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Sample records for displays decreased thermal

  1. Bracelet-Shaped Thermal Display for Representing Numerical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Yuichi; Fujiwara, Susumu; Umetani, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2011-05-01

    A thermal display, a type of haptic display, is effective for providing intuitive information about temperature. In many thermal display studies, users have assumed sitting positions when using these devices. However, their use in a large-scale virtual-reality system requires users to be in a standing position, as they generally observe three-dimensional (3D) objects while standing or walking around. Thus, we developed thermal displays that are suitable for large-scale virtual-reality systems. From another standpoint, in scientific visualization, response time is very important for observing physical phenomena, especially for dynamic numerical simulation. One way to optimize this parameter is to provide two types of thermal information: the rate of thermal change, and the actual temperature. To this end, we propose a bracelet-shaped thermal display with three Peltier elements that can provide both types of information. Finally, we present an example of visualizing and haptizing the result of a molecular dynamics simulation.

  2. Elite synchronized swimmers display decreased energy availability during intensified training.

    PubMed

    Schaal, K; Tiollier, E; Le Meur, Y; Casazza, G; Hausswirth, C

    2017-09-01

    Elite synchronized swimmers follow high-volume training regimen that result in elevated rates of exercise energy expenditure (ExEE). While adequate energy intake (EI) is important to optimize recovery, a number of sport-specific constraints may lead to chronically low energy availability (EA = EI-ExEE). This study aimed to quantify changes in EA, endocrine markers of energy conservation, and perceived fatigue in synchronized swimmers, during a week of baseline training followed by 4 weeks of intensified training (IT). EI, ExEE, and body composition were measured in nine swimmers at Baseline, midpoint (ITWK2 ), and end of IT (ITWK4 ). Waking saliva samples were obtained to measure [leptin]s , [ghrelin]s , and [cortisol]s . Fatigue ratings were provided daily. ExEE increased by 27% during IT. Swimmers increased EI from Baseline to ITWK2 , but decreased it significantly from ITWK2 to ITWK4 . EA, fat mass, and [leptin]s decreased from Baseline to ITWK4 , while [ghrelin]s increased significantly. Fatigue at ITWK4 was inversely correlated with Baseline EI and EA. The significant decrease in EA was accompanied by endocrine signs of energy conservation in elite swimmers. As perceived fatigue was associated with low EA, particular attention should be paid to these athletes' energy intake during phases of heavy training. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Social isolation increases social display after priming in Betta splendens but decreases aggressive readiness.

    PubMed

    Halperin, J R; Dunham, D W; Ye, S

    1992-12-01

    We socially isolated adult, male Siamese fighting fish for 0 to 7 weeks but avoided sensory deprivation, and then measured aggressive display as the fish responded to a series of novel models. Isolates displayed much more strongly than non-isolates to the last model of the series, and display intensity became monotonically stronger with longer social isolation. By contrast, display to the first model seen after isolation was weaker the longer the social isolation. A second experiment compared responses of fish after three weeks during which controls displayed to a conspecific for two minutes every two days, while isolates saw a complex visual stimulus which did not release display. Again, isolates had depressed display readiness, but higher display rates once they were primed. This result supports the hypothesis that social isolation has two effects on aggressive display in Betta, causing decreasing readiness to display, but leading to greater display rates once fish are 'primed'. We discuss two models which predict these phenomena, and show that one of them suggests a new understanding of the function of motivational increases when aggression is 'dammed up'. Methodological issues relevant for examining the rodent behavior literature in the light of the new model are discussed. Copyright © 1992. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Thermally Tunable Hydrogels Displaying Angle‐Independent Structural Colors

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuka, Yumiko; Seki, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report the preparation of thermally tunable hydrogels displaying angle‐independent structural colors. The porous structures were formed with short‐range order using colloidal amorphous array templates and a small amount of carbon black (CB). The resultant porous hydrogels prepared using colloidal amorphous arrays without CB appeared white, whereas the hydrogels with CB revealed bright structural colors. The brightly colored hydrogels rapidly changed hues in a reversible manner, and the hues varied widely depending on the water temperature. Moreover, the structural colors were angle‐independent under diffusive lighting because of the isotropic nanostructure generated from the colloidal amorphous arrays. PMID:26503915

  5. Neither testosterone levels nor aggression decrease when the male Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) displays paternal behavior.

    PubMed

    Juana, Luis; Bárbara, Vázquez-Gaytán; Martín, Martínez-Torres; Agustín, Carmona; Guillermo, Ramos-Blancas; Guadalupe, Ortíz

    2010-03-01

    The first studies that correlated mammalian paternal behavior and testosterone levels indicated that the concentration of this steroid hormone decreases when males exhibit paternal care. However, recent studies have also shown that testosterone levels do not decrease when males display paternal behavior. In this study, we measured testosterone levels in plasma throughout the reproductive cycle of the Mongolian gerbil. Testosterone concentrations were correlated with paternal care as well as aggression. We also examined whether there is a trade-off between paternal behavior and aggression in this mammal. Our results show that Mongolian gerbil testosterone levels do not decrease when the males give paternal care. Likewise, male Mongolian gerbils exhibit high levels of aggression while displaying paternal behavior, indicating that there is no trade-off between aggression and paternal behavior. More studies are needed to determine whether testosterone is involved in the regulation of paternal behavior in this rodent.

  6. Decreasing the Effective Thermal Conductivity in Glass Supported Thermoelectric Layers.

    PubMed

    Bethke, Kevin; Andrei, Virgil; Rademann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    As thermoelectric devices begin to make their way into commercial applications, the emphasis is put on decreasing the thermal conductivity. In this purely theoretical study, finite element analysis is used to determine the effect of a supporting material on the thermal conductivity of a thermoelectric module. The simulations illustrate the heat transfer along a sample, consisting from Cu, Cu2O and PbTe thermoelectric layers on a 1 mm thick Pyrex glass substrate. The influence of two different types of heating, at a constant temperature and at a constant heat flux, is also investigated. It is revealed that the presence of a supporting material plays an important role on lowering the effective thermal conductivity of the layer-substrate ensemble. By using thinner thermoelectric layers the effective thermal conductivity is further reduced, almost down to the value of the glass substrate. As a result, the temperature gradient becomes steeper for a fixed heating temperature, which allows the production of devices with improved performance under certain conditions. Based on the simulation results, we also propose a model for a robust thin film thermoelectric device. With this suggestion, we invite the thermoelectric community to prove the applicability of the presented concept for practical purposes.

  7. Decreasing the Effective Thermal Conductivity in Glass Supported Thermoelectric Layers

    PubMed Central

    Bethke, Kevin; Andrei, Virgil; Rademann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    As thermoelectric devices begin to make their way into commercial applications, the emphasis is put on decreasing the thermal conductivity. In this purely theoretical study, finite element analysis is used to determine the effect of a supporting material on the thermal conductivity of a thermoelectric module. The simulations illustrate the heat transfer along a sample, consisting from Cu, Cu2O and PbTe thermoelectric layers on a 1 mm thick Pyrex glass substrate. The influence of two different types of heating, at a constant temperature and at a constant heat flux, is also investigated. It is revealed that the presence of a supporting material plays an important role on lowering the effective thermal conductivity of the layer-substrate ensemble. By using thinner thermoelectric layers the effective thermal conductivity is further reduced, almost down to the value of the glass substrate. As a result, the temperature gradient becomes steeper for a fixed heating temperature, which allows the production of devices with improved performance under certain conditions. Based on the simulation results, we also propose a model for a robust thin film thermoelectric device. With this suggestion, we invite the thermoelectric community to prove the applicability of the presented concept for practical purposes. PMID:26982458

  8. M4 muscarinic receptor knockout mice display abnormal social behavior and decreased prepulse inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the central nervous system (CNS), the muscarinic system plays key roles in learning and memory, as well as in the regulation of many sensory, motor, and autonomic processes, and is thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of several major diseases of the CNS, such as Alzheimer's disease, depression, and schizophrenia. Previous studies reveal that M4 muscarinic receptor knockout (M4R KO) mice displayed an increase in basal locomotor activity, an increase in sensitivity to the prepulse inhibition (PPI)-disrupting effect of psychotomimetics, and normal basal PPI. However, other behaviorally significant roles of M4R remain unclear. Results In this study, to further investigate precise functional roles of M4R in the CNS, M4R KO mice were subjected to a battery of behavioral tests. M4R KO mice showed no significant impairments in nociception, neuromuscular strength, or motor coordination/learning. In open field, light/dark transition, and social interaction tests, consistent with previous studies, M4R KO mice displayed enhanced locomotor activity compared to their wild-type littermates. In the open field test, M4R KO mice exhibited novelty-induced locomotor hyperactivity. In the social interaction test, contacts between pairs of M4R KO mice lasted shorter than those of wild-type mice. In the sensorimotor gating test, M4R KO mice showed a decrease in PPI, whereas in the startle response test, in contrast to a previous study, M4R KO mice demonstrated normal startle response. M4R KO mice also displayed normal performance in the Morris water maze test. Conclusions These findings indicate that M4R is involved in regulation of locomotor activity, social behavior, and sensorimotor gating in mice. Together with decreased PPI, abnormal social behavior, which was newly identified in the present study, may represent a behavioral abnormality related to psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. PMID:22463818

  9. Liquid-Crystal Display (LCD) Screen Thermal Testing to Simulate Solar Gain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    ARL-TN-0723 ● DEC 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Liquid-Crystal Display (LCD) Screen Thermal Testing to Simulate Solar Gain...Screen Thermal Testing to Simulate Solar Gain by Steven Callaway Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL...Display (LCD) Screen Thermal Testing to Simulate Solar Gain 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Steven

  10. Does the chronic chemical contamination of a European flounder population decrease its thermal tolerance?

    PubMed

    Lavergne, Edouard; Pedron, Nicolas; Calves, Isabelle; Claireaux, Guy; Mazurais, David; Zambonino-Infante, José; Le Bayon, Nicolas; Cahu, Chantal; Laroche, Jean

    2015-06-30

    Juvenile flounders (Platichthys flesus), collected in two estuaries with similar temperature regimes (the heavily polluted Seine and the moderately contaminated Vilaine), were submitted to a common garden experiment. After an acclimation period, both populations were challenged by a thermal stress (9-24°C for 15days, then maintenance at 24°C for 19days). The condition factor of the Vilaine fish increased in both conditions, while it decreased for the heated Seine flounders after 34days. The expression of genes related to the energetic metabolism was measured in the liver. The expression levels for ATP-F0 and COII were significantly reduced for heated vs. standard fish from both estuaries, while a decrease of the 12S expression was detected only in heated vs. standard fish from the Seine estuary. Thus, it is suggested that highly contaminated fish from Seine could display a lower tolerance to thermal stress, compared to moderately contaminated fish from Vilaine.

  11. Composite thermal micro-actuator array for tactile displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enikov, Eniko T.; Lazarov, Kalin V.

    2003-07-01

    Tactile perception of complex symbols through tactile stimulation is an exciting application of a phenomenon known as tactile illusion (TI). Sensation of motion on the skin can be produced by a limited number of discrete mechanical actuators applying light pressure over the skin. This phenomenon can thus be used as a neurophysiological testing tool to determine central and peripheral nervous system injury as well as providing an additional human-machine communication channel. This paper describes the development of a 4 x 5 actuator array of individual vibrating pixels for fingertip tactile communication. The array is approximately one square centimeter and utilizes novel micro-clutch MEMS technology. The individual pixels are turned ON and OFF by pairs of microscopic composite thermal actuators, while the main vibration is generated by a vibrating piezo-electric plate. The physiological parameters required for inducing tactile illusion are described. The fabrication sequence for the thermal micro-actuators along with actuation results are also presented.

  12. Development of thermosets for thermal nanoimprint lithography at decreased temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Freimut; Kubenz, Mike; Schuster, Christine; Fink, Marion; Vogler, Marko; Gruetzner, Gabi; Grimm, Juergen; Kaeppel, Andi

    2005-05-01

    Prepolymers formed from multifunctional allyl monomers can beneficially used in nanoimprint lithography (NIL), since they cure as a consequence of heating during the imprint process. Thus they have the potential to enable NIL at comparatively low temperatures while the imprinted patterns concurrently show high thermal stability, in contrast to thermoplastic polymers, where the thermal behaviour of the imprinted patterns is closely related to the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the polymers. The use of allyl prepolymers for NIL was previously described, but only very few experimental data are known. In recent investigations on the application of allyl prepolymers for NIL a displacement of the patterns on the wafer has been observed after cooling down the imprinted polymer in the press. This could be avoided by detaching the stamp at the imprint temperature, i.e. without cooling down the press, which requires the polymer to be crosslinked to a great extent in this stage. Since high temperatures are necessary (150 °C - 190 °C), and the imprint time is still long, allyl prepolymers to be reported here have been modified aiming at a reduction of imprint temperature and time. The admixture of free-radical initiators increases the polymerization rate and allows the polymerization to start at lower temperatures. A reduced imprint temperature (100 °C) and shorter imprint time (10 min) are achieved. Additional polymer modification by plasticizers improves the material flow during the imprint due to a lower Tg. Recipes for polymer modifications have been found out, which result in thermally stable imprints under the specified processing conditions.

  13. Apparent limitations of head-up-displays and thermal imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    A simulated helicopter flight through a slalom course was presented on a Silicon Graphics IRIS 3130. The display represented the major visual characteristics of thermal images. Subjects were asked to maintain a designated altitude, while flying a slalom course between regularly spaced pylons. The presence of some of the high frequency details in the image improved subjects' ability to reach and maintain the correct altitude. A head-up-display helped in maintaining altitude, but impaired maneuvering around the poles. The results are interpreted in terms of the competition for visual resources between the HUD and the world view.

  14. Gaucher Disease-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Display Decreased Erythroid Potential and Aberrant Myelopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Sgambato, Judi A.; Park, Tea Soon; Miller, Diana; Panicker, Leelamma M.; Sidransky, Ellen; Lun, Yu; Awad, Ola; Bentzen, Søren M.; Zambidis, Elias T.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is the most common lysosomal storage disease resulting from mutations in the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase). The hematopoietic abnormalities in GD include the presence of characteristic Gaucher macrophages that infiltrate patient tissues and cytopenias. At present, it is not clear whether these cytopenias are secondary to the pathological activity of Gaucher cells or a direct effect of GCase deficiency on hematopoietic development. To address this question, we differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from patients with types 1, 2, and 3 GD to CD34+/CD45+/CD43+/CD143+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and examined their developmental potential. The formation of GD-HPCs was unaffected. However, these progenitors demonstrated a skewed lineage commitment, with increased myeloid differentiation and decreased erythroid differentiation and maturation. Interestingly, myeloid colony-formation assays revealed that GD-HPCs, but not control-HPCs, gave rise to adherent, macrophage-like cells, another indication of abnormal myelopoiesis. The extent of these hematologic abnormalities correlated with the severity of the GCase mutations. All the phenotypic abnormalities of GD-HPCs observed were reversed by incubation with recombinant GCase, indicating that these developmental defects were caused by the mutated GCase. Our results show that GCase deficiency directly impairs hematopoietic development. Additionally, our results suggest that aberrant myelopoiesis might contribute to the pathological properties of Gaucher macrophages, which are central to GD manifestations. The hematopoietic developmental defects we observed reflect hematologic abnormalities in patients with GD, demonstrating the utility of GD-iPSCs for modeling this disease. Significance This study showed that hematopoietic progenitors from patients with Gaucher disease (GD) have intrinsic developmental abnormalities that reflect characteristic clinical

  15. Cost and turn-around time display decreases inpatient ordering of reference laboratory tests: a time series.

    PubMed

    Fang, Daniel Z; Sran, Gurmeet; Gessner, Daniel; Loftus, Pooja D; Folkins, Ann; Christopher, John Y; Shieh, Lisa

    2014-12-01

    Reference tests, also known as send-out tests, are commonly ordered laboratory tests with variable costs and turn-around times. We aim to examine the effects of displaying reference laboratory costs and turn-around times during computerised physician order entry (CPOE) on inpatient physician ordering behaviour. We conducted a prospective observational study at a tertiary care hospital involving inpatient attending physicians and residents. Physician ordering behaviour was prospectively observed between September 2010 and December 2012. An intervention was implemented to display cost and turn-around time for reference tests within our CPOE. We examined changes in the mean number of monthly physician orders per inpatient day at risk, the mean cost per order, and the average turn-around time per order. After our intervention, the mean number of monthly physician orders per inpatient day at risk decreased by 26% (51 vs 38, p<0.0001) with a decrease in mean cost per order (US$146.50 vs US$134.20, p=0.0004). There were no significant differences in mean turn-around time per order (5.6 vs 5.7 days, p=0.057). A stratified analysis of both cost and turn-around time showed significant decreases in physician ordering. The intervention projected a mean annual savings of US$330 439. Reference test cost and turn-around time variables were poorly correlated (r=0.2). These findings occurred in the setting of non-significant change to physician ordering in a control cohort of non-reference laboratory tests. Display of reference laboratory cost and turn-around time data during real-time ordering may result in significant decreases in ordering of reference laboratory tests with subsequent cost savings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Utilizing Thermal Mass in Refrigerated Display Cases to Reduce Peak Demand

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, Brian A; Kuruganti, Teja; Nutaro, James J; Fugate, David L; Sanyal, Jibonananda

    2016-01-01

    The potential to store energy within refrigerated food products presents convenience store and supermarket operators with an opportunity to participate in utility sponsored demand response programs, whereby electricity usage can be shifted or reduced during peak periods. To determine the feasibility of reducing peak demand by shifting the refrigeration load to off-peak times, experimental and analytical analyses were performed. Simulated product, consisting of one-pint containers filled with a 50% ethylene glycol and 50% water solution, were stored in a medium-temperature vertical open refrigerated display case. Product temperature rise as a function of time was determined by turning off the refrigeration to the display case, while product temperature pull-down time was subsequently determined by turning on the refrigeration to the display case. It was found that the thermal mass of the product in a medium-temperature display case was such that during a 2.5 hour period with no refrigeration, the average product temperature increased by 5.5 C. In addition, it took approximately 3.5 hours for the product to recover to its initial temperature after the refrigeration was turned on. Transient heat conduction analyses for one-dimensional objects is in good agreement with the experimental results obtained in this study. From the analysis, it appears that the thermal mass of the stored product in refrigerated display cases is sufficient to allow product temperatures to safely drift for a significant time under reduced refrigeration system operation. Thus, strategies for shifting refrigeration system electrical demand can be developed. The use of an advanced refrigeration system controller that can respond to utility signals can enable demand shifting with minimal impact.

  17. Elevated TIM3+ hematopoietic stem cells in untreated myelodysplastic syndrome displayed aberrant differentiation, overproliferation and decreased apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jing-lian; Li, Li-juan; Fu, Rong; Wang, Hua-quan; Jiang, Hui-juan; Yue, Lan-zhu; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Hui; Ruan, Er-bao; Qu, Wen; Wang, Guo-jin; Wang, Xiao-ming; Wu, Yu-hong; Liu, Hong; Song, Jia; Guan, Jing; Xing, Li-min; Shao, Zong-hong

    2014-06-01

    TIM3, as a negative regulator of anti-tumor immunity, is highly expressed on LSCs, but not on normal HSCs. TIM3 on HSCs in MDS patients has not been clarified. Here, both the percentage of TIM3 on HSCs and the MFI of TIM3+ HSCs were higher in untreated MDS than control and were closed to AML, and excessive TIM3+ HSCs was closely related to clinical parameters: WPSS score, karyotype analysis, morphologic blasts, the number of cytopenia involving hematopoietic lineages, anemia and granulocytopenia. TIM3+ HSCs expressed lower CD11b, TpoR, EpoR, G-CSFR and Annexin V, and higher CD71 and GATA2. TIM3+ HSCs displayed aberrant differentiation, overproliferation and decreased apoptosis. TIM3 might be a promising marker for identifying malignant clone cells in MDS and a candidate for targeted therapy.

  18. Stereoscopic uncooled thermal imaging with autostereoscopic 3D flat-screen display in military driving enhancement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haan, H.; Münzberg, M.; Schwarzkopf, U.; de la Barré, R.; Jurk, S.; Duckstein, B.

    2012-06-01

    Thermal cameras are widely used in driver vision enhancement systems. However, in pathless terrain, driving becomes challenging without having a stereoscopic perception. Stereoscopic imaging is a well-known technique already for a long time with understood physical and physiological parameters. Recently, a commercial hype has been observed, especially in display techniques. The commercial market is already flooded with systems based on goggle-aided 3D-viewing techniques. However, their use is limited for military applications since goggles are not accepted by military users for several reasons. The proposed uncooled thermal imaging stereoscopic camera with a geometrical resolution of 640x480 pixel perfectly fits to the autostereoscopic display with a 1280x768 pixels. An eye tracker detects the position of the observer's eyes and computes the pixel positions for the left and the right eye. The pixels of the flat panel are located directly behind a slanted lenticular screen and the computed thermal images are projected into the left and the right eye of the observer. This allows a stereoscopic perception of the thermal image without any viewing aids. The complete system including camera and display is ruggedized. The paper discusses the interface and performance requirements for the thermal imager as well as for the display.

  19. A feasibility study on monitoring the evolution of apparent diffusion coefficient decrease during thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Plata, Juan C; Holbrook, Andrew B; Marx, Michael; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Jones, Peter; Pascal-Tenorio, Aurea; Bouley, Donna; Diederich, Chris; Sommer, Graham; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2015-09-01

    Evaluate whether a decrease in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), associated with loss of tissue viability (LOTV), can be observed during the course of thermal ablation of the prostate. Thermal ablation was performed in a healthy in vivo canine prostate model (N = 2, ages: 5 yr healthy, mixed breed, weights: 13-14 kg) using a transurethral high-intensity ultrasound catheter and was monitored using a strategy that interleaves diffusion weighted images and gradient-echo images. The two sequences were used to measure ADC and changes in temperature during the treatment. Changes in temperature were used to compute expected changes in ADC. The difference between expected and measured ADC, ADCDIFF, was analyzed in regions ranging from moderate hyperthermia to heat fixation. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to select a threshold of detection of LOTV. Time of threshold activation, tLOTV, was compared with time to reach CEM43 = 240, tDOSE. The observed relationship between temperature and ADC in vivo (2.2%/ °C, 1.94%-2.47%/ °C 95% confidence interval) was not significantly different than the previously reported value of 2.4%/ °C in phantom. ADCDIFF changes after correction for temperature showed a mean decrease of 25% in ADC 60 min post-treatment in regions where sufficient thermal dose (CEM43 > 240) was achieved. Following our ROC analysis, a threshold of 2.25% decrease in ADCDIFF for three consecutive time points was chosen as an indicator of LOTV. The ADCDIFF was found to decrease quickly (1-2 min) after reaching CEM43 = 240 in regions associated with heat fixation and more slowly (10-20 min) in regions that received slower heating. Simultaneous monitoring of ADC and temperature during treatment might allow for a more complete tissue viability assessment of ablative thermal treatments in the prostate. ADCDIFF decreases during the course of treatment may be interpreted as loss of tissue viability.

  20. Specific cleavage of the DNase-I binding loop dramatically decreases the thermal stability of actin.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Anastasia V; Khaitlina, Sofia Yu; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2010-09-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate the thermal unfolding of actin specifically cleaved within the DNaseI-binding loop between residues Met47-Gly48 or Gly42-Val43 by two bacterial proteases, subtilisin or ECP32/grimelysin (ECP), respectively. The results obtained show that both cleavages strongly decreased the thermal stability of monomeric actin with either ATP or ADP as a bound nucleotide. An even more pronounced difference in the thermal stability between the cleaved and intact actin was observed when both actins were polymerized into filaments. Similar to intact F-actin, both cleaved F-actins were significantly stabilized by phalloidin and aluminum fluoride; however, in all cases, the thermal stability of the cleaved F-actins was much lower than that of intact F-actin, and the stability of ECP-cleaved F-actin was lower than that of subtilisin-cleaved F-actin. These results confirm that the DNaseI-binding loop is involved in the stabilization of the actin structure, both in monomers and in the filament subunits, and suggest that the thermal stability of actin depends, at least partially, on the conformation of the nucleotide-binding cleft. Moreover, an additional destabilization of the unstable cleaved actin upon ATP/ADP replacement provides experimental evidence for the highly dynamic actin structure that cannot be simply open or closed, but rather should be considered as being able to adopt multiple conformations. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS.

  1. Measurement of temperature decrease caused by blood flow in focused ultrasound irradiation by thermal imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Hatano, Yuichi; Mori, Yashunori; Shen, Rakushin; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    In this study, to estimate the local temperature changes caused by a thick blood vessel, the temperature distribution in a tissue phantom with a thick blood vessel during focused ultrasound irradiation was measured by a thermal imaging method. The blood flow rate in the simulated blood vessel was varied and the relationship between flow rate and temperature decrease was examined. The phantom using the thermal imaging method is divided into two parts, and the increases in temperature distribution as a function of blood flow rate are measured using a thermocamera under constant ultrasound irradiation. The irradiation conditions of ultrasound waves were a central frequency of 1 MHz, a wave number length of 200 cycles, and a duty ratio of 0.2. The irradiation duration was 5 min, and the ultrasound intensity I SPTA was 36 W/cm2. The amount of temperature decrease caused by the cooling effect of blood flow increased with the blood flow rate and it became constant at a certain threshold of blood flow rate. The threshold of blood flow rate is about 250 ml/min.

  2. Body Temperature Controlled Optical and Thermal Information Storage Light Scattering Display with Fluorescence Effect and High Mechanical Strength.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Tong, Xiaoqian; He, Huiwen; Ma, Meng; Shi, Yanqin; Wang, Xu

    2017-04-05

    A kind of body temperature controlled optical and thermal information storage light scattering display based on super strong liquid crystalline physical gel with special "loofah-like gel network" was successfully prepared. Such liquid crystal (LC) gel was obtained by mixing a dendritic gelator (POSS-G1-BOC), an azobenzene compound (2Azo2), and a phosphor tethered liquid crystalline host (5CB), which could show its best contrast ratio at around human body temperature under UV light because of the phosphor's fluorescence effect. The gel also has quite strong mechanical strength, which could be used in wearable device field especially under sunlight, even under the forcing conditions as harsh as being centrifuged for 10 min at the speed of 2000 r/min. The whole production process of such a display is quite simple and could lead to displays at any size through noncontact writing. We believe it will have wide applications in the future.

  3. Thermal resistance of attic loose-fill insulations decreases under simulated winter conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, R.S.; Wilkes, K.E.; McElroy, D.L.

    1994-05-01

    Two absolute techniques were used to measure the thermal resistance of attic loose-fill insulations: the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) and the Unguarded Thin-Heater Apparatus (UTHA). Two types of attic loose-fill insulations (unbonded and bonded/cubed) were tested under simulated winter conditions. To simulate winter conditions for an attic insulation, the specimens were tested with heat flow up, large temperature differences, and an air gap. The specimens were tested either with a constant mean temperature (30 or 21{degrees}C) and an increasing temperature difference or with a constant base temperature (21{degrees}C) and an increasing temperature difference (i.e., a decreasing mean temperature). The UTHA test specimens had a nominal thickness of 0.2 m of loose-fill insulation. The LSCS test specimens had a nominal thickness of 0.3 m of loose-fill insulation contained in a 4.2 by 5 m attic test module with a gypsum board base. The module had a gabled attic with a 5 in 12 slope roof. The tests yielded the surface-to-surface thermal resistance, R, which includes the thermal resistance due to gypsum, insulation, and any wood joists. Tests with and without an air gap were conducted in the UTHA. Surface-to-surface thermal resistance results from the LSCS and the UTHA show similar trends for these two types of loose-fill insulation when tested under simulated winter conditions. Tests with no air gap gave values of R that agreed with the bag label R-value for the insulations; R increased with lower mean temperatures. These no-gap values of R were 2 to 5% greater than the values of R obtained with an air gap for temperature differences of less than 22{degrees}C. For larger temperature differences R decreased, and at temperature differences of over 40{degrees}C, the R values were 50% less than those at small temperature differences.

  4. Adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients display decreased IGRP-specific Tr1 cells in blood.

    PubMed

    Chujo, Daisuke; Nguyen, Thien-Son; Foucat, Emile; Blankenship, Derek; Banchereau, Jacques; Nepom, Gerald T; Chaussabel, Damien; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    The breakdown of immune tolerance against islet antigens causes type 1 diabetes (T1D). The antigens associated with adult-onset T1D (AT1D) remain largely undefined. It is possible that AT1D patients display a unique type of CD4(+) T cells specific for a certain islet antigen. Here we analyzed the cytokine production profiles of CD4(+) helper T (Th) cells that are specific for three islet antigens; GAD65, preproinsulin, and IGRP in patients with AT1D, juvenile-onset T1D (JT1D), and age-, gender- and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched control adults. While IGRP-specific Th cells in AT1D patients were dominantly Th1 cells, IGRP-specific Th cells in control adults and JT1D patients were dominantly Th2 and T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells. Notably, the frequency of IGRP-specific Tr1 cells was significantly lower in AT1D patients than in control adults and JT1D patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that IGRP-specific Th cells play a unique pathogenic role in AT1D.

  5. Correction: Decrease in thermal conductivity in polymeric P3HT nanowires by size-reduction induced by crystal orientation: new approaches towards thermal transport engineering of organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Martín, Jaime; Grauby, Stéphane; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Dilhaire, Stefan; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2015-02-01

    Correction for `Decrease in thermal conductivity in polymeric P3HT nanowires by size-reduction induced by crystal orientation: new approaches towards thermal transport engineering of organic materials' by Miguel Muñoz Rojo et al., Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 7858-7865.

  6. People with diabetic peripheral neuropathy display a decreased stepping accuracy during walking: potential implications for risk of tripping.

    PubMed

    Handsaker, J C; Brown, S J; Bowling, F L; Marple-Horvat, D E; Boulton, A J M; Reeves, N D

    2016-05-01

    To examine the stepping accuracy of people with diabetes and diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Fourteen patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), 12 patients with diabetes but no neuropathy (D) and 10 healthy non-diabetic control participants (C). Accuracy of stepping was measured whilst the participants walked along a walkway consisting of 18 stepping targets. Preliminary data on visual gaze characteristics were also captured in a subset of participants (diabetic peripheral neuropathy group: n = 4; diabetes-alone group: n = 4; and control group: n = 4) during the same task. Patients in the diabetic peripheral neuropathy group, and patients in the diabetes-alone group were significantly less accurate at stepping on targets than were control subjects (P < 0.05). Preliminary visual gaze analysis identified that patients diabetic peripheral neuropathy were slower to look between targets, resulting in less time being spent looking at a target before foot-target contact. Impaired motor control is theorized to be a major factor underlying the changes in stepping accuracy, and potentially altered visual gaze behaviour may also play a role. Reduced stepping accuracy may indicate a decreased ability to control the placement of the lower limbs, leading to patients with neuropathy potentially being less able to avoid observed obstacles during walking. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  7. Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Display Decreased Flow-Mediated Dilatation: Evidence from a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuyu; Xu, Huajun; Qian, Yingjun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2017-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction, which can be measured by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), is an early clinical marker of atherosclerosis, which is considered to be the main cause of the observed cardiovascular complications in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. The association between OSA and endothelial dysfunction has been reported in a number of studies; however, the findings are not entirely consistent. Our aim was to meta-analytically synthesize the existing evidence to explore the association between OSA and endothelial dysfunction. Material/Methods Data from PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, and Google Scholar for all trials that investigated the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and OSA were systematically reviewed. The minimum inclusion criteria for the studies were reporting of the Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) and FMD measurements (as an indicator of endothelial dysfunction) for both OSA and control groups. Data from case-control studies that met the inclusion criteria were extracted. Results Twenty-eight studies comprising a total of 1496 OSA patients and 1135 controls were included in the meta-analysis. A random-effects model was used. The weighted mean difference in the FMD measurements was −3.07 and the 95% confidence interval was −3.71 to −2.43 (P<0.01). Meta-regression analysis showed that age, sex, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, glucose, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol did not explain the heterogeneity. Conclusions This meta-analysis showed that patients with OSA have decreased FMD, which may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:28245208

  8. Significant decrease in thermal conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotube induced by inter-wall van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Xue-Kun; Liu, Yue-Yang; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2016-05-01

    The thermal transport properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were investigated by using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. The results show that the thermal conductivity of MWCNTs decreases significantly comparing to that of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) due to the inter-wall van der Waals interactions. The more interesting is a fact that the thermal conductance of MWCNTs is significantly greater than the thermal conductance summation of each SWCNTs. This is because the thermal conductance of a carbon nanotube protected by an outer tube is much larger than that of one that is not protected. Moreover, we also studied the thermal flux distribution of MWCNTs, and found that the outer tube plays a dominant role in heat energy transfer.

  9. Decrease in thermal conductivity in polymeric P3HT nanowires by size-reduction induced by crystal orientation: new approaches towards thermal transport engineering of organic materials.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Martín, Jaime; Grauby, Stéphane; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Dilhaire, Stefan; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2014-07-21

    To date, there is no experimental characterization of thermal conductivity of semiconductor polymeric individual nanowires embedded in a matrix. This work reports on scanning thermal microscopy measurements in a 3ω configuration to determine how the thermal conductivity of individual nanowires made of a model conjugated polymer (P3HT) is modified when decreasing their diameters. We observe a reduction of thermal conductivity, from λNW = 2.29 ± 0.15 W K(-1) m(-1) to λNW = 0.5 ± 0.24 W K(-1) m(-1), when the diameter of nanowires is reduced from 350 nm to 120 nm, which correlates with the polymer crystal orientation measured by WAXS. Through this work, the foundations for future polymer thermal transport engineering are presented.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells expanded in human platelet lysate display a decreased inhibitory capacity on T- and NK-cell proliferation and function.

    PubMed

    Abdelrazik, Heba; Spaggiari, Grazia M; Chiossone, Laura; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2011-11-01

    The use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) for the culture and expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) limits their possible clinical applications. Although some recent studies recommended substituting FBS with human platelet lysate (HPL) for the expansion of MSCs for clinical use, the functional capacity of the expanded cells has only been partially explored. 10% FBS and two other commercial FBS-containing media (MesenCult and MesenPro) were compared with 10% HPL-containing medium for their ability to support MSCs expansion and immunomodulation. We demonstrate that HPL sustained MSC proliferation and expansion in vitro. However, the cumulative cell numbers recovered were comparable with those obtained in MesenPro medium. Moreover, we show that HPL alters the expression of some relevant MSC surface molecules, namely the DNAM-1 ligands PVR and Nectin-2, the NKG2D ligand ULBP3, the adhesion molecules CD49d and αvβ3 and the fibroblast-associated protein. In addition, MSCs cultured in HPL displayed impaired inhibitory capacity on T-cell proliferation to alloantigen and NK-cell proliferation and cytotoxicity. Finally, they showed decreased constitutive PGE2 production while IL-6, IL-8 and RANTES secretion were upregulated. These results imply some limitations in the use of HPL for the expansion of MSCs to be used as immunomodulators in clinical applications.

  11. Extrusion-formed uranium-2.4 wt. % article with decreased linear thermal expansion and method for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.; Jones, Jack M.; Kollie, Thomas G.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the fabrication of an article of uranium-2.4 wt. % niobium alloy in which the linear thermal expansion in the direction transverse to the extrusion direction is less than about 0.98% between 22.degree. C. and 600.degree. C. which corresponds to a value greater than the 1.04% provided by previous extrusion operations over the same temperature range. The article with the improved thermal expansion possesses a yield strength at 0.2% offset of at least 400 MPa, an ultimate tensile strength of 1050 MPa, a compressive yield strength of at least 0.2% offset of at least 675 MPa, and an elongation of at least 25% over 25.4 mm/sec. To provide this article with the improved thermal expansion, the uranium alloy billet is heated to 630.degree. C. and extruded in the alpha phase through a die with a reduction ratio of at least 8.4:1 at a ram speed no greater than 6.8 mm/sec. These critical extrusion parameters provide the article with the desired decrease in the linear thermal expansion while maintaining the selected mechanical properties without encountering crystal disruption in the article.

  12. Anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 therapy in CCI neuropathy decreases thermal hyperalgesia, macrophage recruitment, and endoneurial TNF-alpha expression.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R; Janjigian, M; Myers, R R

    1998-01-01

    The chronic constriction injury model of mononeuropathy is a direct, partial nerve injury yielding thermal hyperalgesia. The inflammation that results from this injury is believed to contribute importantly to both the neuropathological and behavioral sequelae. This study involved administering a single dose (250 ng) of interleukin-10 (IL-10), an endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide, at the site and time of a chronic constriction injury (CCI) lesion to determine if IL-10 administration could attenuate the inflammatory response of the nerve to CCI and resulting thermal hyperalgesia. In IL-10-treated animals, thermal hyperalgesia was significantly reduced following CCI (days 3, 5 and 9). Histological sections from the peripheral nerve injury site of those animals had decreased cell profiles immunoreactive for ED-1, a marker of recruited macrophages, at both times studied (2 and 5 days post-CCI). IL-10 treatment also decreased cell profiles immunoreactive for the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) at day 2, but not day 5. Qualitative light microscopic assessment of neuropathology at the lesion site did not suggest substantial differences between IL-10 and vehicle-treated sections. The authors propose that initial production of TNF-alpha and perhaps other proinflammatory cytokines at the peripheral nerve lesion site importantly influences the long-term behavioral outcome of nerve injury, and that IL-10 therapy may accomplish this by downregulating the inflammatory response of the nerve to injury.

  13. TLR2−/− Mice Display Decreased Severity of Giardiasis via Enhanced Proinflammatory Cytokines Production Dependent on AKT Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Xichen; Gong, Pengtao; Xia, Feifei; Li, Ling; Yang, Zhengtao; Li, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Giardia infection is one of the most common causes of waterborne diarrheal disease in a wide array of mammalian hosts, including humans globally. Although numerous studies have indicated that adaptive immune responses are important for Giardia defense, however, whether the host innate immune system such as TLRs recognizes Giardia remains poorly understood. TLR2 plays a crucial role in pathogen recognition, innate immunity activation, and the eventual pathogen elimination. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR2 as a non-protective inflammatory response on controlling the severity of giardiasis. RT-PCR analysis suggested that TLR2 expression was increased in vitro. We demonstrated that Giardia lamblia-induced cytokines expression by the activation of p38 and ERK pathways via TLR2. Interestingly, the expression of IL-12 p40, TNF-α, and IL-6, but not IFN-γ, was enhanced in TLR2-blocked and TLR2−/− mouse macrophages exposed to G. lamblia trophozoites compared with wild-type (WT) mouse macrophages. Further analysis demonstrated that G. lamblia trophozoites reduced cytokines secretion by activating AKT pathway in WT mouse macrophages. Immunohistochemical staining in G. lamblia cysts infected TLR2−/− and WT mice showed that TLR2 was highly expressed in duodenum in infected WT mice. Also, infected TLR2−/− and AKT-blocked mice showed an increased production of IL-12 p40 and IFN-γ compared with infected WT mice at the early stage during infection. Interestingly, infected TLR2−/− and AKT-blocked mice displayed a decreased parasite burden, an increased weight gain rate, and short parasite persistence. Histological morphometry showed shortened villus length, hyperplastic crypt and decreased ratio of villus height/crypt depth in infected WT mice compared with in infected TLR2−/− and AKT-blocked mice. Together, our results suggested that TLR2 deficiency leads to alleviation of giardiasis and reduction of parasite burden through the promotion of

  14. p21+/+ (CDKN1A+/+) and p21-/- (CDKN1A-/-) human colorectal carcinoma cells display equivalent amounts of thermal radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Carey; Ng, Cheng E

    2003-08-01

    The mechanism of thermal radiosensitization is related to the inhibition of repair of radiation-induced DNA damage by heat. Due to the interaction of the gene p21/WAF1/CIP1 (now known as CDKN1A) with a variety of DNA repair proteins, its involvement in thermal radiosensitization was investigated. Two isogenetic human colorectal cancer cell lines with wild-type TP53 status were used. The 80S4 cell line was deficient in CDKN1A and the HCT116 cells were CDKN1A proficient. Both cell lines were significantly more sensitive to 44 degrees C than 42 degrees C heating (P < 0.01), and both cell lines expressed thermotolerance for heating times longer than about 2 h at the lower temperature. There were no significant differences in the X-radiation response of the two cell lines. Further, the two cell lines displayed similar cell survival levels after hyperthermia given before or after X radiation for both hyperthermia temperatures. Comparison of thermal enhancement ratios confirmed that there was no difference in the amount of thermal radiosensitization induced in the two cell lines. The induction and subsequent repair of DNA double-strand breaks, as measured by clamped homogeneous gel electrophoresis, was also the same in both cell lines. These findings strongly suggest that the gene CDKN1A does not play an important role in the expression of thermal radiosensitization.

  15. Review of organic light-emitting diodes with thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters for energy-efficient sustainable light sources and displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volz, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) is an emerging hot topic. Even though this photophysical mechanism itself has been described more than 50 years ago and optoelectronic devices with organic matter have been studied, improved, and even commercialized for decades now, the realization of the potential of TADF organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) happened only recently. TADF has been proven to be an attractive and very efficient alternative for phosphorescent materials, such as dopants in OLEDs, light-emitting electrochemical cells as well as potent emitters for chemiluminescence. In this review, the TADF concept is introduced in terms that are also understandable for nonchemists. The basic concepts behind this mechanism as well as state-of-the-art examples are discussed. In addition, the future economic impact, especially for the lighting and display market, is addressed here. We conclude that TADF materials are especially helpful to realize efficient, durable deep blue and white displays.

  16. Despite Increased Type 1 IFN, Autoimmune Nonobese Diabetic Mice Display Impaired Dendritic Cell Response to CpG and Decreased Nuclear Localization of IFN-Activated STAT1

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Jubayer; Rahir, Gwendoline; Dong, Matthew B.; Zhao, Yongge; Rodrigues, Kameron B.; Hotta-Iwamura, Chie; Chen, Ye; Guerrero, Alan; Tarbell, Kristin V.

    2016-01-01

    Innate immune signals help break self-tolerance to initiate autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, but innate contributions to subsequent regulation of disease progression are less clear. Most studies have measured in vitro innate responses of GM-CSF dendritic cells (DCs) that are functionally distinct from conventional DCs (cDCs) and do not reflect in vivo DC subsets. To determine whether autoimmune NOD mice have alterations in type 1 IFN innate responsiveness, we compared cDCs from prediabetic NOD and control C57BL/6 (B6) mice stimulated in vivo with the TLR9 ligand CpG, a strong type 1 IFN inducer. In response to CpG, NOD mice produce more type 1 IFN and express higher levels of CD40, and NOD monocyte DCs make more TNF. However, the overall CpG-induced transcriptional response is muted in NOD cDCs. Of relevance the costimulatory proteins CD80/CD86, signals needed for regulatory T cell homeostasis, are upregulated less on NOD cDCs. Interestingly, NOD Rag1−/− mice also display a defect in CpG-induced CD86 upregulation compared with B6 Rag1−/−, indicating this particular innate alteration precedes adaptive autoimmunity. The impaired response in NOD DCs is likely downstream of the IFN-α/β receptor because DCs from NOD and B6 mice show similar CpG-induced CD86 levels when anti–IFN-α/β receptor Ab is added. IFN-α–induced nuclear localization of activated STAT1 is markedly reduced in NOD CD11c+ cells, consistent with lower type 1 IFN responsiveness. In conclusion, NOD DCs display altered innate responses characterized by enhanced type 1 IFN and activation of monocyte-derived DCs but diminished cDC type 1 IFN response. PMID:26826238

  17. Highly diverse community structure in a remote central Tibetan geothermal spring does not display monotonic variation to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Yim, Lau Chui; Hongmei, Jing; Aitchison, Jonathan C; Pointing, Stephen B

    2006-07-01

    We report an assessment of whole-community diversity for an extremely isolated geothermal location with considerable phylogenetic and phylogeographic novelty. We further demonstrate, using multiple statistical analyses of sequence data, that the response of community diversity is not monotonic to thermal stress along a gradient of 52-83 degrees C. A combination of domain- and division-specific PCR was used to obtain a broad spectrum of community phylotypes, which were resolved by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Among 58 sequences obtained from microbial mats and streamers, some 95% suggest novel archaeal and bacterial diversity at the species level or higher. Moreover, new phylogeographic and thermally defined lineages among the Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, Eubacterium and Thermus are identified. Shannon-Wiener diversity estimates suggest that mats at 63 degrees C supported highest diversity, but when alternate models were applied [Average Taxonomic Distinctness (AvTD) and Variation in Taxonomic Distinctness (VarTD)] that also take into account the phylogenetic relationships between phylotypes, it is evident that greatest taxonomic diversity (AvTD) occurred in streamers at 65-70 degrees C, whereas greatest phylogenetic distance between taxa (VarTD) occurred in streamers of 83 degrees C. All models demonstrated that diversity is not related to thermal stress in a linear fashion.

