic crystals for dispersive surface acoustic wave ozone sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westafer, Ryan S.

    The object of this research was to investigate dispersion in surface phononic crystals (PnCs) for application to a newly developed passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) ozone sensor. Frequency band gaps and slow sound already have been reported for PnC lattice structures. Such engineered structures are often advertised to reduce loss, increase sensitivity, and reduce device size. However, these advances have not yet been realized in the context of surface acoustic wave sensors. In early work, we computed SAW dispersion in patterned surface structures and we confirmed that our finite element computations of SAW dispersion in thin films and in one dimensional surface PnC structures agree with experimental results obtained by laser probe techniques. We analyzed the computations to guide device design in terms of sensitivity and joint spectral operating point. Next we conducted simulations and experiments to determine sensitivity and limit of detection for more conventional dispersive SAW devices and PnC sensors. Finally, we conducted extensive ozone detection trials on passive reflection mode SAW devices, using distinct components of the time dispersed response to compensate for the effect of temperature. The experimental work revealed that the devices may be used for dosimetry applications over periods of several days.

  4. An imaging algorithm for damage detection with dispersion compensation using piezoceramic induced lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangmin; Gao, Weihang; Song, Gangbing; Song, Yue

    2017-02-01

    Piezoceramic induced Lamb waves are often used for imaging based damage detection, especially for plate like structures. The dispersion effect of the Lamb waves deteriorates the performance of most of imaging methods, since the waveform of the dispersion signals will spread out. In this paper, an imaging method which can compensate the dispersion is developed. In the proposed method, the phase induced by the propagation distance is compensated firstly. After that, the phase deviation generated by the dispersion effect is compensated. Via the two compensations, the proposed method can derive an accurate location of the target with a clean imaging map. An experiment using a plate like structure with four piezoceramic transducer was conducted. In the experiment, the four piezoceramic sensors were used to obtain the signals of the scatterer that simulated the damage on an aluminum plate. The experimental results show that since the dispersion effect is compensated, the target’s image based on the proposed method is about 10 cm × 14 cm, which is about a quarter of that of using the back-projection imaging method.

  5. Controllable wave propagation of hybrid dispersive medium with LC high-pass network (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Parra, Edgar; Bergamini, Andrea E.; Ermanni, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    This work reports on the wave transmission characteristics of a hybrid one dimensional (1D) medium. The hybrid characteristic is the result of the coupling between a mechanical waveguide in the form of an elastic beam, and an electrical network. The network configuration investigated is an LC high-pass, consisting of a series of capacitors connected in series through grounded inductors. The capacitors correspond to a periodic array of piezoelectric patches that are bonded to the beam thus coupling the two waveguides. The coupling is characterized by a coincidence frequency/wavenumber corresponding to the intersection of the dispersion curves. At this coincidence frequency, the hybrid medium features attenuation of wave motion as a result of the energy transfer to the electrical network. This energy exchange is depicted in the dispersion by eigenvalue crossing, a particular case of eigenvalue veering. This paper presents the numerical investigations of the wave propagation in the considered medium, and validates the numerical findings with experimental evidence of the wave transmission characteristics. Moreover, the dispersion properties of the electrical network are further studied by varying the inductances thus exploiting the tunability of the periodic electrical domain, i.e: monoatomic and diatmomic unit cell configurations. The LC high-pass network offers several advantages over other configurations, from ease of implementation as the piezoelectric elements are not grounded, to a smaller inductance values to achieve attenuation at a given frequency. Such media could be interfaced with more complex electrical networks to create a new type of smart materials.

  6. Slow shock and rotational discontinuity in MHD and Hall MHD models with anisotropic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau, L.-N.; Wang, B.-J.

    2016-07-01

    Pressure anisotropy may modify the characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, in particular, the slow mode wave and the corresponding shocks and discontinuities. In this study the formation of slow shocks (SSs) in anisotropic plasmas is examined by solving the gyrotropic MHD and Hall MHD equations numerically for one-dimensional Riemann problem. The MHD shocks and discontinuities are generated by imposing a finite normal magnetic field on the Harris type current sheet with a guide magnetic By component. It is shown that anomalous SSs moving faster than the intermediate wave or with positive density-magnetic field correlation may be generated in gyrotropic MHD and Hall MHD models. Moreover, for some parameter values SSs may exhibit upstream wave trains with right-handed polarization in contrast with the earlier prediction that SSs shall possess downstream left-hand polarized wave trains based on the isotropic Hall MHD theory. For the cases of By ≠ 0, SSs with increased density and decreased magnetic field followed by noncoplanar intermediate mode or rotational discontinuity (RD)-like structures similar to the compound SS-RD structures observed in space plasma environments may possibly form in symmetric and asymmetric current layers. The Walén relation of these anomalous RDs without the correction of pressure anisotropy may significantly be violated.

  7. Adiabatically tapered hyperbolic metamaterials for dispersion control of high-k waves.

    PubMed

    West, Paul R; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Ferrera, Marcello; Kildishev, Alexander V; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2015-01-14

    Hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs) have shown great promise in the optical and quantum communities due to their extremely large, broadband photonic density of states. This feature is a direct consequence of supporting photonic modes with unbounded k-vectors. While these materials support such high-k waves, they are intrinsically confined inside the HMM and cannot propagate into the far-field, rendering them impractical for many applications. Here, we demonstrate how the magnitude of k-vectors can be engineered as the propagating radiation passes through media of differing dispersion relations (including type II HMMs and dielectrics) in the in-plane direction. The total outcoupling efficiency of waves in the in-plane direction is shown to be on average 2 orders of magnitude better than standard out-of-plane outcoupling methods. In addition, the outcoupling can be further enhanced using a proposed tapered HMM waveguide that is fabricated using a shadowed glancing angle deposition technique; thereby proving the feasibility of the proposed device. Applications for this technique include converting high-k waves to low-k waves that can be out-coupled into free-space and creating extremely high-k waves that are quickly quenched. Most importantly, this method of in-plane outcoupling acts as a bridge through which waves can cross between the regimes of low-k waves in classical dielectric materials and the high-k waves in HMMs with strongly reduced reflective losses.

  8. The effect of dispersion on spectral broadening of incoherent continuous-wave light in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Soh, Daniel B S; Koplow, Jeffrey P; Moore, Sean W; Schroder, Kevin L; Hsu, Wen L

    2010-10-11

    In addition to fiber nonlinearity, fiber dispersion plays a significant role in spectral broadening of incoherent continuous-wave light. In this paper we have performed a numerical analysis of spectral broadening of incoherent light based on a fully stochastic model. Under a wide range of operating conditions, these numerical simulations exhibit striking features such as damped oscillatory spectral broadening (during the initial stages of propagation), and eventual convergence to a stationary, steady state spectral distribution at sufficiently long propagation distances. In this study we analyze the important role of fiber dispersion in such phenomena. We also demonstrate an analytical rate equation expression for spectral broadening.

  9. Dispersion Analysis of Gravity Waves in Fluid Media Discretized by Energy-Orthogonal Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Brito Castro, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    This article studies the dispersion of gravity waves in fluid media discretized by the finite element method. The element stiffness matrix is split into basic and higher-order components which are respectively related to the mean and deviatoric components of the gradient of displacement potential. This decomposition is applied to the kinetic energy. The dispersion analysis yields a correlation between the higher-order kinetic energy and the kinetic energy error. The use of this correlation as a reference to apply the higher-order energy as an error indicator for the sloshing modes computed by the finite element method is explored.

  10. Four-wave mixing stability in hybrid photonic crystal fibers with two zero-dispersion wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Sévigny, Benoit; Vanvincq, Olivier; Valentin, Constance; Chen, Na; Quiquempois, Yves; Bouwmans, Géraud

    2013-12-16

    The four-wave mixing process in optical fibers is generally sensitive to dispersion uniformity along the fiber length. However, some specific phase matching conditions show increased robustness to longitudinal fluctuations in fiber dimensions, which affect the dispersion, even for signal and idler wavelengths far from the pump. In this paper, we present the method by which this point is found, how the fiber design characteristics impact on the stable point and demonstrate the stability through propagation simulations using the non-linear Schrödinger equation.

  11. Wave equations, dispersion relations, and van Hove singularities for applications of doublet mechanics to ultrasound propagation in bio- and nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junru; Layman, Christopher; Liu, Jun

    2004-02-01

    A fundamental mathematical framework for applications of Doublet Mechanics to ultrasound propagation in a discrete material is introduced. A multiscale wave equation, dispersion relation for longitudinal waves, and shear waves are derived. The van Hove singularities and corresponding highest frequency limits for the Mth-order wave equations of longitudinal and shear waves are determined for a widely used microbundle structure. Doublet Mechanics is applied to soft tissue and low-density polyethylene. The experimental dispersion data for soft tissue and low-density polyethylene are compared with results predicted by Doublet Mechanics and an attenuation model based on a Kramers-Kronig relation in classical continuum mechanics.

  12. Dispersion relation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-component magneto-plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khaira, Vibhooti Ahirwar, G.

    2015-07-31

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi component plasma composed of electrons (denoted by e{sup −}), hydrogen ions (denoted by H{sup +}), helium ions (denoted by He{sup +}) and positively charged oxygen ions (denoted by O{sup +})in magnetized cold plasma. The wave is assumed to propagate perpendicular to the static magnetic field. It is found that the addition of heavy ions in the plasma dispersion modified the lower hybrid mode and also allowed an ion-ion mode. The frequencies of the lower hybrid and ion- ion hybrid modes are derived using cold plasma theory. It is observed that the effect of multi-ionfor different plasma densities on electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is to enhance the wave frequencies. The results are interpreted for the magnetosphere has been applied parameters by auroral acceleration region.

  13. Dispersion characteristics of spin-electromagnetic waves in planar multiferroic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, Andrey A.; Ustinov, Alexey B.; Vitko, Vitaliy V.; Semenov, Alexander A.; Mironenko, Igor G.; Belyavskiy, Pavel Yu.; Kalinikos, Boris A.; Stashkevich, Andrey A.; Lähderanta, E.

    2015-11-14

    A method of approximate boundary conditions is used to derive dispersion relations for spin-electromagnetic waves (SEWs) propagating in thin ferrite films and in multiferroic layered structures. A high accuracy of this method is proven. It was shown that the spin-electromagnetic wave propagating in the structure composed of a thin ferrite film, a thin ferroelectric film, and a slot transmission line is formed as a result of hybridization of the surface spin wave in the ferrite film and the electromagnetic wave in the slot-line. The structure demonstrates dual electric and magnetic field tunability of the SEW spectrum. The electric field tunability is provided by the thin ferroelectric film. Its efficiency increases with an increase in the thicknesses of the ferrite and ferroelectric films and with a decrease in the slot-line gap width. The theory is confirmed by experimental data.

  14. THE BEHAVIOR OF TRANSVERSE WAVES IN NONUNIFORM SOLAR FLUX TUBES. I. COMPARISON OF IDEAL AND RESISTIVE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume; Oliver, Ramón; Goossens, Marcel

    2013-11-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitously observed in the solar atmosphere. Kink waves are a type of transverse MHD waves in magnetic flux tubes that are damped due to resonant absorption. The theoretical study of kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes is usually based on the simplification that the transverse variation of density is confined to a nonuniform layer much thinner than the radius of the tube, i.e., the so-called thin boundary approximation. Here, we develop a general analytic method to compute the dispersion relation and the eigenfunctions of ideal MHD waves in pressureless flux tubes with transversely nonuniform layers of arbitrary thickness. Results for kink waves are produced and compared with fully numerical resistive MHD eigenvalue computations in the limit of small resistivity. We find that the frequency and resonant damping rate are the same in both ideal and resistive cases. The actual results for thick nonuniform layers deviate from the behavior predicted in the thin boundary approximation and strongly depend on the shape of the nonuniform layer. The eigenfunctions in ideal MHD are very different from those in resistive MHD. The ideal eigenfunctions display a global character regardless of the thickness of the nonuniform layer, while the resistive eigenfunctions are localized around the resonance and are indistinguishable from those of ordinary resistive Alfvén modes. Consequently, the spatial distribution of wave energy in the ideal and resistive cases is dramatically different. This poses a fundamental theoretical problem with clear observational consequences.

