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Sample records for disrupts apical junctional

  1. Cyclic stretch disrupts apical junctional complexes in Caco-2 cell monolayers by a JNK-2-, c-Src-, and MLCK-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Samak, Geetha; Gangwar, Ruchika; Crosby, Lynn M.; Desai, Leena P.; Wilhelm, Kristina; Waters, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is subjected to various types of mechanical stress. In this study, we investigated the impact of cyclic stretch on tight junction and adherens junction integrity in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Stretch for 2 h resulted in a dramatic modulation of tight junction protein distribution from a linear organization into wavy structure. Continuation of cyclic stretch for 6 h led to redistribution of tight junction proteins from the intercellular junctions into the intracellular compartment. Disruption of tight junctions was associated with redistribution of adherens junction proteins, E-cadherin and β-catenin, and dissociation of the actin cytoskeleton at the actomyosin belt. Stretch activates JNK2, c-Src, and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK). Inhibition of JNK, Src kinase or MLCK activity and knockdown of JNK2 or c-Src attenuated stretch-induced disruption of tight junctions, adherens junctions, and actin cytoskeleton. Paracellular permeability measured by a novel method demonstrated that cyclic stretch increases paracellular permeability by a JNK, Src kinase, and MLCK-dependent mechanism. Stretch increased tyrosine phosphorylation of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin, and β-catenin. Inhibition of JNK or Src kinase attenuated stretch-induced occludin phosphorylation. Immunofluorescence localization indicated that phospho-MLC colocalizes with the vesicle-like actin structure at the actomyosin belt in stretched cells. On the other hand, phospho-c-Src colocalizes with the actin at the apical region of cells. This study demonstrates that cyclic stretch disrupts tight junctions and adherens junctions by a JNK2, c-Src, and MLCK-dependent mechanism. PMID:24722904

  2. Microtubules regulate disassembly of epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I; McCall, Ingrid C; Babbin, Brian; Samarin, Stanislav N; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    Background Epithelial tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) form the apical junctional complex (AJC) which regulates cell-cell adhesion, paracellular permeability and cell polarity. The AJC is anchored on cytoskeletal structures including actin microfilaments and microtubules. Such cytoskeletal interactions are thought to be important for the assembly and remodeling of apical junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of microtubules in disassembly of the AJC in intestinal epithelial cells using a model of extracellular calcium depletion. Results Calcium depletion resulted in disruption and internalization of epithelial TJs and AJs along with reorganization of perijunctional F-actin into contractile rings. Microtubules reorganized into dense plaques positioned inside such F-actin rings. Depolymerization of microtubules with nocodazole prevented junctional disassembly and F-actin ring formation. Stabilization of microtubules with either docetaxel or pacitaxel blocked contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated internalization of junctional proteins into a subapical cytosolic compartment. Likewise, pharmacological inhibition of microtubule motors, kinesins, prevented contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated disassembly of apical junctions. Kinesin-1 was enriched at the AJC in cultured epithelial cells and it also accumulated at epithelial cell-cell contacts in normal human colonic mucosa. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated association of kinesin-1 with the E-cadherin-catenin complex. Conclusion Our data suggest that microtubules play a role in disassembly of the AJC during calcium depletion by regulating formation of contractile F-actin rings and internalization of AJ/TJ proteins. PMID:16509970

  3. Glutamine Supplementation Attenuates Ethanol-Induced Disruption of Apical Junctional Complexes in Colonic Epithelium and Ameliorates Gut Barrier Dysfunction and Fatty Liver in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K.; Shukla, Pradeep K.; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of glutamine in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury. PMID:26365579

  4. Glutamine supplementation attenuates ethanol-induced disruption of apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and ameliorates gut barrier dysfunction and fatty liver in mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Shukla, Pradeep K; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of Gln in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed with Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed with Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury.

  5. Neisseria gonorrhoeae breaches the apical junction of polarized epithelial cells for transmigration by activating EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Vonetta L.; Wang, Liang-Chun; Dawson, Valerie; Stein, Daniel C.; Song, Wenxia

    2017-01-01

    Summary Neisseria gonorrhoeae initiates infection at the apical surface of columnar endocervical epithelial cells in the female reproductive tract. These cells provide a physical barrier against pathogens by forming continuous apical junctional complexes between neighbouring cells. This study examines the interaction of gonococci (GC) with polarized epithelial cells. We show that viable GC preferentially localize at the apical side of the cell–cell junction in polarized endometrial and colonic epithelial cells, HEC-1-B and T84. In GC-infected cells, continuous apical junctional complexes are disrupted, and the junction-associated protein β-catenin is redistributed from the apical junction to the cytoplasm and to GC adherent sites; however, overall cellular levels remain unchanged. This redistribution of junctional proteins is associated with a decrease in the ‘fence’ function of the apical junction but not its ‘gate’ function. Disruption of the apical junction by removing calcium increases GC transmigration across the epithelial monolayer. GC inoculation induces the phosphorylation of both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and β-catenin, while inhibition of EGFR kinase activity significantly reduces both GC-induced β-catenin redistribution and GC transmigration. Therefore, the gonococcus is capable of weakening the apical junction and polarity of epithelial cells by activating EGFR, which facilitates GC transmigration across the epithelium. PMID:23279089

  6. Neisseria gonorrhoeae breaches the apical junction of polarized epithelial cells for transmigration by activating EGFR.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Vonetta L; Wang, Liang-Chun; Dawson, Valerie; Stein, Daniel C; Song, Wenxia

    2013-06-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae initiates infection at the apical surface of columnar endocervical epithelial cells in the female reproductive tract. These cells provide a physical barrier against pathogens by forming continuous apical junctional complexes between neighbouring cells. This study examines the interaction of gonococci (GC) with polarized epithelial cells. We show that viable GC preferentially localize at the apical side of the cell-cell junction in polarized endometrial and colonic epithelial cells, HEC-1-B and T84. In GC-infected cells, continuous apical junctional complexes are disrupted, and the junction-associated protein β-catenin is redistributed from the apical junction to the cytoplasm and to GC adherent sites; however, overall cellular levels remain unchanged. This redistribution of junctional proteins is associated with a decrease in the 'fence' function of the apical junction but not its 'gate' function. Disruption of the apical junction by removing calcium increases GC transmigration across the epithelial monolayer. GC inoculation induces the phosphorylation of both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and β-catenin, while inhibition of EGFR kinase activity significantly reduces both GC-induced β-catenin redistribution and GC transmigration. Therefore, the gonococcus is capable of weakening the apical junction and polarity of epithelial cells by activating EGFR, which facilitates GC transmigration across the epithelium.

  7. Virus interaction with the apical junctional complex.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Mariscal, Lorenza; Garay, Erika; Lechuga, Susana

    2009-01-01

    In order to infect pathogens must breach the epithelial barriers that separate the organism from the external environment or that cover the internal cavities and ducts of the body. Epithelia seal the passage through the paracellular pathway with the apical junctional complex integrated by tight and adherens junctions. In this review we describe how viruses like coxsackie, swine vesicular disease virus, adenovirus, reovirus, feline calcivirus, herpes viruses 1 and 2, pseudorabies, bovine herpes virus 1, poliovirus and hepatitis C use as cellular receptors integral proteins present at the AJC of epithelial cells. Interaction with these proteins contributes in a significant manner in defining the particular tropism of each virus. Besides these proteins, viruses exhibit a wide range of cellular co-receptors among which proteins present in the basolateral cell surface like integrins are often found. Therefore targeting proteins of the AJC constitutes a strategy that might allow viruses to bypass the physical barrier that blocks their access to receptors expressed on the basolateral surface of epithelial cells.

  8. Dbl3 drives Cdc42 signaling at the apical margin to regulate junction position and apical differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zihni, Ceniz; Munro, Peter M.G.; Elbediwy, Ahmed; Keep, Nicholas H.; Terry, Stephen J.; Harris, John

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells develop morphologically characteristic apical domains that are bordered by tight junctions, the apical–lateral border. Cdc42 and its effector complex Par6–atypical protein kinase c (aPKC) regulate multiple steps during epithelial differentiation, but the mechanisms that mediate process-specific activation of Cdc42 to drive apical morphogenesis and activate the transition from junction formation to apical differentiation are poorly understood. Using a small interfering RNA screen, we identify Dbl3 as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is recruited by ezrin to the apical membrane, that is enriched at a marginal zone apical to tight junctions, and that drives spatially restricted Cdc42 activation, promoting apical differentiation. Dbl3 depletion did not affect junction formation but did affect epithelial morphogenesis and brush border formation. Conversely, expression of active Dbl3 drove process-specific activation of the Par6–aPKC pathway, stimulating the transition from junction formation to apical differentiation and domain expansion, as well as the positioning of tight junctions. Thus, Dbl3 drives Cdc42 signaling at the apical margin to regulate morphogenesis, apical–lateral border positioning, and apical differentiation. PMID:24379416

  9. Breaking into the epithelial apical-junctional complex--news from pathogen hackers.

    PubMed

    Vogelmann, Roger; Amieva, Manuel R; Falkow, Stanley; Nelson, W James

    2004-02-01

    The epithelial apical-junctional complex is a key regulator of cellular functions. In addition, it is an important target for microbial pathogens that manipulate the cell to survive, proliferate and sometimes persist within a host. Out of a myriad of potential molecular targets, some bacterial and viral pathogens have selected a subset of protein targets at the apical-junctional complex of epithelial cells. Studying how microbes use these targets also teaches us about the inherent physiological properties of host molecules in the context of normal junctional structure and function. Thus, we have learned that three recently uncovered components of the apical-junctional complex of the Ig superfamily--junctional adhesion molecule, Nectin and the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor--are important regulators of junction structure and function and represent critical targets of microbial virulence gene products.

  10. RhoGTPases, actomyosin signaling and regulation of the epithelial Apical Junctional Complex.

    PubMed

    Quiros, Miguel; Nusrat, Asma

    2014-12-01

    Epithelial cells form regulated and selective barriers between distinct tissue compartments. The Apical Junctional Complex (AJC) consisting of the tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) control epithelial homeostasis, paracellular permeability and barrier properties. The AJC is composed of mutliprotein complexes consisting of transmembrane proteins that affiliate with an underlying perijunctional F-actin myosin ring through cytoplasmic scaffold proteins. AJC protein associations with the apical actin-myosin cytoskeleton are tightly controlled by a number of signaling proteins including the Rho family of GTPases that orchestrate junctional biology, epithelial homeostasis and barrier function. This review highlights the vital relationship of Rho GTPases and AJCs in controlling the epithelial barrier. The pathophysiologic relationship of Rho GTPases, AJC, apical actomyosin cytoskeleton and epithelial barrier function is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adherens junctions determine the apical position of the midbody during follicular epithelial cell division.

    PubMed

    Morais-de-Sá, Eurico; Sunkel, Claudio

    2013-08-01

    Cytokinesis is asymmetric along the apical-basal axis of epithelial cells, positioning the midbody near the apical domain. However, little is known about the mechanism and purpose of this asymmetry. We use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cell division to show that asymmetric cytokinesis does not result from intrinsic polarization of the main contractile ring components. We show that adherens junctions (AJs) maintain close contact with the apical side of the contractile ring during cytokinesis. Asymmetric distribution of AJ components within follicle cells and in the otherwise unpolarized S2 cells is sufficient to recruit the midbody, revealing that asymmetric cytokinesis is determined by apical AJs in the epithelia. We further show that ectopic midbody localization induces epithelial invaginations, shifting the position of the apical interface between daughter cells relative to the AB axis of the tissue. Thus, apical midbody localization is essential to maintain epithelial tissue architecture during proliferation.

  12. Differential regulation of the Hippo pathway by adherens junctions and apical-basal cell polarity modules.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Graves, Hillary K; Moya, Ivan M; Tao, Chunyao; Hamaratoglu, Fisun; Gladden, Andrew B; Halder, Georg

    2015-02-10

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and cell polarity complexes are key players in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal cell polarity. Loss of AJs or basolateral polarity components promotes tumor formation and metastasis. Recent studies in vertebrate models show that loss of AJs or loss of the basolateral component Scribble (Scrib) cause deregulation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and hyperactivation of its downstream effectors Yes-associated protein (YAP) and Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ). However, whether AJs and Scrib act through the same or independent mechanisms to regulate Hippo pathway activity is not known. Here, we dissect how disruption of AJs or loss of basolateral components affect the activity of the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie (Yki) during imaginal disc development. Surprisingly, disruption of AJs and loss of basolateral proteins produced very different effects on Yki activity. Yki activity was cell-autonomously decreased but non-cell-autonomously elevated in tissues where the AJ components E-cadherin (E-cad) or α-catenin (α-cat) were knocked down. In contrast, scrib knockdown caused a predominantly cell-autonomous activation of Yki. Moreover, disruption of AJs or basolateral proteins had different effects on cell polarity and tissue size. Simultaneous knockdown of α-cat and scrib induced both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous Yki activity. In mammalian cells, knockdown of E-cad or α-cat caused nuclear accumulation and activation of YAP without overt effects on Scrib localization and vice versa. Therefore, our results indicate the existence of multiple, genetically separable inputs from AJs and cell polarity complexes into Yki/YAP regulation.

  13. EVALUATION OF THE APICAL INFILTRATION AFTER ROOT CANAL DISRUPTION AND OBTURATION

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, João Eduardo; Hopp, Renato Nicolás; Bernabé, Pedro Felício Estrada; Nery, Mauro Juvenal; Otoboni, José Arlindo; Dezan, Elói

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two root canal filling techniques used in teeth that had their apical foramen disrupted and compare the apical infiltration with an ideal clinical situation. Twenty-seven freshly extracted single-rooted teeth were selected and radiographed to confirm the existence of a single and straight root canal. The crowns were removed at a mean distance of 11 mm from the apex. The teeth had the root canals instrumented and were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=9): ND group - root canals were filled using the lateral compaction technique and no disruption was performed; DRF group - the apical constriction was disrupted by advancing a #40 K-file 1 mm beyond the original working length, the canals were reinstrumented to create an apical ledge at 1 mm from the apical foramen and were obturated with a master gutta-percha cone with same size as the last file used for reinstrumentation; DF group - the teeth had the apical constriction disrupted and the canals were obturated with a master gutta-percha cone that fit at 1 mm from the apex. The teeth were submitted to dye leakage test with Rhodamine B for 7 days, using vaccum on the initial 5 min. The teeth were sectioned longitudinally and the leakage was measured in a linear fashion from apex to crown. There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) between the groups that had the apical foramen disrupted (DF, DRF), but significant difference was found between the disrupted groups and the non-disrupted one (p<0.01). In conclusion, none of the evaluated techniques was able to prevent apical infiltration, so working length so the working length determination has to be established and maintained carefully. PMID:19089232

  14. NMII forms a contractile transcellular sarcomeric network to regulate apical cell junctions and tissue geometry.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Seham; Fujita, Tomoki; Millis, Bryan A; Kozin, Elliott; Ma, Xuefei; Kawamoto, Sachiyo; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hisa, Yasuo; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S; Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Kachar, Bechara

    2013-04-22

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) is thought to be the master integrator of force within epithelial apical junctions, mediating epithelial tissue morphogenesis and tensional homeostasis. Mutations in NMII are associated with a number of diseases due to failures in cell-cell adhesion. However, the organization and the precise mechanism by which NMII generates and responds to tension along the intercellular junctional line are still not known. We discovered that periodic assemblies of bipolar NMII filaments interlace with perijunctional actin and α-actinin to form a continuous belt of muscle-like sarcomeric units (∼400-600 nm) around each epithelial cell. Remarkably, the sarcomeres of adjacent cells are precisely paired across the junctional line, forming an integrated, transcellular contractile network. The contraction/relaxation of paired sarcomeres concomitantly impacts changes in apical cell shape and tissue geometry. We show differential distribution of NMII isoforms across heterotypic junctions and evidence for compensation between isoforms. Our results provide a model for how NMII force generation is effected along the junctional perimeter of each cell and communicated across neighboring cells in the epithelial organization. The sarcomeric network also provides a well-defined target to investigate the multiple roles of NMII in junctional homeostasis as well as in development and disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid induces protein kinase D-dependent disassembly of apical junctions and barrier dysfunction in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Fariba; Meednu, Nida; Emo, Jason A; Saatian, Bahman; Chapman, Timothy J; Naydenov, Nayden G; De Benedetto, Anna; Beck, Lisa A; Ivanov, Andrei I; Georas, Steve N

    2011-12-01

    Disruption of the epithelial barrier might be a risk factor for allergen sensitization and asthma. Viral respiratory tract infections are strongly associated with asthma exacerbation, but the effects of respiratory viruses on airway epithelial barrier function are not well understood. Many viruses generate double-stranded RNA, which can lead to airway inflammation and initiate an antiviral immune response. We investigated the effects of the synthetic double-stranded RNA polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (polyI:C) on the structure and function of the airway epithelial barrier in vitro. 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells and primary airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface were grown to confluence on Transwell inserts and exposed to polyI:C. We studied epithelial barrier function by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance and paracellular flux of fluorescent markers and structure of epithelial apical junctions by means of immunofluorescence microscopy. PolyI:C induced a profound decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and increase in paracellular permeability. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed markedly reduced junctional localization of zonula occludens-1, occludin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and disorganization of junction-associated actin filaments. PolyI:C induced protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylation, and a PKD antagonist attenuated polyI:C-induced disassembly of apical junctions and barrier dysfunction. PolyI:C has a powerful and previously unsuspected disruptive effect on the airway epithelial barrier. PolyI:C-dependent barrier disruption is mediated by disassembly of epithelial apical junctions, which is dependent on PKD signaling. These findings suggest a new mechanism potentially underlying the associations between viral respiratory tract infections, airway inflammation, and allergen sensitization. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid induces protein kinase D–dependent disassembly of apical junctions and barrier dysfunction in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Fariba; Meednu, Nida; Emo, Jason A.; Saatian, Bahman; Chapman, Timothy J.; Naydenov, Nayden G.; De Benedetto, Anna; Beck, Lisa A.; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Georas, Steve N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Disruption of the epithelial barrier might be a risk factor for allergen sensitization and asthma. Viral respiratory tract infections are strongly associated with asthma exacerbation, but the effects of respiratory viruses on airway epithelial barrier function are not well understood. Many viruses generate double-stranded RNA, which can lead to airway inflammation and initiate an antiviral immune response. Objectives We investigated the effects of the synthetic double-stranded RNA polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (polyI:C) on the structure and function of the airway epithelial barrier in vitro. Methods 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells and primary airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface were grown to confluence on Transwell inserts and exposed to polyI:C. We studied epithelial barrier function by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance and paracellular flux of fluorescent markers and structure of epithelial apical junctions by means of immunofluorescence microscopy. Results PolyI:C induced a profound decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and increase in paracellular permeability. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed markedly reduced junctional localization of zonula occludens-1, occludin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and disorganization of junction-associated actin filaments. PolyI:C induced protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylation, and a PKD antagonist attenuated polyI:C-induced disassembly of apical junctions and barrier dysfunction. Conclusions PolyI:C has a powerful and previously unsuspected disruptive effect on the airway epithelial barrier. PolyI:C-dependent barrier disruption is mediated by disassembly of epithelial apical junctions, which is dependent on PKD signaling. These findings suggest a new mechanism potentially underlying the associations between viral respiratory tract infections, airway inflammation, and allergen sensitization. PMID:21996340

  17. A novel adhering junction in the apical ciliary apparatus of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis (Rotifera, Monogononta).

    PubMed

    Dallai, R; Lupetti, P; Lane, N J

    1996-10-01

    Cultures of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis were examined with regard to their interepithelial junctions after infiltration with the extracellular tracer lanthanum, freeze-fracturing or quick-freeze deep-etching. The lateral borders between ciliated cells have an unusual apical adhering junction. This apical part of their intercellular cleft looks desmosome-like, but it is characterized by unusual intramembranous E-face clusters of particles. Deep-etching reveals that these are packed together in short rows which lie parallel to one another in orderly arrays. The true membrane surface in these areas features filaments in the form of short ribbons; these are produced by projections, possibly part of the glycocalyx, emerging from the membranes, between which the electron-dense tracer lanthanum permeates. These projections appear to overlap with each other in the centre of the intercellular cleft; this would provide a particularly flexible adaptation to maintain cell-cell contact and coordination as a consequence. The filamentous ribbons may be held in position by the intramembranous particle arrays since both have a similar size and distribution. These contacts are quite different from desmosomes and appear to represent a distinct new category of adhesive cell-cell junction. Beneath these novel structures, conventional pleated septate junctions are found, exhibiting the undulating intercellular ribbons typical of this junctional type, as well as the usual parallel alignments of intramembranous rows of EF grooves and PF particles. Below these are found gap junctions as close-packed plaques of intramembranous particles on either the P-face or E-face. After freeze-fracturing, the complementary fracture face to the particles shows pits, usually on the P-face, arrayed with a very precise hexagonal pattern.

  18. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Somesh

    2015-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25792565

  19. Phosphatidylcholine passes through lateral tight junctions for paracellular transport to the apical side of the polarized intestinal tumor cell-line CaCo2.

    PubMed

    Stremmel, Wolfgang; Staffer, Simone; Gan-Schreier, Hongying; Wannhoff, Andreas; Bach, Margund; Gauss, Annika

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant phospholipid in intestinal mucus, indicative of a specific transport system across the mucosal epithelium to the intestinal lumen. To elucidate this transport mechanism, we employed a transwell tissue culture system with polarized CaCo2 cells. It was shown that PC could not substantially be internalized by the cells. However, after basal application of increasing PC concentrations, an apical transport of 47.1±6.3nmolh(-1)mMPC(-1) was observed. Equilibrium distribution studies with PC applied in equal concentrations to the basal and apical compartments showed a 1.5-fold accumulation on the expense of basal PC. Disruption of tight junctions (TJ) by acetaldehyde or PPARγ inhibitors or by treatment with siRNA to TJ proteins suppressed paracellular transport by at least 50%. Transport was specific for the choline containing the phospholipids PC, lysoPC and sphingomyelin. We showed that translocation is driven by an electrochemical gradient generated by apical accumulation of Cl(-) and HCO3(-) through CFTR. Pretreatment with siRNA to mucin 3 which anchors in the apical plasma membrane of mucosal cells inhibited the final step of luminal PC secretion. PC accumulates in intestinal mucus using a paracellular, apically directed transport route across TJs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Arp2/3 promotes junction formation and maintenance in the Caenorhabditis elegans intestine by regulating membrane association of apical proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bernadskaya, Yelena Y.; Patel, Falshruti B.; Hsu, Hsiao-Ting; Soto, Martha C.

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that Arp2/3, which promotes nucleation of branched actin, is needed for epithelial junction initiation but is less important as junctions mature. We focus here on how Arp2/3 contributes to the Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal epithelium and find important roles for Arp2/3 in the maturation and maintenance of junctions in embryos and adults. Electron microscope studies show that embryos depleted of Arp2/3 form apical actin-rich microvilli and electron-dense apical junctions. However, whereas apical/basal polarity initiates, apical maturation is defective, including decreased apical F-actin enrichment, aberrant lumen morphology, and reduced accumulation of some apical junctional proteins, including DLG-1. Depletion of Arp2/3 in adult animals leads to similar intestinal defects. The DLG-1/AJM-1 apical junction proteins, and the ezrin–radixin–moesin homologue ERM-1, a protein that connects F-actin to membranes, are required along with Arp2/3 for apical F-actin enrichment in embryos, whereas cadherin junction proteins are not. Arp2/3 affects the subcellular distribution of DLG-1 and ERM-1. Loss of Arp2/3 shifts both ERM-1 and DLG-1 from pellet fractions to supernatant fractions, suggesting a role for Arp2/3 in the distribution of membrane-associated proteins. Thus, Arp2/3 is required as junctions mature to maintain apical proteins associated with the correct membranes. PMID:21697505

  1. Overexpressed miRNA-155 dysregulates intestinal epithelial apical junctional complex in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Rui; Wang, Rui-Lan; Xie, Hui; Jin, Wei; Yu, Kang-Long

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether miRNA-155 (miR-155) dysregulates apical junctional complex (AJC) protein expression in experimental severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Twenty-four male BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to two groups: the SAP group (n = 12) receiving sequential intraperitoneal injection of 50 µg/kg caerulein and 10 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide over 6 h, and the control group (n = 12) receiving intraperitoneal injection of normal saline. Animals were sacrificed 3 h following the last injection for collection of blood samples and pancreas and distal ileal segment specimens. Routine pancreas and intestine histology was used to assess SAP pathology and intestinal epithelial barrier damage. Levels of serum amylase, diamine oxidase (DAO), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were determined using commercial kits. Total RNA samples were isolated from intestinal epithelial specimens and reversely transcribed into cDNA. miR-155 and RhoA mRNA expression profiles were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Target genes for miR-155 were predicted using the miRTarBase database, RNA22 and PicTar computational methods. Western blotting was performed to quantitate the protein expression levels of the target gene RhoA, as well as zonula occludens (ZO)-1 and E-cadherin, two AJC component proteins. RESULTS: Intraperitoneal injection of caerulein and lipopolysaccharide successfully induced experimental acute pancreatic damage (SAP vs control, 10.0 ± 2.0 vs 3.2 ± 1.2, P < 0.01) and intestinal epithelial barrier damage (3.2 ± 0.7 vs 1.4 ± 0.7, P < 0.01). Levels of serum amylase (21.6 ± 5.1 U/mL vs 14.3 ± 4.2 U/mL, P < 0.01), DAO (21.4 ± 4.1 mg/mL vs 2.6 ± 0.8 mg/mL, P < 0.01), and TNF-α (61.0 ± 15.1 ng/mL vs 42.9 ± 13.9 ng/mL, P < 0.01) increased significantly in SAP mice compared to those in control mice. miR-155 was significantly overexpressed in SAP intestinal epithelia (1.94 ± 0.50 fold vs 1.03 ± 0.23 fold, P < 0.01), and Rho

  2. CCL2 Disrupts the Adherens Junction: Implications for Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Toni K.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Lopez, Lillie; Romero, Ignacio A.; Weksler, Babette B.; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Berman, Joan W.

    2012-01-01

    Alterations to blood-brain barrier (BBB) adhesion molecules and junctional integrity during neuroinflammation can promote central nervous system (CNS) pathology. The chemokine CCL2 is elevated during CNS inflammation and is associated with endothelial dysfunction. The effects of CCL2 on endothelial adherens junctions (AJ) have not been defined. We demonstrate that CCL2 transiently induces Src-dependent disruption of human brain microvascular endothelial AJ. β-catenin is phosphorylated and traffics from the AJ to PECAM-1, where it is sequestered at the membrane. PECAM-1 is also tyrosine phosphorylated, an event associated with recruitment of the phosphatase SHP-2 to PECAM-1, β-catenin release from PECAM-1, and reassociation of β-catenin with the AJ. Surface localization of PECAM-1 is increased in response to CCL2. This may enable the endothelium to sustain CCL2-induced alterations in AJ and facilitate recruitment of leukocytes into the CNS. Our novel findings provide a mechanism for CCL2-mediated disruption of endothelial junctions that may contribute to BBB dysfunction and increased leukocyte recruitment in neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:22641100

  3. Cigarette smoking reprograms apical junctional complex molecular architecture in the human airway epithelium in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Otaki, Fouad; Bonsu, Prince; Dang, David T; Teater, Matthew; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Salit, Jacqueline; Harvey, Ben-Gary; Crystal, Ronald G

    2011-03-01

    The apical junctional complex (AJC), composed of tight and adherens junctions, maintains epithelial barrier function. Since cigarette smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the major smoking-induced disease, are associated with increased lung epithelial permeability, we hypothesized that smoking alters the transcriptional program regulating airway epithelial AJC integrity. Transcriptome analysis revealed global down-regulation of physiological AJC gene expression in the airway epithelium of healthy smokers (n = 59) compared to nonsmokers (n = 53) in association with changes in canonical epithelial differentiation pathways such as PTEN signaling accompanied by induction of cancer-related AJC components. The overall expression of AJC-related genes was further decreased in COPD smokers (n = 23). Exposure of airway epithelial cells to cigarette smoke extract in vitro resulted in down-regulation of several AJC genes paralleled by decreased transepithelial resistance. Thus, cigarette smoking induces transcriptional reprogramming of airway epithelial AJC architecture from its physiological pattern necessary for barrier function toward a disease-associated molecular phenotype.

  4. Cigarette smoke-induced disruption of bronchial epithelial tight junctions is prevented by transforming growth factor-β.

    PubMed

    Schamberger, Andrea C; Mise, Nikica; Jia, Jie; Genoyer, Emmanuelle; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2014-06-01

    The airway epithelium constitutes an essential immunological and cytoprotective barrier to inhaled insults, such as cigarette smoke, environmental particles, or viruses. Although bronchial epithelial integrity is crucial for airway homeostasis, defective epithelial barrier function contributes to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Tight junctions at the apical side of epithelial cell-cell contacts determine epithelial permeability. Cigarette smoke exposure, the major risk factor for COPD, is suggested to impair tight junction integrity; however, detailed mechanisms thereof remain elusive. We investigated whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 affected tight junction integrity. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o(-)) and differentiated primary human bronchial epithelial cells (pHBECs) to CSE significantly disrupted tight junction integrity and barrier function. Specifically, CSE decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and tight junction-associated protein levels. Zonula occludens (ZO)-1 and ZO-2 protein levels were significantly reduced and dislocated from the cell membrane, as observed by fractionation and immunofluorescence analysis. These findings were reproduced in isolated bronchi exposed to CSE ex vivo, as detected by real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry. Combined treatment of 16HBE14o(-) cells or pHBECs with CSE and TGF-β1 restored ZO-1 and ZO-2 levels. TGF-β1 cotreatment restored membrane localization of ZO-1 and ZO-2 protein and prevented CSE-mediated TEER decrease. In conclusion, CSE led to the disruption of tight junctions of human bronchial epithelial cells, and TGF-β1 counteracted this CSE-induced effect. Thus, TGF-β1 may serve as a protective factor for bronchial epithelial cell homeostasis in diseases such as COPD.

  5. Extracellular leucine-rich repeat proteins are required to organize the apical extracellular matrix and maintain epithelial junction integrity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Vincent P.; Parry, Jean M.; Storer, Luke; Poggioli, Corey; Nguyen, Ken C. Q.; Hall, David H.; Sundaram, Meera V.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial cells are linked by apicolateral junctions that are essential for tissue integrity. Epithelial cells also secrete a specialized apical extracellular matrix (ECM) that serves as a protective barrier. Some components of the apical ECM, such as mucins, can influence epithelial junction remodeling and disassembly during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the molecular composition and biological roles of the apical ECM are not well understood. We identified a set of extracellular leucine-rich repeat only (eLRRon) proteins in C. elegans (LET-4 and EGG-6) that are expressed on the apical surfaces of epidermal cells and some tubular epithelia, including the excretory duct and pore. A previously characterized paralog, SYM-1, is also expressed in epidermal cells and secreted into the apical ECM. Related mammalian eLRRon proteins, such as decorin or LRRTM1-3, influence stromal ECM or synaptic junction organization, respectively. Mutants lacking one or more of the C. elegans epithelial eLRRon proteins show multiple defects in apical ECM organization, consistent with these proteins contributing to the embryonic sheath and cuticular ECM. Furthermore, epithelial junctions initially form in the correct locations, but then rupture at the time of cuticle secretion and remodeling of cell-matrix interactions. This work identifies epithelial eLRRon proteins as important components and organizers of the pre-cuticular and cuticular apical ECM, and adds to the small but growing body of evidence linking the apical ECM to epithelial junction stability. We propose that eLRRon-dependent apical ECM organization contributes to cell-cell adhesion and may modulate epithelial junction dynamics in both normal and disease situations. PMID:22278925

  6. Mycophenolic acid mediated disruption of the intestinal epithelial tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Muhammad; Rahman, Hazir; Ahmed, Raees; Oellerich, Michael; Asif, Abdul R

    2014-04-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity is a common adverse effect of mycophenolic acid (MPA) treatment in organ transplant patients, through poorly understood mechanisms. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) is associated with epithelial tight junction (TJ) modulation which leads to defective epithelial barrier function, and has been implicated in GI diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MPA could induce epithelial barrier permeability via MLC2 regulation. Caco-2 monolayers were exposed to therapeutic concentrations of MPA, and MLC2 and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression were analyzed using PCR and immunoblotting. Epithelial cell permeability was assessed by measuring transepithelial resistance (TER) and the flux of paracellular permeability marker FITC-dextran across the epithelial monolayers. MPA increased the expression of MLC2 and MLCK at both the transcriptional and translational levels. In addition, the amount of phosphorylated MLC2 was increased after MPA treatment. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed redistribution of TJ proteins (ZO-1 and occludin) after MPA treatment. This MPA mediated TJ disruption was not due to apoptosis or cell death. Additionally ML-7, a specific inhibitor of MLCK was able to reverse both the MPA mediated decrease in TER and the increase in FITC-dextran influx, suggesting a modulating role of MPA on epithelial barrier permeability via MLCK activity. These results suggest that MPA induced alterations in MLC2 phosphorylation and may have a role in the patho-physiology of intestinal epithelial barrier disruption and may be responsible for the adverse effects (GI toxicity) of MPA on the intestine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reciprocal influence of connexins and apical junction proteins on their expressions and functions

    PubMed Central

    Derangeon, Mickaël; Spray, David C.; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Sarrouilhe, Denis; Hervé, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Membranes of adjacent cells form intercellular junctional complexes to mechanically anchor neighbour cells (anchoring junctions), to seal the paracellular space and to prevent diffusion of integral proteins within the plasma membrane (tight junctions) and to allow cell-to-cell diffusion of small ions and molecules (gap junctions). These different types of specialised plasma membrane microdomains, sharing common adaptor molecules, particularly zonula occludens proteins, frequently present intermingled relationships where the different proteins co-assemble into macromolecular complexes and their expressions are co-ordinately regulated. Proteins forming gap junction channels (connexins, particularly) and proteins fulfilling cell attachment or forming tight junction strands mutually influence expression and functions of one another. PMID:19046940

  8. Mechanism of IFN-γ-induced Endocytosis of Tight Junction Proteins: Myosin II-dependent Vacuolarization of the Apical Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Utech, Markus; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Samarin, Stanislav N.; Bruewer, Matthias; Turner, Jerrold R.; Mrsny, Randall J.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2005-01-01

    Disruption of epithelial barrier by proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ represents a major pathophysiological consequence of intestinal inflammation. We have previously shown that IFN-γ increases paracellular permeability in model T84 epithelial cells by inducing endocytosis of tight junction (TJ) proteins occludin, JAM-A, and claudin-1. The present study was designed to dissect mechanisms of IFN-γ-induced endocytosis of epithelial TJ proteins. IFN-γ treatment of T84 cells resulted in internalization of TJ proteins into large actin-coated vacuoles that originated from the apical plasma membrane and resembled the vacuolar apical compartment (VAC) previously observed in epithelial cells that lose cell polarity. The IFN-γ dependent formation of VACs required ATPase activity of a myosin II motor but was not dependent on rapid turnover of F-actin. In addition, activated myosin II was observed to colocalize with VACs after IFN-γ exposure. Pharmacological analyses revealed that formation of VACs and endocytosis of TJ proteins was mediated by Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) but not myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Furthermore, IFN-γ treatment resulted in activation of Rho GTPase and induced expressional up-regulation of ROCK. These results, for the first time, suggest that IFN-γ induces endocytosis of epithelial TJ proteins via RhoA/ROCK-mediated, myosin II-dependent formation of VACs. PMID:16055505

  9. Tight Junction Disruption Induced by Type 3 Secretion System Effectors Injected by Enteropathogenic and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ugalde-Silva, Paul; Gonzalez-Lugo, Octavio; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium consists of a single cell layer, which is a critical selectively permeable barrier to both absorb nutrients and avoid the entry of potentially harmful entities, including microorganisms. Epithelial cells are held together by the apical junctional complexes, consisting of adherens junctions, and tight junctions (TJs), and by underlying desmosomes. TJs lay in the apical domain of epithelial cells and are mainly composed by transmembrane proteins such as occludin, claudins, JAMs, and tricellulin, that are associated with the cytoplasmic plaque formed by proteins from the MAGUK family, such as ZO-1/2/3, connecting TJ to the actin cytoskeleton, and cingulin and paracingulin connecting TJ to the microtubule network. Extracellular bacteria such as EPEC and EHEC living in the intestinal lumen inject effectors proteins directly from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm, where they play a relevant role in the manipulation of the eukaryotic cell functions by modifying or blocking cell signaling pathways. TJ integrity depends on various cell functions such as actin cytoskeleton, microtubule network for vesicular trafficking, membrane integrity, inflammation, and cell survival. EPEC and EHEC effectors target most of these functions. Effectors encoded inside or outside of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) disrupt the TJ strands. EPEC and EHEC exploit the TJ dynamics to open this structure, for causing diarrhea. EPEC and EHEC secrete effectors that mimic host proteins to manipulate the signaling pathways, including those related to TJ dynamics. In this review, we focus on the known mechanisms exploited by EPEC and EHEC effectors for causing TJ disruption. PMID:27606286

  10. Disruption of MDCK cell tight junctions by the free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Shibayama, Mineko; Martínez-Castillo, Moisés; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Navarro-García, Fernando; Escobar-Herrera, Jaime; Sabanero, Myrna; Tsutsumi, Víctor; Serrano-Luna, Jesús

    2013-02-01

    Naegleria fowleri is the aetiological agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. This parasite invades its host by penetrating the olfactory mucosa. However, the mechanism of epithelium penetration is not well understood. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of N. fowleri trophozoites and the non-pathogenic Naegleria gruberi on Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) tight junction proteins, including claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1, as well as on the actin cytoskeleton. Trophozoites from each of the free-living amoeba species were co-cultured with MDCK cells in a 1 : 1 ratio for 1, 3, 6 or 10 h. Light microscopy revealed that N. fowleri caused morphological changes as early as 3 h post-infection in an epithelial MDCK monolayer. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that after 10 h of co-culture, N. fowleri trophozoites induced epithelial cell damage, which was characterized by changes in the actin apical ring and disruption of the ZO-1 and claudin-1 proteins but not occludin. Western blot assays revealed gradual degradation of ZO-1 and claudin-1 as early as 3 h post-infection. Likewise, there was a drop in transepithelial electrical resistance that resulted in increased epithelial permeability and facilitated the invasion of N. fowleri trophozoites by a paracellular route. In contrast, N. gruberi did not induce alterations in MDCK cells even at 10 h post-infection. Based on these results, we suggest that N. fowleri trophozoites disrupt epithelial monolayers, which could enable their penetration of the olfactory epithelium and subsequent invasion of the central nervous system.

  11. Endocytosis of Epithelial Apical Junctional Proteins by a Clathrin-mediated Pathway into a Unique Storage Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The adherens junction (AJ) and tight junction (TJ) are key regulators of epithelial polarity and barrier function. Loss of epithelial phenotype is accompanied by endocytosis of AJs and TJs via unknown mechanisms. Using a model of calcium depletion, we defined the pathway of internalization of AJ and TJ proteins (E-cadherin, p120 and β-catenins, occludin, JAM-1, claudins 1 and 4, and ZO-1) in T84 epithelial cells. Proteinase protection assay and immunocytochemistry revealed orchestrated internalization of AJs and TJs into a subapical cytoplasmic compartment. Disruption of caveolae/lipid rafts did not prevent endocytosis, nor did caveolin-1 colocalize with internalized junctional proteins. Furthermore, AJ and TJ proteins did not colocalize with the macropinocytosis marker dextran. Inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis blocked internalization of AJs and TJs, and junctional proteins colocalized with clathrin and α-adaptin. AJ and TJ proteins were observed to enter early endosomes followed by movement to organelles that stained with syntaxin-4 but not with markers of late and recycling endosomes, lysosomes, or Golgi. These results indicate that endocytosis of junctional proteins is a clathrin-mediated process leading into a unique storage compartment. Such mechanisms may mediate the disruption of intercellular contacts during normal tissue remodeling and in pathology. PMID:14528017

  12. Localization and Function of Pals1-associated Tight Junction Protein in Drosophila Is Regulated by Two Distinct Apical Complexes.

    PubMed

    Sen, Arnab; Sun, Rui; Krahn, Michael P

    2015-05-22

    The transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) and its intracellular adaptor protein Pals1 (Stardust, Sdt in Drosophila) play a crucial role in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal polarity in epithelial cells in various organisms. In contrast, the multiple PDZ domain-containing protein Pals1-associated tight junction protein (PATJ), which has been described to form a complex with Crb/Sdt, is not essential for apical basal polarity or for the stability of the Crb/Sdt complex in the Drosophila epidermis. Here we show that, in the embryonic epidermis, Sdt is essential for the correct subcellular localization of PATJ in differentiated epithelial cells but not during cellularization. Consistently, the L27 domain of PATJ is crucial for the correct localization and function of the protein. Our data further indicate that the four PDZ domains of PATJ function, to a large extent, in redundancy, regulating the function of the protein. Interestingly, the PATJ-Sdt heterodimer is not only recruited to the apical cell-cell contacts by binding to Crb but depends on functional Bazooka (Baz). However, biochemical experiments show that PATJ associates with both complexes, the Baz-Sdt and the Crb-Sdt complex, in the mature epithelium of the embryonic epidermis, suggesting a role of these two complexes for the function of PATJ during the development of Drosophila.

  13. Apical electrolyte concentration modulates barrier function and tight junction protein localization in bovine mammary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Quesnell, Rebecca R; Erickson, Jamie; Schultz, Bruce D

    2007-01-01

    In vitro mammary epithelial cell models typically fail to form a consistently tight barrier that can effectively separate blood from milk. Our hypothesis was that mammary epithelial barrier function would be affected by changes in luminal ion concentration and inflammatory cytokines. Bovine mammary epithelial (BME-UV cell line) cells were grown to confluence on permeable supports with a standard basolateral medium and either high-electrolyte (H-elec) or low-electrolyte (L-elec) apical medium for 14 days. Apical media were changed to/from H-elec medium at predetermined times prior to assay. Transepithelial electrical resistance (R(te)) was highest in monolayers continuously exposed to apical L-elec. A time-dependent decline in R(te) began within 24 h of H-elec medium exposure. Change from H-elec medium to L-elec medium time-dependently increased R(te). Permeation by FITC-conjugated dextran was elevated across monolayers exposed to H-elec, suggesting compromise of a paracellular pathway. Significant alteration in occludin distribution was evident, concomitant with the changes in R(te), although total occludin was unchanged. Neither substitution of Na(+) with N-methyl-d-glucosamine (NMDG(+)) nor pharmacological inhibition of transcellular Na(+) transport pathways abrogated the effects of apical H-elec medium on R(te). Tumor necrosis factor alpha, but not interleukin-1beta nor interleukin-6, in the apical compartment caused a significant decrease in R(te) within 8 h. These results indicate that mammary epithelium is a dynamic barrier whose cell-cell contacts are acutely modulated by cytokines and luminal electrolyte environment. Results not only demonstrate that BME-UV cells are a model system representative of mammary epithelium but also provide critical information that can be applied to other mammary model systems to improve their physiological relevance.

  14. Crucial Role of Rapgef2 and Rapgef6, a Family of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors for Rap1 Small GTPase, in Formation of Apical Surface Adherens Junctions and Neural Progenitor Development in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Maeta, Kazuhiro; Edamatsu, Hironori; Nishihara, Kaori; Ikutomo, Junji; Bilasy, Shymaa E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral neocortex development in mammals requires highly orchestrated events involving proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neural progenitors and neurons. Rapgef2 and Rapgef6 constitute a unique family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rap1 small GTPase, which is known to play crucial roles in migration of postmitotic neurons. We previously reported that conditional knockout of Rapgef2 in dorsal telencephalon (Rapgef2-cKO) resulted in the formation of an ectopic cortical mass (ECM) resembling that of subcortical band heterotopia. Here we show that double knockout of Rapgef6 in Rapgef2-cKO mice (Rapgef2/6-dKO) results in marked enlargement of the ECM. While Rapgef2-cKO affects late-born neurons only, Rapgef2/6-dKO affects both early-born and late-born neurons. The Rapgef2-cKO cortex at embryonic day (E) 15.5, and the Rapgef2/6-dKO cortex at E13.5 and E15.5 show disruption of the adherens junctions (AJs) on the apical surface, detachment of radial glial cells (RGCs) from the apical surface and disorganization of the radial glial fiber system, which are accompanied by aberrant distribution of RGCs and intermediate progenitors, normally located in the ventricular zone and the subventricular zone, respectively, over the entire cerebral cortex. Moreover, intrauterine transduction of Cre recombinase into the Rapgef2flox/flox brains also results in the apical surface AJ disruption and the RGC detachment from the apical surface, both of which are effectively suppressed by cotransduction of the constitutively active Rap1 mutant Rap1G12V. These results demonstrate a cell-autonomous role of the Rapgef2/6-Rap1 pathway in maintaining the apical surface AJ structures, which is necessary for the proper development of neural progenitor cells. PMID:27390776

  15. Irinotecan disrupts tight junction proteins within the gut

    PubMed Central

    Wardill, Hannah R; Bowen, Joanne M; Al-Dasooqi, Noor; Sultani, Masooma; Bateman, Emma; Stansborough, Romany; Shirren, Joseph; Gibson, Rachel J

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer causes significant gut toxicity, leading to severe clinical manifestations and an increased economic burden. Despite much research, many of the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood hindering effective treatment options. Recently there has been renewed interest in the role tight junctions play in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity. To delineate the underlying mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity, this study aimed to quantify the molecular changes in key tight junction proteins, ZO-1, claudin-1, and occludin, using a well-established preclinical model of gut toxicity. Female tumor-bearing dark agouti rats received irinotecan or vehicle control and were assessed for validated parameters of gut toxicity including diarrhea and weight loss. Rats were killed at 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h post-chemotherapy. Tight junction protein and mRNA expression in the small and large intestines were assessed using semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Significant changes in protein expression of tight junction proteins were seen in both the jejunum and colon, correlating with key histological changes and clinical features. mRNA levels of claudin-1 were significantly decreased early after irinotecan in the small and large intestines. ZO-1 and occludin mRNA levels remained stable across the time-course of gut toxicity. Findings strongly suggest irinotecan causes tight junction defects which lead to mucosal barrier dysfunction and the development of diarrhea. Detailed research is now warranted to investigate posttranslational regulation of tight junction proteins to delineate the underlying pathophysiology of gut toxicity and identify future therapeutic targets. PMID:24316664

  16. The role of apical cell-cell junctions and associated cytoskeleton in mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Sluysmans, Sophie; Vasileva, Ekaterina; Spadaro, Domenica; Shah, Jimit; Rouaud, Florian; Citi, Sandra

    2017-04-01

    Tissues of multicellular organisms are characterised by several types of specialised cell-cell junctions. In vertebrate epithelia and endothelia, tight and adherens junctions (AJ) play critical roles in barrier and adhesion functions, and are connected to the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The interaction between junctions and the cytoskeleton is crucial for tissue development and physiology, and is involved in the molecular mechanisms governing cell shape, motility, growth and signalling. The machineries which functionally connect tight and AJ to the cytoskeleton comprise proteins which either bind directly to cytoskeletal filaments, or function as adaptors for regulators of the assembly and function of the cytoskeleton. In the last two decades, specific cytoskeleton-associated junctional molecules have been implicated in mechanotransduction, revealing the existence of multimolecular complexes that can sense mechanical cues and translate them into adaptation to tensile forces and biochemical signals. Here, we summarise the current knowledge about the machineries that link tight and AJ to actin filaments and microtubules, and the molecular basis for mechanotransduction at epithelial and endothelial AJ. © 2017 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Expression of apical junction complex proteins in colorectal mucosa of miniature dachshunds with inflammatory colorectal polyps

    PubMed Central

    YOKOYAMA, Nozomu; OHTA, Hiroshi; KAGAWA, Yumiko; LEELA-ARPORN, Rommaneeya; DERMLIM, Angkhana; NISA, Khoirun; MORITA, Tomoya; OSUGA, Tatsuyuki; SASAKI, Noboru; MORISHITA, Keitaro; NAKAMURA, Kensuke; TAKIGUCHI, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    We examine the expression of tight junction and adherence junction proteins in the colorectal mucosa of miniature dachshunds (MDs) with inflammatory colorectal polyps (ICRPs). Colorectal mucosa samples were endoscopically obtained from 8 MDs with ICRPs and 8 control dogs for immunoblotting. Paraffin-embedded tissues of surgically resected inflamed lesions from another 5 MDs with ICRPs and full-thickness colorectal specimens from 5 healthy beagles were obtained for immunohistochemistry. The expression patterns of claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -7 and -8, E-cadherin and β-catenin were analyzed in the non-inflamed mucosa and inflamed mucosa of ICRPs and colorectal mucosa of control dogs by immunoblotting. The localization of these proteins in the inflamed lesions was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The expressions of each of claudin, E-cadherin and β-catenin were not significantly different between control dogs and non-inflamed colonic mucosa from MDs with ICRPs. In contrast, only E-cadherin and β-catenin were detected in the inflamed lesions of MDs with ICRPs. By immunohistochemistry, claudin-2, -3, -4, -5 and -7, E-cadherin and β-catenin were expressed in the colorectal epithelium within the inflamed mucosa, but not in granulation tissue. Distributions of claudin-2, -3, -4, -5, and -7, E-cadherin and β-catenin in the colonic epithelium were not different between MDs with ICRPs and control dogs. These results indicated that no significant alteration was detected in several tight junction or adherence junction proteins expression in the colorectal epithelium of ICRPs. PMID:28090006

  18. Atelectrauma disrupts pulmonary epithelial barrier integrity and alters the distribution of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin 4

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation inevitably exposes the delicate tissues of the airways and alveoli to abnormal mechanical stresses that can induce pulmonary edema and exacerbate conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The goal of our research is to characterize the cellular trauma caused by the transient abnormal fluid mechanical stresses that arise when air is forced into a liquid-occluded airway (i.e., atelectrauma). Using a fluid-filled, parallel-plate flow chamber to model the “airway reopening” process, our in vitro study examined consequent increases in pulmonary epithelial plasma membrane rupture, paracellular permeability, and disruption of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-4. Computational analysis predicts the normal and tangential surface stresses that develop between the basolateral epithelial membrane and underlying substrate due to the interfacial stresses acting on the apical cell membrane. These simulations demonstrate that decreasing the velocity of reopening causes a significant increase in basolateral surface stresses, particularly in the region between neighboring cells where TJs concentrate. Likewise, pulmonary epithelial wounding, paracellular permeability, and TJ protein disruption were significantly greater following slower reopening. This study thus demonstrates that maintaining a higher velocity of reopening, which reduces the damaging fluid stresses acting on the airway wall, decreases the mechanical stresses on the basolateral cell surface while protecting cells from plasma membrane rupture and promoting barrier integrity. PMID:22898551

  19. Disruption of cell junctions induces apoptosis and reduces synthetic activity in lactating goat mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Ben Chedly, H; Boutinaud, M; Bernier-Dodier, P; Marnet, P-G; Lacasse, P

    2010-07-01

    Although it is known that disruption of the cell junctions in the mammary gland induces a decrease in milk yield, the cellular mechanisms involved in milk secretion reduction during mammary cell junction disruption are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular regulations taking place after cell junction disruption in the mammary gland of goats. We performed intramammary infusions of Ca chelators to induce cell junction disruption. In a first group of 5 goats, intramammary infusions of ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) in the right gland halves and saline as a control in the left gland halves were performed after 4 consecutive milkings. A second group of 4 goats received 4 intramammary infusions of citrate solution in the right gland halves and lactose solution as a control in the left halves. Intramammary infusion of EGTA and lactose induced a disruption of cell junctions, whereas citrate infusions failed to modify mammary epithelium integrity. The effect of the infused solutions was also tested in vitro via the measurement of transepithelial resistance, confirming mammary epithelium disruption by the EGTA, lactose, and citrate solutions at high concentrations. The disruption of mammary epithelium integrity by EGTA induced a decrease in the expression of the cell junction protein E-cadherin. Both the EGTA and lactose infusions induced a decrease in milk secretion that was accompanied by cellular modifications. We observed a decrease in milk casein, which was associated with a decrease in the mRNA level of kappa-casein in the lactose-infused glands, and a decrease in milk lactose, which was associated with a downregulation of alpha-lactalbumin transcripts in both the EGTA- and lactose-treated glands. Both the EGTA and lactose infusions increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) in the mammary tissue, indicating an induction

  20. AmotL2 disrupts apical-basal cell polarity and promotes tumour invasion.

    PubMed

    Mojallal, Mahdi; Zheng, Yujuan; Hultin, Sara; Audebert, Stéphane; van Harn, Tanja; Johnsson, Per; Lenander, Claes; Fritz, Nicolas; Mieth, Christin; Corcoran, Martin; Lembo, Frédérique; Hallström, Marja; Hartman, Johan; Mazure, Nathalie M; Weide, Thomas; Grandér, Dan; Borg, Jean-Paul; Uhlén, Per; Holmgren, Lars

    2014-08-01

    The establishment and maintenance of apical-basal cell polarity is essential for the functionality of glandular epithelia. Cell polarity is often lost in advanced tumours correlating with acquisition of invasive and malignant properties. Despite extensive knowledge regarding the formation and maintenance of polarity, the mechanisms that deregulate polarity in metastasizing cells remain to be fully characterized. Here we show that AmotL2 expression correlates with loss of tissue architecture in tumours from human breast and colon cancer patients. We further show that hypoxic stress results in activation of c-Fos-dependent expression of AmotL2 leading to loss of polarity. c-Fos/hypoxia-induced p60 AmotL2 interacts with the Crb3 and Par3 polarity complexes retaining them in large vesicles and preventing them from reaching the apical membrane. The resulting loss of polarity potentiates the response to invasive cues in vitro and in vivo in mice. These data provide a molecular mechanism how hypoxic stress deregulates cell polarity during tumour progression.

  1. Disrupted apical exocytosis of cargo vesicles causes enteropathy in FHL5 patients with Munc18-2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Georg F; van Rijn, Jorik M; Krainer, Iris M; Janecke, Andreas R; Posovzsky, Carsten; Cohen, Marta; Searle, Claire; Jantchou, Prevost; Escher, Johanna C; Patey, Natalie; Cutz, Ernest; Müller, Thomas; Middendorp, Sabine; Hess, Michael W; Huber, Lukas A

    2017-07-20

    Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 5 (FHL5) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in STXBP2, coding for Munc18-2, which is required for SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. FHL5 causes hematologic and gastrointestinal symptoms characterized by chronic enteropathy that is reminiscent of microvillus inclusion disease (MVID). However, the molecular pathophysiology of FHL5-associated diarrhea is poorly understood. Five FHL5 patients, including four previously unreported patients, were studied. Morphology of duodenal sections was analyzed by electron and fluorescence microscopy. Small intestinal enterocytes and organoid-derived monolayers displayed the subcellular characteristics of MVID. For the analyses of Munc18-2-dependent SNARE-protein interactions, a Munc18-2 CaCo2-KO model cell line was generated by applying CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Munc18-2 is required for Slp4a/Stx3 interaction in fusion of cargo vesicles with the apical plasma membrane. Cargo trafficking was investigated in patient biopsies, patient-derived organoids, and the genome-edited model cell line. Loss of Munc18-2 selectively disrupts trafficking of certain apical brush-border proteins (NHE3 and GLUT5), while transport of DPPIV remained unaffected. Here, we describe the molecular mechanism how the loss of function of Munc18-2 leads to cargo-selective mislocalization of brush-border components and a subapical accumulation of cargo vesicles, as it is known from the loss of polarity phenotype in MVID.

  2. Chronic sleep restriction disrupts interendothelial junctions in the hippocampus and increases blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Alvarado, G; Velázquez-Moctezuma, J; Gómez-González, B

    2017-10-01

    Chronic sleep loss in the rat increases blood-brain barrier permeability to Evans blue and FITC-dextrans in almost the whole brain and sleep recovery during short periods restores normal blood-brain barrier permeability. Sleep loss increases vesicle density in hippocampal endothelial cells and decreases tight junction protein expression. However, at the ultrastructural level the effect of chronic sleep loss on interendothelial junctions is unknown. In this study we characterised the ultrastructure of interendothelial junctions in the hippocampus, the expression of tight junction proteins, and quantified blood-brain barrier permeability to fluorescein-sodium after chronic sleep restriction. Male Wistar rats were sleep restricted using the modified multiple platform method during 10 days, with a daily schedule of 20-h sleep deprivation plus 4-h sleep recovery at their home-cages. At the 10th day hippocampal samples were obtained immediately at the end of the 20-h sleep deprivation period, and after 40 and 120 min of sleep recovery. Samples were processed for transmission electron microscopy and western blot. Chronic sleep restriction increased blood-brain barrier permeability to fluorescein-sodium, and decreased interendothelial junction complexity by increasing the frequency of less mature end-to-end and simply overlap junctions, even after sleep recovery, as compared to intact controls. Chronic sleep loss also induced the formation of clefts between narrow zones of adjacent endothelial cell membranes in the hippocampus. The expression of claudin-5 and actin decreased after chronic sleep loss as compared to intact animals. Therefore, it seems that chronic sleep loss disrupts interendothelial junctions that leads to blood-brain barrier hyperpermeability in the hippocampus. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  3. Kiwifruit cysteine protease actinidin compromises the intestinal barrier by disrupting tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Grozdanovic, Milica M; Čavić, Milena; Nešić, Andrijana; Andjelković, Uroš; Akbari, Peyman; Smit, Joost J; Gavrović-Jankulović, Marija

    2016-03-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms a barrier that food allergens must cross in order to induce sensitization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the plant-derived food cysteine protease--actinidin (Act d1) on the integrity of intestinal epithelium tight junctions (TJs). Effects of Act d1 on the intestinal epithelium were evaluated in Caco-2 monolayers and in a mouse model by measuring transepithelial resistance and in vivo permeability. Integrity of the tight junctions was analyzed by confocal microscopy. Proteolysis of TJ protein occludin was evaluated by mass spectrometry. Actinidin (1 mg/mL) reduced the transepithelial resistance of the cell monolayer by 18.1% (after 1 h) and 25.6% (after 4 h). This loss of barrier function was associated with Act d 1 disruption of the occludin and zonula occludens (ZO)-1 network. The effect on intestinal permeability in vivo was demonstrated by the significantly higher concentration of 40 kDa FITC-dextran (2.33 μg/mL) that passed from the intestine into the serum of Act d1 treated mice in comparison to the control group (0.5 μg/mL). Human occludin was fragmented, and putative Act d1 cleavage sites were identified in extracellular loops of human occludin. Act d1 caused protease-dependent disruption of tight junctions in confluent Caco-2 cells and increased intestinal permeability in mice. In line with the observed effects of food cysteine proteases in occupational allergy, these results suggest that disruption of tight junctions by food cysteine proteases may contribute to the process of sensitization in food allergy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. 17β-Estradiol Ameliorates Tight Junction Disruption via Repression of MMP Transcription.

    PubMed

    Na, Wonho; Lee, Jee Youn; Kim, Won-Sun; Yune, Tae Young; Ju, Bong-Gun

    2015-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) or blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) formed by capillary endothelial cells provides a physical wall between the central nervous system (CNS) and circulating blood with highly selective permeability. BBB/BSCB disruption by activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) has been shown to result in further neurological damage after CNS injury. Recently it has been discovered that estrogen attenuates BBB/BSCB disruption in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the estrogen-mediated attenuation of BBB/BSCB disruption has not been elucidated fully. In the present study, we found that 17β-estradiol (E2) suppresses nuclear factor-κB-dependent MMP-1b, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-10, and MMP-13 gene activation in microvessel endothelial bEnd.3 cells subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation/reperfusion injury. E2 induced the recruitment of ERα and nuclear receptor corepressor to the nuclear factor-κB binding site on the MMPs' gene promoters. Consistently, ER antagonist ICI 182.780 showed opposite effects of E2. We further found that E2 attenuates tight junction disruption through the decreased degradation of tight junction proteins in bEnd.3 cells subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation-reperfusion injury. In addition, E2 suppressed the up-regulation of MMP expression, leading to a decreased BSCB disruption in the injured spinal cord. In conclusion, we discovered the molecular mechanism underlying the protective role of estrogenin BBB/BSCB disruption using an in vitro and in vivo model. Our study suggests that estrogens may provide a potential therapeutic intervention for preserving BBB/BSCB integrity after CNS injury.

  5. Magnetic forces enable controlled drug delivery by disrupting endothelial cell-cell junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yongzhi; Tong, Sheng; Zhang, Linlin; Sakurai, Yumiko; Myers, David R.; Hong, Lin; Lam, Wilbur A.; Bao, Gang

    2017-06-01

    The vascular endothelium presents a major transport barrier to drug delivery by only allowing selective extravasation of solutes and small molecules. Therefore, enhancing drug transport across the endothelial barrier has to rely on leaky vessels arising from disease states such as pathological angiogenesis and inflammatory response. Here we show that the permeability of vascular endothelium can be increased using an external magnetic field to temporarily disrupt endothelial adherens junctions through internalized iron oxide nanoparticles, activating the paracellular transport pathway and facilitating the local extravasation of circulating substances. This approach provides a physically controlled drug delivery method harnessing the biology of endothelial adherens junction and opens a new avenue for drug delivery in a broad range of biomedical research and therapeutic applications.

  6. VvpE mediates the intestinal colonization of Vibrio vulnificus by the disruption of tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei-Jung; Jung, Young Hyun; Ryu, Jung Min; Jang, Kyung Ku; Choi, Sang Ho; Han, Ho Jae

    2016-01-01

    The disruption of gastrointestinal tight junctions and their colonization evoked by enteric pathogens are hallmarks of the pathogenesis. Vibrio (V.) vulnificus, VvpE, is an elastase which is responsible for host surface adherence and vascular permeability; however, the functional roles of VvpE in the pathogenesis of V. vulnificus (WT) are poorly understood. In the present study, we have investigated the role of VvpE in regulation of intestinal tight junctions and the colonization of WT. We found that mutation of the vvpE gene from V. vulnificus (vvpE mutant) prevents intestinal tight/adherens junction dysregulation due to a WT infection and maintains the physiological level of the epithelial paracellular permeability. Interestingly, the vvpE mutant exhibited defective intestinal colonization abilities, whereas WT colonization was significantly elevated in the ileum in a time-dependent manner. Finally, the vvpE mutant negated the enterotoxicity, the breakdown of red blood cells, and pro-inflammatory responses, all of which are induced by the WT infection. In addition, the results of a LC-MS/MS analysis showed that VvpE contributes to WT pathogenesis in multiple ways by interacting with intestinal proteins, including β-globin, Annexin A2, Annexin A4, F-actin, and intelectin-1b. These results demonstrate that VvpE plays important role in promoting the tight junction disruption and intestinal colonization of V. vulnificus and that it also has the ability to interact with the intestinal proteins responsible for microbial pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Secretion of Alpha-Hemolysin by Escherichia coli Disrupts Tight Junctions in Ulcerative Colitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Du, Zhengyu; Struve, Carsten; Charbon, Godefroid; Karczewski, Jurgen; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki; Petersen, Andreas Munk; Wells, Jerry M

    2016-03-03

    The potential of Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolated from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients to damage the integrity of the intestinal epithelium was investigated. E. coli strains isolated from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and healthy controls were tested for virulence capacity by molecular techniques and cytotoxic assays and transepithelial electric resistance (TER). E. coli isolate p19A was selected, and deletion mutants were created for alpha-hemolysin (α-hemolysin) (hly) clusters and cytotoxic necrotizing factor type 1 (cnf1). Probiotic E. coli Nissle and pathogenic E. coli LF82 were used as controls. E. coli strains from patients with active UC completely disrupted epithelial cell tight junctions shortly after inoculation. These strains belong to phylogenetic group B2 and are all α-hemolysin positive. In contrast, probiotic E. coli Nissle, pathogenic E. coli LF82, four E. coli from patients with inactive UC and three E. coli strains from healthy controls did not disrupt tight junctions. E. coli p19A WT as well as cnf1, and single loci of hly mutants from cluster I and II were all able to damage Caco-2 (Heterogeneous human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma) cell tight junctions. However, this phenotype was lost in a mutant with knockout (Δ) of both hly loci (P<0.001). UC-associated E. coli producing α-hemolysin can cause rapid loss of tight junction integrity in differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers. This effect was abolished in a mutant unable to express α-hemolysin. These results suggest that high Hly expression may be a mechanism by which specific strains of E. coli pathobionts can contribute to epithelial barrier dysfunction and pathophysiology of disease in IBD.