  18. Long-lived Snell dwarf mice display increased proteostatic mechanisms that are not dependent on decreased mTORC1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Joshua C; Bruns, Danielle R; Peelor, Frederick F; Biela, Laurie M; Miller, Richard A; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining proteostasis is thought to be a key factor in slowed aging. In several growth-restricted models of long-life, we have shown evidence of increased proteostatic mechanisms, suggesting that proteostasis may be a shared characteristic of slowed aging. The Snell dwarf mouse is generated through the mutation of the Pit-1 locus causing reductions in multiple hormonal growth factors and mTORC1 signaling. Snell dwarfs are one of the longest lived rodent models of slowed aging. We hypothesized that proteostatic mechanisms would be increased in Snell compared to control (Con) as in other models of slowed aging. Using D2O, we simultaneously assessed protein synthesis in multiple subcellular fractions along with DNA synthesis in skeletal muscle, heart, and liver over 2 weeks in both sexes. We also assessed mTORC1-substrate phosphorylation. Skeletal muscle protein synthesis was decreased in all protein fractions of Snell compared to Con, varied by fraction in heart, and was not different between groups in liver. DNA synthesis was lower in Snell skeletal muscle and heart but not in liver when compared to Con. The new protein to new DNA synthesis ratio was increased threefold in Snell skeletal muscle and heart compared to Con. Snell mTORC1-substrate phosphorylation was decreased only in heart and liver. No effect of sex was seen in this study. Together with our previous investigations in long-lived models, we provide evidence further supporting proteostasis as a shared characteristic of slowed aging and show that increased proteostatic mechanisms may not necessarily require a decrease in mTORC1. PMID:25720574

  19. Long-lived Snell dwarf mice display increased proteostatic mechanisms that are not dependent on decreased mTORC1 activity.

    PubMed

    Drake, Joshua C; Bruns, Danielle R; Peelor, Frederick F; Biela, Laurie M; Miller, Richard A; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2015-06-01

    Maintaining proteostasis is thought to be a key factor in slowed aging. In several growth-restricted models of long-life, we have shown evidence of increased proteostatic mechanisms, suggesting that proteostasis may be a shared characteristic of slowed aging. The Snell dwarf mouse is generated through the mutation of the Pit-1 locus causing reductions in multiple hormonal growth factors and mTORC1 signaling. Snell dwarfs are one of the longest lived rodent models of slowed aging. We hypothesized that proteostatic mechanisms would be increased in Snell compared to control (Con) as in other models of slowed aging. Using D2O, we simultaneously assessed protein synthesis in multiple subcellular fractions along with DNA synthesis in skeletal muscle, heart, and liver over 2 weeks in both sexes. We also assessed mTORC1-substrate phosphorylation. Skeletal muscle protein synthesis was decreased in all protein fractions of Snell compared to Con, varied by fraction in heart, and was not different between groups in liver. DNA synthesis was lower in Snell skeletal muscle and heart but not in liver when compared to Con. The new protein to new DNA synthesis ratio was increased threefold in Snell skeletal muscle and heart compared to Con. Snell mTORC1-substrate phosphorylation was decreased only in heart and liver. No effect of sex was seen in this study. Together with our previous investigations in long-lived models, we provide evidence further supporting proteostasis as a shared characteristic of slowed aging and show that increased proteostatic mechanisms may not necessarily require a decrease in mTORC1.

  20. Paperlike thermochromic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Peng, Suili; Wen, Weijia; Sheng, Ping

    2007-05-01

    The authors report the design and implementation of a paperlike, thermally activated display fabricated from thermochromic composite and embedded conductive wiring patterns, shaped from mixture of metallic nanoparticles in polydimethylsioxane using soft lithography. The display exhibits good image quality and ease of control. Use of electric heating pulses is shown to reduce energy consumption while improving image quality control. The display has excellent mechanical bending flexibility.

  1. Plasma Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma displays use the physical phenomena of the gas discharge and are frequently called gas discharge displays. This is a rather mature display technology that has seen commercial success over a wide size range, from small single digits to one meter diagonal graphics displays having 2 million pixels. Plasma displays currently enjoy the dominant position in large flat panel display technologies. They are likely to maintain that position in at least the next five years because of the many properties of the gas discharge ideally suited for flat panel matrix displays.

  2. Displaying Data As Movies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Judith G.

    1992-01-01

    NMSB Movie computer program displays large sets of data (more than million individual values). Presentation dynamic, rapidly displaying sequential image "frames" in main "movie" window. Any sequence of two-dimensional sets of data scaled between 0 and 255 (1-byte resolution) displayed as movie. Time- or slice-wise progression of data illustrated. Originally written to present data from three-dimensional ultrasonic scans of damaged aerospace composite materials, illustrates data acquired by thermal-analysis systems measuring rates of heating and cooling of various materials. Developed on Macintosh IIx computer with 8-bit color display adapter and 8 megabytes of memory using Symantec Corporation's Think C, version 4.0.

  3. Anomalous decrease of the specific heat capacity at the electrical and thermal conductivity percolation threshold in nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.-W.; Park, S.-H.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    We report an unusual specific heat variation in nanotube/polymer composites, related to a reduction in its value at the electrical and the thermal conductivity percolation threshold, with a concomitant increase in the crystallinity. The reduction has been interpreted in terms of the partition of the total number of nanostructures into isolated or clustered/connected entities, the numbers of which vary as a function of the nanotube filler fraction, and the consequent modulation of the entropic characteristics as well as the conductivity.

  4. Preparation of ordered mesoporous alumina-doped titania films with high thermal stability and their application to high-speed passive-matrix electrochromic displays.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiangfen; Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad; Weng, Wu; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Oveisi, Hamid; Suzuki, Norihiro; Chen, Wei-Jung; Huang, Yu-Tzu; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2013-08-12

    Ordered mesoporous alumina-doped titania thin films with anatase crystalline structure were prepared by using triblock copolymer Pluronic P123 as structure-directing agent. Uniform Al doping was realized by using aluminum isopropoxide as a dopant source which can be hydrolyzed together with titanium tetraisopropoxide. Aluminum doping into the titania framework can prevent rapid crystallization to the anatase phase, thereby drastically increasing thermal stability. With increasing Al content, the crystallization temperatures tend to increase gradually. Even when the Al content doped into the framework was increased to 15 mol %, a well-ordered mesoporous structure was obtained, and the mesostructural ordering was still maintained after calcination at 550 °C. During the calcination process, large uniaxial shrinkage occurred along the direction perpendicular to the substrate with retention of the horizontal mesoscale periodicity, whereby vertically oriented nanopillars were formed in the film. The resulting vertical porosity was successfully exploited to fabricate a high-speed and high-quality passive-matrix electrochromic display by using a leuco dye. The vertical nanospace in the films can effectively prevent drifting of the leuco dye.

  5. The thermal aggregation of ovalbumin as large particles decreases its allergenicity for egg allergic patients and in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Claude, M; Lupi, R; Bouchaud, G; Bodinier, M; Brossard, C; Denery-Papini, S

    2016-07-15

    Most egg-allergic children can tolerate extensively cooked eggs. Ovalbumin, a major allergen in egg whites, is prone to aggregate upon heating. This study compares ovalbumin's allergenicity when it is aggregated as large particles to ovalbumin in its native form. Immunoglobulins (Ig)-binding and the degranulation capacities of native and aggregated ovalbumin were measured with sera from egg-allergic children and from mice sensitized to native or aggregated ovalbumin. The influence of ovalbumin structure on Ig production upon sensitization and elicitation potency by challenge was also studied. We showed that heat aggregation of ovalbumin as large particles enhances IgG production and promotes IgG2a production (a shift toward the T helper 1 profile). Aggregated ovalbumin displayed lower Ig-binding and basophil-activation capacities for sera from both allergic patients and mice. This work illustrates the links between ovalbumin structure after heating and allergenicity potential using parameters from both the sensitization and elicitation phases of the allergic reaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Extrusion-formed uranium-2. 4 wt % article with decreased linear thermal expansion and method for making the same. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.C.; Jones, J.M.; Kollie, T.G.

    1982-05-24

    The present invention is directed to the fabrication of an article of uranium-2.4 wt % niobium alloy in which the linear thermal expansion in the direction transverse to the extrusion direction is less than about 0.98% between 22 and 600/sup 0/C which corresponds to a value greater than the 1.04% provided by previous extrusion operations over the same temperature range. The article with the improved thermal expansion possesses a yield strength at 0.2% offset of at least 400 MPa, an ultimate tensile strength of 1050 MPa, a compressive yield strength of at least 0.2% offset of at least 675 MPa, and an elongation of at least 25% over 25.4 mm/s. To provide this article with the improved thermal expansion, the uranium alloy billet is heated to 630/sup 0/C and extruded in the alpha phase through a die with a reduction ratio of at least 8.4:1 at a ram speed no greater than 6.8 mm/s. These critical extrusion parameters provide the article with a desired decrease in the linear thermal expansion while maintaining the selected mechanical properties without encountering crystal disruption in the article.

  7. Display Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetlow, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Display took a wide variety of forms ranging from students presenting their initial planning and thought processes, to displays of their finished work, and their suggestions for extending the task should they, or others, have time to return to it in the future. A variety of different media were used from traditional posters in many shapes and…

  8. Registration of Forbush decrease 2012/03/08 with a global net of the thermal neutron scintillation en-detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, V.; Arneodo, F.; Bruno, G.; Fulgione, W.; Gromushkin, D.; Shchegolev, O.; Stenkin, Yu; Stepanov, V.; Sulakov, V.

    2013-02-01

    Forbush decrease was recorded for the first time with a global net of the neutron scintillation detectors (en-detectors) developed in INR RAS. The detectors are located at four geographic points: Baksan (43E, 43N), Gran Sasso, Italy (13E, 42N), Moscow (37E, 56N) and Obninsk (38E, 55N). This experimental fact by itself shows not only the possibility of using the detectors for cosmic ray variations study but also unbiasly supports the nuclear physics method developed by us as a novel instrument both for geophysical researches and for neutron environment monitoring.

  9. The reproductive performance of female goats treated with melatonin is not improved after introduction to bucks displaying springtime sexual activity if these does are experiencing decreasing body weight/condition score.

    PubMed

    Zarazaga, L A; Gatica, M C; Gallego-Calvo, L; Guzmán, J L

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to determine whether treatment with melatonin modifies the reproductive response of female goats experiencing increasing or decreasing body weight (BW)/body condition score (BCS) when introduced to bucks displaying springtime sexual activity. During natural anoestrus, 53 does were isolated from bucks for a period of 42days and distributed into two groups: 1) low BW/low BCS animals (N=24) (LLg group), which were fed 1.9 times their maintenance requirements so they would experience increasing BW and BCS; and 2) high BW/high BCS animals (N=29) (HHl group), which were fed 0.4 times their maintenance requirements so they would experience decreasing BW and BCS. Half of each group was treated, or not, with melatonin (LLg+Mel N=12, HHl+Mel N=15, LLg-Mel N=12 and HHl-Mel N=14). On 6th May they were introduced to six males, showing natural sexual activity, fitted with marking harnesses (thus permitting the detection of oestrous activity). The ovulation rate was assessed by transrectal ultrasonography and confirmed via the plasma progesterone concentration (measured twice per week in blood samples). Plasma glucose, IGF-1 and non-esterified fatty acid concentrations were also determined, along with the conception rate, fertility, prolificacy and productivity of the does. LH concentrations and LH pulsatility were also recorded in the hours around introduction to the males. 'Oestrous plus ovulation' was observed only in does treated with melatonin. A higher conception rate and greater fertility and productivity were observed among the LLg+Mel does. These females showed higher glucose and IGF-1 concentrations after the introduction of the males. LH concentrations increased after male introduction independent of all other conditions. In conclusion, the present results show that treatment with melatonin does not enhance reproductive performance in does experiencing decreasing BW/BCS, but can improve it when does are experiencing increasing BW

  10. Projection displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, George L.; Yang, Kei H.

    1998-08-01

    Projection display in today's market is dominated by cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Further progress in this mature CRT projector technology will be slow and evolutionary. Liquid crystal based projection displays have gained rapid acceptance in the business market. New technologies are being developed on several fronts: (1) active matrix built from polysilicon or single crystal silicon; (2) electro- optic materials using ferroelectric liquid crystal, polymer dispersed liquid crystals or other liquid crystal modes, (3) micromechanical-based transducers such as digital micromirror devices, and grating light valves, (4) high resolution displays to SXGA and beyond, and (5) high brightness. This article reviews the projection displays from a transducer technology perspective along with a discussion of markets and trends.

  11. Defense display market assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1998-09-01

    This paper addresses the number, function and size of principal military displays and establishes a basis to determine the opportunities for technology insertion in the immediate future and into the next millennium. Principal military displays are defined as those occupying appreciable crewstation real-estate and/or those without which the platform could not carry out its intended mission. DoD 'office' applications are excluded from this study. The military displays market is specified by such parameters as active area and footprint size, and other characteristics such as luminance, gray scale, resolution, angle, color, video capability, and night vision imaging system (NVIS) compatibility. Funded, future acquisitions, planned and predicted crewstation modification kits, and form-fit upgrades are taken into account. This paper provides an overview of the DoD niche market, allowing both government and industry a necessary reference by which to meet DoD requirements for military displays in a timely and cost-effective manner. The aggregate DoD market for direct-view and large-area military displays is presently estimated to be in excess of 242,000. Miniature displays are those which must be magnified to be viewed, involve a significantly different manufacturing paradigm and are used in helmet mounted displays and thermal weapon sight applications. Some 114,000 miniature displays are presently included within Service weapon system acquisition plans. For vendor production planning purposes it is noted that foreign military sales could substantially increase these quantities. The vanishing vendor syndrome (VVS) for older display technologies continues to be a growing, pervasive problem throughout DoD, which consequently must leverage the more modern display technologies being developed for civil- commercial markets.

  12. Plasma displays

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, A.

    1991-12-01

    Plasma displays make use of lightly ionized glow discharges to produce light, perform switching and selection functions, or both. Both the negative glow and the positive column are used. Color can be attained by using UV from the discharge to stimulate phosphors. The adroit use of priming can reduce the number of drive circuits required - an advantage unique in the display art to plasma devices. Short voltage pulses can improve the efficacy of positive-column devices. Short voltage pulses can improve the efficacy of positive-column devices. The gas discharge can be used as a source of electrons, which can then excite cathodoluminescent phosphors in a variety of colors. It can also be used as a selection means for liquid-crystal displays. In this paper a wide variety of device configurations, using both unidirectional and bidirectional pulse excitations, is described.

  13. Surface Chemistry Manipulation of Gold Nanorods Displays High Cellular Uptake In Vitro While Preserving Optical Properties for Bio-Imaging and Photo-Thermal Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-28

    substantial level of cellular uptake while displaying a unique intracellular clustering pattern. This clustering pattern significantly reduces...association and in vitro intracellular hyperspectral signature .............................15 4.4 High uptake with unique clustering pattern of MTAB...Visualization of intracellular clustering pattern of MTAB-TA GNRs ..........................22 Figure 9. Visualization of MTAB-TA GNRs cellular retention

  14. MITE display.

    PubMed

    Casa, Alexandra M; Nagel, Alexander; Wessler, Susan R

    2004-01-01

    Genome size differences among crop plants are largely due to unequal accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences, mainly transposable elements (TEs). Over the past decade, many families of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) have been identified and characterized in a variety of organisms including animals and plants. MITEs are characterized by short terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) (10-15 bp), small size (approx 100 to 500 bp), high-copy-number (approx 1000 to 15,000 per haploid genome), and a preference for insertion into 2-bp to 3-bp targets that are rich in A and T residues. In this chapter, we present a modified transposon display procedure based on the maize MITE family Heartbreaker (Hbr). This technique is similar to AFLP in which AFLP adaptors are ligated to compatible ends of digested genomic DNA. Subsets of Hbr-containing fragments are then amplified using one AFLP primer and another primer complementary to an internal sequence of the Hbr element. Like AFLP, the Hbr display method permits the simultaneous analysis of numerous DNA fragments. Given the plethora of available marker systems, the major advantage of Hbr markers, and perhaps most MITE-based markers, is a preference for insertion in or near transcriptionally active genomic regions. This feature may be especially valuable in the large genomes of agriculturally important plants like maize, wheat, and barley where gene-rich islands are thought to exist in a sea of retrotransposons. Having a class of markers that are enriched in genic regions, coupled with the ease of isolating MITE markers, could expedite chromosome walks and map-based cloning protocols in these organisms.

  15. Thermal Photon Radiation in High Multiplicity display='inline'>p+Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-02-18

    We observed the collective behavior of hadronic particles in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. In our work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. Moreover, the thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low pT direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2–3 in 0%–1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermal photon enhancement can therefore serve as a signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems.

  16. Non-thermal plasma inhibits human cervical cancer HeLa cells invasiveness by suppressing the MAPK pathway and decreasing matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Yu, K. N.; Bao, Lingzhi; Shen, Jie; Cheng, Cheng; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for anticancer treatment. However, the mechanism underlying its biological effects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of NTP on the invasion of HeLa cells, and explored the possible mechanism. Our results showed that NTP exposure for 20 or 40 s significantly suppressed the migration and invasion of HeLa cells on the basis of matrigel invasion assay and wound healing assay, respectively. Moreover, NTP reduced the activity and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 enzyme. Western blot analysis indicated that NTP exposure effectively decreased phosphorylation level of both ERK1/2 and JNK, but not p38 MAPK. Furthermore, treatment with MAPK signal pathway inhibitors or NTP all exhibited significant depression of HeLa cells migration and MMP-9 expression. The result showed that NTP synergistically suppressed migration and MMP-9 expression in the presence of ERK1/2 inhibitor and JNK inhibitor, but not p38 MAPK inhibitor. Taken together, these findings suggested that NTP exposure inhibited the migration and invasion of HeLa cells via down-regulating MMP-9 expression in ERK1/2 and JNK signaling pathways dependent manner. These findings provide hints to the potential clinical research and therapy of NTP on cervical cancer metastasis.

  17. Displays, deja vu.

    PubMed

    Huntoon, R B

    1985-02-01

    Developments in electronic displays and computers have enabled avionics designers to present the pilot with ever-increasing amounts of information in greater detail and with more accuracy. However, technicological developments have not always brought about enhancement of the pilot's role as aircraft systems manager. In fact, there is evidence that the new technology may add to the pilot's workload to the extent that his performance decreases. Recent articles and reports of research indicate that application of human factor principles and procedures to: (1) develop appropriate display formats, (2) consider the total avionics suite as an integrated system, and (3) simplify or summarize related data will significantly improve total aircraft performance. Indeed, development of the "chip" and new display techniques create an imperative demand for human factor considerations early in system design, ensuring that user evaluation, information integration, and simplification are intrinsic qualities of the system.

  18. Dichroic Liquid Crystal Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    Addressed Dichroic SA Displays * Thermally and Electrically Addressed Dichroic SA Displays * FLUORESCENT DICHROIC LCDs * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  19. Cenozoic tectono-thermal history of the Tordrillo Mountains, Alaska: Paleocene-Eocene ridge subduction, decreasing relief, and late Neogene faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benowitz, Jeff A.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Layer, Paul W.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Wallace, Wes K.; Gillis, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic development inboard of the continental margin is a predicted response to ridge subduction. New thermochronology results from the western Alaska Range document ridge subduction related orogenesis. K-feldspar thermochronology (KFAT) of bedrock samples from the Tordrillo Mountains in the western Alaska Range complement existing U-Pb, 40Ar/39Ar and AFT (apatite fission track) data to provide constraints on Paleocene pluton emplacement, and cooling as well as Late Eocene to Miocene vertical movements and exhumation along fault-bounded blocks. Based on the KFAT analysis we infer rapid exhumation-related cooling during the Eocene in the Tordrillo Mountains. Our KFAT cooling ages are coeval with deposition of clastic sediments in the Cook Inlet, Matanuska Valley and Tanana basins, which reflect high-energy depositional environments. The Tordrillo Mountains KFAT cooling ages are also the same as cooling ages in the Iliamna Lake region, the Kichatna Mountains of the western Alaska Range, and Mt. Logan in the Wrangell-St. Elias Mountains, thus rapid cooling at this time encompasses a broad region inboard of, and parallel to, the continental margin extending for several hundred kilometers. We infer these cooling events and deposition of clastic rocks are related to thermal effects that track the eastward passage of a slab window in Paleocene-Eocene time related to the subduction of the proposed Resurrection-Kula spreading ridge. In addition, we conclude that the reconstructed KFATmax negative age-elevation relationship is likely related to a long period of decreasing relief in the Tordrillo Mountains.

  20. Cenozoic tectono-thermal history of the Tordrillo Mountains, Alaska: Paleocene-Eocene ridge subduction, decreasing relief, and late Neogene faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benowitz, Jeff A.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Layer, Paul W.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Wallace, Wes K.; Gillis, Robert J.

    2012-04-01

    Topographic development inboard of the continental margin is a predicted response to ridge subduction. New thermochronology results from the western Alaska Range document ridge subduction related orogenesis. K-feldspar thermochronology (KFAT) of bedrock samples from the Tordrillo Mountains in the western Alaska Range complement existing U-Pb, 40Ar/39Ar and AFT (apatite fission track) data to provide constraints on Paleocene pluton emplacement, and cooling as well as Late Eocene to Miocene vertical movements and exhumation along fault-bounded blocks. Based on the KFAT analysis we infer rapid exhumation-related cooling during the Eocene in the Tordrillo Mountains. Our KFAT cooling ages are coeval with deposition of clastic sediments in the Cook Inlet, Matanuska Valley and Tanana basins, which reflect high-energy depositional environments. The Tordrillo Mountains KFAT cooling ages are also the same as cooling ages in the Iliamna Lake region, the Kichatna Mountains of the western Alaska Range, and Mt. Logan in the Wrangell-St. Elias Mountains, thus rapid cooling at this time encompasses a broad region inboard of, and parallel to, the continental margin extending for several hundred kilometers. We infer these cooling events and deposition of clastic rocks are related to thermal effects that track the eastward passage of a slab window in Paleocene-Eocene time related to the subduction of the proposed Resurrection-Kula spreading ridge. In addition, we conclude that the reconstructed KFATmax negative age-elevation relationship is likely related to a long period of decreasing relief in the Tordrillo Mountains.

  1. Cooling of organic light-emitting diode display panels with heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sure, Anita; Vankayala, Gowtham Kumar; Baranwal, Vaibhav; Paramanandam, Karthikeyan; Sarma, Kalluri R.; Asokan, S.

    2016-05-01

    Organic light-emitting diode half life is a function of temperature and it decreases with increase in operating temperature. Hence thermal management is important for the efficient operation of OLED based displays. High luminance applications like aerospace cockpits require high power densities which lead to increase in their operating temperatures. Passive cooling is the preferred choice in aerospace applications. In this work passive cooling option with heat pipes is studied and implemented to reduce the display temperature rise.

  2. Reducing Agents Decrease the Oxidative Burst and Improve Clinical Outcomes in COPD Patients: A Randomised Controlled Trial on the Effects of Sulphurous Thermal Water Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Gnesini, Giulia; Forini, Giacomo; Marku, Brunilda; Pauletti, Alessia; Padovani, Anna; Casolari, Paolo; Taurino, Liliana; Ferraro, Andrea; Chicca, Milva; Ciaccia, Adalberto; Papi, Alberto; Pinamonti, Silvano

    2013-01-01

    Background. Inhalation of thermal water with antioxidant properties is empirically used for COPD. Aims. To evaluate the effects of sulphurous thermal water (reducing agents) on airway oxidant stress and clinical outcomes in COPD. Methods. Forty moderate-to-severe COPD patients were randomly assigned to receive 12-day inhalation with sulphurous thermal water or isotonic saline. Patients were assessed for superoxide anion (O2−) production in the exhaled breath condensate and clinical outcomes at recruitment, the day after the conclusion of the 12-day inhalation treatment, and one month after the end of the inhalation treatment. Results. Inhalation of reducing agents resulted in a significant reduction of O2− production in exhaled breath condensate of COPD patients at the end of the inhalatory treatment and at followup compared to baseline. A significant improvement in the COPD assessment test (CAT) questionnaire was shown one month after the end of the inhalatory treatment only in patients receiving sulphurous water. Conclusion. Thermal water inhalation produced an in vivo antioxidant effect and improvement in health status in COPD patients. Larger studies are required in order to evaluate whether inhalation of thermal water is able to modify relevant clinical outcomes of the disease (the study was registered at clinicaltrial.gov—identifier: NCT01664767). PMID:24453924

  3. Reducing agents decrease the oxidative burst and improve clinical outcomes in COPD patients: a randomised controlled trial on the effects of sulphurous thermal water inhalation.

    PubMed

    Contoli, Marco; Gnesini, Giulia; Forini, Giacomo; Marku, Brunilda; Pauletti, Alessia; Padovani, Anna; Casolari, Paolo; Taurino, Liliana; Ferraro, Andrea; Chicca, Milva; Ciaccia, Adalberto; Papi, Alberto; Pinamonti, Silvano

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation of thermal water with antioxidant properties is empirically used for COPD. To evaluate the effects of sulphurous thermal water (reducing agents) on airway oxidant stress and clinical outcomes in COPD. Forty moderate-to-severe COPD patients were randomly assigned to receive 12-day inhalation with sulphurous thermal water or isotonic saline. Patients were assessed for superoxide anion (O2 (-)) production in the exhaled breath condensate and clinical outcomes at recruitment, the day after the conclusion of the 12-day inhalation treatment, and one month after the end of the inhalation treatment. Inhalation of reducing agents resulted in a significant reduction of O2 (-) production in exhaled breath condensate of COPD patients at the end of the inhalatory treatment and at followup compared to baseline. A significant improvement in the COPD assessment test (CAT) questionnaire was shown one month after the end of the inhalatory treatment only in patients receiving sulphurous water. Thermal water inhalation produced an in vivo antioxidant effect and improvement in health status in COPD patients. Larger studies are required in order to evaluate whether inhalation of thermal water is able to modify relevant clinical outcomes of the disease (the study was registered at clinicaltrial.gov-identifier: NCT01664767).

  4. Updated defense display market assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1999-08-01

    This paper addresses the number, function and size of principal military displays and establishes a basis to determine the opportunities for technology insertion in the immediate future and into the next millennium. Principal military displays are defined as those occupying appreciable crewstation real-estate and/or those without which the platform could not carry out its intended mission. DoD 'office' applications are excluded from this study. The military displays market is specified by such parameters as active area and footprint size, and other characteristics such as luminance, gray scale, resolution, angle, color, video capability, and night vision imaging system compatibility. Funded, future acquisitions, planned and predicted crewstation modification kits, and form-fit upgrades are taken into account. This paper provides an overview of the DoD niche market, allowing both government and industry a necessary reference by which to meet DoD requirements for military displays in a timely and cost-effective manner. The aggregate DoD installed base for direct-view and large-area military displays is presently estimated to be in excess of 313,000. Miniature displays are those which must be magnified to be viewed, involve a significantly different manufacturing paradigm and are used in helmet mounted displays and thermal weapon sight applications. Some 114,000 miniature displays are presently included within future weapon system acquisition plans. For vendor production planning purposes it is noted that foreign military sales could substantially increase these quantities. The vanishing vendor syndrome (VVS) for older display technologies continues to be a growing, pervasive problem throughout DoD, which consequently must leverage the more modern, especially flat panel, display technologies being developed to replace older, especially cathode ray tube, technology for civil-commercial markets. Total DoD display needs (FPD, HMD) are some 427,000.

  5. Solid State Electrochromic Display Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnke, Odile; Bohnke, Claude

    1989-12-01

    Polymer electrolyte - based display devices are of growing importance in view of their specific properties compared to liquid devices. One of them is, of course, the possibility to obtain all solid-state devices without leakage and another one, may be more interesting, is the possibility to obtain a strong dependence of the response time of the display on the temperature. Such a property may be conveniently used for the realization of devices with specific applications such as thermal sensors or heated display devices, for instance. The optical response characteristics of amorphous W03/polymeric electrolyte/stainless steel electrochromic display (ECD) devices have been investigated using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry coupled with optical reflection measurements. The variations of both the colouration time and the colouring efficency with temperature are related to both the ionic conductivity of the polymer and the phase diagram of the polymer.

  6. Display formats manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The standards and procedures for the generation of operational display formats to be used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) display control system are presented. The required effort, forms, and fundamentals for the design, specifications, and production of display formats are identified. The principles of display design and system constraints controlling the creation of optimum operational displays for mission control are explained. The basic two types of MCC display systems for presenting information are described.

  7. Neodymium isotopic evidence for decreasing crustal contributions to cenozoic ignimbrites of the western United States. Implications for the thermal evolution of the Cordilleran crust

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, F.V. ); DePaolo, D.J. ); Baldridge, W.S. )

    1993-07-01

    We have estimated the crustal contributions to 12 early Oligocene to Pleistocene rhyolite systems located throughout the Cordillera. We have determined that (1) crustal contributions to large-volume rhyolite systems decrease from the Oligocene to the Miocene, and (2) rhyolite systems younger than 20 Ma are dominated by mantle components. The crustal contributions to rhyolite systems may be controlled by system size and duration, crustal thickness, tectonic setting, crustal composition, crustal density, and crustal temperature. We conclude that regional cooling of the lower crust, which progressively limited the amount of crustal wallrock assimilated by rhyolite systems, is the only parameter that is consistent with geologic and geochemical data for rhyolite systems and the geologic evolution of the Cordillera. A quantitative model that relates the amount of crustal contribution to assimilation/recharge rates and the temperature of the crust indicates that lower-crustal temperatures would have to decrease about 300[degrees]C between early Oligocene and early Miocene time to account for the decrease in crustal contributions. 57 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Stereoscopic Flat Panel Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    the display of stereo imagery have been demonstrated. Stereoscopic displays typically require the user to wear special headgear. Autostereoscopic ...components and the resulting changes in the encoding algorithm. Keywords: Stereoscopic display, LCD, 3D , polarization encoding, flat panel 1...panel display when viewing non-stereoscopic imagery or data. Remotely operated vehicles do not represent the only potential application for 3D

  9. Electrochromic display device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, M. M.

    1984-07-01

    This invention relates to electrochromic devices. In one aspect it relates to electrically controllable display devices. In another aspect it relates to electrically tunable optical or light filters. In yet another aspect it relates to a chemical sensor device which employs a color changing film. There are many uses for electrically controllable display devices. A number of such devices have been in commercial use for some time. These display devices include liquid crystal displays, light emitting diode displays, plasma displays, and the like. Light emitting diode displays and plasma display panels both suffer from the fact that they are active. Light emissive devices which require substantial power for their operation, In addition, it is difficult to fabricate light emitting diode displays in a manner which renders them easily distinguishable under bright ambient illumination. Liquid crystal displays suffer from the disadvantage that they are operative only over a limited temperature range and have substantially no memory within the liquid crystal material.

  10. System status display information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.; Erickson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The system Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the flight crew with enhanced capabilities for monitoring and managing aircraft systems. Guidelines for the design of the electronic system displays were established. The technical approach involved the application of a system engineering approach to the design of candidate displays and the evaluation of a Hernative concepts by part-task simulation. The system engineering and selection of candidate displays are covered.

  11. Dynamic heater for display elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehmlow, Brian P.; Bishop, Gary D.; Steffensmeier, Martin J.; Sampica, James D.; Skarohlid, Mark C.

    1997-07-01

    Liquid crystal display (LCD) deliver optimal performance when the entire display surface is isothermal and at a controllable temperature. This condition creates uniform electro-optical properties within the liquid crystal layer. This paper describes a dynamic, multicontact heater system that actively compensates for uneven heat loads, thereby creating the desired isothermal condition. The heater system includes a uniform resistive sheet, with multiple electrical contacts around the perimeter. A switch network connects each heater contact to a power supply, ground potential, or a high impedance. A microprocessor monitors the display temperature, and detects non-uniformity, and selectively applies heat to cold areas of the display. The dynamic heater system employs a variety of heating patterns to create the desired isothermal condition.Heating patterns vary in duration, power applied, and location on the display face. The microprocessor control loop can also detect and isolate faulty drive elements, and compensate for non- uniformity in the heater itself. The heater prevents stress- induced delaminations, mechanical distortions, and stress- induced birefringence in optical components. Test results indicate that a dynamic heater can be beneficial in the thermal design of LCD products.

  12. Enhanced antiadhesive properties of chitosan/hyaluronic acid polyelectrolyte multilayers driven by thermal annealing: Low adherence for mammalian cells and selective decrease in adhesion for Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Muzzio, Nicolás E; Pasquale, Miguel A; Diamanti, Eleftheria; Gregurec, Danijela; Moro, Marta Martinez; Azzaroni, Omar; Moya, Sergio E

    2017-11-01

    The development of antifouling coatings with restricted cell and bacteria adherence is fundamental for many biomedical applications. A strategy for the fabrication of antifouling coatings based on the layer-by-layer assembly and thermal annealing is presented. Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) assembled from chitosan and hyaluronic acid were thermally annealed in an oven at 37°C for 72h. The effect of annealing on the PEM properties and topography was studied by atomic force microscopy, ζ-potential, circular dichroism and contact angle measurements. Cell adherence on PEMs before and after annealing was evaluated by measuring the cell spreading area and aspect ratio for the A549 epithelial, BHK kidney fibroblast, C2C12 myoblast and MC-3T3-E1 osteoblast cell lines. Chitosan/hyaluronic acid PEMs show a low cell adherence that decreases with the thermal annealing, as observed from the reduction in the average cell spreading area and more rounded cell morphology. The adhesion of S. aureus (Gram-positive) and E. coli (Gram-negative) bacteria strains was quantified by optical microscopy, counting the number of colony-forming units and measuring the light scattering of bacteria suspension after detachment from the PEM surface. A 20% decrease in bacteria adhesion was selectively observed in the S. aureus strain after annealing. The changes in mammalian cell and bacteria adhesion correlate with the changes in topography of the chitosan/hyaluronic PEMs from a rough fibrillar 3D structure to a smoother and planar surface after thermal annealing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Seamless tiled display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubin, Matthew B. (Inventor); Larson, Brent D. (Inventor); Kolosowsky, Aleksandra (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular and scalable seamless tiled display apparatus includes multiple display devices, a screen, and multiple lens assemblies. Each display device is subdivided into multiple sections, and each section is configured to display a sectional image. One of the lens assemblies is optically coupled to each of the sections of each of the display devices to project the sectional image displayed on that section onto the screen. The multiple lens assemblies are configured to merge the projected sectional images to form a single tiled image. The projected sectional images may be merged on the screen by magnifying and shifting the images in an appropriate manner. The magnification and shifting of these images eliminates any visual effect on the tiled display that may result from dead-band regions defined between each pair of adjacent sections on each display device, and due to gaps between multiple display devices.

  14. Thin optical display panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James Thomas

    1997-01-01

    An optical display includes a plurality of optical waveguides each including a cladding bound core for guiding internal display light between first and second opposite ends by total internal reflection. The waveguides are stacked together to define a collective display thickness. Each of the cores includes a heterogeneous portion defining a light scattering site disposed longitudinally between the first and second ends. Adjacent ones of the sites are longitudinally offset from each other for forming a longitudinal internal image display over the display thickness upon scattering of internal display light thereagainst for generating a display image. In a preferred embodiment, the waveguides and scattering sites are transparent for transmitting therethrough an external image in superposition with the display image formed by scattering the internal light off the scattering sites for defining a heads up display.

  15. Scalability of Robotic Displays: Display Size Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    active matrix touch screen display (see figure 1). The screen is a super video graphics array 12.1 inches diagonal with 800x600-pixel resolution...ounces) super- video graphics display, high resolution (800x600) pictures with a 1.425-inch diagonal picture. The device used in this study was a...from a portable operator control unit that provides continuous data and video feedback for precise vehicle positioning. It was developed for the

  16. Pregnant female lizards Iberolacerta cyreni adjust refuge use to decrease thermal costs for their body condition and cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Amo, Luisa; López, Pilar; Martín, José

    2007-02-01

    Lizards often respond to increased predation risk by increasing refuge use, but this strategy may entail a loss of thermoregulatory opportunities, which may lead to a loss of body condition. This may be especially important for pregnant oviparous female lizards, because they need to maintain optimal body temperatures as long as possible to maximize developmental embryos rate until laying. However, little is known about how increased time spent at low temperatures in refuges affects body condition and health state of pregnant female lizards. Furthermore, it is not clear how initial body condition affects refuge use. Female Iberian rock lizards forced to increase time spent at low temperatures showed lower body condition and tended to show lower cell-mediated immune responses than control females. Therefore, the loss of thermoregulatory opportunities seems to be an important cost for pregnant females. Nevertheless, thereafter, when we simulated two repeated predatory attacks, females modified refuge use in relation to their body condition, with females with worse condition decreasing time hidden after attacks. In conclusion, female lizards seemed able to compensate increased predation risk with flexible antipredatory strategies, thus minimizing costs for body condition and health state.

  17. Skylab indicators (event timer) (secondary display) (four-digit metabolic display)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiberg, W.

    1971-01-01

    The effort expended in developing the following indicators is summarized: (1) event timer; (2) secondary display; and (3) 4 digit display (metabolic). The mechanical design, vibration analysis, and thermal analysis of all these units are identical, and descriptions pertain to all three units. All problems incurred during the program are discussed along with the recommendations, conclusions, and actions taken to rectify the situations.

  18. EMU helmet mounted display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmolejo, Jose (Inventor); Smith, Stephen (Inventor); Plough, Alan (Inventor); Clarke, Robert (Inventor); Mclean, William (Inventor); Fournier, Joseph (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A helmet mounted display device is disclosed for projecting a display on a flat combiner surface located above the line of sight where the display is produced by two independent optical channels with independent LCD image generators. The display has a fully overlapped field of view on the combiner surface and the focus can be adjusted from a near field of four feet to infinity.

  19. XVD Image Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Andres, Paul M.; Mortensen, Helen B.; Parizher, Vadim; McAuley, Myche; Bartholomew, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The XVD [X-Windows VICAR (video image communication and retrieval) Display] computer program offers an interactive display of VICAR and PDS (planetary data systems) images. It is designed to efficiently display multiple-GB images and runs on Solaris, Linux, or Mac OS X systems using X-Windows.

  20. Screens and Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edstrom, Malin

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the characteristics of different computer screen technologies including the possible harmful effects on health of cathode ray tube (CRT) terminals. CRT's are compared to other technologies including liquid crystal displays, plasma displays, electroluminiscence displays, and light emitting diodes. A chart comparing the different…

  1. Screens and Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edstrom, Malin

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the characteristics of different computer screen technologies including the possible harmful effects on health of cathode ray tube (CRT) terminals. CRT's are compared to other technologies including liquid crystal displays, plasma displays, electroluminiscence displays, and light emitting diodes. A chart comparing the different…

  2. Digital video display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zygielbaum, A. I.; Martin, W. L.; Engle, A.

    1973-01-01

    System displays image data in real time on 120,000-element raster scan with 2, 4, or 8 shades of grey. Designed for displaying planetary range Doppler data, system can be used for X-Y plotting, displaying alphanumerics, and providing image animation.

  3. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  4. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  5. Personal Display Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Shalf, John; Bethel, E. Wes; Siegerist, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    The LBNL Visualization Group has created a tiled display wall design that uses components that are readily available from a local hardware store and/or multiple online vendors, and requires minimal tools and skill to assemble. The result is a low-cost, easy to assemble tiled display device that is readily accessible to visualization researchers and domain scientists alike. The LBNL Personal Display (PD) Wall differentiates itself from other LCD-matrix displays because its design minimizes cost and complexity while retaining the functionality of its more expensive tiled display brethren. The PD-Wall occupies the same amount of desktop area as a large flatscreen LCD display panel. LBNL will be publishing and distributing simple plans so that any laboratory or user site can construct their own copies of this device.

  6. Multimission helicopter cockpit displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, William S.; Terry, Jody K.; Lovelace, Nancy D.

    1996-05-01

    A new operator display subsystem is being incorporated as part of the next generation United States Navy (USN) helicopter avionics system to be integrated into the multi-mission helicopter (MMH) that replaces both the SH-60B and the SH-60F in 2001. This subsystem exploits state-of-the-art technology for the display hardware, the display driver hardware, information presentation methodologies, and software architecture. Both of the existing SH-60 helicopter display systems are based on monochrome CRT technology; a key feature of the MMH cockpit is the integration of color AMLCD multifunction displays. The MMH program is one of the first military programs to use modified commercial AMLCD elements in a tactical aircraft. This paper presents the general configuration of the MMH cockpit and multifunction display subsystem and discusses the approach taken for presenting helicopter flight information to the pilots as well as presentation of mission sensor data for use by the copilot.

  7. Polyplanar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L.; Beiser, L.

    1997-07-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the electronic interfacing to the DLP{trademark} chip, the opto-mechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  8. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  9. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  10. Display innovations through glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Lori L.

    2016-03-01

    Prevailing trends in thin, lightweight, high-resolution, and added functionality, such as touch sensing, continue to drive innovation in the display market. While display volumes grow, so do consumers’ need for portability, enhanced optical performance, and mechanical reliability. Technical advancements in glass design and process have enabled display innovations in these areas while supporting industry growth. Opportunities for further innovation remain open for glass manufacturers to drive new applications, enhanced functionality, and increased demand.

  11. JAVA Stereo Display Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Karina

    2008-01-01

    This toolkit provides a common interface for displaying graphical user interface (GUI) components in stereo using either specialized stereo display hardware (e.g., liquid crystal shutter or polarized glasses) or anaglyph display (red/blue glasses) on standard workstation displays. An application using this toolkit will work without modification in either environment, allowing stereo software to reach a wider audience without sacrificing high-quality display on dedicated hardware. The toolkit is written in Java for use with the Swing GUI Toolkit and has cross-platform compatibility. It hooks into the graphics system, allowing any standard Swing component to be displayed in stereo. It uses the OpenGL graphics library to control the stereo hardware and to perform the rendering. It also supports anaglyph and special stereo hardware using the same API (application-program interface), and has the ability to simulate color stereo in anaglyph mode by combining the red band of the left image with the green/blue bands of the right image. This is a low-level toolkit that accomplishes simply the display of components (including the JadeDisplay image display component). It does not include higher-level functions such as disparity adjustment, 3D cursor, or overlays all of which can be built using this toolkit.

  12. Imaging sensors and displays. SPIE volume 765

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following contents: HUMAN FACTORS FOR IMAGING SYSTEMS. Analysis of electroluminescent display devices for stereographic display of video images. Field of view, resolution, and brightness parameters for eye-limited displays. Helmet-mounted display for tank applications. Temporal aspects of electro-optical imaging systems. Helmet-mounted display for infantry applications. Image quality: two current issues. ADVANCED IMAGING SENSOR TECHNOLOGY. New color coding method with quasi-field integration mode for solid-state color imaging equipment. One-half inch CCD imager with 510 X 492 pixels. Solid-state imager implementing sensitivity control function on chip. Color laser microscope. A channel stop defined, barrier and drain antiblooming structure for virtual phase CCD image sensors. ADVANCED IMAGING DISPLAYS. Ultrahigh resolution 7 in. round monochrome CRT. High resolution MIM-diode LCD addressed by storage capacitor matrix. IMAGE DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY FOR INFRARED PROJECTORS. IR transducer technology: an overview. IT emitting CRT. IR simulation using the liquid crystal light valve (LCLV). Infrared display array. IR image generation by thermoelectric elements. IR simulation with diffusion image transfer film. Dynamic RAM imaging display technology utilizing silicon blackbody emitters. Thermal target projector for MRTD testing and vehicle identification training.

