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Sample records for disrupts mitochondrial membrane

  1. Toxins in Botanical Dietary Supplements: Blue Cohosh Components Disrupt Cellular Respiration and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA “Black Box” warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3) exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage. PMID:24328138

  2. Toxins in botanical dietary supplements: blue cohosh components disrupt cellular respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B; Khan, Ikhlas A; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-24

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA "black box" warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3), exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage.

  3. Mitochondrial uncouplers act synergistically with the fumigant phosphine to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential and cause cell death.

    PubMed

    Valmas, Nicholas; Zuryn, Steven; Ebert, Paul R

    2008-10-30

    Phosphine is the most widely used fumigant for the protection of stored commodities against insect pests, especially food products such as grain. However, pest insects are developing resistance to phosphine and thereby threatening its future use. As phosphine inhibits cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and reduces the strength of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)), we reasoned that mitochondrial uncouplers should act synergistically with phosphine. The mitochondrial uncouplers FCCP and PCP caused complete mortality in populations of both wild-type and phosphine-resistant lines of Caenorhabditis elegans simultaneously exposed to uncoupler and phosphine at concentrations that were individually nonlethal. Strong synergism was also observed with a third uncoupler DNP. We have also tested an alternative complex IV inhibitor, azide, with FCCP and found that this also caused a synergistic enhancement of toxicity in C. elegans. To investigate potential causes of the synergism, we measured DeltaPsi(m), ATP content, and oxidative damage (lipid hydroperoxides) in nematodes subjected to phosphine-FCCP treatment and found that neither an observed 50% depletion in ATP nor oxidative stress accounted for the synergistic effect. Instead, a synergistic reduction in DeltaPsi(m) was observed upon phosphine-FCCP co-treatment suggesting that this is directly responsible for the subsequent mortality. These results support the hypothesis that phosphine-induced mortality results from the in vivo disruption of normal mitochondrial activity. Furthermore, we have identified a novel pathway that can be targeted to overcome genetic resistance to phosphine.

  4. Naja naja oxiana Cobra Venom Cytotoxins CTI and CTII Disrupt Mitochondrial Membrane Integrity: Implications for Basic Three-Fingered Cytotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Gasanov, Sardar E.; Shrivastava, Indira H.; Israilov, Firuz S.; Kim, Aleksandr A.; Rylova, Kamila A.; Zhang, Boris; Dagda, Ruben K.

    2015-01-01

    Cobra venom cytotoxins are basic three-fingered, amphipathic, non-enzymatic proteins that constitute a major fraction of cobra venom. While cytotoxins cause mitochondrial dysfunction in different cell types, the mechanisms by which cytotoxins bind to mitochondria remain unknown. We analyzed the abilities of CTI and CTII, S-type and P-type cytotoxins from Naja naja oxiana respectively, to associate with isolated mitochondrial fractions or with model membranes that simulate the mitochondrial lipid environment by using a myriad of biophysical techniques. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy data suggest that both cytotoxins bind to isolated mitochondrial fractions and promote the formation of aberrant non-bilayer structures. We then hypothesized that CTI and CTII bind to cardiolipin (CL) to disrupt mitochondrial membranes. Collectively, 31P-NMR, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), proton NMR (1H-NMR), deuterium NMR (2H-NMR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and erythrosine phosphorescence assays suggest that CTI and CTII bind to CL to generate non-bilayer structures and promote the permeabilization, dehydration and fusion of large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes enriched with CL. On the other hand, CTII but not CTI caused biophysical alterations of large unilamellar PC liposomes enriched with phosphatidylserine (PS). Mechanistically, single molecule docking simulations identified putative CL, PS and PC binding sites in CTI and CTII. While the predicted binding sites for PS and PC share a high number of interactive amino acid residues in CTI and CTII, the CL biding sites in CTII and CTI are more divergent as it contains additional interactive amino acid residues. Overall, our data suggest that cytotoxins physically associate with mitochondrial membranes by binding to CL to disrupt mitochondrial structural integrity. PMID:26091109

  5. Cyclosporin A does not protect the disruption of the inner mitochondrial membrane potential induced by potassium ionophores in intact K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Marques-Santos, Luis F; Coqueiro, Vivian M; Rumjanek, Vivian M

    2006-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been widely associated with programmed cell death. Studies of intact cells are important for the understanding of the process of cell death and its relation to mitochondrial physiology. Using cytofluorometric approaches we studied the mitochondrial behavior in an erythroleukemic cell line. The effects of protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), potassium exchanger (nigericin), potassium ionophore (valinomycin), Na+K+-ATPase inhibitor (ouabain) and mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor (cyclosporin A) were evaluated. Cyclosporin A (CSA) was very effective in attenuating the disruption of inner mitochondrial membrane potential induced by CCCP. However, CSA failed to protect the loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential induced by potassium intracellular flux manipulation. Our findings suggest that mitochondrial cyclophilin is not involved in the cell events mediated by deregulation of potassium flux, underlining the need for further studies in intact tumor cells for a better understanding of the involvement of mitochondria physiology in cell death events.

  6. Antifungal Action of Methylene Blue Involves Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Disruption of Redox and Membrane Homeostasis in C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Moiz A.; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is known to cause infections ranging from superficial and systemic in immunocompromised person. In this study, we explored that the antifungal action of Methylene blue (MB) is mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of redox and membrane homeostasis against C. albicans. We demonstrated that MB displayed its antifungal potential against C. albicans and two clinical isolates tested. We also showed that MB is effective against two non- albicans species as well. Notably, the antifungal effect of MB seems to be independent of the major drug efflux pumps transporter activity. We explored that MB treated Candida cells were sensitive on non-fermentable carbon source leading us to propose that MB inhibits mitochondria. This sensitive phenotype was reinforced with the fact that sensitivity of Candida cells to MB could be rescued upon the supplementation of ascorbic acid, an antioxidant. This clearly suggests that disturbances in redox status are linked with MB action. We further demonstrated that Candida cells were susceptible to membrane perturbing agent viz. SDS which was additionally confirmed by transmission electron micrographs showing disruption of membrane integrity. Moreover, the ergosterol levels were significantly decreased by 66% suggesting lipid compositional changes due to MB. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that MB inhibits the yeast to hyphal transition in C. albicans which is one of the major virulence attribute in most of the hyphal inducing conditions. Taken together, the data generated from present study clearly establishes MB as promising antifungal agent that could be efficiently employed in strategies to treat Candida infections. PMID:27006725

  7. Tualang honey induces apoptosis and disrupts the mitochondrial membrane potential of human breast and cervical cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fauzi, Agustine Nengsih; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2011-04-01

    Honey is reported to contain various compounds such as phenols, vitamins and antioxidants. The present study investigates the anticancer potential of Tualang honey (Agromas) (TH) in human breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines; as well as in the normal breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A. The cells were treated with increasing doses of TH (1-10%) for up to 72 h. Increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage from the cell membranes indicates that TH is cytotoxic to all three cancer cells with effective concentrations (EC(50)) of 2.4-2.8%. TH is however, not cytotoxic to the MCF-10A cells. Reactivity with annexin V fluorescence antibody and propidium iodide as analysed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy shows that apoptosis occurred in these cancer cells. TH also reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) in the cancer cell lines after 24h of treatment. The activation of caspase-3/7 and -9 was observed in all TH-treated cancer cells indicating the involvement of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This study shows that TH has significant anticancer activity against human breast and cervical cancer cell lines. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dihydromethysticin kavalactone induces apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells through modulation of PI3K/Akt pathway, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and inducing cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jun-Qi; Huang, Yi-Gang; He, Ai-Na

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the tumor and apoptotic effects of dihydromethysticin kavalactone against human osteosarcoma (MG-63) cells. Antiproliferative activity was measured with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis induction by dihydromethysticin was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy, quantitative videomicroscopy and Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection kit. Mitochondrial membrane potential disruption was demonstrated by rhodamine-123 dye using flow cytometry. We also evaluated the effect of dihydromethysticin on PI3K/Akt pathway with an immunoblotting analysis. The results showed that the compound induced dose-dependent as well as time-dependent antiproliferative effects against MG-63 cell growth. Cell death and apoptotic body formation was noticed followed dihydromethysticin treatment at various doses. The percentage of apoptotic cells (early apoptosis+late apoptosis) increased from 6.63% in untreated control to 23.92%, 23.81% and 93.9% in 25 µM, 75 µM and 100 µ Mdihydromethysticin-treated cells respectively. Flow cytometric analysis showed dihydromethysticin induced an increase in G0/G1 cells (apoptotic cells). Furthermore, we observed mitochondrial transmembrane depolarization along with decreased phosphorylation levels for PI3K, AKT (Ser 473), AKT (Thr 308), GSK-3β, and BAD. These reductions were associated with down regulation of AKT and upregulation of both GSK-3β and BAD.

  9. A mechanism of virulence: virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv, but not attenuated H37Ra, causes significant mitochondrial inner membrane disruption in macrophages leading to necrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minjian; Gan, Huixian; Remold, Heinz G

    2006-03-15

    Infection of human monocyte-derived macrophages with Mycobacterium tuberculosis at low multiplicities of infection leads 48-72 h after the infection to cell death with the characteristics of apoptosis or necrosis. Predominant induction of one or the other cell death modality depends on differences in mitochondrial membrane perturbation induced by attenuated and virulent strains. Infection of macrophages with the attenuated H37Ra or the virulent H37Rv causes mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization characterized by cytochrome c release from the mitochondrial intermembrane space and apoptosis. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization is transient, peaks 6 h after infection, and requires Ca(2+) flux and B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2-associated protein X translocation into mitochondria. In contrast, only the virulent H37Rv induces significant mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Deltapsi(m)) loss caused by mitochondrial permeability transition. Dissipation of Deltapsi(m) also peaks at 6 h after infection, is transient, is inhibited by the classical mitochondrial permeability transition inhibitor cyclosporine A, has a requirement for mitochondrial Ca(2+) loading, and is independent of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma translocation into the mitochondria. Transient dissipation of Deltapsi(m) 6 h after infection is essential for the induction of macrophage necrosis by Mtb, a mechanism that allows further dissemination of the pathogen and development of the disease.

  10. Sulforaphene-Carboplatin Combination Synergistically Enhances Apoptosis by Disruption of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Saswata; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul

    2016-09-01

    Worldwide non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) causes substantial morbidity and mortality among human populations. Due to the severe side effects and low survival rate of patients with the conventional drugs, implementation of new combination therapies is much needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a combination therapy with a conventional drug and a natural medicine. We compared the combination of chemotherapy drug carboplatin and the radish-derived isothiocyanate compound sulforaphene, which synergistically induces higher apoptosis and growth inhibition in A549, to the drug alone in human NSCLC cells. We found that this combination group significantly induced higher depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and intracellular reactive oxygen species generation than the single drug dose, followed by cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase after 24 h of incubation. In addition to that, the Western blot assays showed that combination treatment inhibited the expression of Bcl-2 and successively upregulated the expression of Bax, cytochrome C, apoptosis-inducing factor, caspase-9 and -3, and cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase. It also modulated the expression of PI3K, p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (1/2), and p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase indicating the involvement of antiproliferative properties. Further pretreatment with pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk was carried out to confirm the effect of caspases in the combination therapy-induced apoptosis. To summarize, this is the first report that sulforaphene-carboplatin combination treatment synergistically promotes enhanced apoptosis and antiproliferative effect over single drug treatment against A549, human NSCLC cells through caspase activation, MMP disruption, and cell cycle arrest. This study demonstrates that the duel character of this combination therapy may be an effective replacement for conventional therapy alone against NSCLC.

  11. PUMA-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic disruption by hypoxic postconditioning.

    PubMed

    Li, YuZhen; Guo, Qi; Liu, XiuHua; Wang, Chen; Song, DanDan

    2015-08-01

    Postconditioning can reduce ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by targeting mitochondria. p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is involved in lethal I/R injury. Here, we hypothesized that postconditioning might inhibit mitochondrial pathway-mediated cardiomyocyte apoptosis by controlling PUMA expression. The cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes underwent 3 h of hypoxia and 3 h of reoxygenation. Postconditioning consisted of three cycles of 5 min reoxygenation and 5 min hypoxia after prolonged hypoxia. Hypoxic postconditioning reduced the levels of PUMA mRNA and protein. Concomitantly, the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation were decreased significantly by postconditioning. Overexpression of PUMA increased greatly not only the number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes, but also the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation under postconditioning condition. The data suggest that reduction of PUMA expression mediates the endogenous cardioprotective mechanisms of postconditioning by disrupting mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

  12. Anticancer and apoptotic activities of oleanolic acid are mediated through cell cycle arrest and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, YUE-YONG; HUANG, HONG-YAN; WU, YIN-LIAN

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive form of cancer, with high rates of morbidity and mortality, a poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the anticancer activity of oleanolic acid in HepG2 human HCC cells. Cell viability was evaluated using an MTT assay, following administration of various doses of oleanolic acid. The effect of oleanolic acid on cell cycle phase distribution and mitochondrial membrane potential was evaluated using flow cytometry with propidium iodide and rhodamine-123 DNA-binding cationic fluorescent dyes. Fluorescence microscopy was employed to detect morphological changes in HepG2 cells following oleanolic acid treatment. The results revealed that oleanolic acid induced a dose-dependent, as well as time-dependent inhibition in the growth of HepG2 cancer cells. Following acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining, treatment with various doses (0, 5, 25 and 50 µM) of oleanolic acid induced typical morphological changes associated with apoptosis, including cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and apoptotic body formation. Cell cycle analysis revealed that oleanolic acid induced cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells at the sub-G1 (apoptotic) phase of the cell cycle, in a dose-dependent manner. Staining with Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate and propidium iodide revealed that apoptosis occurred early in these cells. Oleanolic acid treatment also resulted in fragmentation of nuclear DNA in a dose-dependent manner, producing the typical features of DNA laddering on an agarose gel. The results also demonstrated that oleanolic acid treatment resulted in a potent loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which also occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, oleanolic acid may be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of human HCC. PMID:26151733

  13. Anticancer and apoptotic activities of oleanolic acid are mediated through cell cycle arrest and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue-Yong; Huang, Hong-Yan; Wu, Yin-Lian

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive form of cancer, with high rates of morbidity and mortality, a poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the anticancer activity of oleanolic acid in HepG2 human HCC cells. Cell viability was evaluated using an MTT assay, following administration of various doses of oleanolic acid. The effect of oleanolic acid on cell cycle phase distribution and mitochondrial membrane potential was evaluated using flow cytometry with propidium iodide and rhodamine‑123 DNA‑binding cationic fluorescent dyes. Fluorescence microscopy was employed to detect morphological changes in HepG2 cells following oleanolic acid treatment. The results revealed that oleanolic acid induced a dose‑dependent, as well as time‑dependent inhibition in the growth of HepG2 cancer cells. Following acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining, treatment with various doses (0, 5, 25 and 50 µM) of oleanolic acid induced typical morphological changes associated with apoptosis, including cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and apoptotic body formation. Cell cycle analysis revealed that oleanolic acid induced cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells at the sub‑G1 (apoptotic) phase of the cell cycle, in a dose‑dependent manner. Staining with Annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate and propidium iodide revealed that apoptosis occurred early in these cells. Oleanolic acid treatment also resulted in fragmentation of nuclear DNA in a dose‑dependent manner, producing the typical features of DNA laddering on an agarose gel. The results also demonstrated that oleanolic acid treatment resulted in a potent loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which also occurred in a dose‑dependent manner. Therefore, oleanolic acid may be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of human HCC.