  8. Secretion of Alpha-Hemolysin by Escherichia coli Disrupts Tight Junctions in Ulcerative Colitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Du, Zhengyu; Struve, Carsten; Charbon, Godefroid; Karczewski, Jurgen; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki; Petersen, Andreas Munk; Wells, Jerry M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The potential of Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolated from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients to damage the integrity of the intestinal epithelium was investigated. Methods: E. coli strains isolated from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and healthy controls were tested for virulence capacity by molecular techniques and cytotoxic assays and transepithelial electric resistance (TER). E. coli isolate p19A was selected, and deletion mutants were created for alpha-hemolysin (α-hemolysin) (hly) clusters and cytotoxic necrotizing factor type 1 (cnf1). Probiotic E. coli Nissle and pathogenic E. coli LF82 were used as controls. Results: E. coli strains from patients with active UC completely disrupted epithelial cell tight junctions shortly after inoculation. These strains belong to phylogenetic group B2 and are all α-hemolysin positive. In contrast, probiotic E. coli Nissle, pathogenic E. coli LF82, four E. coli from patients with inactive UC and three E. coli strains from healthy controls did not disrupt tight junctions. E. coli p19A WT as well as cnf1, and single loci of hly mutants from cluster I and II were all able to damage Caco-2 (Heterogeneous human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma) cell tight junctions. However, this phenotype was lost in a mutant with knockout (Δ) of both hly loci (P<0.001). Conclusions: UC-associated E. coli producing α-hemolysin can cause rapid loss of tight junction integrity in differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers. This effect was abolished in a mutant unable to express α-hemolysin. These results suggest that high Hly expression may be a mechanism by which specific strains of E. coli pathobionts can contribute to epithelial barrier dysfunction and pathophysiology of disease in IBD. PMID:26938480

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase causes transient disruption of tight junctions and downregulation of PAR-2 in human nasal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic respiratory disease, and the elastase enzyme that it produces increases the permeability of airway epithelial cells owing to the disruption of tight junctions. P. aeruginosa is also implicated in prolonged chronic rhinosinusitis. However, the effects of P. aeruginosa elastase (PE) against the barrier formed by human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) remain unknown. Methods To investigate the mechanisms involved in the disruption of tight junctions by PE in HNECs, primary cultures of HNECs transfected with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT-HNECs) were used. The hTERT-HNECs were pretreated with inhibitors of various signal transduction pathways, PKC, MAPK, p38MAPK, PI3K, JNK, NF-κB, EGF receptor, proteasome, COX1 and COX2 before treatment with PE. Some cells were pretreated with siRNA and agonist of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) before treatment with PE. Expression and structures of tight junctions were determined by Western blotting, real-time PCR, immunostaining and freeze-fracture. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was examined as the epithelial barrier function. Results PE treatment transiently disrupted the epithelial barrier and downregulated the transmembrane proteins claudin-1 and -4, occludin, and tricellulin, but not the scaffold PDZ-expression proteins ZO-1 and -2 and adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and β-catenin. The transient downregulation of tight junction proteins was controlled via distinct signal transduction pathways such as the PKC, MAPK, PI3K, p38 MAPK, JNK, COX-1 and -2, and NF-κB pathways. Furthermore, treatment with PE transiently decreased PAR-2 expression, which also regulated the expression of the tight junction proteins. Treatment with a PAR-2 agonist prevented the downregulation of the tight junction proteins after PE treatment in HNECs. Conclusions PE transiently disrupts tight junctions in HNECs and downregulates PAR-2. The transient disruption of tight

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase causes transient disruption of tight junctions and downregulation of PAR-2 in human nasal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazuaki; Obata, Kazufumi; Keira, Takashi; Miyata, Ryo; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Takano, Ken-ichi; Kohno, Takayuki; Sawada, Norimasa; Himi, Tetsuo; Kojima, Takashi

    2014-02-18

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic respiratory disease, and the elastase enzyme that it produces increases the permeability of airway epithelial cells owing to the disruption of tight junctions. P. aeruginosa is also implicated in prolonged chronic rhinosinusitis. However, the effects of P. aeruginosa elastase (PE) against the barrier formed by human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) remain unknown. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the disruption of tight junctions by PE in HNECs, primary cultures of HNECs transfected with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT-HNECs) were used. The hTERT-HNECs were pretreated with inhibitors of various signal transduction pathways, PKC, MAPK, p38MAPK, PI3K, JNK, NF-κB, EGF receptor, proteasome, COX1 and COX2 before treatment with PE. Some cells were pretreated with siRNA and agonist of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) before treatment with PE. Expression and structures of tight junctions were determined by Western blotting, real-time PCR, immunostaining and freeze-fracture. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was examined as the epithelial barrier function. PE treatment transiently disrupted the epithelial barrier and downregulated the transmembrane proteins claudin-1 and -4, occludin, and tricellulin, but not the scaffold PDZ-expression proteins ZO-1 and -2 and adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and β-catenin. The transient downregulation of tight junction proteins was controlled via distinct signal transduction pathways such as the PKC, MAPK, PI3K, p38 MAPK, JNK, COX-1 and -2, and NF-κB pathways. Furthermore, treatment with PE transiently decreased PAR-2 expression, which also regulated the expression of the tight junction proteins. Treatment with a PAR-2 agonist prevented the downregulation of the tight junction proteins after PE treatment in HNECs. PE transiently disrupts tight junctions in HNECs and downregulates PAR-2. The transient disruption of tight junctions by PE might occur repeatedly

  11. Neisseria gonorrhoeae induced disruption of cell junction complexes in epithelial cells of the human genital tract.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Tirado, Carolina; Maisey, Kevin; Rodríguez, Felipe E; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Reyes-López, Felipe E; Imarai, Mónica

    2012-03-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms, such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, have developed mechanisms to alter epithelial barriers in order to reach subepithelial tissues for host colonization. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of gonococci on cell junction complexes of genital epithelial cells of women. Polarized Ishikawa cells, a cell line derived from endometrial epithelium, were used for experimental infection. Infected cells displayed a spindle-like shape with an irregular distribution, indicating potential alteration of cell-cell contacts. Accordingly, analysis by confocal microscopy and cellular fractionation revealed that gonococci induced redistribution of the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and its adapter protein β-catenin from the membrane to a cytoplasmic pool, with no significant differences in protein levels. In contrast, gonococcal infection did not induce modification of either expression or distribution of the tight junction proteins Occludin and ZO-1. Similar results were observed for Fallopian tube epithelia. Interestingly, infected Ishikawa cells also showed an altered pattern of actin cytoskeleton, observed in the form of stress fibers across the cytoplasm, which in turn matched a strong alteration on the expression of fibronectin, an adhesive glycoprotein component of extracellular matrix. Interestingly, using western blotting, activation of the ERK pathway was detected after gonococcal infection while p38 pathway was not activated. All effects were pili and Opa independent. Altogether, results indicated that gonococcus, as a mechanism of pathogenesis, induced disruption of junction complexes with early detaching of E-cadherin and β-catenin from the adherens junction complex, followed by a redistribution and reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and fibronectin within the extracellular matrix. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

    PubMed

    Sufiawati, Irna; Tugizov, Sharof M

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD). Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals.

  13. HIV-Associated Disruption of Tight and Adherens Junctions of Oral Epithelial Cells Facilitates HSV-1 Infection and Spread

    PubMed Central

    Sufiawati, Irna; Tugizov, Sharof M.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD). Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:24586397

  14. Particulate matter air pollution disrupts endothelial cell barrier via calpain-mediated tight junction protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is a significant risk factor for increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. The mechanism of PM-mediated pathophysiology remains unknown. However, PM is proinflammatory to the endothelium and increases vascular permeability in vitro and in vivo via ROS generation. Objectives We explored the role of tight junction proteins as targets for PM-induced loss of lung endothelial cell (EC) barrier integrity and enhanced cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Methods Changes in human lung EC monolayer permeability were assessed by Transendothelial Electrical Resistance (TER) in response to PM challenge (collected from Ft. McHenry Tunnel, Baltimore, MD, particle size >0.1 μm). Biochemical assessment of ROS generation and Ca2+ mobilization were also measured. Results PM exposure induced tight junction protein Zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) relocation from the cell periphery, which was accompanied by significant reductions in ZO-1 protein levels but not in adherens junction proteins (VE-cadherin and β-catenin). N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, 5 mM) reduced PM-induced ROS generation in ECs, which further prevented TER decreases and atteneuated ZO-1 degradation. PM also mediated intracellular calcium mobilization via the transient receptor potential cation channel M2 (TRPM2), in a ROS-dependent manner with subsequent activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain. PM-activated calpain is responsible for ZO-1 degradation and EC barrier disruption. Overexpression of ZO-1 attenuated PM-induced endothelial barrier disruption and vascular hyperpermeability in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions These results demonstrate that PM induces marked increases in vascular permeability via ROS-mediated calcium leakage via activated TRPM2, and via ZO-1 degradation by activated calpain. These findings support a novel mechanism for PM-induced lung damage and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:22931549

  15. The Role of Circulating Tight Junction Proteins in Evaluating Blood Brain Barrier Disruption following Intracranial Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiaoyang; He, Ping; Li, Yazhen; Fan, Zhicheng; Si, Mengya; Xie, Qingdong; Chang, Xiaolan; Huang, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Brain injury after intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a hallmark of ICH-induced brain injury; however, data mirroring BBB disruption in human ICH are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the significance of circulating biomarkers in evaluating BBB disruption after ICH. Twenty-two patients with ICH were recruited in this study. Concentrations of the tight junction proteins (TJs) Claudin-5 (CLDN5), Occludin (OCLN), and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from patients with ICH. The white blood cell (WBC) count in blood and CSF, albumin (ALB) levels in the CSF (ALBCSF), and the BBB ratio were significantly higher in the ICH than in controls (p < 0.05). Significantly higher levels of CLDN5, OCLN, ZO-1, MMP-9, and VEGF in CSF were observed in the ICH group; these biomarkers were also positively associated with BBB ratio (p < 0.05). Our data revealed that circulating TJs could be considered the potential biomarkers reflecting the integrity of the BBB in ICH.

  16. The Role of Circulating Tight Junction Proteins in Evaluating Blood Brain Barrier Disruption following Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Xiaoyang; He, Ping; Li, Yazhen; Fan, Zhicheng; Si, Mengya; Xie, Qingdong; Chang, Xiaolan; Huang, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Brain injury after intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a hallmark of ICH-induced brain injury; however, data mirroring BBB disruption in human ICH are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the significance of circulating biomarkers in evaluating BBB disruption after ICH. Twenty-two patients with ICH were recruited in this study. Concentrations of the tight junction proteins (TJs) Claudin-5 (CLDN5), Occludin (OCLN), and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from patients with ICH. The white blood cell (WBC) count in blood and CSF, albumin (ALB) levels in the CSF (ALBCSF), and the BBB ratio were significantly higher in the ICH than in controls (p < 0.05). Significantly higher levels of CLDN5, OCLN, ZO-1, MMP-9, and VEGF in CSF were observed in the ICH group; these biomarkers were also positively associated with BBB ratio (p < 0.05). Our data revealed that circulating TJs could be considered the potential biomarkers reflecting the integrity of the BBB in ICH. PMID:26586924

  17. Clostridium difficile Toxins Disrupt Epithelial Barrier Function by Altering Membrane Microdomain Localization of Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, A.; von Eichel-Streiber, C.; Turner, J. R.; Verkade, P.; Madara, J. L.; Parkos, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium difficile is the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis. C. difficile toxins TcdA and TcdB are UDP-glucosyltransferases that monoglucosylate and thereby inactivate the Rho family of GTPases (W. P. Ciesla, Jr., and D. A. Bobak, J. Biol. Chem. 273:16021–16026, 1998). We utilized purified reference toxins of C. difficile, TcdA-10463 (TcdA) and TcdB-10463 (TcdB), and a model intestinal epithelial cell line to characterize their influence on tight-junction (TJ) organization and hence to analyze the mechanisms by which they contribute to the enhanced paracellular permeability and disease pathophysiology of pseudomembranous colitis. The increase in paracellular permeability induced by TcdA and TcdB was associated with disorganization of apical and basal F-actin. F-actin restructuring was paralleled by dissociation of occludin, ZO-1, and ZO-2 from the lateral TJ membrane without influencing the subjacent adherens junction protein, E-cadherin. In addition, we observed decreased association of actin with the TJ cytoplasmic plaque protein ZO-1. Differential detergent extraction and fractionation in sucrose density gradients revealed TcdB-induced redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from detergent-insoluble fractions constituting “raft-like” membrane microdomains, suggesting an important role of Rho proteins in maintaining the association of TJ proteins with such microdomains. These toxin-mediated effects on actin and TJ structure provide a mechanism for early events in the pathophysiology of pseudomembranous colitis. PMID:11179295

  18. Calcium Channels and Oxidative Stress Mediate a Synergistic Disruption of Tight Junctions by Ethanol and Acetaldehyde in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Samak, Geetha; Gangwar, Ruchika; Meena, Avtar S.; Rao, Roshan G.; Shukla, Pradeep K.; Manda, Bhargavi; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is metabolized into acetaldehyde in most tissues. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on the tight junction integrity in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Expression of alcohol dehydrogenase sensitized Caco-2 cells to ethanol-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction, whereas aldehyde dehydrogenase attenuated acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption. Ethanol up to 150 mM did not affect tight junction integrity or barrier function, but it dose-dependently increased acetaldehyde-mediated tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Src kinase and MLCK inhibitors blocked this synergistic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on tight junction. Ethanol and acetaldehyde caused a rapid and synergistic elevation of intracellular calcium. Calcium depletion by BAPTA or Ca2+-free medium blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced barrier dysfunction and tight junction disruption. Diltiazem and selective knockdown of TRPV6 or CaV1.3 channels, by shRNA blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Ethanol and acetaldehyde induced a rapid and synergistic increase in reactive oxygen species by a calcium-dependent mechanism. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cyclosporine A, blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced barrier dysfunction and tight junction disruption. These results demonstrate that ethanol and acetaldehyde synergistically disrupt tight junctions by a mechanism involving calcium, oxidative stress, Src kinase and MLCK. PMID:27958326

  19. Calcium Channels and Oxidative Stress Mediate a Synergistic Disruption of Tight Junctions by Ethanol and Acetaldehyde in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Samak, Geetha; Gangwar, Ruchika; Meena, Avtar S; Rao, Roshan G; Shukla, Pradeep K; Manda, Bhargavi; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-12-13

    Ethanol is metabolized into acetaldehyde in most tissues. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on the tight junction integrity in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Expression of alcohol dehydrogenase sensitized Caco-2 cells to ethanol-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction, whereas aldehyde dehydrogenase attenuated acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption. Ethanol up to 150 mM did not affect tight junction integrity or barrier function, but it dose-dependently increased acetaldehyde-mediated tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Src kinase and MLCK inhibitors blocked this synergistic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on tight junction. Ethanol and acetaldehyde caused a rapid and synergistic elevation of intracellular calcium. Calcium depletion by BAPTA or Ca(2+)-free medium blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced barrier dysfunction and tight junction disruption. Diltiazem and selective knockdown of TRPV6 or CaV1.3 channels, by shRNA blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Ethanol and acetaldehyde induced a rapid and synergistic increase in reactive oxygen species by a calcium-dependent mechanism. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cyclosporine A, blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced barrier dysfunction and tight junction disruption. These results demonstrate that ethanol and acetaldehyde synergistically disrupt tight junctions by a mechanism involving calcium, oxidative stress, Src kinase and MLCK.

  20. Calcium/Ask1/MKK7/JNK2/c-Src signalling cascade mediates disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions by dextran sulfate sodium.

    PubMed

    Samak, Geetha; Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Gangwar, Ruchika; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-02-01

    Disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions is an important event in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induces colitis in mice with symptoms similar to ulcerative colitis. However, the mechanism of DSS-induced colitis is unknown. We investigated the mechanism of DSS-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions and barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and mouse colon in vivo. DSS treatment resulted in disruption of tight junctions, adherens junctions and actin cytoskeleton leading to barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers. DSS induced a rapid activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the inhibition or knockdown of JNK2 attenuated DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. In mice, DSS administration for 4 days caused redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins from the epithelial junctions, which was blocked by JNK inhibitor. In Caco-2 cell monolayers, DSS increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, and depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) by 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester) (BAPTA/AM) or thapsigargin attenuated DSS-induced JNK activation, tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Knockdown of apoptosis signal-regulated kinase 1 (Ask1) or MKK7 blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS activated c-Src by a Ca2+ and JNK-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of Src kinase activity or knockdown of c-Src blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS increased tyrosine phosphorylation of occludin, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), E-cadherin and β-catenin. SP600125 abrogated DSS-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of junctional proteins. Recombinant JNK2 induced threonine phosphorylation and auto-phosphorylation of c-Src. The present study demonstrates that Ca(2+)/Ask1/MKK7/JNK2/cSrc signalling cascade mediates DSS-induced tight

  1. Calcium-Ask1-MKK7-JNK2-c-Src Signaling Cascade Mediates Disruption of Intestinal Epithelial Tight Junctions by Dextran Sulfate Sodium

    PubMed Central

    Samak, Geetha; Chaudhry, Kamaljit K.; Gangwar, Ruchika; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions is an important event in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induces colitis in mice with the symptoms similar to ulcerative colitis. However, the mechanism of DSS-induced colitis is unknown. We investigated the mechanism of DSS-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions and barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and mouse colon in vivo. DSS treatment resulted in disruption of tight junctions, adherens junctions and actin cytoskeleton leading to barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers. DSS induced a rapid activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the inhibition or knockdown of JNK2 attenuated DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. In mice, DSS administration for 4 days caused redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins from the epithelial junctions, which was blocked by JNK inhibitor. In Caco-2 cell monolayers, DSS increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and depletion of intracellular Ca2+ by BAPTA or thapsigargin attenuated DSS-induced JNK activation, tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Knockdown of Ask1 or MKK7 blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS activated c-Src by a Ca2+ and JNK-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of Src kinase activity or knockdown of c-Src blocked DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. DSS increased Tyr-phosphorylation of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin and β-catenin. SP600125 abrogated DSS-induced Tyr-phosphorylation of junctional proteins. Recombinant JNK2 induced threonine phosphorylation and auto phosphorylation of c-Src. This study demonstrates that Ca2+-Ask1-MKK7-JNK2-cSrc signaling cascade mediates DSS-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. PMID:25377781

  2. Oncogenic extracellular HSP70 disrupts the gap-junctional coupling between capillary cells

    PubMed Central

    Thuringer, Dominique; Berthenet, Kevin; Cronier, Laurent; Jego, Gaetan; Solary, Eric; Garrido, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    High levels of circulating heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) are detected in many cancers. In order to explore the effects of extracellular HSP70 on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC), we initially used gap-FRAP technique. Extracellular human HSP70 (rhHSP70), but not rhHSP27, blocks the gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) between HMEC, disrupts the structural integrity of HMEC junction plaques, and decreases connexin43 (Cx43) expression, which correlates with the phosphorylation of Cx43 serine residues. Further exploration of these effects identified a rapid transactivation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in a Toll-Like Receptor 4-dependent manner, preceding its internalization. In turn, cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations are generated. Both GJIC blockade and Ca2+ mobilization partially depend on ATP release through Cx43 and pannexin (Panx-1) channels, as demonstrated by blocking activity or expression of channels, and inactivating extracellular ATP. By monitoring dye-spreading into adjacent cells, we show that HSP70 released from human monocytes in response to macrophage colony-stimulating factor, prevents the formation of GJIC between monocytes and HMEC. Therapeutic manipulation of this pathway could be of interest in inflammatory and tumor growth. PMID:25868858

  3. Exogenous retinoic acid induces digit reduction in opossums (Monodelphis domestica) by disrupting cell death and proliferation, and apical ectodermal ridge and zone of polarizing activity function.

    PubMed

    Molineaux, Anna C; Maier, Jennifer A; Schecker, Teresa; Sears, Karen E

    2015-03-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A derivative. Exposure to exogenous RA generates congenital limb malformations (CLMs) in species from frogs to humans. These CLMs include but are not limited to oligodactyly and long-bone hypoplasia. The processes by which exogenous RA induces CLMs in mammals have been best studied in mouse, but as of yet remain unresolved. We investigated the impact of exogenous RA on the cellular and molecular development of the limbs of a nonrodent model mammal, the opossum Monodelphis domestica. Opossums exposed to exogenous retinoic acid display CLMs including oligodactly, and results are consistent with opossum development being more susceptible to RA-induced disruptions than mouse development. Exposure of developing opossums to exogenous RA leads to an increase in cell death in the limb mesenchyme that is most pronounced in the zone of polarizing activity, and a reduction in cell proliferation throughout the limb mesenchyme. Exogenous RA also disrupts the expression of Shh in the zone of polarizing activity, and Fgf8 in the apical ectodermal ridge, and other genes with roles in the regulation of limb development and cell death. Results are consistent with RA inducing CLMs in opossum limbs by disrupting the functions of the apical ectodermal ridge and zone of polarizing activity, and driving an increase in cell death and reduction of cell proliferation in the mesenchyme of the developing limb. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Diminishing parochialism in intergroup conflict by disrupting the right temporo-parietal junction.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Thomas; Schiller, Bastian; Rieskamp, Jörg; Gianotti, Lorena R R; Knoch, Daria

    2014-05-01

    Individuals react to violation of social norms by outgroup members differently than to transgressions of those same norms by ingroup members: namely outgroup perpetrators are punished much more harshly than ingroup perpetrators. This parochial punishment pattern has been observed and extensively studied in social psychology and behavioral economics. Despite progress in recent years, however, little is known about the neural underpinnings of this intergroup bias. Here, we demonstrate by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) that the transient disruption of the right, but not the left temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), reduces parochial punishment in a third-party punishment paradigm with real social groups. Moreover, we show that this observed TMS effect on parochial punishment is mediated by a classical punishment motive, i.e. retaliation. Finally, our data suggests that a change in perspective-taking might be the underlying mechanism that explains the impact of right TPJ disruption on retaliation motivation and parochial punishment. These findings provide the first causal evidence that the right TPJ plays a pivotal role in the implementation of parochial behaviors.

  5. Diminishing parochialism in intergroup conflict by disrupting the right temporo-parietal junction

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Thomas; Schiller, Bastian; Rieskamp, Jörg; Gianotti, Lorena R.R.; Knoch, Daria

    2014-01-01

    Individuals react to violation of social norms by outgroup members differently than to transgressions of those same norms by ingroup members: namely outgroup perpetrators are punished much more harshly than ingroup perpetrators. This parochial punishment pattern has been observed and extensively studied in social psychology and behavioral economics. Despite progress in recent years, however, little is known about the neural underpinnings of this intergroup bias. Here, we demonstrate by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) that the transient disruption of the right, but not the left temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), reduces parochial punishment in a third-party punishment paradigm with real social groups. Moreover, we show that this observed TMS effect on parochial punishment is mediated by a classical punishment motive, i.e. retaliation. Finally, our data suggests that a change in perspective-taking might be the underlying mechanism that explains the impact of right TPJ disruption on retaliation motivation and parochial punishment. These findings provide the first causal evidence that the right TPJ plays a pivotal role in the implementation of parochial behaviors. PMID:23482623

  6. Lipoxin A4 prevents tight junction disruption and delays the colonization of cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Gerard; Fustero Torre, Coral; Tyrrell, Jean; McNally, Paul; Harvey, Brian J; Urbach, Valerie

    2016-06-01

    The specialized proresolution lipid mediator lipoxin A4 (LXA4) is abnormally produced in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. LXA4 increases the CF airway surface liquid height and stimulates airway epithelial repair and tight junction formation. We report here a protective effect of LXA4 (1 nM) against tight junction disruption caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial challenge together with a delaying action against bacterial invasion in CF airway epithelial cells from patients with CF and immortalized cell lines. Bacterial invasion and tight junction integrity were measured by gentamicin exclusion assays and confocal fluorescence microscopy in non-CF (NuLi-1) and CF (CuFi-1) bronchial epithelial cell lines and in primary CF cultures, grown under an air/liquid interface, exposed to either a clinical or laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa LXA4 delayed P. aeruginosa invasion and transepithelial migration in CF and normal bronchial epithelial cell cultures. These protective effects of LXA4 were inhibited by the ALX/FPR2 lipoxin receptor antagonist BOC-2. LXA4 prevented the reduction in mRNA biosynthesis and protein abundance of the tight junction protein ZO-1 and reduced tight junction disruption induced by P. aeruginsosa inoculation. In conclusion, LXA4 plays a protective role in bronchial epithelium by stimulating tight junction repair and by delaying and reducing the invasion of CF bronchial epithelial cells by P. aeruginsosa. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Acetaldehyde disrupts tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers by a protein phosphatase 2A-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dunagan, Mitzi; Chaudhry, Kamaljit; Samak, Geetha; Rao, R K

    2012-12-15

    Acetaldehyde is accumulated at high concentrations in the colonic lumen following ethanol administration. Previous studies demonstrated that acetaldehyde disrupts intestinal epithelial tight junctions and increases paracellular permeability. In the present study, we investigated the role of PP2A in the acetaldehyde-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions. Caco-2 cell monolayers were exposed to 200-600 μM acetaldehyde for varying times, and the epithelial barrier function was evaluated by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance and inulin permeability. Acetaldehyde treatment resulted in a time-dependent increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the intercellular junctions. Treatment of cells with fostriecin (a PP2A-selective inhibitor) or knockdown of PP2A by siRNA blocked acetaldehyde-induced increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1. The effects of fostriecin and acetaldehyde were confirmed in mouse intestine ex vivo. Acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction were also attenuated by a PP2A-specific inhibitory peptide, TPDYFL. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that acetaldehyde increased the interaction of PP2A with occludin and induced dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues. Fostriecin and TPDYFL significantly reduced acetaldehyde-induced threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. Acetaldehyde failed to change the level of the methylated form of PP2A-C subunit. However, genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor) blocked acetaldehyde-induced association of PP2A with occludin and threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. These results demonstrate that acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions is mediated by PP2A translocation to tight junctions and dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues.

  8. Acetaldehyde disrupts tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers by a protein phosphatase 2A-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dunagan, Mitzi; Chaudhry, Kamaljit; Samak, Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Acetaldehyde is accumulated at high concentrations in the colonic lumen following ethanol administration. Previous studies demonstrated that acetaldehyde disrupts intestinal epithelial tight junctions and increases paracellular permeability. In the present study, we investigated the role of PP2A in the acetaldehyde-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions. Caco-2 cell monolayers were exposed to 200–600 μM acetaldehyde for varying times, and the epithelial barrier function was evaluated by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance and inulin permeability. Acetaldehyde treatment resulted in a time-dependent increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the intercellular junctions. Treatment of cells with fostriecin (a PP2A-selective inhibitor) or knockdown of PP2A by siRNA blocked acetaldehyde-induced increase in inulin permeability and redistribution of occludin and ZO-1. The effects of fostriecin and acetaldehyde were confirmed in mouse intestine ex vivo. Acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction were also attenuated by a PP2A-specific inhibitory peptide, TPDYFL. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that acetaldehyde increased the interaction of PP2A with occludin and induced dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues. Fostriecin and TPDYFL significantly reduced acetaldehyde-induced threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. Acetaldehyde failed to change the level of the methylated form of PP2A-C subunit. However, genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor) blocked acetaldehyde-induced association of PP2A with occludin and threonine dephosphorylation of occludin. These results demonstrate that acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions is mediated by PP2A translocation to tight junctions and dephosphorylation of occludin on threonine residues. PMID:23064762

  9. Cigarette smoke disrupts the integrity of airway adherens junctions through the aberrant interaction of p120-catenin with the cytoplasmic tail of MUC1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Gallup, Marianne; Zlock, Lorna; Basbaum, Carol; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; McNamara, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) containing epithelial cadherin (E-cad) bound to p120-catenin (p120ctn) and β-catenin (β-ctn) play a crucial role in regulating cell–cell adhesion. Cigarette smoke abrogates cell–cell adhesion between epithelial cells by disrupting E-cad, a hallmark of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), yet the underlying mechanism remains unknown. We used an organotypic culture of primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with smoke-concentrated medium (Smk) to establish an essential role for the interaction between p120ctn and the cytoplasmic tail of MUC1 (MUC1-CT) in regulating E-cad disruption. Within the first 4 h of smoke exposure, apical MUC1-CT repositioned to the basolateral membrane of pseudo-stratified HBE cells, where it interacted with p120ctn. A time-dependent increase in MUC1-CT/p120ctn complexes occurred in conjunction with a time-dependent dissociation of p120ctn/E-cad/β-ctn complexes, as well as the coordinated degradation of p120ctn and E-cad. Interestingly, Smk induced a similar interaction between MUC1-CT and β-ctn, but this occurred 44 h after MUC1-CT’s initial interaction with p120ctn, and well after the AJs were destroyed. Blocking MUC1-CT’s interaction with p120ctn using a MUC1-CT dominant-negative peptide, PMIP, successfully abolished Smk’s disruptive effects on AJs and recovered apical-basolateral polarity of HBE cells. The MUC1-CT/p120ctn interaction was highly dependent on EGFR/Src/Jnk-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation (TyrP) of MUC1-CT. Accordingly, EGFR, Src or Jnk inhibitors (AG1478, PP2, SP600125, respectively) abrogated Smk-induced MUC1-CT-TyrP, MUC1-CT/p120ctn interaction, AJ disruption, and loss of cellular polarity. Our work identified MUC1-CT and p120ctn as important regulators of epithelial polarity and cell-cell adhesion during a smoke-induced EMT-like process. Novel therapeutics designed to inhibit MUC1-CT/p120ctn complex formation may prevent EMT in the smoker’s airway. PMID

  10. Petri Net-Based Model of Helicobacter pylori Mediated Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins in Stomach Lining during Gastric Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Anam; Obaid, Ayesha; Awan, Faryal M.; Ikram, Aqsa; Ahmad, Jamil; Ali, Amjad

    2017-01-01

    Tight junctions help prevent the passage of digestive enzymes and microorganisms through the space between adjacent epithelial cells lining. However, Helicobacter pylori encoded virulence factors negatively regulate these tight junctions and contribute to dysfunction of gastric mucosa. Here, we have predicted the regulation of important tight junction proteins, such as Zonula occludens-1, Claudin-2 and Connexin32 in the presence of pathogenic proteins. Molecular events such as post translational modifications and crosstalk between phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, palmitoylation and methylation are explored which may compromise the integrity of these tight junction proteins. Furthermore, the signaling pathways disrupted by dysregulated kinases, proteins and post-translational modifications are reviewed to design an abstracted computational model showing the situation-dependent dynamic behaviors of these biological processes and entities. A qualitative hybrid Petri Net model is therefore constructed showing the altered host pathways in the presence of virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A, leading to the disruption of tight junction proteins. The model is qualitative logic-based, which does not depend on any kinetic parameter and quantitative data and depends on knowledge derived from experiments. The designed model provides insights into the tight junction disruption and disease progression. Model is then verified by the available experimental data, nevertheless formal in vitro experimentation is a promising way to ensure its validation. The major findings propose that H. pylori activated kinases are responsible to trigger specific post translational modifications within tight junction proteins, at specific sites. These modifications may favor alterations in gastric barrier and provide a route to bacterial invasion into host cells. PMID:28932213

  11. Petri Net-Based Model of Helicobacter pylori Mediated Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins in Stomach Lining during Gastric Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Naz, Anam; Obaid, Ayesha; Awan, Faryal M; Ikram, Aqsa; Ahmad, Jamil; Ali, Amjad

    2017-01-01

    Tight junctions help prevent the passage of digestive enzymes and microorganisms through the space between adjacent epithelial cells lining. However, Helicobacter pylori encoded virulence factors negatively regulate these tight junctions and contribute to dysfunction of gastric mucosa. Here, we have predicted the regulation of important tight junction proteins, such as Zonula occludens-1, Claudin-2 and Connexin32 in the presence of pathogenic proteins. Molecular events such as post translational modifications and crosstalk between phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, palmitoylation and methylation are explored which may compromise the integrity of these tight junction proteins. Furthermore, the signaling pathways disrupted by dysregulated kinases, proteins and post-translational modifications are reviewed to design an abstracted computational model showing the situation-dependent dynamic behaviors of these biological processes and entities. A qualitative hybrid Petri Net model is therefore constructed showing the altered host pathways in the presence of virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A, leading to the disruption of tight junction proteins. The model is qualitative logic-based, which does not depend on any kinetic parameter and quantitative data and depends on knowledge derived from experiments. The designed model provides insights into the tight junction disruption and disease progression. Model is then verified by the available experimental data, nevertheless formal in vitro experimentation is a promising way to ensure its validation. The major findings propose that H. pylori activated kinases are responsible to trigger specific post translational modifications within tight junction proteins, at specific sites. These modifications may favor alterations in gastric barrier and provide a route to bacterial invasion into host cells.

  12. Arecoline induced disruption of expression and localization of the tight junctional protein ZO-1 is dependent on the HER 2 expression in human endometrial Ishikawa cells.

    PubMed

    Giri, Sarbani; Poindexter, Kevin M; Sundar, Shyam N; Firestone, Gary L

    2010-07-06

    disrupts cell-cell interactions mediated by ZO-1, which may play a role in arecoline-mediated carcinogenesis. Furthermore, our study has uncovered the dependency of ZO-1 localization and expression on HER2 expression, which has therefore established a new cellular link between HER2 mediated signaling and apical junction formation involving ZO-1.

  13. Arecoline induced disruption of expression and localization of the tight junctional protein ZO-1 is dependent on the HER 2 expression in human endometrial Ishikawa cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    that arecoline potentially disrupts cell-cell interactions mediated by ZO-1, which may play a role in arecoline-mediated carcinogenesis. Furthermore, our study has uncovered the dependency of ZO-1 localization and expression on HER2 expression, which has therefore established a new cellular link between HER2 mediated signaling and apical junction formation involving ZO-1. PMID:20604955

  14. Disruption of gap junctions reduces biomarkers of decidualization and angiogenesis and increases inflammatory mediators in human endometrial stromal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Wu, Juanjuan; Bagchi, Indrani C; Bagchi, Milan K; Sidell, Neil; Taylor, Robert N

    2011-09-15

    Uterine decidualization is critical to embryonic implantation and sustained pregnancy. To evaluate the role of gap junction intercellular communications and connexin (Cx) proteins in the morphological and biochemical differentiation of decidualized human endometrial stromal cell (ESC) cultures. Translational cell biological study. Academic medical center. Endometrial tissue was provided by five healthy reproductive age women on no hormonal medication, undergoing laparoscopy in the early proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Endometrial biopsy under general anesthesia, establishment and decidualization of ESC with 10 nM 17β-estradiol, 100 nM progesterone and 0.5 mM dibutyryl-cAMP (E/P/c), and manipulation of gap junctions in vitro via a combination of pharmacological or transgenic approaches. Decidualized ESC evaluated morphologically for epithelioid transformation, gap junctions by dye diffusion and Cx43, prolactin, VEGF and IL-6 expression by RT-PCR, Western and ELISA methods. Cx43 accumulation and functional gap junctions between decidualized ESC increase concomitantly with morphological differentiation following E/P/c treatment. Disruption of gap junctions using pharmacological inhibitors or Cx43 shRNA prevents morphological differentiation and inhibits prolactin and VEGF secretion. By contrast, IL-6 secretion from decidualized ESC is augmented by both approaches. The findings suggest that decidualized ESC function as a coordinated secretory organ to regulate embryonic implantation via intercellular cooperation mediated by gap junctions. When adjacent cells can communicate through these junctions, decidual prolactin and VEGF secretion appears to be optimized for vascular development of the placental bed. Conversely, when intercellular communications are disrupted, angiogenesis is impaired and an inflammatory state is induced. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeted Disruption of Core 1 β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1galt1) Induces Apical Endocytic Trafficking in Human Corneal Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Woodward, Ashley M.; Pintor, Jesús; Argüeso, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposed mucosal surfaces limit constitutive endocytosis under physiological conditions to prevent uptake of macromolecules and pathogens and, therefore, cellular damage. It is now accepted that cell surface mucins, a group of high molecular weight glycoproteins on the epithelial glycocalyx, defined by their extensive O-glycosylation, play a major role in maintaining barrier function in these surfaces, but the precise mechanisms are unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we utilized a stable tetracycline-inducible RNA interfering system targeting the core 1 ß1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1galt1 or T-synthase), a critical galactosyltransferase required for the synthesis of core 1 O-glycans, to explore the role of mucin-type carbohydrates in apical endocytic trafficking in human corneal keratinocytes. Using cell surface biotinylation and subcellular fractionation, we found increased accumulation of plasma membrane protein in endosomes after C1galt1 depletion. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorometry revealed increased translocation of negatively charged fluorescent nanospheres after C1galt1 knockdown sustained by an active transport process and largely independent of apical intercellular junctions. Internalization of nanospheres could be blocked by dynasore, nocodazole, chlorpromazine, and hyperosmotic sucrose, suggesting a mechanism for clathrin-coated pit budding and vesicular trafficking. This possibility was supported by experiments showing nanosphere colocalization with clathrin heavy chain in the cytoplasm. Conclusions/Significance Together, the data suggest that core 1 O-glycans contribute to maintenance of apical barrier function on exposed mucosal surfaces by preventing clathrin-mediated endocytosis. PMID:22574202

  16. H. pylori-encoded CagA disrupts tight junctions and induces invasiveness of AGS gastric carcinoma cells via Cdx2-dependent targeting of Claudin-2.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin; Chen, Hui-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Deng, Xi-Yun; Xi, Yin-Xue; He, Qing; Peng, Tie-Li; Chen, Jie; Chen, Wei; Wong, Benjamin Chun-Yu; Chen, Min-Hu

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori encoded CagA is presently the only known virulence factor that is injected into gastric epithelial cells where it destroys apical junctional complexes and induces dedifferentiation of gastric epithelial cells, leading to H. pylori-related gastric carcinogensis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which CagA mediates these changes. Caudal-related homeobox 2 (Cdx2) is an intestine-specific transcription factor highly expressed in multistage tissues of dysplasia and cancer. One specific target of Cdx2, Claudin-2, is involved in the regulation of tight junction (TJ) permeability. In this study, our findings showed that the activity of Cdx2 binding to Cdx binding sites of CdxA (GTTTATG) and CdxB (TTTTAGG) of probes corresponding to claudin-2 flanking region increased in AGS cells, infected with CagA positive wild-type strain of H. pylori, compared to CagA negative isogenic mutant-type strain. Moreover, Cdx2 upregulated claudin-2 expression at transcriptional level and translational level. In the meantime, we found that TJs of AGS cells, infected with CagA positive wild-type strain of H. pylori, compared to CagA negative isogenic mutant-type strain, were more severely destroyed, leading to wider cell gap, interference of contact, scattering and highly elevated migration of cells. Herein, this study is firstly demonstrated that H. pylori-encoded CagA disrupts TJs and induces invasiveness of AGS gastric carcinoma cells via Cdx2-dependent targeting of Claudin-2. This provides a new mechanism whereby CagA induced dedifferentiation of AGS cells, leading to malignant behavior of biology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The cadmium-induced disruption of tight junctions in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells does not result from apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Prozialeck, W.C.; Wellington, D.R.; Mosher, T.L.

    1995-09-01

    Exposure of LLC-PK{sub 1} cells to low micromolar concentrations of Cd{sup 2+} for 1-4 hours causes the disruption of the adhering and occluding junctions between the cells, whereas exposure to higher concentrations of Cd{sup 2+} for longer periods of time causes more severe toxic effects and cell death. The objective of the present studies was to determine whether or not the junctional effects of Cd{sup 2+} might be a consequence of apoptotic injury. LLC-PK{sub 1} cells on cell culture inserts were exposed to either Cd{sup +2} or tumor necrosis factor (TNF-{alpha}) plus cycloheximide, a treatment that has recently been shown to cause apoptosis in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells. The results showed that at the time the Cd{sup 2+}-induced junctional changes were occurring, there was no increase in the number of apoptotic cells or evidence of DNA fragmentation. By contrast, TNF-{alpha} plus cycloheximide induced changes that were characteristic of apoptosis. These results indicate that the disruption of intercellular junctions by Cd{sup 2+} in the LLC-PK{sub 1} cell line occurs independently of apoptosis. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Cell Junction Pathology of Neural Stem Cells Is Associated With Ventricular Zone Disruption, Hydrocephalus, and Abnormal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guerra, María Montserrat; Henzi, Roberto; Ortloff, Alexander; Lichtin, Nicole; Vío, Karin; Jiménez, Antonio J; Dominguez-Pinos, María Dolores; González, César; Jara, Maria Clara; Hinostroza, Fernando; Rodríguez, Sara; Jara, Maryoris; Ortega, Eduardo; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Pérez-Fígares, José M; McAllister, James P; Johanson, Conrad E; Rodríguez, Esteban M

    2015-07-01

    Fetal-onset hydrocephalus affects 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births. It is not only a disorder of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics but also a brain disorder that corrective surgery does not ameliorate. We hypothesized that cell junction abnormalities of neural stem cells (NSCs) lead to the inseparable phenomena of fetal-onset hydrocephalus and abnormal neurogenesis. We used bromodeoxyuridine labeling, immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, and cell culture to study the telencephalon of hydrocephalic HTx rats and correlated our findings with those in human hydrocephalic and nonhydrocephalic human fetal brains (n = 12 each). Our results suggest that abnormal expression of the intercellular junction proteins N-cadherin and connexin-43 in NSC leads to 1) disruption of the ventricular and subventricular zones, loss of NSCs and neural progenitor cells; and 2) abnormalities in neurogenesis such as periventricular heterotopias and abnormal neuroblast migration. In HTx rats, the disrupted NSC and progenitor cells are shed into the cerebrospinal fluid and can be grown into neurospheres that display intercellular junction abnormalities similar to those of NSC of the disrupted ventricular zone; nevertheless, they maintain their potential for differentiating into neurons and glia. These NSCs can be used to investigate cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, thereby opening the avenue for stem cell therapy.

  19. Cerebral hypoxia/ischemia selectively disrupts tight junctions complexes in stem cell-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Page, Shyanne; Munsell, Alli; Al-Ahmad, Abraham J

    2016-10-11

    Cerebral hypoxia/ischemia (H/I) is an important stress factor involved in the disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following stroke injury, yet the cellular and molecular mechanisms on how the human BBB responds to such injury remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cellular response of the human BBB to chemical and environmental H/I in vitro. In this study, we used immortalized hCMEC/D3 and IMR90 stem-cell derived human brain microvascular endothelial cell lines (IMR90-derived BMECs). Hypoxic stress was achieved by exposure to cobalt chloride (CoCl2) or by exposure to 1 % hypoxia and oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) was used to model ischemic injury. We assessed barrier function using both transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and sodium fluorescein permeability. Changes in cell junction integrity were assessed by immunocytochemistry and cell viability was assessed by trypan-blue exclusion and by MTS assays. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). CoCl2 selectively disrupted the barrier function in IMR90-derived BMECs but not in hCMEC/D3 monolayers and cytotoxic effects did not drive such disruption. In addition, hypoxia/OGD stress significantly disrupted the barrier function by selectively disrupting tight junctions (TJs) complexes. In addition, we noted an uncoupling between cell metabolic activity and barrier integrity. In this study, we demonstrated the ability of IMR90-derived BMECs to respond to hypoxic/ischemic injury triggered by both chemical and environmental stress by showing a disruption of the barrier function. Such disruption was selectively targeting TJ complexes and was not driven by cellular apoptosis. In conclusion, this study suggests the suitability of stem cell-derived human BMECs monolayers as a model of cerebral hypoxia/ischemia in vitro.

  20. Calcium depletion-mediated protease inhibition and apical-junctional-complex disassembly via an EGTA-conjugated carrier for oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Er-Yuan; Lin, Kun-Ju; Su, Fang-Yi; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Maiti, Barnali; Ho, Yi-Cheng; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Panda, Nilendu; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2013-08-10

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) has a crucial role in maintaining the intestinal protease activity and in forming the apical junctional complex (AJC) that preserves epithelial barrier function. Ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) is a Ca(2+)-specific chelating agent. To maintain the concentration of this chelator in areas where enzyme inhibition and paracellular permeation enhancement are needed, this study synthesized a poly(γ-glutamic acid)-EGTA conjugate (γPGA-EGTA) to form nanoparticles (NPs) with chitosan (CS) for oral insulin delivery. The results of our molecular dynamic (MD) simulations indicate that Ca(2+) ions could be specifically chelated to the nitrogen atoms, ether oxygen atoms, and carboxylate oxygen atoms in [Ca(EGTA)](2-) anions. By chelating Ca(2+), γPGA-EGTA conferred a significant insulin protection effect against proteases in intestinal tracts isolated from rats. Additionally, calcium depletion by γPGA-EGTA could stimulate the endocytosis of AJC components in Caco-2 cell monolayers, which led to a reversible opening of AJCs and thus increased their paracellular permeability. Single-photon emission computed tomography images performed in the biodistribution study clearly show the (123)I-insulin orally delivered by CS/γPGA-EGTA NPs in the heart, aorta, renal cortex, renal pelvis and liver, which ultimately produced a significant and prolonged hypoglycemic effect in diabetic rats. The above results confirm that this γPGA-EGTA conjugate is a promising candidate for oral insulin delivery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mild hypothermia alleviates brain oedema and blood-brain barrier disruption by attenuating tight junction and adherens junction breakdown in a swine model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiebin; Li, Chunsheng; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Yongzhen

    2017-01-01

    Mild hypothermia improves survival and neurological recovery after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether mild hypothermia alleviates early blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We investigated the effects of mild hypothermia on neurologic outcome, survival rate, brain water content, BBB permeability and changes in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) after CA and CPR. Pigs were subjected to 8 min of untreated ventricular fibrillation followed by CPR. Mild hypothermia (33°C) was intravascularly induced and maintained at this temperature for 12 h, followed by active rewarming. Mild hypothermia significantly reduced cortical water content, decreased BBB permeability and attenuated TJ ultrastructural and basement membrane breakdown in brain cortical microvessels. Mild hypothermia also attenuated the CPR-induced decreases in TJ (occludin, claudin-5, ZO-1) and AJ (VE-cadherin) protein and mRNA expression. Furthermore, mild hypothermia decreased the CA- and CPR-induced increases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and increased angiogenin-1 (Ang-1) expression. Our findings suggest that mild hypothermia attenuates the CA- and resuscitation-induced early brain oedema and BBB disruption, and this improvement might be at least partially associated with attenuation of the breakdown of TJ and AJ, suppression of MMP-9 and VEGF expression, and upregulation of Ang-1 expression.

  2. Mild hypothermia alleviates brain oedema and blood-brain barrier disruption by attenuating tight junction and adherens junction breakdown in a swine model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiebin; Li, Chunsheng; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Yongzhen

    2017-01-01

    Mild hypothermia improves survival and neurological recovery after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether mild hypothermia alleviates early blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We investigated the effects of mild hypothermia on neurologic outcome, survival rate, brain water content, BBB permeability and changes in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) after CA and CPR. Pigs were subjected to 8 min of untreated ventricular fibrillation followed by CPR. Mild hypothermia (33°C) was intravascularly induced and maintained at this temperature for 12 h, followed by active rewarming. Mild hypothermia significantly reduced cortical water content, decreased BBB permeability and attenuated TJ ultrastructural and basement membrane breakdown in brain cortical microvessels. Mild hypothermia also attenuated the CPR-induced decreases in TJ (occludin, claudin-5, ZO-1) and AJ (VE-cadherin) protein and mRNA expression. Furthermore, mild hypothermia decreased the CA- and CPR-induced increases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and increased angiogenin-1 (Ang-1) expression. Our findings suggest that mild hypothermia attenuates the CA- and resuscitation-induced early brain oedema and BBB disruption, and this improvement might be at least partially associated with attenuation of the breakdown of TJ and AJ, suppression of MMP-9 and VEGF expression, and upregulation of Ang-1 expression. PMID:28355299

  3. Enteric Pathogens and Their Toxin-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier through Alteration of Tight Junctions in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Hess, Claudia; Hess, Michael

    2017-02-10

    utilize tight junction proteins as receptors for attachment and subsequent internalization, while others modify or destroy the tight junction proteins by different pathways and thereby provide a gateway to the underlying tissue. This review aims to deliver an overview of the tight junction structures and function, and its role in enteric bacterial pathogenesis with a special focus on chickens. A main conclusion will be that the molecular mechanisms used by enteric pathogens to disrupt epithelial barrier function in chickens needs a much better understanding, explicitly highlighted for Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica and Clostridium perfringens. This is a requirement in order to assist in discovering new strategies to avoid damages of the intestinal barrier or to minimize consequences from infections.

  4. Calcium-mediated oxidative stress: a common mechanism in tight junction disruption by different types of cellular stress.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, Ruchika; Meena, Avtar S; Shukla, Pradeep K; Nagaraja, Archana S; Dorniak, Piotr L; Pallikuth, Sandeep; Waters, Christopher M; Sood, Anil; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2017-02-20

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in osmotic stress, dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and cyclic stretch-induced tight junction (TJ) disruption was investigated in Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and restraint stress-induced barrier dysfunction in mouse colon in vivo Live cell imaging showed that osmotic stress, cyclic stretch and DSS triggered rapid production of ROS in Caco-2 cell monolayers, which was blocked by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) by 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. Knockdown of CaV1.3 or TRPV6 channels blocked osmotic stress and DSS-induced ROS production and attenuated TJ disruption and barrier dysfunction. N-Acetyl l-cysteine (NAC) and l-N(G)-Nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME) blocked stress-induced TJ disruption and barrier dysfunction. NAC and l-NAME also blocked stress-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Src. ROS was colocalized with the mitochondrial marker in stressed cells. Cyclosporin A blocked osmotic stress and DSS-induced ROS production, barrier dysfunction, TJ disruption and JNK activation. Mitochondria-targeted Mito-TEMPO blocked osmotic stress and DSS-induced barrier dysfunction and TJ disruption. Chronic restraint stress in mice resulted in the elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), activation of JNK and c-Src, and disruption of TJ in the colonic epithelium. Furthermore, corticosterone administration induced JNK and c-Src activation, TJ disruption and protein thiol oxidation in colonic mucosa. The present study demonstrates that oxidative stress is a common signal in the mechanism of TJ disruption in the intestinal epithelium by different types of cellular stress in vitro and bio behavioral stress in vivo. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. The effect of flowable materials on the microleakage of Class II composite restorations that extend apical to the cemento-enamel junction.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mostafa; Lynch, Christopher D

    2009-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the effects of a thin layer of flowable composite or compomer on microleakage occurring in Class II packable and nanofilled composite restorations that extend apical to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The current study also investigated any differences in microleakage that occur between restorations light-cured using a light-emitting diode (LED) and a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light-curing unit. Standardized Class II "slot" cavity preparations were prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 72 extracted, unrestored, non-carious premolars (n = 144). The gingival margins were placed 1 mm apical to the CEJ. The teeth were divided into two groups (n = 72) and restored with a "packable composite" (Filtek P60) or a "nano-filled composite" (Universal Filtek Supreme XT) with or without flowable composite (Flowable Filtek Supreme XT) or flowable composite (Dyract Flow) as gingival liners placed with thicknesses of 1.0 mm. Each increment was cured for 20 seconds before adding the next. One-half of the samples in each group was cured with QTH (Coltolux 75) and the other half with LED (Coltolux LED) LCUs. After a two-week incubation period at 37 degrees C, the specimens were thermocycled (5 degrees C-55 degrees C x 1500), immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours, sectioned and the microleakage was then evaluated at the gingival margin by two examiners using a 0-3 score scale. Within the current study, when flowable liners were used, both the packable (Filtek P60) and nanofilled (Filtek Supreme XT Universal Restorative) composite materials had significantly less microleakage than when flowable liners were not used (p < 0.05). Both flowable liners (Flowable Filtek Supreme XT and Dyract Flow) resulted in a significant reduction of the microleakage occurring under both types of composite materials at the gingival floors ( p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between them. The choice of light curing technology (LED vs

  6. The Mobile bypass Signal Arrests Shoot Growth by Disrupting Shoot Apical Meristem Maintenance, Cytokinin Signaling, and WUS Transcription Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Keun; Parrott, David L; Adhikari, Emma; Fraser, Nisa; Sieburth, Leslie E

    2016-07-01

    The bypass1 (bps1) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) produces a root-sourced compound (the bps signal) that moves to the shoot and is sufficient to arrest growth of a wild-type shoot; however, the mechanism of growth arrest is not understood. Here, we show that the earliest shoot defect arises during germination and is a failure of bps1 mutants to maintain their shoot apical meristem (SAM). This finding suggested that the bps signal might affect expression or function of SAM regulatory genes, and we found WUSCHEL (WUS) expression to be repressed in bps1 mutants. Repression appears to arise from the mobile bps signal, as the bps1 root was sufficient to rapidly down-regulate WUS expression in wild-type shoots. Normally, WUS is regulated by a balance between positive regulation by cytokinin (CK) and negative regulation by CLAVATA (CLV). In bps1, repression of WUS was independent of CLV, and, instead, the bps signal down-regulates CK responses. Cytokinin treatment of bps1 mutants restored both WUS expression and activity, but only in the rib meristem. How the bps signal down-regulates CK remains unknown, though the bps signal was sufficient to repress expression of one CK receptor (AHK4) and one response regulator (AHP6). Together, these data suggest that the bps signal pathway has the potential for long-distance regulation through modification of CK signaling and altering gene expression. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Enteropathogenic E. coli Effectors EspG1/G2 Disrupt Microtubules, Contribute to Tight Junction Perturbation and Inhibit Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Glotfelty, Lila G.; Zahs, Anita; Hodges, Kimberley; Shan, Kuangda; Alto, Neal M.; Hecht, Gail A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses a type 3 secretion system to transfer effector proteins into the host intestinal epithelial cell. Several effector molecules contribute to tight junction disruption including EspG1 and its homolog EspG2 via a mechanism thought to involve microtubule destruction. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of EspG-mediated microtubule disruption to TJ perturbation. We demonstrate that wild type EPEC infection disassembles microtubules and induces the progressive movement of occludin away from the membrane and into the cytosol. Deletion of espG1/G2 attenuates both of these phenotypes. In addition, EPEC infection impedes barrier recovery from calcium switch, suggesting that inhibition of TJ restoration, not merely disruption, prolongs barrier loss. TJs recover more rapidly following infection with ΔespG1/G2 than with wild type EPEC, demonstrating that EspG1/G2 perpetuate barrier loss. Although EspG regulates ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) and p21-activated kinase (PAK), these activities are not necessary for microtubule destruction or perturbation of TJ structure and function. These data strongly support a role for EspG1/G2 and its associated effects on microtubules in delaying the recovery of damaged tight junctions caused by EPEC infection. PMID:24948117

  8. Calcium oxalate crystals induces tight junction disruption in distal renal tubular epithelial cells by activating ROS/Akt/p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Gan, Xiuguo; Liu, Xukun; An, Ruihua

    2017-11-01

    Tight junction plays important roles in regulating paracellular transports and maintaining cell polarity. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals, the major crystalline composition of kidney stones, have been demonstrated to be able to cause tight junction disruption to accelerate renal cell injury. However, the cellular signaling involved in COM crystal-induced tight junction disruption remains largely to be investigated. In the present study, we proved that COM crystals induced tight junction disruption by activating ROS/Akt/p38 MAPK pathway. Treating Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells with COM crystals induced a substantial increasing of ROS generation and activation of Akt that triggered subsequential activation of ASK1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Western blot revealed a significantly decreased expression of ZO-1 and occludin, two important structural proteins of tight junction. Besides, redistribution and dissociation of ZO-1 were observed by COM crystals treatment. Inhibition of ROS by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) attenuated the activation of Akt, ASK1, p38 MAPK, and down-regulation of ZO-1 and occludin. The redistribution and dissociation of ZO-1 were also alleviated by NAC treatment. These results indicated that ROS were involved in the regulation of tight junction disruption induced by COM crystals. In addition, the down-regulation of ZO-1 and occludin, the phosphorylation of ASK1 and p38 MAPK were also attenuated by MK-2206, an inhibitor of Akt kinase, implying Akt was involved in the disruption of tight junction upstream of p38 MAPK. Thus, these results suggested that ROS-Akt-p38 MAPK signaling pathway was activated in COM crystal-induced disruption of tight junction in MDCK cells.

  9. Enteric Pathogens and Their Toxin-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier through Alteration of Tight Junctions in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Wageha A.; Hess, Claudia; Hess, Michael

    2017-01-01

    can utilize tight junction proteins as receptors for attachment and subsequent internalization, while others modify or destroy the tight junction proteins by different pathways and thereby provide a gateway to the underlying tissue. This review aims to deliver an overview of the tight junction structures and function, and its role in enteric bacterial pathogenesis with a special focus on chickens. A main conclusion will be that the molecular mechanisms used by enteric pathogens to disrupt epithelial barrier function in chickens needs a much better understanding, explicitly highlighted for Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica and Clostridium perfringens. This is a requirement in order to assist in discovering new strategies to avoid damages of the intestinal barrier or to minimize consequences from infections. PMID:28208612

  10. Suppression of Rac1 activity at the apical membrane of MDCK cells is essential for cyst structure maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Shunsuke; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Kiyokawa, Etsuko

    2012-01-01

    Using MDCK cells that constitutively express a Förster resonance energy transfer biosensor, we found that Rac1 activity is homogenous at the entire plasma membrane in early stages of cystogenesis, whereas in later stages Rac1 activity is higher at the lateral membrane than at the apical plasma membrane. If Rac1 is activated at the apical membrane in later stages, however, the monolayer cells move into the luminal space. In these cells, tight junctions are disrupted, accompanied by mislocalization of polarization markers and disorientation of cell division. These observations indicate that Rac1 suppression at the apical membrane is essential for the maintenance of cyst structure. PMID:22261715

  11. Tight junction disruption: Helicobacter pylori and dysregulation of the gastric mucosal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Tyler J; Scott, Kathleen E; Fox, James G; Hagen, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Long-term chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a risk factor for gastric cancer development. In the multi-step process that leads to gastric cancer, tight junction dysfunction is thought to occur and serve as a risk factor by permitting the permeation of luminal contents across an otherwise tight mucosa. Mechanisms that regulate tight junction function and structure in the normal stomach, or dysfunction in the infected stomach, however, are largely unknown. Although conventional tight junction components are expressed in gastric epithelial cells, claudins regulate paracellular permeability and are likely the target of inflammation or H. pylori itself. There are 27 different claudin molecules, each with unique properties that render the mucosa an intact barrier that is permselective in a way that is consistent with cell physiology. Understanding the architecture of tight junctions in the normal stomach and then changes that occur during infection is important but challenging, because most of the reports that catalog claudin expression in gastric cancer pathogenesis are contradictory. Furthermore, the role of H. pylori virulence factors, such as cytotoxin-associated gene A and vacoulating cytotoxin, in regulating tight junction dysfunction during infection is inconsistent in different gastric cell lines and in vivo, likely because non-gastric epithelial cell cultures were initially used to unravel the details of their effects on the stomach. Hampering further study, as well, is the relative lack of cultured cell models that have tight junction claudins that are consistent with native tissues. This summary will review the current state of knowledge about gastric tight junctions, normally and in H. pylori infection, and make predictions about the consequences of claudin reorganization during H. pylori infection. PMID:26523106

  12. Activation of classical estrogen receptor subtypes reduces tight junction disruption of brain endothelial cells under ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin A; Yoon, Joo Chun; Kim, Minsuk; Park, Eun-Mi

    2016-03-01

    Ischemic stroke, which induces oxidative stress in the brain, disrupts tight junctions (TJs) between brain endothelial cells, resulting in blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and brain edema. Estrogen reduces oxidative stress and protects brain endothelial cells from ischemic insult. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effects of estrogen on TJ disruption and to examine the roles of classical estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes, ERα- and ERβ, in estrogen effects in brain endothelial cells (bEnd.3) exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R) injury. Estrogen pretreatment prevented OGD/R-induced decreases in cell viability and TJ protein levels. ERα- and ERβ-specific agonists also reduced TJ disruption. Knockdown of ERα or ERβ expression partially inhibited the effects of estrogen, but completely reversed the effects of corresponding ER subtype-specific agonists on the outcomes of OGD/R. During the early reperfusion period, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α/vascular endothelial growth factor was associated with decreased expression of occludin and claudin-5, respectively, and these changes in TJ protein levels were differentially regulated by ER subtype-specific agonists. Our results suggest that ERα and ERβ activation reduce TJ disruption via inhibition of signaling molecules after ischemic injury and that targeting each ER subtype can be a useful strategy for protecting the BBB from ischemic stroke in postmenopausal women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Irinotecan disrupts tight junction proteins within the gut : implications for chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Hannah R; Bowen, Joanne M; Al-Dasooqi, Noor; Sultani, Masooma; Bateman, Emma; Stansborough, Romany; Shirren, Joseph; Gibson, Rachel J

    2014-02-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer causes significant gut toxicity, leading to severe clinical manifestations and an increased economic burden. Despite much research, many of the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood hindering effective treatment options. Recently there has been renewed interest in the role tight junctions play in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity. To delineate the underlying mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity, this study aimed to quantify the molecular changes in key tight junction proteins, ZO-1, claudin-1, and occludin, using a well-established preclinical model of gut toxicity. Female tumor-bearing dark agouti rats received irinotecan or vehicle control and were assessed for validated parameters of gut toxicity including diarrhea and weight loss. Rats were killed at 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h post-chemotherapy. Tight junction protein and mRNA expression in the small and large intestines were assessed using semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Significant changes in protein expression of tight junction proteins were seen in both the jejunum and colon, correlating with key histological changes and clinical features. mRNA levels of claudin-1 were significantly decreased early after irinotecan in the small and large intestines. ZO-1 and occludin mRNA levels remained stable across the time-course of gut toxicity. Findings strongly suggest irinotecan causes tight junction defects which lead to mucosal barrier dysfunction and the development of diarrhea. Detailed research is now warranted to investigate posttranslational regulation of tight junction proteins to delineate the underlying pathophysiology of gut toxicity and identify future therapeutic targets.

  14. Poly(I:C) Induces Human Lung Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction by Disrupting Tight Junction Expression of Claudin-5

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Li -Yun; Stuart, Christine; Takeda, Kazuyo; ...

    2016-08-09

    Viral infections are often accompanied by pulmonary microvascular leakage and vascular endothelial dysfunction via mechanisms that are not completely defined. Here, we investigated the effect of the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [Poly(I:C)], a synthetic analog of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) commonly used to simulate viral infections, on the barrier function and tight junction integrity of primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Poly(I:C) stimulated IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, and IFNβ production in conjunction with the activation of NF-κB and IRF3 confirming the Poly(I:C)-responsiveness of these cells. Poly(I:C) increased endothelialmonolayer permeability with a corresponding dose- and time-dependent decrease in themore » expression of claudin-5, a transmembrane tight junction protein and reduction of CLDN5 mRNA levels. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed disappearance of membrane-associated claudin-5 and co-localization of cytoplasmic claudin-5 with lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1. Chloroquine and Bay11-7082, inhibitors of TLR3 and NF-κB signaling, respectively, protected against the loss of claudin-5. Altogether, these findings provide new insight on how dsRNA-activated signaling pathways may disrupt vascular endothelial function and contribute to vascular leakage pathologies.« less

  15. Poly(I:C) Induces Human Lung Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction by Disrupting Tight Junction Expression of Claudin-5

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li -Yun; Stuart, Christine; Takeda, Kazuyo; D’Agnillo, Felice; Golding, Basil; Deli, Mária A.

    2016-08-09

    Viral infections are often accompanied by pulmonary microvascular leakage and vascular endothelial dysfunction via mechanisms that are not completely defined. Here, we investigated the effect of the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [Poly(I:C)], a synthetic analog of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) commonly used to simulate viral infections, on the barrier function and tight junction integrity of primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Poly(I:C) stimulated IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, and IFNβ production in conjunction with the activation of NF-κB and IRF3 confirming the Poly(I:C)-responsiveness of these cells. Poly(I:C) increased endothelialmonolayer permeability with a corresponding dose- and time-dependent decrease in the expression of claudin-5, a transmembrane tight junction protein and reduction of CLDN5 mRNA levels. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed disappearance of membrane-associated claudin-5 and co-localization of cytoplasmic claudin-5 with lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1. Chloroquine and Bay11-7082, inhibitors of TLR3 and NF-κB signaling, respectively, protected against the loss of claudin-5. Altogether, these findings provide new insight on how dsRNA-activated signaling pathways may disrupt vascular endothelial function and contribute to vascular leakage pathologies.

  16. EMP-induced alterations of tight junction protein expression and disruption of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Ding, Gui-Rong; Qiu, Lian-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Li, Kang-Chu; Zhou, Yong-Chun; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Jia-Xing; Li, Yu-Rong; Guo, Guo-Zhen

    2010-07-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical to maintain cerebral homeostasis. In this study, we examined the effects of exposure to electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on the functional integrity of BBB and, on the localization and expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins (occludin and ZO-1) in rats. Animals were sham or whole-body exposed to EMP at 200 kV/m for 400 pulses. The permeability of BBB in rat cerebral cortex was examined by using Evans Blue (EB) and lanthanum nitrate as vascular tracers. The localization and expression of TJ proteins were assessed by western blot and immunofluorescence analysis, respectively. The data indicated that EMP exposure caused: (i) increased permeability of BBB, and (ii) altered localization as well as decreased levels of TJ protein ZO-1. These results suggested that the alteration of ZO-1 may play an important role in the disruption of tight junctions, which may lead to dysfunction of BBB after EMP exposure. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Giardia disrupts the arrangement of tight, adherens and desmosomal junction proteins of intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Maia-Brigagão, C; Morgado-Díaz, J A; De Souza, W

    2012-06-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a parasitic protozoan that causes diarrhea and other symptoms which together constitute a disease known as giardiasis. Although the disease has been well defined, the mechanisms involving the establishment of the infection have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we show that after 24h of interaction between parasites and intestinal Caco-2 cells, there was an alteration of the paracellular permeability, as observed by an approximate 42% of reduction in the transepithelial electrical resistance and permeation to ruthenium red, which was concomitant with ultrastructural changes. Nevertheless, epithelium viability was not affected. We also demonstrate that there was no change in expression of junctional proteins (tight and adherens) but that the distribution of these proteins in Caco-2 cells after parasite adhesion was significantly altered, as observed via laser scanning confocal microscopy 3D reconstruction. The present work shows that adhesion of Giardia duodenalis trophozoites to intestinal cells in vitro induces disturbances of the tight, adherens and desmosomal junctions.

  18. Low-dose acetaminophen induces early disruption of cell-cell tight junctions in human hepatic cells and mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Gamal, Wesam; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Sullivan, Gareth J; Siller, Richard; Srsen, Vlastimil; Morgan, Katie; Bryans, Anna; Kozlowska, Ada; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Underwood, Ian; Smith, Stewart; Del-Pozo, Jorge; Moss, Sharon; Thompson, Alexandra Inés; Henderson, Neil C; Hayes, Peter C; Plevris, John N; Bagnaninchi, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Leonard J

    2017-01-30

    Dysfunction of cell-cell tight junction (TJ) adhesions is a major feature in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Liver TJs preserve cellular polarity by delimiting functional bile-canalicular structures, forming the blood-biliary barrier. In acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity, the mechanism by which tissue cohesion and polarity are affected remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that acetaminophen, even at low-dose, disrupts the integrity of TJ and cell-matrix adhesions, with indicators of cellular stress with liver injury in the human hepatic HepaRG cell line, and primary hepatocytes. In mouse liver, at human-equivalence (therapeutic) doses, dose-dependent loss of intercellular hepatic TJ-associated ZO-1 protein expression was evident with progressive clinical signs of liver injury. Temporal, dose-dependent and specific disruption of the TJ-associated ZO-1 and cytoskeletal-F-actin proteins, correlated with modulation of hepatic ultrastructure. Real-time impedance biosensing verified in vitro early, dose-dependent quantitative decreases in TJ and cell-substrate adhesions. Whereas treatment with NAPQI, the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen, or the PKCα-activator and TJ-disruptor phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, similarly reduced TJ integrity, which may implicate oxidative stress and the PKC pathway in TJ destabilization. These findings are relevant to the clinical presentation of acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity and may inform future mechanistic studies to identify specific molecular targets and pathways that may be altered in acetaminophen-induced hepatic depolarization.