  13. Display technology - Human factors concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Alan; Wickens, Christopher; Kite, Kirsten

    1990-03-01

    Recent advances in the design of aircraft cockpit displays are reviewed, with an emphasis on their applicability to automobiles. The fundamental principles of display technology are introduced, and individual chapters are devoted to selective visual attention, command and status displays, foveal and peripheral displays, navigational displays, auditory displays, color and pictorial displays, head-up displays, automated systems, and dual-task performance and pilot workload. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs of typical displays are provided.

  14. Timing considerations of Helmet Mounted Display performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tharp, Gregory; Liu, Andrew; French, Lloyd; Lai, Steve; Stark, Lawrence

    1992-01-01

    The Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) system developed in our lab should be a useful teleoperator systems display if it increases operator performance of the desired task; it can, however, introduce degradation in performance due to display update rate constraints and communication delays. Display update rates are slowed by communication bandwidth and/or computational power limitations. We used simulated 3D tracking and pick-and-place tasks to characterize performance levels for a range of update rates. Initial experiments with 3D tracking indicate that performance levels plateau at an update rate between 10 and 20 Hz. We have found that using the HMD with delay decreases performance as delay increases.

  15. Timing considerations of Helmet Mounted Display performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tharp, Gregory; Liu, Andrew; French, Lloyd; Lai, Steve; Stark, Lawrence

    1992-01-01

    The Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) system developed in our lab should be a useful teleoperator systems display if it increases operator performance of the desired task; it can, however, introduce degradation in performance due to display update rate constraints and communication delays. Display update rates are slowed by communication bandwidth and/or computational power limitations. We used simulated 3D tracking and pick-and-place tasks to characterize performance levels for a range of update rates. Initial experiments with 3D tracking indicate that performance levels plateau at an update rate between 10 and 20 Hz. We have found that using the HMD with delay decreases performance as delay increases.

  16. Effective Monitor Display Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Describes some of the factors that affect computer monitor display design and provides suggestions and insights into how screen displays can be designed more effectively. Topics include color, font choices, organizational structure of text, space outline, and general principles. (Author/LRW)

  17. Display and Presentation Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midgley, Thomas Keith

    The use of display and presentation boards as tools to help teachers/trainers convey messages more clearly is briefly discussed, and 24 different types of display and presentation boards are described and illustrated; i.e., chalk, paste-up, hook-n-loop, electric, flannel, scroll, communication planning, acetate pocket, slot, pin-tack, preview,…

  18. Polyplanar optical display electronics

    SciTech Connect

    DeSanto, L.; Biscardi, C.

    1997-07-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments. In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) circuit board is removed from the Texas Instruments DLP light engine assembly. Due to the compact architecture of the projection system within the display chassis, the DMD{trademark} chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. The authors discuss the operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with various video formats (CVBS, Y/C or S-video and RGB) including the format specific to the B-52 aircraft. A brief discussion of the electronics required to drive the laser is also presented.

  19. SAOIMAGE -- Astronomical image display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Rhys; Privett, G. J.

    SAOimage is an astronomical image display program which works on computers with X-window displays. It allows you to manipulate images in a number of ways, see the changes applied, and when you are happy with the result, produce a hard copy on a Postscript printer. An example of the output is included with this document.

  20. Displays in space.

    PubMed

    Colford, Nicholas

    2002-04-01

    This chapter describes the human and environmental factors that dictate the way that displays must be designed for, and used in space. A brief history of the evolution of such display systems covers developments from the Mercury rockets to the International Space Station.

  1. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2005-05-31

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  2. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2007-05-29

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  3. Display Parameters and Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * HUMAN FACTORS * Anthropometry * Sensory * Cognitive * Discussions * THE HUMAN VISUAL SYSTEM - CAPABILITIES AND LIMITATIONS * Cornea * Pupil and Iris * Lens * Vitreous Humor * Retina * RODS - NIGHT VISION * CONES - DAY VISION * RODS AND CONES - TWILIGHT VISION * VISUAL PIGMENTS * MACULA * BLOOD * CHOROID COAT * Visual Signal Processing * Pathways to the Brain * Spatial Vision * Temporal Vision * Colour Vision * Colour Blindness * DICHROMATISM * Protanopia * Deuteranopia * Tritanopia * ANOMALOUS TRICHROMATISM * Protanomaly * Deuteranomaly * Tritanomaly * CONE MONOCHROMATISM * ROD MONOCHROMATISM * Using Colour Effectively * COLOUR MIXTURES AND THE CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * Colour Matching Functions and Chromaticity Co-ordinates * CIE 1931 Colour Space * CIE PRIMARIES * CIE COLOUR MATCHING FUNCTIONS AND CHROMATICITY CO-ORDINATES * METHODS FOR DETERMINING TRISTIMULUS VALUES AND COLOUR CO-ORDINATES * Spectral Power Distribution Method * Filter Method * CIE 1931 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * ADDITIVE COLOUR MIXTURE * CIE 1976 Chromaticity Diagram * CIE Uniform Colour Spaces and Colour Difference Formulae * CIELUV OR L*u*v* * CIELAB OR L*a*b* * CIE COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE * Colour Temperature and CIE Standard Illuminants and source * RADIOMETRIC AND PHOTOMETRIC QUANTITIES * Photopic (Vλ and Scotopic (Vλ') Luminous Efficiency Function * Photometric and Radiometric Flux * Luminous and Radiant Intensities * Incidence: Illuminance and Irradiance * Exitance or Emittance (M) * Luminance and Radiance * ERGONOMIC REQUIREMENTS OF DISPLAYS * ELECTRO-OPTICAL PARAMETERS AND REQUIREMENTS * Contrast and Contrast Ratio * Luminance and Brightness * Colour Contrast and Chromaticity * Glare * Other Aspects of Legibility * SHAPE AND SIZE OF CHARACTERS * DEFECTS AND BLEMISHES * FLICKER AND DISTORTION * ANGLE OF VIEW * Switching Speed * Threshold and Threshold Characteristic * Measurement Techniques For Electro-optical Parameters * RADIOMETRIC

  4. System status display evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Leland G.

    1988-01-01

    The System Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the crew with an enhanced capability for monitoring and managing the aircraft systems. A flight simulation in a fixed base cockpit simulator was used to evaluate alternative design concepts for this display system. The alternative concepts included pictorial versus alphanumeric text formats, multifunction versus dedicated controls, and integration of the procedures with the system status information versus paper checklists. Twelve pilots manually flew approach patterns with the different concepts. System malfunctions occurred which required the pilots to respond to the alert by reconfiguring the system. The pictorial display, the multifunction control interfaces collocated with the system display, and the procedures integrated with the status information all had shorter event processing times and lower subjective workloads.

  5. Display depth analyses with the wave aberration for the auto-stereoscopic 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Sang, Xinzhu; Yu, Xunbo; Chen, Duo; Chen, Zhidong; Zhang, Wanlu; Yan, Binbin; Yuan, Jinhui; Wang, Kuiru; Yu, Chongxiu; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-07-01

    Because the aberration severely affects the display performances of the auto-stereoscopic 3D display, the diffraction theory is used to analyze the diffraction field distribution and the display depth through aberration analysis. Based on the proposed method, the display depth of central and marginal reconstructed images is discussed. The experimental results agree with the theoretical analyses. Increasing the viewing distance or decreasing the lens aperture can improve the display depth. Different viewing distances and the LCD with two lens-arrays are used to verify the conclusion.

  6. Panoramic projection avionics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmanash, Michael H.

    2003-09-01

    Avionics projection displays are entering production in advanced tactical aircraft. Early adopters of this technology in the avionics community used projection displays to replace or upgrade earlier units incorporating direct-view CRT or AMLCD devices. Typical motivation for these upgrades were the alleviation of performance, cost and display device availability concerns. In these systems, the upgraded (projection) displays were one-for-one form / fit replacements for the earlier units. As projection technology has matured, this situation has begun to evolve. The Lockheed-Martin F-35 is the first program in which the cockpit has been specifically designed to take advantage of one of the more unique capabilities of rear projection display technology, namely the ability to replace multiple small screens with a single large conformal viewing surface in the form of a panoramic display. Other programs are expected to follow, since the panoramic formats enable increased mission effectiveness, reduced cost and greater information transfer to the pilot. Some of the advantages and technical challenges associated with panoramic projection displays for avionics applications are described below.

  7. Microlaser-based displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstedt, Robert; Fink, Charles G.; Flint, Graham W.; Hargis, David E.; Peppler, Philipp W.

    1997-07-01

    Laser Power Corporation has developed a new type of projection display, based upon microlaser technology and a novel scan architecture, which provides the foundation for bright, extremely high resolution images. A review of projection technologies is presented along with the limitations of each and the difficulties they experience in trying to generate high resolution imagery. The design of the microlaser based projector is discussed along with the advantage of this technology. High power red, green, and blue microlasers have been designed and developed specifically for use in projection displays. These sources, in combination with high resolution, high contrast modulator, produce a 24 bit color gamut, capable of supporting the full range of real world colors. The new scan architecture, which reduces the modulation rate and scan speeds required, is described. This scan architecture, along with the inherent brightness of the laser provides the fundamentals necessary to produce a 5120 by 4096 resolution display. The brightness and color uniformity of the display is excellent, allowing for tiling of the displays with far fewer artifacts than those in a traditionally tiled display. Applications for the display include simulators, command and control centers, and electronic cinema.

  8. Segmented cold cathode display panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, Leslie (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a video display device that utilizes the novel concept of generating an electronically controlled pattern of electron emission at the output of a segmented photocathode. This pattern of electron emission is amplified via a channel plate. The result is that an intense electronic image can be accelerated toward a phosphor thus creating a bright video image. This novel arrangement allows for one to provide a full color flat video display capable of implementation in large formats. In an alternate arrangement, the present invention is provided without the channel plate and a porous conducting surface is provided instead. In this alternate arrangement, the brightness of the image is reduced but the cost of the overall device is significantly lowered because fabrication complexity is significantly decreased.

  9. Map display design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretz, Anthony J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive model of a pilot's navigation task and describes an experiment comparing a visual momentum map display to the traditional track-up and north-up approaches. The data show the advantage to a track-up map is its congruence with the ego-centered forward view; however, the development of survey knowledge is hindered by the inconsistency of the rotating display. The stable alignment of a north-up map aids the acquisition of survey knowledge, but there is a cost associated with the mental rotation of the display to a track-up alignment for ego-centered tasks. The results also show that visual momentum can be used to reduce the mental rotation costs of a north-up display.

  10. Gardens on Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinheimer, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    Discusses display gardens and their development by students. Presents guidelines for construction and size consideration and describes details of an outdoor garden, volcanic garden, and shoe box dioramas. (DDR)

  11. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  12. Liquid Crystal Airborne Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    81/2X 11- 10 -9 .8 display using a large advertising alphanimeric ( TCI ) has been added to the front of the optical box used in the F-4 aircraft for HUD...properties over a wide range of tempera - tures, including normal room temperature. What are Liquid Crystals? Liquid crystals have been classified in three...natic fanctions and to present data needed for the semi- automatic and manual control of system functions. Existing aircraft using CRT display

  13. A heterozygous defect for structurally altered pro-alpha 2 chain of type I procollagen in a mild variant of osteogenesis imperfecta. The altered structure decreases the thermal stability of procollagen and makes it resistant to procollagen N-proteinase.

    PubMed

    Sippola, M; Kaffe, S; Prockop, D J

    1984-11-25

    Cultured skin fibroblasts from a proband with an autosomal dominant variant of osteogenesis inperfecta were found to synthesize approximately equal amounts of normal pro-alpha 2(I) chains of type I procollagen and pro-alpha 2(I) chains which migrated more rapidly when examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The structural alteration was present in alpha 2(I)-CB4, a cyanogen bromide fragment containing amino acid residues 7-327 of the alpha 2 chain, and it appeared to be a deletion of about 30 amino acids. The pro-alpha 2(I) chains with the apparent deletion associated with normal pro-alpha 1(I) chains synthesized by the same fibroblasts and formed triple-helical type I procollagen. The presence of the altered pro-alpha 2 chains in trimers of procollagen had two consequences in terms of the physical properties of the molecule. One was to decrease the thermal stability of the protein as judged by resistance to proteolysis at 37 degrees C and by the helix to coil transition as assayed by circular dichroism. The second consequence was to make type I procollagen containing the shortened pro-alpha 2(I) chains resistant to digestion by procollagen N-proteinase. The simplest explanation for the data is that the apparent deletion in half the pro-alpha 2(I) chains produced a partial unfolding of the N-terminal region of type I procollagen which prevented processing of the protein by procollagen N-proteinase.

  14. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications. PMID:28232722

  15. Stereo Painting Display Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, David

    1982-06-01

    The Spanish Surrealist artist Salvador Dali has recently perfected the art of producing two paintings which are stereo pairs. Each painting is separately quite remarkable, presenting a subject with the vivid realism and clarity for which Dali is famous. Due to the surrealistic themes of Dali's art, however, the subjects preser.ted with such naturalism only exist in his imagination. Despite this considerable obstacle to producing stereo art, Dali has managed to paint stereo pairs that display subtle differences of coloring and lighting, in addition to the essential perspective differences. These stereo paintings require a display method that will allow the viewer to experience stereo fusion, but which will not degrade the high quality of the art work. This paper gives a review of several display methods that seem promising in terms of economy, size, adjustability, and image quality.

  16. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications.

  17. Flexible display enabling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sigurd; Fonash, Stephen J.; Jackson, Thomas N.; Sturm, James C.

    2001-09-01

    In a collaboration between Pennsylvania State University and Princeton University, we have been laying the foundations for flexible display technology. Flexible substrates including plastic or steel foil, backplanes of organic or silicone transistors, and directly printed RGB organic light emitting diodes are issues central to this collaboration. We present an overview of key recent results. Silicon based thin film transistors have been processed at the ultralow temperatures required for processing on plastic substrates. Organic thin film transistors and circuits with record mobilities have been fabricated that are naturally matched to low temperature substrates. Organic light emitting diodes have been made by inkjet printing in an approach that solves the RGB patterning problem of OLED displays. The mechanics of flexible substrates have been defined and thin film silicon transistor performance is shown to be unaffected by bending. Substantial progress has been made toward the realization of rugged, lightweight, flexible and even conformal displays.

  18. Thermal-Wave Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert E.; Kramarchuk, Ihor; Williams, Wallace D.; Pouch, John J.; Gilbert, Percy

    1989-01-01

    Computer-controlled thermal-wave microscope developed to investigate III-V compound semiconductor devices and materials. Is nondestructive technique providing information on subsurface thermal features of solid samples. Furthermore, because this is subsurface technique, three-dimensional imaging also possible. Microscope uses intensity-modulated electron beam of modified scanning electron microscope to generate thermal waves in sample. Acoustic waves generated by thermal waves received by transducer and processed in computer to form images displayed on video display of microscope or recorded on magnetic disk.

  19. Viewing angle changeable display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jinbi; Huang, Ziqiang; Yang, Wenjun; Chen, Xiaoxi

    2010-10-01

    Viewing angle changeable display can change the display viewing angle as needed: In the public place the display could have a narrow viewing angle for privacy, while in the private place the displays could have a wide viewing angle for the convenience of the operation and better viewing experience. This article propose a novel adjustable optical transmission device to realize the viewing angle changes for LCD by using the principle of guest- host effect of liquid crystal. The major technology is to insert a special equipment between the backlight and the LCD, through which the backlight will display either parallel or scattered features to get an either narrow or wide viewing angle. The equipment is an adjustable transmission cell (ATC) which is actually a black G-H LC cell. This ATC is the main focus of our invention. The ATC consists of a polarizer sheet and a special guest-host liquid crystal device filled with the two-phase dye (called as GH-LC in this report), to achieve the viewing angle change in the LCD. When an electrical field charges to the ATC, only the so-called near-axis lights can pass through the ATC within a relatively small angle, while the other scattered lights are absorbed sequentially by GH-LC and the polarizer sheet. On the other hand, when there is no electrical charge to the ATC, the cell behaves like a normal polarizer; and the scattered light can pass through the cell and polarizer in a normal way. This paper describes the principle and structure of the device, applies the electric field on the sample to observe the electro-optical properties, combine the theoretical and experimental research, getting the viewing angle effects of the display.

  20. Universal electronic stereoscopic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Lenny; Halnon, Jeff

    1996-04-01

    SimulEYES VRTM, a new product for mass consumer electro-stereoscopic displays, is described. The system uses a unique indexing approach to allow content providers latitude in choosing the display mode. Board and PC manufacturers may also take advantage of the elegance of the solution by building in the SimulEYES VR capability. Hardware components consist, in part, of two custom chips which may be integrated at the board level, or employed in a VGA port dongle and control box. The liquid crystal shuttering eyewear is of a unique ergonomic design which is comfortable for people of all ages and most facial types, even when wearing eyeglasses.

  1. Integrated display scanner

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-12-21

    A display scanner includes an optical panel having a plurality of stacked optical waveguides. The waveguides define an inlet face at one end and a screen at an opposite end, with each waveguide having a core laminated between cladding. A projector projects a scan beam of light into the panel inlet face for transmission from the screen as a scan line to scan a barcode. A light sensor at the inlet face detects a return beam reflected from the barcode into the screen. A decoder decodes the return beam detected by the sensor for reading the barcode. In an exemplary embodiment, the optical panel also displays a visual image thereon.

  2. Thin display optical projector

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1999-01-01

    An optical system (20) projects light into a planar optical display (10). The display includes laminated optical waveguides (12) defining an inlet face (14) at one end and an outlet screen (16) at an opposite end. A first mirror (26) collimates light from a light source (18) along a first axis, and distributes the light along a second axis. A second mirror (28) collimates the light from the first mirror along the second axis to illuminate the inlet face and produce an image on the screen.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal transport in display='inline'>UO2 containing uranium, oxygen, and fission-product defects

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiang -Yang; Cooper, Michael William D.; McClellan, Kenneth James; Lashley, Jason Charles; Byler, Darrin David; Bell, B. D. C.; Grimes, R. W.; Stanek, Christopher Richard; Andersson, David Anders

    2016-10-25

    Uranium dioxide (UO2) is the most commonly used fuel in light-water nuclear reactors and thermal conductivity controls the removal of heat produced by fission, thereby governing fuel temperature during normal and accident conditions. The use of fuel performance codes by the industry to predict operational behavior is widespread. A primary source of uncertainty in these codes is thermal conductivity, and optimized fuel utilization may be possible if existing empirical models are replaced with models that incorporate explicit thermal-conductivity-degradation mechanisms during fuel burn up. This approach is able to represent the degradation of thermal conductivity due to each individual defect type, rather than the overall burn-up measure typically used, which is not an accurate representation of the chemical or microstructure state of the fuel that actually governs thermal conductivity and other properties. To generate a mechanistic thermal conductivity model, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of UO2 thermal conductivity including representative uranium and oxygen defects and fission products are carried out. These calculations employ a standard Buckingham-type interatomic potential and a potential that combines the many-body embedded-atom-method potential with Morse-Buckingham pair potentials. Potential parameters for UO2+x and ZrO2 are developed for the latter potential. Physical insights from the resonant phonon-spin-scattering mechanism due to spins on the magnetic uranium ions are introduced into the treatment of the MD results, with the corresponding relaxation time derived from existing experimental data. High defect scattering is predicted for Xe atoms compared to that of La and Zr ions. Uranium defects reduce the thermal conductivity more than oxygen defects. For each defect and fission product, scattering parameters are derived for application in both a Callaway model and the corresponding high-temperature model

  4. A Plasma Display Terminal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    A graphics terminal designed for use as a remote computer input/output terminal is described. Although the terminal is intended for use in teaching applications, it has several features which make it useful in many other computer terminal applications. These features include: a 10-inch square plasma display panel, permanent storage of information…

  5. Drivers license display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokoski, Francine J.

    1997-01-01

    Carjackings are only one of a growing class of law enforcement problems associated with increasingly violent crimes and accidents involving automobiles plays weapons, drugs and alcohol. Police traffic stops have become increasingly dangerous, with an officer having no information about a vehicle's potentially armed driver until approaching him. There are 15 million alcoholics in the US and 90 percent of them have drivers licenses. Many of them continue driving even after their licenses have ben revoked or suspended. There are thousands of unlicensed truck drivers in the country, and also thousands who routinely exceed safe operating periods without rest; often using drugs in an attempt to stay alert. MIKOS has developed the Drivers License Display Systems to reduce these and other related risks. Although every state requires the continuous display of vehicle registration information on every vehicle using public roads, no state yet requires the display of driver license information. The technology exists to provide that feature as an add-on to current vehicles for nominal cost. An initial voluntary market is expected to include: municipal, rental, and high value vehicles which are most likely to be mis-appropriated. It is anticipated that state regulations will eventually require such systems in the future, beginning with commercial vehicles, and then extending to high risk drivers and eventually all vehicles. The MIKOS system offers a dual-display approach which can be deployed now, and which will utilize all existing state licenses without requiring standardization.

  6. Ferroelectric liquid crystal display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Paul K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A ferroelectric liquid crystal display device employs capacitance spoiling layers to minimize unneeded capacitances created by crossovers of X and Y address lines and to accurately define desired capacitances. The spoiler layers comprise low dielectric constant layers which space electrodes from the ferroelectric at crossover points where capacitance is not needed for device operation.

  7. Color Display Design Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    22 . 20 - MEAN/ALL COLORS/*. .. %.’ 18 -.-. YELLOW u- 16 . . RED /- ........ WHITE ൖ /- MAGENTA -,f 12 - / / CYAN ’"’- 10 /GREEN BLUE C= Ś S• l I I...Hawaii Laboratory P.O. Box 997 Kailua, Hawaii 96734 Attn: Dr. Ross L. Pepper Department of Psychology Panel Displays Incorporated Vanderbilt University

  8. Refreshing Refreshable Braille Displays.

    PubMed

    Russomanno, Alexander; O'Modhrain, Sile; Gillespie, R Brent; Rodger, Matthew W M

    2015-01-01

    The increased access to books afforded to blind people via e-publishing has given them long-sought independence for both recreational and educational reading. In most cases, blind readers access materials using speech output. For some content such as highly technical texts, music, and graphics, speech is not an appropriate access modality as it does not promote deep understanding. Therefore blind braille readers often prefer electronic braille displays. But, these are prohibitively expensive. The search is on, therefore, for a low-cost refreshable display that would go beyond current technologies and deliver graphical content as well as text. And many solutions have been proposed, some of which reduce costs by restricting the number of characters that can be displayed, even down to a single braille cell. In this paper, we demonstrate that restricting tactile cues during braille reading leads to poorer performance in a letter recognition task. In particular, we show that lack of sliding contact between the fingertip and the braille reading surface results in more errors and that the number of errors increases as a function of presentation speed. These findings suggest that single cell displays which do not incorporate sliding contact are likely to be less effective for braille reading.

  9. Digital Holography Display (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheok Peng; Asundi, A.; Yu, Yang; Xiao, Zhen Zhong

    This paper describes the extension work from the last Digital Holography Projector System. From the developed works shows that, some unforeseen factors have created the difficulties for the system alignment. Such factors are the DMD frame rate, light source and diffractive zero order. It is really the challenging development works to achieve the virtual 3D model display on the high speed rotation screen. The three most key factors are emphasizing: 1) The display device's frame rate; 2) The light source orientation angle; and 3) The zero order filtering optic. 1) This device's is the digital micro mirror, in short is DMD. It is the high speed switching device has developed by the most recent technology. The switching frame rate can go up as high as 291fps. At first, the 8 bits depth file must be digitalized and stored for DMD onboard Ram. The digitalized data are transmitting from the PC USB to DMD onboard Ram. Instead of the data are downloading directly from the PC to DVI or VGA during display, this downloading method cause slower down the display speed, which is the common frame rate of 30 Hz. Next, the onboard Ram data then transfer to the DMD mirror's for display, at the 8 bits 291 fps speed. At this frame rate, the display 2D image can almost cover for 10 of out of the 360 0 in 1 revolution. 2) This laser light source must be installed such that free for orientated in any arbitrary angle from 220 to 450. Which is normalized to the DMD mirrors and the brief sketch show on figure (a). The purpose of orientated the light source is ensure that multi diffractive order would be reflected straight from the mirrors. (This multi diffractive order is the phenomenon of the digital micro mirror's characteristic). This mean, the reconstruct images would be followed the DMD normalized direction reflected up to fibre conduit. Moreover, this orientated method install of the laser light source is making space for other optical lenses or device driver/controller. Because, all

  10. Virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    A 3D auditory display can potentially enhance information transfer by combining directional and iconic information in a quite naturalistic representation of dynamic objects in the interface. Another aspect of auditory spatial clues is that, in conjunction with other modalities, it can act as a potentiator of information in the display. For example, visual and auditory cues together can reinforce the information content of the display and provide a greater sense of presence or realism in a manner not readily achievable by either modality alone. This phenomenon will be particularly useful in telepresence applications, such as advanced teleconferencing environments, shared electronic workspaces, and monitoring telerobotic activities in remote or hazardous situations. Thus, the combination of direct spatial cues with good principles of iconic design could provide an extremely powerful and information-rich display which is also quite easy to use. An alternative approach, recently developed at ARC, generates externalized, 3D sound cues over headphones in realtime using digital signal processing. Here, the synthesis technique involves the digital generation of stimuli using Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTF's) measured in the two ear-canals of individual subjects. Other similar approaches include an analog system developed by Loomis, et. al., (1990) and digital systems which make use of transforms derived from normative mannikins and simulations of room acoustics. Such an interface also requires the careful psychophysical evaluation of listener's ability to accurately localize the virtual or synthetic sound sources. From an applied standpoint, measurement of each potential listener's HRTF's may not be possible in practice. For experienced listeners, localization performance was only slightly degraded compared to a subject's inherent ability. Alternatively, even inexperienced listeners may be able to adapt to a particular set of HRTF's as long as they provide adequate

  11. Solar-wind velocity decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geranios, A.

    1980-08-01

    A model is developed to account for the solar wind electron and proton temperature decreases observed following the passage of an interplanetary shock wave and during the velocity decrease of a solar wind stream. The equations of mass and energy conservation are solved for a fully ionized, electrically neutral plasma expanding radially and spherically symmetrically, taking into account the heat flux from the solor corona to the plasma along the open magnetic field lines, and the electron thermal conductivity. An analytical relationship between the temperature and the velocity of the solar wind plasma is obtained which is found to be in agreement with experimental measurements made by the Vela 5 and 6 and IMP 6 satellites from August 1969-May 1974. It is thus proposed that the observed low plasma temperatures are due to the fact that the temperature decrease of the expanding plasma exceeds the heat gain due to thermal conduction from the corona.

  12. Pilot performance with a simulated ILS independence pictorial display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, E.; Wempe, T.

    1972-01-01

    As part of a general investigation of the effectiveness of pictorial displays for manual control and monitoring of aircraft approaches and landings, a simulator study was conducted in which pilot performance with three pictorial displays was evaluated. These displays differed in the type of guidance symbology added to the basic perspective runway display. The effect of decreased resolution and update rate of the runway image on pilot performance was also determined. The results indicate that for pictorial displays with added guidance symbology, there was a marked improvement in pilot performance compared to results of a previous study in which the display consisted of only a runway image and aircraft attitude.

  13. Multifunctional aerial display through use of polarization-processing display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Keitaro; Ito, Shusei; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2017-02-01

    We have realized a multifunctional aerial display. An aerial image of a polarization-processing display is formed through aerial imaging by retro-reflection. By changing the polarization modulation patterns, we can switch between a three-layered display and a secure display.

  14. Digital display holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnaukhov, V. N.; Merzlyakov, N. S.; Mozerov, M. G.; Dimitrov, L. I.; Wenger, E.

    1998-05-01

    Two digital display holograms (DDH) are synthesized to demonstrate the possibility of holographic display of 3D objects given by their mathematical descriptions only. 3D models of the objects and shaded 2D projections in varying viewing directions are generated using the methods of computer graphics. For each projection, a Fourier hologram was synthesized and encoded by the kinoform method. The recording of the obtained digital kinoforms on a commercially available photographic film was done by a computer-controlled laser device. This process produces, after film development and bleaching, a facet DDH. The complete DDHs have a size of 672×672 mm 2 and consist of 900 elementary holograms of 256×256 samples each, calculated for different directions within the solid angle of ±90°. They allow the visual representation of 3D objects with good quality.

  15. Thermoelectric device exhibiting decreased stress

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, D.L.; Chou, D.J.

    1985-02-05

    A thermoelectric device exhibiting both structural integrity and decreased stress across the device notwithstanding the application of thermally cycled temperature differentials thereacross includes, electrically interconnected thermoelectric elements and a rigidly affixed substrate. Thermal stress is relieved by using flexible conductors to interconnect the thermoelectric elements, and by the use of a flexile joint to attach a second substrate to the remainder of the device. Complete elimination of the second substrate may also be used to eliminate stress. Presence of the rigidly affixed substrate gives the device sufficient structural integrity to enable it to withstand rugged conditions.

  16. Text File Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavrus, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    LOOK program permits user to examine text file in pseudorandom access manner. Program provides user with way of rapidly examining contents of ASCII text file. LOOK opens text file for input only and accesses it in blockwise fashion. Handles text formatting and displays text lines on screen. User moves forward or backward in file by any number of lines or blocks. Provides ability to "scroll" text at various speeds in forward or backward directions.

  17. Image Descriptors for Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    information. In Section V of the report, however, we have extended our descriptor for the total channel capacity of a display to include both chromi - nance and...frequency and for constant chromi - nance. The quantities nl(w) represent the number of perceivable colors for a given spatial frequancy and luminance value...the chromi - nance contribution to the total channel capacity, we shall utilize a linear model for thot distribution of perceived chrominance levels. We

  18. Image Descriptors for Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    gain an insight into the detailed mechanisms of aliasing, but it does not predict how important aliasing is. Our statistical approach predicts the...undersampled limit has a maximum edge discrimination ability equivalent to an analog display with a flat pass- band and limiting resolution given by... discrimination ability of the observer is proportional to the statistical average of a quantity that is representative of the perceived information content

  19. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.

    1998-12-08

    A microgap flat panel display is disclosed which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y ``pixel`` strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a ``pixel`` in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel. 6 figs.

  20. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.

    1998-01-01

    A microgap flat panel display which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y "pixel" strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a "pixel" in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel.

  1. Attention-Seeking Displays

    PubMed Central

    Számadó, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Animal communication abounds with extravagant displays. These signals are usually interpreted as costly signals of quality. However, there is another important function for these signals: to call the attention of the receiver to the signaller. While there is abundant empirical evidence to show the importance of this stage, it is not yet incorporated into standard signalling theory. Here I investigate a general model of signalling - based on a basic action-response game - that incorporates this searching stage. I show that giving attention-seeking displays and searching for them can be an ESS. This is a very general result and holds regardless whether only the high quality signallers or both high and low types give them. These signals need not be costly at the equilibrium and they need not be honest signals of any quality, as their function is not to signal quality but simply to call the attention of the potential receivers. These kind of displays are probably more common than their current weight in the literature would suggest. PMID:26287489

  2. Engine monitoring display study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Mary E.

    1992-01-01

    The current study is part of a larger NASA effort to develop displays for an engine-monitoring system to enable the crew to monitor engine parameter trends more effectively. The objective was to evaluate the operational utility of adding three types of information to the basic Boeing Engine Indicating and Crew Alerting System (EICAS) display formats: alphanumeric alerting messages for engine parameters whose values exceed caution or warning limits; alphanumeric messages to monitor engine parameters that deviate from expected values; and a graphic depiction of the range of expected values for current conditions. Ten training and line pilots each flew 15 simulated flight scenarios with five variants of the basic EICAS format; these variants included different combinations of the added information. The pilots detected engine problems more quickly when engine alerting messages were included in the display; adding a graphic depiction of the range of expected values did not affect detection speed. The pilots rated both types of alphanumeric messages (alert and monitor parameter) as more useful and easier to interpret than the graphic depiction. Integrating engine parameter messages into the EICAS alerting system appears to be both useful and preferred.

  3. Stage Cylindrical Immersive Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramyan, Lucy; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Powell, Mark W.; Mittman, David S.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic images with a wide field of view intend to provide a better understanding of an environment by placing objects of the environment on one seamless image. However, understanding the sizes and relative positions of the objects in a panorama is not intuitive and prone to errors because the field of view is unnatural to human perception. Scientists are often faced with the difficult task of interpreting the sizes and relative positions of objects in an environment when viewing an image of the environment on computer monitors or prints. A panorama can display an object that appears to be to the right of the viewer when it is, in fact, behind the viewer. This misinterpretation can be very costly, especially when the environment is remote and/or only accessible by unmanned vehicles. A 270 cylindrical display has been developed that surrounds the viewer with carefully calibrated panoramic imagery that correctly engages their natural kinesthetic senses and provides a more accurate awareness of the environment. The cylindrical immersive display offers a more natural window to the environment than a standard cubic CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment), and the geometry allows multiple collocated users to simultaneously view data and share important decision-making tasks. A CAVE is an immersive virtual reality environment that allows one or more users to absorb themselves in a virtual environment. A common CAVE setup is a room-sized cube where the cube sides act as projection planes. By nature, all cubic CAVEs face a problem with edge matching at edges and corners of the display. Modern immersive displays have found ways to minimize seams by creating very tight edges, and rely on the user to ignore the seam. One significant deficiency of flat-walled CAVEs is that the sense of orientation and perspective within the scene is broken across adjacent walls. On any single wall, parallel lines properly converge at their vanishing point as they should, and the sense of

  4. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  5. Defense Display Strategy and Roadmaps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-06

    ultra-resolution, true 3D , and intelligent displays (integration of computers and communication functions into screens). The new strategy is Service...led. Keywords: defense, electronic displays, high definition, micro-display, 25-megapixel, true 3D , novel and intelligent displays 1...megapixel and true 3D devices. The approved roadmap is illustrated in Figure 1. * Paper

  6. LMDS Lightweight Modular Display System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-16

    LIGHTWEIGHT MODULAR DISPLAY SYSTEM %C AD Gomez SW Wolfe EW Davenport BD Calder 16 February 1982 * / DTrSJUL 22 3829 Approved for public release...375 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Oct 77 to Jan 82 LMDS LIGHTWEIGHT MODULAR DISPLAY SYSTEM S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...Processing Power Distribution Modular Display Low Cost Tactical Display Tactical Tablet Lightweight Display General Purpose Dispiay Functional Modules Touch

  7. Landing Hazard Avoidance Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, Michael Franklin (Inventor); Hirsh, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Landing hazard avoidance displays can provide rapidly understood visual indications of where it is safe to land a vehicle and where it is unsafe to land a vehicle. Color coded maps can indicate zones in two dimensions relative to the vehicles position where it is safe to land. The map can be simply green (safe) and red (unsafe) areas with an indication of scale or can be a color coding of another map such as a surface map. The color coding can be determined in real time based on topological measurements and safety criteria to thereby adapt to dynamic, unknown, or partially known environments.

  8. Pictorial Format Display Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    the pathway moved out of the theoretical field of view of the HUDM It did not disappear from the HUD, however, instead it was pegged to the side of...the HUD in the direction of its current position. When the pathway was pegged to the side, a transitional flight director symbol (an inverted "T...of view,. the flashing tractor beam remained, and the "jewel light" was pegged to the side of the display at the end of the ’flashing tractor beam

  9. Multimodality image display station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, H. Joseph

    1990-07-01

    The Multi-modality Image Display Station (MIDS) is designed for the use of physicians outside of the radiology department. Connected to a local area network or a host computer, it provides speedy access to digitized radiology images and written diagnostics needed by attending and consulting physicians near the patient bedside. Emphasis has been placed on low cost, high performance and ease of use. The work is being done as a joint study with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and as part of a joint development effort with the Mayo Clinic. MIDS is a prototype, and should not be assumed to be an IBM product.

  10. Centaur Engine Display Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-04-14

    The 6,600 pound Centaur test article is a rare artifact recently transported from the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Alabama. Centaur, developed at NASA Glenn Research Center in the late 1950s, was the world's first high-energy upper stage, burning liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX), and has enabled the launch of some of NASA's most important scientific missions over its 50-year history. In this image, technicians prepare to mount the hardware on a permanent display stand close to the main entrance at NASA Glenn Research Center.

  11. Suppressing Display Cockpit Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Rudolf

    1987-09-01

    Modern aircraft displays with relatively high visual brightness levels present day and night sensor images (generated by electro-optical systems) to crew members for navigation and fire control purposes. A heads out display (HOD) on a cathode ray tube (CRT) screen, while effective for one crew member, may distract or irritate another crew member if the image is reflected off a canopy panel into his eyes, particularly at night. This paper presents one solution applied to canopy reflection suppression encountered in the U.S. Army's APACHE Advanced Attack Helicopter where the co-pilot's HOD reflections interfered with the pilot's vision. When the co-pilot would move his head away from the screen, the reflected image path to the pilot, sitting above and behind the co-pilot, would no longer be blocked and distract him. A variety of polarizers were studied and the problem was solved by placing a linear polarizer over the CRT with its axis crossed relative to the skipping vector of the reflection, letting the canopy panel act as an analyzer. Reflected luminance was reduced by more than 25 times.

  12. Tactile display with dielectric multilayer elastomer actuatorsq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysek, Marc; Lotz, Peter; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2009-03-01

    Tactile perception is the human sensation of surface textures through the vibrations generated by stroking a finger over the surface. The skin responds to several distributed physical quantities. Perhaps the most important are high-frequency vibrations, pressure distributions (static shape) and thermal properties. The integration of tactile displays in man-machine interfaces promises a more intuitive handling. For this reason many tactile displays are developed using different technologies. We present several state-of-the-art tactile displays based on different types of dielectric elastomer actuators to clarify the advantages of our matrix display based on multilayer technology. Using this technology perpendicular and hexagonal arrays of actuator elements (tactile stimulators) can be integrated into a PDMS substrate. Element diameters down to 1 mm allow stimuli at the range of the human two-point-discrimination threshold. Driving the elements by column and row addressing enables various stimulation patterns with a reduced number of feeding lines. The transient analysis determines charging times of the capacitive actuators depending on actuator geometry and material parameters. This is very important to ensure an adequate dynamic characteristic of the actuators to stimulate the human skin by vibrations. The suitability of multilayer dielectric elastomer actuators for actuation in tactile displays has been determined. Beside the realization of a static tactile display - where multilayer DEA are integrated as drives for movable contact pins - we focus on the direct use of DEA as a vibrotactile display. Finally, we present the scenario and achieved results of a recognition threshold test. Even relative low voltages in the range of 800 V generate vibrations with 100% recognition ratio within the group of participants. Furthermore, the frequency dependent characteristic of the determined recognition threshold confirms with established literature.

  13. Black optic display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1997-01-01

    An optical display includes a plurality of stacked optical waveguides having first and second opposite ends collectively defining an image input face and an image screen, respectively, with the screen being oblique to the input face. Each of the waveguides includes a transparent core bound by a cladding layer having a lower index of refraction for effecting internal reflection of image light transmitted into the input face to project an image on the screen, with each of the cladding layers including a cladding cap integrally joined thereto at the waveguide second ends. Each of the cores is beveled at the waveguide second end so that the cladding cap is viewable through the transparent core. Each of the cladding caps is black for absorbing external ambient light incident upon the screen for improving contrast of the image projected internally on the screen.

  14. Three dimensional interactive display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) interactive display and method of forming the same, includes a transparent capaciflector (TC) camera formed on a transparent shield layer on the screen surface. A first dielectric layer is formed on the shield layer. A first wire layer is formed on the first dielectric layer. A second dielectric layer is formed on the first wire layer. A second wire layer is formed on the second dielectric layer. Wires on the first wire layer and second wire layer are grouped into groups of parallel wires with a turnaround at one end of each group and a sensor pad at the opposite end. An operational amplifier is connected to each of the sensor pads and the shield pad biases the pads and receives a signal from connected sensor pads in response to intrusion of a probe. The signal is proportional to probe location with respect to the monitor screen.

  15. Ring Details on Display

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-07

    This view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft showcases some of the amazingly detailed structure of Saturn's rings. The rings are made up of many smaller ringlets that blur together when seen from a distance. But when imaged up close, the rings' structures display quite a bit of variation. Ring scientists are debating the nature of these features -- whether they have always appeared this way or if their appearance has evolved over time. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 4 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Sept. 24, 2016. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 283,000 miles (456,000 kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 32 degrees. Image scale is 17 miles (27 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20506

  16. Positive display polarity is particularly advantageous for small character sizes: implications for display design.

    PubMed

    Piepenbrock, Cosima; Mayr, Susanne; Buchner, Axel

    2014-08-01

    To test the display luminance hypothesis of the positive polarity advantage and gain insights for display design, the joint effects of display polarity and character size were assessed with a proofreading task Studies have shown that dark characters on light background (positive polarity) lead to better legibility than do light characters on dark background (negative polarity), presumably due to the typically higher display luminance of positive polarity presentations. Participants performed a proofreading task with black text on white background or white text on black background. Texts were presented in four character sizes (8, 10, 12, and 14 pt; corresponding to 0.22 degrees, 0.25 degrees, 0.31 degrees, and 0.34 degrees of vertical visual angle). A positive polarity advantage was observed in proofreading performance. Importantly, the positive polarity advantage linearly increased with decreasing character size. The findings are in line with the assumption that the typically higher luminance of positive polarity displays leads to an improved perception of detail. Application: The implications seem important for the design of text on such displays as those of computers, automotive control and entertainment systems, and smartphones that are increasingly used for the consumption of text-based media and communication. The sizes of these displays are limited, and it is tempting to use small font sizes to convey as much information as possible. Especially with small font sizes, negative polarity displays should be avoided.

  17. Display Factors and Subjective Evaluation of Dynamic Text Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Joey C. Y.; Chan, Alan H. S.

    2009-01-01

    Communications technology has exploded in past decades, leading to the question of which display method is the best to deliver electronic text messages. Many of these systems employ cathode ray tubes, liquid crystal displays, gas plasma displays, or light-emitting diodes as the output device. In order to overcome the limitations of screen size of the display units, numerous means of presenting dynamic display on screens have been invented. There are many factors that affect the readability of electronic text. This paper reviews some related empirical studies concerning the various display methods of dynamic text presentation, such as text display type, character type, text display direction, and text/background color combination, highlighting method and validity of highlighting. The subjective evaluation questionnaire is also discussed. According to the readability and preference ratings of the subjects given under different conditions, the best display method and color for comprehending the delivered messages were investigated. General recommendations of displaying dynamic information are made for the large display units which have been widely used for delivering important messages.

  18. Developing Intepretive Soil Education Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansmeyer, T. L.; Cooper, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes several soil educational displays developed for park and nature center trails. Displays include full-scale soil monoliths displayed along the trails with explanations on why and how the soils are different, and micro-monoliths exhibiting the different soil types. (MDH)

  19. Colorimetry for CRT displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golz, Jürgen; MacLeod, Donald I. A.

    2003-05-01

    We analyze the sources of error in specifying color in CRT displays. These include errors inherent in the use of the color matching functions of the CIE 1931 standard observer when only colorimetric, not radiometric, calibrations are available. We provide transformation coefficients that prove to correct the deficiencies of this observer very well. We consider four different candidate sets of cone sensitivities. Some of these differ substantially; variation among candidate cone sensitivities exceeds the variation among phosphors. Finally, the effects of the recognized forms of observer variation on the visual responses (cone excitations or cone contrasts) generated by CRT stimuli are investigated and quantitatively specified. Cone pigment polymorphism gives rise to variation of a few per cent in relative excitation by the different phosphors-a variation larger than the errors ensuing from the adoption of the CIE standard observer, though smaller than the differences between some candidate cone sensitivities. Macular pigmentation has a larger influence, affecting mainly responses to the blue phosphor. The estimated combined effect of all sources of observer variation is comparable in magnitude with the largest differences between competing cone sensitivity estimates but is not enough to disrupt very seriously the relation between the L and M cone weights and the isoluminance settings of individual observers. It is also comparable with typical instrumental colorimetric errors, but we discuss these only briefly.