  14. Mitochondrial membrane permeabilization with nanosecond electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Vernier, P Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-short, high-field electric pulses permeabilize plasma and intracellular membranes. We report here nanosecond pulse-induced permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes in living cells. Using four independent methods based on fluorescent dyes--JC-1, rhodamine 123, tetramethyl rhodamine ethyl ester, and cobalt-quenched calcein--we show that as few as five, 4 ns, 10 MV/m pulses delivered at 1 kHz cause an increase of the inner mitochondrial membrane permeability and an associated loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. The most likely interpretation of these results is a pulse-induced permeabilization of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  15. Plasma membrane disruption: repair, prevention, adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Steinhardt, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    Many metazoan cells inhabit mechanically stressful environments and, consequently, their plasma membranes are frequently disrupted. Survival requires that the cell rapidly repair or reseal the disruption. Rapid resealing is an active and complex structural modification that employs endomembrane as its primary building block, and cytoskeletal and membrane fusion proteins as its catalysts. Endomembrane is delivered to the damaged plasma membrane through exocytosis, a ubiquitous Ca2+-triggered response to disruption. Tissue and cell level architecture prevent disruptions from occurring, either by shielding cells from damaging levels of force, or, when this is not possible, by promoting safe force transmission through the plasma membrane via protein-based cables and linkages. Prevention of disruption also can be a dynamic cell or tissue level adaptation triggered when a damaging level of mechanical stress is imposed. Disease results from failure of either the preventive or resealing mechanisms.

  16. Plasma membrane disruption: repair, prevention, adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Steinhardt, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    Many metazoan cells inhabit mechanically stressful environments and, consequently, their plasma membranes are frequently disrupted. Survival requires that the cell rapidly repair or reseal the disruption. Rapid resealing is an active and complex structural modification that employs endomembrane as its primary building block, and cytoskeletal and membrane fusion proteins as its catalysts. Endomembrane is delivered to the damaged plasma membrane through exocytosis, a ubiquitous Ca2+-triggered response to disruption. Tissue and cell level architecture prevent disruptions from occurring, either by shielding cells from damaging levels of force, or, when this is not possible, by promoting safe force transmission through the plasma membrane via protein-based cables and linkages. Prevention of disruption also can be a dynamic cell or tissue level adaptation triggered when a damaging level of mechanical stress is imposed. Disease results from failure of either the preventive or resealing mechanisms.

  17. Enhanced induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via the mitochondrial membrane potential disruption in human U87 malignant glioma cells by aloe emodin.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Samhani; Haris, Khalilah; Abdul Ghani, Abdul Rahman Izaini; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Johan, Muhammad Farid; Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul Aziz

    2013-09-01

    Aloe emodin, one of the active compounds found in Aloe vera leaves, plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and death. It has been reported to promote the anti-cancer effects in various cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. However, the mechanism of inducing apoptosis by this agent is poorly understood in glioma cells. This research is to investigate the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest inducing by aloe emodin on U87 human malignant glioma cells. Aloe emodin showed a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of U87 cells proliferation and decreased the percentage of viable U87 cells via the induction of apoptosis. Characteristic morphological changes, such as the formation of apoptotic bodies, were observed with confocal microscope by Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, supporting our viability study and flow cytometry analysis results. Our data also demonstrated that aloe emodin arrested the cell cycle in the S phase and promoted the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in U87 cells that indicated the early event of the mitochondria-induced apoptotic pathway.

  18. Mitochondrial membrane lipidome defines yeast longevity

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Michelle T.; Bourque, Simon D.; Koupaki, Olivia; Juneau, Mylène; Feldman, Rachel; Iouk, Tatiana; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2013-01-01

    Our studies revealed that lithocholic acid (LCA), a bile acid, is a potent anti-aging natural compound that in yeast cultured under longevity-extending caloric restriction (CR) conditions acts in synergy with CR to enable a significant further increase in chronological lifespan. Here, we investigate a mechanism underlying this robust longevity-extending effect of LCA under CR. We found that exogenously added LCA enters yeast cells, is sorted to mitochondria, resides mainly in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and also associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane. LCA elicits an age-related remodeling of glycerophospholipid synthesis and movement within both mitochondrial membranes, thereby causing substantial changes in mitochondrial membrane lipidome and triggering major changes in mitochondrial size, number and morphology. In synergy, these changes in the membrane lipidome and morphology of mitochondria alter the age-related chronology of mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential, ATP synthesis and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. The LCA-driven alterations in the age-related dynamics of these vital mitochondrial processes extend yeast longevity. In sum, our findings suggest a mechanism underlying the ability of LCA to delay chronological aging in yeast by accumulating in both mitochondrial membranes and altering their glycerophospholipid compositions. We concluded that mitochondrial membrane lipidome plays an essential role in defining yeast longevity. PMID:23924582

  19. Fisetin inhibits growth, induces G₂ /M arrest and apoptosis of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells: role of mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and consequent caspases activation.

    PubMed

    Pal, Harish C; Sharma, Samriti; Elmets, Craig A; Athar, Mohammad; Afaq, Farrukh

    2013-07-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), one of the most common neoplasms, cause serious morbidity and mortality. Therefore, identification of non-toxic phytochemicals for prevention/treatment of NMSCs is highly desirable. Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, present in fruits and vegetables possesses anti-oxidant and antiproliferative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemotherapeutic potential of fisetin in cultured human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Treatment of A431 cells with fisetin (5-80 μm) resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Employing clonogenic assay, we found that fisetin treatment significantly reduced colony formation in A431 cells. Fisetin treatment of A431 cells resulted in G₂ /M arrest and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of A431 cells with fisetin resulted in (i) decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2; Bcl-xL and Mcl-1); (ii) increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bak and Bad); (iii) disruption of mitochondrial potential; (iv) release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria; (v) activation of caspases; and (vi) cleavage of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) blocked fisetin-induced cleavage of caspases and PARP. Taken together, these data provide evidence that fisetin possesses chemotherapeutic potential against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Overall, these results suggest that fisetin could be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of NMSCs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Fisetin inhibits growth, induces G2/M arrest and apoptosis of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells: Role of mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and consequent caspases activation

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Harish C.; Sharma, Samriti; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad; Afaq, Farrukh

    2013-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) one of the most common neoplasms causes serious morbidity and mortality. Therefore, identification of non-toxic phytochemicals for prevention/treatment of NMSCs is highly desirable. Fisetin (3,3′,4′,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, present in fruits and vegetables possesses anti-oxidant and anti-proliferative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemotherapeutic potential of fisetin in cultured human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Treatment of A431 cells with fistein (5-80 μM) resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Employing clonogenic assay, we found that fisetin treatment significantly reduced colony formation in A431 cells. Fisetin treatment of A431 cells resulted in G2/M arrest and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of A431 cells with fisetin resulted in (i) decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1), (ii) increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bak and Bad), (iii) disruption of mitochondrial potential, (iv) release of cytchrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria, (v) activation of caspases, and (vi) cleavage of PARP protein. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) blocked fisetin-induced cleavage of caspases and PARP. Taken together, these data provide evidence that fisetin possesses chemotherapeutic potential against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Overall, these results suggest that fisetin could be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of NMSCs. PMID:23800058

  1. Disruption of mitochondrial function in interpopulation hybrids of Tigriopus californicus.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Christopher K; Burton, Ronald S

    2006-07-01

    Electron transport system (ETS) function in mitochondria is essential for the aerobic production of energy. Because ETS function requires extensive interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear gene products, coadaptation between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes may evolve within populations. Hybridization between allopatric populations may then expose functional incompatibilities between genomes that have not coevolved. The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus has high levels of nucleotide divergence among populations at mitochondrial loci and suffers F2 hybrid breakdown in interpopulation hybrids. We hypothesize that hybridization results in incompatibilities among subunits in ETS enzyme complexes and that these incompatibilities result in diminished mitochondrial function and fitness. To test this hypothesis, we measured fitness, mitochondrial function, and ETS enzyme activity in inbred recombinant hybrid lines of Tigriopus californicus. We found that (1) both fitness and mitochondrial function are reduced in hybrid lines, (2) only those ETS enzymes with both nuclear and mitochondrial subunits show a loss of activity in hybrid lines, and (3) positive relationships exist between ETS enzyme activity and mitochondrial function and between mitochondrial function and fitness. We also present evidence that hybrid lines harboring mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondrial RNA polymerase (mtRPOL) from the same parental source population have higher fitness than those with mtDNA and mtRPOL from different populations, suggesting that mitochondrial gene regulation may play a role in disruption of mitochondrial performance and fitness of hybrids. These results suggest that disruption of coadaptation between nuclear and mitochondrial genes contributes to the phenomenon of hybrid breakdown.

  2. Effect of short-term exposure to diesel exhaust particles and carboxylic acids on mitochondrial membrane disruption in airway epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Diesel exhaust has been shown to induce adverse pulmonary health effects; however, the underlying mechanisms for these effects are still unclear. Previous studies have imlplicated mitochondrial dysfunction in the toxicity of diesel exhaust particles (DEP). DEP contain...

  3. Effect of short-term exposure to diesel exhaust particles and carboxylic acids on mitochondrial membrane disruption in airway epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Diesel exhaust has been shown to induce adverse pulmonary health effects; however, the underlying mechanisms for these effects are still unclear. Previous studies have imlplicated mitochondrial dysfunction in the toxicity of diesel exhaust particles (DEP). DEP contain...

  4. DISRUPTION OF YEAST MEMBRANES BY METHYLPHENIDATE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Methylphenidate blocked sorbose uptake and loss by yeast spheroplasts and, at higher concentrations, disrupted spheroplasts. At high concentrations methylphenidate also ruptured the membranes of whole yeast cells; sorbose and 280 nm-absorbing materials were lost from the cells, and methylene blue stained them. Intracellular structures were extensively affected as shown by electron micrographs, and evidently were more sensitive to methylphenidate than the external membrane. N-ethylmaleimide and Ca(++) enhanced the rupture of external membranes by methylphenidate. (Author)

  5. An analysis of membrane fusion between mitochondrial double membranes and MITO-Porter, mitochondrial fusogenic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Fukuda, Yutaka; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-09-01

    To achieve mitochondrial gene therapy, therapeutic molecules need to be transported through the outer and inner membranes of mitochondria into the innermost space (mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We previously reported on the construction of a MITO-Porter with a high fusogenic activity for the mitochondrial outer membrane for delivering molecules to the mitochondria of human cells. Here, we report on an investigation of a fusogenic lipid composition for the inner membrane, and an analysis of the fusogenic compositions for the outer and inner membranes. A significant relationship was found between fusion activity and the mitochondrial delivery of nucleic acids.

  6. J protein cochaperone of the mitochondrial inner membrane required for protein import into the mitochondrial matrix

    PubMed Central

    D'Silva, Patrick D.; Schilke, Brenda; Walter, William; Andrew, Amy; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2003-01-01

    The major Hsp70 of the mitochondrial matrix (Ssc1 in yeast) is critically important for the translocation of proteins from the cytosol, across the mitochondrial inner membrane, and into the matrix. Tim44, a peripheral inner membrane protein with limited sequence similarity to the J domain of J-type cochaperones, tethers Ssc1 to the import channel. Here we report that, unlike a J protein, Tim44 does not stimulate the ATPase activity of Ssc1, nor does it affect the stimulation by either a known mitochondrial J protein or a peptide substrate. Thus, we conclude that Tim44 does not function as a J protein cochaperone of Ssc1; rather, it tethers Ssc1 to the import channel through interactions independent of those critical for J protein function. However, a previously unstudied essential gene, PAM18, encodes an 18-kDa protein that contains a J domain and is localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane. Pam18 stimulates the ATPase activity of Ssc1; depletion of Pam18 in vivo disrupts import of proteins into the mitochondrial matrix. We propose that Pam18 is the J protein partner for Ssc1 at the import channel and is critical for Ssc1's function in protein import. PMID:14605210

  7. J protein cochaperone of the mitochondrial inner membrane required for protein import into the mitochondrial matrix.

    PubMed

    D'Silva, Patrick D; Schilke, Brenda; Walter, William; Andrew, Amy; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2003-11-25

    The major Hsp70 of the mitochondrial matrix (Ssc1 in yeast) is critically important for the translocation of proteins from the cytosol, across the mitochondrial inner membrane, and into the matrix. Tim44, a peripheral inner membrane protein with limited sequence similarity to the J domain of J-type cochaperones, tethers Ssc1 to the import channel. Here we report that, unlike a J protein, Tim44 does not stimulate the ATPase activity of Ssc1, nor does it affect the stimulation by either a known mitochondrial J protein or a peptide substrate. Thus, we conclude that Tim44 does not function as a J protein cochaperone of Ssc1; rather, it tethers Ssc1 to the import channel through interactions independent of those critical for J protein function. However, a previously unstudied essential gene, PAM18, encodes an 18-kDa protein that contains a J domain and is localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane. Pam18 stimulates the ATPase activity of Ssc1; depletion of Pam18 in vivo disrupts import of proteins into the mitochondrial matrix. We propose that Pam18 is the J protein partner for Ssc1 at the import channel and is critical for Ssc1's function in protein import.

  8. Detergent-resistant membrane subfractions containing proteins of plasma membrane, mitochondrial, and internal membrane origins.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, Ronald L

    2008-04-24

    HEK293 cell detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) isolated by the standard homogenization protocol employing a Teflon pestle homogenizer yielded a prominent opaque band at approximately 16% sucrose upon density gradient ultracentrifugation. In contrast, cell disruption using a ground glass tissue homogenizer generated three distinct DRM populations migrating at approximately 10%, 14%, and 20% sucrose, named DRM subfractions A, B, and C, respectively. Separation of the DRM subfractions by mechanical disruption suggested that they are physically associated within the cellular environment, but can be dissociated by shear forces generated during vigorous homogenization. All three DRM subfractions possessed cholesterol and ganglioside GM1, but differed in protein composition. Subfraction A was enriched in flotillin-1 and contained little caveolin-1. In contrast, subfractions B and C were enriched in caveolin-1. Subfraction C contained several mitochondrial membrane proteins, including mitofilin and porins. Only subfraction B appeared to contain significant amounts of plasma membrane-associated proteins, as revealed by cell surface labeling studies. A similar distribution of DRM subfractions, as assessed by separation of flotillin-1 and caveolin-1 immunoreactivities, was observed in CHO cells, in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and in HEK293 cells lysed in detergent-free carbonate. Teflon pestle homogenization of HEK293 cells in the presence of the actin-disrupting agent latrunculin B generated DRM subfractions A-C. The microtubule-disrupting agent vinblastine did not facilitate DRM subfraction separation, and DRMs prepared from fibroblasts of vimentin-null mice were present as a single major band on sucrose gradients, unless pre-treated with latrunculin B. These results suggest that the DRM subfractions are interconnected by the actin cytoskeleton, and not by microtubes or vimentin intermediate filaments. The subfractions described may prove useful in studying discrete protein

  9. Membrane Disruption Mechanism by Antimicrobial Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka Yee C.

    2011-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a class of small (less than100 residues) host defense peptides that induce selective membrane lytic activity against microbes. To understand the mechanism of membrane disruption by AMPs, we investigated, via atomic force microscopy, topological changes in supported phospholipid bilayers induced by protegrin-1 (PG-1). We have observed that PG-1 induces structural transformations, progressing from fingerlike instabilities at bilayer edges, to the formation of sievelike nanoporous structures and finally to a network of stripelike structures in a zwitterionic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) model membrane in buffer, with increasing PG-1 concentration. Our results suggest that AMPs act to lower the interfacial energy of the bilayer in a way similar to detergents. By varying the lipid composition, temperature and using AMPs with different secondary structures, we are able to identify factors other than electrostatics that are important for the efficacy of AMPs.