  19. Low-dose acetaminophen induces early disruption of cell-cell tight junctions in human hepatic cells and mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Gamal, Wesam; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Sullivan, Gareth J.; Siller, Richard; Srsen, Vlastimil; Morgan, Katie; Bryans, Anna; Kozlowska, Ada; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Underwood, Ian; Smith, Stewart; del-Pozo, Jorge; Moss, Sharon; Thompson, Alexandra Inés; Henderson, Neil C.; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.; Bagnaninchi, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Leonard J.

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of cell-cell tight junction (TJ) adhesions is a major feature in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Liver TJs preserve cellular polarity by delimiting functional bile-canalicular structures, forming the blood-biliary barrier. In acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity, the mechanism by which tissue cohesion and polarity are affected remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that acetaminophen, even at low-dose, disrupts the integrity of TJ and cell-matrix adhesions, with indicators of cellular stress with liver injury in the human hepatic HepaRG cell line, and primary hepatocytes. In mouse liver, at human-equivalence (therapeutic) doses, dose-dependent loss of intercellular hepatic TJ-associated ZO-1 protein expression was evident with progressive clinical signs of liver injury. Temporal, dose-dependent and specific disruption of the TJ-associated ZO-1 and cytoskeletal-F-actin proteins, correlated with modulation of hepatic ultrastructure. Real-time impedance biosensing verified in vitro early, dose-dependent quantitative decreases in TJ and cell-substrate adhesions. Whereas treatment with NAPQI, the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen, or the PKCα-activator and TJ-disruptor phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, similarly reduced TJ integrity, which may implicate oxidative stress and the PKC pathway in TJ destabilization. These findings are relevant to the clinical presentation of acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity and may inform future mechanistic studies to identify specific molecular targets and pathways that may be altered in acetaminophen-induced hepatic depolarization. PMID:28134251

  20. Apical cap

    SciTech Connect

    McLoud, T.C.; Isler, R.J.; Novelline, R.A.; Putman, C.E.; Simeone, J.; Stark, P.

    1981-08-01

    Apical caps, either unilateral or bilateral, are a common feature of advancing age and are usually the result of subpleural scarring unassociated with other diseases. Pancoast (superior sulcus) tumors are a well recognized cause of unilateral asymmetric apical density. Other lesions arising in the lung, pleura, or extrapleural space may produce unilateral or bilateral apical caps. These include: (1) inflammatory: tuberculosis and extrapleural abscesses extending from the neck; (2) post radiation fibrosis after mantle therapy for Hodgkin disease or supraclavicular radiation in the treatment of breast carcinoma; (3) neoplasm: lymphoma extending from the neck or mediastinum, superior sulcus bronchogenic carcinoma, and metastases; (4) traumatic: extrapleural dissection of blood from a ruptured aorta, fractures of the ribs or spine, or hemorrhage due to subclavian line placement; (5) vascular: coarctation of the aorta with dilated collaterals over the apex, fistula between the subclavian artery and vein; and (6) miscellaneous: mediastinal lipomatosis with subcostal fat extending over the apices.

  1. Disruption of cell-cell junctions and induction of pathological cytokines in the retinal pigment epithelium of light-exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Narimatsu, Toshio; Ozawa, Yoko; Miyake, Seiji; Kubota, Shunsuke; Hirasawa, Manabu; Nagai, Norihiro; Shimmura, Shigeto; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2013-07-08

    To elucidate the influences of light exposure on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in vivo that may be involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. Six- to 7-week-old BALB/c mice were exposed to light at 2000 lux for 3 hours. Flat-mount RPE samples were immunostained with anti-ZO-1 antibody for evaluating tight junction, anti-N-cadherin, and anti-β-catenin antibodies for adherens junction, and stained with phalloidin for actin cytoskeleton. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was measured using DCFH-DA; Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase (ROCK) activity was by ELISA. Cytokine expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR and/or ELISA in the RPE-choroid, and macrophage recruitment was by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Either an antioxidant, N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), or a ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632, were administered to analyze the roles of ROS and ROCK activation, respectively. Light exposure disrupted staining patterns of tight junctions, adherens junctions, and actin cytoskeleton in the RPE, where ROS was elevated. However, NAC treatment avoided the RPE changes, reducing ROS. ROCK activity increased after light exposure was suppressed by NAC, and the structural disruptions were suppressed by Y-27632. The levels of MCP-1, CCL11, and IL-6 increased after light exposure were suppressed by NAC. Light-induced MCP-1 and IL-6 were suppressed by Y-27632. Macrophage recruitment after light exposure was also suppressed either by NAC or Y-27632. Light exposure induced ROS and Rho/ROCK activation, which caused disruption of cell-cell junctions (tight junctions and adherens junctions) and actin cytoskeleton, the RPE's barrier structure, and induced AMD-associated pathological changes in the RPE-choroid.

  2. Plant-derived triterpene celastrol ameliorates oxygen glucose deprivation-induced disruption of endothelial barrier assembly via inducing tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Zhao, Jia; Rong, Jianhui

    2016-12-01

    The integrity and functions of blood-brain barrier (BBB) are regulated by the expression and organization of tight junction proteins. The present study was designed to explore whether plant-derived triterpenoid celastrol could regulate tight junction integrity in murine brain endothelial bEnd3 cells. We disrupted the tight junctions between endothelial bEnd3 cells by oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD). We investigated the effects of celastrol on the permeability of endothelial monolayers by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). To clarify the tight junction composition, we analyzed the expression of tight junction proteins by RT-PCR and Western blotting techniques. We found that celastrol recovered OGD-induced TEER loss in a concentration-dependent manner. Celastrol induced occludin, claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) in endothelial cells. As a result, celastrol effectively maintained tight junction integrity and inhibited macrophage migration through endothelial monolayers against OGD challenge. Further mechanistic studies revealed that celastrol induced the expression of occludin and ZO-1) via activating MAPKs and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. We also observed that celastrol regulated claudin-5 expression through different mechanisms. The present study demonstrated that celastrol effectively protected tight junction integrity against OGD-induced damage. Thus, celastrol could be a drug candidate for the treatment of BBB dysfunction in various diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultraviolet A radiation transiently disrupts gap junctional communication in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Provost, Nicolas; Moreau, Marielle; Leturque, Armelle; Nizard, Carine

    2003-01-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) (320-400 nm) radiation is known to cause cutaneous aging and skin cancer. We studied the effect of UVA (365 nm) radiation on the human epidermis by focusing on keratinocyte gap junction-mediated intercellular communication (GJIC). We observed a dose-dependent 10-fold decrease in GJIC induced by UVA in normal human keratinocytes. This decrease in GJIC was associated with time-dependent internalization of connexin43 (Cx43). UVA radiation also damaged the actin cytoskeleton, as shown by microfilament disappearance. Importantly, the decrease in GJIC was transient when keratinocytes were irradiated with 10 J/cm(2) UVA, with a return to baseline values after 8 h. Concomitantly, Cx43 was relocalized and the actin cytoskeleton was restored. UVA irradiation and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) treatment activated protein kinase C and reduced GJIC. However, Cx43 localization and phosphorylation were differently regulated by the two treatments. This suggests that at least two different pathways may mediate the observed fall in GJIC. These findings identify keratinocyte GJIC as a new UVA target that might sensitize human skin to photoaging and cancer formation.

  4. Anodal tDCS targeting the left temporo-parietal junction disrupts verbal reality-monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mondino, Marine; Poulet, Emmanuel; Suaud-Chagny, Marie-Françoise; Brunelin, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    Using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) we aimed to investigate the causal role of the left temporo-parietal and prefrontal regions in source-monitoring. Forty-two healthy participants received tDCS while performing a verbal reality-monitoring task (requiring discrimination between imagined and heard words) and a verbal internal source-monitoring task (requiring discrimination between imagined and said words). In 2 randomized crossover studies, 21 participants received active and sham anodal tDCS applied over the left temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and 21 participants received active and sham cathodal tDCS applied over the left prefrontal cortex (PFC). The reference electrode was placed over the right occipital region in both experiments. Active tDCS over the left TPJ decreased reality-monitoring performance but did not modulate internal source-monitoring performance. Participants were more likely to misattribute self-generated events to externally perceived events (externalization bias). Active tDCS over the left PFC did not modulate performance of participants in both tasks. In summary, anodal tDCS applied over the left TPJ, assumed to enhance cortical excitability, can alter reality-monitoring processes in healthy subjects. Such abnormal reality-monitoring performances have been reported in hallucinating patients with schizophrenia known to display hyperactivity of the left TPJ. Our results highlighted the role of the left TPJ in self/other recognition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Haploinsufficiency for Core Exon Junction Complex Components Disrupts Embryonic Neurogenesis and Causes p53-Mediated Microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zefeng; Silver, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is an RNA binding complex comprised of the core components Magoh, Rbm8a, and Eif4a3. Human mutations in EJC components cause neurodevelopmental pathologies. Further, mice heterozygous for either Magoh or Rbm8a exhibit aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly. Yet despite the requirement of these genes for neurodevelopment, the pathogenic mechanisms linking EJC dysfunction to microcephaly remain poorly understood. Here we employ mouse genetics, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses to demonstrate that haploinsufficiency for each of the 3 core EJC components causes microcephaly via converging regulation of p53 signaling. Using a new conditional allele, we first show that Eif4a3 haploinsufficiency phenocopies aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly of Magoh and Rbm8a mutant mice. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of embryonic brains at the onset of neurogenesis identifies common pathways altered in each of the 3 EJC mutants, including ribosome, proteasome, and p53 signaling components. We further demonstrate all 3 mutants exhibit defective splicing of RNA regulatory proteins, implying an EJC dependent RNA regulatory network that fine-tunes gene expression. Finally, we show that genetic ablation of one downstream pathway, p53, significantly rescues microcephaly of all 3 EJC mutants. This implicates p53 activation as a major node of neurodevelopmental pathogenesis following EJC impairment. Altogether our study reveals new mechanisms to help explain how EJC mutations influence neurogenesis and underlie neurodevelopmental disease. PMID:27618312

  6. Zika-Virus-Encoded NS2A Disrupts Mammalian Cortical Neurogenesis by Degrading Adherens Junction Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ki-Jun; Song, Guang; Qian, Xuyu; Pan, Jianbo; Xu, Dan; Rho, Hee-Sool; Kim, Nam-Shik; Habela, Christa; Zheng, Lily; Jacob, Fadi; Zhang, Feiran; Lee, Emily M; Huang, Wei-Kai; Ringeling, Francisca Rojas; Vissers, Caroline; Li, Cui; Yuan, Ling; Kang, Koeun; Kim, Sunghan; Yeo, Junghoon; Cheng, Yichen; Liu, Sheng; Wen, Zhexing; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Wu, Qingfeng; Christian, Kimberly M; Tang, Hengli; Jin, Peng; Xu, Zhiheng; Qian, Jiang; Zhu, Heng; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-Li

    2017-09-07

    Zika virus (ZIKV) directly infects neural progenitors and impairs their proliferation. How ZIKV interacts with the host molecular machinery to impact neurogenesis in vivo is not well understood. Here, by systematically introducing individual proteins encoded by ZIKV into the embryonic mouse cortex, we show that expression of ZIKV-NS2A, but not Dengue virus (DENV)-NS2A, leads to reduced proliferation and premature differentiation of radial glial cells and aberrant positioning of newborn neurons. Mechanistically, in vitro mapping of protein-interactomes and biochemical analysis suggest interactions between ZIKA-NS2A and multiple adherens junction complex (AJ) components. Functionally, ZIKV-NS2A, but not DENV-NS2A, destabilizes the AJ complex, resulting in impaired AJ formation and aberrant radial glial fiber scaffolding in the embryonic mouse cortex. Similarly, ZIKA-NS2A, but not DENV-NS2A, reduces radial glial cell proliferation and causes AJ deficits in human forebrain organoids. Together, our results reveal pathogenic mechanisms underlying ZIKV infection in the developing mammalian brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Disrupted Junctional Membrane Complexes and Hyperactive Ryanodine Receptors Following Acute Junctophilin Knockdown in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van Oort, Ralph J.; Garbino, Alejandro; Wang, Wei; Dixit, Sayali S.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Gaur, Namit; De Almeida, Angela C.; Skapura, Darlene G.; Rudy, Yoram; Burns, Alan R.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Wehrens, Xander H.T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Excitation-contraction coupling in striated muscle requires proper communication of plasmalemmal voltage-activated Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ release channels on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) within junctional membrane complexes (JMCs). Whereas previous studies revealed a loss of JMCs and embryonic lethality in germ-line junctophilin-2 (JPH2) knockout mice, it has remained unclear whether JPH2 plays an essential role in JMC formation and the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release process in the heart. Our recent work demonstrated loss-of-function mutations in JPH2 in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results To elucidate the role of JPH2 in the heart, we developed a novel approach to conditionally reduce JPH2 protein levels using RNA interference. Cardiac-specific JPH2 knockdown resulted in impaired cardiac contractility, which caused heart failure and increased mortality. JPH2 deficiency resulted in loss of excitation-contraction coupling gain, precipitated by a reduction in the number of JMCs and increased variability in the plasmalemma-SR distance. Conclusions Loss of JPH2 had profound effects on Ca2+ release channel inactivation, suggesting a novel functional role for JPH2 in regulating intracellular Ca2+ release channels in cardiac myocytes. Thus, our novel approach of cardiac-specific shRNA-mediated knockdown of junctophilin-2 has uncovered a critical role for junctophilin in intracellular Ca2+ release in the heart. PMID:21339484

  8. Disruption of CDH2/N-cadherin-based adherens junctions leads to apoptosis of ependymal cells and denudation of brain ventricular walls.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Cristian; González, César A; Alvial, Genaro; Flores, Carlos A; Rodríguez, Esteban M; Bátiz, Luis Federico

    2013-09-01

    Disruption/denudation of the ependymal lining has been associated with the pathogenesis of various human CNS disorders, including hydrocephalus, spina bifida aperta, and periventricular heterotopia. It has been traditionally considered that ependymal denudation is a consequence of mechanical forces such as ventricular enlargement. New evidence indicates that ependymal disruption can precede ventricular dilation, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the onset of ependymal denudation are unknown. Here, we present a novel model to study ependymal cell pathophysiology and demonstrate that selective disruption of N-cadherin-based adherens junctions is sufficient to provoke progressive ependymal denudation. Blocking N-cadherin function using specific peptides that interfere with the histidine-alanine-valine extracellular homophilic interaction domain caused early pathologic changes characterized by disruption of zonula adherens and abnormal intracellular accumulation of N-cadherin. These changes then triggered massive apoptosis of ependymal cells and denudation of brain ventricular walls. Because no typical extrinsic mechanical factors such as elevated pressure or stretching forces are involved in this model, the critical role of N-cadherin-based adherens junctions in ependymal survival/physiology is highlighted. Furthermore, the results suggest that abnormal adherens junctions between ependymal cells should be considered as key components of the pathogenesis of CNS disorders associated with ependymal denudation.

  9. Small bowel entrapment and ureteropelvic junction disruption associated with L3 Chance fracture-dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Pesenti, Sebastien; Blondel, Benjamin; Faure, Alice; Peltier, Emilie; Launay, Franck; Jouve, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric Chance fracture are rare lesions but often associated with abdominal injuries. We herein present the case of a seven years old patient who sustained an entrapment of small bowel and an ureteropelvic disruption associated with a Chance fracture and spine dislocation following a traffic accident. Initial X-rays and computed tomographic (CT) scan showed a Chance fracture with dislocation of L3 vertebra, with an incarceration of a small bowel loop in the spinal canal and a complete section of the left lumbar ureter. Paraplegia was noticed on the initial neurological examination. A posterior L2-L4 osteosynthesis was performed firstly. In a second time she underwent a sus umbilical laparotomy to release the incarcerated jejunum loop in the spinal canal. An end-to-end anastomosis was performed on a JJ probe to suture the left injured ureter. One month after the traumatism, she started to complain of severe headaches related to a leakage of cerebrospinalis fluid. Three months after the traumatism there was a clear regression of the leakage. One year after the trauma, an anterior intervertebral fusion was done. At final follow-up, no neurologic recovery was noticed. In case of Chance fracture, all physicians should think about abdominal injuries even if the patient is asymptomatic. Initial abdominal CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging provide in such case crucial info for management of the spine and the associated lesions. PMID:27672641

  10. Disruption of Tight Junctions by Cellulose Sulfate Facilitates HIV Infection: Model of Microbicide Safety

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Pedro M. M.; Cheshenko, Natalia; Wilson, Sarah S.; Mhatre, Mohak; Guzman, Esmeralda; Fakioglu, Esra; Keller, Marla J.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The lack of biomarkers that are predictive of safety is a critical gap in the development of microbicides. The present experiments were designed to evaluate the predictive value of in vitro models of microbicide safety. Methods Changes in the epithelial barrier were evaluated by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) after exposure of human epithelial cells to candidate microbicides in a dual-chamber system. The significance of observed changes was addressed by challenging cultures with human immuodeficiency virus (HIV) and measuring the ability of virus to cross the epithelium and infect target T cells cultured in the lower chamber. Results Exposure to nonoxynol-9 (N-9) or cellulose sulfate (CS), but not 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine (also referred to as tenofovir) or PRO2000, resulted in a rapid and sustained reduction in TER and a marked increase in HIV infection of T cells cultured in the lower chamber. Moreover, CS triggered nuclear factor κB activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and increased HIV replication in chronically infected U1 cells. Conclusions Epithelial barrier disruption and enhanced viral replication may have contributed to the increased risk of HIV acquisition observed in phase 3 trials of N-9 and CS. Expansion of in vitro safety testing to include these models would provide a more stringent preclinical assessment of microbicide safety and may prove to be more predictive of clinical outcomes. PMID:19586414

  11. Repetitive TMS of the temporo-parietal junction disrupts participant's expectations in a spontaneous Theory of Mind task.

    PubMed

    Bardi, Lara; Six, Pieter; Brass, Marcel

    2017-09-14

    A recent debate about Theory of Mind (ToM) concerns whether spontaneous and explicit mentalizing are based on the same mechanisms. However, only a few neuroimaging studies have investigated the neural bases of spontaneous ToM, with inconsistent results. The present study had two goals: first, to investigate whether the right Temporo-Parietal Junction (rTPJ) is crucially involved in spontaneous ToM and second, to gain insight into the role of the rTPJ in ToM. For the first time, we applied rTMS to the rTPJ while participants were engaged in a spontaneous false belief task. Participants watched videos of a scene including an agent who acquires a true or false belief about the location of an object. At the end of the movie, participants reacted to the presence of the object. Results show that, during stimulation of the control site, RTs were affected by both the participant's expectations and the belief of the agent. Stimulation of the rTPJ significantly modulated task performance, supporting the idea that spontaneous ToM, as well as explicit ToM, relies on TPJ activity. However, we did not observe a disruption of the representation of the agent's belief. Rather, the stimulation interfered with participant's predictions, supporting the idea that rTPJ is crucially involved in self-other distinction. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells disrupt bronchial epithelial barrier integrity by targeting tight junctions through IL-13 in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Kazunari; Steer, Catherine A; Martinez-Gonzalez, Itziar; Altunbulakli, Can; Morita, Hideaki; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Kubo, Terufumi; Wawrzyniak, Paulina; Rückert, Beate; Sudo, Katsuko; Nakae, Susumu; Matsumoto, Kenji; O'Mahony, Liam; Akdis, Mübeccel; Takei, Fumio; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2017-04-06

    Bronchial epithelial barrier leakiness and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) have been separately linked to asthma pathogenesis; however, the influence of ILC2s on the bronchial epithelial barrier has not been investigated previously. We investigated the role of ILC2s in the regulation of bronchial epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and barrier function both in bronchial epithelial cells of asthmatic patients and healthy subjects and general innate lymphoid cell- and ILC2-deficient mice. Cocultures of human ILC2s and bronchial epithelial cells were used to determine transepithelial electrical resistance, paracellular flux, and TJ mRNA and protein expressions. The effect of ILC2s on TJs was examined by using a murine model of IL-33-induced airway inflammation in wild-type, recombination-activating gene 2 (Rag2)(-/-), Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-), and Rora(sg/sg) mice undergoing bone marrow transplantation to analyze the in vivo relevance of barrier disruption by ILC2s. ILC2s significantly impaired the epithelial barrier, as demonstrated by reduced transepithelial electrical resistance and increased fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran permeability in air-liquid interface cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells. This was in parallel to decreased mRNAs and disrupted protein expression of TJ proteins and was restored by neutralization of IL-13. Intranasal administration of recombinant IL-33 to wild-type and Rag2(-/-) mice lacking T and B cells triggered TJ disruption, whereas Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) and Rora(sg/sg) mice undergoing bone marrow transplantation that lack ILC2s did not show any barrier leakiness. Direct nasal administration of IL-13 was sufficient to induce deficiency in the TJ barrier in the bronchial epithelium of mice in vivo. These data highlight an essential mechanism in asthma pathogenesis by demonstrating that ILC2s are responsible for bronchial epithelial TJ barrier leakiness through IL-13. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma

  13. Apical deficiency triggers JNK-dependent apoptosis in the embryonic epidermis of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kolahgar, Golnar; Bardet, Pierre-Luc; Langton, Paul F.; Alexandre, Cyrille; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial homeostasis and the avoidance of diseases such as cancer require the elimination of defective cells by apoptosis. Here, we investigate how loss of apical determinants triggers apoptosis in the embryonic epidermis of Drosophila. Transcriptional profiling and in situ hybridisation show that JNK signalling is upregulated in mutants lacking Crumbs or other apical determinants. This leads to transcriptional activation of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper and to apoptosis. Suppression of JNK signalling by overexpression of Puckered, a feedback inhibitor of the pathway, prevents reaper upregulation and apoptosis. Moreover, removal of endogenous Puckered leads to ectopic reaper expression. Importantly, disruption of the basolateral domain in the embryonic epidermis does not trigger JNK signalling or apoptosis. We suggest that apical, not basolateral, integrity could be intrinsically required for the survival of epithelial cells. In apically deficient embryos, JNK signalling is activated throughout the epidermis. Yet, in the dorsal region, reaper expression is not activated and cells survive. One characteristic of these surviving cells is that they retain discernible adherens junctions despite the apical deficit. We suggest that junctional integrity could restrain the pro-apoptotic influence of JNK signalling. PMID:21693518

  14. Anillin regulates cell-cell junction integrity by organizing junctional accumulation of Rho-GTP and actomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Ciara C.; Jin, Meiyan; Breznau, Elaina B.; Espino, Rhogelyn; Delgado-Gonzalo, Ricard; Goryachev, Andrew B.; Miller, Ann L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Anillin is a scaffolding protein that organizes and stabilizes actomyosin contractile rings and was previously thought to function primarily in cytokinesis [1–10]. Using Xenopus laevis embryos as a model system to examine Anillin’s role in the intact vertebrate epithelium, we find that a population of Anillin surprisingly localizes to epithelial cell-cell junctions throughout the cell cycle, whereas it was previously thought to be nuclear during interphase [5, 11]. Further, we show that Anillin plays a critical role in regulating cell-cell junction integrity. Both tight junctions and adherens junctions are disrupted when Anillin is knocked down, leading to altered cell shape and increased intercellular spaces. Anillin interacts with Rho, F-actin, and Myosin II [3, 8, 9], all of which regulate cell-cell junction structure and function. When Anillin is knocked down, active Rho (Rho-GTP), F-actin, and Myosin II are misregulated at junctions. Indeed, increased dynamic “flares” of Rho-GTP are observed at cell-cell junctions, while overall junctional F-actin and Myosin II accumulation is reduced when Anillin is depleted. We propose that Anillin is required for proper Rho-GTP distribution at cell-cell junctions and for maintenance of a robust apical actomyosin belt, which is required for cell-cell junction integrity. These results reveal a novel role for Anillin in regulating epithelial cell-cell junctions. PMID:24835458

  15. Ketamine alleviates bradykinin-induced disruption of the mouse cerebrovascular endothelial cell-constructed tight junction barrier via a calcium-mediated redistribution of occludin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-Tai; Lin, Yi-Ling; Chen, Ta-Liang; Tai, Yu-Ting; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2016-08-10

    Following brain injury, a sequence of mechanisms leads to disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequent cerebral edema, which is thought to begin with activation of bradykinin. Our previous studies showed that ketamine, a widely used intravenous anesthetic agent, can suppress bradykinin-induced cell dysfunction. This study further aimed to evaluate the protective effects of ketamine against bradykinin-induced disruption of the mouse cerebrovascular endothelial cell (MCEC)-constructed tight junction barrier and the possible mechanisms. Exposure of MCECs to bradykinin increased intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) concentrations in a time-dependent manner. However, pretreatment of MCECs with ketamine time- and concentration-dependently lowered the bradykinin-induced calcium influx. As to the mechanisms, although exposure of MCECs to ketamine induced bradykinin R1 receptor protein and mRNA expression, this anesthetic did not change levels of the bradykinin R2 receptor, a major receptor that responds to bradykinin stimulation. Bradykinin increased amounts of soluble occludin in MCECs, but pretreatment with ketamine alleviated this disturbance in occludin polymerization. Consequently, exposure to bradykinin decreased the transendothelial electronic resistance in the MCEC-constructed tight junction barrier. However, pretreatment with ketamine attenuated the bradykinin-induced disruption of the tight junction barrier. Taken together, this study shows that ketamine at a therapeutic concentration can protect against bradykinin-induced breakage of the BBB via suppressing calcium-dependent redistribution of occludin tight junctions. Thus, ketamine has the potential for maintaining the BBB in critically ill patients with severe brain disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -9 Secreted by Leukemic Cells Increase the Permeability of Blood-Brain Barrier by Disrupting Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Saran; Cen, Jiannong; Huang, Yihong; Shen, Hongjie; Yao, Li; Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Zixing

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in acute leukemia, the mechanisms of leukemic cell infiltration into the CNS have not yet been elucidated. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) makes CNS become a refugee to leukemic cells and serves as a resource of cells that seed extraneural sites. How can the leukemic cells disrupt this barrier and invasive the CNS, even if many of the currently available chemotherapies can not cross the BBB? Tight junction in endothelial cells occupies a central role in the function of the BBB. Except the well known role of degrading extracellular matrix in metastasis of cancer cells, here we show matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9, secreted by leukemic cells, mediate the BBB opening by disrupting tight junction proteins in the CNS leukemia. We demonstrated that leukemic cells impaired tight junction proteins ZO-1, claudin-5 and occludin resulting in increased permeability of the BBB. However, these alterations reduced when MMP-2 and -9 activities were inhibited by RNA interference strategy or by MMP inhibitor GM6001 in an in vitro BBB model. We also found that the disruption of the BBB in company with the down-regulation of ZO-1, claudin-5 and occludin and the up-regulation of MMP-2 and -9 in mouse brain tissues with leukemic cell infiltration by confocal imaging and the assay of in situ gelatin zymography. Besides, GM6001 protected all mice against CNS leukemia. Our findings suggest that the degradation of tight junction proteins ZO-1, claudin-5 and occludin by MMP-2 and -9 secreted by leukemic cells constitutes an important mechanism in the BBB breakdown which contributes to the invasion of leukemic cells to the CNS in acute leukemia. PMID:21857898

  17. Disruption of the Cdc42/Par6/aPKC or Dlg/Scrib/Lgl Polarity Complex Promotes Epithelial Proliferation via Overlapping Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schimizzi, Gregory V; Maher, Meghan T; Loza, Andrew J; Longmore, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of apical-basal polarity is a defining characteristic and essential feature of functioning epithelia. Apical-basal polarity (ABP) proteins are also tumor suppressors that are targeted for disruption by oncogenic viruses and are commonly mutated in human carcinomas. Disruption of these ABP proteins is an early event in cancer development that results in increased proliferation and epithelial disorganization through means not fully characterized. Using the proliferating Drosophila melanogaster wing disc epithelium, we demonstrate that disruption of the junctional vs. basal polarity complexes results in increased epithelial proliferation via distinct downstream signaling pathways. Disruption of the basal polarity complex results in JNK-dependent proliferation, while disruption of the junctional complex primarily results in p38-dependent proliferation. Surprisingly, the Rho-Rok-Myosin contractility apparatus appears to play opposite roles in the regulation of the proliferative phenotype based on which polarity complex is disrupted. In contrast, non-autonomous Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) signaling appears to suppress the proliferation that results from apical-basal polarity disruption, regardless of which complex is disrupted. Finally we demonstrate that disruption of the junctional polarity complex activates JNK via the Rho-Rok-Myosin contractility apparatus independent of the cortical actin regulator, Moesin.

  18. Disruption of the Cdc42/Par6/aPKC or Dlg/Scrib/Lgl Polarity Complex Promotes Epithelial Proliferation via Overlapping Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schimizzi, Gregory V.; Maher, Meghan T.; Loza, Andrew J.; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of apical-basal polarity is a defining characteristic and essential feature of functioning epithelia. Apical-basal polarity (ABP) proteins are also tumor suppressors that are targeted for disruption by oncogenic viruses and are commonly mutated in human carcinomas. Disruption of these ABP proteins is an early event in cancer development that results in increased proliferation and epithelial disorganization through means not fully characterized. Using the proliferating Drosophila melanogaster wing disc epithelium, we demonstrate that disruption of the junctional vs. basal polarity complexes results in increased epithelial proliferation via distinct downstream signaling pathways. Disruption of the basal polarity complex results in JNK-dependent proliferation, while disruption of the junctional complex primarily results in p38-dependent proliferation. Surprisingly, the Rho-Rok-Myosin contractility apparatus appears to play opposite roles in the regulation of the proliferative phenotype based on which polarity complex is disrupted. In contrast, non-autonomous Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) signaling appears to suppress the proliferation that results from apical-basal polarity disruption, regardless of which complex is disrupted. Finally we demonstrate that disruption of the junctional polarity complex activates JNK via the Rho-Rok-Myosin contractility apparatus independent of the cortical actin regulator, Moesin. PMID:27454609

  19. The WD40 protein Morg1 facilitates Par6-aPKC binding to Crb3 for apical identity in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hayase, Junya; Kamakura, Sachiko; Iwakiri, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Izaki, Tomoko; Ito, Takashi; Sumimoto, Hideki

    2013-03-04

    Formation of apico-basal polarity in epithelial cells is crucial for both morphogenesis (e.g., cyst formation) and function (e.g., tight junction development). Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), complexed with Par6, is considered to translocate to the apical membrane and function in epithelial cell polarization. However, the mechanism for translocation of the Par6-aPKC complex has remained largely unknown. Here, we show that the WD40 protein Morg1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase organizer 1) directly binds to Par6 and thus facilitates apical targeting of Par6-aPKC in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells. Morg1 also interacts with the apical transmembrane protein Crumbs3 to promote Par6-aPKC binding to Crumbs3, which is reinforced with the apically localized small GTPase Cdc42. Depletion of Morg1 disrupted both tight junction development in monolayer culture and cyst formation in three-dimensional culture; apico-basal polarity was notably restored by forced targeting of aPKC to the apical surface. Thus, Par6-aPKC recruitment to the premature apical membrane appears to be required for definition of apical identity of epithelial cells.

  20. The inhibition of COPII trafficking is important for intestinal epithelial tight junction disruption during enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Citrobacter rodentium infection.

    PubMed

    Thanabalasuriar, Ajitha; Kim, Jinoh; Gruenheid, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) are bacterial pathogens that cause severe illnesses in humans. Citrobacter rodentium is a related mouse pathogen that serves as a small animal model for EPEC and EHEC infections. EPEC, EHEC and C. rodentium translocate bacterial virulence proteins directly into host intestinal cells via a type III secretion system (T3SS). Non-LEE-encoded effector A (NleA) is a T3SS effector that is common to EPEC, EHEC and C. rodentium. NleA interacts with and inhibits the mammalian COPII complex, impairing cellular secretion; this interaction is required for bacterial virulence. Although diarrhea is a hallmark of EPEC, EHEC and C. rodentium infections, the underlying mechanisms are not well characterized. One of the essential functions of the intestine is to maintain a barrier between the lumen and submucosa. Tight junctions seal the space between adjacent epithelial cells creating this barrier. Consequently, it is thought that the disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions by EPEC, EHEC, and C. rodentium could result in a loss of barrier function. In this study, we demonstrate that NleA mediated COPII inhibition is required for EPEC- and C. rodentium-mediated disruption of tight junction proteins and increases in fecal water content.

  1. Apical domain polarization localizes actin-myosin activity to drive ratchet-like apical constriction.

    PubMed

    Mason, Frank M; Tworoger, Michael; Martin, Adam C

    2013-08-01

    Apical constriction promotes epithelia folding, which changes tissue architecture. During Drosophila gastrulation, mesoderm cells exhibit repeated contractile pulses that are stabilized such that cells apically constrict like a ratchet. The transcription factor Twist is required to stabilize cell shape. However, it is unknown how Twist spatially coordinates downstream signals to prevent cell relaxation. We find that during constriction, Rho-associated kinase (Rok) is polarized to the middle of the apical domain (medioapical cortex), separate from adherens junctions. Rok recruits or stabilizes medioapical myosin II (Myo-II), which contracts dynamic medioapical actin cables. The formin Diaphanous mediates apical actin assembly to suppress medioapical E-cadherin localization and form stable connections between the medioapical contractile network and adherens junctions. Twist is not required for apical Rok recruitment, but instead polarizes Rok medioapically. Therefore, Twist establishes radial cell polarity of Rok/Myo-II and E-cadherin and promotes medioapical actin assembly in mesoderm cells to stabilize cell shape fluctuations.

  2. Giardia duodenalis assemblage-specific induction of apoptosis and tight junction disruption in human intestinal epithelial cells: effects of mixed infections.

    PubMed

    Koh, Wan Hon; Geurden, Thomas; Paget, Tim; O'Handley, Ryan; Steuart, Robert F; Thompson, R C Andrew; Buret, Andre G

    2013-04-01

    In view of the interest in genotype-specific pathogenesis in Giardia duodenalis , the aim of the present study was to examine the effects of infection with different, or mixed, G. duodenalis assemblages on the integrity of human intestinal epithelia. To that end, human epithelial cells (HCT-8) were cultured and exposed to different G. duodenalis assemblages (A, B, and E) or a combination of these assemblages. Epithelial disruption and apoptosis were evaluated by fluorescent microscopy and apoptotic oligonucleosome quantification. The results indicate that infection with trophozoites disrupts epithelial tight junctions and induces varying degrees of enterocyte apoptosis, depending on the infecting assemblage. All disruptions were caspase-3 dependent and were more pronounced when caused by a non-host specific assemblage. Furthermore, infections by isolates in combination with isolates from another assemblage enhanced the epithelial disruption and apoptosis. Further studies in vitro and in vivo are required to confirm the mechanisms of enhanced pathogenicity of mixed or non-host specific (or both) G. duodenalis infections. Findings in the present study point to the potential pathogenic importance of intra-species polyparasitism in giardiasis.

  3. Par3 integrates Tiam1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling to change apical membrane identity.

    PubMed

    Ruch, Travis R; Bryant, David M; Mostov, Keith E; Engel, Joanne N

    2017-01-15

    Pathogens can alter epithelial polarity by recruiting polarity proteins to the apical membrane, but how a change in protein localization is linked to polarity disruption is not clear. In this study, we used chemically induced dimerization to rapidly relocalize proteins from the cytosol to the apical surface. We demonstrate that forced apical localization of Par3, which is normally restricted to tight junctions, is sufficient to alter apical membrane identity through its interactions with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and the Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1. We further show that PI3K activity is required upstream of Rac1, and that simultaneously targeting PI3K and Tiam1 to the apical membrane has a synergistic effect on membrane remodeling. Thus, Par3 coordinates the action of PI3K and Tiam1 to define membrane identity, revealing a signaling mechanism that can be exploited by human mucosal pathogens. © 2017 Ruch et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  5. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology. PMID:20066080

  6. Depletion of cellular brassinolide decreases embryo production and disrupts the architecture of the apical meristems in Brassica napus microspore-derived embryos

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Mark; Elhiti, Mohamed; Waldner, Blaine; Stasolla, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Exogenous applications of brassinolide (BL) increased the number and quality of microspore-derived embryos (MDEs) whereas treatments with brassinazole (BrZ), a BL biosynthetic inhibitor, had the opposite effect. At the optimal concentration (4×10−6 M) BrZ decreased both embryo yield and conversion to less than half the value of control embryos. Metabolic studies revealed that BL levels had profound effects on glutathione and ascorbate metabolism by altering the amounts of their reduced forms (ASC and GSH) and oxidized forms [dehydroascorbate (DHA), ascorbate free radicals (AFRs), and GSSG]. Applications of BL switched the glutathione and ascorbate pools towards the oxidized forms, thereby lowering the ASC/ASC+DHA+AFR and GSH/GSH+GSSG ratios. These changes were ascribed to the ability of BL to increase the activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and decrease that of glutathione reductase (GR). This trend was reversed in a BL-depleted environment, effected by BrZ applications. These metabolic alterations were associated with changes in embryo structure and performance. BL-treated MDEs developed zygotic-like shoot apical meristems (SAMs) whereas embryos treated with BrZ developed abnormal meristems. In the presence of BrZ, embryos either lacked a visible SAM, or formed SAMs in which the meristematic cells showed signs of differentiation, such as vacuolation and storage product accumulation. These abnormalities were accompanied by the lack or misexpression of three meristem marker genes isolated from Brassica napus (denoted as BnSTM, BnCLV1, and BnZLL-1) homologous to the Arabidopsis SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM), CLAVATA 1 (CLV1), and ZWILLE (ZLL). The expression of BnSTM and BnCLV1 increased after a few days in cultures in embryos treated with BL whereas an opposite tendency was observed with applications of BrZ. Compared with control embryos where these two genes exhibited abnormal localization patterns, BnSTM and BnCLV1 always localized throughout the subapical

  7. c-Yes regulates cell adhesion at the blood-testis barrier and the apical ectoplasmic specialization in the seminiferous epithelium of rat testes*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2011-01-01

    During spermatogenesis, extensive junction restructuring takes place at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) and the Sertoli cell-spermatid interface known as the apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES, a testis-specific adherens junction) in the seminiferous epithelium. However, the mechanism(s) that regulates these critical events in the testis remains unknown. Based on the current concept in the field, changes in the phosphorylation status of integral membrane proteins at these sites can induce alterations in protein endocytosis and recycling, causing junction restructuring. Herein, c-Yes, a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, was found to express abundantly at the BTB and apical ES stage-specifically, coinciding with junction restructuring events at these sites during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. c-Yes also structurally associated with adhesion proteins at the BTB (e.g., occludin and N-cadherin) and the apical ES (e.g., β1-integrin, laminin β3 and γ3), possibly to regulate phosphorylation status of proteins at these sites. SU6656, a selective c-Yes inhibitor, was shown to perturb the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier in vitro, which is mediated by changes in the distribution of occludin and N-cadherin at the cell-cell interface, moving from cell surface to cytosol, thereby destabilizing the tight junction-barrier. However, this disruptive effect of SU6656 on the barrier was blocked by testosterone. Furthermore, c-Yes is crucial to maintain the actin filament network in Sertoli cells since a blockade of c-Yes by SU6656 induced actin filament disorganization. In summary, c-Yes regulates BTB and apical ES integrity by maintaining proper distribution of integral membrane proteins and actin filament organization at these sites. PMID:21256972

  8. c-Yes regulates cell adhesion at the blood-testis barrier and the apical ectoplasmic specialization in the seminiferous epithelium of rat testes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2011-04-01

    During spermatogenesis, extensive junction restructuring takes place at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) and the Sertoli cell-spermatid interface known as the apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES, a testis-specific adherens junction) in the seminiferous epithelium. However, the mechanism(s) that regulates these critical events in the testis remains unknown. Based on the current concept in the field, changes in the phosphorylation status of integral membrane proteins at these sites can induce alterations in protein endocytosis and recycling, causing junction restructuring. Herein, c-Yes, a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, was found to express abundantly at the BTB and apical ES stage-specifically, coinciding with junction restructuring events at these sites during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. c-Yes also structurally associated with adhesion proteins at the BTB (e.g., occludin and N-cadherin) and the apical ES (e.g., β1-integrin, laminins β3 and γ3), possibly to regulate phosphorylation status of proteins at these sites. SU6656, a selective c-Yes inhibitor, was shown to perturb the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier in vitro, which is mediated by changes in the distribution of occludin and N-cadherin at the cell-cell interface, moving from cell surface to cytosol, thereby destabilizing the tight junction-barrier. However, this disruptive effect of SU6656 on the barrier was blocked by testosterone. Furthermore, c-Yes is crucial to maintain the actin filament network in Sertoli cells since a blockade of c-Yes by SU6656 induced actin filament disorganization. In summary, c-Yes regulates BTB and apical ES integrity by maintaining proper distribution of integral membrane proteins and actin filament organization at these sites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Human blood-brain barrier disruption by retroviral-infected lymphocytes: role of myosin light chain kinase in endothelial tight-junction disorganization.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Philippe Vicente; Ozden, Simona; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Schmitt, Christine; Seilhean, Danielle; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Gessain, Antoine; Romero, Ignacio Andres; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2007-08-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), which constitutes the interface between blood and cerebral parenchyma, has been shown to be disrupted during retroviral associated neuromyelopathies. Human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease, in which evidence of BBB breakdown has been demonstrated by the presence of lymphocytic infiltrates in the CNS and plasma protein leakage through cerebral endothelium. Using an in vitro human BBB model, we investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in endothelial changes induced by HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes. We demonstrate that coculture with infected lymphocytes induces an increase in paracellular endothelial permeability and transcellular migration, via IL-1alpha and TNF-alpha secretion. This disruption is associated with tight junction disorganization between endothelial cells, and alterations in the expression pattern of tight junction proteins such as zonula occludens 1. These changes could be prevented by inhibition of the NF-kappaB pathway or of myosin light chain kinase activity. Such disorganization was confirmed in histological sections of spinal cord from an HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis patient. Based on this BBB model, the present data indicate that HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes can induce BBB breakdown and may be responsible for the CNS infiltration that occurs in the early steps of retroviral-associated neuromyelopathies.

  10. HIV-1/Cocaine Induced Oxidative Stress Disrupts Tight Junction Protein-1 in Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells: Role of Ras/ERK1/2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mermis, Joel; Zeng, Ruoxi; Sanderson, Miles; Johnson, Sara; Dai, Yuqiao; Sharma, Garima; Ladner, Amy O’Brien; Dhillon, Navneet K.

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous drug use (IVDU) is the major risk factor in the development of HIV-related pulmonary arterial hypertension (HRPAH); however, the pathogenesis of HRPAH in association with IVDU has yet to be characterized. Endothelial injury is considered to be an initiating factor for pulmonary vascular remodeling in animal models of PAH. Our previous study shows that simultaneous exposure to HIV-Trans-activator of transcription (Tat) and cocaine exacerbates both disruption of tight junction proteins and permeability of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells compared with either treatment alone. We here now demonstrate that this HIV-Tat and cocaine mediated endothelial dysfunction accompanies with increase in hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals generation and involves redox sensitive signaling pathway. Pretreatment with antioxidant cocktail attenuated the cocaine and Tat mediated disassembly of Zonula Occludens (ZO)-1 and enhancement of endothelial monolayer permeability. Furthermore, inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin or siRNA-mediated knockdown of gp-91phox abolished the Tat/cocaine-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, suggesting the NADPH oxidase mediated generation of oxidative radicals. In addition, ROS dependent activation of Ras and ERK1/2 Kinase was observed to be mediating the TJP-1 disassembly, and endothelial dysfunction in response to cocaine and Tat exposure. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that Tat/cocaine -mediated production of ROS activate Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 pathway that contributes to disruption of tight junction protein leading to pulmonary endothelial dysfunction associated with pulmonary vascular remodeling. PMID:24409324

  11. The Mobile bypass Signal Arrests Shoot Growth by Disrupting Shoot Apical Meristem Maintenance, Cytokinin Signaling, and WUS Transcription Factor Expression1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, David L.; Adhikari, Emma; Fraser, Nisa

    2016-01-01

    The bypass1 (bps1) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) produces a root-sourced compound (the bps signal) that moves to the shoot and is sufficient to arrest growth of a wild-type shoot; however, the mechanism of growth arrest is not understood. Here, we show that the earliest shoot defect arises during germination and is a failure of bps1 mutants to maintain their shoot apical meristem (SAM). This finding suggested that the bps signal might affect expression or function of SAM regulatory genes, and we found WUSCHEL (WUS) expression to be repressed in bps1 mutants. Repression appears to arise from the mobile bps signal, as the bps1 root was sufficient to rapidly down-regulate WUS expression in wild-type shoots. Normally, WUS is regulated by a balance between positive regulation by cytokinin (CK) and negative regulation by CLAVATA (CLV). In bps1, repression of WUS was independent of CLV, and, instead, the bps signal down-regulates CK responses. Cytokinin treatment of bps1 mutants restored both WUS expression and activity, but only in the rib meristem. How the bps signal down-regulates CK remains unknown, though the bps signal was sufficient to repress expression of one CK receptor (AHK4) and one response regulator (AHP6). Together, these data suggest that the bps signal pathway has the potential for long-distance regulation through modification of CK signaling and altering gene expression. PMID:27208247

  12. Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown after Embolic Stroke in Rats Occurs without Ultrastructural Evidence for Disrupting Tight Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Martin; Härtig, Wolfgang; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bechmann, Ingo; Michalski, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    The term blood-brain barrier (BBB) relates to the ability of cerebral vessels to hold back hydrophilic and large molecules from entering the brain, thereby crucially contributing to brain homeostasis. In fact, experimental opening of endothelial tight junctions causes a breakdown of the BBB evidenced as for instance by albumin leakage. This and similar observations led to the conclusion that BBB breakdown is predominantly mediated by damage to tight junction complexes, but evidentiary ultrastructural data are rare. Since functional deficits of the BBB contribute to an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation and brain edema after stroke, which both critically impact on the clinical outcome, we studied the mechanism of BBB breakdown using an embolic model of focal cerebral ischemia in Wistar rats to closely mimic the essential human pathophysiology. Ischemia-induced BBB breakdown was detected using intravenous injection of FITC-albumin and tight junctions in areas of FITC-albumin extravasation were subsequently studied using fluorescence and electron microscopy. Against our expectation, 25 hours after ischemia induction the morphology of tight junction complexes (identified ultrastructurally and using antibodies against the transcellular proteins occludin and claudin-5) appeared to be regularly maintained in regions where FITC-albumin massively leaked into the neuropil. Furthermore, occludin signals along pan-laminin-labeled vessels in the affected hemisphere equaled the non-affected contralateral side (ratio: 0.966 vs. 0.963; P = 0.500). Additional ultrastructural analyses at 5 and 25 h after ischemia induction clearly indicated FITC-albumin extravasation around vessels with intact tight junctions, while the endothelium exhibited enhanced transendothelial vesicle trafficking and signs of degeneration. Thus, BBB breakdown and leakage of FITC-albumin cannot be correlated with staining patterns for common tight junction proteins alone. Understanding the

  13. Blood-brain barrier breakdown after embolic stroke in rats occurs without ultrastructural evidence for disrupting tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Martin; Härtig, Wolfgang; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bechmann, Ingo; Michalski, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    The term blood-brain barrier (BBB) relates to the ability of cerebral vessels to hold back hydrophilic and large molecules from entering the brain, thereby crucially contributing to brain homeostasis. In fact, experimental opening of endothelial tight junctions causes a breakdown of the BBB evidenced as for instance by albumin leakage. This and similar observations led to the conclusion that BBB breakdown is predominantly mediated by damage to tight junction complexes, but evidentiary ultrastructural data are rare. Since functional deficits of the BBB contribute to an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation and brain edema after stroke, which both critically impact on the clinical outcome, we studied the mechanism of BBB breakdown using an embolic model of focal cerebral ischemia in Wistar rats to closely mimic the essential human pathophysiology. Ischemia-induced BBB breakdown was detected using intravenous injection of FITC-albumin and tight junctions in areas of FITC-albumin extravasation were subsequently studied using fluorescence and electron microscopy. Against our expectation, 25 hours after ischemia induction the morphology of tight junction complexes (identified ultrastructurally and using antibodies against the transcellular proteins occludin and claudin-5) appeared to be regularly maintained in regions where FITC-albumin massively leaked into the neuropil. Furthermore, occludin signals along pan-laminin-labeled vessels in the affected hemisphere equaled the non-affected contralateral side (ratio: 0.966 vs. 0.963; P = 0.500). Additional ultrastructural analyses at 5 and 25 h after ischemia induction clearly indicated FITC-albumin extravasation around vessels with intact tight junctions, while the endothelium exhibited enhanced transendothelial vesicle trafficking and signs of degeneration. Thus, BBB breakdown and leakage of FITC-albumin cannot be correlated with staining patterns for common tight junction proteins alone. Understanding the

  14. Adenovirus fiber disrupts CAR-mediated intercellular adhesion allowing virus escape.

    PubMed

    Walters, Robert W; Freimuth, Paul; Moninger, Thomas O; Ganske, Ingrid; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2002-09-20

    Adenovirus binds its receptor (CAR), enters cells, and replicates. It must then escape to the environment to infect a new host. We found that following infection, human airway epithelia first released adenovirus to the basolateral surface. Virus then traveled between epithelial cells to emerge on the apical surface. Adenovirus fiber protein, which is produced during viral replication, facilitated apical escape. Fiber binds CAR, which sits on the basolateral membrane where it maintains tight junction integrity. When fiber bound CAR, it disrupted junctional integrity, allowing virus to filter between the cells and emerge apically. Thus, adenovirus exploits its receptor for two important but distinct steps in its life cycle: entry into host cells and escape across epithelial barriers to the environment.

  15. Toxicants target cell junctions in the testis: Insights from the indazole-carboxylic acid model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, C Yan

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous types of junctions in the seminiferous epithelium which are integrated with, and critically dependent on the Sertoli cell cytoskeleton. These include the basal tight junctions between Sertoli cells that form the main component of the blood–testis barrier, the basal ectoplasmic specializations (basal ES) and basal tubulobulbar complexes (basal TBC) between Sertoli cells; as well as apical ES and apical TBC between Sertoli cells and the developing spermatids that orchestrate spermiogenesis and spermiation. These junctions, namely TJ, ES, and TBC interact with actin microfilament-based cytoskeleton, which together with the desmosomal junctions that interact with the intermediate filament-based cytoskeleton plus the highly polarized microtubule-based cytoskeleton are working in concert to move spermatocytes and spermatids between the basal and luminal aspect of the seminiferous epithelium. In short, these various junctions are structurally complexed with the actin- and microtubule-based cytoskeleton or intermediate filaments of the Sertoli cell. Studies have shown toxicants (e.g., cadmium, bisphenol A (BPA), perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), phthalates, and glycerol), and some male contraceptives under development (e.g., adjudin, gamendazole), exert their effects, at least in part, by targeting cell junctions in the testis. The disruption of Sertoli–Sertoli cell and Sertoli–germ cell junctions, results in the loss of germ cells from the seminiferous epithelium. Adjudin, a potential male contraceptive under investigation in our laboratory, produces loss of spermatids from the seminiferous tubules through disruption of the Sertoli cell spermatid junctions and disruption of the Sertoli cell cytoskeleton. The molecular and structural changes associated with adjudin administration are described, to provide an example of the profile of changes caused by disturbance of Sertoli-germ cell and also Sertoli cell-cell junctions. PMID:26413399

  16. Disruption of endothelial adherens junction by invasive breast cancer cells is mediated by reactive oxygen species and is attenuated by AHCC.

    PubMed

    Haidari, Mehran; Zhang, Wei; Wakame, Koji

    2013-12-18

    The effect of antioxidants on treatment of cancer is still controversial. Previously, we demonstrated that interaction of breast cancer cells with endothelial cells leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and disruption of endothelial adherens junction (EAJ). The molecular mechanism underlying the anti-metastatic effects of mushroom-derived active hexode correlated compound (AHCC) remains elusive. Several cellular and biochemical techniques were used to determine the contribution of oxidative stress in the disruption of EAJ and to test this hypothesis that AHCC inhibits the breast cancer cell-induced disruption of EAJ. Interaction of breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells) with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) leads to an increase in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment of HUVECs with H2O2 or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) led to tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin, dissociation of β-catenin from VE-cadherin complex and increased transendothelial migration (TEM) of MDA-MB-231 cells. Induction of VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation by PMA or by interaction of MDA-MB-231 cells with HUVECs was mediated by HRas and protein kinase C-α signaling pathways. Disruption of EAJ and phosphorylation of VE-cadherin induced by interaction of MDA-MB-231 cells with HUVECs were attenuated when HUVECs were pretreated with an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or AHCC. AHCC inhibited TEM of MDA-MB-231 cells and generation of ROS induced by interaction of MDA-MB-231 cells with HUVECs. Our studies suggest that ROS contributes to disruption of EAJ induced by interaction of MDA-MB-231 cells with HUVECs and AHCC attenuates this alteration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Access to Nectin Favors Herpes Simplex Virus Infection at the Apical Surface of Polarized Human Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Galen, Benjamin; Cheshenko, Natalia; Tuyama, Ana; Ramratnam, Bharat; Herold, Betsy C.

    2006-01-01

    Viral entry may preferentially occur at the apical or the basolateral surfaces of polarized cells, and differences may impact pathogenesis, preventative strategies, and successful implementation of viral vectors for gene therapy. The objective of these studies was to examine the polarity of herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry using several different human epithelial cell lines. Human uterine (ECC-1), colonic (CaCo-2), and retinal pigment (ARPE-19) epithelial cells were grown on collagen-coated inserts, and the polarity was monitored by measuring the transepithelial cell resistance. Controls were CaSki cells, a human cervical cell line that does not polarize in vitro. The polarized cells, but not CaSki cells, were 16- to 50-fold more susceptible to HSV infection at the apical surface than at the basolateral surface. Disruption of the tight junctions by treatment with EGTA overcame the restriction on basolateral infection but had no impact on apical infection. No differences in binding at the two surfaces were observed. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that nectin-1, the major coreceptor for HSV entry, sorted preferentially to the apical surface, overlapping with adherens and tight junction proteins. Transfection with small interfering RNA specific for nectin-1 resulted in a significant reduction in susceptibility to HSV at the apical surface but had little impact on basolateral infection. Infection from the apical but not the basolateral surface triggered focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation and led to nuclear transport of viral capsids and viral gene expression. These studies indicate that access to nectin-1 contributes to preferential apical infection of these human epithelial cells by HSV. PMID:17005657

  18. Aβ₁₋₄₂-RAGE interaction disrupts tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier via Ca²⁺-calcineurin signaling.

    PubMed

    Kook, Sun-Young; Hong, Hyun Seok; Moon, Minho; Ha, Chang Man; Chang, Sunghoe; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2012-06-27

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), which is formed by adherens and tight junctions (TJs) of endothelial cells, maintains homeostasis of the brain. Disrupted intracellular Ca²⁺ homeostasis and breakdown of the BBB have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is known to interact with amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and mediate Aβ transport across the BBB, contributing to the deposition of Aβ in the brain. However, molecular mechanisms underlying Aβ-RAGE interaction-induced alterations in the BBB have not been identified. We found that Aβ₁₋₄₂ induces enhanced permeability, disruption of zonula occludin-1 (ZO-1) expression in the plasma membrane, and increased intracellular calcium and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) secretion in cultured endothelial cells. Neutralizing antibodies against RAGE and inhibitors of calcineurin and MMPs prevented Aβ₁₋₄₂-induced changes in ZO-1, suggesting that Aβ-RAGE interactions alter TJ proteins through the Ca²⁺-calcineurin pathway. Consistent with these in vitro findings, we found disrupted microvessels near Aβ plaque-deposited areas, elevated RAGE expression, and enhanced MMP secretion in microvessels of the brains of 5XFAD mice, an animal model for AD. We have identified a potential molecular pathway underlying Aβ-RAGE interaction-induced breakage of BBB integrity. This pathway might play an important role in the pathogenesis of AD.

  19. Knockdown of col22a1 gene in zebrafish induces a muscular dystrophy by disruption of the myotendinous junction.

    PubMed

    Charvet, Benjamin; Guiraud, Alexandre; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Zwolanek, Daniela; Guillon, Emilie; Bretaud, Sandrine; Monnot, Catherine; Schulze, Jörg; Bader, Hannah L; Allard, Bruno; Koch, Manuel; Ruggiero, Florence

    2013-11-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the major site of force transfer in skeletal muscle, and defects in its structure correlate with a subset of muscular dystrophies. Col22a1 encodes the MTJ component collagen XXII, the function of which remains unknown. Here, we have cloned and characterized the zebrafish col22a1 gene and conducted morpholino-based loss-of-function studies in developing embryos. We showed that col22a1 transcripts localize at muscle ends when the MTJ forms and that COLXXII protein integrates the junctional extracellular matrix. Knockdown of COLXXII expression resulted in muscular dystrophy-like phenotype, including swimming impairment, curvature of embryo trunk/tail, strong reduction of twitch-contraction amplitude and contraction-induced muscle fiber detachment, and provoked significant activation of the survival factor Akt. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence studies revealed that absence of COLXXII caused a strong reduction of MTJ folds and defects in myoseptal structure. These defects resulted in reduced contractile force and susceptibility of junctional extracellular matrix to rupture when subjected to repeated mechanical stress. Co-injection of sub-phenotypic doses of morpholinos against col22a1 and genes of the major muscle linkage systems showed a synergistic gene interaction between col22a1 and itga7 (α7β1 integrin) that was not observed with dag1 (dystroglycan). Finally, pertinent to a conserved role in humans, the dystrophic phenotype was rescued by microinjection of recombinant human COLXXII. Our findings indicate that COLXXII contributes to the stabilization of myotendinous junctions and strengthens skeletal muscle attachments during contractile activity.

  20. Genomic and Proteomic Profiling Reveals Reduced Mitochondrial Function and Disruption of the Neuromuscular Junction Driving Rat Sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Chick, Joel M.; Kendall, Tracee; Eash, John K.; Li, Christine; Zhang, Yunyu; Vickers, Chad; Wu, Zhidan; Clarke, Brian A.; Shi, Jun; Cruz, Joseph; Fournier, Brigitte; Brachat, Sophie; Gutzwiller, Sabine; Ma, QiCheng; Markovits, Judit; Broome, Michelle; Steinkrauss, Michelle; Skuba, Elizabeth; Galarneau, Jean-Rene; Gygi, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, remain unclear. To identify molecular changes that correlated best with sarcopenia and might contribute to its pathogenesis, we determined global gene expression profiles in muscles of rats aged 6, 12, 18, 21, 24, and 27 months. These rats exhibit sarcopenia beginning at 21 months. Correlation of the gene expression versus muscle mass or age changes, and functional annotation analysis identified gene signatures of sarcopenia distinct from gene signatures of aging. Specifically, mitochondrial energy metabolism (e.g., tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation) pathway genes were the most downregulated and most significantly correlated with sarcopenia. Also, perturbed were genes/pathways associated with neuromuscular junction patency (providing molecular evidence of sarcopenia-related functional denervation and neuromuscular junction remodeling), protein degradation, and inflammation. Proteomic analysis of samples at 6, 18, and 27 months confirmed the depletion of mitochondrial energy metabolism proteins and neuromuscular junction proteins. Together, these findings suggest that therapeutic approaches that simultaneously stimulate mitochondrogenesis and reduce muscle proteolysis and inflammation have potential for treating sarcopenia. PMID:23109432

  1. Uncoupling apical constriction from tissue invagination.

    PubMed

    Chung, SeYeon; Kim, Sangjoon; Andrew, Deborah J

    2017-03-06

    Apical constriction is a widely utilized cell shape change linked to folding, bending and invagination of polarized epithelia. It remains unclear how apical constriction is regulated spatiotemporally during tissue invagination and how this cellular process contributes to tube formation in different developmental contexts. Using Drosophila salivary gland (SG) invagination as a model, we show that regulation of folded gastrulation expression by the Fork head transcription factor is required for apicomedial accumulation of Rho kinase and non-muscle myosin II, which coordinate apical constriction. We demonstrate that neither loss of spatially coordinated apical constriction nor its complete blockage prevent internalization and tube formation, although such manipulations affect the geometry of invagination. When apical constriction is disrupted, compressing force generated by a tissue-level myosin cable contributes to SG invagination. We demonstrate that fully elongated polarized SGs can form outside the embryo, suggesting that tube formation and elongation are intrinsic properties of the SG.

  2. Hyperoxia arrests pulmonary development in newborn rats via disruption of endothelial tight junctions and downregulation of Cx40.

    PubMed

    Li, Chong; Fu, Jianhua; Liu, Hongyu; Yang, Haiping; Yao, Li; You, Kai; Xue, Xindong

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated changes in vascular endothelial cell tight junction structure and the expression of the gene encoding connexin 40 (Cx40) at the early pneumonedema stage of hyperoxia‑induced bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in a newborn rat model. A total of 96 newborn rats were randomly assigned to one of the following two groups, the hyperoxia group (n=48) and the control group (n=48). A hyperoxia-induced BPD model was established for the first group, while rats in the control group were maintained under normoxic conditions. Extravasation of Evans Blue (EB) was measured; the severity of lung injury was assessed; a transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to examine the vascular endothelial cell tight junction structures, and immunohistochemical assay, western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to evaluate the expression of Cx40 at the mRNA and protein level. Our findings showed that injuries due to BPD are progressively intensified during the time-course of exposure to hyperoxic conditions. Pulmonary vascular permeability in the hyperoxia group reached the highest level at day 5, and was significantly higher compared to the control group. TEM observations demonstrated tight junctions between endothelial cells were extremely tight. In the hyperoxia group, no marked changes in the tight junction structure were found at days 1 and 3; paracellular gaps were visible between endothelial cells at days 5 and 7. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the Cx40 protein is mainly expressed in the vascular endothelial cells of lung tissue. Western blotting and RT-PCR assays showed a gradual decrease in Cx40 expression, depending on the exposure time to hyperoxic conditions. However, the Cx40 mRNA level reached a trough at 5 days. Overall, our study demonstrated that exposure to hyperoxia damages the tight junction structures between vascular endothelial cells and downregulates Cx40. We therefore conclude

  3. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Middle Ear Inflammation Disrupts the cochlear Intra-Strial Fluid–Blood Barrier through Down-Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Hou, Zhiqiang; Cai, Jing; Dong, Mingmin; Shi, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    Middle ear infection (or inflammation) is the most common pathological condition that causes fluid to accumulate in the middle ear, disrupting cochlear homeostasis. Lipopolysaccharide, a product of bacteriolysis, activates macrophages and causes release of inflammatory cytokines. Many studies have shown that lipopolysaccharides cause functional and structural changes in the inner ear similar to that of inflammation. However, it is specifically not known how lipopolysaccharides affect the blood-labyrinth barrier in the stria vascularis (intra-strial fluid–blood barrier), nor what the underlying mechanisms are. In this study, we used a cell culture-based in vitro model and animal-based in vivo model, combined with immunohistochemistry and a vascular leakage assay, to investigate lipopolysaccharide effects on the integrity of the mouse intra-strial fluid–blood barrier. Our results show lipopolysaccharide-induced local infection significantly affects intra-strial fluid–blood barrier component cells. Pericytes and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes are particularly affected, and the morphological and functional changes in these cells are accompanied by substantial changes in barrier integrity. Significant vascular leakage is found in the lipopolysaccharide treated-animals. Consistent with the findings from the in vivo animal model, the permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer to FITC-albumin was significantly higher in the lipopolysaccharide-treated monolayer than in an untreated endothelial cell monolayer. Further study has shown the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation to have a major effect on the expression of tight junctions in the blood barrier. Lipopolysaccharide was also shown to cause high frequency hearing loss, corroborated by previous reports from other laboratories. Our findings show lipopolysaccharide-evoked middle ear infection disrupts inner ear fluid balance, and its particular effects on the intra-strial fluid

  4. Lipopolysaccharide-induced middle ear inflammation disrupts the cochlear intra-strial fluid-blood barrier through down-regulation of tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Hou, Zhiqiang; Cai, Jing; Dong, Mingmin; Shi, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    Middle ear infection (or inflammation) is the most common pathological condition that causes fluid to accumulate in the middle ear, disrupting cochlear homeostasis. Lipopolysaccharide, a product of bacteriolysis, activates macrophages and causes release of inflammatory cytokines. Many studies have shown that lipopolysaccharides cause functional and structural changes in the inner ear similar to that of inflammation. However, it is specifically not known how lipopolysaccharides affect the blood-labyrinth barrier in the stria vascularis (intra-strial fluid-blood barrier), nor what the underlying mechanisms are. In this study, we used a cell culture-based in vitro model and animal-based in vivo model, combined with immunohistochemistry and a vascular leakage assay, to investigate lipopolysaccharide effects on the integrity of the mouse intra-strial fluid-blood barrier. Our results show lipopolysaccharide-induced local infection significantly affects intra-strial fluid-blood barrier component cells. Pericytes and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes are particularly affected, and the morphological and functional changes in these cells are accompanied by substantial changes in barrier integrity. Significant vascular leakage is found in the lipopolysaccharide treated-animals. Consistent with the findings from the in vivo animal model, the permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer to FITC-albumin was significantly higher in the lipopolysaccharide-treated monolayer than in an untreated endothelial cell monolayer. Further study has shown the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation to have a major effect on the expression of tight junctions in the blood barrier. Lipopolysaccharide was also shown to cause high frequency hearing loss, corroborated by previous reports from other laboratories. Our findings show lipopolysaccharide-evoked middle ear infection disrupts inner ear fluid balance, and its particular effects on the intra-strial fluid-blood barrier

  5. Direct Exposure to Ethanol Disrupts Junctional Cell-Cell Contact and Hippo-YAP Signaling in HL-1 Murine Atrial Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Noritake, Kanako; Aki, Toshihiko; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Unuma, Kana; Uemura, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Direct exposure of cardiomyocytes to ethanol causes cardiac damage such as cardiac arrythmias and apoptotic cell death. Cardiomyocytes are connected to each other through intercalated disks (ID), which are composed of a gap junction (GJ), adherens junction, and desmosome. Changes in the content as well as the subcellular localization of connexin43 (Cx43), the main component of the cardiac GJ, are reportedly involved in cardiac arrythmias and subsequent damage. Recently, the hippo-YAP signaling pathway, which links cellular physical status to cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, has been implicated in cardiac homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. This study was conducted to explore the possible involvement of junctional intercellular communication, mechanotransduction through cytoskeletal organization, and the hippo-YAP pathway in cardiac damage caused by direct exposure to ethanol. HL-1 murine atrial cardiac cells were used since these cells retain cardiac phenotypes through ID formation and subsequent synchronous contraction. Cells were exposed to 0.5–2% ethanol; significant apoptotic cell death was observed after exposure to 2% ethanol for 48 hours. A decrease in Cx43 levels was already observed after 3 hours exposure to 2% ethanol, suggesting a rapid degradation of this protein. Upon exposure to ethanol, Cx43 translocated into lysosomes. Cellular cytoskeletal organization was also dysregulated by ethanol, as demonstrated by the disruption of myofibrils and intermediate filaments. Coinciding with the loss of cell-cell adherence, decreased phosphorylation of YAP, a hippo pathway effector, was also observed in ethanol-treated cells. Taken together, the results provide evidence that cells exposed directly to ethanol show 1) impaired cell-cell adherence/communication, 2) decreased cellular mechanotransduction by the cytoskeleton, and 3) a suppressed hippo-YAP pathway. Suppression of hippo-YAP pathway signaling should be

  6. Human cytomegalovirus immediate early proteins promote degradation of connexin 43 and disrupt gap junction communication: implications for a role in gliomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zahidul; Yaiw, Koon-Chu; Wilhelmi, Vanessa; Lam, Hoyin; Rahbar, Afsar; Stragliotto, Giuseppe; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    A lack of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is common in cancer. Many oncogenic viruses have been shown to downregulate the junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43) and reduce GJIC. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous, species-specific betaherpesvirus that establishes life-long latency after primary infection. It encodes two viral gene products, immediate early (IE) proteins IE1 and IE2, which are crucial in viral replication and pathogenesis of many diseases. Emerging evidence demonstrates that HCMV DNA and proteins are highly prevalent in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and in other tumors, but HCMV's role in tumorigenesis remains obscure. In the present study, we examined the effects of HCMV infection on Cx43 expression and GJIC as well as the viral mechanism mediating the effects in human GBM cells and tissue samples. We found that HCMV downregulated Cx43 protein, resulting in disruption of functional GJIC as assayed by fluorescent dye transfer assay. We show that both HCMV-IE72 and IE86 mediate downregulation of Cx43 by silencing RNA targeting either IE72 or IE86 coupled with ganciclovir. This finding was further validated by transfection with expression vectors encoding IE72 or IE86, and we show that viral-mediated Cx43 depletion involved proteasomal degradation. Importantly, we also observed that the Cx43 protein levels and IE staining correlated inversely in 10 human GBM tissue specimens. Thus, HCMV regulates Cx43 expression and GJIC, which may contribute to gliomagenesis.