  20. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, Darrell; Azevado, Stephen

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  1. Unique interactive projection display screen

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1997-11-01

    Projection systems continue to be the best method to produce large (1 meter and larger) displays. However, in order to produce a large display, considerable volume is typically required. The Polyplanar Optic Display (POD) is a novel type of projection display screen, which for the first time, makes it possible to produce a large projection system that is self-contained and only inches thick. In addition, this display screen is matte black in appearance allowing it to be used in high ambient light conditions. This screen is also interactive and can be remotely controlled via an infrared optical pointer resulting in mouse-like control of the display. Furthermore, this display need not be flat since it can be made curved to wrap around a viewer as well as being flexible.

  2. LED instrument approach instruction display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, B. D.; Kelly, W. L., IV; Crouch, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A display employing light emitting diodes (LED's) was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of such displays for presenting landing and navigation information to reduce the workload of general aviation pilots during IFR flight. The display consists of a paper tape reader, digital memory, control electronics, digital latches, and LED alphanumeric displays. A presentable digital countdown clock-timer is included as part of the system to provide a convenient means of monitoring time intervals for precise flight navigation. The system is a limited capability prototype assembled to test pilot reaction to such a device under simulated IFR operation. Pilot opinion indicates that the display is helpful in reducing the IFR pilots workload when used with a runway approach plate. However, the development of a compact, low power second generation display was recommended which could present several instructions simultaneously and provide information update capability. A microprocessor-based display could fulfill these requirements.

  3. Colored light application in retail display window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonova, Milena; Narendran, Nadarajah

    2002-06-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the usefulness of colored LEDs in retail display window applications. Human subjects viewed two side-by-side, identical mock-up display windows, and rated their preference. Subjects showed strong preference for the colored background, compared to the white background. In general, subjects disliked the modulated intensity background. Furthermore, the use of colored light (static red and blue) on the background allowed the accent light to be decreased without sacrificing visual appeal, ability to capture attention, and ability to see displayed objects clearly. It appears from this initial laboratory study that the amount of accent light can be reduced significantly, which could provide energy savings. We believe a field study would be greatly beneficial for further confirming these results and for quantifying the total energy savings in an actual store.

  4. Pilot Preferences on Displayed Aircraft Control Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Gregory, Irene M.

    2013-01-01

    The experiments described here explored how pilots want available maneuver authority information transmitted and how this information affects pilots before and after an aircraft failure. The aircraft dynamic variables relative to flight performance were narrowed to energy management variables. A survey was conducted to determine what these variables should be. Survey results indicated that bank angle, vertical velocity, and airspeed were the preferred variables. Based on this, two displays were designed to inform the pilot of available maneuver envelope expressed as bank angle, vertical velocity, and airspeed. These displays were used in an experiment involving control surface failures. Results indicate the displayed limitations in bank angle, vertical velocity, and airspeed were helpful to the pilots during aircraft surface failures. However, the additional information did lead to a slight increase in workload, a small decrease in perceived aircraft flying qualities, and no effect on aircraft situation awareness.

  5. Fundamentals of Thermal Expansion and Thermal Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zi-Kui; Shang, Shun-Li; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Thermal expansion is an important property of substances. Its theoretical prediction has been challenging, particularly in cases the volume decreases with temperature, i.e., thermal contraction or negative thermal expansion at high temperatures. In this paper, a new theory recently developed by the authors has been reviewed and further examined in the framework of fundamental thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Its applications to cerium with colossal thermal expansion and Fe3Pt with thermal contraction in certain temperature ranges are discussed. It is anticipated that this theory is not limited to volume only and can be used to predict a wide range of properties at finite temperatures. PMID:28772771

  6. Fundamentals of Thermal Expansion and Thermal Contraction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Kui; Shang, Shun-Li; Wang, Yi

    2017-04-14

    Thermal expansion is an important property of substances. Its theoretical prediction has been challenging, particularly in cases the volume decreases with temperature, i.e., thermal contraction or negative thermal expansion at high temperatures. In this paper, a new theory recently developed by the authors has been reviewed and further examined in the framework of fundamental thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Its applications to cerium with colossal thermal expansion and Fe₃Pt with thermal contraction in certain temperature ranges are discussed. It is anticipated that this theory is not limited to volume only and can be used to predict a wide range of properties at finite temperatures.

  7. Autostereoscopic three-dimensional display based on two parallax barriers.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiang-Yong; Wang, Qiong-Hua; Zhao, Wu-Xiang; Li, Da-Hai

    2011-06-20

    An autostereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) display composed of a flat-panel display, two parallax barriers, and a backlight panel is proposed. Parallax barrier 1, located between the backlight panel and the flat-panel display, divides the lights to create the perception of stereoscopic images. Parallax barrier 2, located between the flat-panel display and the viewers, acts as the function of decreasing the cross talk of the stereoscopic images. The operation principle of the display and the calculation equations for the parallax barriers are described in detail. An autostereoscopic 3D display prototype is developed. The prototype presents high-quality stereoscopic images. At the optimal viewing distance, it presents stereoscopic images without cross talk. At other viewing distances, it has less cross talk than a conventional autostereoscopic 3D display based on one parallax.

  8. Augmenting digital displays with computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing

    As we inevitably step deeper and deeper into a world connected via the Internet, more and more information will be exchanged digitally. Displays are the interface between digital information and each individual. Naturally, one fundamental goal of displays is to reproduce information as realistically as possible since humans still care a lot about what happens in the real world. Human eyes are the receiving end of such information exchange; therefore it is impossible to study displays without studying the human visual system. In fact, the design of displays is rather closely coupled with what human eyes are capable of perceiving. For example, we are less interested in building displays that emit light in the invisible spectrum. This dissertation explores how we can augment displays with computation, which takes both display hardware and the human visual system into consideration. Four novel projects on display technologies are included in this dissertation: First, we propose a software-based approach to driving multiview autostereoscopic displays. Our display algorithm can dynamically assign views to hardware display zones based on multiple observers' current head positions, substantially reducing crosstalk and stereo inversion. Second, we present a dense projector array that creates a seamless 3D viewing experience for multiple viewers. We smoothly interpolate the set of viewer heights and distances on a per-vertex basis across the arrays field of view, reducing image distortion, crosstalk, and artifacts from tracking errors. Third, we propose a method for high dynamic range display calibration that takes into account the variation of the chrominance error over luminance. We propose a data structure for enabling efficient representation and querying of the calibration function, which also allows user-guided balancing between memory consumption and the amount of computation. Fourth, we present user studies that demonstrate that the ˜ 60 Hz critical flicker fusion

  9. Adjustable Work Station for Video Displays and Keyboards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, F.; Shields, Nicholas, Jr.; Fagg, M. F.; Henderson, D.

    1986-01-01

    Work station for video displays and keyboards adaptable to operational and anthropometric requirements of individual operators. Visual displays placed beyond keyboard and in line with inclination of keyboard to minimize operator's head movement. In addition, station arranged so operator's eyes and hands focus onto three primary control and display areas. Quickens operating response and decreases chance of error, since input devices and feedback to operator are collocated.

  10. PACS displays: how to select the right display technology.

    PubMed

    Hirschorn, David S; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Flynn, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    The medical imaging display is a precision instrument with many features not found in commercial-grade displays. The more one understands what these features are and their corresponding clinical value, the better one can make a purchase decision. None of these displays maintain themselves for 5 years or more without some degree of automatic or manual performance testing. Routine calibration conformance checks are beginning to be mandated by the departments of health of many states. Most manufacturers provide mechanisms to perform these checks and keep track of their results, some more easily than others. A consistent display brightness of about 400 cd/m(2) and close conformance to the DICOM curve are the key components of a successful check. Displays are typically characterized by the number of pixels they contain, usually 2, 3, or 5 megapixels, but this is the least useful determinant of image quality. What matters most is the size of the pixels and the size of the whole display, which should be selected on the basis of the typical viewing distance. The farther one's eyes are from the display, the larger the pixels and the overall display size can be while still feeding the eye as much information as it can see. Care should be taken to use the appropriate display in a given setting for the clinical purpose at hand.

  11. 6000 x 2000 display prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuishi, Tetsuya; Small, David; MacNeil, Ronald L.

    1992-07-01

    While electronic technology has evolved enormously, there are no displays which are both very large and of high resolution. This paper describes our 6 K X 2 K, 60 inch by 20 inch, display prototype which consists of three 2 K X 2 K CRT displays connected seamlessly. Using a custom frame and a half-silvered mirror, the three images are joined by reflecting the center display image from above and transmitting the two side display images directly. Two problems must be solved to achieve a truly seamless effect. First, viewers can still see seams between regular screen images even if the displays are strictly aligned. Second, each physical display has a different geometrical space, and the center display image must be drawn in reverse because it will be reflected by the mirror. We developed a seamless window system to solve these problems. The window system displays overlapping images with translucent borders to enable better blending of the three display screens. Custom application software treats the system as a single 6 K X 2 K area. A concept named ''virtual framebuffer architecture'' enables us to implement the two kinds of seamlessness easily. To evaluate the visual effects, we developed some application systems which include video in a window, stereo sound and a high speed channel to the Connection Machine II for image processing.

  12. Military display market segment: helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    2004-09-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of one of its segments: helicopter displays. Parameters requiring special consideration, to include luminance ranges, contrast ratio, viewing angles, and chromaticity coordinates, are examined. Performance requirements for rotary-wing displays relative to several premier applications are summarized. Display sizes having aggregate defense applications of 5,000 units or greater and having DoD applications across 10 or more platforms, are tabulated. The issue of size commonality is addressed where distribution of active area sizes across helicopter platforms, individually, in groups of two through nine, and ten or greater, is illustrated. Rotary-wing displays are also analyzed by technology, where total quantities of such displays are broken out into CRT, LCD, AMLCD, EM, LED, Incandescent, Plasma and TFEL percentages. Custom, versus Rugged commercial, versus commercial off-the-shelf designs are contrasted. High and low information content designs are identified. Displays for several high-profile military helicopter programs are discussed, to include both technical specifications and program history. The military display market study is summarized with breakouts for the helicopter market segment. Our defense-wide study as of March 2004 has documented 1,015,494 direct view and virtual image displays distributed across 1,181 display sizes and 503 weapon systems. Helicopter displays account for 67,472 displays (just 6.6% of DoD total) and comprise 83 sizes (7.0% of total DoD) in 76 platforms (15.1% of total DoD). Some 47.6% of these rotary-wing applications involve low information content displays comprising just a few characters in one color; however, as per fixed-wing aircraft, the predominant instantiation involves higher information content units capable of showing changeable graphics, color and video.

  13. X-1 on display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    A Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1 series aircraft on display at an Open House at NACA Muroc Flight Test Unit or High-Speed Flight Research Station hangar on South Base of Edwards Air Force Base, California. (The precise date of the photo is uncertain, but it is probably before 1948.) The instrumentation that was carried aboard the aircraft to gather data is on display. The aircraft data was recorded on oscillograph film that was read, calibrated, and converted into meaningful parameters for the engineers to evaluate from each research flight. In the background of the photo are several early U.S. jets. These include several Lockheed P-80 Shooting Stars, which were used as chase planes on X-1 flights; two Bell P-59 Airacomets, the first U.S. jet pursuit aircraft (fighter in later parlance); and a prototype Republic XP-84 Thunderjet. There were five versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for eXperimental Sonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant

  14. Manufacturing Process of Flat Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Tadahiro

    A large size display for entertainment, internet, PC and other information instruments is key tool for coming IT revolutionary era, so that the large size display must be characterized by very low electric power consumption and human friendly performance without tiring user's eyes. Thus, liquid crystal (LC) and electroluminescence (EL) displays are candidates for this target. High quality poly-silicon TFT is essentially required even for LCD displays instead current amorphous Si TFT, because very large current drivability is necessary for TFT due to the increase of LCD cell capacitor with an increase of display size up to 50 inches and beyond. The key issue for this target is a creation of very low temperature poly-Si TFT manufacturing technology without excimer laser annealing and very low cost manufacturing which is characterized by very simplified display structures and very simplified manufacturing steps based on very drastic progress of various relating materials and components such as backlights, polarizer, color filter, and etc.

  15. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  16. Prototyping user displays using CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosta, Charles P.; Miller, Ross; Krolak, Patrick; Vesty, Matt

    1990-01-01

    CLIPS is being used as an integral module of a rapid prototyping system. The prototyping system consists of a display manager for object browsing, a graph program for displaying line and bar charts, and a communications server for routing messages between modules. A CLIPS simulation of a physical model provides dynamic control of the user's display. Currently, a project is well underway to prototype the Advanced Automation System (AAS) for the Federal Aviation Administration.

  17. Flat panel planar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1994-11-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic Display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic class sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  18. Peripheral vision displays: The future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assenhein, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    Several areas of research relating to peripheral vision displays used by aircraft pilots are outlined: fiber optics, display color, and holography. Various capacities and specifications of gas and solid state lasers are enumerated. These lasers are potential sources of green light for the peripheral vision displays. The relative radiance required for rod and cone vision at different wavelengths is presented graphically. Calculated and measured retinal sensitivities (foveal and peripheral) are given for wavelength produced by various lasers.

  19. Display of text on television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treurniet, W. C.

    1981-05-01

    A videotex service whereby the general public will be able to access various kinds of information from central data bases displays textural and graphical information on television receivers much like those currently used in people's homes. Technical and graphic design problems related to the display of such information on a color television are addressed. The results of several studies concerned with the display of text are described, and the relative merits of red-green-blue versus composite video input are discussed.

  20. Miniature information displays: primary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvelda, Phillip; Lewis, Nancy D.

    1998-04-01

    Positioned to replace current liquid crystal display technology in many applications, miniature information displays have evolved to provide several truly portable platforms for the world's growing personal computing and communication needs. The technology and functionality of handheld computer and communicator systems has finally surpassed many of the standards that were originally established for desktop systems. In these new consumer electronics, performance, display size, packaging, power consumption, and cost have always been limiting factors for fabricating genuinely portable devices. The rapidly growing miniature information display manufacturing industry is making it possible to bring a wide range of highly anticipated new products to new markets.

  1. The display of tactile information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrick, Carl E.

    1991-01-01

    There are a number of examples of natural tactile displays that can five us some insights about the solid geometry of touch, and recent experimental work on the subject has extended our thinking considerably. The concern of here is, however, more with synthetic or artificial displays for the production of a virtual environment. Features of synthetic displays that have enjoyed some success in one of the following two enterprises are discussed: the study of the spatio-temporal dimensions of stimuli that afford accurate and rapid processing of environmental information, or the use of displays in the design of sensory aids for disabled persons.

  2. Colorimetric evaluation of display performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmowski, Bogdan B.

    2001-08-01

    The development of information techniques, using new technologies, physical phenomena and coding schemes, enables new application areas to be benefited form the introduction of displays. The full utilization of the visual perception of a human operator, requires the color coding process to be implemented. The evolution of displays, from achromatic (B&W) and monochromatic, to multicolor and full-color, enhances the possibilities of information coding, creating however a need for the quantitative methods of display parameter assessment. Quantitative assessment of color displays, restricted to photometric measurements of their parameters, is an estimate leading to considerable errors. Therefore, the measurements of a display's color properties have to be based on spectral measurements of the display and its elements. The quantitative assessment of the display system parameters should be made using colorimetric systems like CIE1931, CIE1976 LAB or LUV. In the paper, the constraints on the measurement method selection for the color display evaluation are discussed and the relations between their qualitative assessment and the ergonomic conditions of their application are also presented. The paper presents the examples of using LUV colorimetric system and color difference (Delta) E in the optimization of color liquid crystal displays.

  3. Program For A Pushbutton Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, Anthony M.; Luck, William S., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Programmable Display Pushbutton (PDP) is pushbutton device available from Micro Switch having programmable 16X35 matrix of light-emitting diodes on pushbutton surface. Any desired legends display on PDP's, producing user-friendly applications reducing need for dedicated manual controls. Interacts with operator, calls for correct response before transmitting next message. Both simple manual control and sophisticated programmable link between operator and host system. Programmable Display Pushbutton Legend Editor (PDPE) computer program used to create light-emitting-diode (LED) displays for pushbuttons. Written in FORTRAN.

  4. Liquid crystal Fresnel lens display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Qian; Abhishek Kumar, Srivastava; Alwin Tam, Ming-Wai; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Shen, Dong; Vladimir, Chigrinov G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2016-09-01

    A novel see-through display with a liquid crystal lens array was proposed. A liquid crystal Fresnel lens display (LCFLD) with a holographic screen was demonstrated. The proposed display system has high efficiency, simple fabrication, and low manufacturing cost due to the absence of a polarizer and color filter. Project supported by Partner State Key Laboratory on Advanced Displays and Optoelectronics Technologies HKUST, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61435008 and 61575063), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. WM1514036).

  5. Program For A Pushbutton Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, Anthony M.; Luck, William S., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Programmable Display Pushbutton (PDP) is pushbutton device available from Micro Switch having programmable 16X35 matrix of light-emitting diodes on pushbutton surface. Any desired legends display on PDP's, producing user-friendly applications reducing need for dedicated manual controls. Interacts with operator, calls for correct response before transmitting next message. Both simple manual control and sophisticated programmable link between operator and host system. Programmable Display Pushbutton Legend Editor (PDPE) computer program used to create light-emitting-diode (LED) displays for pushbuttons. Written in FORTRAN.

  6. Maintenance Procedure Display: Head Mounted Display (HMD) Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Milrian; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Solem, Jody A.; Holden, Kritina L.; Hoffman, Ronald R.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing maintenance procedures for head mounted displays is shown. The topics include: 1) Study Goals; 2) Near Eye Displays (HMDs); 3) Design; 4) Phase I-Evaluation Methods; 5) Phase 1 Results; 6) Improved HMD Mounting; 7) Phase 2 -Evaluation Methods; 8) Phase 2 Preliminary Results; and 9) Next Steps.

  7. Fabrication of a dye-doped liquid crystal light shutter by thermal curing of polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Byeong-Hun; Ji, Seong-Min; Kim, Jin-Hun; Huh, Jae-Won; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2017-07-01

    We report a thermal curing method for fabrication of a dye-doped polymer-stabilized liquid crystal (PSLC) light shutter, which can prevent the decrease in absorption and discoloration of the dye caused by the UV curing process. We found that the measured transmittance in the opaque state of a dye-doped PSLC cell fabricated by thermal curing was approximately 35% lower than that of a dye-doped PSLC cell fabricated by UV curing. Thermal curing can be an alternative approach for fabrication of a dye-doped PSLC light shutter which can be used to provide high visibility of a see-through display.

  8. Advances in display technology III; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, January 18, 19, 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlam, E.

    1983-01-01

    Human factors in visible displays are discussed, taking into account an introduction to color vision, a laser optometric assessment of visual display viewability, the quantification of color contrast, human performance evaluations of digital image quality, visual problems of office video display terminals, and contemporary problems in airborne displays. Other topics considered are related to electroluminescent technology, liquid crystal and related technologies, plasma technology, and display terminal and systems. Attention is given to the application of electroluminescent technology to personal computers, electroluminescent driving techniques, thin film electroluminescent devices with memory, the fabrication of very large electroluminescent displays, the operating properties of thermally addressed dye switching liquid crystal display, light field dichroic liquid crystal displays for very large area displays, and hardening military plasma displays for a nuclear environment.

  9. Thinking Critically about Data Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duesbery, Luke; Braun-Monegan, Jenelle; Liu, Kimy; McCoy, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The quality of a data display can have an impact on the interpretation of those data. A survey of the literature indicates that data displays can vary in quality of accuracy, clarity, and efficacy. In this study we develop and apply an evaluative rubric to graphs in a sample of six education journals: three research and three practitioner. Results…

  10. Flexible Bistable Cholesteric Reflective Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Deng-Ke

    2006-03-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs) exhibit two stable states at zero field condition-the reflecting planar state and the nonreflecting focal conic state. ChLCs are an excellent candidate for inexpensive and rugged electronic books and papers. This paper will review the display cell structure,materials and drive schemes for flexible bistable cholesteric (Ch) reflective displays.

  11. Displays: Entering a New Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    As display technologies prepare to welcome 3-D, the 21st-century classroom will soon bear little resemblance to anything students and teachers have ever seen. In this article, the author presents the latest innovations in the world of digital display technology. These include: (1) Touchlight, an interactive touch screen program that takes a normal…

  12. You Be the Judge: Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeninger, Jimmy G.

    The instructional package was developed to provide the distributive education teacher-coordinator with visual materials that can be used to supplement existing textbook offerings in the area of display (visual merchandising). Designed for use with 35mm slides of retail store displays, the package allows the student to view the slides of displays…

  13. Drugs derived from phage display

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Andrew E; Sexton, Daniel J; Ladner, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Phage display, one of today’s fundamental drug discovery technologies, allows identification of a broad range of biological drugs, including peptides, antibodies and other proteins, with the ability to tailor critical characteristics such as potency, specificity and cross-species binding. Further, unlike in vivo technologies, generating phage display-derived antibodies is not restricted by immunological tolerance. Although more than 20 phage display-derived antibody and peptides are currently in late-stage clinical trials or approved, there is little literature addressing the specific challenges and successes in the clinical development of phage-derived drugs. This review uses case studies, from candidate identification through clinical development, to illustrate the utility of phage display as a drug discovery tool, and offers a perspective for future developments of phage display technology. PMID:24262785

  14. Three-dimensional display technologies.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain's power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies.

  15. Flat panel display Impurity doping technology for flat panel displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2005-08-01

    Features of the flat panel displays (FPDs) such as liquid crystal display (LCD) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, etc. using low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistors (TFTs) are briefly reviewed comparing with other FPDs. The requirements for fabricating TFTs used for high performance FPDs and system on glass (SoG) are addressed. This paper focuses on the impurity doping technology, which is one of the key technologies together with crystallization by laser annealing, formation of high quality gate insulator and gate-insulator/poly-Si interface. The issues to be solved in impurity doping technology for state of the art and future TFTs are clarified.

  16. INFORMATION DISPLAY: CONSIDERATIONS FOR DESIGNING COMPUTER-BASED DISPLAY SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    O'HARA,J.M.; PIRUS,D.; BELTRATCCHI,L.

    2004-09-19

    This paper discussed the presentation of information in computer-based control rooms. Issues associated with the typical displays currently in use are discussed. It is concluded that these displays should be augmented with new displays designed to better meet the information needs of plant personnel and to minimize the need for interface management tasks (the activities personnel have to do to access and organize the information they need). Several approaches to information design are discussed, specifically addressing: (1) monitoring, detection, and situation assessment; (2) routine task performance; and (3) teamwork, crew coordination, collaborative work.

  17. Operant conditioning of facial displays of pain.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Miriam; Rainville, Pierre; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    The operant model of chronic pain posits that nonverbal pain behavior, such as facial expressions, is sensitive to reinforcement, but experimental evidence supporting this assumption is sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate in a healthy population a) whether facial pain behavior can indeed be operantly conditioned using a discriminative reinforcement schedule to increase and decrease facial pain behavior and b) to what extent these changes affect pain experience indexed by self-ratings. In the experimental group (n = 29), the participants were reinforced every time that they showed pain-indicative facial behavior (up-conditioning) or a neutral expression (down-conditioning) in response to painful heat stimulation. Once facial pain behavior was successfully up- or down-conditioned, respectively (which occurred in 72% of participants), facial pain displays and self-report ratings were assessed. In addition, a control group (n = 11) was used that was yoked to the reinforcement plans of the experimental group. During the conditioning phases, reinforcement led to significant changes in facial pain behavior in the majority of the experimental group (p < .001) but not in the yoked control group (p > .136). Fine-grained analyses of facial muscle movements revealed a similar picture. Furthermore, the decline in facial pain displays (as observed during down-conditioning) strongly predicted changes in pain ratings (R(2) = 0.329). These results suggest that a) facial pain displays are sensitive to reinforcement and b) that changes in facial pain displays can affect self-report ratings.

  18. Design, testing, and delivery of an interactive graphics display subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B.

    1973-01-01

    An interactive graphics display system was designed to be used in locating components on a printed circuit card and outputting data concerning their thermal values. The manner in which this was accomplished in terms of both hardware and software is described. An analysis of the accuracy of this approach is also included.

  19. Schur monotone decreasing sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganikhodjaev, Rasul; Saburov, Mansoor; Saburov, Khikmat

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce Schur monotone decreasing sequences in an n-dimensional space by considering a majorization pre-order. By means of down arrow mappings, we study omega limiting points of bounded Schur monotone decreasing sequences. We provide convergence criteria for such kinds of sequences. We prove that a Cesaro mean (or an arithmetic mean) of any bounded Schur monotone decreasing sequences converges to a unique limiting point.

  20. Tone compatibility between HDR displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bist, Cambodge; Cozot, Rémi; Madec, Gérard; Ducloux, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) is the latest trend in television technology and we expect an in ux of HDR capable consumer TVs in the market. Initial HDR consumer displays will operate on a peak brightness of about 500-1000 nits while in the coming years display peak brightness is expected to go beyond 1000 nits. However, professionally graded HDR content can range from 1000 to 4000 nits. As with Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) content, we can expect HDR content to be available in variety of lighting styles such as low key, medium key and high key video. This raises concerns over tone-compatibility between HDR displays especially when adapting to various lighting styles. It is expected that dynamic range adaptation between HDR displays uses similar techniques as found with tone mapping and tone expansion operators. In this paper, we survey simple tone mapping methods of 4000 nits color-graded HDR content for 1000 nits HDR displays. We also investigate tone expansion strategies when HDR content graded in 1000 nits is displayed on 4000 nits HDR monitors. We conclude that the best tone reproduction technique between HDR displays strongly depends on the lighting style of the content.

  1. Enterprise imaging and display consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybylowicz, James E.

    1997-05-01

    Managed care continues to drive healthcare providers in search of systems that improve productivity and reduce costs. The integration and centralization of information and image management systems are the central design theme of many evolving enterprise solutions. One of the major value drivers of these integrated image and information systems is the time and location independence of the clinical decision. Images and information being presented consistently and independent of the device or workstation is crucial to the enterprise's productivity improvements. This is true for information used for primary clinical decisions as well as for secondary or follow-up treatment. A system must deliver clinical information consistently, location to location as well as over time. The reliability of the system and consistency of the information are crucial design criteria. The integration and distribution of medical imagery increase the complexity of attaining and maintaining information consistency. The design of these enterprise systems implies the need for display devices to be monitored, controlled and maintained. The methods that have evolved break into three classifications. (I) Assume a standard response. (II) Measure the local display response and locally correct the display device. (III) Measure the local display response and transmit this information encapsulated in a device profile. The specific architecture will dictate the appropriate method for establishing display consistency. In all cases, establishing display consistency requires that one measure or model the response of the display device. The ability of an image management system to deliver the productivity goals of an enterprise depends on this basic functionality.

  2. Lizard threat display handicaps endurance.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Y

    2003-01-01

    Honest-signalling theory asserts that threat displays reliably advertise attributes that influence fighting success. Endurance, as measured by treadmill performance, predicts the outcome of agonistic interactions among lizards. If threat displays in lizards function to advertise endurance capacity then variation in threat displays should correlate with endurance. I tested this prediction for the duration of threat posturing in male side-blotched lizards (Uta stansburiana) and examined whether threat displays act as quality handicaps, reliable signals that expend the attribute that is advertised. Individual variation in the duration of threat posturing correlated with endurance, while an experimental reduction of endurance diminished the duration of threat posturing. As expected of a quality handicap, endurance fell below baseline after display production. A restriction of aerobic metabolism can account for this effect. In threat posturing, lateral compression of the thorax may interfere with respiration or with circulation, limiting aerobic metabolism and causing a compensatory increase in anaerobic metabolism, thereby generating lactate and diminishing locomotor capacity. Concentrations of lactate measured after display production were higher than baseline, consistent with the proposed mechanism. By restricting aerobic metabolism, the threat posture can act as a quality handicap, simultaneously advertising and expending the endurance capacity of displaying lizards. PMID:12803896

  3. Texture-Based Correspondence Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerald-Yamasaki, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Texture-based correspondence display is a methodology to display corresponding data elements in visual representations of complex multidimensional, multivariate data. Texture is utilized as a persistent medium to contain a visual representation model and as a means to create multiple renditions of data where color is used to identify correspondence. Corresponding data elements are displayed over a variety of visual metaphors in a normal rendering process without adding extraneous linking metadata creation and maintenance. The effectiveness of visual representation for understanding data is extended to the expression of the visual representation model in texture.

  4. Circular displays: control/display arrangements and stereotype strength with eight different display locations.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alan H S; Hoffmann, Errol R

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments are reported that were designed to investigate control/display arrangements having high stereotype strengths when using circular displays. Eight display locations relative to the operator and control were tested with rotational and translational controls situated on different planes according to the Frame of Reference Transformation Tool (FORT) model of Wickens et al. (2010). (Left. No, Right! Development of the Frame of Reference Transformation Tool (FORT), Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 54th Annual Meeting, 54: 1022-1026). In many cases, there was little effect of display locations, indicating the importance of the Worringham and Beringer (1998. Directional stimulus-response compatibility: a test of three alternative principles. Ergonomics, 41(6), 864-880) Visual Field principle and an extension of this principle for rotary controls (Hoffmann and Chan (2013). The Worringham and Beringer 'visual field' principle for rotary controls. Ergonomics, 56(10), 1620-1624). The initial indicator position (12, 3, 6 and 9 o'clock) had a major effect on control/display stereotype strength for many of the six controls tested. Best display/control arrangements are listed for each of the different control types (rotational and translational) and for the planes on which they are mounted. Data have application where a circular display is used due to limited display panel space and applies to space-craft, robotics operators, hospital equipment and home appliances. Practitioner Summary: Circular displays are often used when there is limited space available on a control panel. Display/control arrangements having high stereotype strength are listed for four initial indicator positions. These arrangements are best for design purposes.

  5. Localization in virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    This paper discusses the development of a particular spatial display medium, the virtual acoustic display. Although the technology can stand alone, it is envisioned ultimately to be a component of a larger multisensory environment and will no doubt find its greatest utility in that context. A general philosophy of the project has been that the development of advanced computer interfaces should be driven first by an understanding of human perceptual requirements, and secondarily by technological capabilities or constraints. In expanding on this view, the paper addresses why virtual acoustic displays are useful, characterizes the abilities of such displays, reviews some recent approaches to their implementation and application, describes the research project at NASA Ames in some detail, and finally outlines some critical research issues for the future.

  6. Multiplane binocular visual display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Electro-optic system is interfaced with digital computer in flight simulator to generate simultaneous multiple-image planes in real time. System may have applications with other display and remote-control systems.

  7. Ten inch Planar Optic Display

    SciTech Connect

    Beiser, L.; Veligdan, J.

    1996-04-01

    A Planar Optic Display (POD) is being built and tested for suitability as a high brightness replacement for the cathode ray tube, (CRT). The POD display technology utilizes a laminated optical waveguide structure which allows a projection type of display to be constructed in a thin (I to 2 inch) housing. Inherent in the optical waveguide is a black cladding matrix which gives the display a black appearance leading to very high contrast. A Digital Micromirror Device, (DMD) from Texas Instruments is used to create video images in conjunction with a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser. An anamorphic optical system is used to inject light into the POD to form a stigmatic image. In addition to the design of the POD screen, we discuss: image formation, image projection, and optical design constraints.

  8. Animated Displays IV: Linear Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chagnon, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Describes several demonstrations that can be easily reproduced to help students understand optical polarization. Displays and supplement text include polarization by reflection; polarization by scattering; liquid crystals; optical activity; calcite; birefringent plastics; retardation plates; photoelasticity; and the "Optical Barber…

  9. Field emitter display (FED) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Ronald

    1995-06-01

    Harris Corporation, Government Aerospace Systems Division, recognized the need for a lower cost alternative to the Active Matrix Liquid Crystal flat-panel display with potentially superior optical performance, lower power dissipation, and less volume at significantly reduced life-cycle cost. This paper compares the performance of Harris' Active Matrix Liquid Crystal Display (AMLCD) with the potential performance of a comparable FED. The FED offers superior sunlight- viewable optical performance compared with the AMLCD. The FED projects a significant reduction in power dissipation that will enhance the reliability of the displays and reduce the cooling loads on the cockpit design. It also promises reduced volume and weight. The simpler FED manufacturing processed, and the elimination of expendable backlight and heaters, will result in reductions in the cost of acquisition and ownership of flat-panel displays.

  10. Animated Displays IV: Linear Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chagnon, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Describes several demonstrations that can be easily reproduced to help students understand optical polarization. Displays and supplement text include polarization by reflection; polarization by scattering; liquid crystals; optical activity; calcite; birefringent plastics; retardation plates; photoelasticity; and the "Optical Barber…

  11. Payload specialist Garneau displays Sunphotometer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1984-10-08

    Payload specialist Marc Garneau displays a Canadian made Sunphotometer, part of a package of experiments which he is concentrating on during this mission. He is sitting on the Challenger's flight deck at the aft station.

  12. Digital display of astronomical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandi, S. A.

    1982-08-01

    A brief summary is given of techniques to enhance for photographic display digital astronomical images. The phenomenon of photographic deresolution is discussed and a proposed algorithm, the highpass squared filter, is presented to correct for this effect.

  13. Color speckle in laser displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    At the beginning of this century, lighting technology has been shifted from discharge lamps, fluorescent lamps and electric bulbs to solid-state lighting. Current solid-state lighting is based on the light emitting diodes (LED) technology, but the laser lighting technology is developing rapidly, such as, laser cinema projectors, laser TVs, laser head-up displays, laser head mounted displays, and laser headlamps for motor vehicles. One of the main issues of laser displays is the reduction of speckle noise1). For the monochromatic laser light, speckle is random interference pattern on the image plane (retina for human observer). For laser displays, RGB (red-green-blue) lasers form speckle patterns independently, which results in random distribution of chromaticity, called color speckle2).

  14. Fluidic-thermochromic display device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grafstein, D.; Hilborn, E. H.

    1968-01-01

    Fluidic decoder and display device has low-power requirements for temperature control of thermochromic materials. An electro-to-fluid converter translates incoming electrical signals into pneumatics signal of sufficient power to operate the fluidic logic elements.

  15. Alternative display and interaction devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolas, M. T.; McDowall, I. E.; Mead, R. X.; Lorimer, E. R.; Hackbush, J. E.; Greuel, C.

    1995-01-01

    While virtual environment systems are typically thought to consist of a head mounted display and a flex-sensing glove, alternative peripheral devices are beginning to be developed in response to application requirements. Three such alternatives are discussed: fingertip sensing gloves, fixed stereoscopic viewers, and counterbalanced head mounted displays. A subset of commercial examples that highlight each alternative is presented as well as a brief discussion of interesting engineering and implementation issues.

  16. A Well Tempered Mammographic Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    ambient light levels. A calibration procedure was developed that derived a display function for the mammogram display based upon equalizing the just...noticeable difference in contrast over the intensity range of the monitor at ambient illumination. The maximum and minimum pixel intensity determined... medio -lateral oblique views was developed. The time to detection and the detection accuracy using ROC analysis was compared for two radiologists reading

  17. ENERGY STAR Certified Displays - Deprecated

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This dataset is up-to-date but newer better data can be retrieved at: https://data.energystar.gov/dataset/ENERGY-STAR-Certified-Displays/xsyb-v8gsCertified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 7.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Displays that are effective as of July 1, 2016. A detailed listing of key efficiency criteria are available at https://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=monitors.pr_crit_monitors.

  18. Spatial Displays and Spatial Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Direction Judgements in Computer-Generated Displays and Actual Scenes 19-1 Stephen R. Ellis, Stephen Smith, Michael W. McGreevy, and Arthur...can be used to correct underlying natural biases in spatial judgements . For example, exocentric direction judgements (Howard, 1982) made of extended...Roscoe, S. N. (1984). Judgements of size and distance with imaging displays. Human Factors, 26, 617-629. Roscoe, S. N. (1987). The trouble with

  19. Holographic Waveguide Array Rollable Display.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    Boulder, CO, and a l-D array of digital micromirrors ( DMD ) from Texas Instruments. The linear format permits simple driving electronics and high...TI’s DMD , or a CMOS-SLM. A collimated laser beaming (combine three colors) or a collimated white light beam from a high intensity halogen lamp can be...projection display technologies based on LCDs, DMDs , and miniature CMOS-SLMs, so that no special image display formatting is necessary. However, for a

  20. Effective color design for displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Lindsay W.

    2002-06-01

    Visual communication is a key aspect of human-computer interaction, which contributes to the satisfaction of user and application needs. For effective design of presentations on computer displays, color should be used in conjunction with the other visual variables. The general needs of graphic user interfaces are discussed, followed by five specific tasks with differing criteria for display color specification - advertising, text, information, visualization and imaging.

  1. Performance studies of electrochromic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Ciprian; Dobre, Robert Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    The idea of having flexible, very thin, light, low power and even low cost display devices implemented using new materials and technologies is very exciting. Nowadays we can talk about more than just concepts, such devices exist, and they are part of an emerging concept: FOLAE (Flexible Organic and Large Area Electronics). Among the advantages of electrochromic devices are the low power consumption (they are non-emissive, i.e. passive) and the aspect like ink on paper with good viewing angle. Some studies are still necessary for further development, before proper performances are met and the functional behavior can be predicted. This paper presents the results of the research activity conducted to develop electric characterization platform for the organic electronics display devices, especially electrochromic displays, to permit a thorough study. The hardware part of platform permits the measuring of different electric and optical parameters. Charging/discharging a display element presents high interest for optimal driving circuitry. In this sense, the corresponding waveforms are presented. The contrast of the display is also measured for different operation conditions as driving voltage levels and duration. The effect of temperature on electrical and optical parameters (contrast) of the display will be also presented.

  2. Stratospheric ozone is decreasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1988-03-01

    The recent discovery that chlorofluorocarbons create the Antarctic ozone hole every October through reactions mediated by ice particles formed at the lowest temperatures of the stratosphere is discussed. A large-scale reanalysis of measurements reveals that protective stratospheric ozone has decreased during the past 17 yrs with some decreases greatly exceeding predictions. It is noted that standard models did not, and still do not, include the ice in their reaction schemes. A tendency toward larger losses at higher colder latitudes is seen.

  3. Global analysis of thermal tolerance and latitude in ectotherms.

    PubMed

    Sunday, Jennifer M; Bates, Amanda E; Dulvy, Nicholas K

    2011-06-22

    A tenet of macroecology is that physiological processes of organisms are linked to large-scale geographical patterns in environmental conditions. Species at higher latitudes experience greater seasonal temperature variation and are consequently predicted to withstand greater temperature extremes. We tested for relationships between breadths of thermal tolerance in ectothermic animals and the latitude of specimen location using all available data, while accounting for habitat, hemisphere, methodological differences and taxonomic affinity. We found that thermal tolerance breadths generally increase with latitude, and do so at a greater rate in the Northern Hemisphere. In terrestrial ectotherms, upper thermal limits vary little while lower thermal limits decrease with latitude. By contrast, marine species display a coherent poleward decrease in both upper and lower thermal limits. Our findings provide comprehensive global support for hypotheses generated from studies at smaller taxonomic subsets and geographical scales. Our results further indicate differences between terrestrial and marine ectotherms in how thermal physiology varies with latitude that may relate to the degree of temperature variability experienced on land and in the ocean.

  4. Global analysis of thermal tolerance and latitude in ectotherms

    PubMed Central

    Sunday, Jennifer M.; Bates, Amanda E.; Dulvy, Nicholas K.

    2011-01-01

    A tenet of macroecology is that physiological processes of organisms are linked to large-scale geographical patterns in environmental conditions. Species at higher latitudes experience greater seasonal temperature variation and are consequently predicted to withstand greater temperature extremes. We tested for relationships between breadths of thermal tolerance in ectothermic animals and the latitude of specimen location using all available data, while accounting for habitat, hemisphere, methodological differences and taxonomic affinity. We found that thermal tolerance breadths generally increase with latitude, and do so at a greater rate in the Northern Hemisphere. In terrestrial ectotherms, upper thermal limits vary little while lower thermal limits decrease with latitude. By contrast, marine species display a coherent poleward decrease in both upper and lower thermal limits. Our findings provide comprehensive global support for hypotheses generated from studies at smaller taxonomic subsets and geographical scales. Our results further indicate differences between terrestrial and marine ectotherms in how thermal physiology varies with latitude that may relate to the degree of temperature variability experienced on land and in the ocean. PMID:21106582

  5. Biocular vehicle display optical designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, H.; Carter, Tom

    2012-06-01

    Biocular vehicle display optics is a fast collimating lens (f / # < 0.9) that presents the image of the display at infinity to both eyes of the viewer. Each eye captures the scene independently and the brain merges the two images into one through the overlapping portions of the images. With the recent conversion from analog CRT based displays to lighter, more compact active-matrix organic light-emitting diodes (AMOLED) digital image sources, display optical designs have evolved to take advantage of the higher resolution AMOLED image sources. To maximize the field of view of the display optics and fully resolve the smaller pixels, the digital image source is pre-magnified by relay optics or a coherent taper fiber optics plate. Coherent taper fiber optics plates are used extensively to: 1. Convert plano focal planes to spherical focal planes in order to eliminate Petzval field curvature. This elimination enables faster lens speed and/or larger field of view of eye pieces, display optics. 2. Provide pre-magnification to lighten the work load of the optics to further increase the numerical aperture and/or field of view. 3. Improve light flux collection efficiency and field of view by collecting all the light emitted by the image source and guiding imaging light bundles toward the lens aperture stop. 4. Reduce complexity of the optical design and overall packaging volume by replacing pre-magnification optics with a compact taper fiber optics plate. This paper will review and compare the performance of biocular vehicle display designs without and with taper fiber optics plate.

  6. Courtship Song Does Not Increase the Rate of Adaptation to a Thermally Stressful Environment in a Drosophila melanogaster Laboratory Population

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Larry G.; Holland, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Courtship song in D. melanogaster contributes substantially to male mating success through female selection. We used experimental evolution to test whether this display trait is maintained through adaptive female selection because it indicates heritable male quality for thermal stress tolerance. We used non-displaying, outbred populations of D. melanogaster (nub1) mutants and measured their rate of adaptation to a new, thermally stressful environment, relative to wild-type control populations that retained courtship song. This design retains sexually selected conflict in both treatments. Thermal stress should select across genomes for newly beneficial alleles, increasing the available genetic and phenotypic variation and, therefore, the magnitude of female benefit derived from courtship song. Following introduction to the thermally stressful environment, net reproductive rate decreased 50% over four generations, and then increased 19% over the following 16 generations. There were no differences between the treatments. Possible explanations for these results are discussed. PMID:25365209

  7. Solid state thermal rectifier

    SciTech Connect

    2016-07-05

    Thermal rectifiers using linear nanostructures as core thermal conductors have been fabricated. A high mass density material is added preferentially to one end of the nanostructures to produce an axially non-uniform mass distribution. The resulting nanoscale system conducts heat asymmetrically with greatest heat flow in the direction of decreasing mass density. Thermal rectification has been demonstrated for linear nanostructures that are electrical insulators, such as boron nitride nanotubes, and for nanostructures that are conductive, such as carbon nanotubes.

  8. Decreasing strabismus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Arora, A; Williams, B; Arora, A K; McNamara, R; Yates, J; Fielder, A

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether there has been a consistent change across countries and healthcare systems in the frequency of strabismus surgery in children over the past decade. Methods: Retrospective analysis of data on all strabismus surgery performed in NHS hospitals in England and Wales, on children aged 0–16 years between 1989 and 2000, and between 1994 and 2000 in Ontario (Canada) hospitals. These were compared with published data for Scotland, 1989–2000. Results: Between 1989 and 1999–2000 the number of strabismus procedures performed on children, 0–16 years, in England decreased by 41.2% from 15 083 to 8869. Combined medial rectus recession with lateral rectus resection decreased from 5538 to 3013 (45.6%) in the same period. Bimedial recessions increased from 489 to 762, oblique tenotomies from 43 to 121, and the use of adjustable sutures from 29 to 44, in 2000. In Ontario, operations for squint decreased from 2280 to 1685 (26.1%) among 0–16 year olds between 1994 and 2000. Conclusion: The clinical impression of decrease in the frequency of paediatric strabismus surgery is confirmed. In the authors’ opinion this cannot be fully explained by a decrease in births or by the method of healthcare funding. Two factors that might have contributed are better conservative strabismus management and increased subspecialisation that has improved the quality of surgery and the need for re-operation. This finding has a significant impact upon surgical services and also on the training of ophthalmologists. PMID:15774914

  9. Some perspective decisions for the regeneration system equipment of the thermal and nuclear power plants decreasing the probability of water ingress into the turbine and rotor acceleration by return steam flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, N. N.; Svyatkin, F. A.; Sintsova, T. G.; Ukhanova, M. G.; Yesin, S. B.; Nikolayenkova, E. K.; Yurchenko, A. Yu.; Grigorieva, E. B.