  15. A Variable-resolution Surface Wave Dispersion Study of Eurasia, North Africa, and Surrounding Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E

    2005-03-21

    This paper presents the results of a large-scale study of surface wave dispersion performed across Eurasia and North Africa. Improvements were made to previous surface wave work by enlarging the study region, increasing path density, improving spatial resolution, and expanding the period range. This study expands the coverage area northwards and eastwards relative to a previous dispersion analysis, which covered only North Africa and the Middle East. We have significantly increased the number of seismograms examined and group velocity measurements made. We have now made good quality dispersion measurements for about 30,000 Rayleigh wave and 20,000 Love wave paths, and have incorporated measurements from several other researchers into the study. A conjugate gradient method was employed for the group velocity tomography, which improved the inversion from the previous study by adopting a variable smoothness. This technique allows us to go to higher resolution where the data allow without producing artifacts. The current results include both Love and Rayleigh wave inversions across the region for periods from 7 to 100 seconds at 1{sup o} resolution. Short period group velocities are sensitive to slow velocities associated with large sedimentary features such as the Caspian Sea, West Siberian Platform, Mediterranean Sea, Bay of Bengal, Tarim Basin, and Persian Gulf. Intermediate periods are sensitive to differences in crustal thickness, such as those between oceanic and continental crust or along orogenic zones and continental plateaus. At longer periods, fast velocities are consistently found beneath cratons while slow upper mantle velocities occur along rift systems, subduction zones, and collision zones such as the Tethys Belt. We have compared the group velocities at various periods with features such as sediment thickness, topographic height, crustal thickness, proximity to plate boundaries, lithospheric age and lithospheric thickness, and find significant

  16. Nonlinear interaction of long dispersive Kelvin waves in deep natural basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnev, Nikolay M.; Lovtsov, Sergey V.; Portyanskaya, Inna A.; Rastegin, Alexey E.; Rubtsov, Valeriy Yu.

    2010-05-01

    Nonlinear phenomena are of great importance for complete understanding of dynamical processes in fluids. However, direct studies of hydrodynamic equations seem to be very hard just due to nonlinear terms. Many approaches to nonlinear dispersive waves are related to the technique of multiple scales. It is one of most seminal ways to obtain those models that combine possibility of analytic investigation with actual effects of nonlinearity. Consideration of long Kelvin waves within the linear theory is well known issue of geophysical hydrodynamics. An influence of boundary effects leads to dispersion of Kelvin waves. At the same time, mutual balance between dispersive and nonlinear terms in motion equations can provide a formation of stable localized structures so-called solitary waves. When stratification is essential, different vertical modes of oscillation are typically excited. Corresponding analysis of vertical structure for solitary Rossby waves has been developed in many works, mainly due to Redekopp. But proper treatment of large-scale Kelvin waves seems to be not indicated in the literature. The principal aim of our work is to fill this lacuna. The present work has been partially inspired by temperature monitoring data obtained in south area of Lake Baikal. Under conditions of winter stratification, specific displacements of fragments of temperature profile from up to down were observed within upper layer. It is valuable that a shape of moving fragment remains almost undistorted. After ending this temperature decreasing, the temperature profile was rectified to initial shape. In all the years of observations, vertical displacements reach several tens of meters with duration of several days. These phenomena were interpreted as manifestation of long dispersive Kelvin waves, especially due to direction of propagation along the coastline. Regularly observed displacements from up to down may be evidences for nonlinear character of wave dynamics. Indeed, internal

  17. Application of high-resolution linear Radon transform for Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy imaging and mode separating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) analysis is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear-wave profile. One of the key steps in the MASW method is to generate an image of dispersive energy in the frequency-velocity domain, so dispersion curves can be determined by picking peaks of dispersion energy. In this paper, we image Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy and separate multimodes from a multichannel record by high-resolution linear Radon transform (LRT). We first introduce Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy imaging by high-resolution LRT. We then show the process of Rayleigh-wave mode separation. Results of synthetic and real-world examples demonstrate that (1) compared with slant stacking algorithm, high-resolution LRT can improve the resolution of images of dispersion energy by more than 50% (2) high-resolution LRT can successfully separate multimode dispersive energy of Rayleigh waves with high resolution; and (3) multimode separation and reconstruction expand frequency ranges of higher mode dispersive energy, which not only increases the investigation depth but also provides a means to accurately determine cut-off frequencies.

  18. PROPAGATION AND DISPERSION OF SAUSAGE WAVE TRAINS IN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, R.; Terradas, J.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2015-06-10

    A localized perturbation of a magnetic flux tube produces wave trains that disperse as they propagate along the tube, where the extent of dispersion depends on the physical properties of the magnetic structure, on the length of the initial excitation, and on its nature (e.g., transverse or axisymmetric). In Oliver et al. we considered a transverse initial perturbation, whereas the temporal evolution of an axisymmetric one is examined here. In both papers we use a method based on Fourier integrals to solve the initial value problem. We find that the propagating wave train undergoes stronger attenuation for longer axisymmetric (or shorter transverse) perturbations, while the internal to external density ratio has a smaller effect on the attenuation. Moreover, for parameter values typical of coronal loops axisymmetric (transverse) wave trains travel at a speed 0.75–1 (1.2) times the Alfvén speed of the magnetic tube. In both cases, the wave train passage at a fixed position of the magnetic tube gives rise to oscillations with periods of the order of seconds, with axisymmetric disturbances causing more oscillations than transverse ones. To test the detectability of propagating transverse or axisymmetric wave packets in magnetic tubes of the solar atmosphere (e.g., coronal loops, spicules, or prominence threads) a forward modeling of the perturbations must be carried out.

  19. Finite-frequency global mantle tomography in the Cubed Earth from Rayleigh wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikesell, T. D.; Nolet, G.; Charlety, J.; Ritsema, J. E.; van Heijst, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, shear wave velocity models of the mantle have been created using combinations of long period surface wave dispersion data, teleseismic body waveforms and travel times, and normal modes (e.g., S40RTS, S362ANI, TX2008). These models use different measurement techniques, and furthermore, such models are usually derived from ray theoretical methods if only to render the very large combined data sets solvable with present day computational resources. We present the first finite frequency interpretation of the updated van Heijst and Woodhouse (1999) Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion data set. Taking PREM as the background Earth model, we compute finite frequency kernels in the isotropic Cubed Earth for global Rayleigh wave phases (fundamental mode up to the fourth overtone). The Cubed Earth parametrization allows us to easily project the solution on different bases. In particular, wavelet bases allow for localization in both the spatial and spectral domains and are suitable to study the large variability of scales in the tomographic solutions and their resolvability geographically. In addition, we allow for Love-Rayleigh interaction. This is particularly important for the higher modes and allows us to study the effects of mode conversion due to scattering. Finally, we compare our preferred model with existing models of shear wave velocity for the upper mantle.

  20. Propagation and Dispersion of Sausage Wave Trains in Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, R.; Ruderman, M. S.; Terradas, J.

    2015-06-01

    A localized perturbation of a magnetic flux tube produces wave trains that disperse as they propagate along the tube, where the extent of dispersion depends on the physical properties of the magnetic structure, on the length of the initial excitation, and on its nature (e.g., transverse or axisymmetric). In Oliver et al. we considered a transverse initial perturbation, whereas the temporal evolution of an axisymmetric one is examined here. In both papers we use a method based on Fourier integrals to solve the initial value problem. We find that the propagating wave train undergoes stronger attenuation for longer axisymmetric (or shorter transverse) perturbations, while the internal to external density ratio has a smaller effect on the attenuation. Moreover, for parameter values typical of coronal loops axisymmetric (transverse) wave trains travel at a speed 0.75-1 (1.2) times the Alfvén speed of the magnetic tube. In both cases, the wave train passage at a fixed position of the magnetic tube gives rise to oscillations with periods of the order of seconds, with axisymmetric disturbances causing more oscillations than transverse ones. To test the detectability of propagating transverse or axisymmetric wave packets in magnetic tubes of the solar atmosphere (e.g., coronal loops, spicules, or prominence threads) a forward modeling of the perturbations must be carried out.

  1. Identification of Upper Crustal Structures Beneath Central Java, Indonesia from of Surface Wave Dispersion Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulhan, Zulfakriza; Saygin, Erdinc; Cummins, Phil; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Luehr, Birger-G.; Bodin, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Our previous study on MERAMEX data (Zulfakriza et al., 2014) obtained features of the tomographic images which correlate well with the surface geology of central Java in periods between 1 to 12 sec. Kendeng Basin and active volcanoes in the central part of this region are clearly imaged with low group velocities with values around 0.8 km/sec, while the carbonate structures in the southern part of the region correspond to higher group velocities in the range of 1.8 to 2.0 km/sec. In this current study, we invert dispersion curves obtained from seismic noise tomography to estimate shear wave-depth profiles of the region. The results are used to discuss the spatial variation of shear wave velocities for a depth range down from the surface to upper crust. Most of the shear wave velocity anomalies, including the upper crustal areas of the Kendeng basin and active volcanoes, are consistent with our previous study of Rayleigh wave group velocities and fit to the regional geology. Keywords: Dispersion Inversion; shear wave velocity; Central Java, Indonesia. Reference: Zulfakriza, Z., Saygin, E., Cummins, P., Widiyantoro, S., Nugraha, A., Luehr, B.-G., Bodin, T., 2014. Upper crustal structure of central Java, Indonesia, from transdimensional seismic ambient noise tomography. Geophys. J. Int. 197.

  2. Observed Dispersion Relation of Yanai Waves and 17-Day Tropical Instability Waves in the Pacific Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    day TIWs. 1. Introduction Mixed Rossby-Gravity waves (often referred to as Yanai waves) play an important role in a variety of phenomena in the...significant role in the SST and SSH variability caused by 17-day TIWs especially in the northern hemisphere. 3. Cross-correlation analysis The phase...penetrating from the upper troposphere into the lower strato - sphere. J. Meteor. Soc. Japan, 47, 167–182. Zangvil, A., 1975: Temporal and spatial

  3. Dark three-sister rogue waves in normally dispersive optical fibers with random birefringence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Soto-Crespo, Jose M; Grelu, Philippe

    2014-11-03

    We investigate dark rogue wave dynamics in normally dispersive birefringent optical fibers, based on the exact rational solutions of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. Analytical solutions are derived up to the second order via a nonrecursive Darboux transformation method. Vector dark "three-sister" rogue waves as well as their existence conditions are demonstrated. The robustness against small perturbations is numerically confirmed in spite of the onset of modulational instability, offering the possibility to observe such extreme events in normal optical fibers with random birefringence, or in other Manakov-type vector nonlinear media.

  4. Dispersion relation of a surface wave at a rough metal-air interface

    DOE PAGES

    Kotelnikov, Igor; Stupakov, Gennady

    2016-11-28

    Here, we derived a dispersion relation of a surface wave at a rough metal-air interface. In contrast to previous publications, we assumed that an intrinsic surface impedance due to a finite electric conductivity of the metal can be of the same order as the roughness-induced impedance. We then applied our results to the analysis of a long-standing problem of the discrepancy between the experimental data on the propagation of surface waves in the terahertz range of frequencies and the classical Drude theory.

  5. In-vitro quantification of rat liver viscoelasticity with shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-rong; Chen, Xin; Lin, Haoming; Zhang, Xinyu

    2013-01-01

    As a new imaging method for tissue mechanical properties, ultrasound elastography has always been the research focus in the field of medical ultrasound imaging ever since it has been proposed. This paper developed an ultrasound viscoelasticity measurement system based on shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV). This system applied acoustic radiation force to excite harmonic vibration in soft tissue. The propagation of the shear wave induced by the vibration was detected and the tissue viscoelasticity properties were calculated. Based on this system, rat livers were measured in vitro. The results shows that the system can measure the viscoelasticity reliably, offering a potential alternative to diagnosis of liver fibrosis.

  6. S-Wave Dispersion Relations: Exact Left Hand E-Plane Discontinuity from the Born Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessis, D.; Temkin, A.