  7. Zonula occludens-1 and -2 regulate apical cell structure and the zonula adherens cytoskeleton in polarized epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Fanning, Alan S.; Van Itallie, Christina M.; Anderson, James M.

    2012-01-01

    The structure and function of both adherens (AJ) and tight (TJ) junctions are dependent on the cortical actin cytoskeleton. The zonula occludens (ZO)-1 and -2 proteins have context-dependent interactions with both junction types and bind directly to F-actin and other cytoskeletal proteins, suggesting ZO-1 and -2 might regulate cytoskeletal activity at cell junctions. To address this hypothesis, we generated stable Madin-Darby canine kidney cell lines depleted of both ZO-1 and -2. Both paracellular permeability and the localization of TJ proteins are disrupted in ZO-1/-2–depleted cells. In addition, immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy revealed a significant expansion of the perijunctional actomyosin ring associated with the AJ. These structural changes are accompanied by a recruitment of 1-phosphomyosin light chain and Rho kinase 1, contraction of the actomyosin ring, and expansion of the apical domain. Despite these changes in the apical cytoskeleton, there are no detectable changes in cell polarity, localization of AJ proteins, or the organization of the basal and lateral actin cytoskeleton. We conclude that ZO proteins are required not only for TJ assembly but also for regulating the organization and functional activity of the apical cytoskeleton, particularly the perijunctional actomyosin ring, and we speculate that these activities are relevant both to cellular organization and epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:22190737

  8. Accumulated HSV1-TK proteins interfere with spermatogenesis through a disruption of the integrity of Sertoli-germ cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Cai, Li-Yi; Kato, Takako; Chen, Mo; Wang, HongHua; Sekine, Ei-ichiro; Izumi, Shun-ichiro; Kato, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic rats show spermatid-specific ectopic expression of the reporter gene, herpes simplex virus type1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK), in the testes and have demonstrated male infertility. However, the disruption of spermatogenesis and the underlying molecular mechanisms in these transgenic animals have not been well clarified. In this study, light and electron microscopic observations were performed to characterize the morphological changes in the testes. To explore the molecular mechanisms of male infertility in the HSV1-TK transgenic rat, cDNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses were performed. The seminiferous tubules of 3-month-old transgenic rats showed morphological alterations including seminiferous epithelial sloughing, vacuolization, and degeneration of spermatogenic cells, suggesting a failure of Sertoli-germ cell interaction. Components of the epididymal lumen from transgenic rats included abnormal spermatozoa, degenerating round spermatids and abnormal elongated spermatids indicating an appearance of direct impairment of spermiogenesis. cDNA microarray and real-time PCRanalyses revealed significant changes (P<0.05) in the gene expression level in six genes, testin, versican, mamdc1, fgf7, ostf1 and cnot7. Among them, testin drew most of our attention, since the testin gene is a sensitive marker for disruption of Sertoli-germ cell adhesion. Thus, our results suggest that the accumulation of HSV1-TK in the spermatids not only directly interferes with spermiogenesis but also disrupts spermatogenesis through a disruption of Sertoli-germ cell adhesions. It is important to explore the testicular actions of the HSV1-TK protein in transgenic experimental models and thereby gain clues to find an appropriate treatment for HSV-infected patients exhibiting human male infertility, as has been recently observed.

  9. Reversal of West Nile virus-induced blood-brain barrier disruption and tight junction proteins degradation by matrix metalloproteinases inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Saguna; Kumar, Mukesh; Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Lum, Stephanie; Nerurkar, Vivek R.

    2011-01-01

    Though compromised blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a pathological hallmark of WNV- associated neurological sequelae, underlying mechanisms are unclear. We characterized the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in WNV-infected human brain-microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE) and -cortical astrocytes (HBCA), components of BBB and their role in BBB disruption. Expression of multiple MMPs was significantly induced in WNV-infected HBCA cells. Naïve HBMVE cells incubated with the supernatant from WNV-infected HBCA cells demonstrated loss of tight junction proteins, which was rescued in the presence of MMP inhibitor, GM6001. Further, supernatant from WNV-infected HBCA cells compromised the in-vitro BBB models integrity. Our data suggests astrocytes as one of the sources of MMP in the brain, which mediates BBB disruption allowing unrestricted entry of immune cells into the brain, thereby contributing to WNV-neuropathogenesis. Because of the unavailability of WNV antivirals and vaccines, use of MMP inhibitors as an adjunct therapy to ameliorate WNV disease progression is warranted. PMID:19922973

  10. Necrotizing Enterocolitis in a mouse model leads to widespread renal inflammation, acute kidney injury and disruption of renal tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Parvesh M; Tatum, Rodney; Ravisankar, Srikanth; Shekhawat, Prem S; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating condition affecting premature infants and leads to high mortality and chronic morbidity. Severe form of NEC is associated with acute renal failure, fluid imbalance, hyponatremia and acidosis. We investigated the effect of NEC on tight junction (TJ) proteins in kidneys using a NEC mouse model to investigate the basis for the observed renal dysfunction. METHODS NEC was induced in C57BL/6 mice by formula feeding and subjecting them to periods of hypoxia and cold stress. NEC was confirmed by gross and histological examination. We studied various markers of inflammation in kidneys and investigated changes in expression of several TJ proteins and AQP2 using immunofluorecent staining and Western blotting. RESULTS We found markedly increased expression of NFκB, TGFβ and ERK1/2 along with claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, -8 and AQP-2 in NEC kidneys. The membrane localization of claudin-2 was altered in the NEC kidneys and its immunostaining signal at TJ was disrupted. CONCLUSION NEC led to a severe inflammatory response not only in the gut but also the kidneys. NEC increased expression of several TJ proteins and caused disruption of claudin-2 in renal tubules. These observed changes can help explain some of the clinical findings observed in NEC. PMID:26270572

  11. ATP Induces Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins via IL-1 Beta-Dependent MMP-9 Activation of Human Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) follows brain trauma or central nervous system (CNS) stress. However, the mechanisms leading to this process or the underlying neural plasticity are not clearly known. We hypothesized that ATP/P2X7R signaling regulates the integrity of BBB. Activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) by ATP induces the release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which in turn enhances the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Degradation of tight junction proteins (TJPs) such as ZO-1 and occludin occurs, which finally contributes to disruption of BBB. A contact coculture system using human astrocytes and hCMEC/D3, an immortalized human brain endothelial cell line, was used to mimic BBB in vitro. Permeability was used to evaluate changes in the integrity of TJPs. ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescent staining procedures were used. Our data demonstrated that exposure to the photoreactive ATP analog, 3′-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5′-triphosphate (BzATP), induced a significant decrease in ZO-1 and occludin expression. Meanwhile, the decrease of ZO-1 and occludin was significantly attenuated by P2X7R inhibitors, as well as IL-1R and MMP antagonists. Further, the induction of IL-1β and MMP-9 was closely linked to ATP/P2X7R-associated BBB leakage. In conclusion, our study explored the mechanism of ATP/P2X7R signaling in the disruption of BBB following brain trauma/stress injury, especially focusing on the relationship with IL-1β and MMP-9. PMID:27795859

  12. ATP Induces Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins via IL-1 Beta-Dependent MMP-9 Activation of Human Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuxing; Zhao, Kai; Zhang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Bainan

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) follows brain trauma or central nervous system (CNS) stress. However, the mechanisms leading to this process or the underlying neural plasticity are not clearly known. We hypothesized that ATP/P2X7R signaling regulates the integrity of BBB. Activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) by ATP induces the release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which in turn enhances the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Degradation of tight junction proteins (TJPs) such as ZO-1 and occludin occurs, which finally contributes to disruption of BBB. A contact coculture system using human astrocytes and hCMEC/D3, an immortalized human brain endothelial cell line, was used to mimic BBB in vitro. Permeability was used to evaluate changes in the integrity of TJPs. ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescent staining procedures were used. Our data demonstrated that exposure to the photoreactive ATP analog, 3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP), induced a significant decrease in ZO-1 and occludin expression. Meanwhile, the decrease of ZO-1 and occludin was significantly attenuated by P2X7R inhibitors, as well as IL-1R and MMP antagonists. Further, the induction of IL-1β and MMP-9 was closely linked to ATP/P2X7R-associated BBB leakage. In conclusion, our study explored the mechanism of ATP/P2X7R signaling in the disruption of BBB following brain trauma/stress injury, especially focusing on the relationship with IL-1β and MMP-9.

  13. Quantitative apical membrane proteomics reveals vasopressin-induced actin dynamics in collecting duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Chin-San; Chen, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Po-Jen; Chen, Pei-Yu; Lin, Shu-Yu; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Fenton, Robert A.; Knepper, Mark A.; Yu, Ming-Jiun

    2013-01-01

    In kidney collecting duct cells, filamentous actin (F-actin) depolymerization is a critical step in vasopressin-induced trafficking of aquaporin-2 to the apical plasma membrane. However, the molecular components of this response are largely unknown. Using stable isotope-based quantitative protein mass spectrometry and surface biotinylation, we identified 100 proteins that showed significant abundance changes in the apical plasma membrane of mouse cortical collecting duct cells in response to vasopressin. Fourteen of these proteins are involved in actin cytoskeleton regulation, including actin itself, 10 actin-associated proteins, and 3 regulatory proteins. Identified were two integral membrane proteins (Clmn, Nckap1) and one actin-binding protein (Mpp5) that link F-actin to the plasma membrane, five F-actin end-binding proteins (Arpc2, Arpc4, Gsn, Scin, and Capzb) involved in F-actin reorganization, and two actin adaptor proteins (Dbn1, Lasp1) that regulate actin cytoskeleton organization. There were also protease (Capn1), protein kinase (Cdc42bpb), and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 2 (Arhgef2) that mediate signal-induced F-actin changes. Based on these findings, we devised a live-cell imaging method to observe vasopressin-induced F-actin dynamics in polarized mouse cortical collecting duct cells. In response to vasopressin, F-actin gradually disappeared near the center of the apical plasma membrane while consolidating laterally near the tight junction. This F-actin peripheralization was blocked by calcium ion chelation. Vasopressin-induced apical aquaporin-2 trafficking and forskolin-induced water permeability increase were blocked by F-actin disruption. In conclusion, we identified a vasopressin-regulated actin network potentially responsible for vasopressin-induced apical F-actin dynamics that could explain regulation of apical aquaporin-2 trafficking and water permeability increase. PMID:24085853

  14. Lecithin-Bound Iodine Prevents Disruption of Tight Junctions of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells under Hypoxic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Masahiko; Kondo, Mineo

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We investigated whether lecithin-bound iodine (LBI) can protect the integrity of tight junctions of retinal pigment epithelial cells from hypoxia. Method. Cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells were pretreated with LBI. To mimic hypoxic conditions, cells were incubated with CoCl2. We compared the integrity of the tight junctions (TJs) of control to cells with either LBI alone, CoCl2 alone, or LBI + CoCl2. The levels of cytokines in the conditioned media were also determined. Results. Significant decrease in the zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) intensity in the CoCl2 group compared to the control (5787.7 ± 4126.4 in CoCl2 group versus 29244.6 ± 2981.2 in control; average ± standard deviation). But the decrease was not significant in the LBI + CoCl2 (27189.0 ± 11231.1). The levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and Chemokine (C-C Motif) Ligand 11 (CCL-11) were significantly higher in the CoCl2 than in the control (340.8 ± 43.3 versus 279.7 ± 68.3 pg/mL for MCP-1, and 15.2 ± 12.9 versus 12.5 ± 6.1 pg/mL for CCL-11. With LBI pretreatment, the levels of both cytokines were decreased to 182.6 ± 23.8 (MCP-1) and 5.46 ± 1.9 pg/mL for CCL-11). Blockade of MCP-1 or CCL-11 also shows similar result representing TJ protection from hypoxic stress. Conclusions. LBI results in a protective action from hypoxia. PMID:27340563

  15. Negatively charged silver nanoparticles cause retinal vascular permeability by activating plasma contact system and disrupting adherens junction.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan-Min; Zhao, Xing-Chen; Clermont, Allen C; Zhou, Qun-Fang; Liu, Qian; Feener, Edward P; Yan, Bing; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively used as antibacterial component in numerous healthcare, biomedical and consumer products. Therefore, their adverse effects to biological systems have become a major concern. AgNPs have been shown to be absorbed into circulation and redistributed into various organs. It is thus of great importance to understand how these nanoparticles affect vascular permeability and uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms. A negatively charged mecaptoundeonic acid-capped silver nanoparticle (MUA@AgNP) was investigated in this work. Ex vivo experiments in mouse plasma revealed that MUA@AgNPs caused plasma prekallikrein cleavage, while positively charged or neutral AgNPs, as well as Ag ions had no effect. In vitro tests revealed that MUA@AgNPs activated the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) by triggering Hageman factor autoactivation. By using specific inhibitors aprotinin and HOE 140, we demonstrated that KKS activation caused the release of bradykinin, which activated B2 receptors and induced the shedding of adherens junction protein, VE-cadherin. These biological perturbations eventually resulted in endothelial paracellular permeability in mouse retina after intravitreal injection of MUA@AgNPs. The findings from this work provided key insights for toxicity modulation and biomedical applications of AgNPs.

  16. Negatively Charged Silver Nanoparticles Cause Retinal Vascular Permeability by Activating Plasma Contact System and Disrupting Adherens Junction

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yan-Min; Zhao, Xing-Chen; Clermont, Allen C.; Zhou, Qun-Fang; Liu, Qian; Feener, Edward P.; Yan, Bing; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively used as antibacterial component in numerous healthcare, biomedical, and consumer products. Therefore, their adverse effects to biological systems have become a major concern. AgNPs have been shown to be absorbed into circulation and redistributed into various organs. It is thus of great importance to understand how these nanoparticles affect vascular permeability and uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms. A negatively charged mecaptoundeonic acid capped silver nanoparticle (MUA@AgNP) was investigated in this work. Ex-vivo experiments in mouse plasma revealed that MUA@AgNPs caused plasma prekallikrein cleavage, while positively charged or neutral AgNPs, as well as Ag ions had no effect. In-vitro tests revealed that MUA@AgNPs activated the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) by triggering Hageman factor autoactivation. By using specific inhibitors aprotinin and HOE 140, we demonstrated that KKS activation caused the release of bradykinin, which activated B2 receptors and induced the shedding of adherens junction protein, VE-cadherin. These biological perturbations eventually resulted in endothelial paracellular permeability in mouse retina after intravitreal injection of MUA@AgNPs. The findings from this work provided key insights for toxicity modulation and biomedical applications of AgNPs. PMID:26399585

  17. The vascular endothelial growth factor-induced disruption of gap junctions is relayed by an autocrine communication via ATP release in coronary capillary endothelium.

    PubMed

    Thuringer, Dominique

    2004-12-01

    Little is known concerning how the coordination of Ca(2+) signaling aids in capillary endothelial cell (CEC) functions, such as microvascular permeability and angiogenesis. Previous reports support the major involvement of gap junction (GJ) channels. However, the cell-to-cell communication may not be straightforward, especially if we consider the participation of active molecules released by CEC. In this study, short-term effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-165) were compared with those of bradykinin (BK) on gap junction coupling (GJC) and remodeling of connexin-43 (Cx43) and then analyzed for intercellular Ca(2+) signal in primary cultures of coronary CEC. Dye-coupling experiments revealed that BK or VEGF completely blocked GJC. These effects correlated with the rapid internalization of Cx43 and its tyrosine phosphorylation in part via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. GJC slowly recovered with BK but not with VEGF in the following hour. In control conditions, mechanical stimulation of a single cell within a confluent monolayer triggered an intercellular Ca(2+) wave that was partially inhibited by GJC blockers or purinergic inhibitors. No wave propagation was observed after blockage of both GJC and purinergic receptors. Cell treatment with VEGF also reduced propagation of the Ca(2+) wave, which was totally prevented by applying a purinergic receptor antagonist but not with a GJC blocker. That excludes purine efflux through Cx hemichannels. We conclude that VEGF-induced disruption of GJC via Cx43 remodeling is relayed by an autocrine communication via secretion of ATP to preserve intercellular Ca(2+) signaling in capillary endothelium.

  18. miR-200b inhibits TNF-α-induced IL-8 secretion and tight junction disruption of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yujie; Zhou, Min; Yan, Junkai; Gong, Zizhen; Xiao, Yongtao; Zhang, Cong; Du, Peng; Chen, Yingwei

    2017-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic, inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract with unclear etiologies. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), containing crypt and villus enterocytes, occupy a critical position in the pathogenesis of IBDs and are a major producer of immunoregulatory cytokines and a key component of the intact epithelial barrier. Previously, we have reported that miR-200b is involved in the progression of IBDs and might maintain the integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier via reducing the loss of enterocytes. In this study, we further investigated the impact of miR-200b on intestinal epithelial inflammation and tight junctions in two distinct differentiated states of Caco-2 cells after TNF-α treatment. We demonstrated that TNF-α-enhanced IL-8 expression was decreased by microRNA (miR)-200b in undifferentiated IECs. Simultaneously, miR-200b could alleviate TNF-α-induced tight junction (TJ) disruption in well-differentiated IECs by reducing the reduction in the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), inhibiting the increase in paracellular permeability, and preventing the morphological redistribution of the TJ proteins claudin 1 and ZO-1. The expression levels of the JNK/c-Jun/AP-1 and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)/phosphorylated myosin light chain (p-MLC) pathways were attenuated in undifferentiated and differentiated enterocytes, respectively. Furthermore, a dual-luciferase reporter gene detection system provided direct evidence that c-Jun and MLCK were the specific targets of miR-200b. Collectively, our results highlighted that miR-200b played a positive role in IECs via suppressing intestinal epithelial IL-8 secretion and attenuating TJ damage in vitro, which suggested that miR-200b might be a promising strategy for IBD therapy.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase-mediated disruption of tight junction proteins in cerebral vessels is reversed by synthetic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor in focal ischemia in rat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Estrada, Eduardo Y; Thompson, Jeffrey F; Liu, Wenlan; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2007-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during reperfusion. Occludin and claudins are recently described tight junction proteins (TJPs) that form the BBB. We hypothesized that the opening of the BBB was because of the degradation of TJPs by the MMPs. Spontaneously hypertensive rats had a 90 mins middle cerebral artery occlusion with reperfusion for 2, 3, or 24 h. Matrix metalloproteinases were measured by immunohistochemistry and in situ and gel zymography. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) measured mRNAs of MMP-2 and -9, furin, membrane-type MMP (MT1-MMP), occludin, and claudin-5. There was opening of the BBB in the piriform cortex after 3 h of reperfusion, and an MMP inhibitor, BB-1101 (30 mg/kg), prevented the opening. At 3 h, in situ zymograms showed gelatinase activity. Zymography and PCR showed greater increases in MMP-2 than in MMP-9. There were increased mRNA and immunohistochemistry for MT1-MMP and furin, which activate MMP-2. Claudin-5 and occludin mRNA expression decreased at 2 h in both hemispheres with fragments of both proteins seen on Western blot by 3 h on the ischemic side; treatment with BB-1101 reversed the degradation of the TJPs. Immunohistochemistry at 3 h showed fragmented TJPs within the endothelial cell clefts. By 24 h, in situ zymography showed gelatinase activity and gel zymography showed elevated levels of MMP-9. Disrupted TJPs previously seen in endothelial cells appeared in the surrounding astrocytes. Our results provide direct evidence that MMPs open the BBB by degrading TJPs and that an MMP inhibitor prevents degradation of the TJPs by MMPs.

  20. Morphogenesis of the mouse neural plate depends on distinct roles of cofilin 1 in apical and basal epithelial domains

    PubMed Central

    Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Hildebrand, Jeffrey; Anderson, Kathryn V.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic control of mammalian epithelial polarity and dynamics can be studied in vivo at cellular resolution during morphogenesis of the mouse neural tube. The mouse neural plate is a simple epithelium that is transformed into a columnar pseudostratified tube over the course of ∼24 h. Apical F-actin is known to be important for neural tube closure, but the precise roles of actin dynamics in the neural epithelium are not known. To determine how the organization of the neural epithelium and neural tube closure are affected when actin dynamics are blocked, we examined the cellular basis of the neural tube closure defect in mouse mutants that lack the actin-severing protein cofilin 1 (CFL1). Although apical localization of the adherens junctions, the Par complex, the Crumbs complex and SHROOM3 is normal in the mutants, CFL1 has at least two distinct functions in the apical and basal domains of the neural plate. Apically, in the absence of CFL1 myosin light chain does not become phosphorylated, indicating that CFL1 is required for the activation of apical actomyosin required for neural tube closure. On the basal side of the neural plate, loss of CFL1 has the opposite effect on myosin: excess F-actin and myosin accumulate and the ectopic myosin light chain is phosphorylated. The basal accumulation of F-actin is associated with the assembly of ectopic basal tight junctions and focal disruptions of the basement membrane, which eventually lead to a breakdown of epithelial organization. PMID:25742799

  1. MRCK-1 drives apical constriction in C. elegans by linking developmental patterning to force generation

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Daniel J.; Higgins, Christopher D.; Peters, Kimberly A.; Cupp, Timothy D.; Dickinson, Daniel J.; Pani, Ariel M.; Moore, Regan P.; Cox, Amanda H.; Kiehart, Daniel P.; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Summary Apical constriction is a change in cell shape that drives key morphogenetic events including gastrulation and neural tube formation. Apical force-producing actomyosin networks drive apical constriction by contracting while connected to cell-cell junctions. The mechanisms by which developmental patterning regulates these actomyosin networks and associated junctions with spatial precision are not fully understood. Here, we identify a myosin light chain kinase MRCK-1 as a key regulator of C. elegans gastrulation that integrates spatial and developmental patterning information. We show that MRCK-1 is required for activation of contractile actomyosin dynamics and elevated cortical tension in the apical cell cortex of endodermal precursor cells. MRCK-1 is apically localized by active Cdc42 at the external, cell-cell contact-free surfaces of apically constricting cells, downstream of cell fate determination mechanisms. We establish that the junctional components α-catenin, β-catenin, and cadherin become highly enriched at the apical junctions of apically-constricting cells, and that MRCK-1 and myosin activity are required in vivo for this enrichment. Taken together, our results define mechanisms that position a myosin activator to a specific cell surface where it both locally increases cortical tension and locally enriches junctional components to facilitate apical constriction. These results reveal crucial links that can tie spatial information to local force generation to drive morphogenesis. PMID:27451898

  2. Regulation of epithelial cell tight junctions by protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Enjoji, Shuhei; Ohama, Takashi; Sato, Koichi

    2014-09-01

    A layer of epithelial cells prevents the invasion of bacteria and the entry of foreign substances into the underlying tissue. The disruption of epithelial tight junctions initiates and exacerbates inflammation. However, the precise mechanism underlying the disruption of the epithelial tight junction remains unclear. The activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) by serine proteases produced by some bacteria and mast cells contributes to inflammation in many tissues. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that PAR2 activation affects the structure and function of tight junctions in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Although the application of a PAR2-activating peptide, PAR2-AP, from the apical side of MDCK cells failed to modify the transepithelial resistance (TER), its application from the basal side markedly suppressed the TER. In 3-dimensional cultures of MDCK cells expressing the mCherry-tagged PAR2, a lateral localization of PAR2 was observed. The application of PAR2-AP from the basal side changed the localization of the tight junctional protein, zonula occludin-1. Furthermore, PAR2-AP induced the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. A p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, SB202190, inhibited PAR2-AP-induced changes in TER. Our results suggest that the activation of PAR2 leads to the disruption of tight junctions and increases the barrier permeability through the activation of p38 MAPK, which may cause the initiation and exacerbation of inflammation.

  3. Apical Dominance in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a tentative hypothesis for the control of plant branching (apical dominance). Explores the mechanism by which apical buds inhibit the growth of axillary buds on the same shoot. Presents an up-to-date picture of the problem and gives economic implications of the study. (BR)

  4. HIV-1 gp120 Glycoprotein Interacting with Dendritic Cell-specific Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 3-grabbing Non-integrin (DC-SIGN) Down-Regulates Tight Junction Proteins to Disrupt the Blood Retinal Barrier and Increase Its Permeability.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi-Wen; Li, Chuan; Jiang, Ai-Ping; Ge, Shengfang; Gu, Ping; Fan, Xianqun; Li, Tai-Sheng; Jin, Xia; Wang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Liang

    2016-10-28

    Approximately 70% of HIV-1 infected patients acquire ocular opportunistic infections and manifest eye disorders during the course of their illness. The mechanisms by which pathogens invade the ocular site, however, are unclear. Under normal circumstances, vascular endothelium and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which possess a well developed tight junction complex, form the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) to prevent pathogen invasion. We hypothesize that disruption of the BRB allows pathogen entry into ocular sites. The hypothesis was tested using in vitro models. We discovered that human RPE cells could bind to either HIV-1 gp120 glycoproteins or HIV-1 viral particles. Furthermore, the binding was mediated by dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) expressed on RPE cells. Upon gp120 binding to DC-SIGN, cellular NF-κB signaling was triggered, leading to the induction of matrix metalloproteinases, which subsequently degraded tight junction proteins and disrupted the BRB integrity. DC-SIGN knockdown or prior blocking with a specific antibody abolished gp120-induced matrix metalloproteinase expression and reduced the degradation of tight junction proteins. This study elucidates a novel mechanism by which HIV, type 1 invades ocular tissues and provides additional insights into the translocation or invasion process of ocular complication-associated pathogens.

  5. Vascular endothelial tight junctions and barrier function are disrupted by 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid partly via protein kinase C ε-mediated zona occludens-1 phosphorylation at threonine 770/772.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Rima; Dyukova, Elena; Singh, Nikhlesh K; Ohba, Motoi; Mobley, James A; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2014-02-07

    Disruption of tight junctions (TJs) perturbs endothelial barrier function and promotes inflammation. Previously, we have shown that 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15(S)-HETE), the major 15-lipoxygenase 1 (15-LO1) metabolite of arachidonic acid, by stimulating zona occludens (ZO)-2 tyrosine phosphorylation and its dissociation from claudins 1/5, induces endothelial TJ disruption and its barrier dysfunction. Here, we have studied the role of serine/threonine phosphorylation of TJ proteins in 15(S)-HETE-induced endothelial TJ disruption and its barrier dysfunction. We found that 15(S)-HETE enhances ZO-1 phosphorylation at Thr-770/772 residues via PKCε-mediated MEK1-ERK1/2 activation, causing ZO-1 dissociation from occludin, disrupting endothelial TJs and its barrier function, and promoting monocyte transmigration; these effects were reversed by T770A/T772A mutations. In the arteries of WT mice ex vivo, 15(S)-HETE also induced ZO-1 phosphorylation and endothelial TJ disruption in a PKCε and MEK1-ERK1/2-dependent manner. In line with these observations, in WT mice high fat diet feeding induced 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LO) expression in the endothelium and caused disruption of its TJs and barrier function. However, in 12/15-LO(-/-) mice, high fat diet feeding did not cause disruption of endothelial TJs and barrier function. These observations suggest that the 12/15-LO-12/15(S)-HETE axis, in addition to tyrosine phosphorylation of ZO-2, also stimulates threonine phosphorylation of ZO-1 in the mediation of endothelial TJ disruption and its barrier dysfunction.

  6. Uncoupling apical constriction from tissue invagination

    PubMed Central

    Chung, SeYeon; Kim, Sangjoon; Andrew, Deborah J

    2017-01-01

    Apical constriction is a widely utilized cell shape change linked to folding, bending and invagination of polarized epithelia. It remains unclear how apical constriction is regulated spatiotemporally during tissue invagination and how this cellular process contributes to tube formation in different developmental contexts. Using Drosophila salivary gland (SG) invagination as a model, we show that regulation of folded gastrulation expression by the Fork head transcription factor is required for apicomedial accumulation of Rho kinase and non-muscle myosin II, which coordinate apical constriction. We demonstrate that neither loss of spatially coordinated apical constriction nor its complete blockage prevent internalization and tube formation, although such manipulations affect the geometry of invagination. When apical constriction is disrupted, compressing force generated by a tissue-level myosin cable contributes to SG invagination. We demonstrate that fully elongated polarized SGs can form outside the embryo, suggesting that tube formation and elongation are intrinsic properties of the SG. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22235.001 PMID:28263180

  7. Evaluation of three instrumentation techniques at the precision of apical stop and apical sealing of obturation

    PubMed Central

    GENÇ, Özgür; ALAÇAM, Tayfun; KAYAOGLU, Guven

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of two NiTi rotary apical preparation techniques used with an electronic apex locator-integrated endodontic motor and a manual technique to create an apical stop at a predetermined level (0.5 mm short of the apical foramen) in teeth with disrupted apical constriction, and to evaluate microleakage following obturation in such prepared teeth. Material and Methods: 85 intact human mandibular permanent incisors with single root canal were accessed and the apical constriction was disrupted using a #25 K-file. The teeth were embedded in alginate and instrumented to #40 using rotary Lightspeed or S-Apex techniques or stainless-steel K-files. Distance between the apical foramen and the created apical stop was measured to an accuracy of 0.01 mm. In another set of instrumented teeth, root canals were obturated using gutta-percha and sealer, and leakage was tested at 1 week and 3 months using a fluid filtration device. Results All techniques performed slightly short of the predetermined level. Closest preparation to the predetermined level was with the manual technique and the farthest was with S-Apex. A significant difference was found between the performances of these two techniques (p<0.05). Lightspeed ranked in between. Leakage was similar for all techniques at either period. However, all groups leaked significantly more at 3 months compared to 1 week (p<0.05). Conclusions Despite statistically significant differences found among the techniques, deviations from the predetermined level were small and clinically acceptable for all techniques. Leakage following obturation was comparable in all groups. PMID:21655774

  8. Left ventricular apical diseases.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Silvia; Duarte, Ricardo; Fernandez-Perez, Gabriel C; Castellon, Daniel; Calatayud, Julia; Lecumberri, Iñigo; Larrazabal, Eneritz; Ruiz, Berta Irene

    2011-08-01

    There are many disorders that may involve the left ventricular (LV) apex; however, they are sometimes difficult to differentiate. In this setting cardiac imaging methods can provide the clue to obtaining the diagnosis. The purpose of this review is to illustrate the spectrum of diseases that most frequently affect the apex of the LV including Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy, LV aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms, apical diverticula, apical ventricular remodelling, apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, LV non-compaction, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia with LV involvement and LV false tendons, with an emphasis on the diagnostic criteria and imaging features. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s13244-011-0091-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  9. Occluding junctions and cytoskeletal components in a cultured transporting epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Meza, I; Ibarra, G; Sabanero, M; Martinez-Palomo, A; Cereijido, M

    1980-01-01

    MDCK cells form uninterrupted monolayers and make occluding junctions similar to those of natural epithelia. This aricle explores the relationship between these junctions and the cytoskeleton by combining studies on the distribution of microfilaments and microtubules with the effect of drugs, such as colchicines and cytochalasin B, on the degree of tightness of the occluding junctions. To study the degree of tightness, monolayers were prepared by plating MDCK cells on mylon disks coated with collagen. Disks were mounted as flat sheets between two Lucite chambers, and the sealing capacity of the junctions was evaluated by measuring the electrical resistance across the monolayers. Equivalent monolayers on coverslips were used to study the distribution of microtubules and microfilaments by indirect immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against tubulin and actin. This was done both on complete cells and on cytoskeleton preparations in which the cell membranes had been solubilized before fixation. Staining with antiactin shows a reticular pattern of very fine filaments that spread radially toward the periphery where they form a continuous cortical ring underlying the plasma membrane. Staining with antitubulin depicts fibers that extend radially to form a network that occupies the cytoplasm up to the edges of the cell. Colchicine causes a profound disruption of microtubules but only a 27 percent decrease in the electrical resistance of the resting monolayers. Cytochalasin B, when present for prolonged periods, disrupts the cytoplasmic microfilaments and abolishes the electrical resistance. The cortical ring of filaments remains in place but appears fragmented with time. We find that removal of extracellular Ca(++), which causes the tight junctions to open, also causes the microfilaments and microtubules to retract toward the center of the cells. The process of junction opening and fiber retraction is reversed by the restoration of Ca(++). Colchicine has no effect

  10. Tight junction proteins: from barrier to tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Runkle, E Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-08-28

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis.

  11. Tight Junction Proteins: From Barrier to Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Runkle, E. Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-01-01

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis. PMID:23743355

  12. [Apical endodontic surgery].

    PubMed

    Lindeboom, J A

    2004-04-01

    If (a revision of) a conventional endodontic treatment is not possible or not successful, apical endodontic surgery can be indicated. The contemporary indications, the better retrograde preparation techniques with ultrasonic retro-tips, and the better visualisation of the operation area with an operation microscope can lead to higher success percentages. Moreover, the current developments in the field of compatible filling materials are promising. Also the application of lasers is promising, but has still to prove its clinical usefulness.

  13. Increased intestinal permeability and tight junction disruption by altered expression and localization of occludin in a murine graft versus host disease model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is increasingly performed for hematologic diseases. As a major side effect, acute graft versus host disease (GvHD) with serious gastrointestinal symptoms including diarrhea, gastrointestinal bleeding and high mortality can be observed. Because surveillance and biopsies of human gastrointestinal GvHD are difficult to perform, rare information of the alterations of the gastrointestinal barrier exists resulting in a need for systematic animal models. Methods To investigate the effects of GvHD on the intestinal barrier of the small intestine we utilized an established acute semi allogenic GvHD in C57BL/6 and B6D2F1 mice. Results By assessing the differential uptake of lactulose and mannitol in the jejunum, we observed an increased paracellular permeability as a likely mechanism for disturbed intestinal barrier function. Electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and PCR analysis indicated profound changes of the tight-junction complex, characterized by downregulation of the tight junction protein occludin without any changes in ZO-1. Furthermore TNF-α expression was significantly upregulated. Conclusions This analysis in a murine model of GvHD of the small intestine demonstrates serious impairment of intestinal barrier function in the jejunum, with an increased permeability and morphological changes through downregulation and localization shift of the tight junction protein occludin. PMID:21977944

  14. The serine protease-mediated increase in intestinal epithelial barrier function is dependent on occludin and requires an intact tight junction

    PubMed Central

    Ronaghan, Natalie J.; Shang, Judie; Iablokov, Vadim; Zaheer, Raza; Colarusso, Pina; Dion, Sébastien; Désilets, Antoine; Leduc, Richard; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2016-01-01

    Barrier dysfunction is a characteristic of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Understanding how the tight junction is modified to maintain barrier function may provide avenues for treatment of IBD. We have previously shown that the apical addition of serine proteases to intestinal epithelial cell lines causes a rapid and sustained increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), but the mechanisms are unknown. We hypothesized that serine proteases increase barrier function through trafficking and insertion of tight junction proteins into the membrane, and this could enhance recovery of a disrupted monolayer after calcium switch or cytokine treatment. In the canine epithelial cell line, SCBN, we showed that matriptase, an endogenous serine protease, could potently increase TER. Using detergent solubility-based cell fractionation, we found that neither trypsin nor matriptase treatment changed levels of tight junction proteins at the membrane. In a fast calcium switch assay, serine proteases did not enhance the rate of recovery of the junction. In addition, serine proteases could not reverse barrier disruption induced by IFNγ and TNFα. We knocked down occludin in our cells using siRNA and found this prevented the serine protease-induced increase in TER. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we found serine proteases induce a greater mobile fraction of occludin in the membrane. These data suggest that a functional tight junction is needed for serine proteases to have an effect on TER, and that occludin is a crucial tight junction protein in this mechanism. PMID:27492333

  15. The serine protease-mediated increase in intestinal epithelial barrier function is dependent on occludin and requires an intact tight junction.

    PubMed

    Ronaghan, Natalie J; Shang, Judie; Iablokov, Vadim; Zaheer, Raza; Colarusso, Pina; Dion, Sébastien; Désilets, Antoine; Leduc, Richard; Turner, Jerrold R; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2016-09-01

    Barrier dysfunction is a characteristic of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Understanding how the tight junction is modified to maintain barrier function may provide avenues for treatment of IBD. We have previously shown that the apical addition of serine proteases to intestinal epithelial cell lines causes a rapid and sustained increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), but the mechanisms are unknown. We hypothesized that serine proteases increase barrier function through trafficking and insertion of tight junction proteins into the membrane, and this could enhance recovery of a disrupted monolayer after calcium switch or cytokine treatment. In the canine epithelial cell line, SCBN, we showed that matriptase, an endogenous serine protease, could potently increase TER. Using detergent solubility-based cell fractionation, we found that neither trypsin nor matriptase treatment changed levels of tight junction proteins at the membrane. In a fast calcium switch assay, serine proteases did not enhance the rate of recovery of the junction. In addition, serine proteases could not reverse barrier disruption induced by IFNγ and TNFα. We knocked down occludin in our cells using siRNA and found this prevented the serine protease-induced increase in TER. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we found serine proteases induce a greater mobile fraction of occludin in the membrane. These data suggest that a functional tight junction is needed for serine proteases to have an effect on TER, and that occludin is a crucial tight junction protein in this mechanism.

  16. Two Cases of Apical Ballooning Syndrome Masking Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ranjini Raina; Hakim, Fayaz A.; Hurst, R. Todd; Simper, David; Appleton, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Apical akinesis and dilation in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease is a typical feature of stress-induced (takotsubo) cardiomyopathy, whereas apical hypertrophy is seen in apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report the cases of 2 patients who presented with takotsubo cardiomyopathy and were subsequently found to have apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, after the apical ballooning from the takotsubo cardiomyopathy had resolved. The first patient, a 43-year-old woman with a history of alcohol abuse, presented with shortness of breath, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic features consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, and no significant coronary artery disease. An echocardiogram 2 weeks later revealed a normal left ventricular ejection fraction and newly apparent apical hypertrophy. The 2nd patient, a 70-year-old woman with pancreatitis, presented with chest pain, apical akinesis, and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.39, consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. One month later, her left ventricular ejection fraction was normal; however, hypertrophy of the left ventricular apex was newly noted. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases in which apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was masked by apical ballooning from stress-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:24808780

  17. A case of apical fenestration misdiagnosed as persistent apical periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Masahiro; Hayakawa, Hiroki; Ida, Atsushi; Ichinohe, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of apical fenestration misdiagnosed as persistent apical periodontitis. The patient was a 55-year-old woman who presented with persistent tooth pain at the right maxillary canine, despite repeated root canal treatment by a general practitioner. When the patient visited Tokyo Dental College Suidobashi Hospital, a CT examination was performed and apical fenestration diagnosed. The patient received an apicoectomy after which the symptoms disappeared. This suggests that dentists should consider the possibility of apical fenestration when examining patients with persistent tooth pain after repeated root canal treatment.

  18. Depletion of Caco-2 cell cholesterol disrupts barrier function by altering the detergent solubility and distribution of specific tight-junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the role of cholesterol in maintaining the barrier properties of the model intestinal cell line Caco-2. We have extracted membrane cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin and demonstrated that maximally, methyl-β-cyclodextrin lowered cell cholesterol levels by 40–45%. Depletion of cell cholesterol was accompanied by an 80–90% decrease in monolayer transepithelial electrical resistance and a significant increase in the paracellular permeability of dextrans of 4, 10 and 40 kDa. The increase in dextran permeability was most pronounced for the two lower molecular mass species. In addition to the decline in the barrier properties of the monolayers, extraction of cell cholesterol produced an increase in the Triton X-100 solubility of claudin 3, claudin 4 and occludin, and the loss of all three proteins from the plasma membrane (tight junctions). In contrast, removal of cholesterol had no detectable influence on the detergent solubility or morphological distribution of claudin 1. These results indicate that membrane cholesterol is a critical factor in maintaining the barrier property of epithelial monolayers. More specifically, cholesterol appears to stabilize the association of certain proteins with the tight junctions. PMID:15500448

  19. EPEC effector EspF promotes Crumbs3 endocytosis and disrupts epithelial cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Rocio; Kralicek, Sarah E; Hecht, Gail A

    2017-06-15

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses a type III secretion system to inject effector proteins into host intestinal epithelial cells causing diarrhoea. EPEC infection redistributes basolateral proteins β1-integrin and Na(+) /K(+) ATPase to the apical membrane of host cells. The Crumbs (Crb) polarity complex (Crb3/Pals1/Patj) is essential for epithelial cell polarisation and tight junction (TJ) assembly. Here, we demonstrate that EPEC displaces Crb3 and Pals1 from the apical membrane to the cytoplasm of cultured intestinal epithelial cells and colonocytes of infected mice. In vitro studies show that EspF, but not Map, alters Crb3, whereas both effectors modulate Pals1. EspF perturbs polarity formation in cyst morphogenesis assays and induces endocytosis and apical redistribution of Na(+) /K(+) ATPase. EspF binds to sorting nexin 9 (SNX9) causing membrane remodelling in host cells. Infection with ΔespF/pespFD3, a mutant strain that ablates EspF binding to SNX9, or inhibition of dynamin, attenuates Crb3 endocytosis caused by EPEC. In addition, infection with ΔespF/pespFD3 has no impact on Na(+) /K(+) ATPase endocytosis. These data support the hypothesis that EPEC perturbs apical-basal polarity in an EspF-dependent manner, which would contribute to EPEC-associated diarrhoea by disruption of TJ and altering the crucial positioning of membrane transporters involved in the absorption of ions and solutes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. c-Yes regulates cell adhesion at the apical ectoplasmic specialization-blood-testis barrier axis via its effects on protein recruitment and distribution.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, C Yan

    2013-01-15

    During spermatogenesis, extensive restructuring takes place at the cell-cell interface since developing germ cells migrate progressively from the basal to the adluminal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium. Since germ cells per se are not motile cells, their movement relies almost exclusively on the Sertoli cell. Nonetheless, extensive exchanges in signaling take place between these cells in the seminiferous epithelium. c-Yes, a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase belonging to the Src family kinases (SFKs) and a crucial signaling protein, was recently shown to be upregulated at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) at stages VIII-IX of the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. It was also highly expressed at the Sertoli cell-spermatid interface known as apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES) at stage V to early stage VIII of the epithelial cycle during spermiogenesis. Herein, it was shown that the knockdown of c-Yes by RNAi in vitro and in vivo affected both Sertoli cell adhesion at the BTB and spermatid adhesion at the apical ES, causing a disruption of the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier function, germ cell loss from the seminiferous epithelium, and also a loss of spermatid polarity. These effects were shown to be mediated by changes in distribution and/or localization of adhesion proteins at the BTB (e.g., occludin, N-cadherin) and at the apical ES (e.g., nectin-3) and possibly the result of changes in the underlying actin filaments at the BTB and the apical ES. These findings implicate that c-Yes is a likely target of male contraceptive research.

  1. c-Yes regulates cell adhesion at the apical ectoplasmic specialization-blood-testis barrier axis via its effects on protein recruitment and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.

    2013-01-01

    During spermatogenesis, extensive restructuring takes place at the cell-cell interface since developing germ cells migrate progressively from the basal to the adluminal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium. Since germ cells per se are not motile cells, their movement relies almost exclusively on the Sertoli cell. Nonetheless, extensive exchanges in signaling take place between these cells in the seminiferous epithelium. c-Yes, a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase belonging to the Src family kinases (SFKs) and a crucial signaling protein, was recently shown to be upregulated at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) at stages VIII–IX of the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. It was also highly expressed at the Sertoli cell-spermatid interface known as apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES) at stage V to early stage VIII of the epithelial cycle during spermiogenesis. Herein, it was shown that the knockdown of c-Yes by RNAi in vitro and in vivo affected both Sertoli cell adhesion at the BTB and spermatid adhesion at the apical ES, causing a disruption of the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier function, germ cell loss from the seminiferous epithelium, and also a loss of spermatid polarity. These effects were shown to be mediated by changes in distribution and/or localization of adhesion proteins at the BTB (e.g., occludin, N-cadherin) and at the apical ES (e.g., nectin-3) and possibly the result of changes in the underlying actin filaments at the BTB and the apical ES. These findings implicate that c-Yes is a likely target of male contraceptive research. PMID:23169788

  2. A Point Mutation in the Exon Junction Complex Factor Y14 Disrupts Its Function in mRNA Cap Binding and Translation Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tzu-Wei; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2016-04-15

    Eukaryotic mRNA biogenesis involves a series of interconnected steps mediated by RNA-binding proteins. The exon junction complex core protein Y14 is required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and promotes translation. Moreover, Y14 binds the cap structure of mRNAs and inhibits the activity of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. In this report, we show that an evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residue (Trp-73) of Y14 is critical for its binding to the mRNA cap structure. A Trp-73 mutant (W73V) bound weakly to mRNAs and failed to protect them from degradation. However, this mutant could still interact with the NMD and mRNA degradation factors and retained partial NMD activity. In addition, we found that the W73V mutant could not interact with translation initiation factors. Overexpression of W73V suppressed reporter mRNA translation in vitro and in vivo and reduced the level of a set of nascent proteins. These results reveal a residue of Y14 that confers cap-binding activity and is essential for Y14-mediated enhancement of translation. Finally, we demonstrated that Y14 may selectively and differentially modulate protein biosynthesis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. A Point Mutation in the Exon Junction Complex Factor Y14 Disrupts Its Function in mRNA Cap Binding and Translation Enhancement*

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Tzu-Wei; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA biogenesis involves a series of interconnected steps mediated by RNA-binding proteins. The exon junction complex core protein Y14 is required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and promotes translation. Moreover, Y14 binds the cap structure of mRNAs and inhibits the activity of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. In this report, we show that an evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residue (Trp-73) of Y14 is critical for its binding to the mRNA cap structure. A Trp-73 mutant (W73V) bound weakly to mRNAs and failed to protect them from degradation. However, this mutant could still interact with the NMD and mRNA degradation factors and retained partial NMD activity. In addition, we found that the W73V mutant could not interact with translation initiation factors. Overexpression of W73V suppressed reporter mRNA translation in vitro and in vivo and reduced the level of a set of nascent proteins. These results reveal a residue of Y14 that confers cap-binding activity and is essential for Y14-mediated enhancement of translation. Finally, we demonstrated that Y14 may selectively and differentially modulate protein biosynthesis. PMID:26887951

  4. Early Activation of MAPK p44/42 Is Partially Involved in DON-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier Function and Tight Junction Network

    PubMed Central

    Springler, Alexandra; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by the plant pathogens Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, is one of the most common mycotoxins, contaminating cereal and cereal-derived products. Although worldwide contamination of food and feed poses health threats to humans and animals, pigs are particularly susceptible to this mycotoxin. DON derivatives, such as deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1), are produced by bacterial transformation of certain intestinal bacteria, which are naturally occurring or applied as feed additives. Intestinal epithelial cells are the initial barrier against these food- and feed-borne toxins. The present study confirms DON-induced activation of MAPK p44/42 and inhibition of p44/42 by MAPK-inhibitor U0126 monoethanolate. Influence of DON and DOM-1 on transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), viability and expression of seven tight junction proteins (TJ), as well as the potential of U0126 to counteract DON-induced effects, was assessed. While DOM-1 showed no effect, DON significantly reduced TEER of differentiated IPEC-J2 and decreased expression of claudin-1 and -3, while leaving claudin-4; ZO-1, -2, and -3 and occludin unaffected. Inhibition of p44/42 counteracted DON-induced TEER decrease and restored claudin-3, but not claudin-1 expression. Therefore, effects of DON on TEER and claudin-3 are at least partially p44/42 mediated, while effects on viability and claudin-1 are likely mediated via alternative pathways. PMID:27618100

  5. Early Activation of MAPK p44/42 Is Partially Involved in DON-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier Function and Tight Junction Network.

    PubMed

    Springler, Alexandra; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-09-08

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by the plant pathogens Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, is one of the most common mycotoxins, contaminating cereal and cereal-derived products. Although worldwide contamination of food and feed poses health threats to humans and animals, pigs are particularly susceptible to this mycotoxin. DON derivatives, such as deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1), are produced by bacterial transformation of certain intestinal bacteria, which are naturally occurring or applied as feed additives. Intestinal epithelial cells are the initial barrier against these food- and feed-borne toxins. The present study confirms DON-induced activation of MAPK p44/42 and inhibition of p44/42 by MAPK-inhibitor U0126 monoethanolate. Influence of DON and DOM-1 on transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), viability and expression of seven tight junction proteins (TJ), as well as the potential of U0126 to counteract DON-induced effects, was assessed. While DOM-1 showed no effect, DON significantly reduced TEER of differentiated IPEC-J2 and decreased expression of claudin-1 and -3, while leaving claudin-4; ZO-1, -2, and -3 and occludin unaffected. Inhibition of p44/42 counteracted DON-induced TEER decrease and restored claudin-3, but not claudin-1 expression. Therefore, effects of DON on TEER and claudin-3 are at least partially p44/42 mediated, while effects on viability and claudin-1 are likely mediated via alternative pathways.

  6. Enabled (Xena) regulates neural plate morphogenesis, apical constriction, and cellular adhesion required for neural tube closure in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Roffers-Agarwal, Julaine; Xanthos, Jennifer B.; Kragtorp, Katherine A.; Miller, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of cellular adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics is essential for neurulation, though it remains unclear how these two processes are coordinated. Members of the Ena/VASP family of proteins are localized to sites of cellular adhesion and actin dynamics and lack of two family members, Mena and VASP, in mice results in failure of neural tube closure. The precise mechanism by which Ena/VASP proteins regulate this process, however, is not understood. In this report, we show that Xenopus Ena (Xena) is localized to apical adhesive junctions of neuroepithelial cells during neurulation and that Xena knockdown disrupts cell behaviors integral to neural tube closure. Changes in the shape of the neural plate as well as apical constriction within the neural plate are perturbed in Xena knockdown embryos. Additionally, we demonstrate that Xena is essential for cell-cell adhesion. These results demonstrate that Xena plays an integral role in coordinating the regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics and cellular adhesion during neurulation in Xenopus. PMID:18201691

  7. Apical membrane antigen 1 mediates apicomplexan parasite attachment but is dispensable for host cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Bargieri, Daniel Y.; Andenmatten, Nicole; Lagal, Vanessa; Thiberge, Sabine; Whitelaw, Jamie A.; Tardieux, Isabelle; Meissner, Markus; Ménard, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites invade host cells by forming a ring-like junction with the cell surface and actively sliding through the junction inside an intracellular vacuole. Apical membrane antigen 1 is conserved in apicomplexans and a long-standing malaria vaccine candidate. It is considered to have multiple important roles during host cell penetration, primarily in structuring the junction by interacting with the rhoptry neck 2 protein and transducing the force generated by the parasite motor during internalization. Here, we generate Plasmodium sporozoites and merozoites and Toxoplasma tachyzoites lacking apical membrane antigen 1, and find that the latter two are impaired in host cell attachment but the three display normal host cell penetration through the junction. Therefore, apical membrane antigen 1, rather than an essential invasin, is a dispensable adhesin of apicomplexan zoites. These genetic data have implications on the use of apical membrane antigen 1 or the apical membrane antigen 1–rhoptry neck 2 interaction as targets of intervention strategies against malaria or other diseases caused by apicomplexans. PMID:24108241

  8. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  9. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  10. Moderate Hypoxia Followed by Reoxygenation Results in Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown via Oxidative Stress-Dependent Tight-Junction Protein Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Zehendner, Christoph M.; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M.; Angamo, Eskedar A.; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in

  11. Polychlorinated biphenyls impair blood-brain barrier integrity via disruption of tight junction proteins in cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of female Wistar rats: neuropotential role of quercetin.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, K; Prabha, R Lakshmi; Saranya, K; Bavithra, S; Krishnamoorthy, G; Arunakaran, J

    2013-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) comprise a ubiquitous class of toxic substances associated with carcinogenic and tumor-promoting effects as well as neurotoxic properties. Reactive oxygen species, which is produced from PCBs, alters blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, which is paralleled by cytoskeletal rearrangements and redistribution and disappearance of tight junction proteins (TJPs) like claudin-5 and occludin. Quercetin, a potent antioxidant present in onion and other vegetables, appears to protect brain cells against oxidative stress, a tissue-damaging process associated with Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative disorders. The aim of this study is to analyze the role of quercetin on oxidative stress markers and transcription of transmembrane and cytoplasmic accessory TJPs on cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of female rats exposed to PCBs. Rats were divided into the following four groups. Group I: received only vehicle (corn oil) intraperitoneally (i.p.); group II: received Aroclor 1254 at a dose of 2 mg/kg body weight (bwt)/day (i.p); group III: received Aroclor 1254 (i.p.) and simultaneously quercetin 50 mg/kg bwt/day through gavage and group IV: received quercetin alone gavage. From the experiment, the levels of hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were observed to increase significantly in cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus as 50%, 25% and 20%, respectively, after exposure to PCB, and the messenger RNA expression of TJP in rats exposed to PCBs is decreased and is retrieved to the normal level simultaneously in quercetin-treated rats. Hence, quercetin can be used as a preventive medicine to PCBs exposure and prevents neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation results in blood-brain barrier breakdown via oxidative stress-dependent tight-junction protein disruption.

    PubMed

    Zehendner, Christoph M; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M; Angamo, Eskedar A; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in this

  13. FSGS3/CD2AP is a barbed-end capping protein that stabilizes actin and strengthens adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Brieher, William M.

    2013-01-01

    By combining in vitro reconstitution biochemistry with a cross-linking approach, we have identified focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 3/CD2-associated protein (FSGS3/CD2AP) as a novel actin barbed-end capping protein responsible for actin stability at the adherens junction. FSGS3/CD2AP colocalizes with E-cadherin and α-actinin-4 at the apical junction in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised actin stability and decreased actin accumulation at the adherens junction. Using a novel apparatus to apply mechanical stress to cell–cell junctions, we showed that knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised adhesive strength, resulting in tearing between cells and disruption of barrier function. Our results reveal a novel function of FSGS3/CD2AP and a previously unrecognized role of barbed-end capping in junctional actin dynamics. Our study underscores the complexity of actin regulation at cell–cell contacts that involves actin activators, inhibitors, and stabilizers to control adhesive strength, epithelial behavior, and permeability barrier integrity. PMID:24322428

  14. FSGS3/CD2AP is a barbed-end capping protein that stabilizes actin and strengthens adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Vivian W; Brieher, William M

    2013-12-09

    By combining in vitro reconstitution biochemistry with a cross-linking approach, we have identified focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 3/CD2-associated protein (FSGS3/CD2AP) as a novel actin barbed-end capping protein responsible for actin stability at the adherens junction. FSGS3/CD2AP colocalizes with E-cadherin and α-actinin-4 at the apical junction in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised actin stability and decreased actin accumulation at the adherens junction. Using a novel apparatus to apply mechanical stress to cell-cell junctions, we showed that knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised adhesive strength, resulting in tearing between cells and disruption of barrier function. Our results reveal a novel function of FSGS3/CD2AP and a previously unrecognized role of barbed-end capping in junctional actin dynamics. Our study underscores the complexity of actin regulation at cell-cell contacts that involves actin activators, inhibitors, and stabilizers to control adhesive strength, epithelial behavior, and permeability barrier integrity.

  15. Liver kinase B1 regulates hepatocellular tight junction distribution and function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tietgens, Amber J.; Van Itallie, Christina M.; Vitale‐Cross, Lynn; Jarnik, Michal; Harding, Olivia J.; Anderson, James M.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Weigert, Roberto; Arias, Irwin M.

    2016-01-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and its downstream effector AMP‐activated protein kinase (AMPK) play critical roles in polarity establishment by regulating membrane trafficking and energy metabolism. In collagen sandwich‐cultured hepatocytes, loss of LKB1 or AMPK impaired apical ABCB11 (Bsep) trafficking and bile canalicular formation. In the present study, we used liver‐specific (albumin‐Cre) LKB1 knockout mice (LKB1−/−) to investigate the role of LKB1 in the maintenance of functional tight junction (TJ) in vivo. Transmission electron microscopy examination revealed that hepatocyte apical membrane with microvilli substantially extended into the basolateral domain of LKB1−/− livers. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that loss of LKB1 led to longer and wider canalicular structures correlating with mislocalization of the junctional protein, cingulin. To test junctional function, we used intravital microscopy to quantify the transport kinetics of 6‐carboxyfluorescein diacetate (6‐CFDA), which is processed in hepatocytes into its fluorescent derivative 6‐carboxyfluorescein (6‐CF) and secreted into the canaliculi. In LKB1−/− mice, 6‐CF remained largely in hepatocytes, canalicular secretion was delayed, and 6‐CF appeared in the blood. To test whether 6‐CF was transported through permeable TJ, we intravenously injected low molecular weight (3 kDa) dextran in combination with 6‐CFDA. In wild‐type mice, 3 kDa dextran remained in the vasculature, whereas it rapidly appeared in the abnormal bile canaliculi in LKB1−/− mice, confirming that junctional disruption resulted in paracellular exchange between the blood stream and the bile canaliculus. Conclusion: LKB1 plays a critical role in regulating the maintenance of TJ and paracellular permeability, which may explain how various drugs, chemicals, and metabolic states that inhibit the LKB1/AMPK pathway result in cholestasis. (Hepatology 2016;64:1317‐1329) PMID:27396550

  16. F5-peptide induces aspermatogenesis by disrupting organization of actin- and microtubule-based cytoskeletons in the testis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Mruk, Dolores D.; Lui, Wing-yee; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    During the release of sperm at spermiation, a biologically active F5-peptide, which can disrupt the Sertoli cell tight junction (TJ) permeability barrier, is produced at the site of the degenerating apical ES (ectoplasmic specialization). This peptide coordinates the events of spermiation and blood-testis barrier (BTB) remodeling at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle, creating a local apical ES-BTB axis to coordinate cellular events across the epithelium. The mechanism(s) by which F5-peptide perturbs BTB restructuring, and its involvement in apical ES dynamics remain unknown. F5-peptide, besides perturbing BTB integrity, was shown to induce germ cell release from the epithelium following its efficient in vivo overexpression in the testis. Overexpression of F5-peptide caused disorganization of actin- and microtubule (MT)-based cytoskeletons, mediated by altering the spatiotemporal expression of actin binding/regulatory proteins in the seminiferous epithelium. F5-peptide perturbed the ability of actin microfilaments and/or MTs from converting between their bundled and unbundled/defragmented configuration, thereby perturbing adhesion between spermatids and Sertoli cells. Since apical ES and basal ES/BTB are interconnected through the underlying cytoskeletal networks, this thus provides an efficient and novel mechanism to coordinate different cellular events across the epithelium during spermatogenesis through changes in the organization of actin microfilaments and MTs. These findings also illustrate the potential of F5-peptide being a male contraceptive peptide for men. PMID:27611949

  17. Disruption of paracellular sealing is an early event in acute caerulein-pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Marcus; Klonowski-Stumpe, Hanne; Eckert, Mario; Lüthen, Reinhard; Häussinger, Dieter

    2004-03-01

    Caerulein-induced pancreatitis is a widely used experimental model for studies on acute pancreatitis, however, the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatitis in response to caerulein hyperstimulation are incompletely understood. We therefore studied early effects of caerulein on tight junctional integrity. Mice were injected with the cholecystokinin analogue caerulein (50microg/kg BW/h) to induce pancreatitis. In pancreatic tissue occludin, claudin 1, zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) were stained immunohistochemically and F-actin was visualized with phalloidin-TRITC. Stained sections and isolated acini were studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Under control conditions occludin, claudin1, ZO-1, and F-actin showed a linear staining pattern delineating the apical membranes of intralobular duct cells and of acinar cells. While in vitro caerulein hyperstimulation induced within 10 minutes disassembly of both occludin and ZO-1, in vivo caerulein hyperstimulation induced disassembly of occludin and claudin1 but not of ZO-1 from the tight junctions. Subsequent progressive disruption of ZO-1 was detected in a time dependent manner. Disruption of the transmembrane tight junction proteins occludin and claudin1 is an early event of caerulein hyperstimulation and may allow evasion of noxious luminal content into the interstitium, which may augment edema formation in acute pancreatitis.

  18. Nerve signaling regulates basal keratinocyte proliferation in the blastema apical epithelial cap in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Bryant, Susan V; Gardiner, David M

    2012-06-15

    The ability of adult vertebrates to repair tissue damage is widespread and impressive; however, the ability to regenerate structurally complex organs such as the limb is limited largely to the salamanders. The fact that most of the tissues of the limb can regenerate has led investigators to question and identify the barriers to organ regeneration. From studies in the salamander, it is known that one of the earliest steps required for successful regeneration involves signaling between nerves and the wound epithelium/apical epithelial cap (AEC). In this study we confirm an earlier report that the keratinocytes of the AEC acquire their function coincident with exiting the cell cycle. We have discovered that this unique, coordinated behavior is regulated by nerve signaling and is associated with the presence of gap junctions between the basal keratinocytes of the AEC. Disruption of nerve signaling results in a loss of gap junction protein, the reentry of the cells into the cell cycle, and regenerative failure. Finally, coordinated exit from the cell cycle appears to be a conserved behavior of populations of cells that function as signaling centers during both development and regeneration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The basolateral vesicle sorting machinery and basolateral proteins are recruited to the site of enteropathogenic E. coli microcolony growth at the apical membrane

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Gitte A.; Jensen, Helene H.; Schelde, Anne-Sofie B.; Toft, Charlotte; Pedersen, Hans N.; Ulrichsen, Maj; Login, Frédéric H.; Amieva, Manuel R.