  10. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

    PubMed

    Roundhill, Elizabeth; Turnbull, Doug; Burchill, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) predicts poor outcome. MRP-1 is also expressed in mitochondria, and we have examined the submitochondrial localization of MRP-1 and investigated the mechanism of MRP-1 transport and role of this organelle in the response to doxorubicin. The mitochondrial localization of MRP-1 was examined in ES cell lines by differential centrifugation and membrane solubilization by digitonin. Whether MRP-1 is chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) was investigated by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and HSP knockout using small hairpin RNA and inhibitors (apoptozole, 17-AAG, and NVPAUY). The effect of disrupting mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux activity on the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin was investigated by counting viable cell number. Mitochondrial MRP-1 is glycosylated and localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is coexpressed with HSP90. MRP-1 binds to both HSP90 and HSP70, although only inhibition of HSP90β decreases expression of MRP-1 in the mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux significantly increases the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin (combination index, <0.9). For the first time, we have demonstrated that mitochondrial MRP-1 is expressed in the outer mitochondrial membrane and is a client protein of HSP90β, where it may play a role in the doxorubicin-induced resistance of ES.-Roundhill, E., Turnbull, D., Burchill, S. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

  11. Novel channels of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Zoratti, Mario; De Marchi, Umberto; Gulbins, Erich; Szabò, Ildikò

    2009-05-01

    Along with a large number of carriers, exchangers and "pumps", the inner mitochondrial membrane contains ion-conducting channels which endow it with controlled permeability to small ions. Some have been shown to be the mitochondrial counterpart of channels present also in other cellular membranes. The manuscript summarizes the current state of knowledge on the major inner mitochondrial membrane channels, properties, identity and proposed functions. Considerable attention is currently being devoted to two K(+)-selective channels, mtK(ATP) and mtBK(Ca). Their activation in "preconditioning" is considered by many to underlie the protection of myocytes and other cells against subsequent ischemic damage. We have recently shown that in apoptotic lymphocytes inner membrane mtK(V)1.3 interacts with the pro-apoptotic protein Bax after the latter has inserted into the outer mitochondrial membrane. Whether the just-discovered mtIK(Ca) has similar cellular role(s) remains to be seen. The Ca(2+) "uniporter" has been characterized electrophysiologically, but still awaits a molecular identity. Chloride-selective channels are represented by the 107 pS channel, the first mitochondrial channel to be observed by patch-clamp, and by a approximately 400 pS pore we have recently been able to fully characterize in the inner membrane of mitochondria isolated from a colon tumour cell line. This we propose to represent a component of the Permeability Transition Pore. The available data exclude the previous tentative identification with porin, and indicate that it coincides instead with the still molecularly unidentified "maxi" chloride channel.

  12. Monitoring mitochondrial membranes permeability in live neurons and mitochondrial swelling through electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Arrázola, Macarena S; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of mitochondrial membrane integrity is essential for mitochondrial function and neuronal viability. Apoptotic stimulus or calcium overload leads to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP ) opening and induces mitochondrial swelling, a common feature of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. The first phenomenon can be evaluated in cells loaded with the dye calcein -AM quenched by cobalt, and mitochondrial swelling can be detected by electron microscopy through the analysis of mitochondrial membrane integrity. Here, we describe a live cell imaging assay to detect mitochondrial permeability transition and the development of a detailed analysis of morphological and ultrastructural changes that mitochondria undergo during this process.

  13. Fullerenol Cytotoxicity in Kidney Cells is Associated with Cytoskeleton Disruption, Autophagic Vacuole Accumulation, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Lyles, Denise N.; Peifley, Kimberly; Lockett, Stephen; Neun, Barry W.; Hansen, Matthew; Clogston, Jeffrey; Stern, Stephan T.; McNeil, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    Water soluble fullerenes, such as the hydroxylated fullerene, fullerenol (C60OHx), are currently under development for diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical applications in the field of nanotechnology. These molecules have been shown to undergo urinary clearance, yet there is limited data available on their renal biocompatibility. Here we examine the biological responses of renal proximal tubule cells (LLC-PK1) exposed to fullerenol. Fullerenol was found to be cytotoxic in the millimolar range, with viability assessed by the sulforhodamine B and trypan blue assays. Fullerenol-induced cell death was associated with cytoskeleton disruption and autophagic vacuole accumulation. Interaction with the autophagy pathway was evaluated in vitro by Lysotracker Red dye uptake, LC3-II marker expression and TEM. Fullerenol treatment also resulted in coincident loss of cellular mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP depletion, as measured by the Mitotracker Red dye and the luciferin-luciferase assays, respectively. Fullerenol-induced ATP depletion and loss of mitochondrial potential were partially ameliorated by co-treatment with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine. In vitro fullerenol treatment did not result in appreciable oxidative stress, as measured by lipid peroxide and glutathione content. Based on these data, it is hypothesized that cytoskeleton disruption may be an initiating event in fullerenol cytotoxicity, leading to subsequent autophagy dysfunction and loss of mitochondrial capacity. As nanoparticle-induced cytoskeleton disruption, autophagic vacuole accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction are commonly reported in the literature, the proposed mechanism may be relevant for a variety of nanomaterials. PMID:20713077

  14. Fullerenol cytotoxicity in kidney cells is associated with cytoskeleton disruption, autophagic vacuole accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson-Lyles, Denise N.; Peifley, Kimberly; Lockett, Stephen; Neun, Barry W.; Hansen, Matthew; Clogston, Jeffrey; Stern, Stephan T.; McNeil, Scott E.

    2010-11-01

    Water soluble fullerenes, such as the hydroxylated fullerene, fullerenol (C{sub 60}OH{sub x}), are currently under development for diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical applications in the field of nanotechnology. These molecules have been shown to undergo urinary clearance, yet there is limited data available on their renal biocompatibility. Here we examine the biological responses of renal proximal tubule cells (LLC-PK1) exposed to fullerenol. Fullerenol was found to be cytotoxic in the millimolar range, with viability assessed by the sulforhodamine B and trypan blue assays. Fullerenol-induced cell death was associated with cytoskeleton disruption and autophagic vacuole accumulation. Interaction with the autophagy pathway was evaluated in vitro by Lysotracker Red dye uptake, LC3-II marker expression and TEM. Fullerenol treatment also resulted in coincident loss of cellular mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP depletion, as measured by the Mitotracker Red dye and the luciferin-luciferase assays, respectively. Fullerenol-induced ATP depletion and loss of mitochondrial potential were partially ameliorated by co-treatment with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine. In vitro fullerenol treatment did not result in appreciable oxidative stress, as measured by lipid peroxide and glutathione content. Based on these data, it is hypothesized that cytoskeleton disruption may be an initiating event in fullerenol cytotoxicity, leading to subsequent autophagy dysfunction and loss of mitochondrial capacity. As nanoparticle-induced cytoskeleton disruption, autophagic vacuole accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction are commonly reported in the literature, the proposed mechanism may be relevant for a variety of nanomaterials.

  15. Nerol triggers mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption via elevation of Ca(2+) and ROS in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Lu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Yanzhen; Zhang, Man; Wang, Xueyan; Tang, Xudong; Peng, Xue; Zeng, Hong

    2017-02-14

    The antifungal activity of Nerol (NEL) against Candida albicans, a pathogenic fungus, has a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 4.4mM that causes noteworthy candidacidal activity through an apoptosis-like mechanism. Calcium (Ca(2+)) levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which are the major causes of apoptosis, were determined in C. albicans cells treated with NEL and were found to increase, which related to mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption. A series of characteristic changes of apoptosis caused by NEL, including mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c (cyt c) release, and metacaspase activation were examined using a flow cytometer and Western blot. The results showed that an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS led to dramatically decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP); cyt c was also released from the mitochondria to the cytosol. Other early apoptotic features were also observed with the metacaspase activation. Finally, the morphological changes of the cells were observed, including phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, nuclear condensation, and DNA fragmentation through Annexin V-FITC and PI double staining, TUNEL assay, and DAPI staining. The results supported the hypothesis that NEL was involved in the apoptosis of C. albicans cells not only at the early stages, but also at the late stages. In summary, NEL can trigger mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption via elevation of Ca(2+) and ROS leading to apoptosis in C. albicans. This research on the mechanism of cell death triggered by NEL against C. albicans has important significance for providing a novel treatment of C. albicans infections.

  16. Metalloproteases of the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane.

    PubMed

    Levytskyy, Roman M; Bohovych, Iryna; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2017-09-12

    The inner mitochondrial membrane (IM) is among the most protein-rich cellular compartments. The metastable IM subproteome where the concentration of proteins is approaching oversaturation creates a challenging protein folding environment with a high probability of protein malfunction or aggregation. Failure to maintain protein homeostasis in such a setting can impair the functional integrity of the mitochondria and drive clinical manifestations. The IM is equipped with a series of highly conserved, proteolytic complexes dedicated to the maintenance of normal protein homeostasis within this mitochondrial subcompartment. Particularly important is a group of membrane-anchored metallopeptidases commonly known as m-AAA and i-AAA proteases, and the ATP-independent Oma1 protease. Herein, we will summarize the current biochemical knowledge of these proteolytic machines and discuss recent advances in our understanding of mechanistic aspects of their functioning.

  17. αSynuclein control of mitochondrial homeostasis in human-derived neurons is disrupted by mutations associated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pozo Devoto, Victorio Martin; Dimopoulos, Nicolas; Alloatti, Matías; Pardi, María Belén; Saez, Trinidad M; Otero, María Gabriela; Cromberg, Lucas Eneas; Marín-Burgin, Antonia; Scassa, Maria Elida; Stokin, Gorazd B; Schinder, Alejandro F; Sevlever, Gustavo; Falzone, Tomás Luis

    2017-07-11

    The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) converges on a common pathogenic pathway of mitochondrial defects in which α-Synuclein (αSyn) is thought to play a role. However, the mechanisms by which αSyn and its disease-associated allelic variants cause mitochondrial dysfunction remain unknown. Here, we analyzed mitochondrial axonal transport and morphology in human-derived neurons overexpressing wild-type (WT) αSyn or the mutated variants A30P or A53T, which are known to have differential lipid affinities. A53T αSyn was enriched in mitochondrial fractions, inducing significant mitochondrial transport defects and fragmentation, while milder defects were elicited by WT and A30P. We found that αSyn-mediated mitochondrial fragmentation was linked to expression levels in WT and A53T variants. Targeted delivery of WT and A53T αSyn to the outer mitochondrial membrane further increased fragmentation, whereas A30P did not. Genomic editing to disrupt the N-terminal domain of αSyn, which is important for membrane association, resulted in mitochondrial elongation without changes in fusion-fission protein levels, suggesting that αSyn plays a direct physiological role in mitochondrial size maintenance. Thus, we demonstrate that the association of αSyn with the mitochondria, which is modulated by protein mutation and dosage, influences mitochondrial transport and morphology, highlighting its relevance in a common pathway impaired in PD.

  18. Aging leads to elevation of O-GlcNAcylation and disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis in retina.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Feng, Zhihui; Zou, Xuan; Cao, Ke; Xu, Jie; Liu, Jiankang

    2014-01-01

    Retina is particularly susceptible to aging as oxidative damage accumulates within retina, leading to age-related retinal dysfunction or even visual loss. However, the underlying mechanisms still remain obscure and effective therapeutic strategy is urgently in need. Here, we quested for the answer particularly focusing on mitochondrial homeostasis and O-GlcNAcylation in rat retina. By comparing expression of electron transfer chain complexes and key factors in mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in retinas of aged and young Sprague-Dawley rats, we found that mitochondrial Complex I, II, IV and V were increased in aged retina with decreased mtTFA and Mfn2. Also, we noticed that p38 and JNK of MAPK signaling were substantially more activated in aged retina, suggesting stress induction. In addition, we found that pan-O-GlcNAcylation was remarkably stronger with lower OGA expression in aged retina. To further elucidate the roles of Mfn2 and O-GlcNAcylation, we employed ARPE-19 cells and found that ATP production, oxygen consumption, and mitochondrial membrane potential were reduced and ROS level was increased by Mfn2 knockdown, while treating with PUGNAc or UDP-GlcNAc heightened oxygen consumption and reduced ROS. Our results suggest disrupted mitochondrial homeostasis may increase oxidative stress; yet enhanced O-GlcNAcylation might defend against oxidative stress and promote mitochondrial respiration in aged retina.

  19. Membrane disruption mechanism of antimicrobial peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka Yee

    2012-04-01

    Largely distributed among living organisms, antimicrobial peptides are a class of small (<100 residues) host defense peptides that induce selective membrane lytic activity against microbial pathogens. The permeabilizing behavior of these diverse peptides has been commonly attributed to the formation of pores, and such pore formation has been categorized as barrel-stave, toroidal, or carpet-like. With the continuing discovery of new peptide species, many are uncharacterized and the exact mechanism is unknown. Through the use of atomic force microscopy, the disruption of supported lipid bilayer patches by protegrin-1 is concentration-dependent. The intercalation of antimicrobial peptide into the bilayer results in structures beyond that of pore formation, but with the formation of worm-like micelles at high peptide concentration. Our results suggest that antimicrobial peptide acts to lower the interfacial energy of the bilayer in a way similar to detergents. Antimicrobial peptides with structural differences, magainin-1 and aurein 1.1, exhibit a mechanistic commonality.

  20. Mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase 4 disruption causes male infertility.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Manuela; Förster, Heidi; Boersma, Auke; Seiler, Alexander; Wehnes, Helga; Sinowatz, Fred; Neumüller, Christine; Deutsch, Manuel J; Walch, Axel; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Wurst, Wolfgang; Ursini, Fulvio; Roveri, Antonella; Maleszewski, Marek; Maiorino, Matilde; Conrad, Marcus

    2009-09-01

    Selenium is linked to male fertility. Glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4), first described as an antioxidant enzyme, is the predominant selenoenzyme in testis and has been suspected of being vital for spermatogenesis. Cytosolic, mitochondrial, and nuclear isoforms are all encoded by the same gene. While disruption of entire GPx4 causes early embryonic lethality in mice, inactivation of nuclear GPx4 does not impair embryonic development or fertility. Here, we show that deletion of mitochondrial GPx4 (mGPx4) allows both normal embryogenesis and postnatal development, but causes male infertility. Infertility was associated with impaired sperm quality and severe structural abnormalities in the midpiece of spermatozoa. Knockout sperm display higher protein thiol content and recapitulate features typical of severe selenodeficiency. Interestingly, male infertility induced by mGPx4 depletion could be bypassed by intracytoplasmic sperm injection. We also show for the first time that mGPx4 is the prevailing GPx4 product in male germ cells and that mGPx4 disruption has no effect on proliferation or apoptosis of germinal or somatic tissue. Our study finally establishes that mitochondrial GPx4 confers the vital role of selenium in mammalian male fertility and identifies cytosolic GPx4 as the only GPx4 isoform being essential for embryonic development and apoptosis regulation.

  1. The outer mitochondrial membrane in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Owen; van der Merwe, Margaretha J; Daley, Daniel O; Whelan, James

    2013-04-01

    The acquisition and integration of intracellular organelles, such as mitochondria and plastids, were important steps in the emergence of complex multicellular life. Although the outer membranes of these organelles have lost many of the functions of their free-living bacterial ancestor, others were acquired during organellogenesis. To date, the biological roles of these proteins have not been systematically characterized. In this review, we discuss the evolutionary origins and functions of outer membrane mitochondrial (OMM) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our analysis, using phylogenetic inference, indicates that several OMM proteins either acquired novel functional roles or were recruited from other subcellular localizations during evolution in Arabidopsis. These observations suggest the existence of novel communication routes and functions between organelles within plant cells.