    1999-01-01

    We show, for a superposition of Yukawa potentials, that the left hand cut discontinuity in the complex E plane of the (S-wave) scattering amplitude is given exactly, in an interval depending on n, by the discontinuity of the Born series stopped at order n. This also establishes an inverse and unexpected correspondence of the Born series at positive high energies and negative low energies. We can thus construct a viable dispersion relation (DR) for the partial (S-) wave amplitude. The high numerical precision achievable by the DR is demonstrated for the exponential potential at zero scattering energy. We also briefly discuss the extension of our results to Field Theory.

  7. S-Wave Dispersion Relations: Exact Left Hand E-Plane Discontinuity from the Born Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessis, D.; Temkin, A.

    1999-01-01

    We show, for a superposition of Yukawa potentials, that the left hand cut discontinuity in the complex E plane of the (S-wave) scattering amplitude is given exactly, in an interval depending on n, by the discontinuity of the Born series stopped at order n. This also establishes an inverse and unexpected correspondence of the Born series at positive high energies and negative low energies. We can thus construct a viable dispersion relation (DR) for the partial (S-) wave amplitude. The high numerical precision achievable by the DR is demonstrated for the exponential potential at zero scattering energy. We also briefly discuss the extension of our results to Field Theory.

  8. Measurement of dispersion curves of circumferential guided waves radiating from curved shells: Theory and numerical validation.

    PubMed

    Chekroun, Mathieu; Minonzio, Jean-Gabriel; Prada, Claire; Laugier, Pascal; Grimal, Quentin

    2016-02-01

    A method is proposed to evaluate in a non-contact way the phase velocity dispersion curves of circumferential waves around a shell of arbitrary shape immersed in a fluid. No assumptions are made about the thickness or the material of the shell. A geometrical model is derived to describe the shape of the radiated wavefronts in the surrounding fluid, and predict the positions of its centers of curvature. Then the time-reversal principle is applied to recover these positions and to calculate the phase velocity of the circumferential waves. Numerical finite-difference simulations are performed to evaluate the method on a circular and on an elliptic thin shell. Different dispersion curves can be recovered with an error of less than 10%.

  9. Third order elastic constants and Rayleigh wave dispersion of shot-peened aero-engine materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rjelka, M.; Barth, M.; Reinert, S.; Koehler, B.; Bamberg, J.; Baron, H.-U.

    2012-05-01

    Mechanically high stressed components used in aero-engines are made of highstrength alloys like IN718 and Ti6246. Additionally, they are surface treated by shot-peening. This introduces compressive residual stress to minimize the material's sensitivity to fatigue or stress corrosion failure mechanisms, resulting in improved performance and increased lifetime of components. Besides that, cold work is introduced in an amount depending on the peening parameters. To determine the remaining lifetime of critical aero engine components, a quantitative non-destructive determination of compressive stresses is required. It was shown that the surface treatment of aero engine alloys can be characterized by broadband Rayleigh wave dispersion but the relative contributions of compressive stress and cold work remained an open point. The present paper presents measurements of the second and third order elastic constants (TOEC) of IN718 and Ti6246. By that the stress contribution to the surface wave dispersion can be estimated.

  10. Nonlinear effects associated with dispersive Alfvén waves in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Stenflo, L.; Bingham, R.; Eliasson, B.

    2004-12-01

    Large amplitude Alfvén waves are frequently found in magnetized space and laboratory plasmas. Our objective here is to discuss the linear and nonlinear properties of dispersive Alfvén waves (DAWs) in a uniform magnetoplasma. We first consider finite frequency (ω/ωci) and ion gyroradius effects on inertial and kinetic Alfvén waves, where ωci is the ion gyrofrequency. Next, we focus on nonlinear effects caused by DAWs. Such effects include plasma density enhancement and depression by the Alfvén wave ponderomotive force, electron Joule heating by the thermal Alfvén wave force, the generation of zonal flows due to the shear Alfvén wave mode couplings as well as the formation of localized Alfvénic structures and Alfvénic vortices. The relevance of our investigation to the appearance of nonlinear Alfvén waves in the Earth's auroral acceleration region, in the solar corona and in the large plasma device at UCLA is discussed.

  11. Internal Gravity Waves in the Strait of Luzon: Dispersion Studies Using Fourier and Continuous Wavelet Transforms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-09

    are compared to results from Korteweg D’Vries theory. Good agreement is obtained for dispersion estimates using wavelet analysis and those from KdV ...analysis and those from KdV theory. 1 Background Internal waves (IWs) occur throughout the world’s oceans and seas. Well known examples in- clude IWs...recognize that KdV theory describes a two-layer model and the IWs under Understanding the Earth as a Complex System 235 investigation occur in a

  12. MHD dissipative flow and heat transfer of Casson fluids due to metachronal wave propulsion of beating cilia with thermal and velocity slip effects under an oblique magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Tripathi, D.; Bég, O. Anwar; Khan, Z. H.

    2016-11-01

    A theoretical investigation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow and heat transfer of electrically-conducting viscoplastic fluids through a channel is conducted. The robust Casson model is implemented to simulate viscoplastic behavior of fluids. The external magnetic field is oblique to the fluid flow direction. Viscous dissipation effects are included. The flow is controlled by the metachronal wave propagation generated by cilia beating on the inner walls of the channel. The mathematical formulation is based on deformation in longitudinal and transverse velocity components induced by the ciliary beating phenomenon with cilia assumed to follow elliptic trajectories. The model also features velocity and thermal slip boundary conditions. Closed-form solutions to the non-dimensional boundary value problem are obtained under physiological limitations of low Reynolds number and large wavelength. The influence of key hydrodynamic and thermo-physical parameters i.e. Hartmann (magnetic) number, Casson (viscoplastic) fluid parameter, thermal slip parameter and velocity slip parameter on flow characteristics are investigated. A comparative study is also made with Newtonian fluids (corresponding to massive values of plastic viscosity). Stream lines are plotted to visualize trapping phenomenon. The computations reveal that velocity increases with increasing the magnitude of Hartmann number near the channel walls whereas in the core flow region (center of the channel) significant deceleration is observed. Temperature is elevated with greater Casson parameter, Hartmann number, velocity slip, eccentricity parameter, thermal slip and also Brinkmann (dissipation) number. Furthermore greater Casson parameter is found to elevate the quantity and size of the trapped bolus. In the pumping region, the pressure rise is reduced with greater Hartmann number, velocity slip, and wave number whereas it is enhanced with greater cilia length.

  13. Shear wave dispersion behaviors of soft, vascularized tissues from the microchannel flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, K. J.; Ormachea, J.; McAleavey, S. A.; Wood, R. W.; Carroll-Nellenback, J. J.; Miller, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    The frequency dependent behavior of tissue stiffness and the dispersion of shear waves in tissue can be measured in a number of ways, using integrated imaging systems. The microchannel flow model, which considers the effects of fluid flow in the branching vasculature and microchannels of soft tissues, makes specific predictions about the nature of dispersion. In this paper we introduce a more general form of the 4 parameter equation for stress relaxation based on the microchannel flow model, and then derive the general frequency domain equation for the complex modulus. Dispersion measurements in liver (ex vivo) and whole perfused placenta (post-delivery) correspond to the predictions from theory, guided by independent stress relaxation measurements and consideration of the vascular tree structure.

  14. Shear wave dispersion behaviors of soft, vascularized tissues from the microchannel flow model.

    PubMed

    Parker, K J; Ormachea, J; McAleavey, S A; Wood, R W; Carroll-Nellenback, J J; Miller, R K

    2016-07-07

    The frequency dependent behavior of tissue stiffness and the dispersion of shear waves in tissue can be measured in a number of ways, using integrated imaging systems. The microchannel flow model, which considers the effects of fluid flow in the branching vasculature and microchannels of soft tissues, makes specific predictions about the nature of dispersion. In this paper we introduce a more general form of the 4 parameter equation for stress relaxation based on the microchannel flow model, and then derive the general frequency domain equation for the complex modulus. Dispersion measurements in liver (ex vivo) and whole perfused placenta (post-delivery) correspond to the predictions from theory, guided by independent stress relaxation measurements and consideration of the vascular tree structure.

  15. A robust approach for analysing dispersion of elastic waves in an orthotropic cylindrical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunov, J.; Nobili, A.

    2017-08-01

    Dispersion of elastic waves in a thin orthotropic cylindrical shell is considered, within the framework of classical 2D Kirchhoff-Love theory. In contrast to direct multi-parametric analysis of the lowest propagating modes, an alternative robust approach is proposed that simply requires evaluation of the evanescent modes (quasi-static edge effect), which, at leading order, do not depend on vibration frequency. A shortened dispersion relation for the propagating modes is then derived by polynomial division and its accuracy is numerically tested against the full Kirchhoff-Love dispersion relation. It is shown that the same shortened relation may be also obtained from a refined dynamic version of the semi-membrane theory for cylindrical shells. The presented results may be relevant for modelling various types of nanotubes which, according to the latest experimental findings, possess strong material anisotropy.

  16. The role of granular shocks in dust-layer dispersal by shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houim, Ryan; Ugarte, Orlando; Oran, Elaine

    2016-11-01

    Exactly how dust-layers are lifted and dispersed by shocks has been a longstanding question in compressible multiphase flow. Understanding the mechanism for this, however, is extremely important for early control of dust explosions. We address this problem by numerically solving a set of equations that couples a fully compressible representation of a gas with a kinetic-theory model for a granular medium (see) to simulate a shock propagating along the surface of a dust layer. The results show that the majority of the dispersed dust is lifted by hydrodynamic shear directly behind the shock wave. Simultaneously, large forces are produced behind the shock that compact the dust layer and create a granular shock. The effects from this granular shock on the surface of the dust layer destabilize the gas-dust boundary layer, which, in turn, enhances turbulence and the rate of dust dispersal.

  17. Emergence of dispersive shocks and rarefaction waves in power-law contact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, H.; Chong, C.; Yang, J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, motivated by generalized forms of the Hertzian dynamics associated with granular crystals, we consider the possibility of such models to give rise to both dispersive shock and rarefaction waves. Depending on the value p of the nonlinearity exponent, we find that both of these possibilities are realizable. We use a quasicontinuum approximation of a generalized inviscid Burgers model in order to predict the solution profile up to times near the formation of the dispersive shock, as well as to estimate when it will occur. Beyond that time threshold, oscillations associated with the highly dispersive nature of the underlying model emerge, which cannot be captured by the quasicontinuum approximation. Our analytical characterization of the above features is complemented by systematic numerical computations.

  18. Dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clobert, J.; Danchin, E.; Dhondt, A.A.; Nichols, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of species to migrate and disperse is a trait that has interested ecologists for many years. Now that so many species and ecosystems face major environmental threats from habitat fragmentation and global climate change, the ability of species to adapt to these changes by dispersing, migrating, or moving between patches of habitat can be crucial to ensuring their survival. This book provides a timely and wide-ranging overview of the study of dispersal and incorporates much of the latest research. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of dispersal at the individual, population, species and community levels are considered. The potential of new techniques and models for studying dispersal, drawn from molecular biology and demography, is also explored. Perspectives and insights are offered from the fields of evolution, conservation biology and genetics. Throughout the book, theoretical approaches are combined with empirical data, and care has been taken to include examples from as wide a range of species as possible.

  19. Modeling radiation belt radial diffusion in ULF wave fields: 1. Quantifying ULF wave power at geosynchronous orbit in observations and in global MHD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chia-Lin; Spence, Harlan E.; Singer, Howard J.; Hughes, W. Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    To provide critical ULF wave field information for radial diffusion studies in the radiation belts, we quantify ULF wave power (f = 0.5-8.3 mHz) in GOES observations and magnetic field predictions from a global magnetospheric model. A statistical study of 9 years of GOES data reveals the wave local time distribution and power at geosynchronous orbit in field-aligned coordinates as functions of wave frequency, solar wind conditions (Vx, ΔPd and IMF Bz) and geomagnetic activity levels (Kp, Dst and AE). ULF wave power grows monotonically with increasing solar wind Vx, dynamic pressure variations ΔPd and geomagnetic indices in a highly correlated way. During intervals of northward and southward IMF Bz, wave activity concentrates on the dayside and nightside sectors, respectively, due to different wave generation mechanisms in primarily open and closed magnetospheric configurations. Since global magnetospheric models have recently been used to trace particles in radiation belt studies, it is important to quantify the wave predictions of these models at frequencies relevant to electron dynamics (mHz range). Using 27 days of real interplanetary conditions as model inputs, we examine the ULF wave predictions modeled by the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry magnetohydrodynamic code. The LFM code does well at reproducing, in a statistical sense, the ULF waves observed by GOES. This suggests that the LFM code is capable of modeling variability in the magnetosphere on ULF time scales during typical conditions. The code provides a long-missing wave field model needed to quantify the interaction of radiation belt electrons with realistic, global ULF waves throughout the inner magnetosphere.