    2017-01-01

    Foodborne Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infections of the small intestine cause diarrhea especially in children and are a major cause of childhood death in developing countries. EPEC infects the apical membrane of the epithelium of the small intestine by attaching, effacing the microvilli under the bacteria and then forming microcolonies on the cell surface. We first asked the question where on epithelial cells EPEC attaches and grows. Using models of polarized epithelial monolayers, we evaluated the sites of initial EPEC attachment to the apical membrane and found that EPEC preferentially attached over the cell-cell junctions and formed microcolonies preferentially where three cells come together at tricellular tight junctions. The ability of EPEC to adhere increased when host cell polarity was compromised yielding EPEC access to basolateral proteins. EPEC pedestals contain basolateral cytoskeletal proteins. Thus, we asked if attached EPEC causes reorganization the protein composition of the host cell plasma membrane at sites of microcolony formation. We found that EPEC microcolony growth at the apical membrane resulted in a local accumulation of basolateral plasma membrane proteins surrounding the microcolony. Basolateral marker protein aquaporin-3 localized to forming EPEC microcolonies. Components of the basolateral vesicle targeting machinery were re-routed. The Exocyst (Exo70) was recruited to individual EPEC as was the basolateral vesicle SNARE VAMP-3. Moreover, several Rab variants were also recruited to the infection site, and their dominant-negative equivalents were not. To quantitatively study the recruitment of basolateral proteins, we created a pulse of the temperature sensitive basolateral VSVG, VSVG3-SP-GFP, from the trans-Golgi Network. We found that after release from the TGN, significantly more VSVG3-SP-GFP accumulated at the site of microcolony growth than on equivalent membrane regions of uninfected cells. This suggests that

  20. The basolateral vesicle sorting machinery and basolateral proteins are recruited to the site of enteropathogenic E. coli microcolony growth at the apical membrane.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Gitte A; Jensen, Helene H; Schelde, Anne-Sofie B; Toft, Charlotte; Pedersen, Hans N; Ulrichsen, Maj; Login, Frédéric H; Amieva, Manuel R; Nejsum, Lene N

    2017-01-01

    Foodborne Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infections of the small intestine cause diarrhea especially in children and are a major cause of childhood death in developing countries. EPEC infects the apical membrane of the epithelium of the small intestine by attaching, effacing the microvilli under the bacteria and then forming microcolonies on the cell surface. We first asked the question where on epithelial cells EPEC attaches and grows. Using models of polarized epithelial monolayers, we evaluated the sites of initial EPEC attachment to the apical membrane and found that EPEC preferentially attached over the cell-cell junctions and formed microcolonies preferentially where three cells come together at tricellular tight junctions. The ability of EPEC to adhere increased when host cell polarity was compromised yielding EPEC access to basolateral proteins. EPEC pedestals contain basolateral cytoskeletal proteins. Thus, we asked if attached EPEC causes reorganization the protein composition of the host cell plasma membrane at sites of microcolony formation. We found that EPEC microcolony growth at the apical membrane resulted in a local accumulation of basolateral plasma membrane proteins surrounding the microcolony. Basolateral marker protein aquaporin-3 localized to forming EPEC microcolonies. Components of the basolateral vesicle targeting machinery were re-routed. The Exocyst (Exo70) was recruited to individual EPEC as was the basolateral vesicle SNARE VAMP-3. Moreover, several Rab variants were also recruited to the infection site, and their dominant-negative equivalents were not. To quantitatively study the recruitment of basolateral proteins, we created a pulse of the temperature sensitive basolateral VSVG, VSVG3-SP-GFP, from the trans-Golgi Network. We found that after release from the TGN, significantly more VSVG3-SP-GFP accumulated at the site of microcolony growth than on equivalent membrane regions of uninfected cells. This suggests that

  1. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  2. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  3. Interactive effects of inflammatory cytokine and abundant low-molecular-weight PAHs on inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication, disruption of cell proliferation control, and the AhR-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Kabátková, Markéta; Svobodová, Jana; Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Mohatad, Dilshad Shaik; Šmerdová, Lenka; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav; Vondráček, Jan

    2015-01-05

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with lower molecular weight exhibit lesser genotoxicity and carcinogenicity than highly carcinogenic PAHs with a higher number of benzene rings. Nevertheless, they elicit specific effects linked with tumor promotion, such as acute inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Although inflammatory reaction may alter bioactivation and toxicity of carcinogenic PAHs, little is known about the impact of pro-inflammatory cytokines on toxic effects of the low-molecular-weight PAHs. Here, we investigated the impact of a pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), on the effects associated with tumor promotion and with induction of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent gene expression in rat liver epithelial cells. We found that a prolonged incubation with TNF-α induced a down-regulation of GJIC, associated with reduced expression of connexin 43 (Cx43), a major connexin isoform found in liver epithelial cells. The Cx43 down-regulation was partly mediated by the activity of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) p38 kinase. Independently of GJIC modulation, or p38 activation, TNF-α potentiated the AhR-dependent proliferative effect of a model low-molecular-weight PAH, fluoranthene, on contact-inhibited cells. In contrast, this pro-inflammatory cytokine repressed the fluoranthene-induced expression of a majority of model AhR gene targets, such as Cyp1a1, Ahrr or Tiparp. The results of the present study indicate that inflammatory reaction may differentially modulate various toxic effects of low-molecular-weight PAHs; the exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines may both strengthen (inhibition of GJIC, disruption of contact inhibition) and repress (expression of a majority of AhR-dependent genes) their impact on toxic endpoints associated with carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1853-1872, 2012.

  5. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  6. Loss of Gα12/13 exacerbates apical area dependence of actomyosin contractility

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shicong; Mason, Frank M.; Martin, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    During development, coordinated cell shape changes alter tissue shape. In the Drosophila ventral furrow and other epithelia, apical constriction of hundreds of epithelial cells folds the tissue. Genes in the Gα12/13 pathway coordinate collective apical constriction, but the mechanism of coordination is poorly understood. Coupling live-cell imaging with a computational approach to identify contractile events, we discovered that differences in constriction behavior are biased by initial cell shape. Disrupting Gα12/13 exacerbates this relationship. Larger apical area is associated with delayed initiation of contractile pulses, lower apical E-cadherin and F-actin levels, and aberrantly mobile Rho-kinase structures. Our results suggest that loss of Gα12/13 disrupts apical actin cortex organization and pulse initiation in a size-dependent manner. We propose that Gα12/13 robustly organizes the apical cortex despite variation in apical area to ensure the timely initiation of contractile pulses in a tissue with heterogeneity in starting cell shape. PMID:27489340

  7. A proposed route to independent measurements of tight junction conductance at discrete cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lushan; Zeng, Yuhan; Baker, Lane A; Hou, Jianghui

    2015-01-01

    Direct recording of tight junction permeability is of pivotal importance to many biologic fields. Previous approaches bear an intrinsic disadvantage due to the difficulty of separating tight junction conductance from nearby membrane conductance. Here, we propose the design of Double whole-cell Voltage Clamp - Ion Conductance Microscopy (DVC-ICM) based on previously demonstrated potentiometric scanning of local conductive pathways. As proposed, DVC-ICM utilizes two coordinated whole-cell patch-clamps to neutralize the apical membrane current during potentiometric scanning, which in models described here will profoundly enhance the specificity of tight junction recording. Several potential pitfalls are considered, evaluated and addressed with alternative countermeasures. PMID:26716077

  8. Apical constriction: themes and variations on a cellular mechanism driving morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adam C.; Goldstein, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Apical constriction is a cell shape change that promotes tissue remodeling in a variety of homeostatic and developmental contexts, including gastrulation in many organisms and neural tube formation in vertebrates. In recent years, progress has been made towards understanding how the distinct cell biological processes that together drive apical constriction are coordinated. These processes include the contraction of actin-myosin networks, which generates force, and the attachment of actin networks to cell-cell junctions, which allows forces to be transmitted between cells. Different cell types regulate contractility and adhesion in unique ways, resulting in apical constriction with varying dynamics and subcellular organizations, as well as a variety of resulting tissue shape changes. Understanding both the common themes and the variations in apical constriction mechanisms promises to provide insight into the mechanics that underlie tissue morphogenesis. PMID:24803648

  9. Apical constriction: themes and variations on a cellular mechanism driving morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Adam C; Goldstein, Bob

    2014-05-01

    Apical constriction is a cell shape change that promotes tissue remodeling in a variety of homeostatic and developmental contexts, including gastrulation in many organisms and neural tube formation in vertebrates. In recent years, progress has been made towards understanding how the distinct cell biological processes that together drive apical constriction are coordinated. These processes include the contraction of actin-myosin networks, which generates force, and the attachment of actin networks to cell-cell junctions, which allows forces to be transmitted between cells. Different cell types regulate contractility and adhesion in unique ways, resulting in apical constriction with varying dynamics and subcellular organizations, as well as a variety of resulting tissue shape changes. Understanding both the common themes and the variations in apical constriction mechanisms promises to provide insight into the mechanics that underlie tissue morphogenesis.

  10. Defects in the adherens junction complex (E-cadherin/ β-catenin) in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shameer; Nijhuis, Anke; Kumagai, Tomoko; Lindsay, James; Silver, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    The epithelial monolayer of the intestine is a selective barrier permitting nutrient and electrolyte absorption yet acting to protect the underlying tissue compartments and cellular components from attack and infiltration by antigens, bacteria and bacterial products present in the lumen. Disruption of this barrier has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The adherens junction (AJ), together with tight junctions (TJ) and desmosomes, form an apical junction complex that controls epithelial cell-to-cell adherence and barrier function as well as regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, intracellular signalling pathways and transcriptional regulation. Numerous studies and reviews highlight the responses of TJs to physiological and pathological stimuli. By comparison, the response of AJ proteins, and the subsequent consequences for barrier function, when exposed to the IBD inflammatory milieu, is less well studied. In this review, we will highlight the roles and responses of the AJ proteins in IBD and provide suggestions for future studies. We will also consider recently proposed therapeutic strategies to preserve or restore epithelial barrier functions to prevent and treat IBD.

  11. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazumichi; Stopfer, Mark

    2013-12-02

    In vertebrates and invertebrates, signaling among neurons is most commonly mediated by chemical synapses. At these synapses neurotransmitter released by presynaptic neurons is detected by receptors on the postsynaptic neurons, leading to an influx of ions through the receptors themselves or through channels activated by intracellular signaling downstream of the receptors. But neurons can communicate with each other in a more direct way, by passing signals composed of small molecules and ions through pores called gap junctions. Gap junctions that transmit electrical signals are called electrical synapses. Unlike most chemical synapses, electrical synapses interact through axon-to-axon or dendrite-to-dendrite contacts. Found throughout the nervous system, they are probably best known for linking the relatively few inhibitory, GABAergic, neurons into large, effective networks within vertebrate brains. They are particularly important early in development before the formation of most chemical synapses, but recent work shows gap junctions play important roles in the adult nervous system, too. Gap junctions are sometimes thought to be mere passageways between cells. But, as recent work shows, their properties can be complex and surprising. Gap junctions help generate, propagate, and regulate neural oscillations, can filter electrical signals, and can be modulated in a variety of ways. Here we discuss recent work highlighting the diversity and importance of gap junctions throughout the nervous system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tight junctions: from simple barriers to multifunctional molecular gates.

    PubMed

    Zihni, Ceniz; Mills, Clare; Matter, Karl; Balda, Maria S

    2016-09-01

    Epithelia and endothelia separate different tissue compartments and protect multicellular organisms from the outside world. This requires the formation of tight junctions, selective gates that control paracellular diffusion of ions and solutes. Tight junctions also form the border between the apical and basolateral plasma-membrane domains and are linked to the machinery that controls apicobasal polarization. Additionally, signalling networks that guide diverse cell behaviours and functions are connected to tight junctions, transmitting information to and from the cytoskeleton, nucleus and different cell adhesion complexes. Recent advances have broadened our understanding of the molecular architecture and cellular functions of tight junctions.

  13. Possible Involvement of Tight Junctions, Extracellular Matrix and Nuclear Receptors in Epithelial Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa-Tomikawa, Naoki; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Satohisa, Seiro; Nishiura, Keisuke; Chiba, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Tight junctions are intercellular junctions localized at the most apical end of the lateral plasma membrane. They consist of four kinds of transmembrane proteins (occludin, claudins, junctional adhesion molecules, and tricellulin) and huge numbers of scaffolding proteins and contribute to the paracellular barrier and fence function. The mutation and deletion of these proteins impair the functions of tight junctions and cause various human diseases. In this paper, we provide an overview of recent studies on transmembrane proteins of tight junctions and highlight the functional significance of tight junctions, extracellular matrix, and nuclear receptors in epithelial differentiation. PMID:22162632

  14. Nectin and junctional adhesion molecule are critical cell adhesion molecules for the apico-basal alignment of adherens and tight junctions in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomohiro; Kuramitsu, Kaori; Rikitsu, Etsuko; Kurita, Souichi; Ikeda, Wataru; Takai, Yoshimi

    2013-11-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) form an apical junctional complex at the apical side of the lateral membranes of epithelial cells, in which TJs are aligned at the apical side of AJs. Many cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and cell polarity molecules (CPMs) cooperatively regulate the formation of the apical junctional complex, but the mechanism for the alignment of TJs at the apical side of AJs is not fully understood. We developed a cellular system with which epithelial-like TJs and AJs were reconstituted in fibroblasts and analyzed the cooperative roles of CAMs and CPMs. We exogenously expressed various combinations of CAMs and CPMs in fibroblasts that express negligible amounts of these molecules endogenously. In these cells, the nectin-based cell-cell adhesion was formed at the apical side of the junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-based cell-cell adhesion, and cadherin and claudin were recruited to the nectin-3- and JAM-based cell-cell adhesion sites to form AJ-like and TJ-like domains, respectively. This inversed alignment of the AJ-like and TJ-like domains was reversed by complementary expression of CPMs Par-3, atypical protein kinase C, Par-6, Crb3, Pals1 and Patj. We describe the cooperative roles of these CAMs and CPMs in the apico-basal alignment of TJs and AJs in epithelial cells.

  15. Serine protease inhibitor A3K protects rabbit corneal endothelium from barrier function disruption induced by TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiaoyue; Zhang, Zhenhao; Xie, Hui; Chen, Lelei; Zhou, Yueping; Chen, Wensheng; Liu, Zuguo

    2013-08-09

    To determine if a serine protease inhibitor A3K (SA3K) reduces TNF-α-induced declines in rabbit corneal endothelial junctional barrier integrity. New Zealand rabbit corneas were incubated ex vivo for 24 hours in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) containing 10% FBS with or without TNF-α, in the presence or absence of SA3K at different concentrations. Corneal endothelial barrier function permeability was determined based on measurements of FITC-dextran tissue accumulation. Apical junctional complex (AJC) integrity was evaluated of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, and filamentous actin (F-actin) and associated microtubules, as well as myosin light chain (MLC) by immunofluorescent staining, Western blot analysis, and/or RT-PCR. TNF-α (20 ng/mL) increased corneal endothelial FITC-dextran permeability by 1.8-fold compared with the untreated control. SA3K (100-200 nM) dose dependently suppressed TNF-α-induced increases in permeability. SA3K nearly completely reversed TNF-α-induced disruptions of tight junctional ZO-1 and subjacent adherens junctions VE-cadherin integrity. Interestingly, SA3K reversed TNF-α-induced disruption of AJC linkage to the cytoskeletal F-actin array by restoring F-actin double-band structures. SA3K also attenuated TNF-α-induced microtubule disassembly. Furthermore, SA3K blocked increases in MLC phosphorylation status elicited by TNF-α. SA3K exposure markedly reduced TNF-α-induced disruption of barrier structure and function in the rabbit corneal endothelium by maintaining AJC integrity. These protective effects are due to suppression of MLC activation. SA3K may have, in vivo, a therapeutic potential to offset TNF-α-induced declines in endothelial barrier structural integrity and function.

  16. Sequential development of apical-basal and planar polarities in aggregating epitheliomuscular cells of Hydra.

    PubMed

    Seybold, Anna; Salvenmoser, Willi; Hobmayer, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Apical-basal and planar cell polarities are hallmarks of metazoan epithelia required to separate internal and external environments and to regulate trans- and intracellular transport, cytoskeletal organization, and morphogenesis. Mechanisms of cell polarization have been intensively studied in bilaterian model organisms, particularly in early embryos and cultured cells, while cell polarity in pre-bilaterian tissues is poorly understood. Here, we have studied apical-basal and planar polarization in regenerating (aggregating) clusters of epitheliomuscular cells of Hydra, a simple representative of the ancestral, pre-bilaterian phylum Cnidaria. Immediately after dissociation, single epitheliomuscular cells do not exhibit cellular polarity, but they polarize de novo during aggregation. Reestablishment of the Hydra-specific epithelial bilayer is a result of short-range cell sorting. In the early phase of aggregation, apical-basal polarization starts with an enlargement of the epithelial apical-basal diameter and by the development of belt-like apical septate junctions. Specification of the basal pole of epithelial cells occurs shortly later and is linked to synthesis of mesoglea, development of hemidesmosome-like junctions, and formation of desmosome-like junctions connecting the basal myonemes of neighbouring cells. Planar polarization starts, while apical-basal polarization is already ongoing. It is executed gradually starting with cell-autonomous formation, parallelization, and condensation of myonemes at the basal end of each epithelial cell and continuing with a final planar alignment of epitheliomuscular cells at the tissue level. Our findings reveal that epithelial polarization in Hydra aggregates occurs in defined steps well accessible by histological and ultrastructural techniques and they will provide a basis for future molecular studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. COEXISTENCE OF GAP AND SEPTATE JUNCTIONS IN AN INVERTEBRATE EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Hudspeth, A. J.; Revel, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The intercellular junctions of the epithelium lining the hepatic caecum of Daphnia were examined. Electron microscope investigations involved both conventionally fixed material and tissue exposed to a lanthanum tracer of the extracellular space. Both septate junctions and gap junctions occur between the cells studied. The septate junctions lie apically and resemble those commonly discerned between cells of other invertebrates. They are atypical in that the high electron opacity of the extracellular space obscures septa in routine preparations. The gap junctions are characterized by a uniform 30 A space between apposed cell membranes. Lanthanum treatment of gap junctions reveals an array of particles of 95 A diameter and 120 A separation lying in the plane of the junction. As this pattern closely resembles that described previously in vertebrates, it appears that the gap junction is phylogenetically widespread. In view of evidence that the gap junction mediates intercellular electrotonic coupling, the assignment of a coupling role to other junctions, notably the septate junction, must be questioned wherever these junctions coexist. PMID:5563454

  18. Apical membrane rupture and backward bile flooding in acetaminophen-induced hepatocyte necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, F-C; Huang, G-T; Lin, C-J; Wang, S-S; Sun, T-L; Lo, S-Y; Lo, W; Chiou, L-L; Dong, C-Y; Lee, H-S

    2011-01-01

    Morphological changes of hepatocyte death have so far only been described on cells in culture or in tissue sections. Using a high-resolution and high-magnification multiphoton microscopic system, we recorded in living mice serial changes of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatocyte necrosis in relevance to metabolism of a fluorogenic bile solute. Initial changes of hepatocyte injury included basal membrane disruption and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. An overwhelming event of rupture at adjacent apical membrane resulting in flooding of bile into these hepatocytes might ensue. Belbs formed on basal membrane and then dislodged into the sinusoid circulation. Transmission electron microscopy disclosed a necrotic hepatocyte depicting well the changes after apical membrane rupture and bile flooding. Administration of the antidote N-acetylcysteine dramatically reduced the occurrence of apical membrane rupture. The present results demonstrated a hidden but critical step of apical membrane rupture leading to irreversible APAP-induced hepatocyte injury. PMID:21776021

  19. Shroom induces apical constriction and is required for hingepoint formation during neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Haigo, Saori L; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D; Harland, Richard M; Wallingford, John B

    2003-12-16

    The morphogenetic events of early vertebrate development generally involve the combined actions of several populations of cells, each engaged in a distinct behavior. Neural tube closure, for instance, involves apicobasal cell heightening, apical constriction at hingepoints, convergent extension of the midline, and pushing by the epidermis. Although a large number of genes are known to be required for neural tube closure, in only a very few cases has the affected cell behavior been identified. For example, neural tube closure requires the actin binding protein Shroom, but the cellular basis of Shroom function and how it influences neural tube closure remain to be elucidated. We show here that expression of Shroom is sufficient to organize apical constriction in transcriptionally quiescent, naive epithelial cells but not in non-polarized cells. Shroom-induced apical constriction was associated with enrichment of apically localized actin filaments and required the small GTPase Rap1 but not Rho. Endogenous Xenopus shroom was found to be expressed in cells engaged in apical constriction. Consistent with a role for Shroom in organizing apical constriction, disrupting Shroom function resulted in a specific failure of hingepoint formation, defective neuroepithelial sheet-bending, and failure of neural tube closure. These data demonstrate that Shroom is an essential regulator of apical constriction during neurulation. The finding that a single protein can initiate this process in epithelial cells establishes that bending of epithelial sheets may be patterned during development by the regulation of expression of single genes.

  20. Defective calmodulin-dependent rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish sensory hair cell mutants.

    PubMed

    Seiler, C; Nicolson, T

    1999-11-15

    Vertebrate mechanosensory hair cells contain a narrow "pericuticular" zone which is densely populated with small vesicles between the cuticular plate and cellular junctions near the apical surface. The presence of many cytoplasmic vesicles suggests that the apical surface of hair cells has a high turnover rate. The significance of intense membrane trafficking at the apical surface is not known. Using a marker of endocytosis, the styryl dye FM1-43, this report shows that rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish lateral line sensory hair cells is calcium and calmodulin dependent and is partially blocked by the presence of amiloride and dihydrostreptomycin, known inhibitors of mechanotransduction channels. As seen in lateral line hair cells, sensory hair cells within the larval otic capsule also exhibit rapid apical endocytosis. Defects in internalization of the dye in both lateral line and inner ear hair cells were found in five zebrafish auditory/vestibular mutants: sputnik, mariner, orbiter, mercury, and skylab. In addition, lateral line hair cells in these mutants were not sensitive to prolonged exposure to streptomycin, which is toxic to hair cells. The presence of endocytic defects in the majority of zebrafish mechanosensory mutants points to a important role of apical endocytosis in hair cell function. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Disruptive Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This paper attempts to develop guidelines relating to the problem of disruptive pupils in the classroom. A disruptive student is defined as one who interferes with the learning process. He is often male, physically aggressive, verbally hostile, over-age and frequently absent. The study examines the overlap between disruptive behavior and emotional…

  2. Drosophila convoluted/dALS is an essential gene required for tracheal tube morphogenesis and apical matrix organization.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Lianna E; Yu, Marcus; Nelson, Kevin S; Laprise, Patrick; Tepass, Ulrich; Beitel, Greg J

    2009-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) control cell and organism growth through evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways. The mammalian acid-labile subunit (ALS) is a secreted protein that complexes with IGFs to modulate their activity. Recent work has shown that a Drosophila homolog of ALS, dALS, can also complex with and modulate the activity of a Drosophila IGF. Here we report the first mutations in the gene encoding dALS. Unexpectedly, we find that these mutations are allelic to a previously described mutation in convoluted (conv), a gene required for epithelial morphogenesis. In conv mutants, the tubes of the Drosophila tracheal system become abnormally elongated without altering tracheal cell number. conv null mutations cause larval lethality, but do not disrupt several processes required for tracheal tube size control, including septate junction formation, deposition of a lumenal/apical extracellular matrix, and lumenal secretion of Vermiform and Serpentine, two putative matrix-modifying proteins. Clearance of lumenal matrix and subcellular localization of clathrin also appear normal in conv mutants. However, we show that Conv/dALS is required for the dynamic organization of the transient lumenal matrix and normal structure of the cuticle that lines the tracheal lumen. These and other data suggest that the Conv/dALS-dependent tube size control mechanism is distinct from other known processes involved in tracheal tube size regulation. Moreover, we present evidence indicating that Conv/dALS has a novel, IGF-signaling independent function in tracheal morphogenesis.

  3. Regeneration of Cassava Plants from Apical Meristems,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Apical meristem culture offers a rapid, efficient method for vegetative propagation of plants and for eliminating systemic viral infections. Since...the first demonstration that virus-free dahlia plants could be regenerated from virus-infected plants by culturing apical meristems , this technique has...widely for human consumption. Propagation through stem cuttings encourages the spread of many virus diseases, such as cassava mosaic virus. This paper reports on procedures for regenerating cassava plants from the apical meristems .

  4. Interplay between tight junctions & adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Hannah K; Maiers, Jessica L; DeMali, Kris A

    2017-09-01

    Cell-cell adhesions are critical for the development and maintenance of tissues. Present at sites of cell-cell contact are the adherens junctions and tight junctions. The adherens junctions mediate cell-cell adhesion via the actions of nectins and cadherins. The tight junctions regulate passage of ions and small molecules between cells and establish cell polarity. Historically, the adherens and tight junctions have been thought of as discrete complexes. However, it is now clear that a high level of interdependency exists between the two junctional complexes. The adherens junctions and tight junctions are physically linked, by the zonula occludens proteins, and linked via signaling molecules including several polarity complexes and actin cytoskeletal modifiers. This review will first describe the individual components of both the adherens and tight junctions and then discuss the coupling of the two complexes with an emphasis on the signaling links and physical interactions between the two junctional complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Findings of routine apical margin biopsy during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Wambi, Chris O; Patel, Trushar; Shapiro, Edan Y; Tal, Oded; Hruby, Greg W; Berg, William T; Benson, Mitchell C; Badani, Ketan K

    2013-06-01

    Intraoperative biopsy of the apical margin during radical prostatectomy has been recommended as a way to reduce the positive margin rate at this location. However, the enhanced visibility of the apex during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) may obviate this need, allowing for the preservation of maximal urethral length. We assessed pathologic findings of routine apical margin biopsy intraoperative frozen section (IFS) during RARP. The Columbia University Robotic Database was retrospectively reviewed to identify men who underwent RARP with biopsy of the apical soft tissue (urethroprostatic junction). Both IFS and permanent section samples were analyzed. The clinical characteristics associated with IFS and permanent section histological findings were assessed. In total, 335 men underwent RARP with apical biopsy from December 2007 to August 2011. Of these, 329 had IFS available for analysis. Median age and prostate-specific antigen level were 60 years (range, 42-78 years) and 5.2 ng/mL (interquartile range, 4.1-6.9 ng/mL), respectively. Of the 329 apical IFS cases, cancer was detected in 9 patients (2.7%), benign prostatic glands in 135 (41%), and nonprostatic tissue in 185 (56.3%). On permanent section, cancer was seen in 9 patients (2.7%), benign prostatic glands in 125 (38%), and nonprostatic tissue in 195 (59.3%). False-positive and false-negative rates of detecting cancer on IFS were 33% (3/9) and 1% (3/320), respectively. The overall positive surgical margin rate was 11%. Cancer is rarely detected by IFS analysis of routine biopsy of the apical margin during RARP. Although routine IFS may not be beneficial for all patients, selective utilization of IFS may be useful in directing apical dissection in men with apical tumors, allowing for the preservation of maximal urethral length.

  6. Tolerance of brightness and contrast adjustments on chronic apical abscess and apical granuloma interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnamasari, L.; Iskandar, H. H. B.; Makes, B. N.

    2017-08-01

    In digitized radiography techniques, adjusting the image enhancement can improve the subjective image quality by optimizing the brightness and contrast for diagnostic needs. To determine the value range of image enhancement (brightness and contrast) on chronic apical abscess and apical granuloma interpretation. 30 periapical radiographs that diagnosed chronic apical abscess and 30 that diagnosed apical granuloma were adjusted by changing brightness and contrast values. The value range of brightness and contrast adjustment that can be tolerated in radiographic interpretations of chronic apical abscess and apical granuloma spans from -10 to +10. Brightness and contrast adjustments on digital radiographs do not affect the radiographic interpretation of chronic apical abscess and apical granuloma if conducted within the value range.

  7. POST-TRAUMATIC APICAL LEFT VENTRICULAR ANEURYSM IN A PATIENT WITH LEFT VENTRICULAR APICAL-ABDOMINAL AORTIC CONDUIT: CASE PRESENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Ugorji, Clement C.; Cooley, Denton A.; Norman, John C.

    1979-01-01

    A patient with a small aortic annulus had an apico-aortic conduit implanted for aortic stenosis approximately three years before being admitted to our institution. Four months after sustaining a steering wheel injury to the chest, he developed chest pain and palpitations. X-ray films and left ventriculograms revealed a large apical aneurysm of unknown duration. At surgery, it was noted that the proximal portion of the conduit had been sewn directly to the myocardium without the use of a rigid or soft apical outlet prosthesis incorporating a sewing ring. The aneurysm was resected along with a small proximal segment of the conduit graft. A polished Pyrolite® rigid inlet tube with a sewing ring and graft extension was inserted into the residual left ventricular apex, and continuity was reestablished with the abdominal segment of the conduit. It is postulated that the aneurysm was caused by either the direct anastomosis of the fabric graft to the apical myocardium at the original operation (with subsequent disruption and aneurysm formation prior to the steering wheel injury), or was the result of fixation of the heart at the diaphragm by the conduit, with increased vulnerability to deceleration injury at the direct left ventricular apex myocardium-fabric graft site. Images PMID:15216296

  8. Molecular organization of tricellular tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mikio; Izumi, Yasushi; Oda, Yukako; Higashi, Tomohito; Iwamoto, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    When the apicolateral border of epithelial cells is compared with a polygon, its sides correspond to the apical junctional complex, where cell adhesion molecules assemble from the plasma membranes of two adjacent cells. On the other hand, its vertices correspond to tricellular contacts, where the corners of three cells meet. Vertebrate tricellular contacts have specialized structures of tight junctions, termed tricellular tight junctions (tTJs). tTJs were identified by electron microscopic observations more than 40 years ago, but have been largely forgotten in epithelial cell biology since then. The identification of tricellulin and angulin family proteins as tTJ-associated membrane proteins has enabled us to study tTJs in terms of not only the paracellular barrier function but also unknown characteristics of epithelial cell corners via molecular biological approaches.

  9. JAM-C is an apical surface marker for neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Sandra; Worlitzer, Maik M A; Bahnassawy, Lamia'a; Hemmer, Kathrin; Rugani, Kirité; Werthschulte, Inga; Schön, Anna-Lena; Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Bunk, Eva C; Palm, Thomas; Ebnet, Klaus; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2012-03-20

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) is an adhesive cell surface protein expressed in various cell types. JAM-C localizes to the apically localized tight junctions (TJs) between contacting endothelial and epithelial cells, where it contributes to cell-cell adhesions. Just as those epithelial cells, also neural stem cells are highly polarized along their apical-basal axis. The defining feature of all stem cells, including neural stem cells (NSCs) is their ability to self renew. This self-renewal depends on the tight control of symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. In NSCs, the decision whether a division is symmetric or asymmetric largely depends on the distribution of the apical membrane and cell fate determinants on the basal pole of the cell. In this study we demonstrate that JAM-C is expressed on neural progenitor cells and neural stem cells in the embryonic as well as the adult mouse brain. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in vivo JAM-C shows enrichment at the apical surface and therefore is asymmetrically distributed during cell divisions. These results define JAM-C as a novel surface marker for neural stem cells.

  10. The apical ES-BTB-BM functional axis is an emerging target for toxicant-induced infertility

    PubMed Central

    Wan, H. T.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Wong, Chris K.C.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2013-01-01

    Testes are sensitive to toxicants, such as cadmium and phthalates, which disrupt a local functional axis in the seminiferous epithelium known as the “apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES)-blood-testis-barrier (BTB)-basement membrane (BM)”. Following exposure, toxicants contact the basement membrane and activate the Sertoli cell, which perturbs its signaling function. Thus, toxicants can modulate signaling and/or cellular events at the apical ES-BTB-BM axis, perturbing spermatogenesis without entering the epithelium. Toxicants also enter the epithelium via drug transporters to potentiate their damaging effects, and downregulation of efflux transporters by toxicants impedes BTB function such that toxicants remain in the epithelium and efficiently disrupt spermatogenesis. These findings support a novel model of toxicant-induced disruption of spermatogenesis that could be interfered with using small molecules. PMID:23643465

  11. Constitutive apical membrane recycling in Aplysia enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Robert Aaron; Runge, Steven William; Moran, William Michael

    2004-11-01

    In Aplysia californica enterocytes, alanine-stimulated Na+ absorption increases both apical membrane exocytosis and fractional capacitance (fCa; a measure of relative apical membrane surface area). These increases are thought to reduce membrane tension during periods of nutrient absorption that cause the enterocytes to swell osmotically. In the absence of alanine, exocytosis and fCa are constant. These findings imply equal rates of constitutive endocytosis and exocytosis and constitutive recycling of the apical plasma membrane. Thus, the purpose of this study was to confirm and determine the relative extent of constitutive apical membrane recycling in Aplysia enterocytes. Biotinylated lectins are commonly used to label plasma membranes and to investigate plasma membrane recycling. Of fourteen biotinylated lectins tested, biotinylated wheat germ agglutinin (bWGA) bound preferentially to the enterocytes apical surface. Therefore, we used bWGA, avidin D (which binds tightly to biotin), and the UV fluorophore 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin-3-acetic acid (AMCA)-conjugated avidin D to assess the extent of constitutive apical membrane recycling. A temperature-dependent (20 vs. 4 degrees C) experimental protocol employed the use of two tissues from each of five snails and resulted in a approximately 60% difference in apical surface fluorescence intensity. Because the extent of membrane recycling is proportional to the difference in surface fluorescence intensity, this difference reveals a relatively high rate of constitutive apical membrane recycling in Aplysia enterocytes.

  12. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeongwoo; Jeong, Sung-min; Choi, Inchul; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10) is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD) of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ), and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR), supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development. PMID:27043020

  13. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeongwoo; Jeong, Sung-min; Choi, Inchul; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10) is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD) of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ), and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR), supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development.

  14. Characteristics of Kcnn4 channels in the apical membranes of an intestinal epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Basalingappa, Kanthesh M; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M; Wonderlin, William F

    2011-11-01

    Intermediate-conductance K(+) (Kcnn4) channels in the apical and basolateral membranes of epithelial cells play important roles in agonist-induced fluid secretion in intestine and colon. Basolateral Kcnn4 channels have been well characterized in situ using patch-clamp methods, but the investigation of Kcnn4 channels in apical membranes in situ has been hampered by a layer of mucus that prevents seal formation. In the present study, we used patch-clamp methods to characterize Kcnn4 channels in the apical membrane of IEC-18 cells, a cell line derived from rat small intestine. A monolayer of IEC-18 cells grown on a permeable support is devoid of mucus, and tight junctions enable selective access to the apical membrane. In inside-out patches, Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels observed with iberiotoxin (a Kcnma1/large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocker) and apamin (a Kcnn1-3/small-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocker) present in the pipette solution exhibited a single-channel conductance of 31 pS with inward rectification. The currents were reversibly blocked by TRAM-34 (a Kcnn4 blocker) with an IC(50) of 8.7 ± 2.0 μM. The channels were not observed when charybdotoxin, a peptide inhibitor of Kcnn4 channels, was added to the pipette solution. TRAM-34 was less potent in inhibiting Kcnn4 channels in patches from apical membranes than in patches from basolateral membranes, which was consistent with a preferential expression of Kcnn4c and Kcnn4b isoforms in apical and basolateral membranes, respectively. The expression of both isoforms in IEC-18 cells was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. This is the first characterization of Kcnn4 channels in the apical membrane of intestinal epithelial cells.

  15. Apical and basolateral transferrin receptors in polarized BeWo cells recycle through separate endosomes

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Contrary to most other epithelia, trophoblasts in the human placenta, which form the physical barrier between the fetal and the maternal blood circulation, express high numbers of transferrin receptors on their apical cell surface. This study describes the establishment of a polarized trophoblast-like cell line BeWo, which exhibit a high expression of transferrin receptors on the apex of the cells. Cultured on permeable filter supports, BeWo cells formed a polarized monolayer with microvilli on their apical cell surface. Across the monolayer a transepithelial resistance developed of approximately 600 omega.cm2 within 4 d. Depletion of Ca2+ from the medium decreased the resistance to background levels, showing its dependence on the integrity of tight junctions. Within the same period of time the secretion of proteins became polarized. In addition, the compositions of integral membrane proteins at the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains were distinct as determined by domain-selective iodination. Similar to placental trophoblasts, binding of 125I-labeled transferrin to BeWo monolayers revealed that the transferrin receptor was expressed at both plasma membrane domains. Apical and basolateral transferrin receptors were found in a 1:2 surface ratio and exhibited identical dissociation constants and molecular weights. After uptake, transferrin recycled predominantly to the domain of administration, indicating separate recycling pathways from the apical and basolateral domain. This was confirmed by using diaminobenzidine cytochemistry, a technique by which colocalization of endocytosed 125I-labeled and HRP-conjugated transferrin can be monitored. No mixing of the two types of ligands was observed, when both ligands were simultaneously internalized for 10 or 60 min from opposite domains, demonstrating that BeWo cells possess separate populations of apical and basolateral early endosomes. In conclusion, the trophoblast-like BeWo cell line can serve as a unique

  16. Rhinovirus Disrupts the Barrier Function of Polarized Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sajjan, Umadevi; Wang, Qiong; Zhao, Ying; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Secondary bacterial infection following rhinovirus (RV) infection has been recognized in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Objectives: We sought to understand mechanisms by which RV infection facilitates secondary bacterial infection. Methods: Primary human airway epithelial cells grown at air–liquid interface and human bronchial epithelial (16HBE14o-) cells grown as polarized monolayers were infected apically with RV. Transmigration of bacteria (nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and others) was assessed by colony counting and transmission electron microscopy. Transepithelial resistance (RT) was measured by using a voltmeter. The distribution of zona occludins (ZO)-1 was determined by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Measurements and Main Results: Epithelial cells infected with RV showed 2-log more bound bacteria than sham-infected cultures, and bacteria were recovered from the basolateral media of RV- but not sham-infected cells. Infection of polarized airway epithelial cell cultures with RV for 24 hours caused a significant decrease in RT without causing cell death or apoptosis. Ultraviolet-treated RV did not decrease RT, suggesting a requirement for viral replication. Reduced RT was associated with increased paracellular permeability, as determined by flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin. Neutralizing antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IFN-γ and IL-1β reversed corresponding cytokine-induced reductions in RT but not that induced by RV, indicating that the RV effect is independent of these proinflammatory cytokines. Confocal microscopy and immunoblotting revealed the loss of ZO-1 from tight junction complexes in RV-infected cells. Intranasal inoculation of mice with RV1B also caused the loss of ZO-1 from the bronchial epithelium tight junctions in vivo. Conclusions: RV facilitates binding, translocation, and persistence of bacteria by disrupting airway epithelial barrier function. PMID:18787220

  17. Factors affecting apical leakage assessment.

    PubMed

    Karagöz-Küçükay, I; Küçükay, S; Bayirli, G

    1993-07-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of immediate versus delayed immersion time, and passive dye immersion versus centrifuged dye on apical leakage measurements. Eighty-four extracted human teeth with single straight canals were instrumented and divided into four experimental groups of 20 teeth each plus 2 negative and 2 positive controls. Low-temperature injection thermoplasticized gutta-percha and sealer were used to obturate the root canals. In groups A and B the filling materials were allowed to set for 72 h before the teeth were placed in India ink. In groups C and D the teeth were placed in India ink immediately after obturation. Also, in groups B and D the teeth were centrifuged in India ink for 20 min at 3,000 rpm before being immersed in ink. After 72 h in India ink, the teeth were cleared, and the linear extent of ink penetration was measured with a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis of the data revealed no significant difference in leakage among the experimental groups whether the teeth were immersed in ink immediately after obturation or after setting of the filling materials for 72 h, and whether or not the teeth were centrifuged in ink prior to immersion.

  18. Apical tuft input efficacy in layer 5 pyramidal cells from rat visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Paul A; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2001-01-01

    at a single critical point, the apex of the distal trunk, and so was relatively undiminished by the background. Further, once initiation at the apex occurred, background had little effect on inward propagation along the trunk.We conclude that synaptic input to the apical tuft of layer 5 cells may be unexpectedly effective in triggering cell firing in vivo. The advantage in efficacy was not dependent upon the characteristics of tuft membrane excitability, but rather stemmed from the geometry of the tuft and its junction with the distal apical trunk. The efficacy of tuft input was, however, critically dependent upon inward propagation, suggesting that modulation of membrane currents which affect propagation in the apical trunk might sensitively control the efficacy of tuft input. PMID:11579167

  19. Effect of thiol-oxidation of glutathione with diamide on corneal endothelial function, junctional complexes, and microfilaments.

    PubMed

    Edelhauser, H F; Van Horn, D L; Miller, P; Pederson, H J

    1976-03-01

    Intracellular-reduced glutathione (GSH) was removed by thiol-oxidation with diamide during in vitro perfusion of the corneal endothelium. By 15 min the normal mosaic-like pattern of the endothelial cells was disrupted by serpentine-like lines of cell separation at the cell juntions. After 45 min of perfusion, infividual clusters of cells formed cup-shaped islands. The resultant exposure of Descemet's membrane to the perfusion solution resulted in corneal swelling. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the endothelial cells separated at the apical junctions and that the microfilaments in the apical cytoplasm of cells formed dense bands, whereas the other subcellular organelles were normal in appearance. The change in cellular shape may be due to loss of cellular adhesion which results in the condensation of the microfilaments or contraction of the microfilaments. The addition of glucose to the perfusate prevented the diamide effect, and the diamide effect could be reversed upon removal and perfusion of a glutathione bicarbonate Ringer's solution. These results suggest that the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione in the endothelial cells plays a role in the maintenance of the endothelial cell barrier function.

  20. Effect of thiol-oxidation of glutathione with diamide on corneal endothelial function, junctional complexes, and microfilaments

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Intracellular-reduced glutathione (GSH) was removed by thiol-oxidation with diamide during in vitro perfusion of the corneal endothelium. By 15 min the normal mosaic-like pattern of the endothelial cells was disrupted by serpentine-like lines of cell separation at the cell juntions. After 45 min of perfusion, infividual clusters of cells formed cup-shaped islands. The resultant exposure of Descemet's membrane to the perfusion solution resulted in corneal swelling. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the endothelial cells separated at the apical junctions and that the microfilaments in the apical cytoplasm of cells formed dense bands, whereas the other subcellular organelles were normal in appearance. The change in cellular shape may be due to loss of cellular adhesion which results in the condensation of the microfilaments or contraction of the microfilaments. The addition of glucose to the perfusate prevented the diamide effect, and the diamide effect could be reversed upon removal and perfusion of a glutathione bicarbonate Ringer's solution. These results suggest that the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione in the endothelial cells plays a role in the maintenance of the endothelial cell barrier function. PMID:1035910

  1. Helicobacter pylori dwelling on the apical surface of gastrointestinal epithelium damages the mucosal barrier through direct contact.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Hongyu; Yu, Lu; Cao, Yi

    2014-10-01

    Epithelial junctions and mucins compose a major portion of the mucosal barrier. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections induce alterations of the tight junctions and adherens junctions in epithelial cells, although the precise mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. The expression of adhesion molecules and MUC1 was systematically investigated in gastrointestinal epithelial cells infected with H. pylori in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we developed several new in vitro methods to study the relationships between the bacterium and the dysfunction of tight junctions using Boyden Chambers. The expression of a series of junctional molecules and MUC1 decreased in the cultured cells that were infected with H. pylori. According to the degree of damage at the tight junctions, direct contact of H. pylori with the apical membrane of the cells resulted in the greatest increase in permeability compared to basal membrane binding or non-binding of H. pylori to the cells. Similarly, we noted that H. pylori infection could reduce the expression and glycosylation of MUC1. Helicobacter pylori dwelling on the apical surface of the gastrointestinal epithelium could directly induce serious injury of the mucosal barrier, and the new methods outlined here, based on the Boyden Chamber system, could be very useful for studying the relationships between bacteria and their target cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Apical sorting of bovine enteropeptidase does not involve detergent-resistant association with sphingolipid-cholesterol rafts.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Lu, D; Sadler, J E

    1999-01-15

    Enteropeptidase is a heterodimeric type II membrane protein of the brush border of duodenal enterocytes. In this location, enteropeptidase cleaves and activates trypsinogen, thereby initiating the activation of other intestinal digestive enzymes. Recombinant bovine enteropeptidase was sorted directly to the apical surface of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Replacement of the cytoplasmic and signal anchor domains with a cleavable signal peptide (mutant proenteropeptidase lacking the amino-terminal signal anchor domain (dSA-BEK)) caused apical secretion. The additional amino-terminal deletion of a mucin-like domain (HL-BEK) resulted in secretion both apically and basolaterally. Further deletion of the noncatalytic heavy chain (L-BEK) resulted in apical secretion. Thus enteropeptidase appears to have at least three distinct sorting signals as follows: the light chain (L-BEK) directs apical sorting, addition of most of the heavy chain (HL-BEK) inhibits apical sorting, and addition of the mucin-like domain (dSA-BEK) restores apical sorting. Inhibition of N-linked glycosylation with tunicamycin or disruption of microtubules with colchicine caused L-BEK to be secreted equally into apical and basolateral compartments, whereas brefeldin A caused basolateral secretion of L-BEK. Full-length BEK was not found in detergent-resistant raft domains of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells or baby hamster kidney cells. These results suggest apical sorting of enteropeptidase depends on N-linked glycosylation of the serine protease domain and an amino-terminal segment that includes an O-glycosylated mucin-like domain and three potential N-glycosylation sites. In contrast to many apically targeted proteins, enteropeptidase does not form detergent-resistant associations with sphingolipid-cholesterol rafts.

  3. Advanced Pointing Imaging Camera (APIC) Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, R. S.; Bills, B. G.; Jorgensen, J.; Jun, I.; Maki, J. N.; McEwen, A. S.; Riedel, E.; Walch, M.; Watkins, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    The Advanced Pointing Imaging Camera (APIC) concept is envisioned as an integrated system, with optical bench and flight-proven components, designed for deep-space planetary missions with 2-DOF control capability.

  4. APIC: A generic interface for sequencing projects

    SciTech Connect

    Bisson, G.; Garreau, A.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, we describe the APIC graphical interface that aims at displaying the results produced by the genomic sequence analysis methods and at helping a comparison of these results. The major feature of APIC lies in its genericity. As a matter of fact, this interface can obviously be used to visualize genetic or physical maps but it also able to display other kinds of information such as curves or pictures. On the one hand, APIC provides the biologist who builds a new sequence analysis method with a standard interface allowing to display his results. Thus, he can avoid implementing a specific visualization tool. On the other hand, even when the methods already have their own interfaces, using APIC has the advantage of giving a homogeneous way to compare several results coming from different analysis tools. Moreover, it provides some powerful functions for navigating and browsing into the results.

  5. Myosin-dependent remodeling of adherens junctions protects junctions from Snail-dependent disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Although Snail is essential for disassembly of adherens junctions during epithelial–mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), loss of adherens junctions in Drosophila melanogaster gastrula is delayed until mesoderm is internalized, despite the early expression of Snail in that primordium. By combining live imaging and quantitative image analysis, we track the behavior of E-cadherin–rich junction clusters, demonstrating that in the early stages of gastrulation most subapical clusters in mesoderm not only persist, but move apically and enhance in density and total intensity. All three phenomena depend on myosin II and are temporally correlated with the pulses of actomyosin accumulation that drive initial cell shape changes during gastrulation. When contractile myosin is absent, the normal Snail expression in mesoderm, or ectopic Snail expression in ectoderm, is sufficient to drive early disassembly of junctions. In both cases, junctional disassembly can be blocked by simultaneous induction of myosin contractility. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for mechanosensitivity of cell–cell junctions and imply that myosin-mediated tension can prevent Snail-driven EMT. PMID:26754645

  6. Developmental stratification of the mammary epithelium occurs through symmetry-breaking vertical divisions of apically positioned luminal cells.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Robert J; Lechler, Terry; Ewald, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Mammary ducts are elongated during development by stratified epithelial structures, known as terminal end buds (TEBs). TEBs exhibit reduced apicobasal polarity and extensive proliferation. A major unanswered question concerns the mechanism by which the simple ductal epithelium stratifies during TEB formation. We sought to elucidate this mechanism using real-time imaging of growth factor-induced stratification in 3D cultures of mouse primary epithelial organoids. We hypothesized that stratification could result from vertical divisions in either the apically positioned luminal epithelial cells or the basally positioned myoepithelial cells. Stratification initiated exclusively from vertical apical cell divisions, both in 3D culture and in vivo. During vertical apical divisions, only the mother cell retained tight junctions and segregated apical membranes. Vertical daughter cells initiated an unpolarized cell population located between the luminal and myoepithelial cells, similar to the unpolarized body cells in the TEB. As stratification and loss of apicobasal polarity are early hallmarks of cancer, we next determined the cellular mechanism of oncogenic stratification. Expression of activated ERBB2 induced neoplastic stratification through analogous vertical divisions of apically positioned luminal epithelial cells. However, ERBB2-induced stratification was accompanied by tissue overgrowth and acute loss of both tight junctions and apical polarity. Expression of phosphomimetic MEK (MEK1DD), a major ERBB2 effector, also induced stratification through vertical apical cell divisions. However, MEK1DD-expressing organoids exhibited normal levels of growth and retained apicobasal polarity. We conclude that both normal and neoplastic stratification are accomplished through receptor tyrosine kinase signaling dependent vertical cell divisions within the luminal epithelial cell layer.

  7. Apical targeting of the P2Y4 receptor is directed by hydrophobic and basic residues in the cytoplasmic tail

    PubMed Central

    DuBose, D. Ross; Wolff, Samuel C.; Qi, Ai-Dong; Naruszewicz, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    The P2Y4 receptor is selectively targeted to the apical membrane in polarized epithelial cell lines and has been shown to play a key role in intestinal chloride secretion. In this study, we delimit a 23 amino acid sequence within the P2Y4 receptor C-tail that directs its apical targeting. Using a mutagenesis approach, we found that four hydrophobic residues near the COOH-terminal end of the signal are necessary for apical sorting, whereas two basic residues near the NH2-terminal end of the signal are involved to a lesser extent. Interestingly, mutation of the key hydrophobic residues results in a basolateral enrichment of the receptor construct, suggesting that the apical targeting sequence may prevent insertion or disrupt stability of the receptor at the basolateral membrane. The signal is not sequence specific, as an inversion of the 23 amino acid sequence does not disrupt apical targeting. We also show that the apical targeting sequence is an autonomous signal and is capable of redistributing the normally basolateral P2Y12 receptor, suggesting that the apical signal is dominant over the basolateral signal in the main body of the P2Y12 receptor. The targeting sequence is unique to the P2Y4 receptor, and sequence alignments of the COOH-terminal tail of mammalian orthologs reveal that the hydrophobic residues in the targeting signal are highly conserved. These data define the novel apical sorting signal of the P2Y4 receptor, which may represent a common mechanism for trafficking of epithelial transmembrane proteins. PMID:23054062

  8. ZO-1 recruitment to α-catenin--a novel mechanism for coupling the assembly of tight junctions to adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Maiers, Jessica L; Peng, Xiao; Fanning, Alan S; DeMali, Kris A

    2013-09-01

    The formation of a barrier between epithelial cells is a fundamental determinant of cellular homeostasis, protecting underlying cells against pathogens, dehydration and damage. Assembly of the tight junction barrier is dependent upon neighboring epithelial cells binding to one another and forming adherens junctions, but the mechanism for how these processes are linked is poorly understood. Using a knockdown and substitution system, we studied whether ZO-1 binding to α-catenin is required for coupling tight junction assembly to the formation of adherens junctions. We found that preventing ZO-1 binding to α-catenin did not appear to affect adherens junctions. Rather the assembly and maintenance of the epithelial barrier were disrupted. This disruption was accompanied by alterations in the mobility of ZO-1 and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Thus, our study identifies α-catenin binding to ZO-1 as a new mechanism for coupling the assembly of the epithelial barrier to cell-to-cell adhesion.

  9. Evaluation of the apical adaptation performance of various root canal instruments

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhanli, K. Tolga; Turkun, Murat; Erdilek, Necdet; Peskersoy, Cem; Kose, Timur

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the apical root canal adaptation performance of various root canal instruments. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 freshly extracted single-rooted mandibular incisors were used in this study. Coroner parts of all teeth were removed from cemento-enamel junction and root canal of each tooth was explored with a size 8 K-file until the tip of the file was just visible at the apex. Working lengths (WLs) were determined as 1 mm short of these measurements. ProTaper, K-file, profile and hedstroem files were inserted into the root canals of 10 teeth to the WL following the flaring of the coronal and middle thirds. Instruments were fixed in the root canals with acrylic resin. The apical 1 mm of each root tip was ground on wet sandpaper to expose the canal and the instrument at the WL and the apical region of each tooth was examined under stereomicroscope. The stereoscopic images of the teeth were digitized and analyzed with software in order to determine the differences between the areas of root canals and file tips. Result data were analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance test (P = 0.05). Results: There were no significant differences between apical file/root canal areas of the evaluated instruments (P > 0.05). Conclusions: None of the evaluated instruments performed a perfect adaptation with the apical root canal surface at the WL in mandibular incisors. Therefore, total removal of the debris from the apical canal surface may not be achieved when these filing instruments are used. PMID:24966727

  10. Behavior of tight-junction, adherens-junction and cell polarity proteins during HNF-4{alpha}-induced epithelial polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Satohisa, Seiro; Chiba, Hideki . E-mail: hidchiba@sapmed.ac.jp; Osanai, Makoto; Ohno, Shigeo; Kojima, Takashi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2005-10-15

    We previously reported that expression of tight-junction molecules occludin, claudin-6 and claudin-7, as well as establishment of epithelial polarity, was triggered in mouse F9 cells expressing hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4{alpha} [H. Chiba, T. Gotoh, T. Kojima, S. Satohisa, K. Kikuchi, M. Osanai, N. Sawada. Hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4{alpha} triggers formation of functional tight junctions and establishment of polarized epithelial morphology in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, Exp. Cell Res. 286 (2003) 288-297]. Using these cells, we examined in the present study behavior of tight-junction, adherens-junction and cell polarity proteins and elucidated the molecular mechanism behind HNF-4{alpha}-initiated junction formation and epithelial polarization. We herein show that not only ZO-1 and ZO-2, but also ZO-3, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-B, JAM-C and cell polarity proteins PAR-3, PAR-6 and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) accumulate at primordial adherens junctions in undifferentiated F9 cells. In contrast, CRB3, Pals1 and PATJ appeared to exhibit distinct subcellular localization in immature cells. Induced expression of HNF-4{alpha} led to translocation of these tight-junction and cell polarity proteins to beltlike tight junctions, where occludin, claudin-6 and claudin-7 were assembled, in differentiated cells. Interestingly, PAR-6, aPKC, CRB3 and Pals1, but not PAR-3 or PATJ, were also concentrated on the apical membranes in differentiated cells. These findings indicate that HNF-4{alpha} provokes not only expression of tight-junction adhesion molecules, but also modulation of subcellular distribution of junction and cell polarity proteins, resulting in junction formation and epithelial polarization.

  11. PKCζ PHOSPHORYLATES OCCLUDIN AND PROMOTES ASSEMBLY OF EPITHELIAL TIGHT JUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Suneet; Suzuki, Takuya; Seth, Ankur; Samak, Geetha; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Evidence indicates that protein kinases play an important role in the regulation of epithelial tight junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of PKCζ in tight junction regulation in Caco-2 and MDCK cell monolayers. Inhibition of PKCζ by a specific PKCζ-pseudosubstrate peptide results in redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the intercellular junctions and disruption of barrier function without affecting cell viability. Reduced expression of PKCζ by antisense oligonucleotide or shRNA also results in compromised tight junction integrity. Inhibition or knock down of PKCζ delays calcium-induced assembly of tight junctions. Tight junction disruption by PKCζ-pseudosubstrate is associated with the dephosphorylation of occludin and ZO-1 on Ser and Thr residues. PKCζ directly binds to the C-terminal domain of occludin and phosphorylates it on Thr residues. T403, T404, T424 and T438 in occludin C-terminal domain are the predominant sites of PKCζ-dependent phosphorylation. T424A or T438A mutation in full length occludin delays its assembly into the tight junctions. Inhibition of PKCζ also induces redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the tight junctions and dissociates these proteins from the detergent-insoluble fractions in mouse ileum. This study demonstrates that PKCζ phosphorylates occludin on specific Thr residues and promotes assembly of epithelial tight junctions. PMID:21545357

  12. 76 FR 77375 - Airworthiness Directives; Apical Industries, Inc., (Apical) Emergency Float Kits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ..., Inc., (Apical) Emergency Float Kits AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This amendment adopts a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the Apical emergency float kits... certain supplemental type certificates with certain emergency float kits, was published in the...

  13. Apical dominance and apical control in multiple flushing of temperate woody species.

    Treesearch

    M. Cline; C. Harrington

    2007-01-01

    In young plants of many woody species, the first flush of growth in the spring may be followed by one or more flushes of the terminal shoot if growing conditions are favorable. The occurrence of these additional flushes may significantly affect crown form and structure. Apical dominance (AD) and apical control (AC) are thought to be important control mechanisms in this...

  14. Apical root resorption in orthodontically treated adults.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Boyd, R L

    1996-09-01

    This study analyzed the relationship in orthodontically treated adults between upper central incisor displacement measured on lateral cephalograms and apical root resorption measured on anterior periapical x-ray films. A multiple linear regression examined incisor displacements in four directions (retraction, advancement, intrusion, and extrusion) as independent variables, attempting to account for observed differences in the dependent variable, resorption. Mean apical resorption was 1.36 mm (sd +/- 1.46, n = 73). Mean horizontal displacement of the apex was -0.83 mm (sd +/- 1.74, n = 67); mean vertical displacement was 0.19 mm (sd +/- 1.48, n = 67). The regression coefficients for the intercept and for retraction were highly significant; those for extrusion, intrusion, and advancement were not. At the 95% confidence level, an average of 0.99 mm (se = +/- 0.34) of resorption was implied in the absence of root displacement and an average of 0.49 mm (se = +/- 0.14) of resorption was implied per millimeter of retraction. R2 for all four directional displacement variables (DDVs) taken together was only 0.20, which implied that only a relatively small portion of the observed apical resorption could be accounted for by tooth displacement alone. In a secondary set of univariate analyses, the associations between apical resorption and each of 14 additional treatment-related variables were examined. Only Gender, Elapsed Time, and Total Apical Displacement displayed statistically significant associations with apical resorption. Additional multiple regressions were then performed in which the data for each of these three statistically significant variables were considered separately, with the data for the four directional displacement variables. The addition of information on Elapsed Time or Total Apical Displacement did not explain a significant additional portion of the variability in apical resorption. On the other hand, the addition of information on Gender to the

  15. Microbiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2013-04-01

    Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease.

  16. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  17. Disruptive Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David H., Ed.

    A committee was formed to explore ways of helping school districts develop more effective programs for disruptive students. Committee findings revealed the need for the development of local guidelines to satisfy each school district's needs and for reliable feedback. Therefore, this report reflects efforts to sample various local approaches to the…

  18. Determination of apical membrane polarity in mammary epithelial cell cultures: The role of cell-cell, cell-substratum, and membrane-cytoskeleton interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, G.; Beck, J.C.; Moss, L.; Bartley, J. ); Ojakian, G.K. )

    1990-06-01

    The membrane glycoprotein, PAS-O, is a major differentiation antigen on mammary epithelial cells and is located exclusively in the apical domain of the plasma membrane. The authors have used 734B cultured human mammary carcinoma cells as a model system to study the role of tight junctions, cell-substratum contacts, and submembranous cytoskeletal elements in restricting PAS-O to the apical membrane. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectronmicroscopy experiments demonstrated that while tight junctions demarcate PAS-O distribution in confluent cultures, apical polarity could be established at low culture densities when cells could not form tight junctions with neighboring cells. They suggest, then, that interactions between vitronectin and its receptor, are responsible for establishment of membrane domains in the absence of tight junctions. The role of cytoskeletal elements in restricting PAS-O distribution was examined by treating cultures with cytochalasin D, colchicine, or acrylamide. Cytochalasin D led to a redistribution of PAS0O while colchicine and acrylamide did not. They hypothesize that PAS-O is restricted to the apical membrane by interactions with a microfilament network and that the cytoskeletal organization is dependent upon cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions.

  19. Apical aneurysm of Chagas's heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, J S; Mello De Oliveira, J A; Frederigue, U; Lima Filho, E C

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of Chagas's heart disease was carried out by a review of necropsy reports with special reference to the lesion known as the apical aneurysm. It was concluded that this lesion was more frequent in men, was unrelated to age, and was unrelated to heart weight. Patients dying of the cardiac consequences of Chagas's cardiomyopathy were more likely to have an apical aneurysm than those whose death was unrelated to the disease but the mode of death (sudden, or with heart failure) was unconnected with its presence. Transillumination from within the ventricle at necropsy was not only useful in demonstrating the aneurysm but also showed areas of myocardial thinning elsewhere. Thrombosis within the lesion was frequent. The aetiology of the apical aneurysm is discussed and it is concluded that while ischaemia, inflammation, thrombosis, and mechanical factors may produce and localise this lesion, the underlying cause is the basic pathogenetic process-parasympathetic nerve cell destruction. Images PMID:7295439

  20. An Unusual Left Ventricular Apical Mass

    PubMed Central

    Cavallero, Erika; Curzi, Mirko; Cioccarelli, Sara Anna; Papalia, Giulio; Ornaghi, Diego; Bragato, Renato Maria

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular apical masses constitute a rare finding. Imaging properties together with the clinical history of the patient usually allow an etiologic definition. We report a challenging case of an ambiguous left ventricular apical mass of uncertain nature till histological examination. Points of interest were singular clinical history and echocardiographic findings, although not conclusive in hypothesis generating. Furthermore to the best of our knowledge, this is one of the rare attempt to excise a deep left ventricular mass with a mini-invasive surgical approach. PMID:28465915

  1. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  2. Microtubules are required for efficient epithelial tight junction homeostasis and restoration

    PubMed Central

    Glotfelty, Lila G.; Zahs, Anita; Iancu, Catalin; Shen, Le

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial tight junctions are critical for creating a barrier yet allowing paracellular transport. Although it is well established that the actin cytoskeleton is critical for preserving the dynamic organization of the tight junction and maintaining normal tight junction protein recycling, contributions of microtubules to tight junction organization and function remain undefined. The aim of this study is to determine the role of microtubules in tight junction homeostasis and restoration. Our data demonstrate that occludin traffics on microtubules and that microtubule disruption perturbs tight junction structure and function. Microtubules are also shown to be required for restoring barrier function following Ca2+ chelation and repletion. These processes are mediated by proteins participating in microtubule minus-end-directed trafficking but not plus-end-directed trafficking. These studies show that microtubules participate in the preservation of epithelial tight junction structure and function and play a vital role in tight junction restoration, thus expanding our understanding of the regulation of tight junction physiology. PMID:24920678

  3. Predictive modelling of ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velev, Julian P.; Burton, John D.; Zhuravlev, Mikhail Ye; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions combine the phenomena of quantum-mechanical tunnelling and switchable spontaneous polarisation of a nanometre-thick ferroelectric film into novel device functionality. Switching the ferroelectric barrier polarisation direction produces a sizable change in resistance of the junction—a phenomenon known as the tunnelling electroresistance effect. From a fundamental perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions and their version with ferromagnetic electrodes, i.e., multiferroic tunnel junctions, are testbeds for studying the underlying mechanisms of tunnelling electroresistance as well as the interplay between electric and magnetic degrees of freedom and their effect on transport. From a practical perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions hold promise for disruptive device applications. In a very short time, they have traversed the path from basic model predictions to prototypes for novel non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories with non-destructive readout. This remarkable progress is to a large extent driven by a productive cycle of predictive modelling and innovative experimental effort. In this review article, we outline the development of the ferroelectric tunnel junction concept and the role of theoretical modelling in guiding experimental work. We discuss a wide range of physical phenomena that control the functional properties of ferroelectric tunnel junctions and summarise the state-of-the-art achievements in the field.

  4. Exercise regulation of intestinal tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah; Schneider, Suzanne; Lanphere, Katherine; Conn, Carole; Dokladny, Karol; Moseley, Pope

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal distress, such as diarrhoea, cramping, vomiting, nausea and gastric pain are common among athletes during training and competition. The mechanisms that cause these symptoms are not fully understood. The stress of heat and oxidative damage during exercise causes disruption to intestinal epithelial cell tight junction proteins resulting in increased permeability to luminal endotoxins. The endotoxin moves into the blood stream leading to a systemic immune response. Tight junction integrity is altered by the phosphoylation state of the proteins occludin and claudins, and may be regulated by the type of exercise performed. Prolonged exercise and high-intensity exercise lead to an increase in key phosphorylation enzymes that ultimately cause tight junction dysfunction, but the mechanisms are different. The purpose of this review is to (1) explain the function and physiology of tight junction regulation, (2) discuss the effects of prolonged and high-intensity exercise on tight junction permeability leading to gastrointestinal distress and (3) review agents that may increase or decrease tight junction integrity during exercise.

  5. Enzymatic vitreous disruption.

    PubMed

    Gandorfer, A

    2008-10-01

    Enzymatic vitreous disruption refers to cleaving the vitreoretinal junction by enzymatic means, thereby inducing posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) and liquefaction of the vitreous gel. Several enzymes have been proposed in this respect, including chondroitinase, hyaluronidase, dispase, and plasmin. In an experimental setting, chondroitinase induced PVD and was helpful in removing epiretinal membranes but no further data have been reported yet. Hyaluronidase liquefies the vitreous as demonstrated in a phase III trial in diabetic patients with vitreous haemorrhage. Dispase induces PVD but also causes inner retinal damage and is now used as an animal model of proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Plasmin has the capability of both PVD induction and liquefaction. However, plasmin is highly unstable and not available for clinical use. Microplasmin (ThromboGenics Ltd, Dublin, Ireland) is a truncated form of human plasmin sharing the same catalytic activity like plasmin. Recombinant microplasmin is under clinical investigation in patients with vitreomacular traction. This review article reports on the current knowledge of enzymatic vitreous disruption and discusses details of the enzyme candidates in basic and clinical research terms.

  6. Tricellular junctions: how to build junctions at the TRICkiest points of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Tomohito; Miller, Ann L.

    2017-01-01

    Tricellular contacts are the places where three cells meet. In vertebrate epithelial cells, specialized structures called tricellular tight junctions (tTJs) and tricellular adherens junctions (tAJs) have been identified. tTJs are important for the maintenance of barrier function, and disruption of tTJ proteins contributes to familial deafness. tAJs have recently been attracting the attention of mechanobiologists because these sites are hot spots of epithelial tension. Although the molecular components, regulation, and function of tTJs and tAJs, as well as of invertebrate tricellular junctions, are beginning to be characterized, many questions remain. Here we broadly cover what is known about tricellular junctions, propose a new model for tension transmission at tAJs, and discuss key open questions. PMID:28705832

  7. Directional Release of Reovirus from the Apical Surface of Polarized Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Caroline M.; Mainou, Bernardo A.; Kim, Kwang S.; Dermody, Terence S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bloodstream spread is a critical step in the pathogenesis of many viruses. However, mechanisms that promote viremia are not well understood. Reoviruses are neurotropic viruses that disseminate hematogenously to the central nervous system. Junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) is a tight junction protein that serves as a receptor for reovirus. JAM-A is required for establishment of viremia in infected newborn mice and viral spread to sites of secondary replication. To determine how viruses gain access to the circulatory system, we examined reovirus infection of polarized human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs). Reovirus productively infects polarized HBMECs, but infection does not alter tight junction integrity. Apical infection of polarized HBMECs is more efficient than basolateral infection, which is attributable to viral engagement of sialic acid and JAM-A. Viral release occurs exclusively from the apical surface via a mechanism that is not associated with lysis or apoptosis of infected cells. These data suggest that infection of endothelial cells routes reovirus apically into the bloodstream for systemic dissemination in the host. Understanding how viruses invade the bloodstream may aid in the development of therapeutics that block this step in viral pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Bloodstream spread of viruses within infected hosts is a critical but poorly understood step in viral disease. Reoviruses first enter the host through the oral or respiratory route and infect cells in the central nervous system. Spread of reoviruses to the brain occurs by blood or nerves, which makes reoviruses useful models for studies of systemic viral dissemination. In this study, we examined how reoviruses infect endothelial cells, which form the walls of blood vessels. We found that reovirus infection of endothelial cells allows the virus to enter blood vessels and serves as a means for the virus to reach high titers in the circulation. Understanding how reovirus

  8. Wideband rotating junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochernyaev, V. N.

    1993-06-01

    Rotating junctions of coaxial-waveguide and waveguide type with a traveling wave coefficient exceeding 0.8 in a wide frequency range are considered. The design of these junctions is based on a method of the theory of electrodynamic circuits. Numerical results are obtained for rotating junctions of partially filled rectangular waveguide type and their particular cases.