  2. Sustained Early Disruption of Mitochondrial Function Contributes to Arsenic-Induced Prostate Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, B; Kulawiec, M; Owens, K M; Singh, A; Singh, K K

    2016-10-01

    Arsenic is a well-known human carcinogen that affects millions of people worldwide, but the underlying mechanisms of carcinogenesis are unclear. Several epidemiological studies have suggested increased prostate cancer incidence and mortality due to exposure to arsenic. Due to lack of an animal model of arsenic-induced carcinogenesis, we used a prostate epithelial cell culture model to identify a role for mitochondria in arsenic-induced prostate cancer. Mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential was impacted within a few hours of arsenic exposure of non-neoplastic prostate epithelial cells. Chronic arsenic treatment induced mutations in mitochondrial genes and altered mitochondrial functions. Human non-neoplastic prostate epithelial cells continuously cultured for seven months in the presence of 5 µM arsenite showed tumorigenic properties in vitro and induced tumors in SCID mice, which indicated transformation of these cells. Protein and mRNA expression of subunits of mtOXPHOS complex I were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Alterations in complex I, a main site for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as well as increased expression of ROS-producing NOX4 in arsenic-transformed cells suggested a role of oxidative stress in tumorigenic transformation of prostate epithelial cells. Whole genome cGH array analyses of arsenic-transformed prostate cells identified extensive genomic instability. Our study revealed mitochondrial dysfunction induced oxidative stress and decreased expression of p53 in arsenic-transformed cells as an underlying mechanism of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomic instability. These studies suggest that early changes in mitochondrial functions are sustained during prolong arsenic exposure. Overall, our study provides evidence that arsenic disruption of mitochondrial function is an early and key step in tumorigenic transformation of prostate epithelial cells.

  3. Amyloid Aggregation and Membrane Disruption by Amyloid Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-03-01

    Amyloidogenesis has been the focus of intense basic and clinical research, as an increasing number of amyloidogenic proteins have been linked to common and incurable degenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, type II diabetes, and Parkinson's. Recent studies suggest that the cell toxicity is mainly due to intermediates generated during the assembly process of amyloid fibers, which have been proposed to attack cells in a variety of ways. Disruption of cell membranes is believed to be one of the key components of amyloid toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Our research in this area is focused on the investigation of the early events in the aggregation and membrane disruption of amyloid proteins, Islet amyloid polypeptide protein (IAPP, also known as amylin) and amyloid-beta peptide, on the molecular level. Structural insights into the mechanisms of membrane disruption by these amyloid proteins and the role of membrane components on the membrane disruption will be presented.

  4. Mitochondrial Membrane Studies Using Impedance Spectroscopy with Parallel pH Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Padmaraj, Divya; Pande, Rohit; Miller, John H.; Wosik, Jarek; Zagozdzon-Wosik, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    A biological microelectromechanical system (BioMEMS) device was designed to study complementary mitochondrial parameters important in mitochondrial dysfunction studies. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to many diseases, including diabetes, obesity, heart failure and aging, as these organelles play a critical role in energy generation, cell signaling and apoptosis. The synthesis of ATP is driven by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane and by the pH difference due to proton flux across it. We have developed a tool to study the ionic activity of the mitochondria in parallel with dielectric measurements (impedance spectroscopy) to gain a better understanding of the properties of the mitochondrial membrane. This BioMEMS chip includes: 1) electrodes for impedance studies of mitochondria designed as two- and four-probe structures for optimized operation over a wide frequency range and 2) ion-sensitive field effect transistors for proton studies of the electron transport chain and for possible monitoring other ions such as sodium, potassium and calcium. We have used uncouplers to depolarize the mitochondrial membrane and disrupt the ionic balance. Dielectric spectroscopy responded with a corresponding increase in impedance values pointing at changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. An electrical model was used to describe mitochondrial sample’s complex impedance frequency dependencies and the contribution of the membrane to overall impedance changes. The results prove that dielectric spectroscopy can be used as a tool for membrane potential studies. It can be concluded that studies of the electrochemical parameters associated with mitochondrial bioenergetics may render significant information on various abnormalities attributable to these organelles. PMID:25010497

  5. Disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis by phytanic acid in cerebellum of young rats.

    PubMed

    Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Zanatta, Angela; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Wajner, Moacir

    2013-06-01

    Phytanic acid (Phyt) brain concentrations are highly increased in Refsum disease, a peroxisomal disorder clinically characterized by neurological features, cardiac abnormalities, and retinitis pigmentosa. Considering that the pathogenesis of cerebellar ataxia, a common finding in this disease, is still unknown, in the present work we investigated the in vitro effects of Phyt at concentrations similar to those found in affected patients on important parameters of mitochondrial homeostasis in cerebellum from young rats. The respiratory parameters states 3 and 4 and respiratory control ratio (RCR) determined by oxygen consumption, membrane potential (∆Ψm), NAD(P)H pool content, and swelling were evaluated in mitochondrial preparations from this cerebral structure. Phyt markedly increased state 4 respiration, whereas state 3 respiration, the RCR, the mitochondrial matrix NAD(P)H content, and ∆Ψm were decreased by this fatty acid, being the latter effect partially prevented by N-acetylcysteine. These data indicate that Phyt behaves as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation and as a metabolic inhibitor disrupting mitochondrial homeostasis in cerebellum. It is proposed that these pathomechanisms may contribute at least in part to the cerebellar alterations found in Refsum disease.

  6. A male sterility-associated mitochondrial protein in wild beets causes pollen disruption in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masayuki P; Shinada, Hiroshi; Onodera, Yasuyuki; Komaki, Chihiro; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2008-06-01

    In higher plants, male reproductive (pollen) development is known to be disrupted in a class of mitochondrial mutants termed cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) mutants. Despite the increase in knowledge regarding CMS-encoding genes and their expression, definitive evidence that CMS-associated proteins actually cause pollen disruption is not yet available in most cases. Here we compare the translation products of mitochondria between the normal fertile cytoplasm and the male-sterile I-12CMS(3) cytoplasm derived from wild beets. The results show a unique 12 kDa polypeptide that is present in the I-12CMS(3) mitochondria but is not detectable among the translation products of normal mitochondria. We also found that a mitochondrial open reading frame (named orf129) was uniquely transcribed in I-12CMS(3) and is large enough to encode the novel 12 kDa polypeptide. Antibodies against a GST-ORF129 fusion protein were raised to establish that this 12 kDa polypeptide is the product of orf129. ORF129 was shown to accumulate in flower mitochondria as well as in root and leaf mitochondria. As for the CMS-associated protein (PCF protein) in petunia, ORF129 is primarily present in the matrix and is loosely associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. The orf129 sequence was fused to a mitochondrial targeting pre-sequence, placed under the control of the Arabidopsis apetala3 promoter, and introduced into the tobacco nuclear genome. Transgenic expression of ORF129 resulted in male sterility, which provides clear supporting evidence that ORF129 is responsible for the male-sterile phenotype in sugar beet with wild beet cytoplasm.

  7. Appoptosin interacts with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuilin; Shi, Zhun; Zhang, Lingzhi; Zhou, Zehua; Zheng, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Guiying; Bu, Guojun; Fraser, Paul E; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Yun-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial morphology is regulated by fusion and fission machinery. Impaired mitochondria dynamics cause various diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Appoptosin (encoded by SLC25A38) is a mitochondrial carrier protein that is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Appoptosin overexpression causes overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-dependent apoptosis, whereas appoptosin downregulation abolishes β-amyloid-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal death during Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we found that overexpression of appoptosin resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation in a manner independent of its carrier function, ROS production or caspase activation. Although appoptosin did not affect levels of mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion (MFN1 and MFN2), inner-membrane fusion (OPA1) and fission [DRP1 (also known as DNM1L) and FIS1] proteins, appoptosin interacted with MFN1 and MFN2, as well as with the mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MITOL (also known as MARCH5) but not OPA1, FIS1 or DRP1. Appoptosin overexpression impaired the interaction between MFN1 and MFN2, and mitochondrial fusion. By contrast, co-expression of MFN1, MITOL and a dominant-negative form of DRP1, DRP1(K38A), partially rescued appoptosin-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis, whereas co-expression of FIS1 aggravated appoptosin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results demonstrate that appoptosin can interact with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

  8. Appoptosin interacts with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cuilin; Shi, Zhun; Zhang, Lingzhi; Zhou, Zehua; Zheng, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Guiying; Bu, Guojun; Fraser, Paul E.; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Yun-wu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial morphology is regulated by fusion and fission machinery. Impaired mitochondria dynamics cause various diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Appoptosin (encoded by SLC25A38) is a mitochondrial carrier protein that is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Appoptosin overexpression causes overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-dependent apoptosis, whereas appoptosin downregulation abolishes β-amyloid-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal death during Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we found that overexpression of appoptosin resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation in a manner independent of its carrier function, ROS production or caspase activation. Although appoptosin did not affect levels of mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion (MFN1 and MFN2), inner-membrane fusion (OPA1) and fission [DRP1 (also known as DNM1L) and FIS1] proteins, appoptosin interacted with MFN1 and MFN2, as well as with the mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MITOL (also known as MARCH5) but not OPA1, FIS1 or DRP1. Appoptosin overexpression impaired the interaction between MFN1 and MFN2, and mitochondrial fusion. By contrast, co-expression of MFN1, MITOL and a dominant-negative form of DRP1, DRP1K38A, partially rescued appoptosin-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis, whereas co-expression of FIS1 aggravated appoptosin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results demonstrate that appoptosin can interact with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology. PMID:26813789

  9. Kinetics membrane disruption due to drug interactions of chlorpromazine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Nussio, Matthew R; Sykes, Matthew J; Miners, John O; Shapter, Joseph G

    2009-01-20

    Drug-membrane interactions assume considerable importance in pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism. Here, we present the interaction of chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPZ) with supported phospholipid bilayers. It was demonstrated that CPZ binds rapidly to phospholipid bilayers, disturbing the molecular ordering of the phospholipids. These interactions were observed to follow first order kinetics, with an activation energy of approximately 420 kJ mol(-1). Time-dependent membrane disruption was also observed for the interaction with CPZ, such that holes appeared in the phospholipid bilayer after the interaction of CPZ. For this process of membrane disruption, "lag-burst" kinetics was demonstrated.

  10. ChChd3, an Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Protein, Is Essential for Maintaining Crista Integrity and Mitochondrial Function*

    PubMed Central

    Darshi, Manjula; Mendiola, Vincent L.; Mackey, Mason R.; Murphy, Anne N.; Koller, Antonius; Perkins, Guy A.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial inner membrane (IM) serves as the site for ATP production by hosting the oxidative phosphorylation complex machinery most notably on the crista membranes. Disruption of the crista structure has been implicated in a variety of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we characterize ChChd3, a previously identified PKA substrate of unknown function (Schauble, S., King, C. C., Darshi, M., Koller, A., Shah, K., and Taylor, S. S. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 14952–14959), and show that it is essential for maintaining crista integrity and mitochondrial function. In the mitochondria, ChChd3 is a peripheral protein of the IM facing the intermembrane space. RNAi knockdown of ChChd3 in HeLa cells resulted in fragmented mitochondria, reduced OPA1 protein levels and impaired fusion, and clustering of the mitochondria around the nucleus along with reduced growth rate. Both the oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates were severely restricted. Ultrastructural analysis of these cells revealed aberrant mitochondrial IM structures with fragmented and tubular cristae or loss of cristae, and reduced crista membrane. Additionally, the crista junction opening diameter was reduced to 50% suggesting remodeling of cristae in the absence of ChChd3. Analysis of the ChChd3-binding proteins revealed that ChChd3 interacts with the IM proteins mitofilin and OPA1, which regulate crista morphology, and the outer membrane protein Sam50, which regulates import and assembly of β-barrel proteins on the outer membrane. Knockdown of ChChd3 led to almost complete loss of both mitofilin and Sam50 proteins and alterations in several mitochondrial proteins, suggesting that ChChd3 is a scaffolding protein that stabilizes protein complexes involved in maintaining crista architecture and protein import and is thus essential for maintaining mitochondrial structure and function. PMID:21081504

  11. Isolation of mitochondria by gentle cell membrane disruption, and their subsequent characterization.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takahiro; Yamashita, Saki; Hirusaki, Kotoe; Katoh, Kaoru; Ohta, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-07

    Mitochondria play a key role in several physiological processes as in integrating signals in the cell. However, understanding of the mechanism by which mitochondria sense and respond to signals has been limited due to the lack of an appropriate model system. In this study, we developed a method to isolate and characterize mitochondria without cell homogenization. By gently pipetting cells treated with streptolysin-O, a pore-forming membrane protein, we disrupted the cell membrane and were able to isolate both elongated and spherical mitochondria. Fluorescence imaging combined with super resolution microscopy showed that both the outer and inner membranes of the elongated mitochondria isolated using the newly developed method were intact. In addition, a FRET-based ATP sensor expressed in the mitochondrial matrix demonstrated that ATP generation by FoF1-ATPase in the isolated elongated mitochondria was as high as that in intracellular mitochondria. On the other hand, some of the spherical mitochondria isolated with this method had the outer membrane that no longer encapsulated the inner membrane. In addition, all mitochondria isolated using conventional procedures involving homogenization were spherical, many of them had damaged membranes, and low levels of ATP generation. Our results suggest that elongated mitochondria isolated from cells through gentle cell membrane disruption using a pore-forming protein tend to be more similar to intracellular mitochondria, having an intact membrane system and higher activity than spherical mitochondria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tamoxifen inhibits mitochondrial membrane damage caused by disulfiram.

    PubMed

    Pavón, Natalia; Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; Correa, Francisco; Yoval-Sánchez, Belem; Belmont, Javier; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Chávez, Edmundo

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we studied the protective effects of tamoxifen (TAM) on disulfiram (Dis)-induced mitochondrial membrane insult. The results indicate that TAM circumvents the inner membrane leakiness manifested as Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial swelling, and collapse of the transmembrane electric gradient. Furthermore, it was found that TAM prevents inactivation of the mitochondrial enzyme aconitase and detachment of cytochrome c from the inner membrane. Interestingly, TAM also inhibited Dis-promoted generation of hydrogen peroxide. Given that TAM is an antioxidant molecule, it is plausible that its protection may be due to the inhibition of Dis-induced oxidative stress.

  13. MINOS is plus: a Mitofilin complex for mitochondrial membrane contacts.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Johannes M

    2011-10-18

    Cristae junctions mark the boundaries of respiratory compartments in the inner mitochondrial membrane. In this issue of Developmental Cell, von der Malsburg et al. (2011) identify a complex, MINOS, that organizes cristae junctions. Mitofilin/Fcj1, the central component of the MINOS complex, also connects the inner membrane to outer membrane protein import machinery.