  20. Increased range of ultrasonic guided wave testing of overhead transmission line cables using dispersion compensation.

    PubMed

    Legg, Mathew; Yücel, Mehmet K; Kappatos, Vassilios; Selcuk, Cem; Gan, Tat-Hean

    2015-09-01

    Overhead Transmission Line (OVTL) cables can experience structural defects and are, therefore, inspected using Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) techniques. Ultrasonic Guided Waves (UGW) is one NDT technique that has been investigated for inspection of these cables. For practical use, it is desirable to be able to inspect as long a section of cable as possible from a single location. This paper investigates increasing the UGW inspection range on Aluminium Conductor Steel Reinforced (ACSR) cables by compensating for dispersion using dispersion curve data. For ACSR cables, it was considered to be difficult to obtain accurate dispersion curves using modelling due to the complex geometry and unknown coupling between wire strands. Group velocity dispersion curves were, therefore, measured experimentally on an untensioned, 26.5m long cable and a method of calculating theoretical dispersion curves was obtained. Attenuation and dispersion compensation were then performed for a broadband Maximum Length Sequence (MLS) excitation signal. An increase in the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of about 4-8dB compared to that of the dispersed signal was obtained. However, the main benefit was the increased ability to resolve the individual echoes from the end of the cable and an introduced defect in the form of a cut, which was 7 to at least 13dB greater than that of the dispersed signal. Five echoes were able to be clearly detected using MLS excitation signal, indicating the potential for an inspection range of up to 130m in each direction. To the best of the authors knowledge, this is the longest inspection range for ACSR cables reported in the literature, where typically cables, which were only one or two meter long, have been investigated previously. Narrow band tone burst and Hann windowed tone burst excitation signal also showed increased SNR and ability to resolve closely spaced echoes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Lamb wave dispersion in a PZT/metal/PZT sandwich plate with imperfect interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Ilkay; Akbarov, Surkay D.; Sezer, Semih

    2016-07-01

    The Lamb wave dispersion in a PZT/Metal/PZT sandwich plate is investigated by employing the exact linear equations of electro-elastic waves in piezoelectric materials within the scope of the plane-strain state. It is assumed that at the interfaces between the piezoelectric face layers and metal core layer, shear-spring and normal-spring type imperfect conditions are satisfied. The degree of this imperfectness is estimated through the corresponding shear-spring and normal-spring type parameters which appear in the contact condition characterizing the transverse and normal displacements' discontinuity. The corresponding dispersion equation is derived, and as a result of the numerical solution to this equation, the dispersion curves are constructed for the first and second lowest modes in the cases where the material of the face layers is PZT and the material of the middle layer is Steel (St). Consequently, for the PZT/St/PZT sandwich plate, the study of the influence of the problem parameters such as the piezoelectric and dielectric constants, layer thickness ratios, non-dimensional shear-spring, and normal-spring type parameters, is carried out. In particular, it is established that the imperfectness of the contact between the layers of the plate causes a decrease in the values of the wave propagation velocity.

  2. A theoretical study of wave dispersion and thermal conduction for HMX/additive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2014-04-01

    The wave dispersion rule for non-uniform material is useful for ultrasonic inspection and engine life prediction, and also is key in achieving an understanding of the energy dissipation and thermal conduction properties of solid material. On the basis of linear response theory and molecular dynamics, we derive a set of formulas for calculating the wave dispersion rate of interface systems, and study four kinds of interfaces inside plastic bonded explosives: HMX/{HMX, TATB, F2312, F2313}. (HMX: octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine; TATB: 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene; F2312, F2313: fluoropolymers). The wave dispersion rate is obtained over a wide frequency range from kHz to PHz. We find that at low frequency, the rate is proportional to the square of the frequency, and at high frequency, the rate couples with the molecular vibration modes at the interface. By using the results, the thermal conductivities of HMX/additive interfaces are derived, and a physical model is built for describing the total thermal conductivity of mixture explosives, including HMX multi-particle systems and {TATB, F2312, F2313}-coated HMX.

  3. Long-range dispersal, stochasticity and the broken accelerating wave of advance.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, G S; Sluckin, T J

    2014-12-24

    Rare long distance dispersal events are thought to have a disproportionate impact on the spread of invasive species. Modelling using integrodifference equations suggests that, when long distance contacts are represented by a fat-tailed dispersal kernel, an accelerating wave of advance can ensue. Invasions spreading in this manner could have particularly dramatic effects. Recently, various authors have suggested that demographic stochasticity disrupts wave acceleration. Integrodifference models have been widely used in movement ecology, and as such a clearer understanding of stochastic effects is needed. Here, we present a stochastic non-linear one-dimensional lattice model in which demographic stochasticity and the dispersal regime can be systematically varied. Extensive simulations show that stochasticity has a profound effect on model behaviour, and usually breaks acceleration for fat-tailed kernels. Exceptions are seen for some power law kernels, K(l)∝|l|(-β) with β<3, for which acceleration persists despite stochasticity. Such kernels lack a second moment and are important in 'accelerating' phenomena such as Lévy flights. Furthermore, for long-range kernels the approach to the continuum limit behaviour as stochasticity is reduced is generally slow. Given that real-world populations are finite, stochastic models may give better predictive power when long-range dispersal is important. Insights from mean-field models such as integrodifference equations should be applied with caution in such circumstances. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Biophysical Origin of Traveling-Wave Dispersion in the Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Zha, Ding-Jun; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2010-01-01

    Sound processing begins at the peripheral auditory system, where it undergoes a highly complex transformation and spatial separation of the frequency components inside the cochlea. This sensory signal processing constitutes a neurophysiological basis for psychoacoustics. Wave propagation in the cochlea, as shown by measurements of basilar membrane velocity and auditory nerve responses to sound, has demonstrated significant frequency modulation (dispersion), in addition to tonotopic gain and active amplification. The physiological and physical basis for this dispersion remains elusive. In this article, a simple analytical model is presented, along with experimental validation using physiological measurements from guinea pigs, to identify the origin of traveling-wave dispersion in the cochlea. We show that dispersion throughout the cochlea is fundamentally due to the coupled fluid-structure interaction between the basilar membrane and the scala fluids. It is further influenced by the variation in physical and geometrical properties of the basilar membrane, the sensitivity or gain of the hearing organ, and the relative dominance of the compression mode at about one-third octave beyond the best frequency. PMID:20858412

  5. Dispersion reducing methods for edge discretizations of the electric vector wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokil, V. A.; Gibson, N. L.; Gyrya, V.; McGregor, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel strategy for minimizing the numerical dispersion error in edge discretizations of the time-domain electric vector wave equation on square meshes based on the mimetic finite difference (MFD) method. We compare this strategy, called M-adaptation, to two other discretizations, also based on square meshes. One is the lowest order Nédélec edge element discretization. The other is a modified quadrature approach (GY-adaptation) proposed by Guddati and Yue for the acoustic wave equation in two dimensions. All three discrete methods use the same edge-based degrees of freedom, while the temporal discretization is performed using the standard explicit Leapfrog scheme. To obtain efficient and explicit time stepping methods, the three schemes are further mass lumped. We perform a dispersion and stability analysis for the presented schemes and compare all three methods in terms of their stability regions and phase error. Our results indicate that the method produced by GY-adaptation and the Nédélec method are both second order accurate for numerical dispersion, but differ in the order of their numerical anisotropy (fourth order, versus second order, respectively). The result of M-adaptation is a discretization that is fourth order accurate for numerical dispersion as well as numerical anisotropy. Numerical simulations are provided that illustrate the theoretical results.

  6. Variation in the dispersion of axisymmetric waves in infinite circular rods with crystallographic wire texture

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, T.A. )

    1999-09-01

    This paper presents the solution to the frequency equation for a number of polycrystalline, textured circular rods having transverse isotropy. The effective, second-order elastic stiffness tensors were estimated using the recursive general Hill arithmetic mean (GHAM). The velocity dispersion curves for a number of combinations of materials and crystallographic fiber or wire textures were calculated and the variation due to texture displayed. At large wavelengths, the velocity dispersion of fiber textured materials exhibits a lowest-order axisymmetric mode which varies only with the directional Poisson[close quote]s ratios in a manner similar to that of isotropic aggregates. In this wavelength regime, the waves propagate nondispersively at the wave speed, C[sub 0], as dictated by the directional Young[close quote]s modulus. At wavelengths smaller than the rod radius, the dispersion curves were more influenced by the full anisotropy of the wire textures. At these wavelengths, the dispersion curves for the anisotropic materials deviated significantly from those of the isotropic materials and one another with the higher axisymmetric vibration modes exhibiting extreme differences. This deviation is a function of the single crystal anisotropy and nature of the wire textures. < --[AN] -->

  7. Dispersion calculation method based on S-transform and coordinate rotation for Love channel waves with two components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Zhang, Yugui

    2017-08-01

    Dispersion analysis is an important part of in-seam seismic data processing, and the calculation accuracy of the dispersion curve directly influences pickup errors of channel wave travel time. To extract an accurate channel wave dispersion curve from in-seam seismic two-component signals, we proposed a time-frequency analysis method based on single-trace signal processing; in addition, we formulated a dispersion calculation equation, based on S-transform, with a freely adjusted filter window width. To unify the azimuth of seismic wave propagation received by a two-component geophone, the original in-seam seismic data undergoes coordinate rotation. The rotation angle can be calculated based on P-wave characteristics, with high energy in the wave propagation direction and weak energy in the vertical direction. With this angle acquisition, a two-component signal can be converted to horizontal and vertical directions. Because Love channel waves have a particle vibration track perpendicular to the wave propagation direction, the signal in the horizontal and vertical directions is mainly Love channel waves. More accurate dispersion characters of Love channel waves can be extracted after the coordinate rotation of two-component signals.

  8. Analysis of group-velocity dispersion of high-frequency Rayleigh waves for near-surface applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear (S)-wave velocity profile using the dispersive characteristic of Rayleigh waves. Most MASW researchers mainly apply Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity dispersion for S-wave velocity estimation with a few exceptions applying Rayleigh-wave group-velocity dispersion. Herein, we first compare sensitivities of fundamental surface-wave phase velocities with group velocities with three four-layer models including a low-velocity layer or a high-velocity layer. Then synthetic data are simulated by a finite difference method. Images of group-velocity dispersive energy of the synthetic data are generated using the Multiple Filter Analysis (MFA) method. Finally we invert a high-frequency surface-wave group-velocity dispersion curve of a real-world example. Results demonstrate that (1) the sensitivities of group velocities are higher than those of phase velocities and usable frequency ranges are wider than that of phase velocities, which is very helpful in improving inversion stability because for a stable inversion system, small changes in phase velocities do not result in a large fluctuation in inverted S-wave velocities; (2) group-velocity dispersive energy can be measured using single-trace data if Rayleigh-wave fundamental-mode energy is dominant, which suggests that the number of shots required in data acquisition can be dramatically reduced and the horizontal resolution can be greatly improved using analysis of group-velocity dispersion; and (3) the suspension logging results of the real-world example demonstrate that inversion of group velocities generated by the MFA method can successfully estimate near-surface S-wave velocities. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Micropolar dissipative models for the analysis of 2D dispersive waves in periodic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, H.; Ganghoffer, J. F.; Lakiss, H.