  9. Comparison of Endodontic Biomaterials as Apical Barriers in Simulated Open Apices

    PubMed Central

    Adel, Mamak; Nima, Moradi Majd; Shivaie Kojoori, Shiva; Norooz Oliaie, Hooryeh; Naghavi, Neda; Asgary, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effect of apical foramen diameter and apical barrier thickness on the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium enriched mixture (CEM) plugs in open apices. Materials and Methods. The fluid filtration method was conducted on a total of 136 roots. Samples were randomly divided into two control (n = 8) and four experimental groups (n = 30). Apical foramen diameters measuring 1.1 and 1.7 mm were shaped for groups “1 and 3” and “2 and 4”, respectively. In groups 1 and 2 MTA plug and in groups 3 and 4 CEM plug was inserted. The groups were further divided into subgroups according to the thickness of the apical plugs (3- or 5-mm). Microleakage was measured at 1, 7, and 30 days. Results. Mixed ANOVA test showed that the microleakage in groups 1 and 3 as well as all 5-mm plug subgroups were significantly less than groups 2 and 4 (P < 0.05) and 3-mm subgroups (P < 0.05), respectively. Microleakage was significantly lower at 30th day (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Reducing canal diameter or increasing apical plug thickness and the time interval increases the sealing ability of apical barriers. Furthermore, in comparison to MTA, CEM plugs demonstrated superior sealing ability. PMID:22792475

  10. Apical versus Non-Apical Lead: Is ICD Lead Position Important for Successful Defibrillation?

    PubMed

    Amit, Guy; Wang, Jia; Connolly, Stuart J; Glikson, Michael; Hohnloser, Stephan; Wright, David J; Brachmann, Johannes; Defaye, Pascal; Neuzner, Joerg; Mabo, Philippe; Vanerven, Liselot; Vinolas, Xavier; O'Hara, Gilles; Kautzner, Josef; Appl, Ursula; Gadler, Fredrik; Stein, Kenneth; Konstantino, Yuval; Healey, Jeff S

    2016-05-01

    We aim to compare the acute and long-term success of defibrillation between non-apical and apical ICD lead position. The position of the ventricular lead was recorded by the implanting physician for 2,475 of 2,500 subjects in the Shockless IMPLant Evaluation (SIMPLE) trial, and subjects were grouped accordingly as non-apical or apical. The success of intra-operative defibrillation testing and of subsequent clinical shocks were compared. Propensity scoring was used to adjust for the impact of differences in baseline variables between these groups. There were 541 leads that were implanted at a non-apical position (21.9%). Patients implanted with a non-apical lead had a higher rate of secondary prevention indication. Non-apical location resulted in a lower mean R-wave amplitude (14.0 vs. 15.2, P < 0.001), lower mean pacing impedance (662 ohm vs. 728 ohm, P < 0.001), and higher mean pacing threshold (0.70 V vs. 0.66 V, P = 0.01). Single-coil leads and cardiac resynchronization devices were used more often in non-apical implants. The success of intra-operative defibrillation was similar between propensity score matched groups (89%). Over a mean follow-up of 3 years, there were no significant differences in the yearly rates of appropriate shock (5.5% vs. 5.4%, P = 0.98), failed appropriate first shock (0.9% vs. 1.0%, P = 0.66), or the composite of failed shock or arrhythmic death (2.8% vs. 2.3% P = 0.35) according to lead location. We did not detect any reduction in the ICD efficacy at the time of implant or during follow-up in patients receiving a non-apical RV lead. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The effect of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) cysteine protease actinidin on the occludin tight junction network in T84 intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cavic, Milena; Grozdanovic, Milica M; Bajic, Aleksandar; Jankovic, Radmila; Andjus, Pavle R; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija

    2014-10-01

    Actinidin, a kiwifruit cysteine protease, is a marker allergen for genuine sensitization to this food allergen source. Inhalatory cysteine proteases have the capacity for disruption of tight junctions (TJs) enhancing the permeability of the bronchial epithelium. No such properties have been reported for allergenic food proteases so far. The aim was to determine the effect of actinidin on the integrity of T84 monolayers by evaluating its action on the TJ protein occludin. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence were employed for the detection of occludin protein alterations. Gene expression was evaluated by RT-PCR. Breach of occludin network was assessed by measuring transepithelial resistance, blue dextran leakage and passage of allergens from the apical to basolateral compartment. Actinidin exerted direct proteolytic cleavage of occludin; no alteration of occludin gene expression was detected. There was a reduction of occludin staining upon actinidin treatment as a consequence of its degradation and dispersion within the membrane. There was an increase in permeability of the T84 monolayer resulting in reduced transepithelial resistance, blue dextran leakage and passage of allergens actinidin and thaumatin-like protein from the apical to basolateral compartment. Opening of TJs by actinidin may increase intestinal permeability and contribute to the process of sensitization in kiwifruit allergy.

  12. Tight junctions in lung cancer and lung metastasis: a review.

    PubMed

    Soini, Ylermi

    2012-01-01

    Tight junctions are structures located in the apicobasal region of the cell membranes. They regulate paracellular solute and electrical permeability of cell layers. Additionally, they influence cellular polarity, form a paracellular fence to molecules and pathogens and divide the cell membranes to apical and lateral compartments. Tight junctions adhere to the corresponding ones of neighbouring cells and by this way also mediate attachment of the cells to one other. Molecules forming the membranous part of tight junctions include occludin, claudins, tricellulin and junctional adhesion molecules. These molecules are attached to scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1, ZO-2 and ZO-3 through which signals are mediated to the cell interior. Expression of tight junction proteins, such as claudins, may be up- or downregulated in cancer and they are involved in EMT thus influencing tumor spread. Like in tumors of other sites, lung tumors show changes in the expression in tight junction proteins. In this review the significance of tight junctions and its proteins in lung cancer is discussed with a focus on the proteins forming the membranous part of these structures.

  13. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  14. YBCO Josephson Junction Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-14

    Conductus 969 West Maude Avenue ř ’AEOTR. 19 4 0 0 75 Sunnyvale CA 94086 9. SPONSORING MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) ’C 510 N’_ ; i )N !’->.G...the primary junction being investigated at Conductus (and one of the better performing junctions in the community) was the bi-epitaxial structure [4...achieved. 2.1 Junctions At the time of proposal, the primary junction being investigated at Conductus (and one of the better performing junctions in

  15. Bacterial pathogenesis and mediators in apical periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2007-01-01

    Apical periodontitis is a group of inflammatory diseases caused by microorganisms (mainly bacteria) infecting the necrotic root canal system. The pathogenesis of different types of apical periodontitis and even the same type in different individuals is unlikely to follow a stereotyped fashion with regard to the involved bacterial mediators. Disease pathogenesis is rather complex and involves a multitude of bacteria- and host-related factors. This review article discusses the bacterial pathogenesis of acute and chronic apical periodontitis, with the main focus on the bacterial mediators conceivably involved in the different stages of the infectious process, including secreted products (enzymes, exotoxins, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine peptides, heat-shock proteins and metabolic end-products) and structural components (lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid, lipoproteins, fimbriae, flagella, outer membrane proteins and vesicles, DNA, and exopolysaccharides). Knowledge of the bacterial factors involved in the pathogenesis of apical periodontitis is important to the understanding of the disease process and to help establishing proper therapeutic measures to inactivate this bacterial "artillery".

  16. Transforming growth factor-β3 regulates cell junction restructuring via MAPK-mediated mRNA destabilization and Smad-dependent protein degradation of junctional adhesion molecule B (JAM-B).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Lui, Wing-Yee

    2015-06-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-B (JAM-B) is found between Sertoli cells at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) as well as between Sertoli and germ cells at the apical ectoplasmic specializations (ES) in the testis. The expression of JAM-B is tightly regulated to modulate the passage of spermatocytes across the BTB as well as the release of mature spermatozoa from the seminiferous epithelium. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) family is implicated in the regulation of testicular cell junction dynamics during spermatogenesis. This study aims to investigate the effects of TGF-β3 on the expression of JAM-B as well as the underlying mechanisms on how TGF-β3 regulates JAM-B expression to facilitate the disassembly of the BTB and apical ES. Our results revealed that TGF-β3 suppresses JAM-B at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. Inhibitor, siRNA knockdown and co-immunoprecipitation have shown that TGF-β3 induces JAM-B protein degradation via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Immunofluorescence staining further confirmed that blockage of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway could abrogate TGF-β3-induced loss of JAM-B at the cell-cell interface. siRNA knockdown and immunofluorescence staining also demonstrated that activation of Smad signaling is required for TGF-β3-induced JAM-B protein degradation. In addition, TGF-β3 reduces JAM-B mRNA levels, at least in part, via post-transcriptional regulation. mRNA stability assay has confirmed that TGF-β3 promotes the degradation of JAM-B transcript and TGF-β3-mediated mRNA destabilization requires the activation of ERK1/2 and p54 JNK signal cascades. Taken together, TGF-β3 significantly downregulates JAM-B expression via post-transcriptional and post-translational modulation and results in the disruption of BTB and apical ES.

  17. Apical membrane permeability of MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Rivers, R L; McAteer, J A; Clendenon, J L; Connors, B A; Evan, A P; Williams, J C

    1996-07-01

    The osmotic water permeability (Pf) and permeability to nonelectrolytes were determined for the apical membrane of clonal strain Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) C12 cells cultured as cysts with the apical membrane facing the surrounding medium. Pf and solute permeabilities were calculated from the rate of volume change of cysts by digitizing images at 1-s intervals after instantaneous osmotic challenge. Image measurement was fully automated with the use of a program that separated the image of the cyst from the background by using adaptive intensity thresholding and shape analysis. Pf, calculated by curve fitting to the volume loss data, averaged 2.4 +/- 0.1 micron/s and was increased by addition of amphotericin B. The energy of activation for Pf was high (16.3 kcal/mol), and forskolin (50 microM) had no effect on Pf. Two populations of MDCK cysts were studied: those with two to three cells and those that appeared to be composed of only one cell. The Pf of multicell cysts was the same as single cell cysts, suggesting that paracellular water flow is not significant. Solute permeability was measured using paired osmotic challenges (sucrose and test solute) on the same cyst. Urea permeability was not different from zero, whereas the permeabilities of acetamide and formamide were consistent with their relative oil-water partition coefficients. Our data are similar to values from studies on the permeability properties of vesicles of water-tight epithelial apical membrane. The combination of the unique model of MDCK apical-out cysts and fully automated data analysis enabled determination of apical membrane permeability in intact epithelial cells with high precision.

  18. The Impact of Apical Patency in the Success of Endodontic Treatment of Necrotic Teeth with Apical Periodontitis: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ricardo; Ferrari, Carlos Henrique; Back, Eduardo; Comparin, Daniel; Tomazinho, Luiz Fernando; Vansan, Luiz Pascoal

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of soft tissue or dentinal remnants in the apical region is a common event that can cause blockage of root canals. This event can be avoided if apical patency is performed during the root canal shaping procedures. However, there is no consensus on the role of apical patency in relation to the success of endodontic treatment of necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to conduct a brief review on the role of apical patency in guaranteeing the success of endodontic treatments of necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis considering two other key points; the root canal anatomy and microbiology.

  19. Organization and Dynamics of the Aspergillus nidulans Golgi during Apical Extension and Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Pantazopoulou, Areti

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans hyphae grow exclusively by apical extension. Golgi equivalents (GEs) labeled with mRFP-tagged PHOSBP domain form a markedly polarized, dynamic network of ring-shaped and fenestrated cisternae that remains intact during “closed” mitosis. mRFP-PHOSBP GEs advance associated with the growing apex where secretion predominates but do not undergo long-distance movement toward the tip that could account for their polarization. mRFP-PHOSBP GEs overlap with the trans-Golgi resident Sec7 but do not colocalize with also polarized accretions of the early Golgi marker GrhAGrh1-GFP, indicating that early and late Golgi membranes segregate spatially. AnSec23-GFP ER exit sites (ERES) are numerous, relatively static foci localizing across the entire cell. However, their density is greatest near the tip, correlating with predominance of early and trans-Golgi elements in this region. Whereas GrhA-GFP structures and ERES reach the apical dome, mRFP-PHOSBP GEs are excluded from this region, which contains the endosome dynein loading zone. After latrunculin-mediated F-actin disruption, mRFP-PHOSBP GEs fragment and, like AnSec23-GFP ERES, depolarize. Brefeldin A transiently collapses late and early GEs into distinct aggregates containing Sec7/mRFP-PHOSBP and GrhA-GFP, respectively, temporarily arresting apical extension. Rapid growth reinitiates after washout, correlating with reacquisition of the normal Golgi organization that, we conclude, is required for apical extension. PMID:19692566

  20. Structural and functional regulation of tight junctions by RhoA and Rac1 small GTPases.

    PubMed

    Jou, T S; Schneeberger, E E; Nelson, W J

    1998-07-13

    Tight junctions (TJ) govern ion and solute diffusion through the paracellular space (gate function), and restrict mixing of membrane proteins and lipids between membrane domains (fence function) of polarized epithelial cells. We examined roles of the RhoA and Rac1 GTPases in regulating TJ structure and function in MDCK cells using the tetracycline repressible transactivator to regulate RhoAV14, RhoAN19, Rac1V12, and Rac1N17 expression. Both constitutively active and dominant negative RhoA or Rac1 perturbed TJ gate function (transepithelial electrical resistance, tracer diffusion) in a dose-dependent and reversible manner. Freeze-fracture EM and immunofluoresence microscopy revealed abnormal TJ strand morphology and protein (occludin, ZO-1) localization in RhoAV14 and Rac1V12 cells. However, TJ strand morphology and protein localization appeared normal in RhoAN19 and Rac1N17 cells. All mutant GTPases disrupted the fence function of the TJ (interdomain diffusion of a fluorescent lipid), but targeting and organization of a membrane protein in the apical membrane were unaffected. Expression levels and protein complexes of occludin and ZO-1 appeared normal in all mutant cells, although ZO-1 was more readily solubilized from RhoAV14-expressing cells with Triton X-100. These results show that RhoA and Rac1 regulate gate and fence functions of the TJ, and play a role in the spatial organization of TJ proteins at the apex of the lateral membrane.

  1. Apical localization of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors is independent of extended synaptotagmins in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Maria Jimena; Oliveira, André G; Schroeder, Lena K; Allgeyer, Edward S; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Nathanson, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts) are a recently identified family of proteins that tether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the plasma membrane (PM) in part by conferring regulation of cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) at these contact sites (Cell, 2013). However, the mechanism by which E-Syts link this tethering to Ca2+ signaling is unknown. Ca2+ waves in polarized epithelia are initiated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP3Rs), and these waves begin in the apical region because InsP3Rs are targeted to the ER adjacent to the apical membrane. In this study we investigated whether E-Syts are responsible for this targeting. Primary rat hepatocytes were used as a model system, because a single InsP3R isoform (InsP3R-II) is tethered to the peri-apical ER in these cells. Additionally, it has been established in hepatocytes that the apical localization of InsP3Rs is responsible for Ca2+ waves and secretion and is disrupted in disease states in which secretion is impaired. We found that rat hepatocytes express two of the three identified E-Syts (E-Syt1 and E-Syt2). Individual or simultaneous siRNA knockdown of these proteins did not alter InsP3R-II expression levels, apical localization or average InsP3R-II cluster size. Moreover, apical secretion of the organic anion 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) was not changed in cells lacking E-Syts but was reduced in cells in which cytosolic Ca2+ was buffered. These data provide evidence that E-Syts do not participate in the targeting of InsP3Rs to the apical region. Identifying tethers that bring InsP3Rs to the apical region remains an important question, since mis-targeting of InsP3Rs leads to impaired secretory activity.

  2. Microbiome in the Apical Root Canal System of Teeth with Post-Treatment Apical Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, José F.; Antunes, Henrique S.; Rôças, Isabela N.; Rachid, Caio T. C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bacteria present in the apical root canal system are directly involved with the pathogenesis of post-treatment apical periodontitis. This study used a next-generation sequencing approach to identify the bacterial taxa occurring in cryopulverized apical root samples from root canal-treated teeth with post-treatment disease. Methods Apical root specimens obtained during periradicular surgery of ten adequately treated teeth with persistent apical periodontitis were cryogenically ground. DNA was extracted from the powder and the microbiome was characterized on the basis of the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene by using paired-end sequencing on Illumina MiSeq device. Results All samples were positive for the presence of bacterial DNA. Bacterial taxa were mapped to 11 phyla and 103 genera composed by 538 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 3% of dissimilarity. Over 85% of the sequences belonged to 4 phyla: Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and Actinobacteria. In general, these 4 phyla accounted for approximately 80% of the distinct OTUs found in the apical root samples. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in 6/10 samples. Fourteen genera had representatives identified in all cases. Overall, the genera Fusobacterium and Pseudomonas were the most dominant. Enterococcus was found in 4 cases, always in relatively low abundance. Conclusions This study showed a highly complex bacterial community in the apical root canal system of adequately treated teeth with persistent apical periodontitis. This suggests that this disease is characterized by multispecies bacterial communities and has a heterogeneous etiology, because the community composition largely varied from case to case. PMID:27689802

  3. Microbiome in the Apical Root Canal System of Teeth with Post-Treatment Apical Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Antunes, Henrique S; Rôças, Isabela N; Rachid, Caio T C C; Alves, Flávio R F

    Bacteria present in the apical root canal system are directly involved with the pathogenesis of post-treatment apical periodontitis. This study used a next-generation sequencing approach to identify the bacterial taxa occurring in cryopulverized apical root samples from root canal-treated teeth with post-treatment disease. Apical root specimens obtained during periradicular surgery of ten adequately treated teeth with persistent apical periodontitis were cryogenically ground. DNA was extracted from the powder and the microbiome was characterized on the basis of the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene by using paired-end sequencing on Illumina MiSeq device. All samples were positive for the presence of bacterial DNA. Bacterial taxa were mapped to 11 phyla and 103 genera composed by 538 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 3% of dissimilarity. Over 85% of the sequences belonged to 4 phyla: Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and Actinobacteria. In general, these 4 phyla accounted for approximately 80% of the distinct OTUs found in the apical root samples. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in 6/10 samples. Fourteen genera had representatives identified in all cases. Overall, the genera Fusobacterium and Pseudomonas were the most dominant. Enterococcus was found in 4 cases, always in relatively low abundance. This study showed a highly complex bacterial community in the apical root canal system of adequately treated teeth with persistent apical periodontitis. This suggests that this disease is characterized by multispecies bacterial communities and has a heterogeneous etiology, because the community composition largely varied from case to case.

  4. Establishing Apical Patency and its Effect on Endodontic Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    canal space and periodontal ligament. Establishing apical patency is controversial with only 50% of dental programs in the United States teaching the... periodontal ligament (PDL) (1) where a small file can passively continue through the apical foramen (2). Establishing apical patency is...teeth with apical periodontitis that will eventually heal demonstrate signs of healing at 1 year follow-up, and almost 50% are completely healed

  5. Magi Is Associated with the Par Complex and Functions Antagonistically with Bazooka to Regulate the Apical Polarity Complex.

    PubMed

    Padash Barmchi, Mojgan; Samarasekera, Gayathri; Gilbert, Mary; Auld, Vanessa J; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian MAGI proteins play important roles in the maintenance of adherens and tight junctions. The MAGI family of proteins contains modular domains such as WW and PDZ domains necessary for scaffolding of membrane receptors and intracellular signaling components. Loss of MAGI leads to reduced junction stability while overexpression of MAGI can lead to increased adhesion and stabilization of epithelial morphology. However, how Magi regulates junction assembly in epithelia is largely unknown. We investigated the single Drosophila homologue of Magi to study the in vivo role of Magi in epithelial development. Magi is localized at the adherens junction and forms a complex with the polarity proteins, Par3/Bazooka and aPKC. We generated a Magi null mutant and found that Magi null mutants were viable with no detectable morphological defects even though the Magi protein is highly conserved with vertebrate Magi homologues. However, overexpression of Magi resulted in the displacement of Baz/Par3 and aPKC and lead to an increase in the level of PIP3. Interestingly, we found that Magi and Baz functioned in an antagonistic manner to regulate the localization of the apical polarity complex. Maintaining the balance between the level of Magi and Baz is an important determinant of the levels and localization of apical polarity complex.

  6. Gastrointestinal mucositis: the role of MMP-tight junction interactions in tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Dasooqi, Noor; Wardill, Hannah R; Gibson, Rachel J

    2014-07-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer causes significant gut toxicity known as mucositis. The pathogenesis of mucositis is ill defined. Recent clinical research guidelines have highlighted epithelial junctional complexes as emerging targets within mucositis research. Given the robust biological evidence linking tight junctions and matrix metalloproteinases, key mediators of mucositis, tight junction proteins have received significant attention. Despite this, the link between tight junctions, matrix metalloproteinases and mucositis development is yet to be established. This critical review therefore aims to describe the role of matrix metalloproteinases in mucositis, and how matrix metalloproteinase-dependent tight junction disruption may contribute to the pathobiology of mucositis.

  7. Endocytosis and Recycling of Tight Junction Proteins in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Utech, Markus; Mennigen, Rudolf; Bruewer, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    A critical function of the epithelial lining is to form a barrier that separates luminal contents from the underlying interstitium. This barrier function is primarily regulated by the apical junctional complex (AJC) consisting of tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) and is compromised under inflammatory conditions. In intestinal epithelial cells, proinflammatory cytokines, for example, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), induce internalization of TJ proteins by endocytosis. Endocytosed TJ proteins are passed into early and recycling endosomes, suggesting the involvement of recycling of internalized TJ proteins. This review summarizes mechanisms by which TJ proteins under inflammatory conditions are internalized in intestinal epithelial cells and point out comparable mechanism in nonintestinal epithelial cells. PMID:20011071

  8. Myosins in cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Katy C.; Cheney, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The development of cell-cell junctions was a fundamental step in metazoan evolution, and human health depends on the formation and function of cell junctions. Although it has long been known that actin and conventional myosin have important roles in cell junctions, research has begun to reveal the specific functions of the different forms of conventional myosin. Exciting new data also reveals that a growing number of unconventional myosins have important roles in cell junctions. Experiments showing that cell junctions act as mechanosensors have also provided new impetus to understand the functions of myosins and the forces they exert. In this review we will summarize recent developments on the roles of myosins in cell junctions. PMID:22954512

  9. Fat1 interacts with Fat4 to regulate neural tube closure, neural progenitor proliferation and apical constriction during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Badouel, Caroline; Zander, Mark A; Liscio, Nicole; Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Sopko, Richelle; Coyaud, Etienne; Raught, Brian; Miller, Freda D; McNeill, Helen

    2015-08-15

    Mammalian brain development requires coordination between neural precursor proliferation, differentiation and cellular organization to create the intricate neuronal networks of the adult brain. Here, we examined the role of the atypical cadherins Fat1 and Fat4 in this process. We show that mutation of Fat1 in mouse embryos causes defects in cranial neural tube closure, accompanied by an increase in the proliferation of cortical precursors and altered apical junctions, with perturbations in apical constriction and actin accumulation. Similarly, knockdown of Fat1 in cortical precursors by in utero electroporation leads to overproliferation of radial glial precursors. Fat1 interacts genetically with the related cadherin Fat4 to regulate these processes. Proteomic analysis reveals that Fat1 and Fat4 bind different sets of actin-regulating and junctional proteins. In vitro data suggest that Fat1 and Fat4 form cis-heterodimers, providing a mechanism for bringing together their diverse interactors. We propose a model in which Fat1 and Fat4 binding coordinates distinct pathways at apical junctions to regulate neural progenitor proliferation, neural tube closure and apical constriction.

  10. Fat1 interacts with Fat4 to regulate neural tube closure, neural progenitor proliferation and apical constriction during mouse brain development

    PubMed Central

    Badouel, Caroline; Zander, Mark A.; Liscio, Nicole; Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Sopko, Richelle; Coyaud, Etienne; Raught, Brian; Miller, Freda D.; McNeill, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian brain development requires coordination between neural precursor proliferation, differentiation and cellular organization to create the intricate neuronal networks of the adult brain. Here, we examined the role of the atypical cadherins Fat1 and Fat4 in this process. We show that mutation of Fat1 in mouse embryos causes defects in cranial neural tube closure, accompanied by an increase in the proliferation of cortical precursors and altered apical junctions, with perturbations in apical constriction and actin accumulation. Similarly, knockdown of Fat1 in cortical precursors by in utero electroporation leads to overproliferation of radial glial precursors. Fat1 interacts genetically with the related cadherin Fat4 to regulate these processes. Proteomic analysis reveals that Fat1 and Fat4 bind different sets of actin-regulating and junctional proteins. In vitro data suggest that Fat1 and Fat4 form cis-heterodimers, providing a mechanism for bringing together their diverse interactors. We propose a model in which Fat1 and Fat4 binding coordinates distinct pathways at apical junctions to regulate neural progenitor proliferation, neural tube closure and apical constriction. PMID:26209645

  11. Human Exoproteome in Acute Apical Abscesses.

    PubMed

    Alfenas, Cristiane F; Mendes, Tiago A O; Ramos, Humberto J O; Bruckner, Fernanda P; Antunes, Henrique S; Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F; Provenzano, José C

    2017-09-01

    An acute apical abscess is a severe response of the host to massive invasion of the periapical tissues by bacteria from infected root canals. Although many studies have investigated the microbiota involved in the process, information on the host factors released during abscess formation is scarce. The purpose of this study was to describe the human exoproteome in samples from acute apical abscesses. Fourteen pus samples were obtained by aspiration from patients with an acute apical abscess. Samples were subjected to protein digestion, and the tryptic peptides were analyzed using a mass spectrometer and ion trap instrument. The human proteins identified in this analysis were classified into different functional categories. A total of 303 proteins were identified. Most of these proteins were involved in cellular and metabolic processes. Immune system proteins were also very frequent and included immunoglobulins, S100 proteins, complement proteins, and heat shock proteins. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil proteins were also commonly detected, including myeloperoxidases, defensins, elastases, and gelatinases. Iron-sequestering proteins including transferrin and lactoferrin/lactotransferrin were found in many samples. The human exoproteome included a wide variety of proteins related to cellular processes, metabolism, and immune response. Proteins involved in different mechanisms against infection, tissue damage, and protection against tissue damage were identified. Knowledge of the presence and function of these proteins using proteomics provides an insight into the complex host-pathogen relationship, the host antimicrobial strategies to fight infections, and the disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor Mimicking Apical Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Makoto; Kiho, Kazuki; Sekine, Genta; Ohta, Takahisa; Matsubara, Makoto; Yoshida, Takakazu; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Tanuma, Jun-ichi; Sumitomo, Shinichiro

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs) are rare. IMTs of the head and neck occur in all age groups, from neonates to old age, with the highest incidence occurring in childhood and early adulthood. An IMT has been defined as a histologically distinctive lesion of uncertain behavior. This article describes an unusual case of IMT mimicking apical periodontitis in the mandible of a 42-year-old man. At first presentation, the patient showed spontaneous pain and percussion pain at teeth #28 to 30, which continued after initial endodontic treatment. Panoramic radiography revealed a radiolucent lesion at the site. Cone-beam computed tomographic imaging showed osteolytic lesions, suggesting an aggressive neoplasm requiring incisional biopsy. Histopathological examination indicated an IMT. The lesion was removed en bloc under general anesthesia, and the patient manifested no clinical evidence of recurrence for 24 months. Lesions of nonendodontic origin should be included in the differential diagnosis of apical periodontitis. Every available diagnostic tool should be used to confirm the diagnosis. Cone-beam computed tomographic imaging is very helpful for differential diagnosis in IMTs mimicking apical periodontitis.

  13. Breast cancer resistance protein regulates apical ectoplasmic specialization dynamics stage specifically in the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D; Wong, Elissa W P; Cheng, C Yan

    2013-04-01

    Drug transporters determine the bioavailability of drugs in the testis behind the blood-testis barrier (BTB). Thus, they are crucial for male contraceptive development if these drugs (e.g., adjudin) exert their effects behind the BTB. Herein breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), an efflux drug transporter, was found to be expressed by both Sertoli and germ cells. Interestingly, Bcrp was not a component of the Sertoli cell BTB. Instead, it was highly expressed by peritubular myoid cells at the tunica propria and also endothelial cells of the microvessels in the interstitium at all stages of the epithelial cycle. Unexpectedly, Bcrp was found to be expressed at the Sertoli-step 18-19 spermatid interface but limited to stage VI-early VIII tubules, and an integrated component of the apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES). Apparently, Bcrp is being used by late-stage spermatids to safeguard their completion of spermiogenesis by preventing harmful drugs to enter these cells while they transform to spermatozoa. Also, the association of Bcrp with actin, Eps8 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8, an actin barbed end capping and bundling protein), and Arp3 (actin-related protein 3, a component of the Arp2/3 complex known to induce branched actin polymerization) at the apical ES suggest that Bcrp may be involved in regulating the organization of actin filament bundles at the site. Indeed, a knockdown of Bcrp by RNAi in the testis perturbed the apical ES function, disrupting spermatid polarity and adhesion. In summary, Bcrp is a regulator of the F-actin-rich apical ES in the testis.

  14. DIFFERENTIATION OF THE JUNCTIONAL COMPLEX OF SURFACE CELLS IN THE DEVELOPING FUNDULUS BLASTODERM

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Thomas L.; Trinkaus, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The structure of the junctional complex between surface cells was investigated in blastula, mid gastrula, late gastrula, and early embryo of the teleost fish Fundulus heteroclitus. In blastulae, the intercellular complex is simple and consists of an apical region where the adjacent membranes are closely apposed (40–60 A) and in places touch, an intermediate zone with a wider intercellular space (> 100 A), and incipient desmosomes. In gastrulae, there are frequent points of fusion of membranes along the apical zone of the complex. Dilatations and an increased number of desmosomes in different stages of development are found along the intermediate zone. In mid gastrula, a close or gap junction with an intercellular space of 20 A occurs below the level of the desmosomes. In late gastrula, the gap junction is reduced in extent and desmosomes are better developed. In the early embryo, the basic organization of the complex is the same, although the deeply situated close junctions are no longer apparent and desmosomes and their associated system of filaments are well developed. At this time, the junctional complex is comparable to that of many epithelia and consists of an apical zonula occludens, a short zonula adherens, and deeply situated maculae adherentes. PMID:5545331

  15. Gap junctions/hemichannels modulate interkinetic nuclear migration in the forebrain precursors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiuxin; Hashimoto-Torii, Kazue; Torii, Masaaki; Ding, Chen; Rakic, Pasko

    2010-01-01

    During mitotic division in the telencephalic proliferative ventricular zone (VZ), the nuclei of the neural precursors move basally away from the ventricular surface for DNA synthesis, and apically return to the surface for mitotic division; a process known as interkinetic migration or “to-and-fro” nuclear translocation. The cell, which remains attached to the ventricular surface, either continues cycling, or exits the cycle and migrates to the subventricular zone (SVZ) or the developing cortical plate. While gap junctions/hemichannels are known to modulate DNA synthesis via Ca2+ waves, the role of Ca+ oscillations and the mechanism of nuclear translocation in the VZ precursors are unclear. Here we provide evidence that during apical nuclear migration, VZ precursors display dynamic spontaneous Ca2+ transients, which depend on functional gap junctions/hemichannels via ATP release and Ca2+ mobilizing messenger diffusion. Furthermore, we found that blocking gap junctions/hemichannels or shRNA mediated knockdown of connexin 43 (Cx43) retards the apically directed interkinetic nuclear migration accompanied with changes in the nuclear length/width ratio. In addition, we demonstrated that blocking functional gap junctions/hemichannels induces phosphorylation of small GTPase cdc42 in the VZ precursors. The basal phase of interkinetic migration is much slower and appears to be mediated passively by mechanical forces after cell division. Our findings indicate that functional interference with gap junctions/hemichannels during embryonic development may lead to abnormal corticogenesis and dysfunction of the cerebral cortex in adult organisms. PMID:20335455

  16. Architecture of apical dendrites in the murine neocortex: dual apical dendritic systems.

    PubMed

    Escobar, M I; Pimienta, H; Caviness, V S; Jacobson, M; Crandall, J E; Kosik, K S

    1986-04-01

    A monoclonal antibody (5F9) against microtubule-associated protein 2 is a selective and sensitive marker for neocortical dendrites in the mouse. The marker stains all dendrites. It affords a particularly comprehensive picture of the patterns of arrangements of apical dendrites which are most intensely stained with this antibody. Dual systems of apical dendrites arise from the polymorphic neurons of layer VI, on the one hand, and the pyramidal neurons of layers II-V, on the other. Terminal arborization of the former is concentrated principally at the interface of layers V and IV, while that of the latter is in the molecular layer. Apical dendrites of both systems are grouped into fascicles. In supragranular layers and in upper layer VI-lower layer V, where apical dendrites are most abundant, the fascicles coalesce into septa. These generate a honeycomb-like pattern, subdividing these cortical levels into columnar spaces of approximately 20-40 micron diameter. At the level of layer IV, where the number of apical dendrites is greatly reduced, the fascicles are isolated bundles. These bundles have the form of circular, elliptical or rectangular columns in the primary somatosensory, temporal and frontal regions, respectively. Those in the barrel field are preferentially concentrated in the sides of barrels and the interbarrel septa. The configurations of the dendritic fascicles, particularly the midcortical bundles, may conform to the spatial configuration of investing axons of interneurons.

  17. Internalization of adhesion junction proteins and their association with recycling endosome marker proteins in rat seminiferous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Young, J'Nelle S; Takai, Yoshimi; Kojic, Katarina L; Vogl, A Wayne

    2012-03-01

    Tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs) are elaborate cytoskeleton-related structures that are formed in association with intercellular junctions in the seminiferous epithelium. They consist of a cylindrical double-membrane core composed of the plasma membranes of the two attached cells, cuffed by a dendritic network of actin filaments. TBCs are proposed to be subcellular machines that internalize intercellular junctions during the extensive junction remodeling that occurs during spermatogenesis. At the apical sites of attachment between Sertoli cells and spermatids, junction disassembly is part of the sperm release mechanism. In this study, we used immunological probes to explore junction internalization and recycling at apical TBCs in the rat seminiferous epithelium. We demonstrate that β1-integrin and nectin 2 were concentrated at the ends of TBCs and for the first time show that the early endosome marker RAB5A was also distinctly localized at the ends of TBCs that appear to be the 'bulbar' regions of the complexes. Significantly, we also demonstrate that the 'long-loop' recycling endosome marker RAB11A was co-distributed with nectin 2 at junctions with early spermatids deeper in the epithelium. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that TBCs associated with late spermatids internalize adhesion junctions and also indicate that some of the internalized junction proteins may be recycled to form junctions with the next generation of spermatids.

  18. Pleated septate junctions in leech photoreceptors: ultrastructure, arrangement of septa, gate and fence functions.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrenner, S; Walz, B

    1998-08-01

    The leech photoreceptor forms a unicellular epithelium: every cell surrounds an extracellular "vacuole" that is connected to the remaining extracellular space via narrow clefts containing pleated septate junctions. We analyzed the complete structural layout of all septa within the junctional complex in elastic brightfield stereo electron micrographs of semithin serial sections from photoreceptors infiltrated with colloidal lanthanum. The septa form tortuous interseptal corridors that are spatially continuous, and open ended basally and apically. Individual septa seem to be impermeable to lanthanum; interseptal corridors form the only diffusional pathway for this ion. The junctions form no diffusion barrier for the electron-dense tracer Ba2+, but they hinder the diffusion of various hydrophilic fluorescent dyes as demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) of live cells. Even those dyes that penetrate gap junctions do not diffuse beyond the septate junctions. The aqueous diffusion pathway within the septal corridors is, therefore, less permeable than the gap-junctional pore. Our morphological results combined with published electrophysiological data suggest that the septa themselves are not completely tight for small physiologically relevant ions. We also examined, by CLSM, whether the septate junctions create a permeability barrier for the lateral diffusion of fluorescent lipophilic dyes incorporated into the peripheral membrane domain. AFC16, claimed to remain in the outer membrane leaflet, does not diffuse beyond the junctional region, whereas DiIC16, claimed to flip-flop, does. Thus, pleated septate junctions, like vertebrate tight junctions, contribute to the maintenance of cell polarity.

  19. Experimental fluid dynamics of transventricular apical aortic cannulation.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Yanaoka, Hideki; Inamura, Takao; Minakawa, Masahito; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2010-03-01

    To clarify the flow pattern from a transventricular apical aortic cannula, hydrodynamic analysis of transventricular apical aortic cannulation (apical cannulation) was performed using particle-image velocimetry in a glass aortic model. Simulated apical cannulation using a 7-mm Sarns Soft-Flow cannula and the newly developed 7-mm apical aortic cannula was compared with standard aortic cannulation. The flow-velocity, streamline, and distribution of magnitude of the strain rate tensor (function of shear stress) were analyzed. Streamline analysis revealed a steady and organized flow profile in apical cannulation as compared with that in standard aortic cannulation. The magnitude of the strain rate tensor decreased within a few centimeters from the exit of the apical cannula.

  20. Effect of alcohols on gastric and small intestinal apical membrane integrity and fluidity.

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, H J; Wilkes, J M; Hirst, B H

    1988-01-01

    Duodenal and jejunal brush border membrane vesicle integrity was studied after in vitro treatment of rabbit tissue with ethyl, benzyl or octyl alcohol. The effects of the alcohols on gastric parietal cell apical and microsomal membrane vesicle integrity was also studied. Membrane vesicle integrity was determined from the enclosed volume of the vesicle preparations, measured as [14C]glucose space at equilibrium. Exposure of vesicles to the three alcohols caused concentration dependent decreases in enclosed volume. The rank order of potency of the alcohol was octyl greater than benzyl greater than ethyl. Concentrations greater than or equal to 10 mM benzyl alcohol significantly reduced the enclosed volume of duodenal or jejunal vesicles; jejunal vesicles were disrupted by 625 mM ethanol, whereas 2 M ethanol was required to disrupt the duodenal vesicles. Gastric apical membrane integrity was reduced with 0.25 M ethanol, the vesicles being approximately an order of magnitude more sensitive to ethanol than gross estimates of gastric mucosal damage, but 1 M ethanol was required to significantly damage gastric microsomes. All concentrations of benzyl or octyl alcohol tested (greater than or equal to 5 mM) reduced the enclosed volume of both gastric apical membrane vesicles and gastric microsomes. As determined by shrink-swell techniques, benzyl alcohol permeated duodenal vesicles at a faster rate than NH4Cl (apparent rate constant of 9.89 (0.71) X 10(-3)s-1 compared with 4.48 (0.23) X 10(-3)s-1). Therefore, reductions in enclosed volume in response to alcohol treatment could not be explained by alcohol induced osmotic shrinkage. The enclosed volume of the vesicles after alcohol treatment was negatively correlated with membrane fluidity suggesting a common causal effect, the increased fluidity increasing membrane fragility. Duodenal vesicles were more resistant to disruption by the alcohols compared with gastric and jejunal vesicles. PMID:3220304

  1. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions.

    PubMed

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the 'apical junctional complex-AJC' with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the 'Junctional Adhesion Molecules' (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers.

  2. Minimal Apical Enlargement for Penetration of Irrigants to the Apical Third of Root Canal System: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, P; Krishna, Amaravadi Gopi; Srinivas, Siva; Reddy, E Sujayeendranatha; Battu, Someshwar; Aravelli, Swathi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine minimal apical enlargement for irrigant penetration into apical third of root canal system using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: Distobuccal canals of 40 freshly extracted human maxillary first molar teeth were instrumented using crown-down technique. The teeth were divided into four test groups according to size of their master apical file (MAF) (#20, #25, #30, #35 0.06% taper), and two control groups. After final irrigation, removal of debris and smear layer from the apical third of root canals was determined under a SEM. Data was analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: Smear layer removal in apical third for MAF size #30 was comparable with that of the control group (size #40). Conclusion: Minimal apical enlargement for penetration of irrigants to the apical third of root canal system is #30 size. PMID:26124608

  3. The effect of irrigation solutions on the apical sealing ability in different root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    Bodrumlu, Emre; Parlak, Esra; Bodrumlu, Ebru Hazar

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of three root canal irrigation solutions on the apical sealing ability of three root canal obturation materials: gutta-percha/AH plus or MM-seal and Resilon/Epiphany SE. A total of 100 teeth with single straight root canals were randomly divided into three equal groups of 30 samples each, with the other 10 teeth (5 positive and 5 negative) used as controls. Each irrigation group was divided into three groups according to the use of three different root canal obturation materials (n = 10): Gutta-percha with AH plus or MM-seal, Resilon with Epiphany SE. The crowns were removed at the cementoenamel junction with a diamond disc under water coolant. The root canals were prepared using step-back technique and irrigation with either sodium hypochlorite (2.5%), chlorhexidine (2%), or MTAD solutions. The roots were obturated with lateral condensation technique using one of the obturation materials. The root surfaces was coated with two layer nail varnish (except apex), placed in 2% methylene blue dye solution, and centrifuged at 3,000 rpm for 5 minutes. Irrigation solutions affected the apical sealing ability of all the sealers. The chlorhexidine irrigation solution exhibited higher apical leakage values than did MTAD and NaOCl in all canal sealers, although the MTAD irrigation solution groups showed the least leakage values. The apical sealing ability of AH plus, Epiphany SE and MM-seal root canal sealers decreased when the chlorhexidine was used as an irrigation solution.

  4. Multiple motifs regulate apical sorting of p75 via a mechanism that involves dimerization and higher-order oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Youker, Robert T.; Bruns, Jennifer R.; Costa, Simone A.; Rbaibi, Youssef; Lanni, Frederick; Kashlan, Ossama B.; Teng, Haibing; Weisz, Ora A.

    2013-01-01

    The sorting signals that direct proteins to the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells are complex and can include posttranslational modifications, such as N- and O-linked glycosylation. Efficient apical sorting of the neurotrophin receptor p75 is dependent on its O-glycosylated membrane proximal stalk, but how this domain mediates targeting is unknown. Protein oligomerization or clustering has been suggested as a common step in the segregation of all apical proteins. Like many apical proteins, p75 forms dimers, and we hypothesized that formation of higher-order clusters mediated by p75 dimerization and interactions of the stalk facilitate its apical sorting. Using fluorescence fluctuation techniques (photon-counting histogram and number and brightness analyses) to study p75 oligomerization status in vivo, we found that wild-type p75–green fluorescent protein forms clusters in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) but not at the plasma membrane. Disruption of either the dimerization motif or the stalk domain impaired both clustering and polarized delivery. Manipulation of O-glycan processing or depletion of multiple galectins expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells had no effect on p75 sorting, suggesting that the stalk domain functions as a structural prop to position other determinants in the lumenal domain of p75 for oligomerization. Additionally, a p75 mutant with intact dimerization and stalk motifs but with a dominant basolateral sorting determinant (Δ250 mutant) did not form oligomers, consistent with a requirement for clustering in apical sorting. Artificially enhancing dimerization restored clustering to the Δ250 mutant but was insufficient to reroute this mutant to the apical surface. Together these studies demonstrate that clustering in the TGN is required for normal biosynthetic apical sorting of p75 but is not by itself sufficient to reroute a protein to the apical surface in the presence of a strong basolateral sorting determinant. Our studies

  5. Multiple motifs regulate apical sorting of p75 via a mechanism that involves dimerization and higher-order oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Youker, Robert T; Bruns, Jennifer R; Costa, Simone A; Rbaibi, Youssef; Lanni, Frederick; Kashlan, Ossama B; Teng, Haibing; Weisz, Ora A

    2013-06-01

    The sorting signals that direct proteins to the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells are complex and can include posttranslational modifications, such as N- and O-linked glycosylation. Efficient apical sorting of the neurotrophin receptor p75 is dependent on its O-glycosylated membrane proximal stalk, but how this domain mediates targeting is unknown. Protein oligomerization or clustering has been suggested as a common step in the segregation of all apical proteins. Like many apical proteins, p75 forms dimers, and we hypothesized that formation of higher-order clusters mediated by p75 dimerization and interactions of the stalk facilitate its apical sorting. Using fluorescence fluctuation techniques (photon-counting histogram and number and brightness analyses) to study p75 oligomerization status in vivo, we found that wild-type p75-green fluorescent protein forms clusters in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) but not at the plasma membrane. Disruption of either the dimerization motif or the stalk domain impaired both clustering and polarized delivery. Manipulation of O-glycan processing or depletion of multiple galectins expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells had no effect on p75 sorting, suggesting that the stalk domain functions as a structural prop to position other determinants in the lumenal domain of p75 for oligomerization. Additionally, a p75 mutant with intact dimerization and stalk motifs but with a dominant basolateral sorting determinant (Δ250 mutant) did not form oligomers, consistent with a requirement for clustering in apical sorting. Artificially enhancing dimerization restored clustering to the Δ250 mutant but was insufficient to reroute this mutant to the apical surface. Together these studies demonstrate that clustering in the TGN is required for normal biosynthetic apical sorting of p75 but is not by itself sufficient to reroute a protein to the apical surface in the presence of a strong basolateral sorting determinant. Our studies

  6. Five-year longitudinal assessment of the prognosis of apical microsurgery.

    PubMed

    von Arx, Thomas; Jensen, Simon S; Hänni, Stefan; Friedman, Shimon

    2012-05-01

    Apical surgery is an important treatment option for teeth with post-treatment apical periodontitis. Knowledge of the long-term prognosis is necessary when weighing apical surgery against alternative treatments. This study assessed the 5-year outcome of apical surgery and its predictors in a cohort for which the 1-year outcome was previously reported. Apical microsurgery procedures were uniformly performed using SuperEBA (Staident International, Staines, UK) or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) (ProRoot MTA; Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK) root-end fillings or alternatively Retroplast capping (Retroplast Trading, Rorvig, Denmark). Subjects examined at 1 year (n = 191) were invited for the 5-year clinical and radiographic examination. Based on blinded, independent assessment by 3 calibrated examiners, the dichotomous outcome (healed or nonhealed) was determined and associated with patient-, tooth-, and treatment-related variables using logistic regression. At the 5-year follow-up, 9 of 191 teeth were unavailable, 12 of 191 teeth were extracted, and 170 of 191 teeth were examined (87.6% recall rate). A total of 129 of 170 teeth were healed (75.9%) compared with 83.8% at 1 year, and 85.3% were asymptomatic. Two significant outcome predictors were identified: the mesial-distal bone level at ≤ 3 mm versus >3 mm from the cementoenamel junction (78.2% vs 52.9% healed, respectively; odds ratio = 5.10; confidence interval, 1.67-16.21; P < .02) and root-end fillings with ProRoot MTA versus SuperEBA (86.4% vs. 67.3% healed, respectively; odds ratio = 7.65; confidence interval, 2.60-25.27; P < .004). This study suggested that the 5-year prognosis after apical microsurgery was 8% poorer than assessed at 1 year. It also suggested that the prognosis was significantly impacted by the interproximal bone levels at the treated tooth and by the type of root-end filling material used. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. All rights reserved.

  7. δ-Aminolevulinate synthase is required for apical transcellular barrier formation in the skin of the Drosophila larva.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Khaleelulla Saheb; Meyer, Frauke; Vázquez, Angel Vizoso; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Cerdán, Maria Esperanza; Moussian, Bernard

    2012-03-01

    Animals construct a layered skin to prevent dehydration and pathogen entrance. The barrier function of the skin relies on the extensive cross-linking of specialised components. In insects, for instance, epidermal cells produce an apical extracellular cuticle that consists of a network of proteins, chitin and lipids. We have identified mutations in the Drosophila gene coding for the δ-aminolevulinate synthase (Alas) that cause massive water loss. The cuticle of alas mutant larvae detaches from the epidermis and its basal region is frayed suggesting that an Alas dependent pathway is needed to organise the contact between the cuticle and the epidermis and anchor the cuticle to the apical surface of epidermal cells. Concomitantly, reduction of Alas function results in weakening of the extracellular dityrosines network in the cuticle, whereas glutamyl-lysine isopeptide bonds are not affected. The lateral septate junctions of epidermal cells that serve as a paracellular plug are intact, as well. Taken together, we hypothesise that Alas activity, which initiates heme biosynthesis in the mitochondrion, is needed for the formation of a dityrosine-based barrier that confers resistance to the internal hydrostatic pressure protecting both the cuticle from transcellular infiltration of body fluid and the animal from dehydration. We conclude that at least two modules--an apical protein-chitin lattice and the lateral septate junctions, act in parallel to ensure Drosophila skin impermeability.

  8. Indian Ocean Triple Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Tapscott, C.R.; Patriat, P.; Fisher, R.L.; Sclater, J.G.; Hoskins, H.; Parsons, B.

    1980-09-10

    The boundaries of three major plates (Africa, India, and Antarctica) meet in a triple junction in the Indian Ocean near 25 /sup 0/S, 70 /sup 0/E. Using observed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies, we locate the junction to within 5 km and show that it is a ridge-ridge-ridge type. Relative plate motion is N60 /sup 0/E at 50 mm/yr (full rate) across the Central Indian Ridge, N47 /sup 0/E at 60 mm/yr across the Southeast Indian Ridge, and N3 /sup 0/W at 15 mm/yr across te Southwest Indian Ridge; the observed velocity triangle is closed. Poles of instantaneous relative plate motion are determined for all plate pairs. The data in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans are consistent with a rigid African plate without significant internal deformation. Two of the ridges at the triple junction are normal midocean spreading centers with well-defined median valleys. The Southwest Indian Ridge, however, has a peculiar morphology near the triple junction, that of an elongate triangular deep, with the triple junction at its apex. The floor of the deep represents crust formed at the Southwest Indian Ridge, and the morphology is a consequence of the evolution of the triple junction and is similar to that at the Galapagos Triple Junction. Though one cannot determine with precision the stability conditions at the triple junction, the development of the junction over the last 10 m.y. can be mapped, and the topographic expressions of the triple junction traces may be detected on the three plates.

  9. The adherens junction is lost during normal pregnancy but not during ovarian hyperstimulated pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dowland, Samson N; Madawala, Romanthi J; Lindsay, Laura A; Murphy, Christopher R

    2016-03-01

    During early pregnancy in the rat, the luminal uterine epithelial cells (UECs) must transform to a receptive state to permit blastocyst attachment and implantation. The implantation process involves penetration of the epithelial barrier, so it is expected that the transformation of UECs includes alterations in the lateral junctional complex. Previous studies have demonstrated a deepening of the tight junction (zonula occludens) and a reduction in the number of desmosomes (macula adherens) in UECs at the time of implantation. However, the adherens junction (zonula adherens), which is primarily responsible for cell-cell adhesion, has been little studied during early pregnancy. This study investigated the adherens junction in rat UECs during the early stages of normal pregnancy and ovarian hyperstimulated (OH) pregnancy using transmission electron microscopy. The adherens junction is present in UECs at the time of fertilisation, but is lost at the time of blastocyst implantation during normal pregnancy. Interestingly, at the time of implantation after OH, adherens junctions are retained and may impede blastocyst penetration of the epithelium. The adherens junction anchors the actin-based terminal web, which is known to be disrupted in UECs during early pregnancy. However, artificial disruption of the terminal web, using cytochalasin D, did not cause removal of the adherens junction in UECs. This study revealed that adherens junction disassembly occurs during early pregnancy, but that this process does not occur during OH pregnancy. Such disassembly does not appear to depend on the disruption of the terminal web.

  10. In vitro study of the apical microleakage with resilon root canal filling using different final endodontic irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Lahor-Soler, Eduard; Brunet-Llobet, Lluís; Farré, Magí; Pumarola, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Background Endodontic microleakage or microfiltration refers to the percolation of fluids and micro-organisms at the interface of the obturation material and the walls of the root canal system. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare apical microfiltration of Resilon root canal filling by employing three different final irrigant solutions. Material and Methods 128 single-rooted teeth were employed. The crowns were sectioned horizontally at the cemento-enamel junction and instrumented with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 17% EDTA gel to obtain an instrumented 040 apical caliber. An intermediate irrigation was performed with distilled water. The roots were then randomly assigned to three experimental groups with three different final irrigants: (A) 20% citric acid (CA); (B) 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX); and (C) 5.25% NaOCl, plus two control groups (positive and negative). They were then dried, obturated with RealSeal™, and cleared by Robertson’s technique. Apical microleakage was measured by the dye penetration method and assessed with a 4.5x stereomicroscope. Data were statistically analyzed by one way ANOVA and post hoc analysis for multiple comparisons. Results Mean and standard deviations for apical microleakage were: 2% CHX (0.24 mm ± 0.22), 20% CA (0.25 mm ± 0.20), and 5.25% NaOCl (0.87 mm ± 0.32). Significant differences were reported among the group irrigated with NaOCl, CHX and CA (P<0.001). Conclusions A higher rate of apical microleakage was observed when the final irrigation was performed with NaOCl whilst lower rates were reported for CHX and CA. Key words:Apical filtration, endodontic irrigation, resin-based sealers, adhesion, root canal filling. PMID:26155335

  11. Apical parietal pleural holes: what are they?

    PubMed

    Galetta, D; Serra, M; Gossot, D

    2010-06-01

    We report the incidental discovery of an apical pleural abnormality characterized by the presence of pleural holes during video-thoracoscopic surgery for upper limb hyperhidrosis. Patients were 4 males and one female with a median age of 24 years. These pleural anomalies were left sided in all cases with a maximum diameter of 5 mm. One of the defects was double. There was neither air leakage nor water leakage after irrigation. Our hypothesis is that the revealed pleural defect is a precursor of cervical lung hernia.

  12. Exogenous expression of the amino-terminal half of the tight junction protein ZO-3 perturbs junctional complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Wittchen, E S; Haskins, J; Stevenson, B R

    2000-11-13

    The functional characteristics of the tight junction protein ZO-3 were explored through exogenous expression of mutant protein constructs in MDCK cells. Expression of the amino-terminal, PSD95/dlg/ZO-1 domain-containing half of the molecule (NZO-3) delayed the assembly of both tight and adherens junctions induced by calcium switch treatment or brief exposure to the actin-disrupting drug cytochalasin D. Junction formation was monitored by transepithelial resistance measurements and localization of junction-specific proteins by immunofluorescence. The tight junction components ZO-1, ZO-2, endogenous ZO-3, and occludin were mislocalized during the early stages of tight junction assembly. Similarly, the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and beta-catenin were also delayed in their recruitment to the cell membrane, and NZO-3 expression had striking effects on actin cytoskeleton dynamics. NZO-3 expression did not alter expression levels of ZO-1, ZO-2, endogenous ZO-3, occludin, or E-cadherin; however, the amount of Triton X-100-soluble, signaling-active beta-catenin was increased in NZO-3-expressing cells during junction assembly. In vitro binding experiments showed that ZO-1 and actin preferentially bind to NZO-3, whereas both NZO-3 and the carboxy-terminal half of the molecule (CZO-3) contain binding sites for occludin and cingulin. We hypothesize that NZO-3 exerts its dominant-negative effects via a mechanism involving the actin cytoskeleton, ZO-1, and/or beta-catenin.

  13. Exogenous Expression of the Amino-Terminal Half of the Tight Junction Protein Zo-3 Perturbs Junctional Complex Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wittchen, Erika S.; Haskins, Julie; Stevenson, Bruce R.

    2000-01-01

    The functional characteristics of the tight junction protein ZO-3 were explored through exogenous expression of mutant protein constructs in MDCK cells. Expression of the amino-terminal, PSD95/dlg/ZO-1 domain-containing half of the molecule (NZO-3) delayed the assembly of both tight and adherens junctions induced by calcium switch treatment or brief exposure to the actin-disrupting drug cytochalasin D. Junction formation was monitored by transepithelial resistance measurements and localization of junction-specific proteins by immunofluorescence. The tight junction components ZO-1, ZO-2, endogenous ZO-3, and occludin were mislocalized during the early stages of tight junction assembly. Similarly, the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and β-catenin were also delayed in their recruitment to the cell membrane, and NZO-3 expression had striking effects on actin cytoskeleton dynamics. NZO-3 expression did not alter expression levels of ZO-1, ZO-2, endogenous ZO-3, occludin, or E-cadherin; however, the amount of Triton X-100–soluble, signaling-active β-catenin was increased in NZO-3–expressing cells during junction assembly. In vitro binding experiments showed that ZO-1 and actin preferentially bind to NZO-3, whereas both NZO-3 and the carboxy-terminal half of the molecule (CZO-3) contain binding sites for occludin and cingulin. We hypothesize that NZO-3 exerts its dominant-negative effects via a mechanism involving the actin cytoskeleton, ZO-1, and/or β-catenin. PMID:11076967

  14. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... Hormones and Health › Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) EDCs Myth vs. ...

  15. Models and methods for in vitro testing of hepatic gap junctional communication

    PubMed Central

    Willebrords, Joost; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Inherent to their pivotal roles in controlling all aspects of the liver cell life cycle, hepatocellular gap junctions are frequently disrupted upon impairment of the homeostatic balance, as occurs during liver toxicity. Hepatic gap junctions, which are mainly built up by connexin32, are specifically targeted by tumor promoters and epigenetic carcinogens. This renders inhibition of gap junction functionality a suitable indicator for the in vitro detection of nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogenicity. The establishment of a reliable liver gap junction inhibition assay for routine in vitro testing purposes requires a cellular system in which gap junctions are expressed at an in vivo-like level as well as an appropriate technique to probe gap junction activity. Both these models and methods are discussed in the current paper, thereby focusing on connexin32-based gap junctions. PMID:26420514

  16. Unevenness of the apical constriction in human maxillary central incisors.

    PubMed

    Olson, David G; Roberts, Steven; Joyce, Anthony P; Collins, D Edward; McPherson, James C

    2008-02-01

    This study examined the incisoapical extent of the apical constriction in 45 human maxillary central incisors. The null hypothesis was that the apical constriction is a flat ring. Our working hypothesis was that the constriction is actually uneven or "skewed" as it traces a path around the circumference of the canal. Teeth were split and imaged with 25x magnification, and the most apical and coronal limits of the apical constriction were identified and measured. Analysis of the data indicates that a majority (>70%) of maxillary central incisors exhibit an unevenness or "skew" of the apical constriction of greater than 100 microm in the incisoapical dimension, with a maximum measured skew of 385 microm. On the basis of the results of this study, a statistically significant (P < .05) variation in the longitudinal position of the apical constriction around its circumference was confirmed in maxillary central incisors.

  17. Plectin is a novel regulator for apical extrusion of RasV12-transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Kadeer, Ailijiang; Maruyama, Takeshi; Kajita, Mihoko; Morita, Tomoko; Sasaki, Ayana; Ohoka, Atsuko; Ishikawa, Susumu; Ikegawa, Masaya; Shimada, Takashi; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have revealed that newly emerging transformed cells are often eliminated from the epithelium, though the underlying molecular mechanisms of this cancer preventive phenomenon still remain elusive. In this study, using mammalian cell culture systems we have identified plectin, a versatile cytoskeletal linker protein, as a novel regulator for apical extrusion of RasV12-transformed cells. Plectin is accumulated in RasV12 cells when they are surrounded by normal epithelial cells. Similarly, cytoskeletal proteins tubulin, keratin, and Epithelial Protein Lost In Neoplasm (EPLIN) are also accumulated in the transformed cells surrounded by normal cells. Knockdown or functional disruption of one of these molecules diminishes the accumulation of the others, indicating that the accumulation process of the individual protein mutually depends on each other. Furthermore, plectin-knockdown attenuates caveolin-1 (Cav-1) enrichment and PKA activity in RasV12 cells and profoundly suppresses the apical extrusion. These results indicate that the plectin-microtubules-EPLIN complex positively regulates apical elimination of RasV12-transformed cells from the epithelium in a coordinated fashion. Further development of this study would open a new avenue for cancer preventive medicine. PMID:28281696

  18. Ontogeny of the maize shoot apical meristem.

    PubMed

    Takacs, Elizabeth M; Li, Jie; Du, Chuanlong; Ponnala, Lalit; Janick-Buckner, Diane; Yu, Jianming; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Schnable, Patrick S; Timmermans, Marja C P; Sun, Qi; Nettleton, Dan; Scanlon, Michael J

    2012-08-01

    The maize (Zea mays) shoot apical meristem (SAM) arises early in embryogenesis and functions during stem cell maintenance and organogenesis to generate all the aboveground organs of the plant. Despite its integral role in maize shoot development, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of SAM initiation. Laser microdissection of apical domains from developing maize embryos and seedlings was combined with RNA sequencing for transcriptomic analyses of SAM ontogeny. Molecular markers of key events during maize embryogenesis are described, and comprehensive transcriptional data from six stages in maize shoot development are generated. Transcriptomic profiling before and after SAM initiation indicates that organogenesis precedes stem cell maintenance in maize; analyses of the first three lateral organs elaborated from maize embryos provides insight into their homology and to the identity of the single maize cotyledon. Compared with the newly initiated SAM, the mature SAM is enriched for transcripts that function in transcriptional regulation, hormonal signaling, and transport. Comparisons of shoot meristems initiating juvenile leaves, adult leaves, and husk leaves illustrate differences in phase-specific (juvenile versus adult) and meristem-specific (SAM versus lateral meristem) transcript accumulation during maize shoot development. This study provides insight into the molecular genetics of SAM initiation and function in maize.

  19. AB223. Expression of tight junction proteins in rat vagina

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyung Jin; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Chung, Ho Suck; Ahn, Kyu Youn; Park, Kwangsung

    2014-01-01

    Aim Tight junction plays a role in apical cell-to-cell adhesion and epithelial polarity. In this study, we investigated the expression of tight junction proteins, such as Claudin-1, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, junction adhesion molecule (JAM)-A, and occludin in rat vagina. Methods Female Sprague-dawley rats (230-240 g, n=20) were divided into two groups: control (n=10) and bilateral ovariectomy (n=10). The expression and cellular localization of claudin-1, ZO-1, JAM-A, and occludin were determined in each group by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results Immunolabeling of ZO-1 was mainly expressed in the capillaries and venules of the vagina. Claudin-1, JAM-A, and occludin were expressed in the epithelium of the vagina. The immunoreactivity and protein expression of claudin-1 was significantly decreased in the ovariectomy group compared with the control group. Conclusions Our results suggest that tight junction proteins may have an important role in the vagina. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of each tight junction protein on vaginal lubrication.

  20. Apical targeting of the formin Diaphanous in Drosophila tubular epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Rousso, Tal; Shewan, Annette M; Mostov, Keith E; Schejter, Eyal D; Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2013-01-01

    Apical secretion from epithelial tubes of the Drosophila embryo is mediated by apical F-actin cables generated by the formin-family protein Diaphanous (Dia). Apical localization and activity of Dia are at the core of restricting F-actin formation to the correct membrane domain. Here we identify the mechanisms that target Dia to the apical surface. PI(4,5)P2 levels at the apical membrane regulate Dia localization in both the MDCK cyst model and in Drosophila tubular epithelia. An N-terminal basic domain of Dia is crucial for apical localization, implying direct binding to PI(4,5)P2. Dia apical targeting also depends on binding to Rho1, which is critical for activation-induced conformational change, as well as physically anchoring Dia to the apical membrane. We demonstrate that binding to Rho1 facilitates interaction with PI(4,5)P2 at the plane of the membrane. Together these cues ensure efficient and distinct restriction of Dia to the apical membrane. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00666.001 PMID:23853710

  1. Pyrosequencing analysis of the apical root canal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Alves, Flávio R F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2011-11-01

    Bacterial biofilm communities established in the apical part of infected root canals are conceivably of utmost importance in the pathogenesis of apical periodontitis. This study investigated the diversity of the apical endodontic microbiota by using cryopulverized root segments and massive parallel pyrosequencing analysis. Ten extracted teeth with attached apical periodontitis lesions were sectioned to obtain 2 root fragments (apical and middle/coronal segments). Apical root fragments were cryogenically ground, and DNA was extracted from samples and subjected to multiplex tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing. Pyrosequencing analysis yielded partial 16S rRNA gene sequences that were taxonomically classified into 187 bacterial species-level phylotypes (at 3% divergence), 84 genera, and 10 phyla. The most represented, abundant, and prevalent phyla were Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, and Actinobacteria. The majority of species-level phylotypes occurred at low levels. The mean number of species-level phylotypes per sample was 37 (range, 13-80). A great interindividual variation in the composition of the apical microbiota was disclosed. This study extensively describes the diversity of the bacterial communities present selectively in the apical part of root canals of teeth with apical periodontitis and revealed a previously unanticipated high bacterial diversity. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Antidromic-rectifying gap junctions amplify chemical transmission at functionally mixed electrical-chemical synapses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Chen, Bojun; Mailler, Roger; Wang, Zhao-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Neurons communicate through chemical synapses and electrical synapses (gap junctions). Although these two types of synapses often coexist between neurons, little is known about whether they interact, and whether any interactions between them are important to controlling synaptic strength and circuit functions. By studying chemical and electrical synapses between premotor interneurons (AVA) and downstream motor neurons (A-MNs) in the Caenorhabditis elegans escape circuit, we found that disrupting either the chemical or electrical synapses causes defective escape response. Gap junctions between AVA and A-MNs only allow antidromic current, but, curiously, disrupting them inhibits chemical transmission. In contrast, disrupting chemical synapses has no effect on the electrical coupling. These results demonstrate that gap junctions may serve as an amplifier of chemical transmission between neurons with both electrical and chemical synapses. The use of antidromic-rectifying gap junctions to amplify chemical transmission is potentially a conserved mechanism in circuit functions. PMID:28317880

  3. Antidromic-rectifying gap junctions amplify chemical transmission at functionally mixed electrical-chemical synapses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Chen, Bojun; Mailler, Roger; Wang, Zhao-Wen

    2017-03-20

    Neurons communicate through chemical synapses and electrical synapses (gap junctions). Although these two types of synapses often coexist between neurons, little is known about whether they interact, and whether any interactions between them are important to controlling synaptic strength and circuit functions. By studying chemical and electrical synapses between premotor interneurons (AVA) and downstream motor neurons (A-MNs) in the Caenorhabditis elegans escape circuit, we found that disrupting either the chemical or electrical synapses causes defective escape response. Gap junctions between AVA and A-MNs only allow antidromic current, but, curiously, disrupting them inhibits chemical transmission. In contrast, disrupting chemical synapses has no effect on the electrical coupling. These results demonstrate that gap junctions may serve as an amplifier of chemical transmission between neurons with both electrical and chemical synapses. The use of antidromic-rectifying gap junctions to amplify chemical transmission is potentially a conserved mechanism in circuit functions.