  14. Mechanism of cytotoxic action of perfluorinated acids II. Disruption of mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Kleszczyński, Konrad; Stepnowski, Piotr; Składanowski, Andrzej C

    2009-03-01

    PFAs and derivatives due to perfect technological properties are broadly applied in industry and consumer goods, and in consequence widely disseminated, environmentally bioaccumulative and found at ppb level in human serum. Earlier we revealed that in vitro cytotoxicity increases with chain length (CF(6)-CF(14)). The compounds dissipate plasma membrane potential and acidify of cytosol. Here we determine whether there is an association between the protonophoric uncoupling of respiration and disruption of bioenergetics caused by CF(6)-CF(12) on HCT116 cell apoptosis. Again the effects were stronger for longer molecules. Incubation of cells with CF(10) stimulated time-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore, release of cytochrome c, activation of caspases and depletion of intracellular level of ATP occurring in intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Incubation with decanoic acid (DA) did not lead to mitochondrial dysfunctions neither to cell cycle disturbances. Synchronized removal of the phosphorylated state of Akt, ERK1/2 and PKCdelta/theta kinases by CF(10) suggests presence of concerted action to uninhibit Bad protein activation and a cascade of intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Blocking MPT pore by cyclosporin A (CsA) led to a reduction of mitochondrial potential dissipation (mtDeltaPsi). Such cells neither showed cytochrome c release nor the downstream activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Our results confirm that mitochondria play a crucial role in perfluorochemicals induced apoptosis by releasing apoptotic signals through MPT pore.

  15. Impaired mitochondrial function due to familial Alzheimer's disease-causing presenilins mutants via Ca(2+) disruptions.

    PubMed

    Toglia, Patrick; Cheung, King-Ho; Mak, Don-On Daniel; Ullah, Ghanim

    2016-05-01

    Mutants in presenilins (PS1 or PS2) is the major cause of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). FAD causing PS mutants affect intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis by enhancing the gating of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) Ca(2+) release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to exaggerated Ca(2+) release into the cytoplasm. Using experimental IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) release data, in conjunction with a computational model of cell bioenergetics, we explore how the differences in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in control cells and cells expressing FAD-causing PS mutants affect key variables such as ATP, reactive oxygen species (ROS), NADH, and mitochondrial Ca(2+). We find that as a result of exaggerated cytosolic Ca(2+) in FAD-causing mutant PS-expressing cells, the rate of oxygen consumption increases dramatically and overcomes the Ca(2+) dependent enzymes that stimulate NADH production. This leads to decreased rates in proton pumping due to diminished membrane potential along with less ATP and enhanced ROS production. These results show that through Ca(2+) signaling disruption, mutant PS leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and potentially to cell death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. On the mechanism underlying ethanol-induced mitochondrial dynamic disruption and autophagy response.

    PubMed

    Bonet-Ponce, Luis; Saez-Atienzar, Sara; da Casa, Carmen; Flores-Bellver, Miguel; Barcia, Jorge M; Sancho-Pelluz, Javier; Romero, Francisco J; Jordan, Joaquín; Galindo, María F

    2015-07-01

    We have explored the mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced mitochondrial dynamics disruption and mitophagy. Ethanol increases mitochondrial fission in a concentration-dependent manner through Drp1 mitochondrial translocation and OPA1 proteolytic cleavage. ARPE-19 (a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line) cells challenged with ethanol showed mitochondrial potential disruptions mediated by alterations in mitochondrial complex IV protein level and increases in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. In addition, ethanol activated the canonical autophagic pathway, as denoted by autophagosome formation and autophagy regulator elements including Beclin1, ATG5-ATG12 and P-S6 kinase. Likewise, autophagy inhibition dramatically increased mitochondrial fission and cell death, whereas autophagy stimulation rendered the opposite results, placing autophagy as a cytoprotective response aimed to remove damaged mitochondria. Interestingly, although ethanol induced mitochondrial Bax translocation, this episode was associated to cell death rather than mitochondrial fission or autophagy responses. Thus, Bax required 600 mM ethanol to migrate to mitochondria, a concentration that resulted in cell death. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking this protein respond to ethanol by undergoing mitochondrial fission and autophagy but not cytotoxicity. Finally, by using the specific mitochondrial-targeted scavenger MitoQ, we revealed mitochondria as the main source of reactive oxygen species that trigger autophagy activation. These findings suggest that cells respond to ethanol activating mitochondrial fission machinery by Drp1 and OPA1 rather than bax, in a manner that stimulates cytoprotective autophagy through mitochondrial ROS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Displacing hexokinase from mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel impairs GLT-1-mediated glutamate uptake but does not disrupt interactions between GLT-1 and mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Joshua G; O'Donnell, John C; Krizman, Elizabeth; Robinson, Michael B

    2015-07-01

    The glutamate transporter GLT-1 is the major route for the clearance of extracellular glutamate in the forebrain, and most GLT-1 protein is found in astrocytes. This protein is coupled to the Na(+) electrochemical gradient, supporting the active intracellular accumulation of glutamate. We recently used a proteomic approach to identify proteins that may interact with GLT-1 in rat cortex, including the Na(+)/K(+) -ATPase, most glycolytic enzymes, and several mitochondrial proteins. We also showed that most GLT-1 puncta (∼ 70%) are overlapped by mitochondria in astroglial processes in organotypic slices. From this analysis, we proposed that the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase (HK)-1 might physically form a scaffold to link GLT-1 and mitochondria because HK1 is known to interact with the outer mitochondrial membrane protein voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC). The current study validates the interactions among HK-1, VDAC, and GLT-1 by using forward and reverse immunoprecipitations and provides evidence that a subfraction of HK1 colocalizes with GLT-1 in vivo. A peptide known to disrupt the interaction between HK and VDAC did not disrupt interactions between GLT-1 and several mitochondrial proteins. In parallel experiments, displacement of HK from VDAC reduced GLT-1-mediated glutamate uptake. These results suggest that, although HK1 forms coimmunoprecipitatable complexes with both VDAC and GLT-1, it does not physically link GLT-1 to mitochondrial proteins. However, the interaction of HK1 with VDAC supports GLT-1-mediated transport activity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Provoke Dominant Inhibition of Mitochondrial Inner Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sauvanet, Cécile; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; Salin, Bénédicte; David, Claudine; Massoni-Laporte, Aurélie; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Rojo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that continuously move, fuse and divide. Mitochondrial dynamics modulate overall mitochondrial morphology and are essential for the proper function, maintenance and transmission of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We have investigated mitochondrial fusion in yeast cells with severe defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) due to removal or various specific mutations of mtDNA. We find that, under fermentative conditions, OXPHOS deficient cells maintain normal levels of cellular ATP and ADP but display a reduced mitochondrial inner membrane potential. We demonstrate that, despite metabolic compensation by glycolysis, OXPHOS defects are associated to a selective inhibition of inner but not outer membrane fusion. Fusion inhibition was dominant and hampered the fusion of mutant mitochondria with wild-type mitochondria. Inhibition of inner membrane fusion was not systematically associated to changes of mitochondrial distribution and morphology, nor to changes in the isoform pattern of Mgm1, the major fusion factor of the inner membrane. However, inhibition of inner membrane fusion correlated with specific alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure, notably with the presence of aligned and unfused inner membranes that are connected to two mitochondrial boundaries. The fusion inhibition observed upon deletion of OXPHOS related genes or upon removal of the entire mtDNA was similar to that observed upon introduction of point mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene that are associated to neurogenic ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) or to maternally inherited Leigh Syndrome (MILS) in humans. Our findings indicate that the consequences of mtDNA mutations may not be limited to OXPHOS defects but may also include alterations in mitochondrial fusion. Our results further imply that, in healthy cells, the dominant inhibition of fusion could mediate the exclusion of OXPHOS-deficient mitochondria from the network of

  19. Mitochondrial DNA mutations provoke dominant inhibition of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Sauvanet, Cécile; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; Salin, Bénédicte; David, Claudine; Massoni-Laporte, Aurélie; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Rojo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that continuously move, fuse and divide. Mitochondrial dynamics modulate overall mitochondrial morphology and are essential for the proper function, maintenance and transmission of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We have investigated mitochondrial fusion in yeast cells with severe defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) due to removal or various specific mutations of mtDNA. We find that, under fermentative conditions, OXPHOS deficient cells maintain normal levels of cellular ATP and ADP but display a reduced mitochondrial inner membrane potential. We demonstrate that, despite metabolic compensation by glycolysis, OXPHOS defects are associated to a selective inhibition of inner but not outer membrane fusion. Fusion inhibition was dominant and hampered the fusion of mutant mitochondria with wild-type mitochondria. Inhibition of inner membrane fusion was not systematically associated to changes of mitochondrial distribution and morphology, nor to changes in the isoform pattern of Mgm1, the major fusion factor of the inner membrane. However, inhibition of inner membrane fusion correlated with specific alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure, notably with the presence of aligned and unfused inner membranes that are connected to two mitochondrial boundaries. The fusion inhibition observed upon deletion of OXPHOS related genes or upon removal of the entire mtDNA was similar to that observed upon introduction of point mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene that are associated to neurogenic ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) or to maternally inherited Leigh Syndrome (MILS) in humans. Our findings indicate that the consequences of mtDNA mutations may not be limited to OXPHOS defects but may also include alterations in mitochondrial fusion. Our results further imply that, in healthy cells, the dominant inhibition of fusion could mediate the exclusion of OXPHOS-deficient mitochondria from the network of

  20. Cancer chemoprevention and mitochondria: targeting apoptosis in transformed cells via the disruption of mitochondrial bioenergetics/redox state.

    PubMed

    Hail, Numsen; Lotan, Reuben

    2009-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention employs agents that block, hinder, or reverse tumorigenesis to prevent malignancy. Several putative cancer chemopreventive agents promote apoptosis in transformed cells initiated in animal carcinogenesis models or identified in human subjects, and/or in tumor cells cultured in vitro. Consequently, apoptosis induction is increasingly valued as a biologically significant anticancer mechanism in the arena of chemoprevention. In vitro studies suggest that the permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes is an important mechanistic determinant associated with the apoptosis induced by these agents. Mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP) may occur via the control of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, and/or by the induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition. Both of these cell death-inducing regulatory mechanisms are ultimately responsive to the bioenergetic status/redox state of mitochondria. Interestingly, in addition to inducing MMP, various chemopreventive agents can directly modulate mitochondrial bioenergetics and/or redox tone in transformed cells. This review will examine prospective mechanisms associated with the disruption of mitochondrial function by chemopreventive agents that affect MMP and apoptosis. In doing so, we will construct a paradigm supporting the notion that the bioenergetic and/or redox characteristics of the mitochondria in transformed cells are important targets in the chemoprevention of cancer.

  1. Mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and cell death during myocardial infarction: roles of calcium and reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Keith A

    2013-01-01

    Excess generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytosolic calcium accumulation play major roles in the initiation of programmed cell death during acute myocardial infarction. Cell death may include necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy, and combinations thereof. During ischemia, calcium handling between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and myofilament is disrupted and calcium is diverted to the mitochondria causing swelling. Reperfusion, while essential for survival, reactivates energy transduction and contractility and causes the release of ROS and additional ionic imbalance. During acute ischemia–reperfusion, the principal death pathways are programmed necrosis and apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway, initiated by the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, respectively. Despite intense investigation, the mechanisms of action and modes of regulation of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization are incompletely understood. Extrinsic apoptosis, necroptosis and autophagy may also contribute to ischemia–reperfusion injury. In this review, the roles of dysregulated calcium and ROS and the contributions of Bcl-2 proteins, as well as mitochondrial morphology in promoting mitochondrial membrane permeability change and the ensuing cell death during myocardial infarction are discussed. PMID:23176689

  2. Mitochondrial fission and fusion in Dictyostelium discoideum: a search for proteins involved in membrane dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial morphology is maintained by two distinct membrane events -fission and fusion. Altering these conserved processes can disrupt mitochondrial morphology and distribution, thereby disrupting the organelle’s functionality and impeding cellular function. In higher eukaryotes, these processes are mediated by a family of dynamin-related proteins (DRP’s). In the lower eukaryotes, for instance Dictyostelium discoideum, mitochondrial fission and fusion have been implicated but not yet established. To understand the overall mechanism of these dynamics across organisms, we developed an assay to identify fission and fusion events in Dictyostelium and to assess the involvement of the mitochondrial proteins, MidA, CluA, and two DRP’s, DymA and DymB. Findings Using laser scanning confocal microscopy we show, for the first time, that lower eukaryotes mediate mitochondrial fission and fusion. In Dictyostelium, these processes are balanced, occurring approximately 1 event/minute. Quantification of the rates in midA-, cluA-, dymA-, or dymB- strains established that MidA appears to play an indirect role in the regulation of fission and fusion, while the DRP’s are not essential for these processes. Rates of fission and fusion were significantly reduced in cluA-cells, indicating that CluA is necessary for maintaining both fission and fusion. Conclusions We have successfully demonstrated that Dictyostelium mitochondria undergo the dynamic processes of fission and fusion. The classical mediators of membrane dynamics - the DRP’s – are not necessary for these dynamics, whereas CluA is necessary for both processes. This work contributes to our overall understanding of mitochondrial dynamics and ultimately will provide additional insight into mitochondrial disease. PMID:22980139

  3. [Effect of macrocyclic esters on mitochondrial and phosphatidylcholine membranes].

    PubMed

    Bogatskiĭ, A V; Luk'ianenko, N G; Nazarov, E I; Nazarova, N Iu; Konup, I P

    1982-01-01

    It has been found that some macrocyclic esters have no ionophoric properties, but can block valinomycin-induced potassium transport in mitochondrial membranes and lessen the potassium current induced by valinomycin in phosphatidylcholine bilayers. It has been also discovered that 36-member cyclic esters of succinic acid and propylene glycoles decrease fluorescence of puridine nucleotides in mitochondria and produce a modifying effect on bimolecular phosphatidylcholine membranes in the medium of litium, calcium and magnesium chlorides at unilateral injection. The results obtained suggest that cyclopolyesters under investigation form mixed complexes with the macromolecules in the composition of mitochondrial and phosphatidylcholine membranes with the participation of the integrated ion.

  4. A novel motif in the yeast mitochondrial dynamin Dnm1 is essential for adaptor binding and membrane recruitment.

    PubMed

    Bui, Huyen T; Karren, Mary A; Bhar, Debjani; Shaw, Janet M

    2012-11-12

    To initiate mitochondrial fission, dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) must bind specific adaptors on the outer mitochondrial membrane. The structural features underlying this interaction are poorly understood. Using yeast as a model, we show that the Insert B domain of the Dnm1 guanosine triphosphatase (a DRP) contains a novel motif required for association with the mitochondrial adaptor Mdv1. Mutation of this conserved motif specifically disrupted Dnm1-Mdv1 interactions, blocking Dnm1 recruitment and mitochondrial fission. Suppressor mutations in Mdv1 that restored Dnm1-Mdv1 interactions and fission identified potential protein-binding interfaces on the Mdv1 β-propeller domain. These results define the first known function for Insert B in DRP-adaptor interactions. Based on the variability of Insert B sequences and adaptor proteins, we propose that Insert B domains and mitochondrial adaptors have coevolved to meet the unique requirements for mitochondrial fission of different organisms.