    2017-03-01

    The computation of the dispersion relations for dissipative periodic lattices having the attributes of metamaterials is an actual research topic raising the interest of researchers in the field of acoustics and wave propagation phenomena. We analyze in this contribution the impact of wave damping on the dispersion features of periodic lattices, which are modeled as beam-lattices. The band diagram structure and damping ratio are computed for different repetitive lattices, based on the homogenized continuum response of the initially discrete lattice architecture, modeled as Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic beams. Three of these lattices (reentrant hexagonal, chiral diamond, hexachiral lattice) are auxetic metamaterials, since they show negative Poisson's ratio. The effective viscoelastic anisotropic continuum behavior of the lattices is first computed in terms of the homogenized stiffness and viscosity matrices, based on the discrete homogenization technique. The dynamical equations of motion are obtained for an equivalent homogenized micropolar continuum evaluated based on the homogenized properties, and the dispersion relation and damping ratio are obtained by inserting an harmonic plane waves Ansatz into these equations. The comparison of the acoustic properties obtained in the low frequency range for the four considered lattices shows that auxetic lattices attenuate waves at lower frequencies compared to the classical hexagonal lattice. The diamond chiral lattice shows the best attenuation properties of harmonic waves over the entire Brillouin zone, and the hexachiral lattice presents better acoustic properties than the reentrant hexagonal lattice. The range of validity of the effective continuum obtained by the discrete homogenization has been assessed by comparing the frequency band structure of this continuum with that obtained by a Floquet-Bloch analysis.

  10. MHD Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R F; Fasoli, A; Testa, D; Sharapov, S; Berk, H L; Breizman, B; Gondhalekar, A; Mantsinen, M

    2004-03-23

    Experiments are conducted on the JET tokamak to assess the diagnostic potential of MHD active and passive spectroscopy, for the plasma bulk and its suprathermal components, using Alfv{acute e}n Eigenmodes (AEs) excited by external antennas and by energetic particles. The measurements of AE frequencies and mode numbers give information on the bulk plasma. Improved equilibrium reconstruction, in particular in terms of radial profiles of density and safety factor, is possible from the comparison between the antenna driven spectrum and that calculated theoretically. Details of the time evolution of the non-monotonic safety factor profile in advanced scenarios can be reconstructed from the frequency of ICRH-driven energetic particle modes. The plasma effective mass can be inferred from the resonant frequency of externally driven AEs in discharges with similar equilibrium profiles. The stability thresholds and the nonlinear development of the instabilities can give clues on energy and spatial distribution of the fast particle population. The presence of unstable AEs provides lower limits in the energy of ICRH generated fast ion tails. Fast ion pressure gradients and their evolution can be inferred from the stability of AEs at different plasma radial positions. Finally, the details of the AE spectrum in the nonlinear stage can be used to obtain information about the fast particle velocity space diffusion.

  11. Crustal thickness estimates for Baja California, Sonora, and Sinaloa, Mexico, using disperse surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Pineda, Leobardo; Rebollar, Cecilio J.; Quintanar, Luis

    2007-04-01

    Dispersed surface waves of regional events recorded at Network of Autonomously Recording Seismographs (NARS)-Baja and Red Sísmica de Banda Ancha (RESBAN) networks located over the Baja California Peninsula, Sonora, and Sinaloa, Mexico, were used to estimate shear wave elastic models and crustal thickness. We analyzed fundamental modes of surface waves with period between 10 and 40 s. Multiple filter analysis and the inversion method described by Herrmann and Ammon (2003) was used. Crustal thickness estimates for the Peninsular Ranges of Northern Baja California agree with those obtained by previous studies in the Peninsular Ranges of Northern Baja California. We analyzed dispersion of surface waves with northwest-southeast travel paths along the east and west sides of the Baja California Peninsula as well as a northwest-southeast travel path along the western sides of the Mexican states of Sonora and Sinaloa. It was found that the crustal structure east of the Baja California Peninsula is similar to the structure of Sonora and Sinaloa. The correlation between those two structures suggests dextral offset of the order of 275 ± 25 km if we consider Baja California Peninsula as a rigid body moving toward the northwest relative to the North America plate. This displacement between the structures is in agreement with the displacement determined by the dating of Miocene deposits located in San Felipe on the Baja California Peninsula (Pacific plate), and Isle Tiburon located west of Sonora (North America plate).

  12. Simplified dispersion relationships for fluid-dominated axisymmetric wave motion in buried fluid-filled pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan; Sui, Fusheng; Muggleton, Jennifer M.; Yang, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The dispersion characteristics of axisymmetric (n=0) waves offer a way to gain physical insight into the low-frequency vibrational behaviour of underground pipe systems. Whilst these can be found in the literature, they are generally calculated numerically. Coupled equations of motion for the n=0 waves that propagate in a buried fluid-filled pipe are presented in this paper and, from this, an analytical solution is developed for the fluid-dominated (s=1) wavenumber. The effect of the frictional stress at the pipe-soil interface on the dispersion behaviour of the s=1 wave is characterised by adopting a soil loading matrix. Overall, the fluid loading has a greater effect on the propagation wavespeed compared with the soil loading: for metal pipes, the effect of soil loading is negligible; for plastic pipes, however, simply neglecting the effect of soil loading can lead to a considerable underestimation in the calculation of the wavespeed. The wave attenuation increases significantly at higher frequencies regardless of pipe material resulting from the added damping due to radiation into the soil. Theoretical predictions of the s=1 wavenumber are compared with experimental data measured on an MDPE water pipe. The degree of agreement between prediction and experiment makes clear that, although the wavespeed is only slightly affected by the presence of the frictional stress, the frictional stress at the pipe-soil interface needs to be appropriately taken into account for attenuation predictions.

  13. Nonlinear coupling of left and right handed circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R. P. Sharma, Swati Gaur, Nidhi

    2014-07-15

    The nonlinear phenomena are of prominent interests in understanding the particle acceleration and transportation in the interplanetary space. The ponderomotive nonlinearity causing the filamentation of the parallel propagating circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave having a finite frequency may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the heating of the plasmas. The contribution will be different of the left (L) handed mode, the right (R) handed mode, and the mix mode. The contribution also depends upon the finite frequency of the circularly polarized waves. In the present paper, we have investigated the effect of the nonlinear coupling of the L and R circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave on the localized structures formation and the respective power spectra. The dynamical equations are derived in the presence of the ponderomotive nonlinearity of the L and R pumps and then studied semi-analytically as well as numerically. The ponderomotive nonlinearity accounts for the nonlinear coupling between both the modes. In the presence of the adiabatic response of the density fluctuations, the nonlinear dynamical equations satisfy the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The equations thus obtained are solved in solar wind regime to study the coupling effect on localization and the power spectra. The effect of coupling is also studied on Faraday rotation and ellipticity of the wave caused due to the difference in the localization of the left and the right modes with the distance of propagation.

  14. Propagation and dispersion of transverse wave trains in magnetic flux tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, R.; Terradas, J.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    The dispersion of small-amplitude, impulsively excited wave trains propagating along a magnetic flux tube is investigated. The initial disturbance is a localized transverse displacement of the tube that excites a fast kink wave packet. The spatial and temporal evolution of the perturbed variables (density, plasma displacement, velocity, ...) is given by an analytical expression containing an integral that is computed numerically. We find that the dispersion of fast kink wave trains is more important for shorter initial disturbances (i.e., more concentrated in the longitudinal direction) and for larger density ratios (i.e., for larger contrasts of the tube density with respect to the environment density). This type of excitation generates a wave train whose signature at a fixed position along a coronal loop is a short event (duration ≅ 20 s) in which the velocity and density oscillate very rapidly with typical periods of the order of a few seconds. The oscillatory period is not constant but gradually declines during the course of this event. Peak values of the velocity are of the order of 10 km s{sup –1} and are accompanied by maximum density variations of the order of 10%-15% the unperturbed loop density.

  15. Rayleigh wave dispersion curve inversion by using particle swarm optimization and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyuk, Ersin; Zor, Ekrem; Karaman, Abdullah

    2017-04-01

    Inversion of surface wave dispersion curves with its highly nonlinear nature has some difficulties using traditional linear inverse methods due to the need and strong dependence to the initial model, possibility of trapping in local minima and evaluation of partial derivatives. There are some modern global optimization methods to overcome of these difficulties in surface wave analysis such as Genetic algorithm (GA) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). GA is based on biologic evolution consisting reproduction, crossover and mutation operations, while PSO algorithm developed after GA is inspired from the social behaviour of birds or fish of swarms. Utility of these methods require plausible convergence rate, acceptable relative error and optimum computation cost that are important for modelling studies. Even though PSO and GA processes are similar in appearence, the cross-over operation in GA is not used in PSO and the mutation operation is a stochastic process for changing the genes within chromosomes in GA. Unlike GA, the particles in PSO algorithm changes their position with logical velocities according to particle's own experience and swarm's experience. In this study, we applied PSO algorithm to estimate S wave velocities and thicknesses of the layered earth model by using Rayleigh wave dispersion curve and also compared these results with GA and we emphasize on the advantage of using PSO algorithm for geophysical modelling studies considering its rapid convergence, low misfit error and computation cost.

  16. Measurement of Thermal Effects in the Dispersion Relation of the Dust Acoustic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyng, Joshua; Williams, Jeremiah

    2016-10-01

    A complex or dusty plasma is a four-component plasma system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of these charged microparticles reveals different plasma phenomena, including a new wave mode known as the dust acoustic, or dust density, wave (DAW). The DAW is a low frequency, longitudinal mode that propagates through the microparticle component of the dusty plasma system and is self-excited by the energy from the ions streaming through this component. In recent years the DAW has been the subject of intense study and has provided a way to examine the thermal properties of the microparticle component. In this presentation, we report the results of an experimental study examining the thermal effects in the dispersion relation of this wave mode over a range of neutral gas pressures.

  17. A comprehensive dispersion model of surface wave phase and group velocity for the globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhitu; Masters, Guy; Laske, Gabi; Pasyanos, Michael

    2014-10-01

    A new method is developed to measure Rayleigh- and Love-wave phase velocities globally using a cluster analysis technique. This method clusters similar waveforms recorded at different stations from a single event and allows users to make measurements on hundreds of waveforms, which are filtered at a series of frequency ranges, at the same time. It also requires minimal amount of user interaction and allows easy assessment of the data quality. This method produces a large amount of phase delay measurements in a manageable time frame. Because there is a strong trade-off between the isotropic part of the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity and azimuthal anisotropy, we include the effect of azimuthal anisotropy in our inversions in order to obtain reliable isotropic phase velocity. We use b-splines to combine these isotropic phase velocity maps with our previous group velocity maps to produce an internally consistent global surface wave dispersion model.

  18. Dispersion-compensated beam-splitting of femtosecond light pulses: Wave optics analysis.

    PubMed

    Mínguez-Vega, Gladys; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Fernández-Alonso, Mercedes; Climent, Vicent; Lancis, Jesús; Caraquitena, José; Andrés, Pedro

    2007-01-22

    Recently, using parageometrical optics concepts, a hybrid, diffractive-refractive, lens triplet has been suggested to significantly improve the spatiotemporal resolution of light spots in multifocal processing with femtosecond laser pulses. Here, we carry out a rigorous wave-optics analysis, including the spatiotemporal nature of the wave equation, to elucidate both the spatial extent of the diffractive spots and the temporal duration of the pulse at the output plane. Specifically, we show nearly transform-limited behavior of diffraction maxima. Moreover, the temporal broadening of the pulse is related to the group velocity dispersion, which can be pre-compensated for in practical applications. Finally, some numerical simulations of the spatiotemporal wave field at the output plane in a realistic case are provided.

  19. Effects of viscosity and constraints on the dispersion and dissipation of waves in large blood vessels. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E.; Anliker, M.; Chang, I.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the effects of blood viscosity on dissipation as well as dispersion of small waves in arteries and veins by means of a parametric study. A linearized analysis of axisymmetric waves in a cylindrical membrane that contains a viscous fluid indicates that there are two families of waves: a family of slow waves and one of fast waves. The faster waves are shown to be more sensitive to variations in the elastic properties of the medium surrounding the blood vessels and at high values of the frequency parameter alpha. At low values of alpha the effects of viscosity on attenuation are reversed.