  4. Actin microfilaments play a critical role in endocytosis at the apical but not the basolateral surface of polarized epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Treatment with cytochalasin D, a drug that acts by inducing the depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton, selectively blocked endocytosis of membrane bound and fluid phase markers from the apical surface of polarized MDCK cells without affecting the uptake from the basolateral surface. Thus, in MDCK cell transformants that express the VSV G protein, cytochalasin blocked the internalization of an anti-G mAb bound to apical G molecules, but did not reduce the uptake of antibody bound to the basolateral surface. The selective effect of cytochalasin D on apical endocytosis was also demonstrated by the failure of the drug to reduce the uptake of 125I-labeled transferrin, which occurs by receptor-mediated endocytosis, via clathrin-coated pits, almost exclusively from the basolateral surface. The actin cytoskeleton appears to play a critical role in adsorptive as well as fluid phase apical endocytic events, since treatment with cytochalasin D prevented the apical uptake of cationized ferritin, that occurs after the marker binds to the cell surface, as well as uptake of Lucifer yellow, a fluorescent soluble dye. Moreover, the drug efficiently blocked infection of the cells with influenza virus, when the viral inoculum was applied to the apical surface. On the other hand, it did not inhibit the basolateral uptake of Lucifer yellow, nor did it prevent infection with VSV from the basolateral surface, or with influenza when this virus was applied to monolayers in which the formation of tight junctions had been prevented by depletion of calcium ions. EM demonstrated that cytochalasin D leads to an increase in the number of coated pits in the apical surface where it suppresses the pinching off of coated vesicles. In addition, in drug-treated cells cationized ferritin molecules that were bound to microvilli were not cleared from the microvillar surface, as is observed in untreated cells. These findings indicate that there is a fundamental difference in the process by which

  5. Quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiang; Liu, Huan; Zhitomirsky, David; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Wang, Xihua; Furukawa, Melissa; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO(2)); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics.

  6. Contrasting effects of ERK on tight junction integrity in differentiated and under-differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sudhir; Suzuki, Takuya; Taylor, William L.; Bhargava, Aditi; Rao, Radhakrishna K.

    2013-01-01

    ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) activation leads to disruption of tight junctions in some epithelial monolayers, whereas it prevents disruption of tight junctions in other epithelia. The factors responsible for such contrasting influences of ERK on tight junction integrity are unknown. The present study investigated the effect of the state of cell differentiation on ERK-mediated regulation of tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers. EGF (epidermal growth factor) potentiated H2O2-induced tight junction disruption in under-differentiated cell monolayers, which was attenuated by the MEK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK kinase] inhibitor U0126. In contrast, EGF prevented H2O2-induced disruption of tight junctions in differentiated cell monolayers, which was also attenuated by U0126. Knockdown of ERK1/2 enhanced tight junction integrity and accelerated assembly of tight junctions in under-differentiated cell monolayers, whereas it had the opposite effect in differentiated cell monolayers. Regulated expression of wild-type and constitutively active MEK1 disrupted tight junctions, and the expression of dominant-negative MEK1 enhanced tight junction integrity in under-differentiated cells, whereas contrasting responses were recorded in differentiated cells. EGF prevented both H2O2-induced association of PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A), and loss of association of PKCζ (protein kinase Cζ), with occludin by an ERK-dependent mechanism in differentiated cell monolayers, but not in under-differentiated cell monolayers. Active ERK was distributed in the intracellular compartment in under-differentiated cell monolayers, whereas it was localized mainly in the perijunctional region in differentiated cell monolayers. Thus ERK may exhibit its contrasting influences on tight junction integrity in under-differentiated and differentiated epithelial cells by virtue of differences in its subcellular distribution and ability to regulate the association of PKCζ and

  7. Visualization of removal of trapped air from the apical region of the straight root canal models generating 2-phase intermittent counter flow during ultrasonically activated irrigation.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Harry Huiz; Iskandar, Bernard; Suardita, Ketut; Suharto, Djoko

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of irrigant traveling apically and generating 2-phase intermittent counter flow in straight root canal models during activation of the irrigant by ultrasonic means in an endodontic procedure. A high-speed imaging system, with high temporal and spatial resolution (FastCam SA5; Photron, Tokyo, Japan) at a frame rate of 100,000 frames per second using a macro lens (60 mm, f/2.8; Nikon, Tokyo, Japan), was used to visualize, in glass models of root canals, an ultrasonically induced acoustic pressure wave in an EDTA solution environment. A 25-mm stainless steel noncutting file #20 driven by an ultrasonic device (P5 Newtron; Satelec Acteon, Mérignac, France) at power settings of 5 and 7 produced disturbances at the solution-air interface. We found that apically directed travel of the irrigant was caused by disruption of the surface tension at the solution-air interface. This disruption caused by ultrasonic activation energy displaced air in the form of bubbles from the apical region toward the solution. The apical movement of the solution may be attributed to ultrasonically induced wave generation at the solution-air interface, resulting in the removal of trapped air from the root canal and allowing the solution to travel apically in the opposite directions (via a 2-phase intermittent counter flow). Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of apical extrusion of debris and irrigants using four rotary instrumentation systems: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Nagaveni, S Aspalli; Balakoti, K Reddy; Smita, Karan; Ratnakar, P; Satish, S V; Aravind, T

    2013-11-01

    The apical extrusion of infected debris may have the potential to disrupt the balance between microbial aggression and host defense, resulting in incidents of acute inflammation. During preparation, irrigants and debris, such as bacteria, dentin filings and necrotic tissue may be extruded into the periradicular region leading to periapical inflammation and postoperative flare ups. Using an instrumentation technique that minimizes apical extrusion would be beneficial to both the practitioner and patient. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the weight of debris and volume of irrigant extruded apically from extracted teeth in vitro after endodontic instrumentation using four different rotary root canal instrumentation systems. Four groups of each 20 extracted mandibular premolars were instrumented using one of the four systems: ProTaper Universal (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland)), Hero-shaper (MicroMega, Besancon, France), RaCe (FKG Dentaire, La-Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland) and K3 (SybronEndo, West Collins, CA). Debris and irrigant extruded from the apical foramen during instrumentation were collected in preweighed test tubes. Volume of irrigant extruded was noted. The containers were stored in incubator at 70° for two days to evaporate the moisture. Weight of dry debris was noted. Data was analyzed using Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test at a significance of 0.001. The results indicated that all of the instrumentation systems tested caused measurable apical extrusion of debris and irrigants. Higher extrusion was observed with Protaper system which was statistically significant with Hero-Shaper, RaCe and K3 systems. There were no statistical differences between Hero-shaper, K3 and RaCe systems (p < 0.05). All instrumentation techniques apically extruded debris and irrigant. However, Hero-shaper, K3 and RaCe systems produced less extruded debris and irrigant than the Protaper system.

  9. A histone octamer blocks branch migration of a Holliday junction.

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriev, M; Hsieh, P

    1997-01-01

    The Holliday junction is a key intermediate in genetic recombination. Here, we examine the effect of a nucleosome core on movement of the Holliday junction in vitro by spontaneous branch migration. Histone octamers consisting of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 are reconstituted onto DNA duplexes containing an artificial nucleosome-positioning sequence consisting of a tandem array of an alternating AT-GC sequence motif. Characterization of the reconstituted branch migration substrates by micrococcal nuclease mapping and exonuclease III and hydroxyl radical footprinting reveal that 70% of the reconstituted octamers are positioned near the center of the substrate and the remaining 30% are located at the distal end, although in both cases some translational degeneracy is observed. Branch migration assays with the octamer-containing substrates reveal that the Holliday junction cannot migrate spontaneously through DNA organized into a nucleosomal core unless DNA-histone interactions are completely disrupted. Similar results are obtained with branch migration substrates containing an octamer positioned on a naturally occurring sequence derived from the yeast GLN3 locus. Digestion of Holliday junctions with T7 endonuclease I establishes that the junction is not trapped by the octamer but can branch migrate in regions free of histone octamers. Our findings suggest that migration of Holliday junctions during recombination and the recombinational repair of DNA damage requires proteins not only to accelerate the intrinsic rate of branch migration but also to facilitate the passage of the Holliday junction through a nucleosome. PMID:9372946

  10. Apical phosphatidylserine externalization in auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaorui; Gillespie, Peter G; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2007-01-01

    In hair cells of the inner ear, phosphatidylserine (PS), detected with fluorescent annexin V labeling, was rapidly exposed on the external leaflet of apical plasma membranes upon dissection of the organ of Corti. PS externalization was unchanged by caspase inhibition, suggesting that externalization did not portend apoptosis or necrosis. Consistent with that conclusion, mitochondrial membrane potential and hair-cell nuclear structure remained normal during externalization. PS externalization was triggered by forskolin, which raises cAMP, and blocked by inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase. Blocking Na(+) influx by inhibiting the mechanoelectrical transduction channels and P2X ATP channels also inhibited external PS externalization. Diminished PS externalization was also seen in cells exposed to LY 294002, which blocks membrane recycling in hair cells by inhibiting phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. These results indicate that PS exposure on the external leaflet, presumably requiring vesicular transport, results from elevation of intracellular cAMP, which can be triggered by Na(+) entry into hair cells.

  11. Apical entry channels in calcium-transporting epithelia.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ji-Bin; Brown, Edward M; Hediger, Matthias A

    2003-08-01

    The identification of the apical calcium channels CaT1 and ECaC revealed the key molecular mechanisms underlying apical calcium entry in calcium-transporting epithelia. These channels are regulated directly or indirectly by vitamin D and dietary calcium and undergo feedback control by intracellular calcium, suggesting their rate-limiting roles in transcellular calcium transport.

  12. Apical Ballooning Syndrome: A Complication of Dual Chamber Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Abu Sham'a, Raed A. H; Asher, Elad; Luria, David; Berger, Michael; Glikson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Apical ballooning is a cardiac syndrome (Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy) described as a typical form of acute transient left ventricular dysfunction. While its onset has often been associated with emotionally or physically stressful situations, it has an overall favorable prognosis. We describe here a case of transient apical ballooning following permanent pacemaker implantation. PMID:19652736

  13. Apical ballooning syndrome: a complication of dual chamber pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Abu Sham'a, Raed A H; Asher, Elad; Luria, David; Berger, Michael; Glikson, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Apical ballooning is a cardiac syndrome (Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy) described as a typical form of acute transient left ventricular dysfunction. While its onset has often been associated with emotionally or physically stressful situations, it has an overall favorable prognosis. We describe here a case of transient apical ballooning following permanent pacemaker implantation.

  14. Role of tight junctions in signal transduction: an update

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Kenichi; Kojima, Takashi; Sawada, Norimasa; Himi, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs), which are the most apically located of the intercellular junctional complexes, have a barrier function and a fence function. Recent studies show that they also participate in signal transduction mechanisms. TJs are modulated by intracellular signaling pathways including protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-ϰB, to affect the epithelial barrier function in response to diverse stimuli. TJs are also regulated by various cytokines, growth factors, and hormones via signaling pathways. To investigate the regulation of TJ molecules via signaling pathways in human epithelial cells under normal and pathological conditions, we established a novel model of human telomerase reverse transcriptase-transfected human epithelial cells. In this review, we describe the recent progress in our understanding of the role of TJs for signal transduction under normal conditions in upper airway epithelium, pancreatic duct epithelial cells, hepatocytes, and endometrial epithelial cells, and in pathological conditions including cancer and infection. PMID:26417329

  15. Protein kinase Cζ phosphorylates occludin and promotes assembly of epithelial tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Jain, Suneet; Suzuki, Takuya; Seth, Ankur; Samak, Geetha; Rao, Radhakrishna

    2011-07-15

    Protein kinases play an important role in the regulation of epithelial tight junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of PKCζ (protein kinase Cζ) in tight junction regulation in Caco-2 and MDCK (Madin-Darby canine kidney) cell monolayers. Inhibition of PKCζ by a specific PKCζ pseudosubstrate peptide results in redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 (zona occludens 1) from the intercellular junctions and disruption of barrier function without affecting cell viability. Reduced expression of PKCζ by antisense oligonucleotide or shRNA (short hairpin RNA) also results in compromised tight junction integrity. Inhibition or knockdown of PKCζ delays calcium-induced assembly of tight junctions. Tight junction disruption by PKCζ pseudosubstrate is associated with the dephosphorylation of occludin and ZO-1 on serine and threonine residues. PKCζ directly binds to the C-terminal domain of occludin and phosphorylates it on threonine residues. Thr403, Thr404, Thr424 and Thr438 in the occludin C-terminal domain are the predominant sites of PKCζ-dependent phosphorylation. A T424A or T438A mutation in full-length occludin delays its assembly into the tight junctions. Inhibition of PKCζ also induces redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the tight junctions and dissociates these proteins from the detergent-insoluble fractions in mouse ileum. The present study demonstrates that PKCζ phosphorylates occludin on specific threonine residues and promotes assembly of epithelial tight junctions.

  16. Bile duct epithelial tight junctions and barrier function.

    PubMed

    Rao, R K; Samak, G

    2013-10-01

    Bile ducts play a crucial role in the formation and secretion of bile as well as excretion of circulating xenobiotic substances. In addition to its secretory and excretory functions, bile duct epithelium plays an important role in the formation of a barrier to the diffusion of toxic substances from bile into the hepatic interstitial tissue. Disruption of barrier function and toxic injury to liver cells appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver diseases such as primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and cholangiocarcinoma. Although the investigations into understanding the structure and regulation of tight junctions in gut, renal and endothelial tissues have expanded rapidly, very little is known about the structure and regulation of tight junctions in the bile duct epithelium. In this article we summarize the current understanding of physiology and pathophysiology of bile duct epithelium, the structure and regulation of tight junctions in canaliculi and bile duct epithelia and different mechanisms involved in the regulation of disruption and protection of bile duct epithelial tight junctions. This article will make a case for the need of future investigations toward our understanding of molecular organization and regulation of canalicular and bile duct epithelial tight junctions.

  17. Bile duct epithelial tight junctions and barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Rao, R.K.; Samak, G.

    2013-01-01

    Bile ducts play a crucial role in the formation and secretion of bile as well as excretion of circulating xenobiotic substances. In addition to its secretory and excretory functions, bile duct epithelium plays an important role in the formation of a barrier to the diffusion of toxic substances from bile into the hepatic interstitial tissue. Disruption of barrier function and toxic injury to liver cells appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver diseases such as primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and cholangiocarcinoma. Although the investigations into understanding the structure and regulation of tight junctions in gut, renal and endothelial tissues have expanded rapidly, very little is known about the structure and regulation of tight junctions in the bile duct epithelium. In this article we summarize the current understanding of physiology and pathophysiology of bile duct epithelium, the structure and regulation of tight junctions in canaliculi and bile duct epithelia and different mechanisms involved in the regulation of disruption and protection of bile duct epithelial tight junctions. This article will make a case for the need of future investigations toward our understanding of molecular organization and regulation of canalicular and bile duct epithelial tight junctions. PMID:24665411

  18. Regulatory dissociation of Tctex-1 light chain from dynein complex is essential for the apical delivery of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ting-Yu; Peretti, Diego; Chuang, Jen-Zen; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique; Sung, Ching-Hwa

    2006-11-01

    Post-Golgi to apical surface delivery in polarized epithelial cells requires the cytoplasmic dynein motor complex. However, the nature of dynein-cargo interactions and their underlying regulation are largely unknown. Previous studies have shown that the apical surface targeting of rhodopsin requires the dynein light chain, Tctex-1, which binds directly to both dynein intermediate chain (IC) and rhodopsin. In this report, we show that the S82E mutant of Tctex-1, which mimics Tctex-1 phosphorylated at serine 82, has a reduced affinity for dynein IC but not for rhodopsin. Velocity sedimentation experiments further suggest that S82E is not incorporated into the dynein complex. The dominant-negative effect of S82E causes rhodopsin mislocalization in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. The S82A mutant, which mimics dephosphorylated Tctex-1, can be incorporated into dynein complex but is impaired in its release. Expression of S82A also causes disruption of the apical localization of rhodopsin in MDCK cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the dynein complex disassembles to release cargo due to the specific phosphorylation of Tctex-1 at the S82 residue and that this process is critical for the apical delivery of membrane cargoes.

  19. Unique apicomplexan IMC sub-compartment proteins are early markers for apical polarity in the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, Benoit; Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Brady, Declan; Silvie, Olivier; Wright, Megan H.; Ferguson, David J. P.; Wall, Richard J.; Whipple, Sarah; Guttery, David S.; Tate, Edward W.; Wickstead, Bill; Holder, Anthony A.; Tewari, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Summary The phylum Apicomplexa comprises over 5000 intracellular protozoan parasites, including Plasmodium and Toxoplasma, that are clinically important pathogens affecting humans and livestock. Malaria parasites belonging to the genus Plasmodium possess a pellicle comprised of a plasmalemma and inner membrane complex (IMC), which is implicated in parasite motility and invasion. Using live cell imaging and reverse genetics in the rodent malaria model P. berghei, we localise two unique IMC sub-compartment proteins (ISPs) and examine their role in defining apical polarity during zygote (ookinete) development. We show that these proteins localise to the anterior apical end of the parasite where IMC organisation is initiated, and are expressed at all developmental stages, especially those that are invasive. Both ISP proteins are N-myristoylated, phosphorylated and membrane-bound. Gene disruption studies suggest that ISP1 is likely essential for parasite development, whereas ISP3 is not. However, an absence of ISP3 alters the apical localisation of ISP1 in all invasive stages including ookinetes and sporozoites, suggesting a coordinated function for these proteins in the organisation of apical polarity in the parasite. PMID:24244852

  20. Rab14 specifies the apical membrane through Arf6-mediated regulation of lipid domains and Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ruifeng; Wilson, Jean M.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of cell polarity is essential for the development of multi-cellular organisms as well as for the function of epithelial organs in the mature animal. Small GTPases regulate the establishment and maintenance of polarity through effects on cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and signaling. Using short-term 3-dimensional culture of MDCK cells, we find that the small GTPase Rab14 is required for apical membrane specification. Rab14 knockdown results in disruption of polarized lipid domains and failure of the Par/aPKC/Cdc42 polarity complex to localize to the apical membrane. These effects are mediated through tight control of lipid localization, as overexpression of the phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase α [PtdIns(4)P5K] activator Arf6 or PtdIns(4)P5K alone, or treatment with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdInsI3K) inhibitor wortmannin, rescued the multiple-apical domain phenotype observed after Rab14 knockdown. Rab14 also co-immunoprecipitates and colocalizes with the small GTPase Cdc42, and Rab14 knockdown results in increased Cdc42 activity. Furthermore, Rab14 regulates trafficking of vesicles to the apical domain, mitotic spindle orientation, and midbody position, consistent with Rab14’s reported localization to the midbody as well as its effects upon Cdc42. These results position Rab14 at the top of a molecular cascade that regulates the establishment of cell polarity. PMID:27901125

  1. Efficacy of Biodentine as an Apical Plug in Nonvital Permanent Teeth with Open Apices: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Bani, Mehmet; Sungurtekin-Ekçi, Elif; Odabaş, Mesut Enes

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the apical microleakage of Biodentine and MTA orthograde apical plugs and to compare the effect of thickness of these biomaterials on their sealing ability. A total of eighty maxillary anterior teeth were used. The apices were removed by cutting with a diamond disc (Jota, Germany) 2 mm from the apical root end in an attempt to standardize the working length of all specimens to 15 ± 1 mm. Both materials were placed in 1-4 mm thickness as apical plugs root canal. Root canal leakage was evaluated by the fluid filtration technique. One-way ANOVA was used in order to determine normality of dispersal distribution of parameters; thereafter, results were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Overall, between microleakage values of MTA and Biodentine regardless of apical plug thickness, no difference was observed. In terms of plug thickness, a statistically significant difference was observed between the subgroups of MTA and Biodentine (p < 0.05). The apical sealing ability of Biodentine was comparable to MTA at any apical plug thickness.

  2. Efficacy of Biodentine as an Apical Plug in Nonvital Permanent Teeth with Open Apices: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Bani, Mehmet; Sungurtekin-Ekçi, Elif; Odabaş, Mesut Enes

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the apical microleakage of Biodentine and MTA orthograde apical plugs and to compare the effect of thickness of these biomaterials on their sealing ability. A total of eighty maxillary anterior teeth were used. The apices were removed by cutting with a diamond disc (Jota, Germany) 2 mm from the apical root end in an attempt to standardize the working length of all specimens to 15 ± 1 mm. Both materials were placed in 1–4 mm thickness as apical plugs root canal. Root canal leakage was evaluated by the fluid filtration technique. One-way ANOVA was used in order to determine normality of dispersal distribution of parameters; thereafter, results were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Overall, between microleakage values of MTA and Biodentine regardless of apical plug thickness, no difference was observed. In terms of plug thickness, a statistically significant difference was observed between the subgroups of MTA and Biodentine (p < 0.05). The apical sealing ability of Biodentine was comparable to MTA at any apical plug thickness. PMID:26436090

  3. Apical vacuole formation by gastric parietal cells in primary culture: effect of low extracellular Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Nakada, Stephanie L.; Machen, Terry E.; Forte, John G.

    2012-01-01

    In primary culture, the gastric parietal cell's deeply invaginated apical membrane, seen in microscopy by phalloidin binding to F-actin (concentrated in microvilli and a subapical web), is engulfed into the cell, separated from the basolateral membrane (which then becomes the complete plasma membrane), and converted, from a lacy interconnected system of canaliculi, into several separate vacuoles. In this study, vacuolar morphology was achieved by 71% of parietal cells 8 h after typical collagenase digestion of rabbit gastric mucosa, but the tight-junctional protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) was completely delocalized after ∼2 h, when cells were ready for culturing. Use of low-Ca2+ medium (4 mM EGTA) to release cells quickly from gastric glands yielded parietal cells in which ZO-1 was seen in a small spot or ring, a localization quickly lost if these cells were then cultured in normal Ca2+ but remaining up to 20 h if they were cultured in low Ca2+. The cells in low Ca2+ mostly retained, at 20 h, an intermediate morphology of many bulbous canalicular expansions (“prevacuoles”), seemingly with narrow interconnections. Histamine stimulation of 20-h cells with intermediate morphology caused colocalization of proton-pumping H-K-ATPase with canaliculi and prevacuoles but little swelling of those structures, consistent with a remaining apical pore through which secreted acid could escape. Apparent canalicular interconnections, lack of stimulated swelling, and lingering ZO-1 staining indicate inhibition of membrane fission processes that separate apical from basolateral membrane and vacuoles from each other, suggesting an important role for extracellular Ca2+ in these, and possibly other, endocytotic processes. PMID:23099641

  4. Apical and basal epitheliomuscular F-actin dynamics during Hydra bud evagination

    PubMed Central

    Aufschnaiter, Roland; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bending of 2D cell sheets is a fundamental morphogenetic mechanism during animal development and reproduction. A critical player driving cell shape during tissue bending is the actin cytoskeleton. Much of our current knowledge about actin dynamics in whole organisms stems from studies of embryonic development in bilaterian model organisms. Here, we have analyzed actin-based processes during asexual bud evagination in the simple metazoan Hydra. We created transgenic Hydra strains stably expressing the actin marker Lifeact-GFP in either ectodermal or endodermal epitheliomuscular cells. We then combined live imaging with conventional phalloidin staining to directly follow actin reorganization. Bending of the Hydra epithelial double layer is initiated by a group of epitheliomuscular cells in the endodermal layer. These cells shorten their apical-basal axis and arrange their basal muscle processes in a circular configuration. We propose that this rearrangement generates the initial forces to bend the endoderm towards the ectoderm. Convergent tissue movement in both epithelial layers towards the centre of evagination then leads to elongation and extension of the bud along its new body axis. Tissue movement into the bud is associated with lateral intercalation of epithelial cells, remodelling of apical septate junctions, and rearrangement of basal muscle processes. The work presented here extends the analysis of morphogenetic mechanisms beyond embryonic tissues of model bilaterians. PMID:28630355

  5. Evaluation of Correlation Between apical Diameter and File Size Using Propex Pixi Apex Locator.

    PubMed

    Kolanu, Sreeha Kaluva; Bolla, Nagesh; Varri, Sujana; Thummu, Jayaprakash; Vemuri, Sayesh; Mandava, Pragna

    2014-12-01

    AIM of this study is to evaluate the influence of critical diameter of apical foramen and file size using propex pixi apex locator in working length determination. In this study, ten single rooted teeth were selected. They were decoronated at cemento enamel junction. After determining the actual working length, they were embedded in alginate mold. Foramina were widened from 0.6mm to 0.8mm. The measurements were taken with electronic apex locator propex pixi with files from sizes 10 K to respective sizes. Statistical accuracy of propex pixi was calculated by using Anova test for different diameters and for the influence of file size. RESULTS showed that propex pixi apex locator was accurate when foramen diameter is 0.6 (60k file size), its accuracy diminished with increased foramen diameter Propex pixi is accurate for foramen diameter of 0.6mm, independent of file size. Its accuracy decreases as apical foramen widens, so care should be taken when using clinically.

  6. Evaluation of Correlation Between apical Diameter and File Size Using Propex Pixi Apex Locator

    PubMed Central

    Bolla, Nagesh; Varri, Sujana; Thummu, Jayaprakash; Vemuri, Sayesh; Mandava, Pragna

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of critical diameter of apical foramen and file size using propex pixi apex locator in working length determination. Materials and Methods: In this study, ten single rooted teeth were selected. They were decoronated at cemento enamel junction. After determining the actual working length, they were embedded in alginate mold. Foramina were widened from 0.6mm to 0.8mm. The measurements were taken with electronic apex locator propex pixi with files from sizes 10 K to respective sizes. Statistical accuracy of propex pixi was calculated by using Anova test for different diameters and for the influence of file size. Results: Results showed that propex pixi apex locator was accurate when foramen diameter is 0.6 (60k file size), its accuracy diminished with increased foramen diameter Conclusion: Propex pixi is accurate for foramen diameter of 0.6mm, independent of file size. Its accuracy decreases as apical foramen widens, so care should be taken when using clinically. PMID:25654023

  7. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-06-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit.

  8. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  9. Dot junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1986-01-01

    A design of solar cells with reduced junction area on the cell surface is investigated for reduction of saturation current and increase in open-circuit voltage. Equidiameter dot junctions distributed across the surface of the cell offer an efficient alternative, with variations in dot diameter and in the spacing between dots giving the required variations in the ratio of junction area to total surface area. A simplified analysis for short-circuit current and other cell parameters, which enables cell design optimization, is presented. Experimental solar-cell performance results, as functions of different area ratios, are presented and compared with the model. It is shown that saturation current reduction is possible for achieving efficiencies as high as 18 percent in flat-plate terrestrial applications.

  10. Disruptive Pedagogies: How Teacher Educators Disrupt Homophobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsbree, Anne Rene

    This study examined how teacher educators made sense of their efforts to disrupt homophobia in the classroom. Participants were teacher educators who were collaboratively designing and constructing a video product to be used in teacher education classrooms to help teachers understand, recognize, and disrupt homophobia. The study involved…

  11. The estrogen-dependent c-JunER protein causes a reversible loss of mammary epithelial cell polarity involving a destabilization of adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Members of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor family are known to be specifically involved in mammary carcinogenesis. As a nuclear target of activated receptors, we examined c-Jun in mammary epithelial cells. For this, we used a c-JunER fusion protein which was tightly controlled by estrogen. Activation of the JunER by hormone resulted in the transcriptional regulation of a variety of AP-1 target genes. Hormone-activated JunER induced the loss of epithelial polarity, a disruption of intercellular junctions and normal barrier function and the formation of irregular multilayers. These changes were completely reversible upon hormone withdrawal. Loss of epithelial polarity involved redistribution of both apical and basolateral proteins to the entire plasma membrane. The redistribution of E-cadherin and beta- catenin was accompanied by a destabilization of complexes formed between these two proteins, leading to an enrichment of beta-catenin in the detergent-soluble fraction. Uninduced cells were able to form three- dimensional tubular structures in collagen I gels which were disrupted upon JunER activation, leading to irregular cell aggregates. The JunER- induced disruption of tubular structures was dependent on active signaling by growth factors. Moreover, the effects of JunER could be mimicked in normal cells by the addition of acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF). These data suggest that a possible function of c-Jun in epithelial cells is to modulate epithelial polarity and regulate tissue organization, processes which may be equally important for both normal breast development and as initiating steps in carcinogenesis. PMID:8601589

  12. PI(4,5)P2 produced by the PI4P5K SKTL controls apical size by tethering PAR-3 in Drosophila epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Claret, Sandra; Jouette, Julie; Benoit, Béatrice; Legent, Kevin; Guichet, Antoine

    2014-05-19

    The control of apical-basal polarity in epithelial layers is a fundamental event in many processes, ranging from embryonic development to tumor formation. A key feature of polarized epithelial cells is their ability to maintain an asymmetric distribution of specific molecular complexes, including the phosphoinositides PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3. The spatiotemporal regulation of these phosphoinositides is controlled by the concerted action of phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases. Using the Drosophila follicular epithelium as a model system in vivo, we show here that PI(4,5)P2 is crucial to maintain apical-basal polarity. PI(4,5)P2 is essentially regulated by the PI4P5 kinase Skittles (SKTL), whereas neither the phosphatase PTEN nor the PI(4,5)P3 kinase DP110 lead to loss of apical-basal polarity. By inactivating SKTL and thereby strongly reducing PI(4,5)P2 levels in a single cell of the epithelium, we observe the disassembly of adherens junctions, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, and apical constriction leading to delamination, a process similar to that observed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We provide evidence that PI(4,5)P2 controls the apical targeting of PAR-3/Bazooka to the plasma membrane and that the loss of this polarized distribution is sufficient to induce a similar cell shape change. Finally, we show that PI(4,5)P2 is excluded from the cell apex and that PAR-3 diffuses laterally just prior to the apical constriction in a context of endogenous invagination. All together, these results indicate that the PIP5 kinase SKTL, by controlling PI(4,5)P2 polarity, regulates PAR-3 localization and thus the size of the apical domain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural and Functional Regulation of Tight Junctions by RhoA and Rac1 Small GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Jou, Tzuu-Shuh; Schneeberger, Eveline E.; James Nelson, W.

    1998-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) govern ion and solute diffusion through the paracellular space (gate function), and restrict mixing of membrane proteins and lipids between membrane domains (fence function) of polarized epithelial cells. We examined roles of the RhoA and Rac1 GTPases in regulating TJ structure and function in MDCK cells using the tetracycline repressible transactivator to regulate RhoAV14, RhoAN19, Rac1V12, and Rac1N17 expression. Both constitutively active and dominant negative RhoA or Rac1 perturbed TJ gate function (transepithelial electrical resistance, tracer diffusion) in a dose-dependent and reversible manner. Freeze-fracture EM and immunofluoresence microscopy revealed abnormal TJ strand morphology and protein (occludin, ZO-1) localization in RhoAV14 and Rac1V12 cells. However, TJ strand morphology and protein localization appeared normal in RhoAN19 and Rac1N17 cells. All mutant GTPases disrupted the fence function of the TJ (interdomain diffusion of a fluorescent lipid), but targeting and organization of a membrane protein in the apical membrane were unaffected. Expression levels and protein complexes of occludin and ZO-1 appeared normal in all mutant cells, although ZO-1 was more readily solubilized from RhoAV14-expressing cells with Triton X-100. These results show that RhoA and Rac1 regulate gate and fence functions of the TJ, and play a role in the spatial organization of TJ proteins at the apex of the lateral membrane. PMID:9660866

  14. TLR2 Regulates Gap Junction Intercellular Communication in Airway Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Francis J.; Prince, Alice S.

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune response to inhaled bacteria, such as the opportunist Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is initiated by TLR2 displayed on the apical surface of airway epithelial cells. Activation of TLR2 is accompanied by an immediate Ca2+ flux that is both necessary and sufficient to stimulate NF-κB and MAPK proinflammatory signaling to recruit and activate polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the airway. In human airway cells gap junction channels were found to provide a regulated conduit for the movement of Ca2+ from cell to cell. In response to TLR2 stimulation, by either lipid agonists or P. aeruginosa, gap junctions functioned to transiently amplify proinflammatory signaling by communicating Ca2+ fluxes from stimulated to adjacent, non-stimulated cells thus increasing epithelial CXCL8 production. P. aeruginosa stimulation also induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Connexin 43 and association with c-Src, events linked to the closure of these channels. By 4 hours post bacterial stimulation, gap junction communication was decreased indicating an autoregulatory control of the connexins. Thus, gap junction channels comprised of Connexin 43 and other connexins in airway cells provide a mechanism to coordinate and regulate the epithelial immune response even in the absence of signals from the immune system. PMID:18354224

  15. Minimal Effects of VEGF and Anti-VEGF Drugs on the Permeability or Selectivity of RPE Tight Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shaomin; Adelman, Ron A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Bevacizumab and ranibizumab are currently used to treat age-related macular degeneration by neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In this study, the potential side effects on the outer blood–retinal barrier were examined. Methods. Human fetal RPE (hfRPE) cells were used because they are highly differentiated in culture. The claudin composition of RPE tight junctions was determined by RT-PCR, immunoblot analysis, and immunofluorescence. ELISA assays monitored the secretion and trafficking of VEGF and a fluid-phase marker, methylpolyethylene glycol (mPEG). Tight junction functions were assessed by the conductance of K+ and Na+ (derived from the transepithelial electrical resistance, TER) and the flux of NaCl and mPEG. Results. Claudin-3, claudin-10, and claudin-19 were detected in RPE tight junctions. VEGF was secreted in equal amounts across the apical and basolateral membranes, but the apical membrane was more active in endocytosing and degrading VEGF. Exogenous VEGF and mPEG crossed the RPE monolayer by transcytosis, predominantly in the apical-to-basal direction. RPE tight junctions were selective for K+, but did not discriminate between Na+ and Cl−. VEGF, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab had minimal effects on TER, permeation of mPEG, and selectivity for K+, Na+, and Cl−. They had minimal effects on the expression and distribution of the claudins. Conclusions. RPE has mechanisms for maintaining low concentrations of VEGF in the subretinal space that include endocytosis and degradation and fluid-phase transcytosis in the apical-to-basal direction. RPE tight junctions are selective for K+ over Na+ and Cl−. Permeability and selectivity of the junctions are not affected by VEGF, bevacizumab, or ranibizumab. PMID:20042644

  16. Apical surgery: A review of current techniques and outcome

    PubMed Central

    von Arx, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Apical surgery is considered a standard oral surgical procedure. It is often a last resort to surgically maintain a tooth with a periapical lesion that cannot be managed with conventional endodontic (re-)treatment. The main goal of apical surgery is to prevent bacterial leakage from the root-canal system into the periradicular tissues by placing a tight root-end filling following root-end resection. Clinicians are advised to utilize a surgical microscope to perform apical surgery to benefit from magnification and illumination. In addition, the application of microsurgical techniques in apical surgery, i.e., gentle incision and flap elevation, production of a small osteotomy, and the use of sonic- or ultrasonic driven microtips, will result in less trauma to the patient and faster postsurgical healing. A major step in apical surgery is to identify possible leakage areas at the cut root face and subsequently to ensure adequate root-end filling. Only a tight and persistent apical obturation will allow periapical healing with good long-term prognosis. The present paper describes current indications, techniques and outcome of apical surgery. PMID:24151412

  17. FIP5 phosphorylation during mitosis regulates apical trafficking and lumenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongying; Mangan, Anthony; Cicchini, Louis; Margolis, Ben; Prekeris, Rytis

    2014-04-01

    Apical lumen formation is a key step during epithelial morphogenesis. The establishment of the apical lumen is a complex process that involves coordinated changes in plasma membrane composition, endocytic transport, and cytoskeleton organization. These changes are accomplished, at least in part, by the targeting and fusion of Rab11/FIP5-containing apical endosomes with the apical membrane initiation site (AMIS). Although AMIS formation and polarized transport of Rab11/FIP5-containing endosomes are crucial for the formation of a single apical lumen, the spatiotemporal regulation of this process remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the formation of the midbody during cytokinesis is a symmetry-breaking event that establishes the location of the AMIS. The interaction of FIP5 with SNX18, which is required for the formation of apical endocytic carriers, is inhibited by GSK-3 phosphorylation at FIP5-T276. Importantly, we show that FIP5-T276 phosphorylation occurs specifically during metaphase and anaphase, to ensure the fidelity and timing of FIP5-endosome targeting to the AMIS during apical lumen formation.

  18. Healing of apical periodontitis through modern endodontic retreatment techniques.

    PubMed

    Ray, Jarom J; Kirkpatrick, Timothy C

    2013-01-01

    The presence of apical periodontitis in teeth which have undergone initial root canal treatment is largely attributed to bacteria residing in or invading from the apical root canal space. Bacteria-associated apical periodontitis will not heal spontaneously, nor will systemic antibiotics eradicate the infection. Only endodontic retreatment, endodontic surgery, or extraction will control the bacterial etiology. Modern retreatment is an effective means of addressing apical periodontitis. A mandibular premolar with apical periodontitis, apical root resorption, and overfilled gutta percha was retreated with post removal, retrieval of gutta percha from beyond the apex, ultrasonic irrigation and disinfection, and placement of a collagen internal matrix to facilitate a well-controlled MTA apical fill. The magnification and illumination imparted by the operating microscope was integral to achievement of treatment objectives. The patient's symptoms were resolved and complete osseous healing occurred. During treatment planning, clinicians should consider the capability of modern endodontic techniques to overcome technical challenges, often allowing the natural dentition to be preserved and restored to function days after retreatment.

  19. Auxin at the Shoot Apical Meristem

    PubMed Central

    Vernoux, Teva; Besnard, Fabrice; Traas, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Plants continuously generate new tissues and organs through the activity of populations of undifferentiated stem cells, called meristems. Here, we discuss the so-called shoot apical meristem (SAM), which generates all the aerial parts of the plant. It has been known for many years that auxin plays a central role in the functioning of this meristem. Auxin is not homogeneously distributed at the SAM and it is thought that this distribution is interpreted in terms of differential gene expression and patterned growth. In this context, auxin transporters of the PIN and AUX families, creating auxin maxima and minima, are crucial regulators. However, auxin transport is not the only factor involved. Auxin biosynthesis genes also show specific, patterned activities, and local auxin synthesis appears to be essential for meristem function as well. In addition, auxin perception and signal transduction defining the competence of cells to react to auxin, add further complexity to the issue. To unravel this intricate signaling network at the SAM, systems biology approaches, involving not only molecular genetics but also live imaging and computational modeling, have become increasingly important. PMID:20452945

  20. Chloride conductance of frog skin: localization to the tight junctions?

    PubMed

    Nagel, W

    1989-01-01

    The pathway(s) of passive conductive Cl transport across isolated frog skin are analyzed by electrophysiological techniques including microelectrode impalement of principal cells. It is found that the apical membrane of granular cells is virtually impermeable for Cl. Substitution of mucosal Cl by anions except NO3 and SCN decreases Cl-related tissue conductance (gCl) with first order kinetics. NO3 and SCN block gCl with half-maximal concentration of 18 and 5 mM, respectively. Omission of serosal Cl has little effect on gCl unless the inhibiting anions NO3 or SCN are used. The putative Cl channel blocker diphenylaminocarbonic acid (DPC) and some analogs inhibit gCl, half-inhibitory concentration of the most potent dichloro-DPC is 10(-6) M. The inhibitors act only from the mucosal side. Slow dissipation of gCl after abolition of Na entry across the apical membranes which can be prevented by preceding blockage of the Na-K-ATPase with ouabain suggests that the intracellular Na activity might influence the permeability of the Cl pathway. It is supposed that this control involves microfilaments between the cytoskeleton and the tight junctions with Cl-specific permeation sites in outer regions of the junctional complex.

  1. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  2. Anchored PKA as a gatekeeper for gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Pidoux, Guillaume; Taskén, Kjetil

    2015-01-01

    Anchored protein kinase A (PKA) bound to A Kinase Anchoring Protein (AKAP) mediates effects of localized increases in cAMP in defined subcellular microdomains and retains the specificity in cAMP-PKA signaling to distinct extracellular stimuli. Gap junctions are pores between adjacent cells constituted by connexin proteins that provide means of communication and transfer of small molecules. While the PKA signaling is known to promote human trophoblast cell fusion, the gap junction communication through connexin 43 (Cx43) is a prerequisite for this process. We recently demonstrated that trophoblast fusion is regulated by ezrin, a known AKAP, which binds to Cx43 and delivers PKA in the vicinity gap junctions. We found that disruption of the ezrin-Cx43 interaction abolished PKA-dependent phosphorylation of Cx43 as well as gap junction communication and subsequently cell fusion. We propose that the PKA-ezrin-Cx43 macromolecular complex regulating gap junction communication constitutes a general mechanism to control opening of Cx43 gap junctions by phosphorylation in response to cAMP signaling in various cell types.

  3. Brain barriers: Crosstalk between complex tight junctions and adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Silvia; Engelhardt, Britta

    2015-05-25

    Unique intercellular junctional complexes between the central nervous system (CNS) microvascular endothelial cells and the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the endothelial blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the epithelial blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), respectively. These barriers inhibit paracellular diffusion, thereby protecting the CNS from fluctuations in the blood. Studies of brain barrier integrity during development, normal physiology, and disease have focused on BBB and BCSFB tight junctions but not the corresponding endothelial and epithelial adherens junctions. The crosstalk between adherens junctions and tight junctions in maintaining barrier integrity is an understudied area that may represent a promising target for influencing brain barrier function. © 2015 Tietz and Engelhardt.

  4. Intercellular junctions in myriapods.

    PubMed

    Dallai, R; Bigliardi, E; Lane, N J

    1990-01-01

    Tissue from the intestinal tract of myriapods, including millipedes, centipedes and pauropods were examined in tracer-impregnated sections and freeze-fracture replicas. The foregut and hindgut of all three classes exhibit pleated septate junctions; these display undulating intercellular ribbons in thin sections. In replicas they show discrete intramembranous particle (IMP) arrays aligned in rows in parallel; with one another. The tissues of the hindgut also possess scalariform junctions, characterized by cross-striated intercellular clefts in sections and IMP-enriched membranes in replicas. Gap junctions occur in all groups, but they are atypical in replicas in that their component IMPs do not always fracture onto the E face, as is characteristic of other arthropods; some IMPs cleave to the P face and others to the E face. The midgut of these organisms exhibits smooth septate junctions with conventional straight septal ribbons and occasional interseptal columns. However the intramembranous appearance in replicas is variable, particularly in centipedes, in that the rows of IMPs in chemically-unfixed propanecryofixed tissues, are prominent and adhere preferentially to the E face, with complementary P face grooves, while in fixed tissues the IMPs are much less distinct and fracture to either P face or E face. They tend not to protrude far beyond the mid-plane of the membrane bilayer and lie in rows which commonly take on the form of a network. Individual rows of the network sometimes curve to run beside a second row, over a short distance, before bending away into another part of the network. The aligned particle rows, which are much more prominent in millipedes, where they frequently lie in close parallel appositions, do not fuse into ridges as often occurs in insect tissues. The myriapod junctions, therefore, are of the same general kind as are found in the gut tract of other arthropod groups, but differ with respect to the subtleties of their intramembranous

  5. De novo lumen formation and elongation in the developing nephron: a central role for afadin in apical polarity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhufeng; Zimmerman, Susan; Brakeman, Paul R; Beaudoin, Gerard M; Reichardt, Louis F; Marciano, Denise K

    2013-04-01

    A fundamental process in biology is the de novo formation and morphogenesis of polarized tubules. Although these processes are essential for the formation of multiple metazoan organ systems, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate them. In this study, we have characterized several steps in tubule formation and morphogenesis using the mouse kidney as a model system. We report that kidney mesenchymal cells contain discrete Par3-expressing membrane microdomains that become restricted to an apical domain, coinciding with lumen formation. Once lumen formation has been initiated, elongation occurs by simultaneous extension and additional de novo lumen generation. We demonstrate that lumen formation and elongation require afadin, a nectin adaptor protein implicated in adherens junction formation. Mice that lack afadin in nephron precursors show evidence of Par3-expressing membrane microdomains, but fail to develop normal apical-basal polarity and generate a continuous lumen. Absence of afadin led to delayed and diminished integration of nectin complexes and failure to recruit R-cadherin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that afadin is required for Par complex formation. Together, these results suggest that afadin acts upstream of the Par complex to regulate the integration and/or coalescence of membrane microdomains, thereby establishing apical-basal polarity and lumen formation/elongation during kidney tubulogenesis.

  6. ZO-1 controls endothelial adherens junctions, cell–cell tension, angiogenesis, and barrier formation

    PubMed Central

    Tornavaca, Olga; Chia, Minghao; Dufton, Neil; Almagro, Lourdes Osuna; Conway, Daniel E.; Randi, Anna M.; Schwartz, Martin A.; Matter, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Intercellular junctions are crucial for mechanotransduction, but whether tight junctions contribute to the regulation of cell–cell tension and adherens junctions is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the tight junction protein ZO-1 regulates tension acting on VE-cadherin–based adherens junctions, cell migration, and barrier formation of primary endothelial cells, as well as angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. ZO-1 depletion led to tight junction disruption, redistribution of active myosin II from junctions to stress fibers, reduced tension on VE-cadherin and loss of junctional mechanotransducers such as vinculin and PAK2, and induced vinculin dissociation from the α-catenin–VE-cadherin complex. Claudin-5 depletion only mimicked ZO-1 effects on barrier formation, whereas the effects on mechanotransducers were rescued by inhibition of ROCK and phenocopied by JAM-A, JACOP, or p114RhoGEF down-regulation. ZO-1 was required for junctional recruitment of JACOP, which, in turn, recruited p114RhoGEF. ZO-1 is thus a central regulator of VE-cadherin–dependent endothelial junctions that orchestrates the spatial actomyosin organization, tuning cell–cell tension, migration, angiogenesis, and barrier formation. PMID:25753039

  7. ZO-1 controls endothelial adherens junctions, cell-cell tension, angiogenesis, and barrier formation.

    PubMed

    Tornavaca, Olga; Chia, Minghao; Dufton, Neil; Almagro, Lourdes Osuna; Conway, Daniel E; Randi, Anna M; Schwartz, Martin A; Matter, Karl; Balda, Maria S

    2015-03-16

    Intercellular junctions are crucial for mechanotransduction, but whether tight junctions contribute to the regulation of cell-cell tension and adherens junctions is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the tight junction protein ZO-1 regulates tension acting on VE-cadherin-based adherens junctions, cell migration, and barrier formation of primary endothelial cells, as well as angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. ZO-1 depletion led to tight junction disruption, redistribution of active myosin II from junctions to stress fibers, reduced tension on VE-cadherin and loss of junctional mechanotransducers such as vinculin and PAK2, and induced vinculin dissociation from the α-catenin-VE-cadherin complex. Claudin-5 depletion only mimicked ZO-1 effects on barrier formation, whereas the effects on mechanotransducers were rescued by inhibition of ROCK and phenocopied by JAM-A, JACOP, or p114RhoGEF down-regulation. ZO-1 was required for junctional recruitment of JACOP, which, in turn, recruited p114RhoGEF. ZO-1 is thus a central regulator of VE-cadherin-dependent endothelial junctions that orchestrates the spatial actomyosin organization, tuning cell-cell tension, migration, angiogenesis, and barrier formation.

  8. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) traffics to apical membrane in lipid rafts in mouse cortical collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Hill, Warren G; Butterworth, Michael B; Wang, Huamin; Edinger, Robert S; Lebowitz, Jonathan; Peters, Kathryn W; Frizzell, Raymond A; Johnson, John P

    2007-12-28

    We previously showed that ENaC is present in lipid rafts in A6 cells, a Xenopus kidney cell line. We now demonstrate that ENaC can be detected in lipid rafts in mouse cortical collecting duct ((MPK)CCD(14)) cells by detergent insolubility, buoyancy on density gradients using two distinct approaches, and colocalization with caveolin 1. Less than 30% of ENaC subunits were found in raft fractions. The channel subunits also colocalized on sucrose gradients with known vesicle targeting and fusion proteins syntaxin 1A, Vamp 2, and SNAP23. Hormonal stimulation of ENaC activity by either forskolin or aldosterone, short or long term, did not alter the lipid raft distribution of ENaC. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin added apically to (MPK)CCD(14) cells resulted in a slow decline in amiloride-sensitive sodium transport with short circuit current reductions of 38.1 +/- 9.6% after 60 min. The slow decline in ENaC activity in response to apical cyclodextrin was identical to the rate of decline seen when protein synthesis was inhibited by cycloheximide. Apical biotinylation of (MPK)CCD(14) cells confirmed the loss of ENaC at the cell surface following cyclodextrin treatment. Acute stimulation of the recycling pool of ENaC was unaffected by apical cyclodextrin application. Expression of dominant negative caveolin isoforms (CAV1-eGFP and CAV3-DGV) which disrupt caveolae, reduced basal ENaC currents by 72.3 and 78.2%, respectively; but, as with cyclodextrin, the acute response to forskolin was unaffected. We conclude that ENaC is present in and regulated by lipid rafts. The data are consistent with a model in which rafts mediate the constitutive apical delivery of ENaC.

  9. β2-syntrophin and Par-3 promote an apicobasal Rac activity gradient at cell-cell junctions by differentially regulating Tiam1 activity.

    PubMed

    Mack, Natalie A; Porter, Andrew P; Whalley, Helen J; Schwarz, Juliane P; Jones, Richard C; Khaja, Azharuddin Sajid Syed; Bjartell, Anders; Anderson, Kurt I; Malliri, Angeliki

    2012-11-01

    Although Rac and its activator Tiam1 are known to stimulate cell-cell adhesion, the mechanisms regulating their activity in cell-cell junction formation are poorly understood. Here, we identify β2-syntrophin as a Tiam1 interactor required for optimal cell-cell adhesion. We show that during tight-junction (TJ) assembly β2-syntrophin promotes Tiam1-Rac activity, in contrast to the function of the apical determinant Par-3 whose inhibition of Tiam1-Rac activity is necessary for TJ assembly. We further demonstrate that β2-syntrophin localizes more basally than Par-3 at cell-cell junctions, thus generating an apicobasal Rac activity gradient at developing cell-cell junctions. Targeting active Rac to TJs shows that this gradient is required for optimal TJ assembly and apical lumen formation. Consistently, β2-syntrophin depletion perturbs Tiam1 and Rac localization at cell-cell junctions and causes defects in apical lumen formation. We conclude that β2-syntrophin and Par-3 fine-tune Rac activity along cell-cell junctions controlling TJ assembly and the establishment of apicobasal polarity.

  10. β2-syntrophin and Par-3 promote an apicobasal Rac activity gradient at cell-cell junctions by differentially regulating Tiam1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Natalie A.; Porter, Andrew P.; Whalley, Helen J.; Schwarz, Juliane P.; Jones, Richard C.; Syed, Azharuddin Sajid; Bjartell, Anders; Anderson, Kurt I.; Malliri, Angeliki

    2012-01-01

    Although Rac and its activator Tiam1 are known to stimulate cell-cell adhesion, the mechanisms regulating their activity in cell-cell junction formation are poorly understood. Here, we identify β2-syntrophin as a Tiam1 interactor required for optimal cell-cell adhesion. We show that during tight junction (TJ) assembly β2-syntrophin promotes Tiam1-Rac activity, in contrast to the function of the apical determinant Par-3 whose inhibition of Tiam1-Rac activity is necessary for TJ assembly. We further demonstrate that β2-syntrophin localises more basally than Par-3 at cell-cell junctions, thus generating an apicobasal Rac activity gradient at developing cell-cell junctions. Targeting active Rac to TJs shows that this gradient is required for optimal TJ assembly and apical lumen formation. Consistently, β2-syntrophin depletion perturbs Tiam1 and Rac localisation at cell-cell junctions and causes defects in apical lumen formation. We conclude that β2-syntrophin and Par-3 finetune Rac activity along cell-cell junctions controlling TJ assembly and the establishment of apicobasal polarity. PMID:23103911

  11. A Case of Persistent Apical Ballooning Complicated by Apical Thrombus in Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patient

    PubMed Central

    Shim, In Kyoung; Kim, Bong-Joon; Kim, Hyunsu; Lee, Jae-Woo; Cha, Tae-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, which is also known as "transient apical ballooning", is a cardiac syndrome associated with emotional and physical stress that occurs in postmenopausal women. It may mimic acute coronary syndrome but coronary angiography reveals normal epicardial coronary arteries. The prognosis is favorable with the normalization of wall motion abnormalities within weeks. We report a case of persistent apical ballooning complicated by an apical thrombus in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy of systemic lupus erythematous patient. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy may not be always transient and left ventricular thrombus can occur in the disease course as our patient. PMID:24198920

  12. Surgery for women with apical vaginal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Maher, Christopher; Feiner, Benjamin; Baessler, Kaven; Christmann-Schmid, Corina; Haya, Nir; Brown, Julie

    2016-10-01

    Apical vaginal prolapse is a descent of the uterus or vaginal vault (post-hysterectomy). Various surgical treatments are available and there are no guidelines to recommend which is the best. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of any surgical intervention compared to another intervention for the management of apical vaginal prolapse. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group's Specialised Register of controlled trials, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, ClinicalTrials.gov, WHO ICTRP and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings (searched July 2015) and ClinicalTrials.gov (searched January 2016). We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We used Cochrane methods. Our primary outcomes were awareness of prolapse, repeat surgery and recurrent prolapse (any site). We included 30 RCTs (3414 women) comparing surgical procedures for apical vaginal prolapse. Evidence quality ranged from low to moderate. Limitations included imprecision, poor methodological reporting and inconsistency. Vaginal procedures versus sacral colpopexy (six RCTs, n = 583; one to four-year review). Awareness of prolapse was more common after vaginal procedures (risk ratio (RR) 2.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06 to 4.21, 3 RCTs, n = 277, I(2) = 0%, moderate-quality evidence). If 7% of women are aware of prolapse after sacral colpopexy, 14% (7% to 27%) are likely to be aware after vaginal procedures. Repeat surgery for prolapse was more common after vaginal procedures (RR 2.28, 95% CI 1.20 to 4.32; 4 RCTs, n = 383, I(2) = 0%, moderate-quality evidence). The confidence interval suggests that if 4% of women require repeat prolapse surgery after sacral colpopexy, between 5% and 18% would require it after vaginal procedures.We found no conclusive evidence that vaginal procedures increaserepeat surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) (RR 1.87, 95% CI 0.72 to 4.86; 4 RCTs, n = 395; I(2) = 0%, moderate

  13. Vacuolar protein in apical and flower-petal cells.

    PubMed

    Shumway, L K; Cheng, V; Ryan, C A

    1972-12-01

    Vegetative apices, floral apices and flower petals of five Solanaceae (potato, tomato, tobacco, petunia and nightshade) and of corn and Nigella were examined with an electron microscope for the presence of protein bodies in the cell vacuoles. Electron-dense bodies were found in vacuoles of all plants investigated but not in every tissue examined. The bodies observed in the apices are similar to the protein bodies previously found in tomato leaves where they appear to be related to the presence of chymotrypsin inhibitor I protein (Shumway et al., 1970). The bodies appeared in very young cells in small vacuoles, disappearing as the cell matured. They are apparently related to the growth and development of the new cells. The results suggest that plants may regulate specific proteins within the apical region through selective synthesis and degradation of proteins accompanied by compartmentalization in the vacuole.

  14. Vacuolar processing enzyme activates programmed cell death in the apical meristem inducing loss of apical dominance.

    PubMed

    Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Buskila, Yossi; Belausov, Eduard; Wolf, Dalia; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Lers, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2017-10-01

    The potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber is a swollen underground stem that can sprout in an apical dominance (AD) pattern. Bromoethane (BE) induces loss of AD and the accumulation of vegetative vacuolar processing enzyme (S. tuberosum vacuolar processing enzyme [StVPE]) in the tuber apical meristem (TAM). Vacuolar processing enzyme activity, induced by BE, is followed by programmed cell death in the TAM. In this study, we found that the mature StVPE1 (mVPE) protein exhibits specific activity for caspase 1, but not caspase 3 substrates. Optimal activity of mVPE was achieved at acidic pH, consistent with localization of StVPE1 to the vacuole, at the edge of the TAM. Downregulation of StVPE1 by RNA interference resulted in reduced stem branching and retained AD in tubers treated with BE. Overexpression of StVPE1 fused to green fluorescent protein showed enhanced stem branching after BE treatment. Our data suggest that, following stress, induction of StVPE1 in the TAM induces AD loss and stem branching. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evaluation of Apical Microleakage in Open Apex Teeth Using MTA Apical Plug in Different Sessions

    PubMed Central

    Yazdizadeh, Mohammad; Bouzarjomehri, Zeinab; Khalighinejad, Navid; Sadri, Leyli

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To compare microleakage of apexification using MTA in one or two sessions. Materials and Methods. 88 single rooted teeth were prepared and divided into two groups then received MTA apical plug. In the first group, the teeth were immersed in normal saline for 24 hours and then backfilled with guttapercha and AH26 sealer. In the second group, the teeth were obturated immediately after receiving apical plug. Four positive and four negative controls were selected. All specimens were placed in 1% methylene blue and decalcified in 5% nitric acid and finally were placed in methyl salicylate until getting transparent. All teeth were visualized for assessment of dye penetration under stereo dissecting microscope. Results. 36 and 35 teeth showed dye leakage in the first and second groups. Dye penetration into the entire canal length was confirmed in the positive control group, and in the negative control group no dye penetration was seen. Mean dye penetration in the first and second group was 5813 and 9152 μm. t-test revealed a significant difference between dye penetrations of two groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion. MTA requires adequate time for setting in the presence of the moisture, and final obturation should be delayed until final setting of MTA. PMID:24282642

  16. Effects of proinflammatory cytokines on the claudin-19 rich tight junctions of human retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shaomin; Gan, Geliang; Rao, Veena S; Adelman, Ron A; Rizzolo, Lawrence J

    2012-07-27

    Chronic, subclinical inflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of several ocular diseases, including age-related macular degeneration. Proinflammatory cytokines affect tight junctions in epithelia that lack claudin-19, but in the retinal pigment epithelium claudin-19 predominates. We examined the effects of cytokines on the tight junctions of human fetal RPE (hfRPE). hfRPE was incubated with interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), interferon-gamma (IFNγ), or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), alone or in combination. Permeability and selectivity of the tight junctions were assessed using nonionic tracers and electrophysiology. Claudins, occludin, and ZO-1 were examined using PCR, immunoblotting, and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Only TNFα consistently reduced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) >80%. A serum-free medium revealed two effects of TNFα: (1) decreased TER was observed only when TNFα was added to the apical side of the monolayer, and (2) expression of TNFα receptors and inhibitors of apoptosis were induced from either side of the monolayer. In untreated cultures, tight junctions were slightly cation selective, and this was affected minimally by TNFα. The results were unexplained by effects on claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-19, occludin, and ZO-1, but changes in the morphology of the junctions and actin cytoskeleton may have a role. Claudin-19-rich tight junctions have low permeability for ionic and nonionic solutes, and are slightly cation-selective. Claudin-19 is not a direct target of TNFα. TNFα may protect RPE from apoptosis, but makes the monolayer leaky when it is presented to the apical side of the monolayer. Unlike other epithelia, IFNγ failed to augment the effect of TNFα on tight junctions.

  17. Effects of Proinflammatory Cytokines on the Claudin-19 Rich Tight Junctions of Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shaomin; Gan, Geliang; Rao, Veena S.; Adelman, Ron A.; Rizzolo, Lawrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Chronic, subclinical inflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of several ocular diseases, including age-related macular degeneration. Proinflammatory cytokines affect tight junctions in epithelia that lack claudin-19, but in the retinal pigment epithelium claudin-19 predominates. We examined the effects of cytokines on the tight junctions of human fetal RPE (hfRPE). Methods. hfRPE was incubated with interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), interferon-gamma (IFNγ), or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), alone or in combination. Permeability and selectivity of the tight junctions were assessed using nonionic tracers and electrophysiology. Claudins, occludin, and ZO-1 were examined using PCR, immunoblotting, and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results. Only TNFα consistently reduced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) >80%. A serum-free medium revealed two effects of TNFα: (1) decreased TER was observed only when TNFα was added to the apical side of the monolayer, and (2) expression of TNFα receptors and inhibitors of apoptosis were induced from either side of the monolayer. In untreated cultures, tight junctions were slightly cation selective, and this was affected minimally by TNFα. The results were unexplained by effects on claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-19, occludin, and ZO-1, but changes in the morphology of the junctions and actin cytoskeleton may have a role. Conclusions. Claudin-19–rich tight junctions have low permeability for ionic and nonionic solutes, and are slightly cation-selective. Claudin-19 is not a direct target of TNFα. TNFα may protect RPE from apoptosis, but makes the monolayer leaky when it is presented to the apical side of the monolayer. Unlike other epithelia, IFNγ failed to augment the effect of TNFα on tight junctions. PMID:22761260

  18. Effect of cytochalasin A on apical growth, actin cytoskeleton organization and enzyme secretion in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Torralba, S; Raudaskoski, M; Pedregosa, A M; Laborda, F

    1998-01-01

    The role of actin in apical growth and enzyme secretion in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans was studied by treating the hyphae with cytochalasin A (CA), which inhibits actin polymerization. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed actin at the tips of main hyphae and branches, and at the site of developing septa. CA inhibited the growth of the fungus and changed the growth pattern of hyphal tips from cylindrical tubes to spherical beads. The regions with swellings showed no actin fluorescence, and neither was actin seen in association with septa. After 4 h exposure, hyphae were able to resume the normal tip growth pattern in the presence of CA for a short period of time and new cylindrical hyphae, with actin fluorescence at the apex, emerged from the swollen tips. Later, the tips of the hyphae swelled again, which led to a beaded appearance. We also studied the effect of CA on the secretion of alpha- and beta-galactosidase. alpha-Galactosidase is secreted into the culture medium, whereas beta-galactosidase remains in the mycelium, with part of its activity bound to the cell wall. When A. nidulans mycelium was incubated in the presence of CA, a reduction in the secretion of alpha-galactosidase into the culture medium and a decrease in the alpha- and beta-galactosidase activities bound to the cell wall was detected. However, the CA dose used for the hyphae did not modify the secretion of the enzymes from protoplasts. Results described here provide evidence that a polymerized actin cytoskeleton is required for normal apical growth, hyphal tip shape and polarized enzyme secretion in A. nidulans. Cytochalasin-induced disruptions of the actin cytoskeleton could result in the alterations of apical growth and inhibition of enzyme secretion observed by blocking secretory vesicle transport to the apex.

  19. A Polarized Cell Model for Chikungunya Virus Infection: Entry and Egress of Virus Occurs at the Apical Domain of Polarized Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Pei Jin; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has resulted in several outbreaks in the past six decades. The clinical symptoms of Chikungunya infection include fever, skin rash, arthralgia, and an increasing incidence of encephalitis. The re-emergence of CHIKV with more severe pathogenesis highlights its potential threat on our human health. In this study, polarized HBMEC, polarized Vero C1008 and non-polarized Vero cells grown on cell culture inserts were infected with CHIKV apically or basolaterally. Plaque assays, viral binding assays and immunofluorescence assays demonstrated apical entry and release of CHIKV in polarized HBMEC and Vero C1008. Drug treatment studies were performed to elucidate both host cell and viral factors involved in the sorting and release of CHIKV at the apical domain of polarized cells. Disruption of host cell myosin II, microtubule and microfilament networks did not disrupt the polarized release of CHIKV. However, treatment with tunicamycin resulted in a bi-directional release of CHIKV, suggesting that N-glycans of CHIKV envelope glycoproteins could serve as apical sorting signals. PMID:24587455

  20. Visualization of removal of trapped air from the apical region in simulated root canals by laser-activated irrigation using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Harry Huiz; De Moor, Roeland J G; Suharto, Djoko

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this visualization study was to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism by which trapped air is removed from the apical region of simulated root canals by activation of an irrigant using an erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser during endodontic procedures. A high-speed imaging system with high temporal and spatial resolution was used to visualize laser-induced shock waves in a resin block model with a curved root canal (inner diameter at the apex 0.08 mm, taper 4 %, crown height 10 mm, overall length 40 mm) and a glass cylinder model with a straight root canal (inner diameter 1 mm, crown height 10 mm, overall length 40 mm). The study utilized MZ3 and RFT3 tips in each model, without water or air spray, and with an average power of 1 W at 35 Hz. Laser-activated irrigation overcame the airlock effect by releasing air trapped in the air column. The mechanism underlying the removal of trapped air from the apical region using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser in a dry root canal is via the disruption of the surface tension at the solution-air interface. This disruption, caused by bubble implosion (cavitation), displaces air in the form of bubbles from the apical region toward the solution, which allows the solution to travel apically.