  5. A novel motif in the yeast mitochondrial dynamin Dnm1 is essential for adaptor binding and membrane recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Huyen T.; Karren, Mary A.; Bhar, Debjani

    2012-01-01

    To initiate mitochondrial fission, dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) must bind specific adaptors on the outer mitochondrial membrane. The structural features underlying this interaction are poorly understood. Using yeast as a model, we show that the Insert B domain of the Dnm1 guanosine triphosphatase (a DRP) contains a novel motif required for association with the mitochondrial adaptor Mdv1. Mutation of this conserved motif specifically disrupted Dnm1–Mdv1 interactions, blocking Dnm1 recruitment and mitochondrial fission. Suppressor mutations in Mdv1 that restored Dnm1–Mdv1 interactions and fission identified potential protein-binding interfaces on the Mdv1 β-propeller domain. These results define the first known function for Insert B in DRP–adaptor interactions. Based on the variability of Insert B sequences and adaptor proteins, we propose that Insert B domains and mitochondrial adaptors have coevolved to meet the unique requirements for mitochondrial fission of different organisms. PMID:23148233

  6. Mitochondrial membrane potential changes in osteoblasts treated with parathyroid hormone and estradiol.

    PubMed

    Troyan, M B; Gilman, V R; Gay, C V

    1997-06-15

    This study assessed mitochondrial membrane potential changes in cultured osteoblasts treated with hormones known to regulate osteoblasts. A fluorescent carbocyanine dye, 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolocarbocyanine++ + iodide, also called JC-1, was used as a probe. JC-1 emits photons at 585 nm (orange-red) when the membrane potential in mitochondria is highly negative, but when the potential becomes reduced emission occurs at 527 nm (green). Osteoblasts were rinsed in serum-free medium for 5 min, then loaded with 1 x 10(-6) M JC-1 for 10 min. The distribution and intensity of JC-1 fluorescence were evaluated with a laser-scanning confocal microscope system. Hormone treatments included parathyroid hormone (PTH; 10(-8) M), 17beta-estradiol (10(-8) M), and thyroxine (T4; 10(-8) M). The potassium ionophore valinomycin (10(-6) M) was used as a control since it is known to disrupt the electrochemical gradient of mitochondria without interfering with the pH gradient. Valinomycin caused a profound, rapid increase (22.5% above untreated values) in the green/red ratio, which indicated a lowering of the mitochondrial membrane potential in all samples evaluated. PTH caused a less pronounced, but significant (7-14%), reduction in membrane potential in all cells examined. PTH is known to affect osteoblasts in a number of ways and is inhibitory to mitochondrial respiration; the results confirm this effect. For estradiol, half of the cells responded at a significant level, with a membrane potential reduction of 6 to 13% being recorded; the other half did not respond. Thyroxine did not alter mitochondrial membrane potential. Responses were detectable within 20 s for valinomycin, but occurred at a slower rate, over 200 to 300 s, following PTH and estradiol treatment. Responses to PTH and estradiol could be due to mitochondrial uptake of cytosolic Ca2+.

  7. Proteomic analysis of the mouse liver mitochondrial inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Da Cruz, Sandrine; Xenarios, Ioannis; Langridge, James; Vilbois, Francis; Parone, Phillipe A; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2003-10-17

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in cellular homeostasis, which justifies the increasing interest in mapping the different components of these organelles. Here we have focused our study on the identification of proteins of the mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM). This membrane is of particular interest because, besides the well known components of the respiratory chain complexes, it contains several ion channels and many carrier proteins that certainly play a key role in mitochondrial function and, therefore, deserve to be identified at the molecular level. To achieve this goal we have used a novel approach combining the use of highly purified mouse liver mitochondrial inner membranes, extraction of membrane proteins with organic acid, and two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. This procedure allowed us to identify 182 proteins that are involved in several biochemical processes, such as the electron transport machinery, the protein import machinery, protein synthesis, lipid metabolism, and ion or substrate transport. The full range of isoelectric point (3.9-12.5), molecular mass (6-527 kDa), and hydrophobicity values (up to 16 transmembrane predicted domains) were represented. In addition, of the 182 proteins found, 20 were unknown or had never previously been associated with the MIM. Overexpression of some of these proteins in mammalian cells confirmed their mitochondrial localization and resulted in severe remodeling of the mitochondrial network. This study provides the first proteome of the MIM and provides a basis for a more detailed study of the newly characterized proteins of this membrane.

  8. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Habicht, K-L.; Singh, N.S.; Indig, F.E.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.; Shimmo, R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized on to Immobilized Artificial Membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC-(U87MG) column and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08 ± 1.49 and 0.0086 ± 0.0006 μM respectively, which was consistent with previously reported values. Further, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX and rotenone. Additionally, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC-(U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  9. Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteome of Trypanosoma brucei Reveals Novel Factors Required to Maintain Mitochondrial Morphology*

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Moritz; Wiese, Sebastian; Mani, Jan; Chanfon, Astrid; Jackson, Christopher; Meisinger, Chris; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a unicellular parasite that causes devastating diseases in humans and animals. It diverged from most other eukaryotes very early in evolution and, as a consequence, has an unusual mitochondrial biology. Moreover, mitochondrial functions and morphology are highly regulated throughout the life cycle of the parasite. The outer mitochondrial membrane defines the boundary of the organelle. Its properties are therefore key for understanding how the cytosol and mitochondria communicate and how the organelle is integrated into the metabolism of the whole cell. We have purified the mitochondrial outer membrane of T. brucei and characterized its proteome using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for protein abundance profiling in combination with statistical analysis. Our results show that the trypanosomal outer membrane proteome consists of 82 proteins, two-thirds of which have never been associated with mitochondria before. 40 proteins share homology with proteins of known functions. The function of 42 proteins, 33 of which are specific to trypanosomatids, remains unknown. 11 proteins are essential for the disease-causing bloodstream form of T. brucei and therefore may be exploited as novel drug targets. A comparison with the outer membrane proteome of yeast defines a set of 17 common proteins that are likely present in the mitochondrial outer membrane of all eukaryotes. Known factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial morphology are virtually absent in T. brucei. Interestingly, RNAi-mediated ablation of three outer membrane proteins of unknown function resulted in a collapse of the network-like mitochondrion of procyclic cells and for the first time identified factors that control mitochondrial shape in T. brucei. PMID:23221899

  10. Mitochondrial outer membrane proteome of Trypanosoma brucei reveals novel factors required to maintain mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Moritz; Wiese, Sebastian; Mani, Jan; Chanfon, Astrid; Jackson, Christopher; Meisinger, Chris; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2013-02-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a unicellular parasite that causes devastating diseases in humans and animals. It diverged from most other eukaryotes very early in evolution and, as a consequence, has an unusual mitochondrial biology. Moreover, mitochondrial functions and morphology are highly regulated throughout the life cycle of the parasite. The outer mitochondrial membrane defines the boundary of the organelle. Its properties are therefore key for understanding how the cytosol and mitochondria communicate and how the organelle is integrated into the metabolism of the whole cell. We have purified the mitochondrial outer membrane of T. brucei and characterized its proteome using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for protein abundance profiling in combination with statistical analysis. Our results show that the trypanosomal outer membrane proteome consists of 82 proteins, two-thirds of which have never been associated with mitochondria before. 40 proteins share homology with proteins of known functions. The function of 42 proteins, 33 of which are specific to trypanosomatids, remains unknown. 11 proteins are essential for the disease-causing bloodstream form of T. brucei and therefore may be exploited as novel drug targets. A comparison with the outer membrane proteome of yeast defines a set of 17 common proteins that are likely present in the mitochondrial outer membrane of all eukaryotes. Known factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial morphology are virtually absent in T. brucei. Interestingly, RNAi-mediated ablation of three outer membrane proteins of unknown function resulted in a collapse of the network-like mitochondrion of procyclic cells and for the first time identified factors that control mitochondrial shape in T. brucei.

  11. Ischemic preconditioning preserves mitochondrial membrane potential and limits reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Quarrie, Ricardo; Lee, Daniel S; Steinbaugh, Gregory; Cramer, Brandon; Erdahl, Warren; Pfeiffer, Douglas R; Zweier, Jay L; Crestanello, Juan A

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial superoxide radical (O(2)(•¯)) production increases after cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (IR). Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) preserves mitochondrial function and attenuates O(2)(•¯) production, but the mechanism is unknown. Mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔΨ) is known to affect O(2)(•¯) production; mitochondrial depolarization decreases O(2)(•¯) formation. We examined the relationship between O(2)(•¯) production and mΔΨ during IR and IPC. Rat hearts were subjected to Control or IPC. Mitochondria were isolated at end equilibration (End EQ), end ischemia (End I), and end reperfusion (End RP). mΔΨ was measured using a tetraphenylphosphonium electrode. Mitochondrial O(2)(•¯) production was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance using DMPO spin trap. Cytochrome c levels were measured using high-pressure liquid chromatography. IPC preserved mΔΨ at End I (-156 ± 5 versus -131 ± 6 mV, P < 0.001) and End RP (-168 ± 2 versus -155 ± 2 mV, P < 0.05). At End RP, IPC attenuated O(2)(•¯) production (2527 ± 221 versus 3523 ± 250 AU/mg protein, P < 0.05). IPC preserved cytochrome c levels (351 ± 14 versus 269 ± 16 picomoles/mg protein, P < 0.05) at End RP, and decreased mitochondrial cristae disruption (10% ± 4% versus 33% ± 7%, P < 0.05) and amorphous density formation (18% ± 4% versus 28% ± 1%, P < 0.05). We conclude that IPC preserves mΔΨ, possibly by limiting disruption of mitochondrial inner membrane. IPC also decreases mitochondrial O(2)(•¯) production and preserves mitochondrial ultrastructure after IR. While it was previously held that slight decreases in mΔΨ decrease O(2)(•¯) production, our results indicate that preservation of mΔΨ is associated with decreased O(2)(•¯) and preservation of cardiac function in IPC. These findings indicate that the mechanism of IPC may not involve mΔΨ depolarization, but rather preservation of mitochondrial electrochemical potential. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc

  12. Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) and Syntaphilin collaborate to modulate axonal mitochondrial anchoring.

    PubMed

    Park, Cana; Lee, Seol-Ae; Hong, Ji-Ho; Suh, Yeongjun; Park, Sung Jin; Suh, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Youngsik; Choi, Jinhyuk; Huh, Ji-Won; Kim, You-Me; Park, Sang Ki

    2016-07-02

    In neuronal axons, the ratio of motile-to-stationary mitochondria is tightly regulated by neuronal activation, thereby meeting the need for local calcium buffering and maintaining the ATP supply. However, the molecular players and detailed regulatory mechanisms behind neuronal mitochondrial movement are not completely understood. Here, we found that neuronal activation-induced mitochondrial anchoring is regulated by Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), which is accomplished by functional association with Syntaphilin (SNPH). DISC1 deficiency resulted in reduced axonal mitochondrial movement, which was partially reversed by concomitant SNPH depletion. In addition, a SNPH deletion mutant lacking the sequence for interaction with DISC1 exhibited an enhanced mitochondrial anchoring effect than wild-type SNPH. Moreover, upon neuronal activation, mitochondrial movement was preserved by DISC1 overexpression, not showing immobilized response of mitochondria. Taken together, we propose that DISC1 in association with SNPH is a component of a modulatory complex that determines mitochondrial anchoring in response to neuronal activation.

  13. Accumulation of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Disrupts Cardiac Progenitor Cell Function and Reduces Survival.

    PubMed

    Orogo, Amabel M; Gonzalez, Eileen R; Kubli, Dieter A; Baptista, Igor L; Ong, Sang-Bing; Prolla, Tomas A; Sussman, Mark A; Murphy, Anne N; Gustafsson, Åsa B

    2015-09-04

    Transfer of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) improves cardiac function in heart failure patients. However, CPC function is reduced with age, limiting their regenerative potential. Aging is associated with numerous changes in cells including accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, but it is unknown how this impacts CPC function. Here, we demonstrate that acquisition of mtDNA mutations disrupts mitochondrial function, enhances mitophagy, and reduces the replicative and regenerative capacities of the CPCs. We show that activation of differentiation in CPCs is associated with expansion of the mitochondrial network and increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Interestingly, mutant CPCs are deficient in mitochondrial respiration and rely on glycolysis for energy. In response to differentiation, these cells fail to activate mitochondrial respiration. This inability to meet the increased energy demand leads to activation of cell death. These findings demonstrate the consequences of accumulating mtDNA mutations and the importance of mtDNA integrity in CPC homeostasis and regenerative potential.

  14. Deleterious variants in TRAK1 disrupt mitochondrial movement and cause fatal encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Barel, Ortal; Christine V Malicdan, May; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Kandel, Judith; Pri-Chen, Hadass; Stephen, Joshi; Castro, Inês G; Metz, Jeremy; Atawa, Osama; Moshkovitz, Sharon; Ganelin, Eti; Barshack, Iris; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Nass, Dvora; Marek-Yagel, Dina; Amariglio, Ninette; Shalva, Nechama; Vilboux, Thierry; Ferreira, Carlos; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Heimer, Gali; Hoffmann, Chen; Yardeni, Tal; Nissenkorn, Andreea; Avivi, Camila; Eyal, Eran; Kol, Nitzan; Glick Saar, Efrat; Wallace, Douglas C; Gahl, William A; Rechavi, Gideon; Schrader, Michael; Eckmann, David M; Anikster, Yair

    2017-03-01

    Cellular distribution and dynamics of mitochondria are regulated by several motor proteins and a microtubule network. In neurons, mitochondrial trafficking is crucial because of high energy needs and calcium ion buffering along axons to synapses during neurotransmission. The trafficking kinesin proteins (TRAKs) are well characterized for their role in lysosomal and mitochondrial trafficking in cells, especially neurons. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified homozygous truncating variants in TRAK1 (NM_001042646:c.287-2A > C), in six lethal encephalopathic patients from three unrelated families. The pathogenic variant results in aberrant splicing and significantly reduced gene expression at the RNA and protein levels. In comparison with normal cells, TRAK1-deficient fibroblasts showed irregular mitochondrial distribution, altered mitochondrial motility, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, and diminished mitochondrial respiration. This study confirms the role of TRAK1 in mitochondrial dynamics and constitutes the first report of this gene in association with a severe neurodevelopmental disorder.

  15. Transient disruptions of aortic endothelial cell plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Q C; McNeil, P L

    1992-12-01

    Cells of gut, skin, and muscle frequently suffer transient survivable plasma membrane disruptions ("wounds") under physiological conditions, but it is not known whether endothelial cells of the aorta, which are constantly exposed to hemodynamically generated mechanical forces, similarly are injured in vivo. We have used serum albumin as a molecular probe for identifying endothelial cells of the rat aorta that incurred and survived transient plasma membrane wounds in vivo. Such wounded endothelial cells were in fact observed in the aortas of all rats examined. However, the percentage of wounded cells in the total aortic endothelial population varied remarkably between individuals ranging from 1.4% to 17.9% with a mean of 6.5% (+/- 4.6% SD). Wounded endothelial cells were heterogeneously distributed, being found in distinct clusters often in the shape of streaks aligned with the long axis of the vessel, or in the shape of partial or complete rims surrounding bifurcation openings, such as the ostia of the intercostal arteries. Physical exercise (running) did not increase the frequency of aortic endothelial cell membrane wounding, nor did spontaneous hypertension. Surprisingly, 80% of mitotic endothelial cell figures were identified as wounded. This article identified a previously unrecognized form of endothelial cell injury, survivable disruptions of the plasma membrane, and shows that injury to the endothelial cells of the normal aorta is far more commonplace than previously suspected. Plasma membrane wounding of endothelial cells could be linked to the initiation of atherosclerosis.