  20. Effects of viscosity and constraints on the dispersion and dissipation of waves in large blood vessels. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E.; Anliker, M.; Chang, I.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the effects of blood viscosity on dissipation as well as dispersion of small waves in arteries and veins by means of a parametric study. A linearized analysis of axisymmetric waves in a cylindrical membrane that contains a viscous fluid indicates that there are two families of waves: a family of slow waves and one of fast waves. The faster waves are shown to be more sensitive to variations in the elastic properties of the medium surrounding the blood vessels and at high values of the frequency parameter alpha. At low values of alpha the effects of viscosity on attenuation are reversed.

  1. MHD Power Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Arthur; Rosa, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the operation of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator and advantages of the system over coal, oil or nuclear powered generators. Details the development of MHD generators in the United States and Soviet Union. (CP)

  2. MHD Power Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Arthur; Rosa, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the operation of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator and advantages of the system over coal, oil or nuclear powered generators. Details the development of MHD generators in the United States and Soviet Union. (CP)

  3. Crust and upper mantle shear wave structure of Northeast Algeria from Rayleigh wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radi, Zohir; Yelles-Chaouche, Abdelkrim; Corchete, Victor; Guettouche, Salim

    2017-09-01

    We resolve the crust and upper mantle structure beneath Northeast Algeria at depths of 0-400 km, using inversion of fundamental mode Rayleigh wave. Our data set consists of 490 earthquakes recorded between 2007 and 2014 by five permanent broadband seismic stations in the study area. Applying a combination of different filtering technics and inversion method shear wave velocities structure were determined as functions of depth. The resolved changes in Vs at 50 km depth are in perfect agreement with crustal thickness estimates, which reflect the study area's orogenic setting, partly overlying the collision zone between the African and Eurasian plates. The inferred Moho discontinuity depths are close to those estimated for other convergent areas. In addition, there is good agreement between our results and variations in orientations of regional seismic anisotropy. At depths of 80-180 km, negative Vs anomalies at station CBBR suggest the existence of a failed subduction slab.

  4. Spreading of electron scale magnetic reconnection with a wave number dependent speed due to the propagation of dispersive waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we study electron scale spreading of localized magnetic reconnection in the presence of a guide magnetic field, however, without the influence of ions and cross-scale coupling. These fundamental physics studies will help to understand the coupling of the electron scale spreading with the ion scales in real systems. An electron-magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model is employed to model the physics at electron scales. Three dimensional EMHD simulations and linear eigen mode analysis are performed for different guide field strengths. The simulations show a wave-like bi-directional spreading of magnetic reconnection at electron scales. The electron scale spreading, however, unlike the ion scale spreading by Alfvén waves, is caused by the uni- and bi-directional propagation of the dispersive flow induced and whistler wave modes, respectively. The dispersive nature of the two wave modes makes the spreading-speed dependent on the wave numbers of the unstable tearing mode, which depend on the thickness of the electron current sheet and the strength of the guide field. A model of the speed of spreading is developed, in which the spreading-speeds parallel and anti-parallel to the guide field are given by linear combinations of the group speeds of the two wave modes. The model prediction of the spreading speeds agrees well with the speeds obtained from the simulation results. For small guide fields, the spreading is asymmetric being faster in the direction of the electron flow. On increasing the guide field, the spreading becomes increasingly symmetric, with the speeds of the order of electron Alfvén speed in the guide magnetic field, due to the dominance of the whistler group speed in determining the speed of the spreading. As a consequence of the asymmetric spreading, the chain of alternate X- and O-points, formed due the growth of oblique tearing modes, extends farther in the direction of electron flow as compared to that in the direction of the guide magnetic

  5. Development of Surface Wave Dispersion and Attenuation Maps and Improved Methods for Measuring Surface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-30

    waves at KNET stations due to Lop Nor explosions .........................26 3.6. 3D Calculations of Lop Nor to KNET and comparison with the Born...out of Lop Nor. Right – same, but the velocity model has been smoothed by modeling it as a bilinear rather than piecewise discontinuous function...attributed to the effects of the propagation near the basin boundary. ............ 25 Figure 3.10. Paths (top) and data (bottom) for the Lop Nor explosion of

  6. Dispersion analysis of Lamb waves and damage detection for aluminum structures using ridge in the time-scale domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fucai; Meng, Guang; Ye, Lin; Lu, Ye; Kageyama, Kazuro

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, the dispersion of Lamb waves in aluminum structures was systematically analyzed to differentiate the mode of each package in Lamb wave signals and localize damage. Piezoelectric transducers were bonded on the surfaces of aluminum structures, functioning as actuator and sensor to excite and acquire Lamb waves, respectively. Wavelet transform was applied to the acquired Lamb wave signals, in which the optimal mother wavelet was selected using the concept of Shannon entropy to obtain the most accurate location of each wave package. The ridge and contour of the Lamb wave signals in the time-scale domain were obtained to distinguish the mode of each wave package and pinpoint these packages for estimating the actual group velocities of dispersion curves and localizing damage. The proposed approach could help search the actual dispersion curves in the excitation frequency band by using only one Lamb wave signal. Ridges in the time-scale domain and the actual group velocities were further used to identify damage in the structures. Results demonstrate that the proposed approaches were effective in dispersion analysis, wave mode differentiation and damage localization.

  7. Low velocity normal fault structures associated with intermediate depth seismicity - insights from body wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, T.; Rietbrock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Low velocity structures in the upper slab have been inferred from guided wave studies (e.g Abers 2000) and subsequently resolved by a number of geophysical methods including receiver function analyses and high resolution seismic tomography . These low velocity structures are potentially explained by the presence of hydrous mineral assemblages in the subducted oceanic crust. This supports the long proposed theory that mineral dehydration during subduction may weaken the crust and allow for intermediate depth seismicity. Recently it has been proposed that normal faulting in the slab may provide a mechanism for hydration deep in the slab, as stress changes due to slab bending promotes the downward pumping of fluids (Faccenda et al. 2009). At greater depth, the reactivation of outer rise normal faults has been postulated by Ranero et al. (2005) as a cause Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity. However there is no direct seismological evidence of normal faults at intermediate depths. Here we present seismic evidence that these faults are in fact associated with low velocities, possibly caused by hydrous minerals or the presence of fluids. We analyse dispersive P-wave arrivals from intermediate depth events in Northern Japan. Finite difference wave propagation models are used to constrain the structure related to this dispersion. Dispersion of deeper events (>150 km) can be explained by a low velocity layer (LVL) at the top of the slab acting as a waveguide. This LVL has a thickness of ~8 km, and a 5 - 12% reduction in velocity. Shallower events (70 - 150 km depth) that occur well below the top of the slab also show dispersion. This cannot be attributed to the upper LVL as the event must be on or near to the waveguide for dispersion to occur. Numerical modeling shows that these shallower dispersive events can be explained by very low velocity structures dipping with a normal fault geometry. We propose that these dipping planes might indicate hydrated material along normal

  8. Dispersive wave emission and supercontinuum generation in a silicon wire waveguide pumped around the 1550 nm telecommunication wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, François; Gorza, Simon-Pierre; Safioui, Jassem; Kockaert, Pascal; Coen, Stéphane; Dave, Utsav; Kuyken, Bart; Roelkens, Gunther

    2014-06-01

    We experimentally and numerically study dispersive wave emission, soliton fission and supercontinuum generation in a silicon wire at telecommunication wavelengths. Through dispersion engineering, we experimentally confirm a previously reported numerical study [1] and show that the emission of resonant radiation from the solitons can lead to the generation of a supercontinuum spanning over 500 nm. An excellent agreement with numerical simulations is observed.

  9. Modeling blast waves, gas and particles dispersion in urban and hilly ground areas.

    PubMed

    Hank, S; Saurel, R; Le Métayer, O; Lapébie, E

    2014-09-15

    The numerical simulation of shock and blast waves as well as particles dispersion in highly heterogeneous media such as cities, urban places, industrial plants and part of countries is addressed. Examples of phenomena under study are chemical gas products dispersion from damaged vessels, gas dispersion in urban places under explosion conditions, shock wave propagation in urban environment. A three-dimensional simulation multiphase flow code (HI2LO) is developed in this aim. To simplify the consideration of complex geometries, a heterogeneous discrete formulation is developed. When dealing with large scale domains, such as countries, the topography is considered with the help of elevation data. Meteorological conditions are also considered, in particular regarding complex temperature and wind profiles. Heat and mass transfers on sub-scale objects, such as buildings, trees and other obstacles are considered as well. Particles motion is addressed through a new turbulence model involving a single parameter to describe accurately plumes. Validations against experiments in basic situations are presented as well as examples of industrial and environmental computations.

  10. Anisotropy in the Pacific upper mantle from inversion of a surface-wave dispersion dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy, C. L.; Ekstrom, G.; Nettles, M.; Gaherty, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    We present work towards a three-dimensional model of the anisotropic velocity structure of the Pacific upper mantle. Models of seismic anisotropy in oceanic regions provide important constraints on the geometry of strain in the mantle, the nature of the lithosphere-asthenosphere transition, and the possible presence of partial melt in the asthenosphere. The goal of this work is to produce a three-dimensional model of isotropic and anisotropic velocities in the Pacific, which will improve constraints on olivine fabrics and strain geometries in the oceanic upper mantle. Measurements of fundamental-mode dispersion for Rayleigh and Love waves traversing oceanic paths are drawn from the waveform dataset used to construct the global dispersion model GDM52. We develop anisotropic phase-velocity maps of the Pacific basin for Rayleigh and Love waves between 25 s and 250 s and invert the phase-velocity maps for anisotropic velocity structure at depth. The resulting models are radially anisotropic and include the G parameters that are related to the azimuthal anisotropy of vSV. We compare results of these two-step inversions with direct inversions of fundamental-mode phase anomalies for three-dimensional anisotropic structure. In much of the central and western Pacific, vertical gradients in both vS and anisotropy are consistent with the transition from rigid lithosphere to viscously deforming asthenosphere. In future work we plan to incorporate waveform data providing constraints on higher-mode dispersion in the modeling of the three-dimensional anisotropic structure.

  11. Gravitational-wave detection by dispersion force modulation in nanoscale parametric amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrizio, Pinto

    2016-05-01

    Two infinite parallel plane slabs separated by a gap alter the zero-point-energy of the matter-electromagnetic field system. Generally speaking, the corresponding interaction depends on the reflection properties of the boundaries, and therefore on the dielectric functions of both the slab and gap materials, on the gap width, and on the absolute temperature of the system. Importantly, it is known experimentally that dispersion forces can be modulated in time. This can be achieved by mechanically varying the gap width so as to introduce parametric oscillations. Much more fundamentally, however, dispersion forces can be altered by acting on the dielectric functions involved as is the case in semiconductors. In the optical analogy, a gravitational wave introduces an additional time dependence of the effective gap dielectric function. These elements, already confirmed by direct experimentation or predicted from the Lifshitz theory, support the design of a novel approach to ground-based nanoscale gravitational wave detection based on parametric amplification driven by dispersion force modulation.

  12. A theory for narrow-banded radio bursts at Uranus - MHD surface waves as an energy driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Curtis, S. A.; Desch, M. D.; Lepping, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A possible scenario for the generation of the narrow-banded radio bursts detected at Uranus by the Voyager 2 planetary radio astronomy experiment is described. In order to account for the emission burstiness which occurs on time scales of hundreds of milliseconds, it is proposed that ULF magnetic surface turbulence generated at the frontside magnetopause propagates down the open/closed field line boundary and mode-converts to kinetic Alfven waves (KAW) deep within the polar cusp. The oscillating KAW potentials then drive a transient electron stream that creates the bursty radio emission. To substantiate these ideas, Voyager 2 magnetometer measurements of enhanced ULF magnetic activity at the frontside magnetopause are shown. It is demonstrated analytically that such magnetic turbulence should mode-convert deep in the cusp at a radial distance of 3 RU.