    2016-03-01

    The regeneration system heaters are one of the sources of possible ingress of the water into the turbine. The water penetrates into the turbine either at the heaters overflow or with the return flow of steam generated when the water being in the heater boils up in the dynamic operation modes or at deenergization of the power-generating unit. The return flow of steam and water is dangerous to the turbine blades and can result in the rotor acceleration. The known protective devices used to prevent the overflow of the low-pressure and high-pressure heaters (LPH and HPH), of the horizontal and vertical heaters of heating-system water (HWH and VWH), as well as of the deaerators and low-pressure mixing heaters (LPMH) were considered. The main protective methods of the steam and water return flows supplied by the heaters in dynamic operation modes or at deenergization of the power-generating unit are described. Previous operating experience shows that the available protections do not fully prevent water ingress into the turbine and the rotor acceleration and, therefore, the development of measures to decrease the possibility of ingress of the water into the turbine is an actual problem. The measures allowing eliminating or reducing the water mass in the heaters are expounded; some of them were designed by the specialists of OAO Polzunov Scientific and Development Association on Research and Design of Power Equipment (NPO CKTI) and are efficiently introduced at heat power plants and nuclear power plants. The suggested technical solutions allow reducing the possibility of the water ingress into the turbine and rotor acceleration by return steam flow in the dynamic operation modes or in the case of power generating unit deenergization. Some of these solutions have been tested in experimental-industrial exploitation and can be used in industry.

  10. Designing displays for severe environment military fighter applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukes, Malcolm L.

    1997-07-01

    Smiths Industries is a world class supplier of multi-purpose color displays for severe environment fast-jet and rotary wing applications. In this paper we describe the technical issues, design techniques and qualification experience gained through replacing shadow-mask cathode ray tube with active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) devices in our 5 inch and 6 inch display products. The operational needs for primary flight/mission displays are reviewed from which display brightness, dimming range, contrast, viewing angle and resolution requirements are derived. These requirements when combined with the environment conditions found in a jet fighter cockpit challenge the display designer to find novel cost effective solutions. We shall discuss: the development of an AMLCD for severe environment applications; the development of a backlight to achieve long life, wide luminance range and compatibility with night vision imaging systems; mens to manage the local thermal environment of the AMLCD and the backlight. Practical realization of these solutions are demonstrated in our 5 inch and 6 inch multi- purpose color display products which have been qualified for flight in severe military environments. Operator and engineering evaluations have been made in representative lighting environments and through flight trials to compare the performance of AMLCD against our traditional 'de-facto' standard CRT products.

  11. Future of autostereoscopic electronic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Lenny

    1992-06-01

    Recently there has been significant activity in the attempt to develop autostereoscopic electronic displays. An interesting variation of the panoramagram, the moving slit technique, was described by Collender in the early seventies, and there have been various new types of volumetric display techniques, such as the Spacegraph acoustical mirror and the Texas Instruments laser scanned revolving surface. Lately liquid crystal technology has been employed by NTT and Dimension Technologies, offering the promise of a true three- dimensional display without the need for individual viewing devices. There are fundamental considerations with regard to presentation of visual information that provide constraints with regard to making such products competitive compared with current field-sequential electronic displays. These field-sequential displays have been successful in the marketplace and provide a standard against which the performance of new products must be measured. Products like CrystalEyesR allow any number of spectators to view the image, and have a high degree of compatibility with the present computer graphics and video infrastructures -- an important issue for manufacturers integrating such products into, for example, workstations, and for the user in terms of price and ease of use.

  12. Three-dimensional display technologies

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain’s power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies. PMID:25530827

  13. Mask lithography for display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Ekberg, P.

    2010-05-01

    The last ten years have seen flat displays conquer our briefcases, desktops, and living rooms. There has been an enormous development in production technology, not least in lithography and photomasks. Current masks for large displays are more than 2 m2 and make 4-6 1X prints on glass substrates that are 9 m2. One of the most challenging aspects of photomasks for displays is the so called mura, stripes or blemishes which cause visible defects in the finished display. For the future new and even tighter maskwriter specifications are driven by faster transistors and more complex pixel layouts made necessary by the market's wish for still better image quality, multi-touch panels, 3D TVs, and the next wave of e-book readers. Large OLED screens will pose new challenges. Many new types of displays will be lowcost and use simple lithography, but anything which can show video and high quality photographic images needs a transistor backplane and sophisticated masks for its production.

  14. Military Display Market: Fourth Comprehensive Edition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    Display is implemented via a Sperry Rascar 2500M monochrome, touch screen display. The IC-M120 is a VHF Marine Transceiver by ICOM with seven-segment...display with SVGA resolution by Sperry . The BMS-1000 has the same Sperry display as the TAO, while the computer software allows for more options. The...display uses large seven-segments per character for four characters in monochrome. The SRD-331 Remote Display unit by Sperry uses a monochrome display. The

  15. Phosphors for flat panel emissive displays

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.T.; Walko, R.J.; Phillips, M.L.F.

    1995-07-01

    An overview of emissive display technologies is presented. Display types briefly described include: cathode ray tubes (CRTs), field emission displays (FEDs), electroluminescent displays (ELDs), and plasma display panels (PDPs). The critical role of phosphors in further development of the latter three flat panel emissive display technologies is outlined. The need for stable, efficient red, green, and blue phosphors for RGB fall color displays is emphasized.

  16. Decreasing Fires in Mediterranean Europe.

    PubMed

    Turco, Marco; Bedia, Joaquín; Di Liberto, Fabrizio; Fiorucci, Paolo; von Hardenberg, Jost; Koutsias, Nikos; Llasat, Maria-Carmen; Xystrakis, Fotios; Provenzale, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Forest fires are a serious environmental hazard in southern Europe. Quantitative assessment of recent trends in fire statistics is important for assessing the possible shifts induced by climate and other environmental/socioeconomic changes in this area. Here we analyse recent fire trends in Portugal, Spain, southern France, Italy and Greece, building on a homogenized fire database integrating official fire statistics provided by several national/EU agencies. During the period 1985-2011, the total annual burned area (BA) displayed a general decreasing trend, with the exception of Portugal, where a heterogeneous signal was found. Considering all countries globally, we found that BA decreased by about 3020 km2 over the 27-year-long study period (i.e. about -66% of the mean historical value). These results are consistent with those obtained on longer time scales when data were available, also yielding predominantly negative trends in Spain and France (1974-2011) and a mixed trend in Portugal (1980-2011). Similar overall results were found for the annual number of fires (NF), which globally decreased by about 12600 in the study period (about -59%), except for Spain where, excluding the provinces along the Mediterranean coast, an upward trend was found for the longer period. We argue that the negative trends can be explained, at least in part, by an increased effort in fire management and prevention after the big fires of the 1980's, while positive trends may be related to recent socioeconomic transformations leading to more hazardous landscape configurations, as well as to the observed warming of recent decades. We stress the importance of fire data homogenization prior to analysis, in order to alleviate spurious effects associated with non-stationarities in the data due to temporal variations in fire detection efforts.

  17. Decreasing Fires in Mediterranean Europe

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Marco; Bedia, Joaquín; Di Liberto, Fabrizio; Fiorucci, Paolo; von Hardenberg, Jost; Koutsias, Nikos; Llasat, Maria-Carmen; Xystrakis, Fotios; Provenzale, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Forest fires are a serious environmental hazard in southern Europe. Quantitative assessment of recent trends in fire statistics is important for assessing the possible shifts induced by climate and other environmental/socioeconomic changes in this area. Here we analyse recent fire trends in Portugal, Spain, southern France, Italy and Greece, building on a homogenized fire database integrating official fire statistics provided by several national/EU agencies. During the period 1985-2011, the total annual burned area (BA) displayed a general decreasing trend, with the exception of Portugal, where a heterogeneous signal was found. Considering all countries globally, we found that BA decreased by about 3020 km2 over the 27-year-long study period (i.e. about -66% of the mean historical value). These results are consistent with those obtained on longer time scales when data were available, also yielding predominantly negative trends in Spain and France (1974-2011) and a mixed trend in Portugal (1980-2011). Similar overall results were found for the annual number of fires (NF), which globally decreased by about 12600 in the study period (about -59%), except for Spain where, excluding the provinces along the Mediterranean coast, an upward trend was found for the longer period. We argue that the negative trends can be explained, at least in part, by an increased effort in fire management and prevention after the big fires of the 1980’s, while positive trends may be related to recent socioeconomic transformations leading to more hazardous landscape configurations, as well as to the observed warming of recent decades. We stress the importance of fire data homogenization prior to analysis, in order to alleviate spurious effects associated with non-stationarities in the data due to temporal variations in fire detection efforts. PMID:26982584

  18. Developing tiled projection display systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Judson, I. R.; Paris, J.; Stevens, R. L.

    2000-06-08

    Tiled displays are an emerging technology for constructing high-resolution semi-immersive visualization environments capable of presenting high-resolution images from scientific simulation [EVL, PowerWall]. In this way, they complement other technologies such as the CAVE [Cruz-Niera92] or ImmersaDesk, [Czernuszenko97], which by design give up pure resolution in favor of width of view and stereo. However, the largest impact may well be in using large-format tiled displays as one of possibly multiple displays in building ''information'' or ''active'' spaces that surround the user with diverse ways of interacting with data and multimedia information flows [IPSI, Childers00, Raskar98, ROME, Stanford, UNC]. These environments may prove to be the ultimate successor of the desktop metaphor for information technology work.

  19. IMDISP - INTERACTIVE IMAGE DISPLAY PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The Interactive Image Display Program (IMDISP) is an interactive image display utility for the IBM Personal Computer (PC, XT and AT) and compatibles. Until recently, efforts to utilize small computer systems for display and analysis of scientific data have been hampered by the lack of sufficient data storage capacity to accomodate large image arrays. Most planetary images, for example, require nearly a megabyte of storage. The recent development of the "CDROM" (Compact Disk Read-Only Memory) storage technology makes possible the storage of up to 680 megabytes of data on a single 4.72-inch disk. IMDISP was developed for use with the CDROM storage system which is currently being evaluated by the Planetary Data System. The latest disks to be produced by the Planetary Data System are a set of three disks containing all of the images of Uranus acquired by the Voyager spacecraft. The images are in both compressed and uncompressed format. IMDISP can read the uncompressed images directly, but special software is provided to decompress the compressed images, which can not be processed directly. IMDISP can also display images stored on floppy or hard disks. A digital image is a picture converted to numerical form so that it can be stored and used in a computer. The image is divided into a matrix of small regions called picture elements, or pixels. The rows and columns of pixels are called "lines" and "samples", respectively. Each pixel has a numerical value, or DN (data number) value, quantifying the darkness or brightness of the image at that spot. In total, each pixel has an address (line number, sample number) and a DN value, which is all that the computer needs for processing. DISPLAY commands allow the IMDISP user to display all or part of an image at various positions on the display screen. The user may also zoom in and out from a point on the image defined by the cursor, and may pan around the image. To enable more or all of the original image to be displayed on the

  20. Multifunction display system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and construction of a multifunction display man/machine interface for use with a 4 pi IBM-360 System are described. The system is capable of displaying superimposed volatile alphanumeric and graphical data on a 512 x 512 element plasma panel, and holographically stored multicolor archival information. The volatile data may be entered from a keyboard or by means of an I/O interface to the 360 system. A 2-page memory local to the display is provided for storing the entered data. The archival data is stored as a phase hologram on a vinyl tape strip. This data is accessible by means of a rapid transport system which responds to inputs provided by the I/O channel on the keyboard. As many as 500 frames may be stored on a tape strip for access in under 6 seconds.

  1. Telerobotics - Display, control, and communication problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Lawrence; Kim, Won-Soo; Tendick, Frank; Hannaford, Blake; Ellis, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    An experimental telerobotics simulation is described suitable for studying human operator (HO) performance. Simple manipulator pick-and-place and tracking tasks allowed quantitative comparison of a number of calligraphic display viewing conditions. An enhanced perspective display was effective with a reference line from target to base, with or without a complex three-dimensional grid framing the view. This was true especially if geometrical display parameters such as azimuth and elevation were arranged to be near optimal. Quantitative comparisons were made possible, utilizing control performance measures such as root mean square error. There was a distinct preference for controlling the manipulator in end-effector Cartesian space for the primitive pick-and-place task, rather than controlling joint angles and then, via direct kinematis, the end-effector position. An introduced communication delay was found to produce decrease in performance. In considerable part, this difficulty could be compensated for by preview control information. The fact that neurological control of normal human movement contains a sampled data period of 0.2 s may relate to this robustness of HO control to delay.

  2. Optimization of color LC displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmowski, Bogdan B.

    1995-08-01

    The advancement of the liquid crystal display (LCD) technology, and improvements of the optical and electro-optical properties, have enabled the broad expansion of LCDs application field. The rapid development of the multimedia techniques, new applications in automotive, office, medical domain, forced the demand for the color displays--for the information presentation with the color code. The necessity to fulfil many contradictory and extreme conditions caused the development of the optimization procedures of the color LC displays to be a big problem. Most of the LCDs used nowadays are the twisted nematic, super twisted nematic, and active matrix thin film transistor LCD. The characterization of the achromatic black/white LCDs is made by means of photometric measuring methods, and quantitative measures are used: luminance, reflectance, contrast, contrast ration; as a function of a driving voltage, viewing angle, temperature, etc. The characterization of the color LCD is based on the spectral distributions of the transmittance or reflectance. Quantitative measures are chromatic coordinates and luminance factors are defined according to the colorimetric systems--CIE 1931, CIE 1976, CIELUV, CIELAB. The color difference (Delta) E in the CIELUV system is applied as a optimization parameter for the color display module. The spectral properties of all optical elements of the display module are analyzed and their influence on the set of the optical factors of LCD is evaluated. The correlation between technological parameters and optical characteristics of the LCD has been investigated. The choice of the optimization criterion is discussed and the optimization algorithm is proposed. Results of the color displays evaluation for some examples with different preconditions are presented.

  3. PROGRAMMABLE DISPLAY PUSHBUTTON LEGEND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Programmable Display Pushbutton (PDP) is a pushbutton device available from Micro Switch which has a programmable 16 x 35 matrix of LEDs on the pushbutton surface. Any desired legends can be displayed on the PDPs, producing user-friendly applications which greatly reduce the need for dedicated manual controls. Because the PDP can interact with the operator, it can call for the correct response before transmitting its next message. It is both a simple manual control and a sophisticated programmable link between the operator and the host system. The Programmable Display Pushbutton Legend Editor, PDPE, is used to create the LED displays for the pushbuttons. PDPE encodes PDP control commands and legend data into message byte strings sent to a Logic Refresh and Control Unit (LRCU). The LRCU serves as the driver for a set of four PDPs. The legend editor (PDPE) transmits to the LRCU user specified commands that control what is displayed on the LED face of the individual pushbuttons. Upon receiving a command, the LRCU transmits an acknowledgement that the message was received and executed successfully. The user then observes the effect of the command on the PDP displays and decides whether or not to send the byte code of the message to a data file so that it may be called by an applications program. The PDPE program is written in FORTRAN for interactive execution. It was developed on a DEC VAX 11/780 under VMS. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 12800 bytes. It requires four Micro Switch PDPs and two RS-232 VAX 11/780 terminal ports. The PDPE program was developed in 1985.

  4. Gravitation and mass decrease

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, R.

    1982-08-01

    Consequences in physical theory of assuming the general relativistic time tranformation for the de Broglie frequencies of matter, v = E/h = mc/sup 2//h, are investigated in this paper. Experimentally it is known that electromagnetic waves from a source in a gravitational field are decreased in frequency, in accordance with the Einstein general relativity time transformation. An extension to de Broglie frequencies implies mass decreases in a gravitational field. Such a decrease gives an otherwise missing energy conservation for some processes; also, a physical alteration is then associated with change in gravitational potential. Further, the general relativity time transformation that is the source of gravitational action in the weak field (Newtonian) approximation than has a physical correlate in the proposed gravitational mass loss. Rotational motion and the associated equivalent gravitional-field mass loss are considered; an essential formal difference between metric (gravitational) mass loss and special relativity mass increase is discussed. For a spherical nonrotating mass collapsed to its Schwarzschild radius the postulated mass loss is found to give a 25% decrease in the mass acting as origin off an external gravitational field.

  5. Thermal conductivity and thermal instability of sand

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    Buried high voltage power cables generate heat when a current is passed through the conductor, and failure of the cable may occur if this causes the temperature to exceed the design limit. The thermal conductivity of the backfill soil of the cable trench greatly influences the temperature rise of the cable, therefore, it is necessary to know how this soil property varies with the different conditions in the cable environment. Thermal instability, a moisture migration phenomenon resulting in a decrease in the thermal conductivity of the backfill soil, has caused thermally induced failure of many cables. Accurate methods of predicting thermal instability are needed so that the maximum amount of electricity may be safety passed through the cable. Laboratory thermal needle tests were performed on several sands to determine how the property of thermal conductivity varied with temperature, moisture content, time, and water content at compaction. Thermal instability was investigated using laboratory tests, scaled model tests, and field tests. Using a specially developed laboratory thermal instability test apparatus, the time to instability for a sand was found to increase with increasing initial moisture content and increasing temperature.

  6. Drag and drop display & builder

    SciTech Connect

    Bolshakov, Timofei B.; Petrov, Andrey D.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Drag and Drop (DnD) Display & Builder is a component-oriented system that allows users to create visual representations of data received from data acquisition systems. It is an upgrade of a Synoptic Display mechanism used at Fermilab since 2002. Components can be graphically arranged and logically interconnected in the web-startable Project Builder. Projects can be either lightweight AJAX- and SVG-based web pages, or they can be started as Java applications. The new version was initiated as a response to discussions between the LHC Controls Group and Fermilab.

  7. Modern Display Technologies and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    3.3.4.1 Matrix addressing 72 3.3.4.2 Improvements in drive methods 74 3.3.4.3 Exploitation of alternative liquid crystal effects 75 3.3.4.4...addressing method on e.g. LCD displays, the maximum ratio for rms ON voltage over rms OFF voltage for addressed and non-selected pixels (2.11) is shown...analogue pointer displays. The method makes use of the correlation properties of pseudorandom binary sequence (prbs) waveforms. Each line electrode of

  8. Visual Attention to Radar Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moray, N.; Richards, M.; Brophy, C.

    1984-01-01

    A model is described which predicts the allocation of attention to the features of a radar display. It uses the growth of uncertainty and the probability of near collision to call the eye to a feature of the display. The main source of uncertainty is forgetting following a fixation, which is modelled as a two dimensional diffusion process. The model was used to predict information overload in intercept controllers, and preliminary validation obtained by recording eye movements of intercept controllers in simulated and live (practice) interception.

  9. Vetronics Technology Demonstrator Display Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Private Computing Devices CanadaA GENERAL DYNAMICS COMPANY Display Architecture Video Module •General Purpose Video I/F • LVDS •RGB Analog •Separate...Hsync & Vsync •Composite TTL Sync •Sync on Green (RS-170) •NTSC/PAL/SECAM •Frame rate/Scan converter/Scaler •Standard LVDS output Power Supply Module...Mil-Std-1275 compliant input •Heater Power @ 150W LCD Display Head •Backlight •Microcontroller •Video I/F ( LVDS ) •Adapted for each specific LCD •8.4

  10. Making public displays interactive everywhere.

    PubMed

    Boring, Sebastian; Baur, Dominikus

    2013-01-01

    As the number of large public displays increases, the need for interaction techniques to control them is emerging. One promising way to provide such interaction is through personal mobile devices. However, although much research has covered this topic, it hasn't yet brought those technologies fully into the public that is, by allowing for interactions in a variety of public spaces. A proposed tracking technology has led to several prototype applications that employ mobile devices to interact with large public displays. In turn, these prototypes have led to an overarching interaction concept that allows for public deployment regardless of the space's characteristics (for example, layout and technologies).

  11. 40 CFR 91.1007 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Display exemption. 91.1007 Section 91....1007 Display exemption. An uncertified marine SI engine is a display engine when it is to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident and necessary to the display purpose,...

  12. 40 CFR 91.1007 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Display exemption. 91.1007 Section 91....1007 Display exemption. An uncertified marine SI engine is a display engine when it is to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident and necessary to the display purpose,...

  13. 40 CFR 91.1007 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Display exemption. 91.1007 Section 91....1007 Display exemption. An uncertified marine SI engine is a display engine when it is to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident and necessary to the display purpose,...

  14. 40 CFR 89.907 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Display exemption. 89.907 Section 89....907 Display exemption. Where an uncertified nonroad engine is a display engine to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident and necessary to the display purpose, and will not...

  15. 40 CFR 89.907 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Display exemption. 89.907 Section 89....907 Display exemption. Where an uncertified nonroad engine is a display engine to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident and necessary to the display purpose, and will not...

  16. 40 CFR 89.907 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Display exemption. 89.907 Section 89....907 Display exemption. Where an uncertified nonroad engine is a display engine to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident and necessary to the display purpose, and will not...

  17. 40 CFR 89.907 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Display exemption. 89.907 Section 89....907 Display exemption. Where an uncertified nonroad engine is a display engine to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident and necessary to the display purpose, and will not...

  18. 40 CFR 89.907 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Display exemption. 89.907 Section 89....907 Display exemption. Where an uncertified nonroad engine is a display engine to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident and necessary to the display purpose, and will not...

  19. 40 CFR 91.1007 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Display exemption. 91.1007 Section 91....1007 Display exemption. An uncertified marine SI engine is a display engine when it is to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident and necessary to the display purpose,...

  20. Coordinated Displays to Assist Cyber Defenders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    databases . The current experiment examined whether analyst performance efficiency would be improved by coordinated displays, i.e., displays that...automatically link relevant information across databases . We found that coordinated displays nearly doubled performance efficiency, in contrast to the... databases . The current experiment examined whether analyst performance efficiency would be improved by coordinated displays, i.e., displays that

  1. Real Time Sonic Boom Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Ed

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will provide general information about sonic boom mitigation technology to the public in order to supply information to potential partners and licensees. The technology is a combination of flight data, atmospheric data and terrain information implemented into a control room real time display for flight planning. This research is currently being performed and as such, any results and conclusions are ongoing.

  2. Synthetic vision display evaluation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regal, David M.; Whittington, David H.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this research was to help us understand the display requirements for a synthetic vision system for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Four experiments were conducted to examine the effects of different levels of perceptual cue complexity in displays used by pilots in a flare and landing task. Increased levels of texture mapping of terrain and runway produced mixed results, including harder but shorter landings and a lower flare initiation altitude. Under higher workload conditions, increased texture resulted in an improvement in performance. An increase in familiar size cues did not result in improved performance. Only a small difference was found between displays using two patterns of high resolution texture mapping. The effects of increased perceptual cue complexity on performance was not as strong as would be predicted from the pilot's subjective reports or from related literature. A description of the role of a synthetic vision system in the High Speed Civil Transport is provide along with a literature review covering applied research related to perceptual cue usage in aircraft displays.

  3. Autostereoscopic display with eye tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomono, Takao; Hoon, Kyung; Ha, Yong Soo; Kim, Sung-Sik; Son, Jung-Young

    2002-05-01

    Auto-stereoscopic 21-inch display with eye tracking having wide viewing zone and bright image was fabricated. The image of display is projected to retinal through several optical components. We calculated optical system for wider viewing zone by using Inverse-Ray Trace Method. The viewing zone of first model is 155mm (theoretical value: 161mm). We could widen viewing zone by controlling paraxial radius of curvature of spherical mirror, the distance between lenses and so on. The viewing zone of second model is 208mm. We used two spherical mirrors to obtain twice brightness. We applied eye-tracking system to the display system. Eye recognition is based on neural network card based on ZICS technology. We fabricated Auto-stereoscopic 21-inch display with eye tracking. We measured viewing zone based on illumination area. The viewing zone was 206mm, which was close to theoretical value. We could get twice brightness also. We could see 3D image according to position without headgear.

  4. Lethally Innocuous Visual Display Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawkell, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    Examines conflicting studies which report on the effects of Visual Display Units (VDU) on health. Five aspects of alleged VDU effects are discussed: (1) radiation or emission effects; (2) visual effects; (3) postural effects; (4) effects on the arms and fingers; and (5) ultrasonic noise from scanning components. (36 references) (MAB)

  5. Vibratory tactile display for textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikei, Yasushi; Ikeno, Akihisa; Fukuda, Shuichi

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a tactile display that produces vibratory stimulus to a fingertip in contact with a vibrating tactor matrix. The display depicts tactile surface textures while the user is exploring a virtual object surface. A piezoelectric actuator drives the individual tactor in accordance with both the finger movement and the surface texture being traced. Spatiotemporal display control schemes were examined for presenting the fundamental surface texture elements. The temporal duration of vibratory stimulus was experimentally optimized to simulate the adaptation process of cutaneous sensation. The selected duration time for presenting a single line edge agreed with the time threshold of tactile sensation. Then spatial stimulus disposition schemes were discussed for representation of other edge shapes. As an alternative means not relying on amplitude control, a method of augmented duration at the edge was investigated. Spatial resolution of the display was measured for the lines presented both in perpendicular and parallel to a finger axis. Discrimination of texture density was also measured on random dot textures.

  6. Video Display Terminals: Radiation Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, William E.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses information gathered in past few years related to health effects of video display terminals (VDTs) with particular emphasis given to issues raised by VDT users. Topics covered include radiation emissions, health concerns, radiation surveys, occupational radiation exposure standards, and long-term risks. (17 references) (EJS)

  7. Graphics Display of Foreign Scripts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abercrombie, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Graphics Project for Foreign Language Learning at the University of Pennsylvania, which has developed ways of displaying foreign scripts on microcomputers. Character design on computer screens is explained; software for graphics, printing, and language instruction is discussed; and a text editor is described that corrects optically…

  8. Display Technology: An Annotated Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-12-01

    Courtney and Company, Philadelphia, Pa., March 1963. This study analyzes the visual world of the pilot and identifies information requirements for...various flight tasks. 11.2 Burnette , K. T. The Status of Human Perceptual Characteristic Data for Electronic Flight Display Design. Paper presented at

  9. Interference Phenomenon with Mobile Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trantham, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    A simple experiment is presented in which the spacing and geometric pattern of pixels in mobile displays is measured. The technique is based on optical constructive interference. While the experiment is another opportunity to demonstrate wave interference from a grating-like structure, this can also be used to demonstrate concepts of solid state…

  10. Book Display as Adult Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Matthew S.

    1997-01-01

    Defines book display as an adult service as choosing and positioning adult books from the library collection to increase their circulation. The author contrasts bookstore arrangement for sales versus library arrangement for access, including contrasting missions, genre grouping, weeding, problems, and dimensions. (Author/LRW)

  11. Information retrieval and display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groover, J. L.; King, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Versatile command-driven data management system offers users, through simplified command language, a means of storing and searching data files, sorting data files into specified orders, performing simple or complex computations, effecting file updates, and printing or displaying output data. Commands are simple to use and flexible enough to meet most data management requirements.

  12. Interference Phenomenon with Mobile Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trantham, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    A simple experiment is presented in which the spacing and geometric pattern of pixels in mobile displays is measured. The technique is based on optical constructive interference. While the experiment is another opportunity to demonstrate wave interference from a grating-like structure, this can also be used to demonstrate concepts of solid state…

  13. Lethally Innocuous Visual Display Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawkell, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    Examines conflicting studies which report on the effects of Visual Display Units (VDU) on health. Five aspects of alleged VDU effects are discussed: (1) radiation or emission effects; (2) visual effects; (3) postural effects; (4) effects on the arms and fingers; and (5) ultrasonic noise from scanning components. (36 references) (MAB)

  14. Crystal ball single event display

    SciTech Connect

    Grosnick, D.; Gibson, A.; Allgower, C.; Alyea, J. |

    1997-10-15

    The Single Event Display (SED) is a routine that is designed to provide information graphically about a triggered event within the Crystal Ball. The SED is written entirely in FORTRAN and uses the CERN-based HICZ graphing package. The primary display shows the amount of energy deposited in each of the NaI crystals on a Mercator-like projection of the crystals. Ten different shades and colors correspond to varying amounts of energy deposited within a crystal. Information about energy clusters is displayed on the crystal map by outlining in red the thirteen (or twelve) crystals contained within a cluster and assigning each cluster a number. Additional information about energy clusters is provided in a series of boxes containing useful data about the energy distribution among the crystals within the cluster. Other information shown on the event display include the event trigger type and data about {pi}{sup o}`s and {eta}`s formed from pairs of clusters as found by the analyzer. A description of the major features is given, along with some information on how to install the SED into the analyzer.

  15. Solar active region display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, M.; Raben, V.; Weyland, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Solar Active Region Display System (SARDS) is a client-server application that automatically collects a wide range of solar data and displays it in a format easy for users to assimilate and interpret. Users can rapidly identify active regions of interest or concern from color-coded indicators that visually summarize each region's size, magnetic configuration, recent growth history, and recent flare and CME production. The active region information can be overlaid onto solar maps, multiple solar images, and solar difference images in orthographic, Mercator or cylindrical equidistant projections. Near real-time graphs display the GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, flare events, and daily F10.7 value as a function of time; color-coded indicators show current trends in soft x-ray flux, flare temperature, daily F10.7 flux, and x-ray flare occurrence. Through a separate window up to 4 real-time or static graphs can simultaneously display values of KP, AP, daily F10.7 flux, GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, GOES >10 and >100 MeV proton flux, and Thule neutron monitor count rate. Climatologic displays use color-valued cells to show F10.7 and AP values as a function of Carrington/Bartel's rotation sequences - this format allows users to detect recurrent patterns in solar and geomagnetic activity as well as variations in activity levels over multiple solar cycles. Users can customize many of the display and graph features; all displays can be printed or copied to the system's clipboard for "pasting" into other applications. The system obtains and stores space weather data and images from sources such as the NOAA Space Environment Center, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, the joint ESA/NASA SOHO spacecraft, and the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory, and can be extended to include other data series and image sources. Data and images retrieved from the system's database are converted to XML and transported from a central server using HTTP and SOAP protocols, allowing

  16. Display Sharing: An Alternative Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The current Johnson Space Center (JSC) Mission Control Center (MCC) Video Transport System (VTS) provides flight controllers and management the ability to meld raw video from various sources with telemetry to improve situational awareness. However, maintaining a separate infrastructure for video delivery and integration of video content with data adds significant complexity and cost to the system. When considering alternative architectures for a VTS, the current system's ability to share specific computer displays in their entirety to other locations, such as large projector systems, flight control rooms, and back supporting rooms throughout the facilities and centers must be incorporated into any new architecture. Internet Protocol (IP)-based systems also support video delivery and integration. IP-based systems generally have an advantage in terms of cost and maintainability. Although IP-based systems are versatile, the task of sharing a computer display from one workstation to another can be time consuming for an end-user and inconvenient to administer at a system level. The objective of this paper is to present a prototype display sharing enterprise solution. Display sharing is a system which delivers image sharing across the LAN while simultaneously managing bandwidth, supporting encryption, enabling recovery and resynchronization following a loss of signal, and, minimizing latency. Additional critical elements will include image scaling support, multi -sharing, ease of initial integration and configuration, integration with desktop window managers, collaboration tools, host and recipient controls. This goal of this paper is to summarize the various elements of an IP-based display sharing system that can be used in today's control center environment.

  17. Tunable quantum chaos in the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model coupled to a thermal bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiming; Zhai, Hui; Zhang, Pengfei

    2017-07-01

    The Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model describes Majorana fermions with random interaction, which displays many interesting properties such as non-Fermi liquid behavior, quantum chaos, emergent conformal symmetry and holographic duality. Here we consider a SYK model or a chain of SYK models with N Majorana fermion modes coupled to another SYK model with N 2 Majorana fermion modes, in which the latter has many more degrees of freedom and plays the role as a thermal bath. For a single SYK model coupled to the thermal bath, we show that although the Lyapunov exponent is still proportional to temperature, it monotonically decreases from 2 π/β ( β = 1 /( k B T), T is temperature) to zero as the coupling strength to the thermal bath increases. For a chain of SYK models, when they are uniformly coupled to the thermal bath, we show that the butterfly velocity displays a crossover from a √{T} -dependence at relatively high temperature to a linear T-dependence at low temperature, with the crossover temperature also controlled by the coupling strength to the thermal bath. If only the end of the SYK chain is coupled to the thermal bath, the model can introduce a spatial dependence of both the Lyapunov exponent and the butterfly velocity. Our models provide canonical examples for the study of thermalization within chaotic models.

  18. Does precision decrease with set size?

    PubMed Central

    Mazyar, Helga; van den Berg, Ronald; Ma, Wei Ji

    2012-01-01

    The brain encodes visual information with limited precision. Contradictory evidence exists as to whether the precision with which an item is encoded depends on the number of stimuli in a display (set size). Some studies have found evidence that precision decreases with set size, but others have reported constant precision. These groups of studies differed in two ways. The studies that reported a decrease used displays with heterogeneous stimuli and tasks with a short-term memory component, while the ones that reported constancy used homogeneous stimuli and tasks that did not require short-term memory. To disentangle the effects of heterogeneity and short-memory involvement, we conducted two main experiments. In Experiment 1, stimuli were heterogeneous, and we compared a condition in which target identity was revealed before the stimulus display with one in which it was revealed afterward. In Experiment 2, target identity was fixed, and we compared heterogeneous and homogeneous distractor conditions. In both experiments, we compared an optimal-observer model in which precision is constant with set size with one in which it depends on set size. We found that precision decreases with set size when the distractors are heterogeneous, regardless of whether short-term memory is involved, but not when it is homogeneous. This suggests that heterogeneity, not short-term memory, is the critical factor. In addition, we found that precision exhibits variability across items and trials, which may partly be caused by attentional fluctuations. PMID:22685337

  19. JTEC panel on display technologies in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannas, Lawrence E., Jr.; Glenn, William E.; Credelle, Thomas; Doane, J. William; Firester, Arthur H.; Thompson, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that describes research and development efforts in Japan in the area of display technologies. The following are included in this report: flat panel displays (technical findings, liquid crystal display development and production, large flat panel displays (FPD's), electroluminescent displays and plasma panels, infrastructure in Japan's FPD industry, market and projected sales, and new a-Si active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) factory); materials for flat panel displays (liquid crystal materials, and light-emissive display materials); manufacturing and infrastructure of active matrix liquid crystal displays (manufacturing logistics and equipment); passive matrix liquid crystal displays (LCD basics, twisted nematics LCD's, supertwisted nematic LCD's, ferroelectric LCD's, and a comparison of passive matrix LCD technology); active matrix technology (basic active matrix technology, investment environment, amorphous silicon, polysilicon, and commercial products and prototypes); and projection displays (comparison of Japanese and U.S. display research, and technical evaluation of work).

  20. Displaying Colors of Specified Chrominance on a Color Graphics Display.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    coordinates (such as Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage CIEXYZ coordinates). This report contains the description of a procedure for displaying...colors of known chrominance as specified by CIEXYZ coordinates. The procedure makes use of models of a color graphics system intensity (bits) to lumi...coordinates (e.g., CIELUV -1976 CT contrast equations as described in Robertson, 1977). Thus, the results of most efforts to specify a set of colors to

  1. Effect of display size on utilization of traffic situation display for self-spacing task. [transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, T. S.; Moen, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    The weather radar cathode ray tube (CRT) is the prime candidate for presenting cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI) in current, conventionally equipped transport aircraft. Problems may result from this, since the CRT size is not optimized for CDTI applications and the CRT is not in the pilot's primary visual scan area. The impact of display size on the ability of pilots to utilize the traffic information to maintain a specified spacing interval behind a lead aircraft during an approach task was studied. The five display sizes considered are representative of the display hardware configurations of airborne weather radar systems. From a pilot's subjective workload viewpoint, even the smallest display size was usable for performing the self spacing task. From a performane viewpoint, the mean spacing values, which are indicative of how well the pilots were able to perform the task, exhibit the same trends, irrespective of display size; however, the standard deviation of the spacing intervals decreased (performance improves) as the display size increased. Display size, therefore, does have a significant effect on pilot performance.

  2. Cell surface display of functional human MHC class II proteins: yeast display versus insect cell display

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Fei; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.; Zhao, Huimin

    2011-01-01

    Reliable and robust systems for engineering functional major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) proteins have proved elusive. Availability of such systems would enable the engineering of peptide-MHCII (pMHCII) complexes for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. In this paper, we have developed a system based on insect cell surface display that allows functional expression of heterodimeric DR2 molecules with or without a covalently bound human myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide, which is amenable to directed evolution of DR2–MBP variants with improved T cell receptor (TCR)-binding affinity. This study represents the first example of functional display of human pMHCII complexes on insect cell surface. In the process of developing this pMHCII engineering system, we have also explored the potential of using yeast surface display for the same application. Our data suggest that yeast display is a useful system for analysis and engineering of peptide binding of MHCII proteins, but not suitable for directed evolution of pMHC complexes that bind with low affinity to self-reactive TCRs. PMID:21752831

  3. Characterization of the rotating display.

    PubMed

    Keyes, J W; Fahey, F H; Harkness, B A; Eggli, D F; Balseiro, J; Ziessman, H A

    1988-09-01

    The rotating display is a useful method for reviewing single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. This study evaluated the requirements for a subjectively pleasing and useful implementation of this technique. Twelve SPECT data sets were modified and viewed by several observers who recorded the minimum framing rates for apparent smooth rotation, 3D effect, effects of image size, and other parameters. The results showed that a minimum of 16 frames was needed for a useful display. Smaller image sizes and more frames were preferred. The recommended minimal framing rate for a 64-frame study is 16-17 frames per second and for a 32-frame study, 12-13 frames per second. Other enhancements also were useful.

  4. Game engines and immersive displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Benjamin; Destefano, Marc

    2014-02-01

    While virtual reality and digital games share many core technologies, the programming environments, toolkits, and workflows for developing games and VR environments are often distinct. VR toolkits designed for applications in visualization and simulation often have a different feature set or design philosophy than game engines, while popular game engines often lack support for VR hardware. Extending a game engine to support systems such as the CAVE gives developers a unified development environment and the ability to easily port projects, but involves challenges beyond just adding stereo 3D visuals. In this paper we outline the issues involved in adapting a game engine for use with an immersive display system including stereoscopy, tracking, and clustering, and present example implementation details using Unity3D. We discuss application development and workflow approaches including camera management, rendering synchronization, GUI design, and issues specific to Unity3D, and present examples of projects created for a multi-wall, clustered, stereoscopic display.

  5. Symbolic enhancement of perspective displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Hacisalihzade, Selim S.

    1990-01-01

    Two exocentric azimuth judgment experiments with a perspective display were conducted with 16 subjects. Previous work has shown these judgments to exhibit a bias possibly due to misinterpretation of the viewing parameters used to generate the display. Though geometric compensations may be used to correct for the bias, an alternate technique selected in the following 2 experiments was the introduction of symbolic enhancements in the form of compass roses. It is suggested that a compass rose with 30 deg divisions results in overall optimal azimuth estimation accuracy when accuracy and decision time are both considered. The data also suggest that the added radial lines on the compass roses may interact with normalization processes that influence the judgment errors.

  6. Displays for future intermediate UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel; Metzler, James; Blakesley, David; Rister, Courtney; Nuhu, Abdul-Razak

    2008-04-01

    The Dedicated Autonomous Extended Duration Airborne Long-range Utility System (DAEDALUS) is a prototype Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) that won the 2007 AFRL Commander's Challenge. The purpose of the Commander's Challenge was to find an innovative solution to urgent warfighter needs by designing a UAV with increased persistence for tactical employment of sensors and communication systems. DAEDALUS was chosen as a winning prototype by AFRL, AFMC and SECAF. Follow-on units are intended to fill an intermediate role between currently fielded Tier I and Tier II UAV's. The UAV design discussed in this paper, including sensors and displays, will enter Phase II for Rapid Prototype Development with the intent of developing the design for eventual production. This paper will discuss the DAEDALUS UAV prototype system, with particular focus on its communications, to include the infrared sensor and electro-optical camera, but also displays, specifically man-portable.

  7. Interactive displays in medical art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconathy, Deirdre Alla; Doyle, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Medical illustration is a field of visual communication with a long history. Traditional medical illustrations are static, 2-D, printed images; highly realistic depictions of the gross morphology of anatomical structures. Today medicine requires the visualization of structures and processes that have never before been seen. Complex 3-D spatial relationships require interpretation from 2-D diagnostic imagery. Pictures that move in real time have become clinical and research tools for physicians. Medical illustrators are involved with the development of interactive visual displays for three different, but not discrete, functions: as educational materials, as clinical and research tools, and as data bases of standard imagery used to produce visuals. The production of interactive displays in the medical arts is examined.

  8. Simplified night sky display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, Timothy P. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A portable structure, simply constructed with inexpensive and generally lightweight materials, for displaying a selected portion of the night sky and selected planets, satellites, comets and other astronomically observable objects that are visually perceptible within that portion of the night sky. The structure includes a computer having stored signals representing the observable objects, an image projector that converts and projects the stored signals as visually perceptible images, a first curvilinear light-reflecting surface to receive and reflect the visually perceptible images, and a second curvilinear surface to receive and display the visually perceptible images reflected from the first surface. The images may be motionless or may move with passage of time. In one embodiment, the structure includes an inflatable screen surface that receives gas in an enclosed volume, supports itself without further mechanical support, and optionally self-regulates pressure of the received gas within the enclosed volume.

  9. Near-infrared display materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Paul H.; Davidson, Mark R.; Shepherd, Nigel D.; Kale, Ajay; Glass, William; Harrison, Benjamin S.; Foley, Timothy J.; Reynolds, John R.; Schanze, Kirk S.; Boncella, James M.; Sinnott, Susan; Norton, David P.

    2003-09-01

    With the increasing use of night vision goggles and night missions, new methods to display information in the infrared region is of interest. We have developed both inorganic and organic electroluminescent thin films which emit at wavelengths between 700 nm and 1.8 μm. These thin films have been incorporated into simple devices and the feasibility of a NIR flat panel display has been demonstrated. Both inorganic zinc sulfide and organic polymers doped with rare earth lanthanide ions have been demonstrated. The wavelength of emission can be varied by choosing the appropriate lanthanide ion, such as dysprosium, erbium, thulium or neodymium. Power densities of ~30 μW/cm2 have been achieved with these devices.

  10. Reconfigurable Auditory-Visual Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R. (Inventor); Anderson, Mark R. (Inventor); McClain, Bryan (Inventor); Miller, Joel D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    System and method for visual and audible communication between a central operator and N mobile communicators (N greater than or equal to 2), including an operator transceiver and interface, configured to receive and display, for the operator, visually perceptible and audibly perceptible signals from each of the mobile communicators. The interface (1) presents an audible signal from each communicator as if the audible signal is received from a different location relative to the operator and (2) allows the operator to select, to assign priority to, and to display, the visual signals and the audible signals received from a specified communicator. Each communicator has an associated signal transmitter that is configured to transmit at least one of the visual signals and the audio signal associated with the communicator, where at least one of the signal transmitters includes at least one sensor that senses and transmits a sensor value representing a selected environmental or physiological parameter associated with the communicator.