  16. Interchangeable adaptors regulate mitochondrial dynamin assembly for membrane scission

    PubMed Central

    Koirala, Sajjan; Guo, Qian; Kalia, Raghav; Bui, Huyen T.; Eckert, Debra M.; Frost, Adam; Shaw, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission is mediated by the dynamin-related GTPases Dnm1/Drp1 (yeast/mammals), which form spirals around constricted sites on mitochondria. Additional membrane-associated adaptor proteins (Fis1, Mdv1, Mff, and MiDs) are required to recruit these GTPases from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface. Whether these adaptors participate in both GTPase recruitment and membrane scission is not known. Here we use a yeast strain lacking all fission proteins to identify the minimal combinations of GTPases and adaptors sufficient for mitochondrial fission. Although Fis1 is dispensable for fission, membrane-anchored Mdv1, Mff, or MiDs paired individually with their respective GTPases are sufficient to divide mitochondria. In addition to their role in Drp1 membrane recruitment, MiDs coassemble with Drp1 in vitro. The resulting heteropolymer adopts a dramatically different structure with a narrower diameter than Drp1 homopolymers assembled in isolation. This result demonstrates that an adaptor protein alters the architecture of a mitochondrial dynamin GTPase polymer in a manner that could facilitate membrane constriction and severing activity. PMID:23530241

  17. Interchangeable adaptors regulate mitochondrial dynamin assembly for membrane scission.

    PubMed

    Koirala, Sajjan; Guo, Qian; Kalia, Raghav; Bui, Huyen T; Eckert, Debra M; Frost, Adam; Shaw, Janet M

    2013-04-09

    Mitochondrial fission is mediated by the dynamin-related GTPases Dnm1/Drp1 (yeast/mammals), which form spirals around constricted sites on mitochondria. Additional membrane-associated adaptor proteins (Fis1, Mdv1, Mff, and MiDs) are required to recruit these GTPases from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface. Whether these adaptors participate in both GTPase recruitment and membrane scission is not known. Here we use a yeast strain lacking all fission proteins to identify the minimal combinations of GTPases and adaptors sufficient for mitochondrial fission. Although Fis1 is dispensable for fission, membrane-anchored Mdv1, Mff, or MiDs paired individually with their respective GTPases are sufficient to divide mitochondria. In addition to their role in Drp1 membrane recruitment, MiDs coassemble with Drp1 in vitro. The resulting heteropolymer adopts a dramatically different structure with a narrower diameter than Drp1 homopolymers assembled in isolation. This result demonstrates that an adaptor protein alters the architecture of a mitochondrial dynamin GTPase polymer in a manner that could facilitate membrane constriction and severing activity.

  18. Simple Strategy for Taming Membrane-Disrupting Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A strategy has been devised for increasing the cellular selectivity of membrane-disrupting antibiotics based on the attachment of a facially amphiphilic sterol. Using Amphotericin B (AmB) as a prototype, covalent attachment of cholic acid bound to a series of α,ω-diamines has led to a dramatic reduction in hemolytic activity, a significant reduction in toxicity toward HEK293T cells, and significant retention of antifungal activity. PMID:27801580

  19. Paraquat Induces Cell Death Through Impairing Mitochondrial Membrane Permeability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuen-Lin; Chao, Chih-Chang; Lee, Yi-Chao; Lu, Mei-Kuang; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Yang, Ying-Chen; Wang, Vin-Chi; Chang, Wen-Chang; Huang, Nai-Kuei

    2016-05-01

    Paraquat (PQ) as a Parkinsonian mimetic has been demonstrated to impair dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons and is highly correlated with the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) where the death of DAergic neurons has been mainly attributed to impaired mitochondrial functioning. In this study, PQ-induced cytotoxicity focusing on mitochondrial membrane permeability (MMP), which has been implicated to play a part in neurodegeneration, was investigated. Primarily, PQ-induced cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were inhibited by an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (NOX), indicating the toxic effect of PQ redox cycling. Further, dibucaine and cyclosporin A which respectively inhibit mitochondrial apoptosis-induced channels (MAC) and mitochondrial permeability transition pores (mPTP) were used and found to prevent PQ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, such as decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased MMP, mitochondrial ROS, and pro-apoptotic factor release. Knockdown of bax and/or bak blocked PQ-induced mitochondrial clusterization of Bax and/or Bak and cytotoxicity, demonstrating the significance of MAC which is composed of Bax and/or Bak. This clusterization coincided with the release of mitochondrial apoptotic factors before there was an increase in inner MMP, indicating that MAC may precede mPTP formation. Besides, NOX inhibitor but not dibucaine attenuated the earlier PQ-induced cytosolic ROS formation or Bax and/or Bak clusterization indicating PQ redox cycling may account for MAC formation. In this model, we have resolved for the first that PQ cytotoxicity through redox cycling may sequentially result in increased outer (MAC) and inner (mPTP) MMP and suggested MMP could be implicated as a therapeutic target in treating neurodegenerative diseases like PD.

  20. Tau accumulation impairs mitophagy via increasing mitochondrial membrane potential and reducing mitochondrial Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-hao; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Xiangnan; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Feng, Qiong; Wang, Qun; Yue, Zhenyu; Chen, Zhong; Ye, Keqiang; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of wild type tau is a hallmark of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying tau toxicity is not fully understood. Here, we detected mitophagy deficits evidenced by the increased levels of mitophagy markers, including COX IV, TOMM20, and the ratio of mtDNA to genomic DNA indexed as mt-Atp6/Rpl13, in the AD brains and in the human wild type full-length tau (htau) transgenic mice. More interestingly, the mitophagy deficit was only shown in the AD patients who had an increased total tau level. Further studies demonstrated that overexpression of htau induced mitophagy deficits in HEK293 cells, the primary hippocampal neurons and in the brains of C57 mice. Upon overexpression of htau, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and the levels of PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and Parkin decreased in the mitochondrial fraction, while upregulation of Parkin attenuated the htau-induced mitophagy deficits. Finally, we detected a dose-dependent allocation of tau proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane fraction along with its cytoplasmic accumulation. These data suggest that intracellular accumulation of htau induces mitophagy deficits by direct inserting into the mitochondrial membrane and thus increasing the membrane potential, which impairs the mitochondrial residence of PINK1/Parkin. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying the htau-induced neuronal toxicities in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:26943044

  1. Proteome analysis of mitochondrial outer membrane from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Simone; Prokisch, Holger; Schlunk, Tilman; Camp, David G.; Ahting, Uwe; Waizenegger, Thomas; Scharfe, Curt M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Imhof, Axel; Neupert, Walter; Oefner, Peter J.; Rapaport, Doron

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane mediates numerous interactions between the metabolic and genetic systems of mitochondria and the rest of the eukaryotic cell. We performed a proteomic study to discover novel functions of components of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Proteins of highly pure outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Neurospora crassa were identified by a combination of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of tryptic peptide digests and gel electrophoresis of solubilized OMV proteins, followed by their identification using MALDI-MS peptide fingerprinting. Among the 30 proteins found in at least three of four separate analyses were 23 proteins with known functions in the outer membrane. These included components of the import machinery (the TOM and TOB complexes), a pore-forming component (Porin), and proteins that control fusion and fission of the organelle. In addition, proteins playing a role in various biosynthetic pathways, whose intracellular location had not been established previously, could be localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Thus, the proteome of the outer membrane can help in identifying new mitochondria-related functions.

  2. Interaction of tau protein with model lipid membranes induces tau structural compaction and membrane disruption

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Emmalee M.; Dubey, Manish; Camp, Phillip J.; Vernon, Briana C.; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Chi, Eva Y.

    2012-01-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of the intrinsically disordered, microtubule-associated tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the mechanisms of tau aggregation and toxicity remain unknown. Recent work has shown that lipid membrane can induce tau aggregation and that membrane permeabilization may serve as a pathway by which protein aggregates exert toxicity, suggesting that the plasma membrane may play dual roles in tau pathology. This prompted our investigation to assess tau's propensity to interact with membranes and to elucidate the mutually disruptive structural perturbations the interactions induce in both tau and the membrane. We show that although highly charged and soluble, the full-length tau (hTau40) is also highly surface active, selectively inserts into anionic DMPG lipid monolayers and induces membrane morphological changes. To resolve molecular-scale structural details of hTau40 associated with lipid membranes, X-ray and neutron scattering techniques are utilized. X-ray reflectivity indicates hTau40's presence underneath a DMPG monolayer and penetration into the lipid headgroups and tailgroups, whereas grazing incidence X-ray diffraction shows that hTau40 insertion disrupts lipid packing. Moreover, both air/water and DMPG lipid membrane interfaces induce the disordered hTau40 to partially adopt a more compact conformation with density similar to that of a folded protein. Neutron reflectivity shows that tau completely disrupts supported DMPG bilayers while leaving the neutral DPPC bilayer intact. Our results show that hTau40's strong interaction with anionic lipids induces tau structural compaction and membrane disruption, suggesting possible membrane-based mechanisms of tau aggregation and toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22401494

  3. Displacing hexokinase from mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) impairs GLT-1-mediated glutamate uptake but does not disrupt interactions between GLT-1 and mitochondrial proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joshua G.; O’Donnell, John C.; Krizman, Elizabeth; Robinson, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    The glutamate transporter GLT-1 is the major route for the clearance of extracellular glutamate in the forebrain, and most GLT-1 protein is found in astrocytes. This protein is coupled to the Na+-electrochemical gradient, supporting the active intracellular accumulation of glutamate. We recently used a proteomic approach to identify proteins that may interact with GLT-1 in rat cortex, including the Na+/K+-ATPase, most glycolytic enzymes, and several mitochondrial proteins. We also showed that most GLT-1 puncta (~70%) are overlapped by mitochondria in astroglial processes in organotypic slices. Based on this analysis, we proposed that the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase 1 (HK1) might physically form a scaffold to link GLT-1 and mitochondria because HK1 is known to interact with the outer mitochondrial membrane protein, voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC). In the present study, we first validated the interactions between HK-1, VDAC and GLT-1 using forward and reverse immunoprecipitations. We also provided evidence that a subfraction of HK1 co-localizes with GLT-1 in vivo. We found that a peptide, known to disrupt the interaction between HK and VDAC, did not disrupt interactions between GLT-1 and several mitochondrial proteins. In parallel experiments, we found that displacement of HK from VDAC reduced GLT-1-mediated glutamate uptake. These results suggest that although HK1 forms co-immunoprecipitatable complexes with both VDAC and GLT-1, it does not physically link GLT-1 to mitochondrial proteins. However, the interaction of HK1 with VDAC supports GLT-1-mediated transport activity. PMID:25546576

  4. Disruptive mitochondrial DNA mutations in complex I subunits are markers of oncocytic phenotype in thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Gasparre, Giuseppe; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Bonora, Elena; Pennisi, Lucia Fiammetta; Toller, Matteo; Iommarini, Luisa; Ghelli, Anna; Moretti, Massimo; Betts, Christine M; Martinelli, Giuseppe Nicola; Ceroni, Alberto Rinaldi; Curcio, Francesco; Carelli, Valerio; Rugolo, Michela; Tallini, Giovanni; Romeo, Giovanni

    2007-05-22

    Oncocytic tumors are a distinctive class of proliferative lesions composed of cells with a striking degree of mitochondrial hyperplasia that are particularly frequent in the thyroid gland. To understand whether specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are associated with the accumulation of mitochondria, we sequenced the entire mtDNA in 50 oncocytic lesions (45 thyroid tumors of epithelial cell derivation and 5 mitochondrion-rich breast tumors) and 52 control cases (21 nononcocytic thyroid tumors, 15 breast carcinomas, and 16 gliomas) by using recently developed technology that allows specific and reliable amplification of the whole mtDNA with quick mutation scanning. Thirteen oncocytic lesions (26%) presented disruptive mutations (nonsense or frameshift), whereas only two samples (3.8%) presented such mutations in the nononcocytic control group. In one case with multiple thyroid nodules analyzed separately, a disruptive mutation was found in the only nodule with oncocytic features. In one of the five mitochondrion-rich breast tumors, a disruptive mutation was identified. All disruptive mutations were found in complex I subunit genes, and the association between these mutations and the oncocytic phenotype was statistically significant (P=0.001). To study the pathogenicity of these mitochondrial mutations, primary cultures from oncocytic tumors and corresponding normal tissues were established. Electron microscopy and biochemical and molecular analyses showed that primary cultures derived from tumors bearing disruptive mutations failed to maintain the mutations and the oncocytic phenotype. We conclude that disruptive mutations in complex I subunits are markers of thyroid oncocytic tumors.

  5. Membrane Curvature-sensing and Curvature-inducing Activity of Islet Amyloid Polypeptide and Its Implications for Membrane Disruption*♦

    PubMed Central

    Kegulian, Natalie C.; Sankhagowit, Shalene; Apostolidou, Melania; Jayasinghe, Sajith A.; Malmstadt, Noah; Butler, Peter C.; Langen, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is a 37-amino acid amyloid protein intimately associated with pancreatic islet β-cell dysfunction and death in type II diabetes. In this study, we combine spectroscopic methods and microscopy to investigate α-helical IAPP-membrane interactions. Using light scattering and fluorescence microscopy, we observe that larger vesicles become smaller upon treatment with human or rat IAPP. Electron microscopy shows the formation of various highly curved structures such as tubules or smaller vesicles in a membrane-remodeling process, and spectrofluorometric detection of vesicle leakage shows disruption of membrane integrity. This effect is stronger for human IAPP than for the less toxic rat IAPP. From CD spectra in the presence of different-sized vesicles, we also uncover the membrane curvature-sensing ability of IAPP and find that it transitions from inducing to sensing membrane curvature when lipid negative charge is decreased. Our in vivo EM images of immunogold-labeled rat IAPP and human IAPP show both forms to localize to mitochondrial cristae, which contain not only locally curved membranes but also phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin, lipids with high spontaneous negative curvature. Disruption of membrane integrity by induction of membrane curvature could apply more broadly to other amyloid proteins and be responsible for membrane damage observed in other amyloid diseases as well. PMID:26283787

  6. Topological Transitions in Mitochondrial Membranes controlled by Apoptotic Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Sanders, Lori K.; Mishra, Abhijit; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Ivashyna, Olena; Schlesinger, Paul H.

    2010-03-01

    The Bcl-2 family comprises pro-apoptotic proteins, capable of permeabilizing the mitochondrial membrane, and anti-apoptotic members interacting in an antagonistic fashion to regulate programmed cell death (apoptosis). They offer potential therapeutic targets to re-engage cellular suicide in tumor cells but the extensive network of implicated protein-protein interactions has impeded full understanding of the decision pathway. We show, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, that pro-apoptotic proteins interact with mitochondrial-like model membranes to generate saddle-splay (negative Gaussian) curvature topologically required for pore formation, while anti-apoptotic proteins can deactivate curvature generation by molecules drastically different from Bcl-2 family members and offer evidence for membrane-curvature mediated interactions general enough to affect very disparate systems.

  7. Amphipathic beta-strand mimics as potential membrane disruptive antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jessica L; Gillies, Elizabeth R

    2009-08-21

    In recent years, there have been increasing numbers of bacterial strains emerging that are resistant to the currently available antibiotics. In the search for new antibiotics, attention has been focused on natural antimicrobial peptides that act by selectively disrupting the membranes of bacterial cells, a mechanism that is thought to be nonconducive to the development of resistance. It is desirable to mimic the structures and activities of these peptides while introducing properties such as resistance to proteolytic degradation, which make molecules more ideal for development as drugs. Described here is the design and synthesis of beta-strand mimetic oligomers based on alternating alpha-amino acids and azacyclohexenone units that segregate cationic lysine and hydrophobic valine side chains on opposite faces of the beta-strand. (1)H NMR dilution studies demonstrated that despite the incorporation of alternating d- and l-amino acids in order to obtain facial amphiphilicity, these oligomers are capable of dimerizing to beta-sheet mimics in a manner similar to the oligomers containing all l-amino acids. The ability of the molecules to disrupt phospholipid vesicles mimicking the membranes of both bacterial and mammalian cells was investigated using a fluorescent dye leakage assay. Several of the oligomers were found to exhibit activity and selectivity for the bacterial over mammalian membranes. Overall, these studies demonstrate the promise of this class of molecules for the development of new potential antibiotics and provide information on the structural features that are important for activity.