  13. A theory for narrow-banded radio bursts at Uranus - MHD surface waves as an energy driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Curtis, S. A.; Desch, M. D.; Lepping, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A possible scenario for the generation of the narrow-banded radio bursts detected at Uranus by the Voyager 2 planetary radio astronomy experiment is described. In order to account for the emission burstiness which occurs on time scales of hundreds of milliseconds, it is proposed that ULF magnetic surface turbulence generated at the frontside magnetopause propagates down the open/closed field line boundary and mode-converts to kinetic Alfven waves (KAW) deep within the polar cusp. The oscillating KAW potentials then drive a transient electron stream that creates the bursty radio emission. To substantiate these ideas, Voyager 2 magnetometer measurements of enhanced ULF magnetic activity at the frontside magnetopause are shown. It is demonstrated analytically that such magnetic turbulence should mode-convert deep in the cusp at a radial distance of 3 RU.

  14. Bridging Three Orders of Magnitude: Multiple Scattered Waves Sense Fractal Microscopic Structures via Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Simon A; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Nordsletten, David; Michler, Christian; Juge, Lauriane; Serfaty, Jean-Michel; Bilston, Lynne; Guzina, Bojan; Holm, Sverre; Sinkus, Ralph

    2015-08-28

    Wave scattering provides profound insight into the structure of matter. Typically, the ability to sense microstructure is determined by the ratio of scatterer size to probing wavelength. Here, we address the question of whether macroscopic waves can report back the presence and distribution of microscopic scatterers despite several orders of magnitude difference in scale between wavelength and scatterer size. In our analysis, monosized hard scatterers 5  μm in radius are immersed in lossless gelatin phantoms to investigate the effect of multiple reflections on the propagation of shear waves with millimeter wavelength. Steady-state monochromatic waves are imaged in situ via magnetic resonance imaging, enabling quantification of the phase velocity at a voxel size big enough to contain thousands of individual scatterers, but small enough to resolve the wavelength. We show in theory, experiments, and simulations that the resulting coherent superposition of multiple reflections gives rise to power-law dispersion at the macroscopic scale if the scatterer distribution exhibits apparent fractality over an effective length scale that is comparable to the probing wavelength. Since apparent fractality is naturally present in any random medium, microstructure can thereby leave its fingerprint on the macroscopically quantifiable power-law exponent. Our results are generic to wave phenomena and carry great potential for sensing microstructure that exhibits intrinsic fractality, such as, for instance, vasculature.

  15. Composite materials stiffness determination and defects characterization using enhanced leaky Lamb wave dispersion data acquisition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mal, Ajit K.; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu

    1999-01-01

    The leaky Lamb wave (LLW) technique is approaching a maturity level that is making it an attractive quantitative NDE tool for composites and bonded joints. Since it was first observed in 1982, the phenomenon has been studied extensively, particularly in composite materials. The wave is induced by oblique insonification using a pitch-catch arrangement and the plate wave modes are detected by identifying minima in the reflected spectra to obtain the dispersion data. The wave behavior in multi-orientation laminates has ben well documented and corroborated experimentally with high accuracy. The sensitivity of the wave to the elastic constants of the material and to the boundary conditions led to the capability to measure the elastic properties of bonded joints. Recently, the authors significantly enhanced the LLW method's capability by increasing the speed of the data acquisition, the number of modes that can be identified and the accuracy of the data inversion. In spite of the theoretical and experimental progress, methods that employ oblique insonification of composites are still not being applied as standard industrial NDE methods. The authors investigated the issues that are hampering the transition of the LLW to industrial applications and identified 4 key issues. The current capability of the method and the nature of these issues are described in this paper.

  16. Composite Materials NDE Using Enhanced Leaky Lamb Wave Dispersion Data Acquisition Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mal, Ajit; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu

    1999-01-01

    The leaky Lamb wave (LLW) technique is approaching a maturity level that is making it an attractive quantitative NDE tool for composites and bonded joints. Since it was first observed in 1982, the phenomenon has been studied extensively, particularly in composite materials. The wave is induced by oblique insonification using a pitch-catch arrangement and the plate wave modes are detected by identifying minima in the reflected spectra to obtain the dispersion data. The wave behavior in multi-orientation laminates has been well documented and corroborated experimentally with high accuracy. The sensitivity of the wave to the elastic constants of the material and to the boundary conditions led to the capability to measure the elastic properties of bonded joints. Recently, the authors significantly enhanced the LLW method's capability by increasing the speed of the data acquisition, the number of modes that can be identified and the accuracy of the data inversion. In spite of the theoretical and experimental progress, methods that employ oblique insonification of composites are still not being applied as standard industrial NDE methods. The authors investigated the issues that are hampering the transition of the LLW to industrial applications and identified 4 key issues. The current capability of the method and the nature of these issues are described in this paper.

  17. Composite Materials NDE Using Enhanced Leaky Lamb Wave Dispersion Data Acquisition Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mal, Ajit; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu

    1999-01-01

    The leaky Lamb wave (LLW) technique is approaching a maturity level that is making it an attractive quantitative NDE tool for composites and bonded joints. Since it was first observed in 1982, the phenomenon has been studied extensively, particularly in composite materials. The wave is induced by oblique insonification using a pitch-catch arrangement and the plate wave modes are detected by identifying minima in the reflected spectra to obtain the dispersion data. The wave behavior in multi-orientation laminates has been well documented and corroborated experimentally with high accuracy. The sensitivity of the wave to the elastic constants of the material and to the boundary conditions led to the capability to measure the elastic properties of bonded joints. Recently, the authors significantly enhanced the LLW method's capability by increasing the speed of the data acquisition, the number of modes that can be identified and the accuracy of the data inversion. In spite of the theoretical and experimental progress, methods that employ oblique insonification of composites are still not being applied as standard industrial NDE methods. The authors investigated the issues that are hampering the transition of the LLW to industrial applications and identified 4 key issues. The current capability of the method and the nature of these issues are described in this paper.

  18. Bridging Three Orders of Magnitude: Multiple Scattered Waves Sense Fractal Microscopic Structures via Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Simon A.; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Nordsletten, David; Michler, Christian; Juge, Lauriane; Serfaty, Jean-Michel; Bilston, Lynne; Guzina, Bojan; Holm, Sverre; Sinkus, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    Wave scattering provides profound insight into the structure of matter. Typically, the ability to sense microstructure is determined by the ratio of scatterer size to probing wavelength. Here, we address the question of whether macroscopic waves can report back the presence and distribution of microscopic scatterers despite several orders of magnitude difference in scale between wavelength and scatterer size. In our analysis, monosized hard scatterers 5 μ m in radius are immersed in lossless gelatin phantoms to investigate the effect of multiple reflections on the propagation of shear waves with millimeter wavelength. Steady-state monochromatic waves are imaged in situ via magnetic resonance imaging, enabling quantification of the phase velocity at a voxel size big enough to contain thousands of individual scatterers, but small enough to resolve the wavelength. We show in theory, experiments, and simulations that the resulting coherent superposition of multiple reflections gives rise to power-law dispersion at the macroscopic scale if the scatterer distribution exhibits apparent fractality over an effective length scale that is comparable to the probing wavelength. Since apparent fractality is naturally present in any random medium, microstructure can thereby leave its fingerprint on the macroscopically quantifiable power-law exponent. Our results are generic to wave phenomena and carry great potential for sensing microstructure that exhibits intrinsic fractality, such as, for instance, vasculature.

  19. Microvasculature alters the dispersion properties of shear waves--a multi-frequency MR elastography study.

    PubMed

    Jugé, Lauriane; Petiet, Anne; Lambert, Simon A; Nicole, Pascal; Chatelin, Simon; Vilgrain, Valerie; Van Beers, Bernard E; Bilston, Lynne E; Sinkus, Ralph

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) uses macroscopic shear wave propagation to quantify mechanical properties of soft tissues. Micro-obstacles are capable of affecting the macroscopic dispersion properties of shear waves. Since disease or therapy can change the mechanical integrity and organization of vascular structures, MRE should be able to sense these changes if blood vessels represent a source for wave scattering. To verify this, MRE was performed to quantify alteration of the shear wave speed cs due to the presence of vascular outgrowths using an aortic ring model. Eighteen fragments of rat aorta included in a Matrigel matrix (n=6 without outgrowths, n=6 with a radial outgrowth extent of ~600 µm and n=6 with ~850 µm) were imaged using a 7 Tesla MR scanner (Bruker, PharmaScan). High resolution anatomical images were acquired in addition to multi-frequency MRE (ν = 100, 115, 125, 135 and 150 Hz). Average cs was measured within a ring of ~900 µm thickness encompassing the aorta and were normalized to cs0 of the corresponding Matrigel. The frequency dependence was fit to the power law model cs ~ν(y). After scanning, optical microscopy was performed to visualize outgrowths. Results demonstrated that in presence of vascular outgrowths (1) normalized cs significantly increased for the three highest frequencies (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.0002 at 125 Hz and P = 0.002 at 135 Hz and P = 0.003 at 150 Hz) but not for the two lowest (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.63 at 100 Hz and P = 0.87 at 115 Hz), and (2) normalized cs followed a power law behavior not seen in absence of vascular outgrowths (ANOVA test, P < 0.0001). These results showed that vascular outgrowths acted as micro-obstacles altering the dispersion relationships of propagating shear waves and that MRE could provide valuable information about microvascular changes.

  20. Frequency dispersion of love waves in a piezoelectric nanofilm bonded on a semi-infinite elastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sijia; Gu, Bin; Zhang, Hongbin; Pan, Rongying; Alamusi; Feng, Xiqiao

    2015-11-01

    Research on the propagation of elastic waves in piezoelectric nanostructures is very limited. The frequency dispersion of Love waves in layered piezoelectric nanostructures has not yet been reported when surface effects are taken into account. Based on the surface elasticity theory, the propagation of Love waves with surface effects in a structure consisting of a nanosized piezoelectric film and a semi-infinite elastic substrate is investigated focusing on the frequency dispersion curves of different modes. The results show that under the electrically-open conditions, surface effects give rise to the dependence of Love wave dispersion on the film thickness when the thickness of the piezoelectric film reduces to nanometers. For a given wave frequency, phase velocity of Love waves in all dispersion modes exhibit obvious toward shift as the film thickness decreases or the surface parameters increase. Moreover, there may exist a cut-off frequency in the first mode dispersion below which Love waves will be evanescent in the structure due to surface effects. The cut-off frequency depends on the film thickness, the surface parameters and the bulk material properties.

  1. Dispersive Alfvén waves in a plasma with anisotropic superthermal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. Wang, Y. F.; Hu, T. P.

    2016-04-15

    The dispersion of dispersive Alfvén wave in a low β plasma with anisotropic superthermal particles modeled by a bi-nonextensive distribution is derived from a kinetic way. The effect of anisotropic temperature on inertial Alfvén wave is so small that it is negligible. However, it will play an important role on the property of kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW). The numerical results reveal that the presence of superthermal electrons in the small wavenumber limit will lead the damping rate of the KAW bigger than the one with Maxwellian distribution. Whereas, the damping rate of KAW in the large wavenumber limit will decrease with the presence of superthermal electrons. When the effect of electron anisotropic temperature overwhelms the effect of finite ion gyroradius in the small wavenumber regime, the damping rate of KAW grows with the presence of electron temperature anisotropy. On the other hand, when the effects of finite ion gyroradius play a dominant role in the large wavenumber regime, the damping rate of KAW increases with the effective perpendicular and parallel electron temperatures.

  2. Saturn A ring surface mass densities from spiral density wave dispersion behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Pilorz, Stuart; Lane, Arthur L.; Nelson, Robert M.; Pollard, Benjamin; Russell, Christopher T.