  11. Thermal modification of chrysotile asbestos: evidence for decreased cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Valentine, R; Chang, M J; Hart, R W; Finch, G L; Fisher, G L

    1983-09-01

    Many asbestiform minerals exhibit temperature-dependent thermoluminescence. Since thermoluminescence involves electronic transitions within crystalline materials, the effect of temperature on asbestos cytotoxicity was evaluated. Heat pretreatment of Canadian chrysotile asbestos reduces its cytotoxicity towards cultured human fibroblasts and bovine alveolar macrophages. When monitored 44 hr after the addition of either 200 degrees C or 400 degrees C heat-pretreated asbestos, alveolar macrophage viability was approximately 40% higher than comparable amounts of unheated asbestos. Similarly, asbestos toxicity, expressed as fibroblast growth inhibition, was inversely related to the asbestos pretreatment temperature in the following manner, 70 degrees C greater than 200 degrees C greater than 400 degrees C = unexposed fibroblast controls. Pretreatment of chrysotile asbestos to 400 degrees C reduced its adsorptive capacity for bovine serum albumin by 25%. Furthermore, asbestos heated to 200 degrees C followed by irradiation with 4 MeV X-rays (4500 rads) resulted in reactivation of asbestos cytotoxicity. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the ratios of free to fiber-associated alveolar macrophages and the fiber fragment size distributions were unaffected by either heat pretreatment or X-ray irradiation. These observations strongly suggest that the surface charge characteristics and electronic state of asbestos fibers may be responsible for its biological activity.

  12. The virtual environment display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environment technology is a display and control technology that can surround a person in an interactive computer generated or computer mediated virtual environment. It has evolved at NASA-Ames since 1984 to serve NASA's missions and goals. The exciting potential of this technology, sometimes called Virtual Reality, Artificial Reality, or Cyberspace, has been recognized recently by the popular media, industry, academia, and government organizations. Much research and development will be necessary to bring it to fruition.

  13. Spatial Displays and Spatial Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R. (Editor); Kaiser, Mary K. (Editor); Grunwald, Arthur J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The conference proceedings topics are divided into two main areas: (1) issues of spatial and picture perception raised by graphical electronic displays of spatial information; and (2) design questions raised by the practical experience of designers actually defining new spatial instruments for use in new aircraft and spacecraft. Each topic is considered from both a theoretical and an applied direction. Emphasis is placed on discussion of phenomena and determination of design principles.

  14. Large Screen Display Technology Survey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    iii Singer/Librascope has developed a laser-addressed liquid crystal display to replace their laser-addressed film-scriber system. Litton Industries ...optic devices, because of their solid-state design, are particularly suited to military and industrial applications. Their inherent low power...International, Lucitron, Inc., Philips of Hamburg, Germany and Photonics Technology. Litton Industries and Philips of Hamburg, Germany are

  15. Thermal expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junying; Shen, Xiangying; Jiang, Chaoran; Wu, Zuhui; Huang, Jiping

    2017-08-01

    One type of thermal device, named as thermal expander, is proposed and verified through both simulation and experiment. The thermal expander performs an efficient way to expand a heat flow of line-shape front. Moreover, the thermal expander shows an advantage in rectifying a heat flow from crooked front to line-shape front, which indicates that the thermal expander could act as an efficient point-to-line heat source convertor. We suggest that the thermal expander would be of help to energy saving and emission reduction, especially in thermal circuits and thermal management.

  16. Multiview synthesis for autostereoscopic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dane, Gökçe.; Bhaskaran, Vasudev

    2013-09-01

    Autostereoscopic (AS) displays spatially multiplex multiple views, providing a more immersive experience by enabling users to view the content from different angles without the need of 3D glasses. Multiple views could be captured from multiple cameras at different orientations, however this could be expensive, time consuming and not applicable to some applications. The goal of multiview synthesis in this paper is to generate multiple views from a stereo image pair and disparity map by using various video processing techniques including depth/disparity map processing, initial view interpolation, inpainting and post-processing. We specifically emphasize the need for disparity processing when there is no depth information is available that is associated with the 2D data and we propose a segmentation based disparity processing algorithm to improve disparity map. Furthermore we extend the texture based 2D inpainting algorithm to 3D and further improve the hole-filling performance of view synthesis. The benefit of each step of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated with comparison to state of the art algorithms in terms of visual quality and PSNR metric. Our system is evaluated in an end-to-end multi view synthesis framework where only stereo image pair is provided as input to the system and 8 views are outputted and displayed in 8-view Alioscopy AS display.

  17. Newly developed foam ceramic body shows promise as thermal insulation material at 3000 deg F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blocker, E. W.; Paul, R. D.

    1967-01-01

    Optimized zirconia foam ceramic body shows promise for use as a thermal insulation material. The insulating media displays low density and thermal conductivity, good thermal shock resistance, high melting point, and mechanical strength.

  18. A wearable navigation display can improve attentiveness to the surgical field.

    PubMed

    Stewart, James; Billinghurst, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Surgical navigation is typically shown on a computer display that is distant from the patient, making it difficult for the surgeon to watch the patient while performing a guided task. We investigate whether a light-weight, untracked, wearable display (such as Google Glass, which has the same size and weight as corrective glasses) can improve attentiveness to the surgical field in a simulated surgical task. Three displays were tested: a computer monitor; a peripheral display above the eye; and a through-the-lens display in front of the eye. Twelve subjects performed a task to position and orient a tracked tool on a plastic femur. Both wearable displays were tested on the dominant and non-dominant eyes of each subject. Attentiveness during the task was measured by the time taken to respond to randomly illuminated LEDs on the femur. Attentiveness was improved with the wearable displays at the cost of a decrease in accuracy. The through-the-lens display performed better than the peripheral display. The peripheral display performed better when on the dominant eye, while the through-the-lens display performed better when on the non-dominant eye. Attentiveness to the surgical field can be improved with the use of a light-weight, untracked, wearable display. A through-the-lens display performs better than a peripheral display, and both perform better than a computer monitor. Eye dominance should be considered when positioning the display.

  19. 40 CFR 85.1707 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Display exemption. 85.1707 Section 85... Engines § 85.1707 Display exemption. Where an uncertified vehicle or engine is a display vehicle or engine to be used solely for display purposes, will not be operated on the public streets or highways...

  20. 40 CFR 90.907 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Display exemption. 90.907 Section 90... of Nonroad Engines from Regulations § 90.907 Display exemption. Where an uncertified nonroad engine is a display engine to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident...

  1. 40 CFR 90.907 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Display exemption. 90.907 Section 90... of Nonroad Engines from Regulations § 90.907 Display exemption. Where an uncertified nonroad engine is a display engine to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident...

  2. 40 CFR 85.1707 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Display exemption. 85.1707 Section 85... Engines § 85.1707 Display exemption. Where an uncertified vehicle or engine is a display vehicle or engine to be used solely for display purposes, will not be operated on the public streets or highways...

  3. 40 CFR 90.907 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Display exemption. 90.907 Section 90... of Nonroad Engines from Regulations § 90.907 Display exemption. Where an uncertified nonroad engine is a display engine to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident...

  4. 40 CFR 85.1707 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Display exemption. 85.1707 Section 85... Engines § 85.1707 Display exemption. Where an uncertified vehicle or engine is a display vehicle or engine to be used solely for display purposes, will not be operated on the public streets or highways...

  5. 40 CFR 90.907 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Display exemption. 90.907 Section 90... of Nonroad Engines from Regulations § 90.907 Display exemption. Where an uncertified nonroad engine is a display engine to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident...

  6. 40 CFR 90.907 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Display exemption. 90.907 Section 90... of Nonroad Engines from Regulations § 90.907 Display exemption. Where an uncertified nonroad engine is a display engine to be used solely for display purposes, will only be operated incident...

  7. Australian Children's Understanding of Display Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Cultural display rules govern the manifestation of emotional expressions. In compliance with display rules, the facial expressions displayed (i.e. apparent emotion) may be incongruent with the emotion experienced (i.e. real emotion). This study investigates Australian Caucasian children's understanding of display rules. A sample of 80 four year…

  8. 40 CFR 85.1707 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Display exemption. 85.1707 Section 85... Engines § 85.1707 Display exemption. Where an uncertified vehicle or engine is a display vehicle or engine to be used solely for display purposes, will not be operated on the public streets or highways...

  9. Density Gradient Columns for Chemical Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, William B.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures for preparing density gradient columns for chemical displays are presented. They include displays illustrating acid-base reactions, metal ion equilibria, and liquid density. The lifetime of these metastable displays is surprising, some lasting for months in display cabinets. (JN)

  10. Aviation Display Support for Situation Awareness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    air traffic control (May, Campbell, & Wickens, 1996; Wickens, Miller, & Tham...level traffic in either air traffic control displays (Wickens, Miller, & Tham, 1996) or cockpit traffic displays (Merwin et al., 1997). Finally, in...P. A., Campbell, M., & Wickens, C. D. (1996). Perspective displays for air traffic control : Display of terrain and weather. Air Traffic Control

  11. Thermal performance of the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaffari, H. T.; Jones, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    In the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house, an energy-efficient envelope, passive solar collectors, and a variety of energy conservation methods are incorporated. The thermal characteristics of the house during the tested heating season are evaluated. Temperature distributions at different zones are displayed, and the effects of extending heating supply ducts only to the main floor and heating return ducts only from the second floor are discussed. The thermal retrievals from the structure and the passive collectors are assessed, and the total conservation and passive solar contributions are outlined. Several correlation factors relating these thermal behaviors are introduced, and their diurnal variations are displayed. Finally, the annual energy requirements, and the average load factors are analyzed and discussed.

  12. Parallax multi-viewer autostereoscopic three-dimensional display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Lingdao; Schonfeld, Dan; Li, Qun

    2014-03-01

    It is a widely held belief that in the long run, three-dimensional (3D) display should supply stereo to multiple viewers without wearing any viewing aids and free to move. Over the last few decades, great e®orts have been made to approach auto-stereoscopic (AS) display for multiple viewers. Spatial multiplexing technique has ¯rst been employed to accommodate multiple viewers simultaneously in stereoscopic planar display. However, resolution of each view image decreases as the number of viewers increases. Recent development of high-speed liquid crystal display (LCD), which is capable of operating 240-Hz frame rate, makes feasible multi-viewer display via time multiplexing and improving image quality at the same time. In this paper, we propose a display adjustment algorithm that enables high-quality auto-stereoscopic display for multiple viewers. The proposed method relies on spatio-temporal parallax barrier to channel desired stereo pair to corresponding viewers according to their locations. We subsequently conduct simulations that demonstrate the e®ectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Development of Land Analysis System display modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Douglas; Hollaren, Douglas; Huewe, Laurie

    1986-01-01

    The Land Analysis System (LAS) display modules were developed to allow a user to interactively display, manipulate, and store image and image related data. To help accomplish this task, these modules utilize the Transportable Applications Executive and the Display Management System software to interact with the user and the display device. The basic characteristics of a display are outlined and some of the major modifications and additions made to the display management software are discussed. Finally, all available LAS display modules are listed along with a short description of each.

  14. Reflective color display using thermochromic pigments.

    PubMed

    Heo, Kyong Chan; Sohn, Youngku; Yi, Jonghoon; Kwon, Jin Hyuk; Son, Phil Kook; Gwag, Jin Seog

    2012-06-20

    A reflective thermochromic display fabricated by a very simple method using three kinds of thermochromic pigments is produced and its thermo-optical characteristics are investigated. The display exhibits maximum red, green, and blue reflectances of 38%, 30%, and 35%, respectively. The reflective display cell shows continuous gray color with changing temperature, which is crucial for multicolor displays. It also shows an excellent viewing angle above 80° without any of the additional optical components that are required in liquid crystal displays. We expect that this display technology will be used for outdoor billboard information display applications.

  15. Modeling the thermal responses of the skin surface during hand-object interactions.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsin-Ni; Jones, Lynette A

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this research is to analyze and model the decreases in skin temperature when the hand makes contact with an object at room temperature so that thermal feedback can be incorporated into haptic displays. A thermal model is proposed that predicts the thermal responses of the skin and object surface as well as the heat flux exchanged during hand-object interactions. The model was evaluated by comparing the theoretical predictions of temperature changes to those experimentally measured using an infrared thermal measurement system. The thermal measurement system was designed to overcome the limitations imposed by contact thermal sensors, and was able to measure skin temperature during contact, together with the contact area and contact force. The experimental results indicated that over the pressure range of 0.73-10.98 kPa, changes in skin temperature were well localized to the contact area and were affected by contact pressure. The pressure in turn influenced both thermal contact resistance and blood flow. Over the range of contact forces typically used in manual exploration, blood perfusion and metabolic heat generation do not appear to have a significant effect on the skin's thermal responses. The theoretical predictions and the measured data were consistent in characterizing the time course and amplitude of the skin temperature change during contact with differences typically being less than 1 degrees C between the two for pressures greater than 4 kPa. These findings indicate that the proposed thermal model is able to characterize and predict the skin temperature responses during hand-object interactions and could be used in a thermal display that simulates the properties of different materials.

  16. Real-Time Data Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedings, Marc

    2007-01-01

    RT-Display is a MATLAB-based data acquisition environment designed to use a variety of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware to digitize analog signals to a standard data format usable by other post-acquisition data analysis tools. This software presents the acquired data in real time using a variety of signal-processing algorithms. The acquired data is stored in a standard Operator Interactive Signal Processing Software (OISPS) data-formatted file. RT-Display is primarily configured to use the Agilent VXI (or equivalent) data acquisition boards used in such systems as MIDDAS (Multi-channel Integrated Dynamic Data Acquisition System). The software is generalized and deployable in almost any testing environment, without limitations or proprietary configuration for a specific test program or project. With the Agilent hardware configured and in place, users can start the program and, in one step, immediately begin digitizing multiple channels of data. Once the acquisition is completed, data is converted into a common binary format that also can be translated to specific formats used by external analysis software, such as OISPS and PC-Signal (product of AI Signal Research Inc.). RT-Display at the time of this reporting was certified on Agilent hardware capable of acquisition up to 196,608 samples per second. Data signals are presented to the user on-screen simultaneously for 16 channels. Each channel can be viewed individually, with a maximum capability of 160 signal channels (depending on hardware configuration). Current signal presentations include: time data, fast Fourier transforms (FFT), and power spectral density plots (PSD). Additional processing algorithms can be easily incorporated into this environment.

  17. Recent Trend in Development of Olfactory Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Yasuyuki

    An olfactory display is a device that generates scented air with desired concentration of aroma, and delivers it to the user's olfactory organ. In this article, the nature of olfaction is briefly described from the view point of how to configure olfactory displays. Next, component technologies to compose olfactory displays, i.e., making scents and delivering scents, are categorized. Several existing olfactory display systems are introduced to show the current status of research and development of olfactory displays.

  18. DP: Parameter Display Page Program

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.

    1994-02-19

    The Parameter Display Page program (DP) is a Motif/X11-based program to allow easily configured, dynamic device and process variable monitoring and manipulation in the EPICS environment. DP provides a tabular data format for interactive viewing and manipulation of device and process variable statistics, as well as formatted PostScript output to files and printers. DP understands and operates in two (unfortunately disjoint at this time) namespaces in the EPICS environment ``devices`` and ``process variables``. The higher level namespace of devices includes Composite and Atomic Devices registered via the Device Access server; the lower level (flat) namespace is that of normal Process Variables accessible via Channel Access.

  19. Multi-megapixel display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Robin Y.; Marlor, Guy A.

    1997-05-01

    Newly developed high sensitivity and high resolution photoactivated liquid crystal light valves enjoy an enormous advantage with regard to supporting multi-megapixel display formats. Using multiple optical drivers, for example six polysilicon 800 X 600 pixel AMTFT devices, allows for the provision of very high brightness 2400 X 1200 pixel images. The use of linearly scanned, multiple ELD devices, take the format into the six million to eight million pixels capability that is truly needed to satisfy the capabilities of the human visual system. Our work details applications in CAD/CAM, simulation, digital cinema and the workstations of the future.

  20. Morphological and thermal properties of PLA/OMMT nanocomposites prepared via vane extruder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Liu, H. Y.; Zhang, G. Z.; Qu, J. P.

    2017-06-01

    Polylactide/Organo-Montmorillonite (PLA/OMMT) Nanocomposites were prepared by melting extrusion using a novel vane extruder (VE), which can induce global elongational flow. In the study, the influence of different concentrations of the OMMT on the morphological and thermal properties were investigated. The morphology and structure of the nanocomposites were evaluated using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) respectively, whereas the thermal behaviors and thermal stabilities were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) respectively. The results illustrate that PLA/OMMT nanocomposites displayed clear intercalation and/or exfoliation structures. Interestingly, increasing the clay content did not lead to the agglomeration of OMMT layers. Moreover, the presence of nanoclay decreased the enthalpy of crystallization of PLA/OMMT composites. Also, the melting temperatures of the nanocomposites were reduced by the addition of nanoclay.

  1. The effects of format in computer-based procedure displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desaulniers, David R.; Gillan, Douglas J.; Rudisill, Marianne

    1988-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate display variables likely to influence the effectiveness of computer-based procedure displays. In experiment 1, procedures were presented in three formats, text, extended-text, and flowchart. Text and extended-text are structured prose formats which differ in the spatial density of presentation. The flowchart format differs from the text format in both syntax and spatial representation. Subjects were required to use the procedures to diagnose a hypothetical system anomaly. The results indicate that performance was most accurate with the flowchart format. In experiment 2, procedure window size was varied (6-line, 12-line, and 24-line) in addition to procedure format. In the six line window condition, experiment 2 replicated the findings of experiment 1. As predicted, completion times for flowchart procedures decreased with increasing window size; however, accuracy of performance decreased substantially. Implications for the design of computer-based procedure displays are discussed.

  2. Optical display for radar sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold; Hsu, Charles; Willey, Jefferson; Landa, Joseph; Hsieh, Minder; Larsen, Louis V.; Krzywicki, Alan T.; Tran, Binh Q.; Hoekstra, Philip; Dillard, John T.; Krapels, Keith A.; Wardlaw, Michael; Chu, Kai-Dee

    2015-05-01

    Boltzmann headstone S = kB Log W turns out to be the Rosette stone for Greek physics translation optical display of the microwave sensing hieroglyphics. The LHS is the molecular entropy S measuring the degree of uniformity scattering off the sensing cross sections. The RHS is the inverse relationship (equation) predicting the Planck radiation spectral distribution parameterized by the Kelvin temperature T. Use is made of the conservation energy law of the heat capacity of Reservoir (RV) change T Δ S = -ΔE equals to the internal energy change of black box (bb) subsystem. Moreover, an irreversible thermodynamics Δ S > 0 for collision mixing toward totally larger uniformity of heat death, asserted by Boltzmann, that derived the so-called Maxwell-Boltzmann canonical probability. Given the zero boundary condition black box, Planck solved a discrete standing wave eigenstates (equation). Together with the canonical partition function (equation) an average ensemble average of all possible internal energy yielded the celebrated Planck radiation spectral (equation) where the density of states (equation). In summary, given the multispectral sensing data (equation), we applied Lagrange Constraint Neural Network (LCNN) to solve the Blind Sources Separation (BSS) for a set of equivalent bb target temperatures. From the measurements of specific value, slopes and shapes we can fit a set of Kelvin temperatures T's for each bb targets. As a result, we could apply the analytical continuation for each entropy sources along the temperature-unique Planck spectral curves always toward the RGB color temperature display for any sensing probing frequency.

  3. Simulated monitor display for CCTV

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    Two computer programs have been developed which generate a two-dimensional graphic perspective of the video output produced by a Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) camera. Both programs were primarily written to produce a graphic display simulating the field-of-view (FOV) of a perimeter assessment system as seen on a CCTV monitor. The original program was developed for use on a Tektronix 4054 desktop computer; however, the usefulness of this graphic display program led to the development of a similar program for a Hewlett-Packard 9845B desktop computer. After entry of various input parameters, such as, camera lens and orientation, the programs automatically calculate and graphically plot the locations of various items, e.g., fences, an assessment zone, running men, and intrusion detection sensors. Numerous special effects can be generated to simulate such things as roads, interior walls, or sides of buildings. Other objects can be digitized and entered into permanent memory similar to the running men. With this type of simulated monitor perspective, proposed camera locations with respect to fences and a particular assessment zone can be rapidly evaluated without the costly time delays and expenditures associated with field evaluation.

  4. Accommodative load for stereoscopic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Masako; Ishihara, Shin'ya; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Ishigaki, Hisao; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Miyao, Masaru; Tahara, Hiroshi

    2005-03-01

    In the present study, we examined the visual accommodation of subjects who were gazing fixedly at 3D images from two different displays: a cathode ray tube (CRT) while wearing special glasses and a liquid crystal display (LCD) while not wearing special glasses. The subjects were 3 people aged 20 years (2 people) and 36 years, all with normal vision. Visual function was tested using a custom-made apparatus (Nidek AR-1100). The instrument objectively measured visual accommodative changes of the right eye in both binocular and natural viewing conditions. The target shown to subjects moved away slowly and disappeared at a distance about 3 m from the eye. The results suggested that it was easy and comfortable to focus on both the LCD and CRT. When the subjects viewed the progressively receding target, their accommodation was about 0.8 D at the presumed furthest points, a level at which the ciliary muscle is relaxed. The accommodative power differed by about 1.5 D from the near to far point. Thus, the ciliary muscle is repeatedly strained and relaxed while the subject views the moving target. In the present study, the subjects" accommodative amplitude was changed when the target moved from the near to far point.

  5. MAS Bulletin. Microtherm Thermal Insulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-03

    EUROPEAN OFFICE Box 39, FPO New York 0951P .0700 Phone (AV)235.ൕjLomm) 409-4131 MASB 16-89 11 1 E, March 1989 MICROTHERM THERMAL INSULAT 00T...Background. Microtherm insulation is being marketed by Figure 1 illustrates the relative differenbeibetween Microtherm Micropore Insulation, Ltd., of Wirral...tivity properties. Figure 2 displays thermal conductivity compari- facturer has introduced a new product - Microtherm MPS, a sons between Microtherm MPS

  6. Effect of Thermal Cycling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    MEASUREMENT METHOD To characterize the surfaces, a real time Twyman -Green phase shifting interferometer was mounted on an air-suspended 8000 lb granite... interferometer and mirror mounts were augmented to decrease their natural resonance frequency. To minimize thermal effects, a thermal insulation... INTERFEROMETER INTERFACE HP COMPUTER Fig. 8. RTI test arrangement. 22 1𔃺a wa M VIl. SURFACE FIGURE RESULTS 1. Uniform heating - 60 K/hr (Figs. 9a

  7. Electronically scanned analog liquid crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Soref, R A

    1970-06-01

    A new analog display technique for liquid crystal display panels is demonstrated. The size, shape, and location of display patterns can be changed continuously using low power electronic control. The display consists of a thin liquid crystal layer sandwiched between high resistance transparent area electrodes. Transverse voltage gradients on the electrodes actuate the device. The display operates with either dynamic scattering liquids or quiescent scattering liquids. Experimental results are given for three prototype analog displays: a voltmeter, a flying spot scanner, and a null indicator.

  8. A lattice model for data display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.; Dyer, Charles R.; Paul, Brian E.

    1994-01-01

    In order to develop a foundation for visualization, we develop lattice models for data objects and displays that focus on the fact that data objects are approximations to mathematical objects and real displays are approximations to ideal displays. These lattice models give us a way to quantize the information content of data and displays and to define conditions on the visualization mappings from data to displays. Mappings satisfy these conditions if and only if they are lattice isomorphisms. We show how to apply this result to scientific data and display models, and discuss how it might be applied to recursively defined data types appropriate for complex information processing.

  9. Simulator scene display evaluation device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for aligning and calibrating scene displays in an aircraft simulator has a base on which all of the instruments for the aligning and calibrating are mounted. Laser directs beam at double right prism which is attached to pivoting support on base. The pivot point of the prism is located at the design eye point (DEP) of simulator during the aligning and calibrating. The objective lens in the base is movable on a track to follow the laser beam at different angles within the field of vision at the DEP. An eyepiece and a precision diopter are movable into a position behind the prism during the scene evaluation. A photometer or illuminometer is pivotable about the pivot into and out of position behind the eyepiece.

  10. Auditory display for the blind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A system for providing an auditory display of two-dimensional patterns as an aid to the blind is described. It includes a scanning device for producing first and second voltages respectively indicative of the vertical and horizontal positions of the scan and a further voltage indicative of the intensity at each point of the scan and hence of the presence or absence of the pattern at that point. The voltage related to scan intensity controls transmission of the sounds to the subject so that the subject knows that a portion of the pattern is being encountered by the scan when a tone is heard, the subject determining the position of this portion of the pattern in space by the frequency and interaural difference information contained in the tone.

  11. Schematic displays for the Space Shuttle Orbiter multifunction cathode-ray-tube display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, W.

    1979-01-01

    A standardized procedure for developing cathode ray tube displayed schematic diagrams. The displaying of Spacelab information on the space shuttle orbiter multifunction cathode ray tube display system is used to illustrate this procedure. Schematic displays with the equivalent tabular displays are compared.

  12. Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In order to reduce heat transfer between a hot gas heat source and a metallic engine component, a thermal insulating layer of material is placed between them. This thermal barrier coating is applied by plasma spray processing the thin films. The coating has been successfully employed in aerospace applications for many years. Lewis Research Center, a leader in the development engine components coating technology, has assisted Caterpillar, Inc. in applying ceramic thermal barrier coatings on engines. Because these large engines use heavy fuels containing vanadium, engine valve life is sharply decreased. The barrier coating controls temperatures, extends valve life and reduces operating cost. Additional applications are currently under development.

  13. Simplified Night Sky Display System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, Timothy P.

    2010-01-01

    A document describes a simple night sky display system that is portable, lightweight, and includes, at most, four components in its simplest configuration. The total volume of this system is no more than 10(sup 6) cm(sup 3) in a disassembled state, and weighs no more than 20 kilograms. The four basic components are a computer, a projector, a spherical light-reflecting first surface and mount, and a spherical second surface for display. The computer has temporary or permanent memory that contains at least one signal representing one or more images of a portion of the sky when viewed from an arbitrary position, and at a selected time. The first surface reflector is spherical and receives and reflects the image from the projector onto the second surface, which is shaped like a hemisphere. This system may be used to simulate selected portions of the night sky, preserving the appearance and kinesthetic sense of the celestial sphere surrounding the Earth or any other point in space. These points will then show motions of planets, stars, galaxies, nebulae, and comets that are visible from that position. The images may be motionless, or move with the passage of time. The array of images presented, and vantage points in space, are limited only by the computer software that is available, or can be developed. An optional approach is to have the screen (second surface) self-inflate by means of gas within the enclosed volume, and then self-regulate that gas in order to support itself without any other mechanical support.

  14. Scanning laser beam displays based on a 2D MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niesten, Maarten; Masood, Taha; Miller, Josh; Tauscher, Jason

    2010-05-01

    The combination of laser light sources and MEMS technology enables a range of display systems such as ultra small projectors for mobile devices, head-up displays for vehicles, wearable near-eye displays and projection systems for 3D imaging. Images are created by scanning red, green and blue lasers horizontally and vertically with a single two-dimensional MEMS. Due to the excellent beam quality of laser beams, the optical designs are efficient and compact. In addition, the laser illumination enables saturated display colors that are desirable for augmented reality applications where a virtual image is used. With this technology, the smallest projector engine for high volume manufacturing to date has been developed. This projector module has a height of 7 mm and a volume of 5 cc. The resolution of this projector is WVGA. No additional projection optics is required, resulting in an infinite focus depth. Unlike with micro-display projection displays, an increase in resolution will not lead to an increase in size or a decrease in efficiency. Therefore future projectors can be developed that combine a higher resolution in an even smaller and thinner form factor with increased efficiencies that will lead to lower power consumption.

  15. Super stereoscopy technique for comfortable and realistic 3D displays.

    PubMed

    Akşit, Kaan; Niaki, Amir Hossein Ghanbari; Ulusoy, Erdem; Urey, Hakan

    2014-12-15

    Two well-known problems of stereoscopic displays are the accommodation-convergence conflict and the lack of natural blur for defocused objects. We present a new technique that we name Super Stereoscopy (SS3D) to provide a convenient solution to these problems. Regular stereoscopic glasses are replaced by SS3D glasses which deliver at least two parallax images per eye through pinholes equipped with light selective filters. The pinholes generate blur-free retinal images so as to enable correct accommodation, while the delivery of multiple parallax images per eye creates an approximate blur effect for defocused objects. Experiments performed with cameras and human viewers indicate that the technique works as desired. In case two, pinholes equipped with color filters per eye are used; the technique can be used on a regular stereoscopic display by only uploading a new content, without requiring any change in display hardware, driver, or frame rate. Apart from some tolerable loss in display brightness and decrease in natural spatial resolution limit of the eye because of pinholes, the technique is quite promising for comfortable and realistic 3D vision, especially enabling the display of close objects that are not possible to display and comfortably view on regular 3DTV and cinema.

  16. Consortium for military LCD display procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echols, Gregg

    2002-08-01

    International Display Consortium (IDC) is the joining together of display companies to combined their buying power and obtained favorable terms with a major LCD manufacturer. Consolidating the buying power and grouping the demand enables the rugged display industry of avionics, ground vehicles, and ship based display manufacturers to have unencumbered access to high performance AMLCDs while greatly reducing risk and lowering cost. With an unrestricted supply of AMLCD displays, the consortium members have total control of their risk, cost, deliveries and added value partners. Every display manufacturer desires a very close relationship with a display vender. With IDC each consortium member achieves a close relationship. Consortium members enjoy cost effective access to high performance, industry standard sized LCD panels, and modified commercial displays with 100 degree C clearing points and portrait configurations. Consortium members also enjoy proposal support, technical support and long-term support.

  17. X-Windows Widget for Image Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    XvicImage is a high-performance XWindows (Motif-compliant) user interface widget for displaying images. It handles all aspects of low-level image display. The fully Motif-compliant image display widget handles the following tasks: (1) Image display, including dithering as needed (2) Zoom (3) Pan (4) Stretch (contrast enhancement, via lookup table) (5) Display of single-band or color data (6) Display of non-byte data (ints, floats) (7) Pseudocolor display (8) Full overlay support (drawing graphics on image) (9) Mouse-based panning (10) Cursor handling, shaping, and planting (disconnecting cursor from mouse) (11) Support for all user interaction events (passed to application) (12) Background loading and display of images (doesn't freeze the GUI) (13) Tiling of images.

  18. Comparative performance analysis of mobile displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaee-Rad, Reza; Aleksic, Milivoje

    2012-01-01

    Cell-phone display performance (in terms of color quality and optical efficiency) has become a critical factor in creating a positive user experience. As a result, there is a significant amount of effort by cell-phone OEMs to provide a more competitive display solution. This effort is focused on using different display technologies (with significantly different color characteristics) and more sophisticated display processors. In this paper, the results of a mobile-display comparative performance analysis are presented. Three cell-phones from major OEMs are selected and their display performances are measured and quantified. Comparative performance analysis is done using display characteristics such as display color gamut size, RGB-channels crosstalk, RGB tone responses, gray tracking performance, color accuracy, and optical efficiency.

  19. Six-Message Electromechanical Display System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.

    2007-01-01

    A proposed electromechanical display system would be capable of presenting as many as six distinct messages. In the proposed system, each display element would include a cylinder having a regular hexagonal cross section.

  20. 40 CFR 91.1007 - Display exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Exclusion and Exemption of Marine SI Engines § 91.1007 Display exemption. An uncertified marine SI engine is a display engine when it is to be used...

  1. Thermal Conductivity of Coated Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, Lei L; Pan, Yun-Long; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Wang, Hsin; Peterson, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a method for measuring the thermal conductivity of paper using a hot disk system. To the best of our knowledge, few publications are found discussing the thermal conductivity of a coated paper although it is important to various forms of today s digital printing where heat is used for imaging as well as for toner fusing. This motivates us to investigate the thermal conductivity of paper coating. Our investigation demonstrates that thermal conductivity is affected by the coat weight and the changes in the thermal conductivity affect ink gloss and density. As the coat weight increases, the thermal conductivity increases. Both the ink gloss and density decrease as the thermal conductivity increases. The ink gloss appears to be more sensitive to the changes in the thermal conductivity.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Coated Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Lei L.; Pan, Yun-Long; Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Wang, Hsin; Peterson, Robert C.

    2009-04-01

    In this article, a method for measuring the thermal conductivity of paper using a hot disk system is introduced. To the best of our knowledge, few publications are found discussing the thermal conductivity of a coated paper, although it is important to various forms of today’s digital printing where heat is used for imaging, as well as for toner fusing. This motivated an investigation of the thermal conductivity of paper coating. This study demonstrates that the thermal conductivity is affected by the coating mass and the changes in the thermal conductivity affect toner gloss and density. As the coating mass increases, the thermal conductivity increases. Both the toner gloss and density decrease as the thermal conductivity increases. The toner gloss appears to be more sensitive to the changes in the thermal conductivity.

  3. Display system for imaging scientific telemetric information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabiyakin, G. I.; Rykovanov, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    A system for imaging scientific telemetric information, based on the M-6000 minicomputer and the SIGD graphic display, is described. Two dimensional graphic display of telemetric information and interaction with the computer, in analysis and processing of telemetric parameters displayed on the screen is provided. The running parameter information output method is presented. User capabilities in the analysis and processing of telemetric information imaged on the display screen and the user language are discussed and illustrated.

  4. Raster graphic helmet-mounted display study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beamon, William S.; Moran, Susanna I.

    1990-01-01

    A design of a helmet mounted display system is presented, including a design specification and development plan for the selected design approach. The requirements for the helmet mounted display system and a survey of applicable technologies are presented. Three helmet display concepts are then described which utilize lasers, liquid crystal display's (LCD's), and subminiature cathode ray tubes (CRT's), respectively. The laser approach is further developed in a design specification and a development plan.

  5. Toward eyeglasses-based electronic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, Mark B.; Aquilino, P. D.; McClelland, Robert W.; Rensing, Noa M.

    1997-06-01

    The development of a head mounted display concealed within eyeglasses has been a long term objective of many head mounted display (HMD) development efforts. This paper will review design concepts from the literature, with a view toward assessing the practical merits of the various approaches. The factors of importance in miniaturizing a HMD will be summarized. Finally, we will briefly summarize some new approaches including the use of alternative display technology that may lead to a display system hidden within eyeglasses frames.

  6. Personalized Intuitive Displays Enhance Pilot Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    The cockpit of the Multi-Modal Suite (MMS) was equipped with four new interfaces: Voice Interface , Tactile Display, 3D audio display, and Dual...Layer Display. 2.2.2 Voice interface The voice interface consisted of software modules that use speech as an input or generate speech or audio as an...audio display. Five statements concerned the DLD as well as the Voice Interface , and ten more statements dealt with the MMS concept in general. The

  7. Holographic Helmet-Mounted Display Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, James R., II; Larussa, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    Helmet-mounted display unit designed for use in testing innovative concepts for display of information to aircraft pilots. Operates in conjunction with computers generating graphical displays. Includes two ocular subunits containing miniature cathoderay tubes and optics providing 40 degrees vertical, 50 degrees horizontal field of view to each eye, with or without stereopsis. In future color application, each ocular subunit includes trichromatic holographic combiner tuned to red, green, and blue wavelengths of phosphors used in development of miniature color display devices.

  8. Real Imagery as a Three Dimensional Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    under two categories--stereoscopic and autostereoscopic displays. The difference between these two displays is that autostereoscopic displays do not...require the use of special viewing glasses whereas stereoscopic displays do. In order to place a minimum incumbrance on the viewer, the autostereoscopic ...fooled into believing that the scene is three dimensional. This is accomplished even though the second view that normally comes with an autostereoscopic

  9. Helmet-Mounted Display For Infantry Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Andrew J.

    1987-04-01

    A generic sensor/display/soldier interface concept is described for potential application as a helmet or headdress mounted infantry display system. A compact, lightweight infrared camera mounted on a rifle is expected to provide the video image. The objective for the head-mounted display is to increase the soldier's personal safety and functional performance by remotely displaying an image that is generated by a boresighted camera and to reduce eye fatigue.

  10. The Escherichia coli glycophage display system.

    PubMed

    Dürr, Clemens; Nothaft, Harald; Lizak, Christian; Glockshuber, Rudi; Aebi, Markus

    2010-11-01

    We describe a phage display technique that allows the production and selective enrichment of phages that display an N-glycoprotein (glycophages). We applied glycophage display to select functional glycosylation sequons from a pool of randomized acceptor sequences. Our system provides a genetic platform to study and engineer different steps in the pathway of bacterial N-linked protein glycosylation.

  11. Displaying Geographically-Based Domestic Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quann, J.; Dalton, J.; Banks, M.; Helfer, D.; Szczur, M.; Winkert, G.; Billingsley, J.; Borgstede, R.; Chen, J.; Chen, L.; Fuh, J.; Cyprych, E.

    1982-01-01

    Decision Information Display System (DIDS) is rapid-response information-retrieval and color-graphics display system. DIDS transforms tables of geographically-based domestic statistics (such as population or unemployment by county, energy usage by county, or air-quality figures) into high-resolution, color-coded maps on television display screen.

  12. Reconfigurable Full-Page Braille Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, H. Douglas

    1994-01-01

    Electrically actuated braille display cells of proposed type arrayed together to form full-page braille displays. Like other braille display cells, these provide changeable patterns of bumps driven by digitally recorded text stored on magnetic tapes or in solid-state electronic memories. Proposed cells contain electrorheological fluid. Viscosity of such fluid increases in strong electrostatic field.

  13. 27 CFR 6.83 - Product displays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Product displays. 6.83... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Exceptions § 6.83 Product displays. (a) General. The act by an industry member of giving or selling product displays to a retailer does not constitute a means to...

  14. 27 CFR 6.83 - Product displays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Product displays. 6.83... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Exceptions § 6.83 Product displays. (a) General. The act by an industry member of giving or selling product displays to a retailer does not constitute a means to...

  15. 27 CFR 6.55 - Display service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Display service. 6.55... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Paying for Advertising, Display Or Distribution Service § 6.55 Display service. Industry member reimbursements to retailers for setting up...

  16. 27 CFR 6.55 - Display service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Display service. 6.55... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Paying for Advertising, Display Or Distribution Service § 6.55 Display service. Industry member reimbursements to retailers for setting up...

  17. 27 CFR 6.55 - Display service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Display service. 6.55... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Paying for Advertising, Display Or Distribution Service § 6.55 Display service. Industry member reimbursements to retailers for setting up...

  18. 14 CFR 21.161 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Display. 21.161 Section 21.161 Aeronautics... PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Certificates § 21.161 Display. The holder of a production certificate shall display it prominently in the main office of the factory in which the product concerned...

  19. 27 CFR 6.55 - Display service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Display service. 6.55... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Paying for Advertising, Display Or Distribution Service § 6.55 Display service. Industry member reimbursements to retailers for setting up...

  20. 27 CFR 6.83 - Product displays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Product displays. 6.83... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Exceptions § 6.83 Product displays. (a) General. The act by an industry member of giving or selling product displays to a retailer does not constitute a means to...

  1. 27 CFR 6.83 - Product displays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Product displays. 6.83... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Exceptions § 6.83 Product displays. (a) General. The act by an industry member of giving or selling product displays to a retailer does not constitute a means to...

  2. 14 CFR 21.161 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Display. 21.161 Section 21.161 Aeronautics... PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Certificates § 21.161 Display. The holder of a production certificate shall display it prominently in the main office of the factory in which the product concerned...

  3. Sigma 2 Graphic Display Software Program Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. T.

    1973-01-01

    A general purpose, user oriented graphic support package was implemented. A comprehensive description of the two software components comprising this package is given: Display Librarian and Display Controller. These programs have been implemented in FORTRAN on the XDS Sigma 2 Computer Facility. This facility consists of an XDS Sigma 2 general purpose computer coupled to a Computek Display Terminal.

  4. Emerging Large-Screen Display Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    1255, Santa Clara, CA. 25. Williams, R. D., and F. Garcia, 1988, "A Real Time Autostereoscopic Multiplanar 3D Display System," Society for Information...K. Miyaji, 1989, " 3D Display using Laser and Moving Screen, Japan Display 1989, Paper P3-5. 27. Sterling, R. D., R. D. TeKolste, J. M. Haggerty, T. C

  5. Modified and improved sleep monitoring display console

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An outline is given of a sleep monitoring display console capable of simultaneously displaying: (1) the visible current sleep stage of each subject, (2) a cumulative, numerical display (in hours and minutes) of the total amount of time the subject spends in each stage, and (3) a stepwise, graphic recording of subject's sleep stage versus time.

  6. 27 CFR 6.55 - Display service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Display service. 6.55 Section 6.55 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Paying for Advertising, Display Or Distribution Service § 6.55 Display service....

  7. Displaying Geographically-Based Domestic Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quann, J.; Dalton, J.; Banks, M.; Helfer, D.; Szczur, M.; Winkert, G.; Billingsley, J.; Borgstede, R.; Chen, J.; Chen, L.; hide

    1982-01-01

    Decision Information Display System (DIDS) is rapid-response information-retrieval and color-graphics display system. DIDS transforms tables of geographically-based domestic statistics (such as population or unemployment by county, energy usage by county, or air-quality figures) into high-resolution, color-coded maps on television display screen.

  8. Laser Optometric Assessment Of Visual Display Viewability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murch, Gerald M.

    1983-08-01

    Through the technique of laser optometry, measurements of a display user's visual accommodation and binocular convergence were used to assess the visual impact of display color, technology, contrast, and work time. The studies reported here indicate the potential of visual-function measurements as an objective means of improving the design of visual displays.

  9. Thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents the basic theory and techniques of thermal analysis. It discusses a range of applications and instrumentation from all fields of applied and basic research, and concludes with problem sets. Topics covered include: The Basics of Thermal Analysis; Thermometry; Differential Thermal Analysis; Calorimetry; Thermomechanical Analysis and Dilatometry; and Thermogravimetry.

  10. Thermal conductivity of supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Biddle, John W; Holten, Vincent; Sengers, Jan V; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2013-04-01

    The heat capacity of supercooled water, measured down to -37°C, shows an anomalous increase as temperature decreases. The thermal diffusivity, i.e., the ratio of the thermal conductivity and the heat capacity per unit volume, shows a decrease. These anomalies may be associated with a hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled water below the line of homogeneous nucleation. However, while the thermal conductivity is known to diverge at the vapor-liquid critical point due to critical density fluctuations, the thermal conductivity of supercooled water, calculated as the product of thermal diffusivity and heat capacity, does not show any sign of such an anomaly. We have used mode-coupling theory to investigate the possible effect of critical fluctuations on the thermal conductivity of supercooled water and found that indeed any critical thermal-conductivity enhancement would be too small to be measurable at experimentally accessible temperatures. Moreover, the behavior of thermal conductivity can be explained by the observed anomalies of the thermodynamic properties. In particular, we show that thermal conductivity should go through a minimum when temperature is decreased, as Kumar and Stanley observed in the TIP5P model of water. We discuss physical reasons for the striking difference between the behavior of thermal conductivity in water near the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical points.

  11. SIG. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.; Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1992-01-22

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG; a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments, commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a `repeat` sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  12. SIG. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.; Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1992-01-22

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time-and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments, commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  13. SIG. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.; Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1992-01-22

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  14. Supersonic Research Display for Tour

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1946-03-21

    On March 22, 1946, 250 members of the Institute of Aeronautical Science toured the NACA’s Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory. NACA Chairman Jerome Hunsaker and Secretary John Victory were on hand to brief the attendees in the Administration Building before the visited the lab’s test facilities. At each of the twelve stops, researchers provided brief presentations on their work. Topics included axial flow combustors, materials for turbine blades, engine cooling, icing prevention, and supersonic flight. The laboratory reorganized itself in October 1945 as World War II came to an end to address newly emerging technologies such as the jet engine, rockets, and high-speed flight. While design work began on what would eventually become the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel, NACA Lewis quickly built several small supersonic tunnels. These small facilities utilized the Altitude Wind Tunnel’s massive air handling equipment to generate high-speed airflow. The display seen in this photograph was set up in the building that housed the first of these wind tunnels. Eventually the building would contain three small supersonic tunnels, referred to as the “stack tunnels” because of the vertical alignment. The two other tunnels were added to this structure in 1949 and 1951. The small tunnels were used until the early 1960s to study the aerodynamic characteristics of supersonic inlets and exits.