  1. Haemostatic agents in apical surgery. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Clé-Ovejero, Adrià

    2016-01-01

    Background Blood presence in apical surgery can prevent the correct vision of the surgical field, change the physical properties of filling materials and reduce their sealing ability. Objetive To describe which are the most effective and safest haemostatic agents to control bleeding in patients undergoing apical surgery. Material and Methods TWe carried out a systematic review, using Medline and Cochrane Library databases, of human clinical studies published in the last 10 years. Results The agents that proved more effective in bleeding control were calcium sulphate (100%) and collagen plus epinephrine (92.9%) followed by ferric sulphate (60%), gauze packing (30%) and collagen (16.7%). When using aluminium chloride (Expasyl®), over 90% of the apical lesions improved, but this agent seemed to increase swelling. Epinephrine with collagen did not significantly raise either blood pressure or heart rate. Conclusions Despite the use of several haemostatic materials in apical surgery, there is little evidence on their effectiveness and safety. The most effective haemostatic agents were calcium sulphate and epinephrine plus collagen. Epinephrine plus collagen did not seem to significantly raise blood pressure or heart rate during surgery. Aluminium chloride did not increase postoperative pain but could slightly increase postoperative swelling. Randomized clinical trials are needed to assess the haemostatic effectiveness and adverse effects of haemostatic materials in apical surgery. Key words:Haemostasis, apical surgery. PMID:27475689

  2. Healing of apical rarefaction of three nonvital open apex anterior teeth using a white portland cement apical plug

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Amitabha; Dey, Bibhas; Dhar, Reema; Sardar, Prabir

    2012-01-01

    The major challenge of performing root canal treatment in an open apex pulp-less tooth is to obtain a good apical seal. MTA has been successfully used to achieve a good apical seal, wherein the root canal obturation can be done immediately. MTA and White Portland Cement has been shown similarity in their physical, chemical and biological properties and has also shown similar outcome when used in animal studies and human trials. In our study, open apex of three non vital upper central incisors has been plugged using modified white Portland cement. 3 to 6 months follow up revealed absence of clinical symptoms and disappearance of peri-apical rarefactions. The positive clinical outcome may encourage the future use of white Portland cement as an apical plug material in case of non vital open apex tooth as much cheaper substitute of MTA. PMID:23230357

  3. AKAP220 manages apical actin networks that coordinate aquaporin-2 location and renal water reabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Jennifer L.; Ogier, Leah; Forbush, Katherine A.; Bucko, Paula; Gopalan, Janani; Seternes, Ole-Morten; Langeberg, Lorene K.; Scott, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Filtration through the kidney eliminates toxins, manages electrolyte balance, and controls water homeostasis. Reabsorption of water from the luminal fluid of the nephron occurs through aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water pores in principal cells that line the kidney-collecting duct. This vital process is impeded by formation of an “actin barrier” that obstructs the passive transit of AQP2 to the plasma membrane. Bidirectional control of AQP2 trafficking is managed by hormones and signaling enzymes. We have discovered that vasopressin-independent facets of this homeostatic mechanism are under the control of A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 220 (AKAP220; product of the Akap11 gene). CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and imaging approaches show that loss of AKAP220 disrupts apical actin networks in organoid cultures. Similar defects are evident in tissue sections from AKAP220-KO mice. Biochemical analysis of AKAP220-null kidney extracts detected reduced levels of active RhoA GTPase, a well-known modulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Fluorescent imaging of kidney sections from these genetically modified mice revealed that RhoA and AQP2 accumulate at the apical surface of the collecting duct. Consequently, these animals are unable to appropriately dilute urine in response to overhydration. We propose that membrane-proximal signaling complexes constrained by AKAP220 impact the actin barrier dynamics and AQP2 trafficking to ensure water homeostasis. PMID:27402760

  4. Multiciliated cell basal bodies align in stereotypical patterns coordinated by the apical cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Herawati, Elisa; Kanoh, Hatsuho

    2016-01-01

    Multiciliated cells (MCCs) promote fluid flow through coordinated ciliary beating, which requires properly organized basal bodies (BBs). Airway MCCs have large numbers of BBs, which are uniformly oriented and, as we show here, align linearly. The mechanism for BB alignment is unexplored. To study this mechanism, we developed a long-term and high-resolution live-imaging system and used it to observe green fluorescent protein–centrin2–labeled BBs in cultured mouse tracheal MCCs. During MCC differentiation, the BB array adopted four stereotypical patterns, from a clustering “floret” pattern to the linear “alignment.” This alignment process was correlated with BB orientations, revealed by double immunostaining for BBs and their asymmetrically associated basal feet (BF). The BB alignment was disrupted by disturbing apical microtubules with nocodazole and by a BF-depleting Odf2 mutation. We constructed a theoretical model, which indicated that the apical cytoskeleton, acting like a viscoelastic fluid, provides a self-organizing mechanism in tracheal MCCs to align BBs linearly for mucociliary transport. PMID:27573463

  5. RNG1 is a Late Marker of the Apical Polar Ring in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Johnson Q.; de Leon, Jessica C.; Li, Catherine; Huynh, My-Hang; Beatty, Wandy; Morrissette, Naomi S.

    2010-01-01

    The asexually proliferating stages of apicomplexan parasites cause acute symptoms of diseases such as malaria, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis. These stages are characterized by the presence of two independent microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). Centrioles are found at the poles of the intranuclear spindle. The apical polar ring (APR), a MTOC unique to apicomplexans, organizes subpellicular microtubules which impose cell shape and apical polarity on these protozoa. Here we describe the characteristics of a novel protein that localizes to the APR of Toxoplasma gondii which we have named ring-1 (RNG1). There are related RNG1 proteins in Neospora caninum and Sarcocystis neurona but no obvious homologs in Plasmodium spp., Cryptosporidium spp. or Babesia spp. RNG1 is a small, low-complexity, detergent-insoluble protein that assembles at the APR very late in the process of daughter parasite replication. We were unable to knock-out the RNG1 gene, suggesting that its gene product is essential. Tagged RNG1 lines have also allowed us to visualize the APR during growth of Toxoplasma in the microtubule-disrupting drug oryzalin. Oryzalin inhibits nuclear division and cytokinesis although Toxoplasma growth continues, and similar to earlier observations of unchecked centriole duplication in oryzalin-treated parasites, the APR continues to duplicate during aberrant parasite growth. PMID:20658557

  6. Holliday Junction Resolvases

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Haley D.M.; West, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. PMID:25183833

  7. Holliday junction resolvases.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Haley D M; West, Stephen C

    2014-09-02

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  8. Drosophila Nesprin-1 controls glutamate receptor density at neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Morel, Véronique; Lepicard, Simon; Rey, Alexandre N; Parmentier, Marie-Laure; Schaeffer, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Nesprin-1 is a core component of a protein complex connecting nuclei to cytoskeleton termed LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton). Nesprin-1 is anchored to the nuclear envelope by its C-terminal KASH domain, the disruption of which has been associated with neuronal and neuromuscular pathologies, including autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. Here, we describe a new and unexpected role of Drosophila Nesprin-1, Msp-300, in neuromuscular junction. We show that larvae carrying a deletion of Msp-300 KASH domain (Msp-300 (∆KASH) ) present a locomotion defect suggestive of a myasthenia, and demonstrate the importance of muscle Msp-300 for this phenotype, using tissue-specific RNAi knock-down. We show that Msp-300 (∆KASH) mutants display abnormal neurotransmission at the larval neuromuscular junction, as well as an imbalance in postsynaptic glutamate receptor composition with a decreased percentage of GluRIIA-containing receptors. We could rescue Msp-300 (∆KASH) locomotion phenotypes by GluRIIA overexpression, suggesting that the locomotion impairment associated with the KASH domain deletion is due to a reduction in junctional GluRIIA. In summary, we found that Msp-300 controls GluRIIA density at the neuromuscular junction. Our results suggest that Drosophila is a valuable model for further deciphering how Nesprin-1 and LINC disruption may lead to neuronal and neuromuscular pathologies.

  9. The rice FON1 gene controls vegetative and reproductive development by regulating shoot apical meristem size.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sunok; Jung, Ki-Hong; Lee, Do-Eun; Lee, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Jinwon; An, Kyungsook; Kang, Hong-Gyu; An, Gynheung

    2006-02-28

    Most plant organs develop from meristems. Rice FON1, which is an ortholog of Clv1, regulates stem cell proliferation and organ initiation. The point muta-tions, fon1-1 and fon1-2, disrupt meristem balance, resulting in alteration of floral organ numbers and the architecture of primary rachis branches. In this study, we identified two knockout alleles, fon1-3 and fon1-4, generated by T-DNA and Tos17 insertion, respectively. Unlike the previously isolated point mutants, the null mutants have alterations not only of the reproductive organs but also of vegetative tissues, producing fewer tillers and secondary rachis branches. The mutant plants are semi-dwarfs due to delayed leaf emergence, and leaf senescence is delayed. SEM analysis showed that the shoot apical meristems of fon1-3 mutants are enlarged. These results indicate that FON1 controls vegetative as well as reproductive development by regulating meristem size.

  10. Babesia divergens and Neospora caninum apical membrane antigen 1 structures reveal selectivity and plasticity in apicomplexan parasite host cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin, Michelle L; Crawford, Joanna; Lebrun, Maryse L; Boulanger, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Host cell invasion by the obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium (malaria) and Toxoplasma (toxoplasmosis), requires a step-wise mechanism unique among known host–pathogen interactions. A key step is the formation of the moving junction (MJ) complex, a circumferential constriction between the apical tip of the parasite and the host cell membrane that traverses in a posterior direction to enclose the parasite in a protective vacuole essential for intracellular survival. The leading model of MJ assembly proposes that Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2) is secreted into the host cell and integrated into the membrane where it serves as the receptor for apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) on the parasite surface. We have previously demonstrated that the AMA1-RON2 interaction is an effective target for inhibiting apicomplexan invasion. To better understand the AMA1-dependant molecular recognition events that promote invasion, including the significant AMA1-RON2 interaction, we present the structural characterization of AMA1 from the apicomplexan parasites Babesia divergens (BdAMA1) and Neospora caninum (NcAMA1) by X-ray crystallography. These studies offer intriguing structural insight into the RON2-binding surface groove in the AMA1 apical domain, which shows clear evidence for receptor–ligand co-evolution, and the hyper variability of the membrane proximal domain, which in Plasmodium is responsible for direct binding to erythrocytes. By incorporating the structural analysis of BdAMA1 and NcAMA1 with existing AMA1 structures and complexes we were able to define conserved pockets in the AMA1 apical groove that could be targeted for the design of broadly reactive therapeutics. PMID:23169033

  11. Effect of Calcium Hydroxide, Chlorhexidine Digluconate and Camphorated Monochlorophenol on the Sealing Ability of Biodentine Apical Plug

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Harshit; Prasad, Ashwini B; Raisingani, Deepak; Soni, Dileep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Teeth with immature apex are managed by establishing an apical plug using various materials and techniques. However, the use of previously placed intracanal medicament may affect the sealing ability of permanent filling material used as an apical plug. Aim To evaluate the effect of removal of previously placed Calcium Hydroxide, Chlorhexidine Digluconate and Camphorated Monochlorophenol as an intracanal medicament on the sealing ability of the Biodentine as an apical plug. Materials and Methods A total of 72 recently extracted human permanent teeth with single root were selected and stored in saline at room temperature. The crown portion of each tooth was removed at the level of cemento enamel junction; 14mm root length was taken as standard length. All the roots were submerged in 20% sulphuric acid up to 3 mm from the apex, for four days for root resorption. One sample was cut longitudinally to look for root resorption under stereo microscope. The canal preparation was done; the roots were kept in moist gauze after instrumentation. A total of 71 roots were randomly divided into three groups. GROUP 1:Calcium hydroxide paste, GROUP 2: Chlorhexidine digluconate, GROUP 3: Camphorated Monochlorophenol (CMCP). The medicaments were removed with stainless steel hand files and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite irrigation. After removal of medicament Biodentine was placed in apical third of resorbed roots and the remaining portion of the canals was filled with gutta-percha. All the 71 roots were analysed with fluid filtration method for evaluating microleakage. Results Comparing all the three groups statistically there was no significant difference. The mean values were found more for group 1 followed by group 2 & 3. Conclusion All the groups showed microleakage. Calcium hydroxide showed the maximum microleakage followed by Chlorhexidine digluconate and least with CMCP. PMID:27504409

  12. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  13. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Segalman, Rachel A; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-03-16

    By trapping molecules between two gold electrodes with a temperature difference across them, the junction Seebeck coefficients of 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT), 4,4'-dibenzenedithiol, and 4,4''-tribenzenedithiol in contact with gold were measured at room temperature to be +8.7 +/- 2.1 microvolts per kelvin (muV/K), +12.9 +/- 2.2 muV/K, and +14.2 +/- 3.2 muV/K, respectively (where the error is the full width half maximum of the statistical distributions). The positive sign unambiguously indicates p-type (hole) conduction in these heterojunctions, whereas the Au Fermi level position for Au-BDT-Au junctions was identified to be 1.2 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbital level of BDT. The ability to study thermoelectricity in molecular junctions provides the opportunity to address these fundamental unanswered questions about their electronic structure and to begin exploring molecular thermoelectric energy conversion.

  14. Effect of apical clearing technique on the treatment outcome of teeth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Priya; Logani, Ajay; Shah, Naseem; Pandey, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to compare the periapical healing of teeth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis treated either by conventional apical preparation (CAP) or apical clearing technique (ACT). Materials and Methods: Twenty subjects with bilateral nonvital similar teeth exhibiting comparable periapical index (PAI) score were enrolled and randomly allocated. Group I (CAP, n = 20): Apical preparation three sizes greater (master apical file [MAF]) than the first binding file at the established working length. Group II (ACT, n = 20): Apical preparation three sizes greater than the MAF that was followed by dry reaming. Root canal therapy was accomplished in single-visit for all the teeth. They were pursued radiographically at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Pre- and post-treatment PAI scores were compared. To ascertain the proportion of healed teeth between the two groups, McNemar Chi-square test was applied. Results: At 3, 6, and 9 months’ time interval the proportion of healed teeth for Group II (ACT) was greater in comparison to Group I (CAP) (P < 0.05). However, at 12 months follow-up period this difference was not significant (P = 0.08). Conclusion: ACT enhanced the healing kinetics. However, the long-term (12 months) radiographic outcome was similar for either technique. PMID:27656054

  15. Differentiation of Apical Bud Cells in a Newly Developed Apical Bud Transplantation Model Using GFP Transgenic Mice as Donor

    PubMed Central

    Sakagami, Ryuji; Yoshinaga, Yasunori; Okamura, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Rodent mandibular incisors have a unique anatomical structure that allows teeth to grow throughout the lifetime of the rodent. This report presents a novel transplantation technique for studying the apical bud differentiation of rodent mandibular incisors. Incisal apical end tissue with green fluorescent protein from transgenic mouse was transplanted to wild type mice, and the development of the transplanted cells were immunohistologically observed for 12 weeks after the transplantation. Results indicate that the green fluorescent apical end tissue replaced the original tissue, and cells from the apical bud differentiated and extended toward the incisal edge direction. The immunostaining with podoplanin also showed that the characteristics of the green fluorescent tissue were identical to those of the original. The green fluorescent cells were only found in the labial side of the incisor up to 4 weeks. After 12 weeks, however, they were also found in the lingual side. Here the green fluorescent cementocyte-like cells were only present in the cementum close to the dentin surface. This study suggests that some of the cells that form the cellular cementum come from the apical tissue including the apical bud in rodent incisors. PMID:26978064

  16. Translocation of Transfected GLUT2 to the Apical Membrane in Rat Intestinal IEC-6 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ye; Sarr, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we transfected the full length cDNA of GLUT2 into IEC-6 cells (which lack GLUT2 expression) to investigate GLUT2 translocation in enterocytes. AIM To investigate cellular mechanisms of GLUT2 translocation and its signaling pathway. METHODS Rat glut2 cDNA was transfected into IEC-6 cells. Glucose uptake was measured by incubating cell monolayers with glucose (0.5 to 50 mM), containing 14C-d-glucose and 3H-L-glucose to measure stereospecific, carrier-mediated and passive uptake, resp. We imaged GLUT2 immunoreactivity by confocal fluorescence microscopy. We evaluated the GLUT2 inhibitor (1mM phloretin), SGLT1 inhibitor (0.5 mM phlorizin), disrupting microtubular integrity (2 µM nocodazole and 0.5 µM cytochalasin B), PKC inhibitors (50 nM calphostin C and 10 µM chelerythrine), and PKC activator (50 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate: PMA). RESULTS In GLUT2-IEC cells, the Km (54.5 mM) increased compared with non-transfected IEC-6 cells (7.8 mM); phloretin (GLUT2 inhibitor) inhibited glucose uptake to that of non-transfected IEC-6 cells (p<0.05). Nocodazole and cytochalasin B (microtubule disrupters) inhibited uptake by 43–58% only at glucose concentrations ≥ 25 and 50 mM and the 10-min incubations. Calphostin C (PKC inhibitor) reproduced the inhibition of nocodazole; PMA (a PKC activator) enhanced glucose uptake by 69%. Exposure to glucose increased the GFP signal at the apical membrane of GLUT-1EC Cells. CONCLUSION IEC-6 cells lacking GLUT2 translocate GLUT2 apically when transfected to express GLUT2. Translocation of GLUT2 occurs through glucose stimulation via a PKC-dependent signaling pathway and requires integrity of the microtubular skeletal structure. PMID:22116644

  17. Translocation of transfected GLUT2 to the apical membrane in rat intestinal IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ye; Sarr, Michael G

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we transfected the full length cDNA of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) into IEC-6 cells (which lack GLUT2 expression) to investigate GLUT2 translocation in enterocytes. The purpose of this study was to investigate cellular mechanisms of GLUT2 translocation and its signaling pathway. Rat GLUT2 cDNA was transfected into IEC-6 cells. Glucose uptake was measured by incubating cell monolayers with glucose (0.5-50 mM), containing (14)C-D-glucose and (3)H-L-glucose, to measure stereospecific, carrier-mediated and passive uptake. We imaged GLUT2 immunoreactivity by confocal fluorescence microscopy. We evaluated the GLUT2 inhibitor (1 mM phloretin), SGLT1 inhibitor (0.5 mM phlorizin), disrupting microtubular integrity (2 μM nocodazole and 0.5 μM cytochalasin B), protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors (50 nM calphostin C and 10 μM chelerythrine), and PKC activator (50 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate: PMA). In GLUT2-IEC cells, the K(m) (54.5 mM) increased compared with non-transfected IEC-6 cells (7.8 mM); phloretin (GLUT2 inhibitor) inhibited glucose uptake to that of non-transfected IEC-6 cells (P < 0.05). Nocodazole and cytochalasin B (microtubule disrupters) inhibited uptake by 43-58% only at glucose concentrations ≥25 and 50 mM and the 10-min incubations. Calphostin C (PKC inhibitor) reproduced the inhibition of nocodazole; PMA (a PKC activator) enhanced glucose uptake by 69%. Exposure to glucose increased the GFP signal at the apical membrane of GLUT-1EC cells. IEC-6 cells lacking GLUT2 translocate GLUT2 apically when transfected to express GLUT2. Translocation of GLUT2 occurs through glucose stimulation via a PKC-dependent signaling pathway and requires integrity of the microtubular skeletal structure.

  18. GLUT2 Accumulation in Enterocyte Apical and Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Omar, Amal; Monteiro-Sepulveda, Milena; Poitou, Christine; Le Gall, Maude; Cotillard, Aurélie; Gilet, Jules; Garbin, Kevin; Houllier, Anne; Château, Danièle; Lacombe, Amélie; Veyrie, Nicolas; Hugol, Danielle; Tordjman, Joan; Magnan, Christophe; Serradas, Patricia; Clément, Karine; Leturque, Armelle; Brot-Laroche, Edith

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In healthy rodents, intestinal sugar absorption in response to sugar-rich meals and insulin is regulated by GLUT2 in enterocyte plasma membranes. Loss of insulin action maintains apical GLUT2 location. In human enterocytes, apical GLUT2 location has not been reported but may be revealed under conditions of insulin resistance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Subcellular location of GLUT2 in jejunal enterocytes was analyzed by confocal and electron microscopy imaging and Western blot in 62 well-phenotyped morbidly obese subjects and 7 lean human subjects. GLUT2 locations were assayed in ob/ob and ob/+ mice receiving oral metformin or in high-fat low-carbohydrate diet–fed C57Bl/6 mice. Glucose absorption and secretion were respectively estimated by oral glucose tolerance test and secretion of [U-14C]-3-O-methyl glucose into lumen. RESULTS In human enterocytes, GLUT2 was consistently located in basolateral membranes. Apical GLUT2 location was absent in lean subjects but was observed in 76% of obese subjects and correlated with insulin resistance and glycemia. In addition, intracellular accumulation of GLUT2 with early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1) was associated with reduced MGAT4a activity (glycosylation) in 39% of obese subjects on a low-carbohydrate/high-fat diet. Mice on a low-carbohydrate/high-fat diet for 12 months also exhibited endosomal GLUT2 accumulation and reduced glucose absorption. In ob/ob mice, metformin promoted apical GLUT2 and improved glucose homeostasis. Apical GLUT2 in fasting hyperglycemic ob/ob mice tripled glucose release into intestinal lumen. CONCLUSIONS In morbidly obese insulin-resistant subjects, GLUT2 was accumulated in apical and/or endosomal membranes of enterocytes. Functionally, apical GLUT2 favored and endosomal GLUT2 reduced glucose transepithelial exchanges. Thus, altered GLUT2 locations in enterocytes are a sign of intestinal adaptations to human metabolic pathology. PMID:21852673

  19. Treatment decisions in 330 cases referred for apical surgery.

    PubMed

    von Arx, Thomas; Roux, Eliane; Bürgin, Walter

    2014-02-01

    Apical surgery is an important treatment option for teeth with postendodontic apical periodontitis. However, little information is available regarding treatment planning in cases referred for apical surgery. This study evaluated the decisions made in such cases and analyzed the variables influencing the decision-making process. The study retrospectively assessed clinical and radiographic data of 330 teeth that had been referred to a specialist in apical surgery with regard to the treatment decisions made in those teeth. The clinical and radiographic variables were divided into subcategories to analyze which factors influenced the decision-making process. The treatment decisions included apical surgery (59.1%), tooth extraction (25.8%), no treatment (9.1%), and nonsurgical endodontic retreatment (6.1%). Variables that showed statistically significant differences comparing treatment decisions among subcategories included probing depth (P = .001), clinical attachment level (P = .0001), tooth mobility (P = .012), pain (P = .014), clinical signs (P = .0001), length (P = .041) and quality (P = .026) of the root canal filling, and size (P = .0001) and location (P = .0001) of the periapical lesion. This study shows that apical surgery was the most frequently made treatment decision in teeth referred to a specialist in apical surgery, but every fourth tooth was considered nonretainable and was scheduled for extraction. The data showed that the most common variables that influenced the decision to extract teeth were teeth with an increased probing depth and tooth mobility and teeth presenting with lesions not located at the apex. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemotherapy-induced mucosal barrier dysfunction: an updated review on the role of intestinal tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Hannah R; Bowen, Joanne M

    2013-06-01

    Gut toxicity, or mucositis, is a major dose-limiting side effect of chemotherapy that until recently received very little attention. Despite significant research, the mechanisms that underpin chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity (CIGT) remain unclear. Recently however, there has been renewed interest in the role tight junctions play in the pathogenesis of CIGT and associated diarrhea. Thus, this review will cover the role of tight junctions in maintaining gastrointestinal homeostasis and touch on recently proposed mechanisms of how tight junctions may contribute to the development of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. There is a wealth of anecdotal evidence regarding the role of tight junctions in the pathogenesis of gut toxicity. However, few studies have quantified or assessed the molecular changes in tight junctions in response to chemotherapy. This review will highlight the major findings of these studies and discuss the potential mechanisms by which tight junction disruption and mucosal barrier dysfunction may contribute to diarrhea. The significant clinical and economic impact associated with CIGT and diarrhea has only recently been appreciated. This has prompted significant research efforts in an attempt to reveal the pathophysiology of this debilitating complication. Renewed interest has been shown regarding the role of tight junctions in not only maintaining gastrointestinal health, but also contributing to mucosal barrier injury and diarrhea development. More detailed research into the effect chemotherapy has on the molecular characteristics of tight junctions will lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of CIGT and may uncover the therapeutic potential of tight junctions in treating diarrhea.

  1. Regulation of neuronal axon specification by glia-neuron gap junctions in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingfeng; Zhang, Albert; Jin, Yishi; Yan, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Axon specification is a critical step in neuronal development, and the function of glial cells in this process is not fully understood. Here, we show that C. elegans GLR glial cells regulate axon specification of their nearby GABAergic RME neurons through GLR-RME gap junctions. Disruption of GLR-RME gap junctions causes misaccumulation of axonal markers in non-axonal neurites of RME neurons and converts microtubules in those neurites to form an axon-like assembly. We further uncover that GLR-RME gap junctions regulate RME axon specification through activation of the CDK-5 pathway in a calcium-dependent manner, involving a calpain clp-4. Therefore, our study reveals the function of glia-neuron gap junctions in neuronal axon specification and shows that calcium originated from glial cells can regulate neuronal intracellular pathways through gap junctions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19510.001 PMID:27767956

  2. Regulation of neuronal axon specification by glia-neuron gap junctions in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingfeng; Zhang, Albert; Jin, Yishi; Yan, Dong

    2016-10-21

    Axon specification is a critical step in neuronal development, and the function of glial cells in this process is not fully understood. Here, we show that C. elegans GLR glial cells regulate axon specification of their nearby GABAergic RME neurons through GLR-RME gap junctions. Disruption of GLR-RME gap junctions causes misaccumulation of axonal markers in non-axonal neurites of RME neurons and converts microtubules in those neurites to form an axon-like assembly. We further uncover that GLR-RME gap junctions regulate RME axon specification through activation of the CDK-5 pathway in a calcium-dependent manner, involving a calpain clp-4. Therefore, our study reveals the function of glia-neuron gap junctions in neuronal axon specification and shows that calcium originated from glial cells can regulate neuronal intracellular pathways through gap junctions.

  3. The Extracellular Architecture of Adherens Junctions Revealed by Crystal Structures of Type I Cadherins

    SciTech Connect

    O Harrison; X Jin; S Hong; F Bahna; G Ahlsen; J Brasch; Y Wu; J Vendome; K Felsovalyi; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Adherens junctions, which play a central role in intercellular adhesion, comprise clusters of type I classical cadherins that bind via extracellular domains extended from opposing cell surfaces. We show that a molecular layer seen in crystal structures of E- and N-cadherin ectodomains reported here and in a previous C-cadherin structure corresponds to the extracellular architecture of adherens junctions. In all three ectodomain crystals, cadherins dimerize through a trans adhesive interface and are connected by a second, cis, interface. Assemblies formed by E-cadherin ectodomains coated on liposomes also appear to adopt this structure. Fluorescent imaging of junctions formed from wild-type and mutant E-cadherins in cultured cells confirm conclusions derived from structural evidence. Mutations that interfere with the trans interface ablate adhesion, whereas cis interface mutations disrupt stable junction formation. Our observations are consistent with a model for junction assembly involving strong trans and weak cis interactions localized in the ectodomain.

  4. Tight junctions in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Landy, Jonathan; Ronde, Emma; English, Nick; Clark, Sue K; Hart, Ailsa L; Knight, Stella C; Ciclitira, Paul J; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar

    2016-03-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterised by inflammation that compromises the integrity of the epithelial barrier. The intestinal epithelium is not only a static barrier but has evolved complex mechanisms to control and regulate bacterial interactions with the mucosal surface. Apical tight junction proteins are critical in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function and control of paracellular permeability. The characterisation of alterations in tight junction proteins as key players in epithelial barrier function in inflammatory bowel diseases is rapidly enhancing our understanding of critical mechanisms in disease pathogenesis as well as novel therapeutic opportunities. Here we give an overview of recent literature focusing on the role of tight junction proteins, in particular claudins, in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer.

  5. Tight junctions in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landy, Jonathan; Ronde, Emma; English, Nick; Clark, Sue K; Hart, Ailsa L; Knight, Stella C; Ciclitira, Paul J; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterised by inflammation that compromises the integrity of the epithelial barrier. The intestinal epithelium is not only a static barrier but has evolved complex mechanisms to control and regulate bacterial interactions with the mucosal surface. Apical tight junction proteins are critical in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function and control of paracellular permeability. The characterisation of alterations in tight junction proteins as key players in epithelial barrier function in inflammatory bowel diseases is rapidly enhancing our understanding of critical mechanisms in disease pathogenesis as well as novel therapeutic opportunities. Here we give an overview of recent literature focusing on the role of tight junction proteins, in particular claudins, in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27003989

  6. Anatomical variations of the anterior atlanto-dental joint and relations to the apical and alar ligaments in a geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarush; Iwanaga, Joe; Sardi, Juan P; Alonso, Fernando; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-08-17

    Degenerative changes in the upper cervical spine may be age related degeneration or a pathological process such as rheumatoid arthritis. However, to our knowledge, the relationship between the apical and alar ligaments and these anomalies has not been discussed. We present anatomical variations of the anterior atlanto-dental joint observed during cadaveric dissection of adult craniovertebral junctions, the relationship with the alar and apical ligaments and discuss possible origins and clinical implications. The upper cervical spine including part of the occiput was dissected from cadavers whose mean age at death was 78.9 years-old. The anterior atlanto-dental joint and apical and alar ligaments were observed and any atypical findings were noted. In eleven specimens, seven had a dens corona, three had an os odontoideum and one had a dens aureola, which arose from the upper part of the anterior arch of the atlas. Only four specimens had an apical ligament. The possible etiologies and the clinical applications of these craniovertebral anomalies in a geriatric population should be appreciated by the clinician treating patients with disease in this area or interpreting imaging in the region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Testicular cell junction: a novel target for male contraception.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nikki P Y; Wong, Elissa W P; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-01-01

    Even though various contraceptive methods are widely available, the number of unwanted pregnancies is still on the rise in developing countries, pressurizing the already resource limited nations. One of the major underlying reasons is the lack of effective, low cost, and safe contraceptives for couples. During the past decade, some studies were performed using animal models to decipher if the Sertoli-germ cell junction in the testis is a target for male fertility regulation. Some of these study models were based on the use of hormones and/or chemicals to disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis (e.g., androgen-based implants or pills) and others utilized a panel of chemical entities or synthetic peptides to perturb spermatogenesis either reversibly or non-reversibly. Among them, adjudin, a potential male contraceptive, is one of the compounds exerting its action on the unique adherens junctions, known as ectoplasmic specializations, in the testis. Since the testis is equipped with inter-connected cell junctions, an initial targeting of one junction type may affect the others and these accumulative effects could lead to spermatogenic arrest. This review attempts to cover an innovative theme on how male infertility can be achieved by inducing junction instability and defects in the testis, opening a new window of research for male contraceptive development. While it will still take much time and effort of intensive investigation before a product can reach the consumable market, these findings have provided hope for better family planning involving men.

  8. Signatures of topological Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Berg, Erez; Oreg, Yuval; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the 4 π -periodic dc Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching-current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching-current measurements.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated disruption of mucosal barriers and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS disease

    PubMed Central

    Tugizov, Sharof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral, intestinal and genital mucosal epithelia have a barrier function to prevent paracellular penetration by viral, bacterial and other pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV can overcome these barriers by disrupting the tight and adherens junctions of mucosal epithelia. HIV-associated disruption of epithelial junctions may also facilitate paracellular penetration and dissemination of other viral pathogens. This review focuses on possible molecular mechanisms of HIV-associated disruption of mucosal epithelial junctions and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:27583187

  10. Apical Revascularization after Delayed Tooth Replantation: An Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra; Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra; de Carvalho, Fabricio Kitazono; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the clinical and radiological outcome of the treatment involving a delayed tooth replantation after an avulsed immature permanent incisor, with a follow-up of 1 year and 6 months. An 8-year-old boy was referred after dental trauma that occurred on the previous day. The permanent maxillary right central incisor (tooth 11) had been avulsed. The tooth was hand-held during endodontic therapy and an intracanal medication application with calcium hydroxide-based paste was performed. An apical plug with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was introduced into the apical portion of the canal. When the avulsed tooth was replanted with digital pressure, a blood clot had formed within the socket, which moved the MTA apical plug about 2 mm inside of the root canal. These procedures developed apical revascularization, which promoted a successful endodontic outcome, evidenced by apical closure, slight increase in root length, and absence of signs of external root resorption, during a follow-up of 1 year and 6 months. PMID:27882250

  11. [Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) a success story in apical surgery].

    PubMed

    von Arx, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The objective of apical surgery is to retain teeth with persistent apical pathosis following orthograde root canal treatment if endodontic non-surgical revision is difficult or associated with risks, or is even declined by the patient. Since the most frequent cause of recurrent apical disease is bacterial reinfection from the (remaining) root canal system, the bacteria-tight root-end filling is the most important step in apical surgery. In the early 1990s, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed at the Loma Linda University in California/USA. Preclinical studies clearly showed that MTA has a high sealing capability, a good material stability and an excellent biocompatbility. Multiple experimental studies in animals highlighted the mild tissue reactions observed adjacent to this material. Furthermore, histological analysis of the periapical regions demonstrated a frequent deposition of new cementum not only onto the resection plane (cut dentinal surface), but also directly onto MTA. For these reasons, MTA is considered a bioactive material. In 1997 MTA was cleared for clinical use in patients. Multiple prospective clinical and randomized studies have documented high and constant success rates of MTA-treated teeth in apical surgery. A recently published longitudinal study showed that MTA-treated teeth remained stable over five years; hence the high healed rates documented after one year are maintained during long-term observation.

  12. Characterization of rat apical tissues in different root development stage.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Yang, Zhenhua; Jin, Fang; Duan, Yinzhong; Jin, Yan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we try to compare the histological characteristics and the odontogenic capability of apical tissues (AT) at different root development stages of rat molar teeth. AT of mandibular first molars from 8-day-old, 21-day-old, and 35-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were selected as being representative of root-initiating, root-forming, and root-completing stages, respectively. Cell counting, flow cytometry assays, alkaline phosphatase activity, alizarin red staining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed to assess the proliferation and mineralization potential of apical tissue cells at different stages of root development in vitro. In vivo transplantation of apical tissue cells combined with ceramic bovine bone was used to characterize the differentiation capacity. It was shown that there was a structurally and functionally dynamic change in the apical tissue of developing tooth root of rats, of which the unique developmental potential will reduce gradually with the ending up of root development. The AT of root-initiating and root-forming stage exhibited much higher proliferation and tissue-regenerative capacity than those of root-completing stage. Our present results indicate that the apical tissue, with the sustainable developmental ability throughout almost the whole process of tooth development, can yet be regarded as a competent candidate source for root/periodontal tissues regeneration.

  13. Coronal and apical sealing ability of a new endodontic cement

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Morvarid; Iravani, Maryam; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This in vitro study aims to evaluate the coronal and apical sealing ability of gutta-percha (GP) root filling used with either mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), new endodontic cement (NEC) or AH26 as filler/sealers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty eight single-rooted extracted teeth were selected, decoronated and then instrumented. Samples were randomly divided into three experimental (n=12) and two control groups (n=6). In group 1, root canals were filled using lateral condensation technique (L); while single cone technique (S) was used for groups 2 and 3. AH26, MTA and NEC were the root canal sealer/fillers in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Samples were immersed in 1% methylene-blue dye and then independently centrifuged apically and coronally. The roots were split longitudinally and linear extent of dye penetration was measured with a stereomicroscope from apical and coronal directions. Data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and T-test. RESULTS: No statistical differences in mean apical dye penetration between groups LGP/AH26, SGP/MTA and SGP/NEC were found; SGP/NEC group showed significantly less coronal dye penetration (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Considering the limitations of this in vitro study, it was concluded that the simple single cone technique with NEC can provide favorable coronal and apical seal. PMID:23864871

  14. Josephson junctions with delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Blackburn, James A.; Huberman, Bernardo A.; Smith, H. J. T.

    1992-12-01

    We study a simple model of an overdamped Josephson junction coupled to a transmission line, which is regarded as a delayed feedback to the junction. It is demonstrated analytically how the nonlocal time dependence can give rise to hysteresis and steps in the current-voltage characteristics of the junction and the fundamental difference between positive and negative feedback is discussed. Excellent agreement between the analytical results and the results of numerical simulations is found.

  15. Asymmetric inheritance of the apical domain and self-renewal of retinal ganglion cell progenitors depend on Anillin function.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Alessio; Duchemin, Anne-Laure; Albadri, Shahad; Patzel, Eva; Bornhorst, Dorothee; González Avalos, Paula; Lemke, Steffen; Machate, Anja; Brand, Michael; Sel, Saadettin; Di Donato, Vincenzo; Del Bene, Filippo; Zolessi, Flavio R; Ramialison, Mirana; Poggi, Lucia

    2015-03-01

    Divisions that generate one neuronal lineage-committed and one self-renewing cell maintain the balance of proliferation and differentiation for the generation of neuronal diversity. The asymmetric inheritance of apical domains and components of the cell division machinery has been implicated in this process, and might involve interactions with cell fate determinants in regulatory feedback loops of an as yet unknown nature. Here, we report the dynamics of Anillin - an essential F-actin regulator and furrow component - and its contribution to progenitor cell divisions in the developing zebrafish retina. We find that asymmetrically dividing retinal ganglion cell progenitors position the Anillin-rich midbody at the apical domain of the differentiating daughter. anillin hypomorphic conditions disrupt asymmetric apical domain inheritance and affect daughter cell fate. Consequently, the retinal cell type composition is profoundly affected, such that the ganglion cell layer is dramatically expanded. This study provides the first in vivo evidence for the requirement of Anillin during asymmetric neurogenic divisions. It also provides insights into a reciprocal regulation between Anillin and the ganglion cell fate determinant Ath5, suggesting a mechanism whereby the balance of proliferation and differentiation is accomplished during progenitor cell divisions in vivo.

  16. Total and Specific Bacterial Levels in the Apical Root Canal System of Teeth with Post-treatment Apical Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Henrique S; Rôças, Isabela N; Alves, Flávio R F; Siqueira, José F

    2015-07-01

    Most studies of the microbiota in root canal-treated teeth focused only on the main canal, not distinguishing regions nor incorporating the intricate anatomy in the analysis. Moreover, most of them provided only prevalence data. This study was designed to evaluate the total bacterial counts and the presence, levels, and relative abundance of candidate endodontic pathogens exclusively in the apical root canal system associated with post-treatment apical periodontitis. Apical root specimens obtained during periradicular surgery of 27 adequately treated teeth with persistent apical periodontitis were cryogenically ground. DNA was extracted from the powder, and real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the total bacteria and 7 bacterial taxa. Samples from 21 teeth were positive for bacteria. Streptococcus species were the most prevalent (76%) followed by members of the Actinobacteria phylum (52%) and Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus (19%). The mean total bacterial load in the apical root segments was 5.7 × 10(4) cell equivalents per root apex (or 2.1 × 10(4)/100 mg root powder). Streptococci comprised from 0.02%-99.9% of the total bacterial counts, Actinobacteria from 0.02%-84.7%, and P. alactolyticus from 67.9%-99%. Although Enterococcus faecalis was found in only 3 (14%) cases, it was dominant in 2. Streptococcus species, members of the Actinobacteria phylum, and P. alactolyticus were the most prevalent taxa in the apical canal system and dominated the bacterial populations in many cases of post-treatment apical periodontitis. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrastructural studies of the junctional complex in the musculature of the arrow-worm (Sagitta setosa) (Chaetognatha).

    PubMed

    Duvert, M; Gros, D; Salat, C

    1980-01-01

    In the A fibres of the primary musculature of Sagitta, the junctional complex is made up of three kinds of junctions. From the apex to the base they occur in the following order: an apical zonula adherens, a columnar zonula then columnar maculae intermingled with gap junction. Each columnar junction joins two intracellular filament networks in adjacent cells; this cytoskeleton is largely developed around the nucleus of the A fibres and in close relation with the contractile apparatus, especially at the I band level. The B fibres, which never reach the general cavity, lack zonula adherens and columnar zonula. The columnar junction constitutes a new type of junction which seems to belong to the adherens kind. At their level fibrous columns cross the extracellular space, joining the membranes. Each column faces two cytoplasmic densities localized against the cytoplasmic leaflets of the membranes. A cytoskeleton composed of bunldes of cytoplasmic filaments is in close contact with these cytoplasmic densities. The great number of columnar junctions and associated cytoskeleton assure the cohesion of the tissue and the distribution of contractile forces in the absence of connective tissue. The abundance of gap junctions can account for the metabolic and ionic coupling of the fibres.

  18. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  19. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  20. The ITPA disruption database

    SciTech Connect

    Eidietis, N. W.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Granetz, R. S.; Kawano, Y.; Lehnen, M.; Lister, J. B.; Pautasso, G.; Riccardo, V.; Tanna, R. L.; Thornton, A. J.

    2015-05-22

    A multi-device database of disruption characteristics has been developed under the auspices of the International Tokamak Physics Activity magneto hydrodynamics topical group. The purpose of this ITPA Disruption Database (IDDB) is to find the commonalities between the disruption and disruption mitigation characteristics in a wide variety of tokamaks in order to elucidate the physics underlying tokamak disruptions and to extrapolate toward much larger devices, such as ITER and future burning plasma devices. Conversely, in order to previous smaller disruption data collation efforts, the IDDB aims to provide significant context for each shot provided, allowing exploration of a wide array of relationships between pre-disruption and disruption parameters. Furthermore, the IDDB presently includes contributions from nine tokamaks, including both conventional aspect ratio and spherical tokamaks. An initial parametric analysis of the available data is presented. Our analysis includes current quench rates, halo current fraction and peaking, and the effectiveness of massive impurity injection. The IDDB is publicly available, with instruction for access provided herein.

  1. The ITPA disruption database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidietis, N. W.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Granetz, R. S.; Kawano, Y.; Lehnen, M.; Lister, J. B.; Pautasso, G.; Riccardo, V.; Tanna, R. L.; Thornton, A. J.; ITPA Disruption Database Participants, The

    2015-06-01

    A multi-device database of disruption characteristics has been developed under the auspices of the International Tokamak Physics Activity magneto-hydrodynamics topical group. The purpose of this ITPA disruption database (IDDB) is to find the commonalities between the disruption and disruption mitigation characteristics in a wide variety of tokamaks in order to elucidate the physics underlying tokamak disruptions and to extrapolate toward much larger devices, such as ITER and future burning plasma devices. In contrast to previous smaller disruption data collation efforts, the IDDB aims to provide significant context for each shot provided, allowing exploration of a wide array of relationships between pre-disruption and disruption parameters. The IDDB presently includes contributions from nine tokamaks, including both conventional aspect ratio and spherical tokamaks. An initial parametric analysis of the available data is presented. This analysis includes current quench rates, halo current fraction and peaking, and the effectiveness of massive impurity injection. The IDDB is publicly available, with instruction for access provided herein.

  2. The ITPA disruption database

    DOE PAGES

    Eidietis, N. W.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Granetz, R. S.; ...

    2015-05-22

    A multi-device database of disruption characteristics has been developed under the auspices of the International Tokamak Physics Activity magneto hydrodynamics topical group. The purpose of this ITPA Disruption Database (IDDB) is to find the commonalities between the disruption and disruption mitigation characteristics in a wide variety of tokamaks in order to elucidate the physics underlying tokamak disruptions and to extrapolate toward much larger devices, such as ITER and future burning plasma devices. Conversely, in order to previous smaller disruption data collation efforts, the IDDB aims to provide significant context for each shot provided, allowing exploration of a wide array ofmore » relationships between pre-disruption and disruption parameters. Furthermore, the IDDB presently includes contributions from nine tokamaks, including both conventional aspect ratio and spherical tokamaks. An initial parametric analysis of the available data is presented. Our analysis includes current quench rates, halo current fraction and peaking, and the effectiveness of massive impurity injection. The IDDB is publicly available, with instruction for access provided herein.« less

  3. External apical root resorption in maxillary incisors in orthodontic patients: associated factors and radiographic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Patanaporn, Virush; Janhom, Apirum; Korwanich, Narumanus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the incidence and degree of external apical root resorption of maxillary incisors after orthodontic treatment and to evaluate particular associated factors related to external apical root resorption. Materials and Methods The records and maxillary incisor periapical radiographs of 181 patients were investigated. Crown and root lengths were measured and compared on the pre- and post-treatment periapical radiographs. Crown length was measured from the center of the incisal edge to the midpoint of the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). Root length was measured from the CEJ midpoint to the root apex. A correction factor for the enlargement difference was used to calculate root resorption. Results The periapical radiographs of 564 teeth showed that the average root resorption was 1.39±1.27 (8.24±7.22%) and 1.69±1.14 mm (10.16±6.78%) for the maxillary central and lateral incisors, respectively. The results showed that the dilacerated or pointed roots, maxillary premolar extraction cases, and treatment duration were highly significant factors for root resorption (p<0.001). Allergic condition was a significant factor at p<0.01. Age at the start of treatment, large overjet, and history of facial trauma were also factors significantly associated with root resorption (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in root resorption among the factors of gender, overbite, tongue-thrusting habit, types of malocclusion, and types of bracket. Conclusion These results suggested that orthodontic treatment should be carefully performed in pre-treatment extraction patients who have pointed or dilacerated roots and need long treatment duration. PMID:23071964

  4. Apical oscillations in amnioserosa cells: basolateral coupling and mechanical autonomy.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Aroshan K; Crews, Sarah M; Mashburn, David N; Hutson, M Shane

    2013-07-02

    Holographic laser microsurgery is used to isolate single amnioserosa cells in vivo during early dorsal closure. During this stage of Drosophila embryogenesis, amnioserosa cells undergo oscillations in apical surface area. The postisolation behavior of individual cells depends on their preisolation phase in these contraction/expansion cycles: cells that were contracting tend to collapse quickly after isolation; cells that were expanding do not immediately collapse, but instead pause or even continue to expand for ∼40 s. In either case, the postisolation apical collapse can be prevented by prior anesthetization of the embryos with CO2. These results suggest that although the amnioserosa is under tension, its cells are subjected to only small elastic strains. Furthermore, their postisolation apical collapse is not a passive elastic relaxation, and both the contraction and expansion phases of their oscillations are driven by intracellular forces. All of the above require significant changes to existing computational models.

  5. Apical Oscillations in Amnioserosa Cells: Basolateral Coupling and Mechanical Autonomy

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Aroshan K.; Crews, Sarah M.; Mashburn, David N.; Hutson, M. Shane

    2013-01-01

    Holographic laser microsurgery is used to isolate single amnioserosa cells in vivo during early dorsal closure. During this stage of Drosophila embryogenesis, amnioserosa cells undergo oscillations in apical surface area. The postisolation behavior of individual cells depends on their preisolation phase in these contraction/expansion cycles: cells that were contracting tend to collapse quickly after isolation; cells that were expanding do not immediately collapse, but instead pause or even continue to expand for ∼40 s. In either case, the postisolation apical collapse can be prevented by prior anesthetization of the embryos with CO2. These results suggest that although the amnioserosa is under tension, its cells are subjected to only small elastic strains. Furthermore, their postisolation apical collapse is not a passive elastic relaxation, and both the contraction and expansion phases of their oscillations are driven by intracellular forces. All of the above require significant changes to existing computational models. PMID:23823245

  6. Proliferation of epithelial cell rests, formation of apical cysts, and regression of apical cysts after periapical wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Louis M; Huang, George T-J; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2007-08-01

    There is continuing controversy regarding the potential for inflammatory apical cysts to heal after nonsurgical endodontic therapy. Molecular cell biology may provide answers to a series of related questions. How are the epithelial cell rests of Malassez stimulated to proliferate? How are the apical cysts formed? How does the lining epithelium of apical cysts regress after endodontic therapy? Epithelial cell rests are induced to divide and proliferate by inflammatory mediators, proinflammatory cytokines, and growth factors released from host cells during periradicular inflammation. Quiescent epithelial cell rests can behave like restricted-potential stem cells if stimulated to proliferate. Formation of apical cysts is most likely caused by the merging of proliferating epithelial strands from all directions to form a three-dimensional ball mass. After endodontic therapy, epithelial cells in epithelial strands of periapical granulomas and the lining epithelium of apical cysts may stop proliferating because of a reduction in inflammatory mediators, proinflammatory cytokines, and growth factors. Epithelial cells will also regress because of activation of apoptosis or programmed cell death through deprivation of survival factors or by receiving death signals during periapical wound healing.

  7. Mineral trioxide aggregate as apical plug in teeth with necrotic pulp and immature apices: a 10-year case series.

    PubMed

    Pace, Riccardo; Giuliani, Valentina; Nieri, Michele; Di Nasso, Luca; Pagavino, Gabriella

    2014-08-01

    This 10-year study evaluated the clinical and radiologic outcomes of teeth with necrotic pulp, immature apices, and periapical lesions treated with the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apical plug technique. Seventeen single-rooted immature teeth with necrotic pulp and periapical lesion from 17 patients treated between January 2001 and December 2001 were included in this study. Apical obturation on all teeth included in the study was completed in 2 visits: first using calcium hydroxide as an interappointment intracanal medication and a second visit for the creation of the artificial apical barrier with MTA. The outcome, based on clinical and radiographic criteria, was assessed by 2 calibrated investigators using the periapical index (PAI). The Friedman test was used to verify the differences between baseline and the 1-, 5-, and 10-year PAI scores. Of the 17 patients treated, 1 patient dropped out at 5 years. At the 10-year follow-up, 15 teeth were healed (PAI ≤2), and 1 tooth had been extracted because of the presence of a longitudinal root fracture. The PAI score exhibited a significant decrease between baseline and 1 year and between 1 and 5 years. The difference between 5 and 10 years was not significant. The apical plug with MTA was a successful and effective technique for long-term management of this group of teeth with necrotic pulps with immature root development and periapical lesions. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The β1-integrin-p-FAK-p130Cas-DOCK180-RhoA-vinculin is a novel regulatory protein complex at the apical ectoplasmic specialization in adult rat testes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ching Hang; Xia, Weiliang; Mruk, Dolores D; Lee, Will M

    2011-01-01

    During spermatogenesis, step 1 spermatids (round spermatids) derive from spermatocytes following meiosis I and II at stage XIV of the epithelial cycle begin a series of morphological transformation and differentiation via 19 steps in rats to form spermatozoa. This process is known as spermiogenesis, which is marked by condensation of the genetic material in the spermatid head, formation of the acrosome and elongation of the tail. Since developing spermatids are lacking the robust protein synthesis and transcriptional activity, the cellular, molecular and morphological changes associated with spermiogenesis rely on the Sertoli cell in the seminiferous epithelium via desmosome and gap junction between Sertoli cells and step 1–7 spermatids. Interestingly, a unique anchoring junction type arises at the interface of step 8 spermatid and Sertoli cell known as apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES). Once it appears, apical ES is the only anchoring device restricted to the interface of step 8–19 spermatids and Sertoli cells to confer spermatid polarity, adhesion, signal communication and structural support, and to provide nutritional support during spermiogenesis, replacing desmosome and gap junction. While the adhesion protein complexes that constitute the apical ES are known, the signaling protein complexes that regulate apical ES dynamics, however, remain largely unknown. Herein we report the presence of a FAK (focal adhesion kinase)-p130Cas (p130 Crk-associated substrate)-DOCK180 (Dedicator of cytokinesis 180)-RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A)-vinculin signaling protein complex at the apical ES, which is also an integrated component of the β1-integrin-based adhesion protein complex based on co-immunoprecipitation experiment. It was also shown that besides p-FAK-Tyr397 and p-FAK-Tyr576, β1-integrin, p130Cas, RhoA and vinculin displayed stage-specific expression in the seminiferous epithelium during the epithelial cycle with predominant localization

  9. Rectal sensation test helps avoid pain of apical prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Jones, J Stephen; Zippe, Craig D

    2003-12-01

    Apical cores obtained during transrectal prostate biopsy are associated with greater pain than cores obtained from the remainder of the gland. We present a method to minimize this pain. During 30 consecutive apical biopsies the needle was purposefully placed above all rectal pain fibers, which are anatomically present only below the dentate line. All patients received a periprostatic nerve block prior to biopsy. The patient was asked if he felt the sharp sensation of the needle as it was placed lightly against the rectal mucosa when the needle was aimed at apex (the rectal sensation test). If so, the needle was advanced cranially 2 to 3 mm or until he could no longer detect its light touch. The probe handle was then rotated dorsally, pulling the rectal mucosa downward until the needle was again aimed at the apex. Patients were asked to report a visual analog pain score for each biopsy. These results were compared to those obtained when doing 30 consecutive apical biopsies without the rectal sensation test. The average visual analog pain score for apical biopsy was 1.25 (range 0 to 2.2) for patients in whom the rectal sensation test was used to bypass rectal pain sensory fibers. The average score in control patients in whom the rectal sensation test was not used was higher at 2.28 (range 0.3-6.2). These results were statistically significant (p > 0.0005). Increased sensitivity to apical prostate biopsy is due to rectal pain fibers located below the dentate line. These fibers and the associated pain may be safely avoided by passing through the rectal wall above the dentate line. The rectal sensation test easily identifies the sensate area below the dentate line. Painless apical biopsy can then be achieved by rotating the ultrasound probe to aim the biopsy needle in the desired path.

  10. Dental Apical Papilla as Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    De Berdt, P; Vanacker, J; Ucakar, B; Elens, L; Diogenes, A; Leprince, J G; Deumens, R; des Rieux, A

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells of the apical papilla (SCAP) represent great promise regarding treatment of neural tissue damage, such as spinal cord injury (SCI). They derive from the neural crest, express numerous neurogenic markers, and mediate neurite outgrowth and axonal targeting. The goal of the present work was to investigate for the first time their potential to promote motor recovery after SCI in a rat hemisection model when delivered in their original stem cell niche-that is, by transplantation of the human apical papilla tissue itself into the lesion. Control groups consisted of animals subjected to laminectomy only (shams) and to lesion either untreated or injected with a fibrin hydrogel with or without human SCAP. Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotor scores at 1 and 3 d postsurgery confirmed early functional decline in all SCI groups. This significant impairment was reversed, as seen in CatWalk analyses, after transplantation of apical papilla into the injured spinal cord wound, whereas the other groups demonstrated persistent functional impairment. Moreover, tactile allodynia did not develop as an unwanted side effect in any of the groups, even though the SCAP hydrogel group showed higher expression of the microglial marker Iba-1, which has been frequently associated with allodynia. Notably, the apical papilla transplant group presented with reduced Iba-1 expression level. Masson trichrome and human mitochondria staining showed the preservation of the apical papilla integrity and the presence of numerous human cells, while human cells could no longer be detected in the SCAP hydrogel group at the 6-wk postsurgery time point. Altogether, our data suggest that the transplantation of a human apical papilla at the lesion site improves gait in spinally injured rats and reduces glial reactivity. It also underlines the potential interest for the application of delivering SCAP in their original niche, as compared with use of a fibrin hydrogel.

  11. Tight Junctions Go Viral!

    PubMed

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-09-23

    Tight junctions (TJs) are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells.

  12. Changes of Root Length and Root-to-Crown Ratio after Apical Surgery: An Analysis by Using Cone-beam Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    von Arx, Thomas; Jensen, Simon S; Bornstein, Michael M

    2015-09-01

    Apical surgery is an important treatment option for teeth with post-treatment periodontitis. Although apical surgery involves root-end resection, no morphometric data are yet available about root-end resection and its impact on the root-to-crown ratio (RCR). The present study assessed the length of apicectomy and calculated the loss of root length and changes of RCR after apical surgery. In a prospective clinical study, cone-beam computed tomography scans were taken preoperatively and postoperatively. From these images, the crown and root lengths of 61 roots (54 teeth in 47 patients) were measured before and after apical surgery. Data were collected relative to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) as well as to the crestal bone level (CBL). One observer took all measurements twice (to calculate the intraobserver variability), and the means were used for further analysis. The following parameters were assessed for all treated teeth as well as for specific tooth groups: length of root-end resection and percentage change of root length, preoperative and postoperative RCRs, and percentage change of RCR after apical surgery. The mean length of root-end resection was 3.58 ± 1.43 mm (relative to the CBL). This amounted to a loss of 33.2% of clinical and 26% of anatomic root length. There was an overall significant difference between the tooth groups (P < .05). There was also a statistically significant difference comparing mandibular and maxillary teeth (P < .05), but not for incisors/canines versus premolars/molars (P = .125). The mean preoperative and postoperative RCRs (relative to CEJ) were 1.83 and 1.35, respectively (P < .001). With regard to the CBL reference, the mean preoperative and postoperative RCRs were 1.08 and 0.71 (CBL), respectively (P < .001). The calculated changes of RCR after apical surgery were 24.8% relative to CEJ and 33.3% relative to CBL (P < .001). Across the different tooth groups, the mean RCR was not significantly different (P = .244 for

  13. Multiple idiopathic external apical root resorption: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Parul; Nikhil, Vineeta; Kapur, Sonali

    2015-01-01

    Multiple idiopathic external apical root resorption (MIEARR) is a relatively rare condition affecting multiple teeth in a dentition. As the condition is nonsymptomatic, a case is usually detected as an incidental radiographic finding. However, it may cause pain and mobility in severe cases. It is sometimes self-limiting or sometimes may progress to tooth loss. This paper presents a case of external apical root resorption involving multiple teeth in which etiology was not identified, so idiopathic root resorption was considered as a diagnosis of exclusion. PMID:25657532

  14. Complex Polarity: Building Multicellular Tissues Through Apical Membrane Traffic.

    PubMed

    Román-Fernández, Alvaro; Bryant, David M

    2016-12-01

    The formation of distinct subdomains of the cell surface is crucial for multicellular organism development. The most striking example of this is apical-basal polarization. What is much less appreciated is that underpinning an asymmetric cell surface is an equally dramatic intracellular endosome rearrangement. Here, we review the interplay between classical cell polarity proteins and membrane trafficking pathways, and discuss how this marriage gives rise to cell polarization. We focus on those mechanisms that regulate apical polarization, as this is providing a number of insights into how membrane traffic and polarity are regulated at the tissue level.

  15. Lipid rafts are disrupted in mildly inflamed intestinal microenvironments without overt disruption of the epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Rachel V; Donatello, Simona; Lyes, Clíona; Owens, Mark B; Babina, Irina S; Hudson, Lance; Walsh, Shaun V; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid P; Amu, Sylvie; Barry, Sean P; Fallon, Padraic G; Hopkins, Ann M

    2012-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial barrier disruption is a feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but whether barrier disruption precedes or merely accompanies inflammation remains controversial. Tight junction (TJ) adhesion complexes control epithelial barrier integrity. Since some TJ proteins reside in cholesterol-enriched regions of the cell membrane termed lipid rafts, we sought to elucidate the relationship between rafts and intestinal epithelial barrier function. Lipid rafts were isolated from Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells primed with the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or treated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin as a positive control for raft disruption. Rafts were also isolated from the ilea of mice in which colitis had been induced in conjunction with in vivo intestinal permeability measurements, and lastly from intestinal biopsies of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with predominantly mild or quiescent disease. Raft distribution was analyzed by measuring activity of the raft-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase and by performing Western blot analysis for flotillin-1. Epithelial barrier integrity was estimated by measuring transepithelial resistance in cytokine-treated cells or in vivo permeability to fluorescent dextran in colitic mice. Raft and nonraft fractions were analyzed by Western blotting for the TJ proteins occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Our results revealed that lipid rafts were disrupted in IFN-γ-treated cells, in the ilea of mice with subclinical colitis, and in UC patients with quiescent inflammation. This was not associated with a clear pattern of occludin or ZO-1 relocalization from raft to nonraft fractions. Significantly, a time-course study in colitic mice revealed that disruption of lipid rafts preceded the onset of increased intestinal permeability. Our data suggest for the first time that lipid raft disruption occurs early in the inflammatory cascade in murine and human colitis and, we speculate, may contribute to

  16. Corneal endothelial cells possess an elaborate multipolar shape to maximize the basolateral to apical membrane area

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Theresa A.; He, Zhiguo; Boggs, Kristin; Thuret, Gilles; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The corneal endothelium is widely believed to consist of geometrically regular cells interconnected by junctional complexes. However, while en face visualization of the endothelial apical surface reveals characteristic polygonal borders, the overall form of the component cells has rarely been observed. Methods To visualize the shape of individual endothelial cells within the native monolayer, two independent Cre/LoxP-based cell labeling approaches were used. In the first, a P0-Cre mouse driver strain was bred to an R26-tdTomato reporter line to map neural crest–derived endothelial cells with cytosolic red fluorescent protein. In the second, HPRT-Cre induction of small numbers of green and red fluorescent protein–filled cells within a background of unlabeled cells was achieved using a dual-color reporter system, mosaic analysis with double markers (MADM). Selective imaging of the endothelial lateral membranes at different apicobasal levels was accomplished after staining with antibodies to ZO-1 and the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Results When viewed in their entirety in whole-mount preparations, fluorescent protein–filled cells appear star-shaped, extending multiple dendritic processes that radiate outward in the plane of the monolayer. Examination of rare cases where cells expressing different fluorescent proteins lie directly adjacent to one another reveals that these long processes undergo extensive interdigitation. The resulting overlap allows individual cells to extend over a greater area than if the cell boundaries were mutually exclusive. Anti-NCAM staining of these interlocking peripheral cell extensions reveals an elaborate system of lateral membrane folds that, when viewed in optical sections, increase in complexity from the apical to the basal pole. This not only produces a substantial increase in the basolateral, relative to the apical, membrane but also greatly extends the paracellular pathway as a highly convoluted space

  17. Corneal endothelial cells possess an elaborate multipolar shape to maximize the basolateral to apical membrane area.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Theresa A; He, Zhiguo; Boggs, Kristin; Thuret, Gilles; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Defoe, Dennis M

    2016-01-01

    The corneal endothelium is widely believed to consist of geometrically regular cells interconnected by junctional complexes. However, while en face visualization of the endothelial apical surface reveals characteristic polygonal borders, the overall form of the component cells has rarely been observed. To visualize the shape of individual endothelial cells within the native monolayer, two independent Cre/LoxP-based cell labeling approaches were used. In the first, a P0-Cre mouse driver strain was bred to an R26-tdTomato reporter line to map neural crest-derived endothelial cells with cytosolic red fluorescent protein. In the second, HPRT-Cre induction of small numbers of green and red fluorescent protein-filled cells within a background of unlabeled cells was achieved using a dual-color reporter system, mosaic analysis with double markers (MADM). Selective imaging of the endothelial lateral membranes at different apicobasal levels was accomplished after staining with antibodies to ZO-1 and the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). When viewed in their entirety in whole-mount preparations, fluorescent protein-filled cells appear star-shaped, extending multiple dendritic processes that radiate outward in the plane of the monolayer. Examination of rare cases where cells expressing different fluorescent proteins lie directly adjacent to one another reveals that these long processes undergo extensive interdigitation. The resulting overlap allows individual cells to extend over a greater area than if the cell boundaries were mutually exclusive. Anti-NCAM staining of these interlocking peripheral cell extensions reveals an elaborate system of lateral membrane folds that, when viewed in optical sections, increase in complexity from the apical to the basal pole. This not only produces a substantial increase in the basolateral, relative to the apical, membrane but also greatly extends the paracellular pathway as a highly convoluted space. Our analysis indicates that, far

  18. Myosin-IXA regulates collective epithelial cell migration by targeting RhoGAP activity to cell-cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Omelchenko, Tatiana; Hall, Alan

    2012-02-21

    Epithelial tissues undergo extensive collective movements during morphogenesis, repair, and renewal. Collective epithelial cell migration requires the intercellular coordination of cell-cell adhesions and the establishment of anterior-posterior polarity, while maintaining apical-basal polarity, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not well understood. Using an RNA interference-based screen to identify Rho family GTPase regulators required for the collective migration of human bronchial epithelial cells, we identified myosin-IXA (gene name: Myo9a). Depletion of myosin-IXA, a RhoGAP and actin motor protein, in collectively migrating cells led to altered organization of the actin cytoskeleton and tension-dependent disruption of cell-cell adhesions, followed by an inability to form new adhesions resulting in cell scattering. Closer examination revealed that myosin-IXA is required during the formation of junction-associated actin bundles soon after cell-cell contact. Structure-function analysis of myosin-IXA revealed that the motor domain is necessary and sufficient for binding to actin filaments, whereas expression of the RhoGAP domain partially rescued the cell scattering phenotype induced by myosin-IXA depletion. Finally, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensor revealed a significant increase in Rho activity at nascent cell-cell contacts in myosin-IXA depleted cells compared to controls. We propose that myosin-IXA locally regulates Rho and the assembly of thin actin bundles associated with nascent cell-cell adhesions and that this is required to sustain the collective migration of epithelial cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Myosin-IXA Regulates Collective Epithelial Cell Migration by Targeting RhoGAP Activity to Cell-Cell Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Omelchenko, Tatiana; Hall, Alan

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Epithelial tissues undergo extensive collective movements during morphogenesis, repair and renewal. Collective epithelial cell migration requires the intercellular coordination of cell-cell adhesions and the establishment of anterior-posterior polarity, while maintaining apical-basal polarity, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not well understood. Results Using an RNAi-based screen to identify Rho family GTPase regulators required for the collective migration of human bronchial epithelial cells, we identified myosin-IXA (gene name: Myo9a). Depletion of myosin-IXA, a RhoGAP and actin motor protein, in collectively migrating cells led to altered organization of the actin cytoskeleton and tension-dependent disruption of cell-cell adhesions, followed by an inability to form new adhesions resulting in cell scattering. Closer examination revealed myosin-IXA is required during the formation of junction-associated actin bundles soon after cell-cell contact. Structure-function analysis of myosin-IXA revealed that the motor domain is necessary and sufficient for binding to actin filaments, while expression of the RhoGAP domain partially rescued the cell scattering phenotype induced by myosin-IXA depletion. Finally, a FRET biosensor revealed a significant increase in Rho activity at nascent cell-cell contacts in myosin-IXA depleted cells compared to controls. Conclusion We propose that myosin-IXA locally regulates Rho and the assembly of thin actin bundles associated with nascent cell-cell adhesions and that this is required to sustain the collective migration of epithelial cells. PMID:22305756

  20. Crumbs 3b promotes tight junctions in an ezrin-dependent manner in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Tilston-Lünel, Andrew M.; Haley, Kathryn E.; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Wang, Yanhua; Chatterton, Abigail L.D.; Moleirinho, Susana; Watson, Ailsa; Hundal, Harinder S.; Prystowsky, Michael B.; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Reynolds, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Crumbs 3 (CRB3) is a component of epithelial junctions, which has been implicated in apical-basal polarity, apical identity, apical stability, cell adhesion, and cell growth. CRB3 undergoes alternative splicing to yield two variants: CRB3a and CRB3b. Here, we describe novel data demonstrating that, as with previous studies on CRB3a, CRB3b also promotes the formation of tight junctions (TJs). However, significantly we demonstrate that the 4.1-ezrin–radixin–moesin-binding motif of CRB3b is required for CRB3b functionality and that ezrin binds to the FBM of CRB3b. Furthermore, we show that ezrin contributes to CRB3b functionality and the correct distribution of TJ proteins. We demonstrate that both CRB3 isoforms are required for the production of functionally mature TJs and also the localization of ezrin to the plasma membrane. Finally, we demonstrate that reduced CRB3b expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) correlates with cytoplasmic ezrin, a biomarker for aggressive disease, and shows evidence that while CRB3a expression has no effect, low CRB3b and high cytoplasmic ezrin expression combined may be prognostic for HNSCC. PMID:27190314

  1. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  2. Confronting the disruptive physician.

    PubMed

    Linney, B J

    1997-01-01

    Ignoring disruptive behavior is no longer an option in today's changing health care environment. Competition and managed care have caused mo