    2004-10-01

    We have undertaken an analysis of the Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) stellar occultation data of Saturn's A ring. The Voyager PPS observed the bright star δ Scorpii as it was occulted by Saturn's main rings during the spacecraft flyby of the Saturn system in 1981. The occultation measurement produced a ring profile with radial resolution of approximately 100 m, and radial structure is evident in the profile down to the resolution limit. We have applied an autoregressive technique to the data for estimating the power spectrum as a function of radius, which has allowed us to identify 40 spiral density waves in Saturn's A ring, associated with the strongest torques due to forcing from the moons. The majority of the detected waves are observed to disperse linearly in regions beginning a few kilometers from the resonance location. We have used the dispersion behavior for those waves to calculate local surface mass densities in the vicinity of each wave. We find that the inner three-quarters of the A ring (up to the beginning of the Encke gap) has an average surface mass density of 43.8±7.9 g cm-2, while the outer region has an average surface mass density of 28.3±10.8 g cm-2. The two regions have different mean surface mass densities with a significance of approximately 0.999993, as estimated with a T-statistic, which corresponds to about 4.5 σ. While the mean optical depth of the A ring increases slightly with increasing distance from Saturn, we find that it is not significantly correlated with the surface mass density; the two quantities having a linear Pearson's correlation coefficient of rcorr≈-0.03. The variation of mass density, independent of PPS optical depth, is consistent with previous conjectures that the particle size distribution and composition are not constant across the entire A ring, particularly in the very outer portion. We estimate the mass of Saturn's A ring from our surface mass density estimates as 4.9×10 21 gm, or 8.61×10 -9 of the mass

  3. Travelling-wave solutions of a weakly nonlinear two-dimensional higher-order Kadomtsev-Petviashvili dynamical equation for dispersive shallow-water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seadawy, Aly R.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of three-dimensional nonlinear irrotational flow of an inviscid and incompressible fluid of the long waves in dispersive shallow-water approximation is analyzed. The problem formulation of the long waves in dispersive shallow-water approximation lead to fifth-order Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) dynamical equation by applying the reductive perturbation theory. By using an extended auxiliary equation method, the solitary travelling-wave solutions of the two-dimensional nonlinear fifth-order KP dynamical equation are derived. An analytical as well as a numerical solution of the two-dimensional nonlinear KP equation are obtained and analyzed with the effects of external pressure flow.

  4. Direct inversion of surface wave dispersion for three-dimensional shallow crustal structure based on ray tracing: methodology and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongjian; Yao, Huajian; Zhang, Haijiang; Huang, Yu-Chih; van der Hilst, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    We propose a method to invert surface wave dispersion data directly for 3-D variations of shear wave speed, that is, without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps, using frequency-dependent ray tracing and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. To simplify the problem we consider quasi-stratified media with smoothly varying seismic properties. We represent the 3-D shear wave speed model by means of 1-D profiles beneath grid points, which are determined from all dispersion data simultaneously using a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic method. The wavelet coefficients of the wave speed model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm, and upon iteration the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated using the newly obtained wave speed model. To demonstrate its feasibility, we apply the method to determine the 3-D shallow crustal shear wave speed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan using short period interstation Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion measurements extracted from the ambient noise cross-correlation method. The results are consistent with previous studies and reveal strong shallow crustal heterogeneity that correlates with surface geology.

  5. Simultaneous chromatic dispersion monitoring and optical modulation format identification utilizing four wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Sheng; Qiu, Chen; Ke, Changjian; He, Sheng; Liu, Deming

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a method which is able to monitor the chromatic dispersion (CD) and identify the modulation format (MF) of optical signals simultaneously. This method utilizes the features of the output curve of the highly sensitive all-optical CD monitor based on four wave mixing (FWM). From the symmetric center of the curve CD can be estimated blindly and independently, while from the profile and convergence region of the curve ten commonly used modulation formats can be recognized with simple algorithm based on maximum correlation classifier. This technique does not need any high speed optoelectronics and has no limitation on signal rate. Furthermore it can tolerate large CD distortions and is robust to polarization mode dispersion (PMD) and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise.

  6. Onset of dispersion in Nb microstrip transmission lines at submillimeter wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, H. H. S.; Mcgrath, William R.; Bumble, B.; Leduc, Henry G.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured the dispersion in phase velocity of a Nb-SiO(x)-Nb microstrip transmission line resonator over a frequency range from 50 GHz to 800 GHz. A submicron Nb/Al-AlO(x)/Nb Josephson junction was used as a voltage-controlled oscillator to excite the high order modes in the resonator. The same junction is used as a direct detector resulting in a series of step-like structures in the DC current-voltage characteristic at the position of each mode frequency. The transmission line is dispersionless up to about 500 GHz where the phase velocity begins to decrease. This is well below the gap frequency f(sub g) approx. equals 700 GHz. Results agree qualitatively with the expected theoretical behavior near f(sub g). This onset of dispersion and loss in Nb transmission lines will have a significant impact on the design of submillimeter wave RF circuits.

  7. Longitudinal dielectric function and dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in relativistic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touil, B.; Bendib, A.; Bendib-Kalache, K.

    2017-02-01

    The longitudinal dielectric function is derived analytically from the relativistic Vlasov equation for arbitrary values of the relevant parameters z = m c 2 / T , where m is the rest electron mass, c is the speed of light, and T is the electron temperature in energy units. A new analytical approach based on the Legendre polynomial expansion and continued fractions was used. Analytical expression of the electron distribution function was derived. The real part of the dispersion relation and the damping rate of electron plasma waves are calculated both analytically and numerically in the whole range of the parameter z . The results obtained improve significantly the previous results reported in the literature. For practical purposes, explicit expressions of the real part of the dispersion relation and the damping rate in the range z > 30 and strongly relativistic regime are also proposed.

  8. Manipulating dispersive wave generation by anomalous self-steepening effect in metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuanjiang; Wu, Jipeng; Dai, Xiaoyu; Wen, Shuangchun; Guo, Jun; Wang, Qingkai

    2012-11-19

    We present a theoretical investigation of dispersive wave (DW) generation in nonlinear metamaterials (MMs). The role of the anomalous self-steepening (SS) effect, which can be either positive or negative, and the negative SS parameter can have a very large value compared to an ordinary positive-index material, in DW generation is particularly identified. It is demonstrated that the SS effect exerts a great impact on the peak power while has little effect on the frequency shift of DW. For positive third-order dispersion (TOD), the negative SS broadens the pulse spectrum and weakens the DW's peak power significantly, opposite to the case of positive SS. For negative TOD, however, the negative SS narrows the pulse spectrum and enhances the DW's peak power, also opposite to the case of positive SS. The results suggest that the DW generation in nonlinear MMs can be manipulated by SS effect to a large extent.

  9. Evanescent-wave comb spectroscopy of liquids with strongly dispersive optical fiber cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avino, S.; Giorgini, A.; Salza, M.; Fabian, M.; Gagliardi, G.; De Natale, P.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate evanescent-wave fiber cavity-enhanced spectroscopy in the liquid phase using a near-infrared frequency comb. Exploiting strong fiber-dispersion effects, we show that liquid absorption spectra can be recorded without any external dispersive element. The fiber cavity is used both as sensor and spectrometer. The resonance modes are frequency locked to the comb teeth while the cavity photon lifetime is measured over 155 nm, from 1515 nm to 1670 nm, where absorption bands of liquid polyamines are detected as a proof of concept. Our fiber spectrometer lends itself to in situ, real-time chemical analysis in environmental monitoring, biomedical assays, and micro-opto-fluidic systems.

  10. Competing four-wave mixing processes in dispersion oscillating telecom fiber.

    PubMed

    Finot, Christophe; Fatome, Julien; Sysoliatin, Alexej; Kosolapov, A; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2013-12-15

    We experimentally study the dynamics of the generation of multiple sidebands by means of a quasi-phase-matched four-wave mixing (FWM) process occurring in a dispersion-oscillating, highly nonlinear optical fiber. The fiber under test is pumped by a ns microchip laser operating in the normal average group-velocity dispersion regime and in the telecom C band. We reveal that the growth of higher-order sidebands is strongly influenced by the competition with cascade FWM between the pump and the first-order quasi-phase matched sidebands. The properties of these competing FWM processes are substantially affected when a partially coherent pump source is used, leading to a drastic reduction of the average power needed for sideband generation.

  11. SciDAC - Center for Simulation of Wave Interactions with MHD -- General Atomics Support of ORNL Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Abla, G

    2012-11-09

    The Center for Simulation of Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM) project is dedicated to conduct research on integrated multi-physics simulations. The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) is a framework that was created by the SWIM team. It provides an integration infrastructure for loosely coupled component-based simulations by facilitating services for code execution coordination, computational resource management, data management, and inter-component communication. The IPS framework features improving resource utilization, implementing application-level fault tolerance, and support of the concurrent multi-tasking execution model. The General Atomics (GA) team worked closely with other team members on this contract, and conducted research in the areas of computational code monitoring, meta-data management, interactive visualization, and user interfaces. The original website to monitor SWIM activity was developed in the beginning of the project. Due to the amended requirements, the software was redesigned and a revision of the website was deployed into production in April of 2010. Throughout the duration of this project, the SWIM Monitoring Portal (http://swim.gat.com:8080/) has been a critical production tool for supporting the project's physics goals.

  12. Evaluating Chemical Dispersant Efficacy In An Experimental Wave Tank: 1, Dispersant Effectiveness As A Function Of Energy Dissipation Rate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous laboratory test systems have been developed for the comparison of efficacy between various chemical oil dispersant formulations. However, for the assessment of chemical dispersant effectiveness under realistic sea state, test protocols are required to produce hydrodynam...

  13. Evaluating Chemical Dispersant Efficacy In An Experimental Wave Tank: 1, Dispersant Effectiveness As A Function Of Energy Dissipation Rate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous laboratory test systems have been developed for the comparison of efficacy between various chemical oil dispersant formulations. However, for the assessment of chemical dispersant effectiveness under realistic sea state, test protocols are required to produce hydrodynam...

  14. Cascaded interactions between Raman induced solitons and dispersive waves in photonic crystal fibers at the advanced stage of supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Driben, Rodislav; Mitschke, Fedor; Zhavoronkov, Nickolai

    2010-12-06

    The complex mechanism of multiple interactions between solitary and dispersive waves at the advanced stage of supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fiber is studied in experiment and numerical simulations. Injection of high power negatively chirped pulses near zero dispersion frequency results in an effective soliton fission process with multiple interactions between red shifted Raman solitons and dispersive waves. These interactions may result in relative acceleration of solitons with further collisions between them of quasi-elastic or quasi-plastic kinds. In the spectral domain these processes result in enhancement of certain wavelength regions within the spectrum or development of a new significant band at the long wavelength side of the spectrum.

  15. A gradient-based model parametrization using Bernstein polynomials in Bayesian inversion of surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, Jeremy M.; Dosso, Stan E.; Cassidy, John F.; Quijano, Jorge E.; Molnar, Sheri; Dettmer, Jan

    2017-10-01

    This paper develops and applies a Bernstein-polynomial parametrization to efficiently represent general, gradient-based profiles in nonlinear geophysical inversion, with application to ambient-noise Rayleigh-wave dispersion data. Bernstein polynomials provide a stable parametrization in that small perturbations to the model parameters (basis-function coefficients) result in only small perturbations to the geophysical parameter profile. A fully nonlinear Bayesian inversion methodology is applied to estimate shear wave velocity (VS) profiles and uncertainties from surface wave dispersion data extracted from ambient seismic noise. The Bayesian information criterion is used to determine the appropriate polynomial order consistent with the resolving power of the data. Data error correlations are accounted for in the inversion using a parametric autoregressive model. The inversion solution is defined in terms of marginal posterior probability profiles for VS as a function of depth, estimated using Metropolis-Hastings sampling with parallel tempering. This methodology is applied to synthetic dispersion data as well as data processed from passive array recordings collected on the Fraser River Delta in British Columbia, Canada. Results from this work are in good agreement with previous studies, as well as with co-located invasive measurements. The approach considered here is better suited than `layered' modelling approaches in applications where smooth gradients in geophysical parameters are expected, such as soil/sediment profiles. Further, the Bernstein polynomial representation is more general than smooth models based on a fixed choice of gradient type (e.g. power-law gradient) because the form of the gradient is determined objectively by the data, rather than by a subjective parametrization choice.

  16. MHD energy fluxes for late type dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R.; Musielak, Z. E.

    1987-01-01

    The efficiency of MHD wave generation by turbulent motions in stratified stellar atmospheres with embedded uniform magnetic fields is calculated. In contradiction with previous results, it is shown that there is no significant increase in the efficiency of wave generation because of the presence of magnetic fields, at least within the theory's limits of applicability. It is shown that MHD energy fluxes for late-type stars are less than those obtained for acoustic waves in a magnetic-field-free atmosphere, and do not vary enough for a given spectral type in order to explain observed UV and X-ray fluxes. Thus, the results show that