  15. Distributed graph visualization on tiled displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Sangwon

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a distributed force-directed layout algorithm in order to handle large graph data on tiled display that consists of multiple computing machines and multiple displays connected to each computing machine through Ethernet. The distributed tiled display makes one big screen using multiple displays in order to discern data obviously. Besides, multiple computing devices on tiled displays share the parts of an entire dataset. Therefore, it can dramatically reduce the processing time to visualize data on screen compared with the processing time on a single machine.

  16. Video display engineering and optimization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, James (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A video display engineering and optimization CAD simulation system for designing a LCD display integrates models of a display device circuit, electro-optics, surface geometry, and physiological optics to model the system performance of a display. This CAD system permits system performance and design trade-offs to be evaluated without constructing a physical prototype of the device. The systems includes a series of modules which permit analysis of design trade-offs in terms of their visual impact on a viewer looking at a display.

  17. Medical color displays and their calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiahua; Roehrig, Hans; Dallas, W.; Krupinski, Elizabeth

    2009-08-01

    Color displays are increasingly used for medical imaging, replacing the traditional monochrome displays in radiology for multi-modality applications, 3D representation applications, etc. Color displays are also used increasingly because of wide spread application of Tele-Medicine, Tele-Dermatology and Digital Pathology. At this time, there is no concerted effort for calibration procedures for this diverse range of color displays in Telemedicine and in other areas of the medical field. Using a colorimeter to measure the display luminance and chrominance properties as well as some processing software we developed a first attempt to a color calibration protocol for the medical imaging field.

  18. Test techniques for evaluating flight displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loran A.; Newman, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    The rapid development of graphics technology allows for greater flexibility in aircraft displays, but display evaluation techniques have not kept pace. Historically, display evaluation has been based on subjective opinion and not on the actual aircraft/pilot performance. Existing electronic display specifications and evaluation techniques are reviewed. A display rating technique analogous to handling qualities ratings was developed and is recommended for future evaluations. The choice of evaluation pilots is also discussed and the use of a limited number of trained evaluators is recommended over the use of a large number of operational pilots.

  19. Perception of spatial features with stereoscopic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piantanida, T. P.

    1980-10-01

    At the beginning of this project year, our plan was to review the literature pertaining to stereo display systems, binocular vision and stereopsis, and the interaction of the observer with the display system in order to determine which major display system variables warranted closest and most immediate study. Upon delving into the literature, we found that, very often, no distinction is made between systems that require stereopsis and those that do not. Consequently, it is first necessary to categorize existing displays into those that require the viewer to observe the display with both eyes and those that transmit the same information to the observer even when viewed monocularly.

  20. Open control/display system for a telerobotics work station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keslowitz, Saul

    1987-01-01

    A working Advanced Space Cockpit was developed that integrated advanced control and display devices into a state-of-the-art multimicroprocessor hardware configuration, using window graphics and running under an object-oriented, multitasking real-time operating system environment. This Open Control/Display System supports the idea that the operator should be able to interactively monitor, select, control, and display information about many payloads aboard the Space Station using sets of I/O devices with a single, software-reconfigurable workstation. This is done while maintaining system consistency, yet the system is completely open to accept new additions and advances in hardware and software. The Advanced Space Cockpit, linked to Grumman's Hybrid Computing Facility and Large Amplitude Space Simulator (LASS), was used to test the Open Control/Display System via full-scale simulation of the following tasks: telerobotic truss assembly, RCS and thermal bus servicing, CMG changeout, RMS constrained motion and space constructible radiator assembly, HPA coordinated control, and OMV docking and tumbling satellite retrieval. The proposed man-machine interface standard discussed has evolved through many iterations of the tasks, and is based on feedback from NASA and Air Force personnel who performed those tasks in the LASS.

  1. Additive and subtractive transparent depth displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Frank L.; Toet, Alexander

    2003-09-01

    Image fusion is the generally preferred method to combine two or more images for visual display on a single screen. We demonstrate that perceptual image separation may be preferable over perceptual image fusion for the combined display of enhanced and synthetic imagery. In this context image separation refers to the simultaneous presentation of images on different depth planes of a single display. Image separation allows the user to recognize the source of the information that is displayed. This can be important because synthetic images are more liable to flaws. We have examined methods to optimize perceptual image separation. A true depth difference between enhanced and synthetic imagery works quite well. A standard stereoscopic display based on convergence is less suitable since the two images tend to interfere: the image behind is masked (occluded) by the image in front, which results in poor viewing comfort. This effect places 3D systems based on 3D glasses, as well as most autostereoscopic displays, at a serious disadvantage. A 3D display based on additive or subtractive transparency is acceptable: both the perceptual separation and the viewing comfort are good, but the color of objects depends on the color in the other depth layer(s). A combined additive and subtractive transparent display eliminates this disadvantage and is most suitable for the combined display of enhanced and synthetic imagery. We suggest that the development of such a display system is of a greater practical value than increasing the number of depth planes in autostereoscopic displays.

  2. The effect of display movement angle, indicator type and display location on control/display stereotype strength.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Errol R; Chan, Alan H S

    2016-10-31

    Much research on stereotype strength relating display and control movements for displays moving in the vertical or horizontal directions has been reported. Here we report effects of display movement angle, where the display moves at angles (relative to the vertical) of between 0° and 180°. The experiment used six different controls, four display locations relative to the operator and three types of indicator. Indicator types were included because of the strong effects of the 'scale-side principle' that are variable with display angle. A directional indicator had higher stereotype strength than a neutral indicator, and showed an apparent reversal in control/display stereotype direction beyond an angle of 90°. However, with a neutral indicator this control reversal was not present. Practitioner summary: The effects of display moving at angles other than the four cardinal directions, types of control, location of display and types of indicator are investigated. Indicator types (directional and neutral) have an effect on stereotype strength and may cause an apparent control reversal with change of display movement angle.

  3. Toner display based on particle control technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    Toner Display is based on an electrical movement of charged particles. Two types of black toner and white particles charged in the different electric polarity are enclosed between two electrodes. The particle movement is controlled by the external electric field applied between two transparent electrodes. The toner is collected to the electrode by an electrostatic force across the insulating layer to display a black image. The toners can be put back to the counter electrode by applying a reverse electric field, and white solid image is displayed. We have studied on the movement of three color particles independently to display color image in Toner Display. Two positively charged color particles with different amount of charge to mass ratio and negatively charged white particles were enclosed in the toner display cell. Yellow, cyan and white images were displayed by an application of voltage.

  4. Optical advantages in retinal scanning displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urey, Hakan

    2000-06-01

    Virtual Retinal DisplayTM technology is a retinal scanning display (RSD) technology being developed at Microvision, Inc., for a variety of applications including microdisplays. An RSD scans a modulated light beam onto a viewer's retina to produce a perceived image. Red, green and blue light sources, such as lasers, laser diodes or LEDs combine with Microvision's proprietary miniaturized scanner designs to make the RSD very well suited for head-worn and helmet-mounted displays (HMD). This paper compares the features of RSD technology to other display technologies such as the cathode ray tubes or matrix-based displays for HMD and other wearable display applications, and notes important performance advantages due to the number of pixel- generating elements. Also discussed are some fundamental optical limitations for virtual displays used in the HMD applications.

  5. Laser-based displays: a review.

    PubMed

    Chellappan, Kishore V; Erden, Erdem; Urey, Hakan

    2010-09-01

    After the invention of lasers, in the past 50 years progress made in laser-based display technology has been very promising, with commercial products awaiting release to the mass market. Compact laser systems, such as edge-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and optically pumped semiconductor lasers, are suitable candidates for laser-based displays. Laser speckle is an important concern, as it degrades image quality. Typically, one or multiple speckle reduction techniques are employed in laser displays to reduce speckle contrast. Likewise, laser safety issues need to be carefully evaluated in designing laser displays under different usage scenarios. Laser beam shaping using refractive and diffractive components is an integral part of laser displays, and the requirements depend on the source specifications, modulation technique, and the scanning method being employed in the display. A variety of laser-based displays have been reported, and many products such as pico projectors and laser televisions are commercially available already.

  6. An Inventory Model for Special Display Goods with Seasonal Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, Hidefumi

    2010-10-01

    The present study discusses the retailer's optimal replenishment policy for seasonal products. The demand rate of seasonal merchandise such as clothes, sporting goods, children's toys and electrical home appearances tends to decrease with time after reaching its maximum value. In this study, we focus on "Special Display Goods", which are heaped up in end displays or special areas at retail stores. They are sold at a fast velocity when their quantity displayed is large, but are sold at a low velocity if the quantity becomes small. We develop the model with a finite time horizon (selling period) to determine the optimal replenishment policy, which maximizes the retailer's total profit. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the theoretical underpinnings of the proposed model.

  7. Automated system function allocation and display format: Task information processing requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerwinski, Mary P.

    1993-01-01

    An important consideration when designing the interface to an intelligent system concerns function allocation between the system and the user. The display of information could be held constant, or 'fixed', leaving the user with the task of searching through all of the available information, integrating it, and classifying the data into a known system state. On the other hand, the system, based on its own intelligent diagnosis, could display only relevant information in order to reduce the user's search set. The user would still be left the task of perceiving and integrating the data and classifying it into the appropriate system state. Finally, the system could display the patterns of data. In this scenario, the task of integrating the data is carried out by the system, and the user's information processing load is reduced, leaving only the tasks of perception and classification of the patterns of data. Humans are especially adept at this form of display processing. Although others have examined the relative effectiveness of alphanumeric and graphical display formats, it is interesting to reexamine this issue together with the function allocation problem. Currently, Johnson Space Center is the test site for an intelligent Thermal Control System (TCS), TEXSYS, being tested for use with Space Station Freedom. Expert TCS engineers, as well as novices, were asked to classify several displays of TEXSYS data into various system states (including nominal and anomalous states). Three different display formats were used: fixed, subset, and graphical. The hypothesis tested was that the graphical displays would provide for fewer errors and faster classification times by both experts and novices, regardless of the kind of system state represented within the display. The subset displays were hypothesized to be the second most effective display format/function allocation condition, based on the fact that the search set is reduced in these displays. Both the subset and the

  8. Microspheres in Plasma Display Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Filling small bubbles of molten glass with gases is just as difficult as it sounds, but the technical staff at NASA is not known to shy away from a difficult task. When Microsphere Systems, Inc. (MSI), of Ypsilanti, Michigan, and Imaging Systems Technology, Inc. (IST), of Toledo, Ohio, were trying to push the limits of plasma displays but were having difficulty with the designs, NASA s Glenn Garrett Morgan Commercialization Initiative (GMCI) assembled key personnel at Glenn Research Center and Ohio State University for a brainstorming session to come up with a solution for the companies. They needed a system that could produce hollow, glass micro-sized spheres (microspheres) that could be filled with a variety of gasses. But the extremely high temperature required to force the micro-sized glass bubbles to form at the tip of a metal nozzle resulted in severe discoloration of the microspheres. After countless experiments on various glass-metal combinations, they had turned to the GMCI for help. NASA experts in advanced metals, ceramics, and glass concluded that a new design approach was necessary. The team determined that what was needed was a phosphate glass composition that would remain transparent, and they went to work on a solution. Six weeks later, using the design tips from the NASA team, Tim Henderson, president of MSI, had designed a new system in which all surfaces in contact with the molten glass would be ceramic instead of metal. Meanwhile, IST was able to complete a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and supply a potential customer with samples of the microspheres for evaluation as filler materials for high-performance insulations.

  9. Military display market segment: wearable and portable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    2003-09-01

    The military display market (MDM) is analyzed in terms of one of its segments, wearable and portable displays. Wearable and portable displays are those embedded in gear worn or carried by warfighters. Categories include hand-mobile (direct-view and monocular/binocular), palm-held, head/helmet-mounted, body-strapped, knee-attached, lap-born, neck-lanyard, and pocket/backpack-stowed. Some 62 fielded and developmental display sizes are identified in this wearable/portable MDM segment. Parameters requiring special consideration, such as weight, luminance ranges, light emission, viewing angles, and chromaticity coordinates, are summarized and compared. Ruggedized commercial versus commercial off-the-shelf designs are contrasted; and a number of custom displays are also found in this MDM category. Display sizes having aggregate quantities of 5,000 units or greater or having 2 or more program applications are identified. Wearable and portable displays are also analyzed by technology (LCD, LED, CRT, OLED and plasma). The technical specifications and program history of several high-profile military programs are discussed to provide a systems context for some representative displays and their function. As of August 2002 our defense-wide military display market study has documented 438,882 total display units distributed across 1,163 display sizes and 438 weapon systems. Wearable and portable displays account for 202,593 displays (46% of total DoD) yet comprise just 62 sizes (5% of total DoD) in 120 weapons systems (27% of total DoD). Some 66% of these wearable and portable applications involve low information content displays comprising just a few characters in one color; however, there is an accelerating trend towards higher information content units capable of showing changeable graphics, color and video.

  10. Conceptual design of industrial process displays.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, C R; Lind, M

    1999-11-01

    Today, process displays used in industry are often designed on the basis of piping and instrumentation diagrams without any method of ensuring that the needs of the operators are fulfilled. Therefore, a method for a systematic approach to the design of process displays is needed. This paper discusses aspects of process display design taking into account both the designer's and the operator's points of view. Three aspects are emphasized: the operator tasks, the display content and the display form. The distinction between these three aspects is the basis for proposing an outline for a display design method that matches the industrial practice of modular plant design and satisfies the needs of reusability of display design solutions. The main considerations in display design in the industry are to specify the operator's activities in detail, to extract the information the operators need from the plant design specification and documentation, and finally to present this information. The form of the display is selected from existing standardized display elements such as trend curves, mimic diagrams, ecological interfaces, etc. Further knowledge is required to invent new display elements. That is, knowledge about basic visual means of presenting information and how humans perceive and interpret these means and combinations. This knowledge is required in the systematic selection of graphical items for a given display content. The industrial part of the method is first illustrated in the paper by a simple example from a plant with batch processes. Later the method is applied to develop a supervisory display for a condenser system in a nuclear power plant. The differences between the continuous plant domain of power production and the batch processes from the example are analysed and broad categories of display types are proposed. The problems involved in specification and invention of a supervisory display are analysed and conclusions from these problems are made. It is

  11. Impact of price display on provider ordering: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Mark T; Bongiovanni, Tasce R; Glover, Janis G; Gross, Cary P

    2016-01-01

    Displaying order prices to physicians is 1 potential strategy to reduce unnecessary health expenditures, but its impact on patterns of care is unclear. To review characteristics of previous price display interventions, impact on order costs and volume, effects on patient safety, acceptability to physicians, and the quality of this evidence. Systematic review of studies that showed numeric prices of laboratory tests, imaging studies, or medications to providers in real time during the ordering process and evaluated the impact on provider ordering. Two investigators independently extracted data for each study and evaluated study quality using a modified Downs and Black checklist. Of 1494 studies reviewed, 19 met inclusion criteria, including 5 randomized trials, 13 pre-post intervention studies, and 1 time series analysis. Studies were published between 1983 and 2014. Of 15 studies reporting the quantitative impact of price display on aggregate order costs or volume, 10 demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in the intervention group. Price display was found to decrease aggregate order costs (9 of 13 studies) more frequently than order volume (3 of 8 studies). Patient safety was evaluated in 5 studies and was unaffected by price display. Provider acceptability tended to be positive, although evidence was limited. Study quality was mixed, with checklist scores ranging from 5/21 to 20/21. Provider price display likely reduces order costs to a modest degree. Patient safety appeared unchanged, though evidence was limited. More high-quality evidence is needed to confirm these findings within a modern context. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  12. Development of a synthetic vision display of the second generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smietanski, Guillaume; Lenhart, Peter M.; Kranz, Stephan; Mayer, Udo

    2000-06-01

    The Darmstadt University of Technology (TUD) develops displays with 3D terrain depiction to improve pilots spatial situation awareness. This will enhance safety and will lead to economical benefits by supporting new traffic procedures (i.e. SMGCS taxiing). Flight tests and simulation with a first generation of displays gave proof of the concept. However, for global usability it was necessary to rebuild the software concept. Displays of second generation utilise a worldwide database instead of a local and experimental one. With this new software concept either the database of the tools, to build it, should be certifiable. For performance reasons, logic information is included in the database. This means that the animation information about special objects is described in the database and not in the display software routines. This was the motivation to implement a new version of the software instead of an update of the first generation. A graphics library, written to build 3D graphic applications is used. This library makes optimal use of the graphic hardware and supports database. The new version provides a lot of flexibility, without decreasing the performance of the displays software. It is build for experimental research and not as a final product. The display format must have a lot of flexibility, because the software is contributing to different research projects in different configurations. It is also necessary to have a great flexibility for the interface configuration. Important steps in the development process of TUD's second generation Synthetic Vision Displays will be presented. Furthermore, features of the drawing process and the communication interface of the software will be explained.

  13. Individualized image display improves performance in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Rajan K; Steigman, Shaun A; Aidlen, Jeremy T; Luks, François I

    2012-12-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has made great advances over the years, but it is still dependent on a single viewpoint. This single-lens system impedes multitasking and may provide suboptimal views of the operative field. We have previously developed a prototype of interactive laparoscopic image display to enable individualized manipulation of the displayed image by each member of the operating team. The current study examines whether the concept of individualized image display improves performance during laparoscopic surgery. Individualized display of the endoscopic image was implemented in vitro using two cameras, independently manipulated by each operator, in a Fundamental of Laparoscopic Surgery (Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons) endotrainer model. The standardized bead transfer and endoloop tasks were adapted to a two-operator exercise. Each team of two was paired by experience level (novice or expert) and was timed twice: once while using a single camera (control) and once using two cameras (individualized image). In total, 20 medical students, residents, and attending surgeons were paired in various combinations. Bead transfer times for the individualized image experiment were significantly shorter in the expert group (61.8 ± 14.8% of control, P=.002). Endoloop task performance time was significantly decreased in both novices (80.3 ± 44.4%, P=.04) and experts (69.5 ± 12.9%, P=.001) using the two-camera set-up. Many advances in laparoscopic image display have led to an incremental improvement in performance. They have been most beneficial to novices, as experts have learned to overcome the shortcomings of laparoscopy. Using a validated tool of laparoscopic training, we have shown that efficiency is improved with the use of an individualized image display and that this effect is more pronounced in experts. The concept of individual image manipulation and display will be further developed into a hands-free, intuitive system and must be

  14. A QUALITATIVE METHOD TO ESTIMATE HSI DISPLAY COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques Hugo; David Gertman

    2013-04-01

    There is mounting evidence that complex computer system displays in control rooms contribute to cognitive complexity and, thus, to the probability of human error. Research shows that reaction time increases and response accuracy decreases as the number of elements in the display screen increase. However, in terms of supporting the control room operator, approaches focusing on addressing display complexity solely in terms of information density and its location and patterning, will fall short of delivering a properly designed interface. This paper argues that information complexity and semantic complexity are mandatory components when considering display complexity and that the addition of these concepts assists in understanding and resolving differences between designers and the preferences and performance of operators. This paper concludes that a number of simplified methods, when combined, can be used to estimate the impact that a particular display may have on the operator's ability to perform a function accurately and effectively. We present a mixed qualitative and quantitative approach and a method for complexity estimation.

  15. Perchlorate behavior in a municipal lake following fireworks displays.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Richard T; Fine, Dennis D; Burnett, Nicole G

    2007-06-01

    Perchlorate salts of potassium and ammonium are the primary oxidants in pyrotechnic mixtures, yet insufficient information is available regarding the relationship between fireworks displays and the environmental occurrence of perchlorate. Here we document changes in perchlorate concentrations in surface water adjacent to a site of fireworks displays from 2004 to 2006. Preceding fireworks displays, perchlorate concentrations in surface water ranged from 0.005 to 0.081 microg/L, with a mean value of 0.043 microg/L. Within 14 h after the fireworks, perchlorate concentrations spiked to values ranging from 24 to 1028x the mean baseline value. A maximum perchlorate concentration of 44.2 microg/L was determined following the July 4th event in 2006. After the fireworks displays, perchlorate concentrations decreased toward the background level within 20 to 80 days, with the rate of attenuation correlating to surface water temperature. Adsorption tests indicate that sediments underlying the water column have limited (< 100 nmol/g) capacity to remove perchlorate via chemical adsorption. Microcosms showed comparatively rapid intrinsic perchlorate degradation in the absence of nitrate consistent with the observed disappearance of perchlorate from the study site. This suggests that at sites with appropriate biogeochemical conditions, natural attenuation may be an important factor affecting the fate of perchlorate following fireworks displays.

  16. 3-D displays for cockpits: where they pay off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, John M.; Mazur, Kim M.

    1990-09-01

    The cockpits of both military and civilian aircraft now contain color, multifunction displays. This capability, coupled with advances in graphics generators, has given the crew station designer the ability to create display formats which are very intuitive. However these display formats are limited to 2-D (flat -- such as a road map) or 2 l/2-D (perspective -- such as railroad tracks narrowing to a distant vanishing point) when trying to portray spatial concepts. The recent development of technology to allow for the incorporation of 3-D stereo into the display formats has the potential to dramatically decrease the pilot's information processing load through the creation of formats which can more realistically portray real world scenes that are inherently three dimensional. This paper describes a series of experiments designed to determine if there is payoff in 3-D stereo in combination with various monocular depth cues such as size coding and aerial perspective. Guidelines are presented discussing the types of display formats in which 3-D stereo will have the greatest contribution.

  17. Evaluation of stereoscopic display with visual function and interview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Fumio

    1999-05-01

    The influence of binocular stereoscopic (3D) television display on the human eye were compared with one of a 2D display, using human visual function testing and interviews. A 40- inch double lenticular display was used for 2D/3D comparison experiments. Subjects observed the display for 30 minutes at a distance 1.0 m, with a combination of 2D material and one of 3D material. The participants were twelve young adults. Main optometric test with visual function measured were visual acuity, refraction, phoria, near vision point, accommodation etc. The interview consisted of 17 questions. Testing procedures were performed just before watching, just after watching, and forty-five minutes after watching. Changes in visual function are characterized as prolongation of near vision point, decrease of accommodation and increase in phoria. 3D viewing interview results show much more visual fatigue in comparison with 2D results. The conclusions are: 1) change in visual function is larger and visual fatigue is more intense when viewing 3D images. 2) The evaluation method with visual function and interview proved to be very satisfactory for analyzing the influence of stereoscopic display on human eye.

  18. Miniaturized LEDs for flat-panel displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich J.; Meitl, Matthew; Prevatte, Carl; Bonafede, Salvatore; Rotzoll, Robert; Gomez, David; Moore, Tanya; Raymond, Brook; Cok, Ronald; Fecioru, Alin; Trindade, António Jose; Fisher, Brent; Goodwin, Scott; Hines, Paul; Melnik, George; Barnhill, Sam; Bower, Christopher A.

    2017-02-01

    Inorganic light emitting diodes (LEDs) serve as bright pixel-level emitters in displays, from indoor/outdoor video walls with pixel sizes ranging from one to thirty millimeters to micro displays with more than one thousand pixels per inch. Pixel sizes that fall between those ranges, roughly 50 to 500 microns, are some of the most commercially significant ones, including flat panel displays used in smart phones, tablets, and televisions. Flat panel displays that use inorganic LEDs as pixel level emitters (μILED displays) can offer levels of brightness, transparency, and functionality that are difficult to achieve with other flat panel technologies. Cost-effective production of μILED displays requires techniques for precisely arranging sparse arrays of extremely miniaturized devices on a panel substrate, such as transfer printing with an elastomer stamp. Here we present lab-scale demonstrations of transfer printed μILED displays and the processes used to make them. Demonstrations include passive matrix μILED displays that use conventional off-the shelf drive ASICs and active matrix μILED displays that use miniaturized pixel-level control circuits from CMOS wafers. We present a discussion of key considerations in the design and fabrication of highly miniaturized emitters for μILED displays.

  19. Evolution of displays within the pair bond

    PubMed Central

    Servedio, Maria R.; Price, Trevor D.; Lande, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Although sexual selection is an important cause of display evolution, in socially monogamous species (e.g. many birds), displays continue after formation of the pair bond. Here, we consider that these displays evolve because they stimulate the partner to increase investment in offspring. Our study is motivated by elaborate mutual displays in species that are largely monomorphic and have long-term pair bonds (e.g. the great crested grebe, Podiceps cristatus) and by many empirical results evidencing that display manipulation affects parental investment. Using population genetic models, we show that a necessary condition for the permanent establishment of mutual displays in the pair bond is that the benefit of investment by the pair is more than twice that resulting from investment by a single individual. Pre-existing biases to respond to displays by increased investment are a necessary component of display evolution. We also consider examples where one sex (e.g. males) stimulates increased investment in offspring by the other sex. Here, display and additional investment cannot evolve permanently, but can increase and linger at high frequency for a long time before loss. We discuss how such transient effects may lead to the evolution of permanent displays as a result of evolution at additional loci. PMID:23427172

  20. Displays of the honeyeater Manorina melanocephala.

    PubMed

    Dow, D D

    1975-08-01

    Investigated displays of Noisy Miners, Manorina melanocephala, in Australia. This unusual bird lives in colonies and many male male care for the offspring of each female. 3 flight displays, 11 non-flight displays, and several components of facial displays (including a variable eye patch) are discribed. The eye patch provides a large yellow and black augmented eye, important in intimidation. No stereotyped sequence of courtship behaviour precedes copulation. Displays are used to advertise nest locations. A greeting display, the corroboree, is extremely common. The possibility of the evolution of submissive display from threat is discussed. Special vocalisations of male male and female female are used in a duet. The maintenance of bonds among many individuals in a colony may be more important than strong pair bonds. Group cohesion is probably maintained by flight display, nest display, mobbing, and other communal activities. High interspecific aggression results in few resident species in colonies. This level of interspecific aggression might be maintained by incorporating much intraspecific mimetic display and ritualised submissive behaviour.

  1. Cotton thermal defoliation economics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton harvest-aid chemical and application expenses are justified by increased quantity and value of harvested fiber, and decreased harvest costs. Chemical use may be restricted in certain production situations. Harvest preparation costs and producer returns were compared for thermal defoliation ...

  2. Investigation of Energy-Efficient Supermarket Display Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.H.

    2005-01-21

    Supermarkets represent one of the largest energy-intensive building groups in the commercial sector, consuming 2 to 3 million kWh/yr per store (ES-1). Over half of this energy use is for the refrigeration of food display cases and storage coolers. Display cases are used throughout a supermarket for the merchandising of perishable food products. The cases are maintained at air temperatures ranging from -10 to 35 F, depending upon the type of product stored. The operating characteristics and energy requirements of the refrigeration system are directly related to the refrigeration load. The sources of the display case refrigeration load consist of: (1) Moist and warm air infiltration through the open front of the case--air curtains are employed to inhibit this infiltration, but some ambient air is entrained, which adds a substantial portion to the refrigeration load. (2) Heat conduction through case panels and walls. (3) Thermal radiation from the ambient to the product and display case interior. (4) Internal thermal loads--the use of lights, evaporator fans, periodic defrosts, and antisweat heaters adds to the refrigeration load of the display case as well as directly consuming electric energy. The impact of each of these elements on the refrigeration load is very dependent upon case type (Figure ES-1). For example, air infiltration is the most significant portion of the refrigeration load for open, multi-deck cases, while radiation is the largest part of the load for tub-type cases. The door anti-sweat heaters represent a major share of the refrigeration load for frozen food door reach-in cases. Figure ES-2 shows the distribution of display cases in a typical supermarket (ES-2). Open, multi-deck, medium temperature display cases typically comprise about half of the refrigerated fixtures in a store (ES-3). In addition, medium temperature fixtures and storage coolers account for roughly 70 to 75 percent of the total store refrigeration load with open, multi-deck cases

  3. Cytochrome bd Displays Significant Quinol Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Sinan; Yu, Yuanjie; Pinkse, Martijn; Hoeser, Jo; Friedrich, Thorsten; Bald, Dirk; de Vries, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome bd is a prokaryotic terminal oxidase that catalyses the electrogenic reduction of oxygen to water using ubiquinol as electron donor. Cytochrome bd is a tri-haem integral membrane enzyme carrying a low-spin haem b558, and two high-spin haems: b595 and d. Here we show that besides its oxidase activity, cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli is a genuine quinol peroxidase (QPO) that reduces hydrogen peroxide to water. The highly active and pure enzyme preparation used in this study did not display the catalase activity recently reported for E. coli cytochrome bd. To our knowledge, cytochrome bd is the first membrane-bound quinol peroxidase detected in E. coli. The observation that cytochrome bd is a quinol peroxidase, can provide a biochemical basis for its role in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide and may explain the frequent findings reported in the literature that indicate increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and decreased virulence in mutants that lack the enzyme. PMID:27279363

  4. Projection display technology and product trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Frederic J.

    1999-05-01

    Major technology and market trends that could generate a 20 billion dollar electronic projector market by 2010 are reviewed in the perspective of recent product introductions. A log linear analysis shows that the light outputs of benchmark transportable data video projectors have increased at a rate of almost 90 percent per year since 1993. The list prices of these same projectors have decreased at a rate of over 40 percent per year. The tradeoffs of light output vs. resolution and weight are illustrated. Recent trends in projector efficacy vs. year are discussed. Lumen output per dollar of list price is shown to be a useful market metric. Continued technical advances and innovations including higher throughput light valve technologies with integrated drivers, brighter light source, field sequential color, integrated- and micro-optical components, and aerospace materials are likely to sustain these trends. The new technologies will enable projection displays for entertainment and computer applications with unprecedented levels of performance, compactness, and cost-effectiveness.

  5. Wetting Transitions Displayed by Persistent Active Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepúlveda, Néstor; Soto, Rodrigo

    2017-08-01

    A lattice model for active matter is studied numerically, showing that it displays wetting transitions between three distinctive phases when in contact with an impenetrable wall. The particles in the model move persistently, tumbling with a small rate α , and interact via exclusion volume only. When increasing the tumbling rates α , the system transits from total wetting to partial wetting and unwetting phases. In the first phase, a wetting film covers the wall, with increasing heights when α is reduced. The second phase is characterized by wetting droplets on the wall with a periodic spacing between them. Finally, the wall dries with few particles in contact with it. These phases present nonequilibrium transitions. The first transition, from partial to total wetting, is continuous and the fraction of dry sites vanishes continuously when decreasing the tumbling rate α . For the second transition, from partial wetting to dry, the mean droplet distance diverges logarithmically when approaching the critical tumbling rate, with saturation due to finite-size effects.

  6. Wetting Transitions Displayed by Persistent Active Particles.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Néstor; Soto, Rodrigo

    2017-08-18

    A lattice model for active matter is studied numerically, showing that it displays wetting transitions between three distinctive phases when in contact with an impenetrable wall. The particles in the model move persistently, tumbling with a small rate α, and interact via exclusion volume only. When increasing the tumbling rates α, the system transits from total wetting to partial wetting and unwetting phases. In the first phase, a wetting film covers the wall, with increasing heights when α is reduced. The second phase is characterized by wetting droplets on the wall with a periodic spacing between them. Finally, the wall dries with few particles in contact with it. These phases present nonequilibrium transitions. The first transition, from partial to total wetting, is continuous and the fraction of dry sites vanishes continuously when decreasing the tumbling rate α. For the second transition, from partial wetting to dry, the mean droplet distance diverges logarithmically when approaching the critical tumbling rate, with saturation due to finite-size effects.

  7. Geologic mapping using thermal images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. J.; Kahle, A. B.; Palluconi, F. D.; Schieldge, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal radiance data from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite has been used to measure surface reflectance data and to provide additional material composition information through remote sensing. The primary goal was to investigate the utility of HCMM data for geologic applications. Three techniques were used for displaying and combining thermal and visible near infrared (VNIR) data for two desert areas in southern California (Trona and Pisgah): color additive composites (CAC) for day and night IR and day VNIR, principal components, and calculation of thermal inertia images. The HCMM thermal data were more effective than Landsat data in producing separation of compositionally different areas including volcanic and intrusive rocks. The satellite CAC data produced an image for a 1 x 2 degree area, and the color picture was enlarged to a scale of 1:250,000. Playa composition, moisture content, presence of standing water, and vegetation cover were displayed in a variety of colors according to physical characteristics. Areas such as sand dunes were not distinguishable because of the coarse 500-mm HCMM resolution. HCMM thermal data have shown a new dimension to geologic remote sensing, and future satellite missions should allow the continued development of the thermal infrared data for geology.

  8. Geologic mapping using thermal images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. J.; Kahle, A. B.; Palluconi, F. D.; Schieldge, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal radiance data from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite has been used to measure surface reflectance data and to provide additional material composition information through remote sensing. The primary goal was to investigate the utility of HCMM data for geologic applications. Three techniques were used for displaying and combining thermal and visible near infrared (VNIR) data for two desert areas in southern California (Trona and Pisgah): color additive composites (CAC) for day and night IR and day VNIR, principal components, and calculation of thermal inertia images. The HCMM thermal data were more effective than Landsat data in producing separation of compositionally different areas including volcanic and intrusive rocks. The satellite CAC data produced an image for a 1 x 2 degree area, and the color picture was enlarged to a scale of 1:250,000. Playa composition, moisture content, presence of standing water, and vegetation cover were displayed in a variety of colors according to physical characteristics. Areas such as sand dunes were not distinguishable because of the coarse 500-mm HCMM resolution. HCMM thermal data have shown a new dimension to geologic remote sensing, and future satellite missions should allow the continued development of the thermal infrared data for geology.

  9. Thermal Video Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Hughes Aircraft Corporation's Probeye Model 3300 Thermal Video System consists of tripod mounted infrared scanner that detects the degree of heat emitted by an object and a TV monitor on which results are displayed. Latest addition to Hughes line of infrared medical applications can detect temperature variations as fine as one-tenth of a degree centigrade. Thermography, proving to be a valuable screening tool in diagnosis, can produce information to preclude necessity of performing more invasive tests that may be painful and hazardous. Also useful in verifying a patient's progress through therapy and rehabilitation.

  10. A switchable yeast display/secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Van Deventer, James A.; Kelly, Ryan L.; Rajan, Saravanan; Wittrup, K. Dane; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2015-01-01

    Display technologies such as yeast and phage display offer powerful alternatives to traditional immunization-based antibody discovery, but require conversion of displayed proteins into soluble form prior to downstream characterization. Here we utilize amber suppression to implement a yeast-based switchable display/secretion system that enables the immediate production of soluble, antibody-like reagents at the end of screening efforts. Model selections in the switchable format remain efficient, and library screening in the switchable format yields renewable sources of affinity reagents exhibiting nanomolar binding affinities. These results confirm that this system provides a seamless link between display-based screening and the production and evaluation of soluble forms of candidate binding proteins. Switchable display/secretion libraries provide a cloning-free, accessible approach to affinity reagent generation. PMID:26333274

  11. Polyplanar optic display for cockpit application

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L.; Freibott, W.

    1998-04-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a high contrast display screen being developed for cockpit applications. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a long lifetime, (10,000 hour), 200 mW green solid-state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design and speckle reduction, the authors discuss the electronic interfacing to the DLP{trademark} chip, the opto-mechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  12. Laser-driven polyplanar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L.; Beiser, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte-black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 200 milliwatt green solid-state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the DLP chip, the optomechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  13. A switchable yeast display/secretion system.

    PubMed

    Van Deventer, James A; Kelly, Ryan L; Rajan, Saravanan; Wittrup, K Dane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2015-10-01

    Display technologies such as yeast and phage display offer powerful alternatives to traditional immunization-based antibody discovery, but require conversion of displayed proteins into soluble form prior to downstream characterization. Here we utilize amber suppression to implement a yeast-based switchable display/secretion system that enables the immediate production of soluble, antibody-like reagents at the end of screening efforts. Model selections in the switchable format remain efficient, and library screening in the switchable format yields renewable sources of affinity reagents exhibiting nanomolar binding affinities. These results confirm that this system provides a seamless link between display-based screening and the production and evaluation of soluble forms of candidate binding proteins. Switchable display/secretion libraries provide a cloning-free, accessible approach to affinity reagent generation.

  14. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluations of various display designs for a simple k/s-squared plant in a compensatory tracking task using an Optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s-squared plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  15. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluation of various display designs for a simple k/s sup 2 plant in a compensatory tracking task using an optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s sup 2 plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  16. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluations of various display designs for a simple k/s-squared plant in a compensatory tracking task using an Optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s-squared plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  17. Takeoff Performance Monitoring System display options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B.; Srivatsan, Raghavachari; Person, Lee H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The development of displays for the Takeoff Performance Monitoring System (TPMS) is described with attention given to the three concepts prepared for commercial applications. The TPMS algorithm is described and related to the display requirements for pilots of two-engine airplanes. Head-up and -down displays are considered for displaying the simple advisory data which indicate whether the takeoff is a 'Go' or 'No-go' based on engine failure, acceleration error, and runway length. Six pilots are shown the three display options which include: (1) basic information; (2) basic data with 'Go/No-go' advisory flags; and (3) basic data, advisory flags, and an abort-warning symbol. The pilots tended to select the option with the most advisory data available, but the inconclusive preference study led to the concept of presenting all three configurations as possible display options for the TPMS.

  18. Thin, lightweight, foldable thermochromic displays on paper.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Adam C; Phillips, Scott T; Wiley, Benjamin J; Whitesides, George M

    2009-10-07

    This article describes an electronic display that is fabricated by patterning electrically conductive wires (heaters) with micron-scale dimensions on one side of a sheet of paper, and thermochromic ink on the opposite side. Passing electrical current through the wires heats the paper and changes the thermochromic ink from colored (black, green, or other colors) to transparent; this change in property reveals the paper underneath the ink-exposing any messages printed on the paper-and serves as the basis for a two-state "shutter" display. This type of display is thin (100 microm), flat, lightweight (the display weighs <20 mg/cm(2)), can be folded, rolled, twisted, and creased while maintaining function, and ultimately can (if required) be disposed of by incineration. The display is appropriate for applications where information must be presented clearly (usually only once) for little cost (each display costs <$0.10/m(2) in materials) and where limited electrical power is available.

  19. Spectroradiometric characterization of autostereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiño, Manuel; Salas, Carlos; Pozo, Antonio M.; Castro, J. J.; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    Spectroradiometric measurements have been made for the experimental characterization of the RGB channels of autostereoscopic 3D displays, giving results for different measurement angles with respect to the normal direction of the plane of the display. In the study, 2 different models of autostereoscopic 3D displays of different sizes and resolutions were used, making measurements with a spectroradiometer (model PR-670 SpectraScan of PhotoResearch). From the measurements made, goniometric results were recorded for luminance contrast, and the fundamental hypotheses have been evaluated for the characterization of the displays: independence of the RGB channels and their constancy. The results show that the display with the lower angle variability in the contrast-ratio value and constancy of the chromaticity coordinates nevertheless presented the greatest additivity deviations with the measurement angle. For both displays, when the parameters evaluated were taken into account, lower angle variability consistently resulted in the 2D mode than in the 3D mode.

  20. Takeoff Performance Monitoring System display options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B.; Srivatsan, Raghavachari; Person, Lee H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The development of displays for the Takeoff Performance Monitoring System (TPMS) is described with attention given to the three concepts prepared for commercial applications. The TPMS algorithm is described and related to the display requirements for pilots of two-engine airplanes. Head-up and -down displays are considered for displaying the simple advisory data which indicate whether the takeoff is a 'Go' or 'No-go' based on engine failure, acceleration error, and runway length. Six pilots are shown the three display options which include: (1) basic information; (2) basic data with 'Go/No-go' advisory flags; and (3) basic data, advisory flags, and an abort-warning symbol. The pilots tended to select the option with the most advisory data available, but the inconclusive preference study led to the concept of presenting all three configurations as possible display options for the TPMS.

  1. Thermal microstructure measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A thermal microstructure measurement system (TMMS) operates autonomously h its own internal power supply and telemeters data to a platform. A thermal array is mounted on a cross-braced frame designed to orient itself normal to existing currents with fixed sensor positioning bars protruding from the cross bars. A plurality of matched thermistors, conductivity probes and inclinometers are mounted on the frame. A compass and pressure transducer are contained in an electronics package suspended below the array. The array is deployed on a taut mooring below a subsurface float. Data are digitized, transmitted via cable to a surface buoy and then telemetered to the platform where the data is processed via a computer, recorded and/or displayed. The platform computer also sends commands to the array via telemetry.

  2. THERMAL BATTERY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    THERMAL BATTERIES, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING)), DESIGN, ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES, CHLORINE, LITHIUM, ELECTRODES, GAS ANALYSIS , CALIBRATION, IMPURITIES, PRESSURE, POLARIZATION, GRAPHITE, DIFFUSION, CONTROL SYSTEMS.

  3. Mission-Clock-Display Software Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilera, Christine; Murphy, Susan C.; Miller, Kevin J.; Guerrero, Ana Maria P.

    1993-01-01

    Displays including images of alarm clocks illustrate temporal statuses of multiple events. MCLK is customizable clock-display computer program with Motif user interface. Used to keep track of such multiple "milestone" events as those occurring during countdowns in spacecraft launches, and alerts user when event time reached. In addition, program displays time from several time zones. Real time measured in Coordinated Universal Time. Written in C language.

  4. Review of Defense Display Research Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    ruggedness of display systems, while pushing the state-of-the- art in display performance, or the ability to improve information assimilation... movement of reflective particles within a microcapsule, revealing or concealing a colored material. Potential applications include avionics, ship, and...25 Defense Display Research This paper was cleared by ASC 01-1010 on 18 May 2001 Table III. State of the art fighter cockpit versus

  5. Rugged low-cost display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Roger; Chiang, Anne; Hermanns, Anno; Vicentini, Frederic; Jacobsen, Jeffrey; Atherton, Jim; Boling, Ed; Cuomo, Frank; Drzaic, Paul; Pearson, Sean

    2002-08-01

    Alien technology has developed a family of rugged, plastic displays for portable devices like SmartCards, electronic signs, cellular telephones and military devices. These displays are driven by ultra-miniaturized silicon integrated circuits called NanoBlcok ICs that are put together using a Fluidic Self Assembly (FSA) process. This low-cost, high- volume manufacturing technique makes possible new types of liquid crystal and OLED display products.

  6. High Fidelity Electronic Display of Digital Mammographs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    quality of scattering processes are modeled with the Monte Carlo CRT devices has not been adequate for displaying digital method by randomly sampling the...Electronic Display of Digital Mammographs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael J. Flynn, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Henry Ford Health Systems Detroit...TYPE AND DATES COVERED October 1997 Annual (3 Sep 96 - 2 Sep 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS High Fidelity Electronic Display of Digital

  7. 3-D Imagery Cockpit Display Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    display. is needed. Good information - (3) Change from pictorial gauges to difficult to interpret. word warnings. Display EGT & OIL indicators at all times...indicator. Popped CBs. Information to be changed : Comments: (5) Nothing needs to be changed . Great format. (2) Standardize colors. Display is good. Use all ...sense? Any suggestions for changes ? 6 Pilots Good. 5 Pilots Great! Don’t change the format. 1 Pilot Stores part great. 1 Pilot Provides all the necessary

  8. Mission-Clock-Display Software Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilera, Christine; Murphy, Susan C.; Miller, Kevin J.; Guerrero, Ana Maria P.

    1993-01-01

    Displays including images of alarm clocks illustrate temporal statuses of multiple events. MCLK is customizable clock-display computer program with Motif user interface. Used to keep track of such multiple "milestone" events as those occurring during countdowns in spacecraft launches, and alerts user when event time reached. In addition, program displays time from several time zones. Real time measured in Coordinated Universal Time. Written in C language.

  9. Laser Based 3D Volumetric Display System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Literature, Costa Mesa, CA July 1983. 3. "A Real Time Autostereoscopic Multiplanar 3D Display System", Rodney Don Williams, Felix Garcia, Jr., Texas...8217 .- NUMBERS LASER BASED 3D VOLUMETRIC DISPLAY SYSTEM PR: CD13 0. AUTHOR(S) PE: N/AWIU: DN303151 P. Soltan, J. Trias, W. Robinson, W. Dahlke 7...laser generated 3D volumetric images on a rotating double helix, (where the 3D displays are computer controlled for group viewing with the naked eye

  10. Matrix-addressable electrochromic display cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beni, G.; Schiavone, L. M.

    1981-04-01

    We report an electrochromic display cell with intrinsic matrix addressability. The cell, based on a sputtered iridium oxide film (SIROF) and a tantalum-oxide hysteretic counterelectrode, has electrochromic parameters (i.e., response times, operating voltages, and contrast) similar to those of other SIROF display devices, but in addition, has short-circuit memory and voltage threshold. Memory and threshold are sufficiently large to allow, in principle, multiplexing of electrochromic display panels of large-screen TV pixel size.

  11. Future Directions for Astronomical Image Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Eric

    2000-01-01

    In the "Future Directions for Astronomical Image Displav" project, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories (NOAO) evolved our existing image display program into fully extensible. cross-platform image display software. We also devised messaging software to support integration of image display into astronomical analysis systems. Finally, we migrated our software from reliance on Unix and the X Window System to a platform-independent architecture that utilizes the cross-platform Tcl/Tk technology.

  12. Digital time slot display for Omega receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Methods of decoding a digital word to display alpha-numeric characters for driving a standard seven-segment LED display have been devised for Omega station identification. The circuit could replace the system now being used in Ohio University's Omega receivers, which lights one of eight LED's to signify the Omega time slot being received. The letters A through H, representing the Omega stations, can be read directly from the seven-segment display.

  13. A new approach to characterize the effect of fabric deformation on thermal protective performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Li, Xiaohui; Lu, Yehu; Wang, Yunyi

    2012-04-01

    It is very important to evaluate thermal protective performance (TPP) in laboratory-simulated fire scenes as accurately as possible. For this paper, to thoroughly understand the effect of fabric deformation on basic physical properties and TPP of flame-retardant fabrics exposed to flash fire, a new modified TPP testing apparatus was developed. Different extensions were employed to simulate the various extensions displayed during different body motions. The tests were also carried out with different air gaps. The results showed a significant decrease in air permeability after deformation. However, the change of thickness was slight. The fabric deformation had a complicated effect on thermal protection with different air gaps. The change of TPP depended on the balance between the surface contact area and the thermal insulation. The newly developed testing apparatus could be well employed to evaluate the effect of deformation on TPP of flame-resistant fabrics.

  14. Thermal study of the Missouri River in North Dakota using infrared imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosby, O. A.

    1971-01-01

    Studies of infrared imagery obtained from aircraft at 305- to 1,524-meter altitudes indicate the feasibility of monitoring thermal changes attributable to the operation of thermal electric plants and storage reservoirs, as well as natural phenomena such as tributary inflow and ground water seeps in large rivers. No identifiable sources of ground water inflow below the surface of the river could be found in the imagery. The thermal patterns from the generating plants and the major tributary inflow are readily apparent in imagery obtained from an altitude of 305 meters. Portions of the tape-recorded imagery were processed in a color-coded quantization to enhance the displays and to attach quantitative significance to the data. The study indicates a marked decrease in water temperature in the Missouri River prior to early fall and a moderate increase in temperature in late fall because of the Lake Sakakawea impoundment.

  15. New ultraportable display technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvelda, Phillip; Lewis, Nancy D.

    1998-08-01

    MicroDisplay devices are based on a combination of technologies rooted in the extreme integration capability of conventionally fabricated CMOS active-matrix liquid crystal display substrates. Customized diffraction grating and optical distortion correction technology for lens-system compensation allow the elimination of many lenses and systems-level components. The MicroDisplay Corporation's miniature integrated information display technology is rapidly leading to many new defense and commercial applications. There are no moving parts in MicroDisplay substrates, and the fabrication of the color generating gratings, already part of the CMOS circuit fabrication process, is effectively cost and manufacturing process-free. The entire suite of the MicroDisplay Corporation's technologies was devised to create a line of application- specific integrated circuit single-chip display systems with integrated computing, memory, and communication circuitry. Next-generation portable communication, computer, and consumer electronic devices such as truly portable monitor and TV projectors, eyeglass and head mounted displays, pagers and Personal Communication Services hand-sets, and wristwatch-mounted video phones are among the may target commercial markets for MicroDisplay technology. Defense applications range from Maintenance and Repair support, to night-vision systems, to portable projectors for mobile command and control centers.

  16. Microencapsulated Electrophoretic Films for Electronic Paper Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundson, Karl

    2003-03-01

    Despite the dominance of liquid crystal displays, they do not perform some functions very well. While backlit liquid crystal displays can offer excellent color performance, they wash out in bright lighting and suffer from high power consumption. Reflective liquid crystal displays have limited brightness, making these devices challenging to read for long periods of time. Flexible liquid crystal displays are difficult to manufacture and keep stable. All of these attributes (long battery lifetime, bright reflective appearance, compatibility with flexible substrates) are traits that would be found in an ideal electronic paper display - an updateable substitute for paper that could be employed in electronic books, newspapers, and other applications. I will discuss technologies that are being developed for electronic-paper-like displays, and especially on particle-based technologies. A microencapsulated electrophoretic display technology is being developed at the E Ink corporation. This display film offers offer high brightness and an ink-on-paper appearance, compatibility with flexible substrates, and image stability that can lead to very low power consumption. I will present some of the physical and chemical challenges associated with making display films with high performance.

  17. Aircraft flight path angle display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A display system for use in an aircraft control wheel steering system provides the pilot with a single, quickened flight path angle display to overcome poor handling qualities due to intrinsic flight path angle response lags, while avoiding multiple information display symbology. The control law for the flight path angle control system is designed such that the aircraft's actual flight path angle response lags the pilot's commanded flight path angle by a constant time lag .tau., independent of flight conditions. The synthesized display signal is produced as a predetermined function of the aircraft's actual flight path angle, the time lag .tau. and command inputs from the pilot's column.

  18. Dual use display systems for telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massimino, Michael J.; Meschler, Michael F.; Rodriguez, Alberto A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a telerobotics display system, the Multi-mode Manipulator Display System (MMDS), that has applications for a variety of remotely controlled tasks. Designed primarily to assist astronauts with the control of space robotics systems, the MMDS has applications for ground control of space robotics as well as for toxic waste cleanup, undersea, remotely operated vehicles, and other environments which require remote operations. The MMDS has three modes: (1) Manipulator Position Display (MPD) mode, (2) Joint Angle Display (JAD) mode, and (3) Sensory Substitution (SS) mode. These three modes are discussed in the paper.

  19. Framework for effective use of multiple displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiong; Kimber, Don; Zhao, Frank; Huang, Jeffrey

    2005-10-01

    Meeting environments, such as conference rooms, executive briefing centers, and exhibition spaces, are now commonly equipped with multiple displays, and will become increasingly display-rich in the future. Existing authoring/presentation tools such as PowerPoint, however, provide little support for effective utilization of multiple displays. Even using advanced multi-display enabled multimedia presentation tools, the task of assigning material to displays is tedious and distracts presenters from focusing on content. This paper describes a framework for automatically assigning presentation material to displays, based on a model of the quality of views of audience members. The framework is based on a model of visual fidelity which takes into account presentation content, audience members' locations, the limited resolution of human eyes, and display location, orientation, size, resolution, and frame rate. The model can be used to determine presentation material placement based on average or worst case audience member view quality, and to warn about material that would be illegible. By integrating this framework with a previous system for multi-display presentation [PreAuthor, others], we created a tool that accepts PowerPoint and/or other media input files, and automatically generates a layout of material onto displays for each state of the presentation. The tool also provides an interface allowing the presenter to modify the automatically generated layout before or during the actual presentation. This paper discusses the framework, possible application scenarios, examples of the system behavior, and our experience with system use.

  20. Refreshable Braille displays using EAP actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2010-04-01

    Refreshable Braille can help visually impaired persons benefit from the growing advances in computer technology. The development of such displays in a full screen form is a great challenge due to the need to pack many actuators in small area without interferences. In recent years, various displays using actuators such as piezoelectric stacks have become available in commercial form but most of them are limited to one line Braille code. Researchers in the field of electroactive polymers (EAP) investigated methods of using these materials to form full screen displays. This manuscript reviews the state of the art of producing refreshable Braille displays using EAP-based actuators.

  1. Status review of field emission displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghrayeb, Joseph; Daniels, Reginald

    2001-09-01

    Cathode ray tube (CRT) technology dominates the direct view display market. Mature CRT technology for many designs is still the preferred choice. CRT manufacturers have greatly improved the size and weight of the CRT displays. High performance CRTs continue to be in great demand, however, supply have to contend with the vanishing CRT vendor syndrome. Therefore, the vanishing CRT vendor syndrome fuels the search for an alternate display technology source. Within the past 10 years, field emission display (FED) technology had gained momentum and, at one time, was considered the most viable electronic display technology candidate [to replace the CRT]. The FED community had advocated and promised many advantages over active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCD), electro luminescent (EL) or Plasma displays. Some observers, including potential FED manufacturers and the Department of Defense, (especially the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA)), consider the FED entry as having leapfrog potential. Despite major investments by US manufacturers as well as Asian manufacturers, reliability and manufacturing difficulties greatly slowed down the advancement of the technology. The FED manufacturing difficulties have caused many would-be FED manufacturing participants to abandon FED research. This paper will examine the trends, which are leading this nascent technology to its downfall. FED technology was once considered to have the potential to leapfrog over AMLCD's dominance in the display industry. At present the FED has suffered severe setbacks and there are very few [FED] manufacturers still pursuing research in the area. These companies have yet to deliver a display beyond the prototype stage.

  2. Refreshable Braille Displays Using EAP Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2010-01-01

    Refreshable Braille can help visually impaired persons benefit from the growing advances in computer technology. The development of such displays in a full screen form is a great challenge due to the need to pack many actuators in small area without interferences. In recent years, various displays using actuators such as piezoelectric stacks have become available in commercial form but most of them are limited to one line Braille code. Researchers in the field of electroactive polymers (EAP) investigated methods of using these materials to form full screen displays. This manuscript reviews the state of the art of producing refreshable Braille displays using EAP-based actuators..

  3. Volumetric Three-Dimensional Display Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Barry G.; Schwarz, Adam J.

    2000-03-01

    A comprehensive study of approaches to three-dimensional visualization by volumetric display systems This groundbreaking volume provides an unbiased and in-depth discussion on a broad range of volumetric three-dimensional display systems. It examines the history, development, design, and future of these displays, and considers their potential for application to key areas in which visualization plays a major role. Drawing substantially on material that was previously unpublished or available only in patent form, the authors establish the first comprehensive technical and mathematical formalization of the field, and examine a number of different volumetric architectures. System level design strategies are presented, from which proposals for the next generation of high-definition predictable volumetric systems are developed. To ensure that researchers will benefit from work already completed, they provide: * Descriptions of several recent volumetric display systems prepared from material supplied by the teams that created them * An abstract volumetric display system design paradigm * An historical summary of 90 years of development in volumetric display system technology * An assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of many of the systems proposed to date * A unified presentation of the underlying principles of volumetric display systems * A comprehensive bibliography Beautifully supplemented with 17 color plates that illustrate volumetric images and prototype displays, Volumetric Three-Dimensional Display Systems is an indispensable resource for professionals in imaging systems development, scientific visualization, medical imaging, computer graphics, aerospace, military planning, and CAD/CAE.

  4. Testing Instrument for Flight-Simulator Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1987-01-01

    Displays for flight-training simulators rapidly aligned with aid of integrated optical instrument. Calibrations and tests such as aligning boresight of display with respect to user's eyes, checking and adjusting display horizon, checking image sharpness, measuring illuminance of displayed scenes, and measuring distance of optical focus of scene performed with single unit. New instrument combines all measurement devices in single, compact, integrated unit. Requires just one initial setup. Employs laser and produces narrow, collimated beam for greater measurement accuracy. Uses only one moving part, double right prism, to position laser beam.

  5. Nanoscale thermal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David G.; Ford, Wayne K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Merlin, Roberto; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime—experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  6. Display format and highlight validity effects on search performance using complex visual displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donner, Kimberly A.; Mckay, Tim; O'Brien, Kevin M.; Rudisill, Marianne

    1991-01-01

    Display format and highlight validity were shown to affect visual display search performance; however, these studies were conducted on small, artificial displays of alphanumeric stimuli. A study manipulating these variables was conducted using realistic, complex Space Shuttle information displays. A 2x2x3 within-subjects analysis of variance found that search times were faster for items in reformatted displays than for current displays. The significant format by highlight validity interaction showed that there was little difference in response time to both current and reformatted displays when the highlight validity was applied; however, under the non or invalid highlight conditions, search times were faster with reformatted displays. Benefits of highlighting and reformatting displays to enhance search and the necessity to consider highlight validity and format characteristics in tandem for predicting search performance are discussed.

  7. Isotropic Negative Thermal Expansion Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingling; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2016-07-13

    Negative thermal expansion materials are important and desirable in science and engineering applications. However, natural materials with isotropic negative thermal expansion are rare and usually unsatisfied in performance. Here, we propose a novel method to achieve two- and three-dimensional negative thermal expansion metamaterials via antichiral structures. The two-dimensional metamaterial is constructed with unit cells that combine bimaterial strips and antichiral structures, while the three-dimensional metamaterial is fabricated by a multimaterial 3D printing process. Both experimental and simulation results display isotropic negative thermal expansion property of the samples. The effective coefficient of negative thermal expansion of the proposed models is demonstrated to be dependent on the difference between the thermal expansion coefficient of the component materials, as well as on the circular node radius and the ligament length in the antichiral structures. The measured value of the linear negative thermal expansion coefficient of the three-dimensional sample is among the largest achieved in experiments to date. Our findings provide an easy and practical approach to obtaining materials with tunable negative thermal expansion on any scale.

  8. Flight-deck display of neighboring aircraft wake vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holforty, Wendy L.

    Over the coming decades, aviation operations are predicted to rise steadily, increasing the burden on already congested and constrained airspace. A major factor governing the safe minimum separation distance between aircraft is the hazard generated by the wake of neighboring aircraft. Unaware of their proximity to other traffic, aircraft have encountered the wake turbulence of neighboring aircraft tens of miles ahead of them with serious or fatal consequences. The wake display described herein is a perspective view, synthetic vision, flight deck display that enables flight crews to "see" neighboring aircraft, as well as their wakes via a predictive algorithm. Capable of enhancing the situational awareness with respect to the wake-vortex encounter hazard by enabling the flight crew to see the relative position of their aircraft with respect to the wake hazard, the display may allow for a decrease in the standard aircraft spacing to those now used in VFR conditions and an increase in airport and airspace capacity. At present, there is no mechanism in place in the National Airspace System that warns pilots of potential wake vortex encounters. The concept of a wake vortex display addresses the need for a real-time wake vortex avoidance scheme available directly to the pilot. The wake display has been evaluated under both simulated and actual flight conditions. Thirteen pilots with flight experience ranging from a student pilot to commercial airline and military pilots served as pilot test subjects evaluating the display under simulated conditions. The pilot test subjects completed a survey concerning their knowledge and understanding of wake vortices prior to the simulation data trials and, after the trials, they completed a pilot evaluation and postflight survey rating their experience and providing feedback for the display design. One test pilot and four guest pilots flew the display during the in-flight evaluations incorporating three wake encounter scenarios. They

  9. Effect of display location on control-display stereotype strength for translational and rotational controls with linear displays.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alan H S; Hoffmann, Errol R

    2015-01-01

    Experiments were designed to investigate the effects of control type and display location, relative to the operator, on the strength of control/display stereotypes. The Worringham and Beringer Visual Field principle and an extension of this principle for rotary controls (Hoffmann E.R., and Chan A.H.S. 2013). "The Worringham and Beringer 'Visual Field' Principle for Rotary Controls. Ergonomics." 56 (10): 1620-1624) indicated that, for a number of different control types (rotary and lever) on different planes, there should be no significant effect of the display location relative to the seated operator. Past data were surveyed and stereotype strengths listed. Experiments filled gaps where data are not available. Six different control types and seven display locations were used, as in the Frame of Reference Transformation Tool (FORT) model of Wickens et al. (Wickens, C.D., Keller, J.W., and Small, R.L. (2010). "Left. No, Right! Development of the Frame of Reference Transformation Tool (FORT)." Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 54th Annual Meeting September 2010, 54: 1022-1026). Control/display arrangements with high stereotype strengths were evaluated yielding data for designers of complex control/display arrangements where the control and display are in different planes and for where the operator is moving. It was found possible to predict display/control arrangements with high stereotype strength, based on past data. Practitioner Summary: Controls and displays in complex arrangements need to have high compatibility. These experiments provide arrangements for six different controls (rotary and translational) and seven different display locations relative to the operator.

  10. THERMAL REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal remediation is being proposed by Region I for remediation of the overburden soil and groundwater at the Solvent Recovery Services New England Superfund site. This presentation at the public meeting will acquaint area residents with thermal remediation. The two types of ...

  11. Thermal Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    central nervous system ; exertional heat stroke Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified 6 Lisa R. Leon 508-233-4862 Reset Thermal Stress...multiorgan system failure, and death. indicates stimulatory pathway, indicates inhibitor pathway. 336 Thermal Stressstress. Cardiovascular mechanisms have...clinically characterized by elevated core temperature (typically, but not always 440 1C), hot dry flushed skin, and central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction

  12. Thermal Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, Norman

    The role that a good thermal environment plays in the educational process is discussed. Design implications arise from an analysis of the heating and ventilating principles as apply to vocational-technical facilities. The importance of integrating thermal components in the total design is emphasized. (JS)

  13. THERMAL REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal remediation is being proposed by Region I for remediation of the overburden soil and groundwater at the Solvent Recovery Services New England Superfund site. This presentation at the public meeting will acquaint area residents with thermal remediation. The two types of ...

  14. Spatioangular Prefiltering for Multiview 3D Displays.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Vikas; Hirakawa, Keigo; Zwicker, Matthias; Nguyen, Truong

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the reproduction of light fields on multiview 3D displays. A three-way interaction between the input light field signal (which is often aliased), the joint spatioangular sampling grids of multiview 3D displays, and the interview light leakage in modern multiview 3D displays is characterized in the joint spatioangular frequency domain. Reconstruction of light fields by all physical 3D displays is prone to light leakage, which means that the reconstruction low-pass filter implemented by the display is too broad in the angular domain. As a result, 3D displays excessively attenuate angular frequencies. Our analysis shows that this reduces sharpness of the images shown in the 3D displays. In this paper, stereoscopic image recovery is recast as a problem of joint spatioangular signal reconstruction. The combination of the 3D display point spread function and human visual system provides the narrow-band low-pass filter which removes spectral replicas in the reconstructed light field on the multiview display. The nonideality of this filter is corrected with the proposed prefiltering. The proposed light field reconstruction method performs light field antialiasing as well as angular sharpening to compensate for the nonideal response of the 3D display. The union of cosets approach which has been used earlier by others is employed here to model the nonrectangular spatioangular sampling grids on a multiview display in a generic fashion. We confirm the effectiveness of our approach in simulation and in physical hardware, and demonstrate improvement over existing techniques.

  15. Military display market: fourth comprehensive edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.; Marasco, Peter L.; Byrd, James C.; Neubauer, Jon

    2006-05-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of all fully electronic and many electro-mechanical displays used on combat platforms across all DoD Services. The military market for displays is defined by parameters such as active area, bezel-to-bezel measurement and technology. Other characteristics such as luminance, contrast ratio, gray levels, resolution, viewing angle, color, video capability, and night vision imaging system compatibility are noted. This study takes into account all displays that are either installed or funded for installation. In some few cases, it also includes planned displays. Display sizes having aggregate defense applications of 5,000 units or greater and having DoD applications across 10 or more platform fleets, are tabulated. The issue of size commonality is addressed where distribution of active area across platform fleets, individually, in groups of two through nine, and ten or more, is illustrated. Military displays are also analyzed by technology, where total quantities of such displays are broken out into CRT, LCD, AMLCD, EM, LED, Incandescent, Plasma and TFEL percentages. Custom, versus Ruggedized Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (RCOTS), versus Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) designs are contrasted. High and low information content designs are identified. Displays for several high-profile military programs are discussed, to include both technical specifications and program history. Our defense-wide study as of February 2006 has documented 1,195 direct-view and 15 virtualview display sizes across 628 weapon system platforms for a total of 1,161,977 displays.

  16. Enhanced spatial-state feedback for night-vision goggle displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelder, Edward N.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1997-06-01

    in the NVG display. A significant decrease in instrument-scanning time was observed for both the overlay and cut-out displays compared to the NVG display, with pilots flying essentially head-out- of-cockpit while using the rate-cueing displays. Contrast was not observed to have a significant effect on hover performance in any of the displays.

  17. Three methods of presenting flight vector information in a head-up display during simulated STOL approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer, J. H., III; Palmer, E. A., III

    1975-01-01

    A simulator study was conducted to determine the usefulness of adding flight path vector symbology to a head-up display designed to improve glide-slope tracking performance during steep 7.5 deg visual approaches in STOL aircraft. All displays included a fixed attitude symbol, a pitch- and roll-stabilized horizon bar, and a glide-slope reference bar parallel to and 7.5 deg below the horizon bar. The displays differed with respect to the flight-path marker (FPM) symbol: display 1 had no FPM symbol; display 2 had an air-referenced FPM, and display 3 had a ground-referenced FPM. No differences between displays 1 and 2 were found on any of the performance measures. Display 3 was found to decrease height error in the early part of the approach and to reduce descent rate variation over the entire approach. Two measures of workload did not indicate any differences between the displays.

  18. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Cork, Christopher P.; Becker, John A.; Knapp, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  19. Decreasing trend of groundwater in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarachi, S.; Moghim, S.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2010-12-01

    In these days the increasing demand for water has created problems for availability of its resources. Some recent issues like population growth, global warming and inefficient methods of water consumption, generated the need to find sources of water other than surface water such as ground water. Excess using of groundwater in most parts of the world causes depletion of ground water in those areas. Scientists are trying to find efficient means to quantify these trends. GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) including two satellites launched in March 2002, is making measurements of the Earth's gravity field which is used to display the change of storage of the water on the Earth. GRACE makes it possible to find the trend of the change of storage all over the world.It can show specific areas in the world that have dramatic decreasing trend of water storage. One of these regions that have been considered in this study is Turkey in western Asia, as one of the countries deeply affected by global warming. Turkey is identified as one of the first places where desertification will start in Europe, according to estimates by the UN Environment Program (UNEP). Turkey has 25 underground water tables and they had a decrease in level of 27 meters in the past 25 years (Turkey water report 2009). In this paper the change of the ground water is evaluated by applying the GRACE storage anomalies and the mass conservation equation that concludes the reduction trend in groundwater. The results clarify that decreasing trend of groundwater is more noticeable during recent years, particularly since 2006. Our results show that in recent years the average decrease in ground water level is 2.5 cm per year and the maximum decrease occurred in May 2007 with the value of about 7.9 cm. KEY WORDS: water resources; Ground water; Turkey; GRACE

  20. Optimization of light field display-camera configuration based on display properties in spectral domain.

    PubMed

    Bregović, Robert; Kovács, Péter Tamás; Gotchev, Atanas

    2016-02-08

    The visualization capability of a light field display is uniquely determined by its angular and spatial resolution referred to as display passband. In this paper we use a multidimensional sampling model for describing the display-camera channel. Based on the model, for a given display passband, we propose a methodology for determining the optimal distribution of ray generators in a projection-based light field display. We also discuss the required camera setup that can provide data with the necessary amount of details for such display that maximizes the visual quality and minimizes the amount of data.

  1. Effects of display curvature, display zone, and task duration on legibility and visual fatigue during visual search task.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungryul; Choi, Donghee; Yi, Jihhyeon; Lee, Songil; Lee, Ja Eun; Choi, Byeonghwa; Lee, Seungbae; Kyung, Gyouhyung

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the effects of display curvature (400, 600, 1200 mm, and flat), display zone (5 zones), and task duration (15 and 30 min) on legibility and visual fatigue. Each participant completed two 15-min visual search task sets at each curvature setting. The 600-mm and 1200-mm settings yielded better results than the flat setting in terms of legibility and perceived visual fatigue. Relative to the corresponding centre zone, the outermost zones of the 1200-mm and flat settings showed a decrease of 8%-37% in legibility, whereas those of the flat setting showed an increase of 26%-45% in perceived visual fatigue. Across curvatures, legibility decreased by 2%-8%, whereas perceived visual fatigue increased by 22% during the second task set. The two task sets induced an increase of 102% in the eye complaint score and a decrease of 0.3 Hz in the critical fusion frequency, both of which indicated an increase in visual fatigue. In summary, a curvature of around 600 mm, central display zones, and frequent breaks are recommended to improve legibility and reduce visual fatigue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Epitope Mapping with Random Phage Display Library

    PubMed Central

    Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Goldblum, Randall M.

    2017-01-01

    Random phage display library is used to map conformational as well as linear epitopes. These libraries are available in varying lengths and with circularization. We provide here a protocol conveying our experience using a commercially available peptide phage display library, which in our hands provides good results. PMID:24515483

  3. 49 CFR 509.2 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Display. 509.2 Section 509.2 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OMB CONTROL NUMBERS FOR INFORMATION COLLECTION REQUIREMENTS § 509.2 Display. 49...

  4. 41 CFR 60-999.2 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Display. 60-999.2 Section 60-999.2 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... CONTROL NUMBERS FOR OFCCP INFORMATION COLLECTION REQUIREMENTS § 60-999.2 Display. 41 CFR Part where...

  5. 49 CFR 509.2 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Display. 509.2 Section 509.2 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OMB CONTROL NUMBERS FOR INFORMATION COLLECTION REQUIREMENTS § 509.2 Display. 49...

  6. 49 CFR 509.2 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Display. 509.2 Section 509.2 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OMB CONTROL NUMBERS FOR INFORMATION COLLECTION REQUIREMENTS § 509.2 Display. 49...

  7. 41 CFR 60-999.2 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Display. 60-999.2 Section 60-999.2 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... CONTROL NUMBERS FOR OFCCP INFORMATION COLLECTION REQUIREMENTS § 60-999.2 Display. 41 CFR Part where...

  8. 33 CFR 4.02 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Display. 4.02 Section 4.02 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL OMB CONTROL NUMBERS ASSIGNED PURSUANT TO THE PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT § 4.02 Display. 33 CFR part or section whereidentified...

  9. 41 CFR 60-999.2 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Display. 60-999.2 Section 60-999.2 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... CONTROL NUMBERS FOR OFCCP INFORMATION COLLECTION REQUIREMENTS § 60-999.2 Display. 41 CFR Part where...

  10. 49 CFR 509.2 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Display. 509.2 Section 509.2 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OMB CONTROL NUMBERS FOR INFORMATION COLLECTION REQUIREMENTS § 509.2 Display. 49...

  11. 41 CFR 60-999.2 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Display. 60-999.2 Section 60-999.2 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... CONTROL NUMBERS FOR OFCCP INFORMATION COLLECTION REQUIREMENTS § 60-999.2 Display. 41 CFR Part where...

  12. 33 CFR 4.02 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Display. 4.02 Section 4.02 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL OMB CONTROL NUMBERS ASSIGNED PURSUANT TO THE PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT § 4.02 Display. 33 CFR part or section where...

  13. 41 CFR 60-999.2 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Display. 60-999.2 Section 60-999.2 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... CONTROL NUMBERS FOR OFCCP INFORMATION COLLECTION REQUIREMENTS § 60-999.2 Display. 41 CFR Part where...

  14. 49 CFR 509.2 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Display. 509.2 Section 509.2 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OMB CONTROL NUMBERS FOR INFORMATION COLLECTION REQUIREMENTS § 509.2 Display. 49...

  15. 33 CFR 4.02 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Display. 4.02 Section 4.02 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL OMB CONTROL NUMBERS ASSIGNED PURSUANT TO THE PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT § 4.02 Display. 33 CFR part or section whereidentified...

  16. 33 CFR 4.02 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Display. 4.02 Section 4.02 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL OMB CONTROL NUMBERS ASSIGNED PURSUANT TO THE PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT § 4.02 Display. 33 CFR part or section where...

  17. 33 CFR 4.02 - Display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Display. 4.02 Section 4.02 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL OMB CONTROL NUMBERS ASSIGNED PURSUANT TO THE PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT § 4.02 Display. 33 CFR part or section whereidentified...

  18. Display Developer for Firing Room Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    The firing room at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is responsible for all NASA human spaceflight launch operations, therefore it is vital that all displays within the firing room be properly tested, up-to-date, and user-friendly during a launch. The Ground Main Propulsion System (GMPS) requires a number of remote displays for Vehicle Integration and Launch (VIL) Operations at KSC. My project is to develop remote displays for the GMPS using the Display Services and Framework (DSF) editor. These remote displays will be based on model images provided by GMPS through PowerPoint. Using the DSF editor, the PowerPoint images can be recreated with active buttons associated with the correct Compact Unique Identifiers (CUIs). These displays will be documented in the Software Requirements and Design Specifications (SRDS) at the 90% GMPS Design Review. In the future, these remote displays will be available for other developers to improve, edit, or add on to so that the display may be incorporated into the firing room to be used for launches.

  19. Recent progress in flexible OLED displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, Michael G.; Weaver, Michael S.; Mahon, Janice K.; Brown, Julie J.

    2001-09-01

    Organic light emitting device (OLED) technology has recently been shown to demonstrate excellent performance and cost characteristics for use in numerous flat panel display (FPD) applications. OLED displays emit bright, colorful light with excellent power efficiency, wide viewing angle and video response rates. OLEDs are also demonstrating the requisite environmental robustness for a wide variety of applications. OLED technology is also the first FPD technology with the potential to be highly functional and durable in a flexible format. The use of plastic and other flexible substrate materials offers numerous advantages over commonly used glass substrates, including impact resistance, light weight, thinness and conformability. Currently, OLED displays are being fabricated on rigid substrates, such as glass or silicon wafers. At Universal Display Corporation (UDC), we are developing a new class of flexible OLED displays (FOLEDs). These displays also have extremely low power consumption through the use of electrophosphorescent doped OLEDs. To commercialize FOLED technology, a number of technical issues related to packaging and display processing on flexible substrates need to be addressed. In this paper, we report on our recent results to demonstrate the key technologies that enable the manufacture of power efficient, long-life flexible OLED displays for commercial and military applications.

  20. Helmet-Mounted Liquid-Crystal Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steve; Plough, Alan; Clarke, Robert; Mclean, William; Fournier, Joseph; Marmolejo, Jose A.

    1991-01-01

    Helmet-mounted binocular display provides text and images for almost any wearer; does not require fitting for most users. Accommodates users from smallest interpupillary distance to largest. Two liquid-crystal display units mounted in helmet. Images generated seen from any position head can assume inside helmet. Eyes directed to position for best viewing.

  1. Introduction to the National Information Display Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Curtis R.

    1992-01-01

    The goals of the National Information Display Laboratory (NIDL) are described in viewgraph form. The NIDL is a Center of Excellence in softcopy technology with the overall goal to develop new ways to satisfy government information needs through aggressive user support and the development of advanced technology. Government/industry/academia participation, standards development, and various display technologies are addressed.

  2. Helmet-Mounted Liquid-Crystal Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steve; Plough, Alan; Clarke, Robert; Mclean, William; Fournier, Joseph; Marmolejo, Jose A.

    1991-01-01

    Helmet-mounted binocular display provides text and images for almost any wearer; does not require fitting for most users. Accommodates users from smallest interpupillary distance to largest. Two liquid-crystal display units mounted in helmet. Images generated seen from any position head can assume inside helmet. Eyes directed to position for best viewing.

  3. Presentation of Information on Visual Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettersson, Rune

    This discussion of factors involved in the presentation of text, numeric data, and/or visuals using video display devices describes in some detail the following types of presentation: (1) visual displays, with attention to additive color combination; measurements, including luminance, radiance, brightness, and lightness; and standards, with…

  4. A visual-display and storage device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosomworth, D. R.; Moles, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Memory and display device uses cathodochromic material to store visual information and fast phosphor to recall information for display and electronic processing. Cathodochromic material changes color when bombarded with electrons, and is restored to its original color when exposed to light of appropiate wavelength.

  5. Blood pressure measurement and display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farkas, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    System is described that employs solid state circuitry to transmit visual display of patient's blood pressure. Response of sphygmomanometer cuff and microphone provide input signals. Signals and their amplitudes, from turn-on time to turn-off time, are continuously fed to data transmitter which transmits to display device.

  6. Factors affecting dwell times on digital displaying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A. J.; Harris, R. L., Sr.

    1985-01-01

    A series of exploratory tests were conducted to investigate the effects of advanced display formats and display media on pilot scanning behavior using Langley's oculometer, a desktop flight simulator, a conventional electro-mechanical meter, and various digital displays. The primary task was for the test subject to maintain level flight, on a specific course heading, during moderate turbulence. A secondary task of manually controlling the readout of a display was used to examine the effects of the display format on a subject's scan behavior. Secondary task scan parameters that were evaluated were average dwell time, dwell time histograms, and number of dwells per meter change. The round dial meter demonstrated shorter dwell times and fewer dwells per meter change than the digital displays. The following factors affected digital display scanning behavior: (1) the number of digits; (2) the update rate of the digits; (3) the display media; and (4) the character font. The size of the digits used in these tests (0.28 to 0.50 inches) did not affect scan behavior measures.

  7. Developing three-dimensional display technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallas, William J.; Roehrig, Hans; Allen, Daniel J.

    2008-08-01

    Stereo, multi-perspective, and volumetric display technologies have made several recent gains. We are seeing increased availability of such systems for entertainment, both in theaters and for the home. The concurrent advent of medical imaging modalities that deliver very large data sets such as, spiral CT, high-field MRI, and 3-D ultrasound, makes renewed assessment of 3-D display of medical images attractive. We concentrate on autostereographic displays, those that are viewed without viewing aids such as special eye-glasses or goggles. We begin with a very brief review of a few stereo-display, multi-perspective, and volumetric display technologies. We focus our attention primarily on the integral display (ID) and the computer-generated hologram (CGH). We will examine the boost that ID has gotten from the availability of flat-panel displays with very high pixel counts. We also discuss some recent advances in CGH's included the emergence of rewritable holographic materials. We also look at one, undeveloped 3-D display technology: the Correlelogram.

  8. Microlaser-based three-dimensional display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Eric B.; Bergstedt, Robert; Hargis, David E.; Higley, Paul D.

    1999-08-01

    Three dimensional (3D) displays are critical for viewing complex multi-dimensional information and for viewing representations of the three dimensional real world. A teaming arrangement between Laser Power Corporation (LPC) and Specialty Devices, Inc. (SDI) has led to the feasibility demonstration of a directly-viewed three dimensional volumetric display. LPC has developed red, green, and blue (RGB) diode pumped solid state microlaser display technology for use as a high resolution, high brightness display engine for the three dimensional display. Concurrently, SDI has developed a unique technology for viewing high resolution three dimensional volumetric images without external viewing aids (eye wear). When coupled to LPC's display engine, the resultant all solid state three dimensional display presets a true, physical three dimensionality which is directly viewable from all angles by multiple viewers without additional viewing equipment (eye wear). The resultant volumetric display will further enable applications such as the 'virtual sandbox,' visualization of radar and sonar data, air traffic control, remote surgery and diagnostics, and CAD workstations.

  9. Methods for Selecting Phage Display Antibody Libraries.

    PubMed

    Jara-Acevedo, Ricardo; Diez, Paula; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Maria; Degano, Rosa Maria; Ibarrola, Nieves; Gongora, Rafael; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The selection process aims sequential enrichment of phage antibody display library in clones that recognize the target of interest or antigen as the library undergoes successive rounds of selection. In this review, selection methods most commonly used for phage display antibody libraries have been comprehensively described.

  10. Assessment of OLED displays for vision research

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Emily A.; Jiang, Haomiao; Vildavski, Vladimir; Farrell, Joyce E.; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    Vision researchers rely on visual display technology for the presentation of stimuli to human and nonhuman observers. Verifying that the desired and displayed visual patterns match along dimensions such as luminance, spectrum, and spatial and temporal frequency is an essential part of developing controlled experiments. With cathode-ray tubes (CRTs) becoming virtually unavailable on the commercial market, it is useful to determine the characteristics of newly available displays based on organic light emitting diode (OLED) panels to determine how well they may serve to produce visual stimuli. This report describes a series of measurements summarizing the properties of images displayed on two commercially available OLED displays: the Sony Trimaster EL BVM-F250 and PVM-2541. The results show that the OLED displays have large contrast ratios, wide color gamuts, and precise, well-behaved temporal responses. Correct adjustment of the settings on both models produced luminance nonlinearities that were well predicted by a power function (“gamma correction”). Both displays have adjustable pixel independence and can be set to have little to no spatial pixel interactions. OLED displays appear to be a suitable, or even preferable, option for many vision research applications. PMID:24155345

  11. Assessment of OLED displays for vision research.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Emily A; Jiang, Haomiao; Vildavski, Vladimir; Farrell, Joyce E; Norcia, Anthony M

    2013-10-23

    Vision researchers rely on visual display technology for the presentation of stimuli to human and nonhuman observers. Verifying that the desired and displayed visual patterns match along dimensions such as luminance, spectrum, and spatial and temporal frequency is an essential part of developing controlled experiments. With cathode-ray tubes (CRTs) becoming virtually unavailable on the commercial market, it is useful to determine the characteristics of newly available displays based on organic light emitting diode (OLED) panels to determine how well they may serve to produce visual stimuli. This report describes a series of measurements summarizing the properties of images displayed on two commercially available OLED displays: the Sony Trimaster EL BVM-F250 and PVM-2541. The results show that the OLED displays have large contrast ratios, wide color gamuts, and precise, well-behaved temporal responses. Correct adjustment of the settings on both models produced luminance nonlinearities that were well predicted by a power function ("gamma correction"). Both displays have adjustable pixel independence and can be set to have little to no spatial pixel interactions. OLED displays appear to be a suitable, or even preferable, option for many vision research applications.

  12. Handling qualities effects of display latency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Display latency is the time delay between aircraft response and the corresponding response of the cockpit displays. Currently, there is no explicit specification for allowable display lags to ensure acceptable aircraft handling qualities in instrument flight conditions. This paper examines the handling qualities effects of display latency between 70 and 400 milliseconds for precision instrument flight tasks of the V-22 Tiltrotor aircraft. Display delay effects on the pilot control loop are analytically predicted through a second order pilot crossover model of the V-22 lateral axis, and handling qualities trends are evaluated through a series of fixed-base piloted simulation tests. The results show that the effects of display latency for flight path tracking tasks are driven by the stability characteristics of the attitude control loop. The data indicate that the loss of control damping due to latency can be simply predicted from knowledge of the aircraft's stability margins, control system lags, and required control bandwidths. Based on the relationship between attitude control damping and handling qualities ratings, latency design guidelines are presented. In addition, this paper presents a design philosophy, supported by simulation data, for using flight director display augmentation to suppress the effects of display latency for delays up to 300 milliseconds.

  13. Imager displays free fall in stop action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Microprocessor-controlled imaging system displays sequence of "frozen" images of free-falling object, using video cameras positioned along fall. Strobe lights flash as object passes each camera's viewfield. Sequence stored on video disk and displayed on television monitor is stop-action record of fall dynamics. With modification, system monitiors other high speed phenomena.

  14. LED display for solo aircraft instrument navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Kelly, W. L., VI; Lina, L. J.; Meredith, B. D.

    1979-01-01

    Solo pilot's task is made easier through convenient display of landing and navigation data. Use of display shows promise as more efficient means of presenting sequential instructions and data, such as course heading, altitude, and radio frequency, to minimize pilot's workload during solo instrument flight.

  15. LED display for solo aircraft instrument navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Kelly, W. L., VI; Lina, L. J.; Meredith, B. D.

    1979-01-01

    Solo pilot's task is made easier through convenient display of landing and navigation data. Use of display shows promise as more efficient means of presenting sequential instructions and data, such as course heading, altitude, and radio frequency, to minimize pilot's workload during solo instrument flight.

  16. Geosyncronous imager thermal balance test and thermal model modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bingting; Dong, Yaohai; Wang, Ganquan; Jiang, Shichen

    2014-11-01

    The multi-channel scanning imager is one of the main payloads of a Geostationary earth orbit satellite of China, which observe multi spectrum from earth. Passive thermal control was applied to decrease temperature rise when solar intrusion at midnight, and heat compensation was made to decrease thermal fluctuation in one orbit. Effort was focused on the scanning mechanism for its relatively strict temperature gradient requirement. In order to validate thermal control scheme, thermal balance experiment scheme was planned. Considering the complexity of solar heat flux into sunshade, solar simulator was used to precisely simulate the heat flux variation. Limited to the dimension of vacuum chamber and solar simulator lamp, only the flux into sunshade was simulated by solar simulator, and other parts was simulated by electrical heaters. The solar illuminated region was analysed in order to keep the total heat flux correct. Detailed test process was figured out to carry out two kinds of heat flux simulation. Date were acquired and compared to thermal analysis. Based on experiment condition, thermal model was constructed and modified. From analysis of all the effecting factors, it is find that thermal contact resistance between heatpipes and heat dissipating plate can largely effect the temperature of scanning mechanism. Thermal model of scanning mechanism was detailly constructed including features effecting heat flux absorption and temperature distribution. After modification, the prediction ability of thermal model was enhanced. And optimization of thermal design was made to decrease temperature level and gradient of scanning mechanism. Thermal analyse was done to estimate the optimization, and its effectiveness was validated.

  17. Display-management system for MFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.O.

    1981-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is controlled by 65 local control microcomputers which are supervised by a local network of nine 32-bit minicomputers. Associated with seven of the nine computers are state-of-the-art graphics devices, each with extensive local processing capability. These devices provide the means for an operator to interact with the control software running on the minicomputers. It is critical that the information the operator views accurately reflects the current state of the experiment. This information is integrated into dynamically changing pictures called displays. The primary organizational component of the display system is the software-addressable segment. The segments created by the display creation software are managed by display managers associated with each graphics device. Each display manager uses sophisticated storage management mechanisms to keep the proper segments resident in the local graphics device storage.

  18. A Centralized Display for Mission Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    2004-01-01

    Humans traditionally experience a vigilance decrement over extended periods of time on reliable systems. One possible solution to aiding operators in monitoring is to use polar-star displays that will show deviations from normal in a more salient manner. The primary objectives of this experiment were to determine if polar-star displays aid in monitoring and preliminary diagnosis of the aircraft state. This experiment indicated that the polar-star display does indeed aid operators in detecting and diagnosing system events. Subjects were able to notice system events earlier and they subjectively reported the polar-star display helped them in monitoring, noticing an event, and diagnosing an event. Therefore, these results indicate that the polar-star display used for monitoring and preliminary diagnosis improves performance in these areas for system related events.

  19. Real time speech formant analyzer and display

    DOEpatents

    Holland, George E.; Struve, Walter S.; Homer, John F.

    1987-01-01

    A speech analyzer for interpretation of sound includes a sound input which converts the sound into a signal representing the sound. The signal is passed through a plurality of frequency pass filters to derive a plurality of frequency formants. These formants are converted to voltage signals by frequency-to-voltage converters and then are prepared for visual display in continuous real time. Parameters from the inputted sound are also derived and displayed. The display may then be interpreted by the user. The preferred embodiment includes a microprocessor which is interfaced with a television set for displaying of the sound formants. The microprocessor software enables the sound analyzer to present a variety of display modes for interpretive and therapeutic used by the user.

  20. Generating Animated Displays of Spacecraft Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candey, Robert M.; Chimiak, Reine A.; Harris, Bernard T.

    2005-01-01

    Tool for Interactive Plotting, Sonification, and 3D Orbit Display (TIPSOD) is a computer program for generating interactive, animated, four-dimensional (space and time) displays of spacecraft orbits. TIPSOD utilizes the programming interface of the Satellite Situation Center Web (SSCWeb) services to communicate with the SSC logic and database by use of the open protocols of the Internet. TIPSOD is implemented in Java 3D and effects an extension of the preexisting SSCWeb two-dimensional static graphical displays of orbits. Orbits can be displayed in any or all of the following seven reference systems: true-of-date (an inertial system), J2000 (another inertial system), geographic, geomagnetic, geocentric solar ecliptic, geocentric solar magnetospheric, and solar magnetic. In addition to orbits, TIPSOD computes and displays Sibeck's magnetopause and Fairfield's bow-shock surfaces. TIPSOD can be used by the scientific community as a means of projection or interpretation. It also has potential as an educational tool.