  8. Coverage and disruption of phospholipid membranes by oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pera, Harke; Nolte, Tom M; Leermakers, Frans A M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2014-12-09

    We studied the interactions of silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles with phospholipid membranes and show how electrostatics plays an important role. For this, we systematically varied the charge density of both the membranes by changing their lipid composition and the oxide particles by changing the pH. For the silica nanoparticles, results from our recently presented fluorescence vesicle leakage assay are combined with data on particle adsorption onto supported lipid bilayers obtained by optical reflectometry. Because of the strong tendency of the TiO2 nanoparticles to aggregate, the interaction of these particles with the bilayer was studied only in the leakage assay. Self-consistent field (SCF) modeling was applied to interpret the results on a molecular level. At low charge densities of either the silica nanoparticles or the lipid bilayers, no electrostatic barrier to adsorption exists. However, the adsorption rate and adsorbed amounts drop with increasing (negative) charge densities on particles and membranes because of electric double-layer repulsion, which is confirmed by the effect of the ionic strength. SCF calculations show that charged particles change the structure of lipid bilayers by a reorientation of a fraction of the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) headgroups. This explains the affinity of the silica particles for pure PC lipid layers, even at relatively high particle charge densities. Particle adsorption does not always lead to the disruption of the membrane integrity, as is clear from a comparison of the leakage and adsorption data for the silica particles. The attraction should be strong enough, and in line with this, we found that for positively charged TiO2 particles vesicle disruption increases with increasing negative charge density on the membranes. Our results may be extrapolated to a broader range of oxide nanoparticles and ultimately may be used for establishing more accurate nanoparticle toxicity assessments and drug

  9. Mitochondrial-Targeted Nitroxides Disrupt Mitochondrial Architecture and Inhibit Expression of Peroxiredoxin 3 and FOXM1 in Malignant Mesothelioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cunniff, Brian; Benson, Kira; Stumpff, Jason; Newick, Kheng; Held, Paul; Taatjes, Douglas; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Heintz, Nicholas H.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an intractable tumor of the peritoneal and pleural cavities primarily linked to exposure to asbestos. Recently, we described an interplay between mitochondrial-derived oxidants and expression of FOXM1, a redox-responsive transcription factor that has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in solid malignancies. Here we have investigated the effects of nitroxides targeted to mitochondria via triphenylphosphonium (TPP) moieties on mitochondrial oxidant production, expression of FOXM1 and peroxiredoxin 3 (PRX3), and cell viability in MM cells in culture. Both Mito-carboxy-proxyl (MCP) and Mito-TEMPOL (MT) caused dose-dependent increases in mitochondrial oxidant production that was accompanied by inhibition of expression of FOXM1 and PRX3 and loss of cell viability. At equivalent concentrations TPP, CP, and TEMPOL had no effect on these endpoints. Live cell ratiometric imaging with a redox-responsive green fluorescent protein targeted to mitochondria (mito-roGFP) showed that MCP and MT, but not CP, TEMPOL, or TPP, rapidly induced mitochondrial fragmentation and swelling, morphological transitions that were associated with diminished ATP levels and increased production of mitochondrial oxidants. Mdivi-1, an inhibitor of mitochondrial fission, did not rescue mitochondria from fragmentation by MCP. Immunofluorescence microscopy experiments indicate a fraction of FOXM1 coexists in the cytoplasm with mitochondrial PRX3. Our results indicate that MCP and MT inhibit FOXM1 expression and MM tumor cell viability via perturbations in redox homeostasis caused by marked disruption of mitochondrial architecture, and suggest that both compounds, either alone or in combination with thiostrepton or other agents, may provide credible therapeutic options for the management of MM. PMID:23018647

  10. Application of a homogenous membrane potential assay to assess mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Sakamuru, Srilatha; Li, Xiao; Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Huang, Ruili; Lu, Jianming; Shou, Louie; Shen, Min; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2012-01-01

    Decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction that could lead to cell death. The MMP is generated by an electrochemical gradient via the mitochondrial electron transport chain coupled to a series of redox reactions. Measuring the MMP in living cells is commonly used to assess the effect of chemicals on mitochondrial function; decreases in MMP can be detected using lipophilic cationic fluorescent dyes. To identify an optimal dye for use in a high-throughput screening (HTS) format, we compared the ability of mitochondrial membrane potential sensor (Mito-MPS), 5,5′,6,6′-tetrachloro-1,1′,3,3′ tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide, rhodamine 123, and tetramethylrhodamine to quantify a decrease in MMP in chemically exposed HepG2 cells cultured in 1,536-well plates. Under the conditions used, the optimal dye for this purpose is Mito-MPS. Next, we developed and optimized a homogenous cell-based Mito-MPS assay for use in 1,536-well plate format and demonstrated the utility of this assay by screening 1,280 compounds in the library of pharmacologically active compounds in HepG2 cells using a quantitative high-throughput screening platform. From the screening, we identified 14 compounds that disrupted the MMP, with half-maximal potencies ranging from 0.15 to 18 μM; among these, compound clusters that contained tyrphostin and 3′-substituted indolone analogs exhibited a structure-activity relationship. Our results demonstrate that this homogenous cell-based Mito-MPS assay can be used to evaluate the ability of large numbers of chemicals to decrease mitochondrial function. PMID:22433785

  11. Two-Step Mechanism of Membrane Disruption by Aβ through Membrane Fragmentation and Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sciacca, Michele F.M.; Kotler, Samuel A.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Chen, Jennifer; Lee, Dong-kuk; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of cell membranes by Aβ is believed to be one of the key components of Aβ toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that membrane disruption by Aβ occurs by a two-step process, with the initial formation of ion-selective pores followed by nonspecific fragmentation of the lipid membrane during amyloid fiber formation. Immediately after the addition of freshly dissolved Aβ1–40, defects form on the membrane that share many of the properties of Aβ channels originally reported from single-channel electrical recording, such as cation selectivity and the ability to be blockaded by zinc. By contrast, subsequent amyloid fiber formation on the surface of the membrane fragments the membrane in a way that is not cation selective and cannot be stopped by zinc ions. Moreover, we observed that the presence of ganglioside enhances both the initial pore formation and the fiber-dependent membrane fragmentation process. Whereas pore formation by freshly dissolved Aβ1–40 is weakly observed in the absence of gangliosides, fiber-dependent membrane fragmentation can only be observed in their presence. These results provide insights into the toxicity of Aβ and may aid in the design of specific compounds to alleviate the neurodegeneration of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:22947931

  12. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Svarnas, P.; Aleiferis, Sp.; Matrali, S. H.; Gazeli, K.; Clement, F.; Antimisiaris, S. G.

    2012-12-24

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  13. Disruption of mitochondrial electron transport chain function potentiates the pro-apoptotic effects of MAPK inhibition.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Andrew P; Gelles, Jesse D; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Loi, Patrick; Arbiser, Jack L; Chipuk, Jerry E

    2017-07-14

    The mitochondrial network is a major site of ATP production through the coupled integration of the electron transport chain (ETC) with oxidative phosphorylation. In melanoma arising from the V600E mutation in the kinase v-RAF murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF(V600E)), oncogenic signaling enhances glucose-dependent metabolism while reducing mitochondrial ATP production. Likewise, when BRAF(V600E) is pharmacologically inhibited by targeted therapies (e.g. PLX-4032/vemurafenib), glucose metabolism is reduced, and cells increase mitochondrial ATP production to sustain survival. Therefore, collateral inhibition of oncogenic signaling and mitochondrial respiration may help enhance the therapeutic benefit of targeted therapies. Honokiol (HKL) is a well tolerated small molecule that disrupts mitochondrial function; however, its underlying mechanisms and potential utility with targeted anticancer therapies remain unknown. Using wild-type BRAF and BRAF(V600E) melanoma model systems, we demonstrate here that HKL administration rapidly reduces mitochondrial respiration by broadly inhibiting ETC complexes I, II, and V, resulting in decreased ATP levels. The subsequent energetic crisis induced two cellular responses involving cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). First, loss of CDK1-mediated phosphorylation of the mitochondrial division GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 promoted mitochondrial fusion, thus coupling mitochondrial energetic status and morphology. Second, HKL decreased CDK2 activity, leading to G1 cell cycle arrest. Importantly, although pharmacological inhibition of oncogenic MAPK signaling increased ETC activity, co-treatment with HKL ablated this response and vastly enhanced the rate of apoptosis. Collectively, these findings integrate HKL action with mitochondrial respiration and shape and substantiate a pro-survival role of mitochondrial function in melanoma cells after oncogenic MAPK inhibition.

  14. Bcl-xL-mediated antioxidant function abrogates the disruption of mitochondrial dynamics induced by LRRK2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Saez-Atienzar, Sara; Bonet-Ponce, Luis; da Casa, Carmen; Perez-Dolz, Laura; Blesa, Jose R; Nava, Eduardo; Galindo, Maria F; Jordan, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    We have used the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y overexpressing Bcl-xL (SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL) to clarify the effects of this mitochondrial protein on the control of mitochondrial dynamics and the autophagic processes which occur after the inhibition of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) with GSK2578215A. In wild type (SH-SY5Y/Neo) cells, GSK2578215A (1nM) caused a disruption of mitochondrial morphology and an imbalance in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as indicated by an increase in dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and 4-hydroxynonenal. However, SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL cells under GSK2578215A treatment, unlike the wild type, preserved a high mitochondrial membrane potential and did not exhibit apoptotical chromatins. In contrast to wild type cells, in SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL cells, GSK2578215A did not induce mitochondrial translocation of neither dynamin related protein-1 nor the proapoptotic protein, Bax. In SH-SY5Y/Neo, but not SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL cells, mitochondrial fragmentation elicited by GSK2578215A precedes an autophagic response. Furthermore, the overexpression of Bcl-xL protein restores the autophagic flux pathway disrupted by this inhibitor. SH-SY5Y/Neo, but not SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL cells, responded to LRRK2 inhibition by an increase in the levels of acetylated tubulin, indicating that this was abrogated by Bcl-xL overexpression. This hyperacetylation of tubulin took place earlier than any of the above-mentioned events suggesting that it is involved in the autophagic flux interruption. Pre-treatment with tempol prevented the GSK2578215A-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, autophagy and the rise in acetylated tubulin in SH-SY5Y/Neo cells. Thus, these data support the notion that ROS act as a second messenger connexion between LRRK2 inhibition and these deleterious responses, which are markedly alleviated by the Bcl-xL-mediated ROS generation blockade.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA copy numbers in pyramidal neurons are decreased and mitochondrial biogenesis transcriptome signaling is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease hippocampi.

    PubMed

    Rice, Ann C; Keeney, Paula M; Algarzae, Norah K; Ladd, Amy C; Thomas, Ravindar R; Bennett, James P

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of adult-onset dementia and is characterized in its pre-diagnostic stage by reduced cerebral cortical glucose metabolism and in later stages by reduced cortical oxygen uptake, implying reduced mitochondrial respiration. Using quantitative PCR we determined the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene copy numbers from multiple groups of 15 or 20 pyramidal neurons, GFAP(+) astrocytes and dentate granule neurons isolated using laser capture microdissection, and the relative expression of mitochondrial biogenesis (mitobiogenesis) genes in hippocampi from 10 AD and 9 control (CTL) cases. AD pyramidal but not dentate granule neurons had significantly reduced mtDNA copy numbers compared to CTL neurons. Pyramidal neuron mtDNA copy numbers in CTL, but not AD, positively correlated with cDNA levels of multiple mitobiogenesis genes. In CTL, but not in AD, hippocampal cDNA levels of PGC1α were positively correlated with multiple downstream mitobiogenesis factors. Mitochondrial DNA copy numbers in pyramidal neurons did not correlate with hippocampal Aβ1-42 levels. After 48 h exposure of H9 human neural stem cells to the neurotoxic fragment Aβ25-35, mtDNA copy numbers were not significantly altered. In summary, AD postmortem hippocampal pyramidal neurons have reduced mtDNA copy numbers. Mitochondrial biogenesis pathway signaling relationships are disrupted in AD, but are mostly preserved in CTL. Our findings implicate complex alterations of mitochondria-host cell relationships in AD.

  16. Bcl-2 apoptosis proteins, mitochondrial membrane curvature, and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Schmidt, Nathan; Sanders, Lori; Mishra, Abhijit; Wong, Gerard; Ivashyna, Olena; Christenson, Eric; Schlesinger, Paul; Akabori, Kiyotaka; Santangelo, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Critical interactions between Bcl-2 family proteins permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane, a common decision point early in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway that irreversibly commits the cell to death. However, a unified picture integrating the essential non-passive role of lipid membranes with the contested dynamics of Bcl-2 regulation remains unresolved. Correlating results between synchrotron x-ray diffraction and microscopy in cell-free assays, we report activation of pro-apoptotic Bax induces strong pure negative Gaussian membrane curvature topologically necessary for pore formation and membrane remodeling events. Strikingly, Bcl-xL suppresses not only Bax-induced pore formation, but also membrane remodeling by disparate systems including cell penetrating, antimicrobial or viral fusion peptides, and bacterial toxin, none of which have BH3 allosteric domains to mediate direct binding. We propose a parallel mode of Bcl-2 pore regulation in which Bax and Bcl-xL induce antagonistic and mutually interacting Gaussian membrane curvatures. The universal nature of curvature-mediated interactions allows synergy with direct binding mechanisms, and potentially accounts for the Bcl-2 family modulation of mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics.

  17. Altered Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Proteome As the Basis of Disruption of Mitochondrial Function in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zabielski, Piotr; Lanza, Ian R.; Gopala, Srinivas; Holtz Heppelmann, Carrie J.; Bergen, H. Robert; Dasari, Surendra

    2016-01-01

    Insulin plays pivotal role in cellular fuel metabolism in skeletal muscle. Despite being the primary site of energy metabolism, the underlying mechanism on how insulin deficiency deranges skeletal muscle mitochondrial physiology remains to be fully understood. Here we report an important link between altered skeletal muscle proteome homeostasis and mitochondrial physiology during insulin deficiency. Deprivation of insulin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice decreased mitochondrial ATP production, reduced coupling and phosphorylation efficiency, and increased oxidant emission in skeletal muscle. Proteomic survey revealed that the mitochondrial derangements during insulin deficiency were related to increased mitochondrial protein degradation and decreased protein synthesis, resulting in reduced abundance of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and β-oxidation. However, a paradoxical upregulation of proteins involved in cellular uptake of fatty acids triggered an accumulation of incomplete fatty acid oxidation products in skeletal muscle. These data implicate a mismatch of β-oxidation and fatty acid uptake as a mechanism leading to increased oxidative stress in diabetes. This notion was supported by elevated oxidative stress in cultured myotubes exposed to palmitate in the presence of a β-oxidation inhibitor. Together, these results indicate that insulin deficiency alters the balance of proteins involved in fatty acid transport and oxidation in skeletal muscle, leading to impaired mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress. PMID:26718503

  18. Urinary mitochondrial DNA is a biomarker of mitochondrial disruption and renal dysfunction in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Ryan M.; Stallons, L. Jay; Kneff, Joshua E.; Alge, Joseph L.; Harmon, Jennifer L.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Arthur, John M.; Beeson, Craig C.; Chan, Sherine L.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies show the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in the initiation and progression of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, no biomarkers exist linking renal injury to mitochondrial function and integrity. To this end, we evaluated urinary mitochondrial DNA (UmtDNA) as a biomarker of renal injury and function in humans with AKI following cardiac surgery. mtDNA was isolated from the urine of patients following cardiac surgery and quantified by qPCR. Patients were stratified into no AKI, stable AKI and progressive AKI groups based on Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) staging. UmtDNA was elevated in progressive AKI patients, and was associated with progression of patients with AKI at collection to higher AKIN stages. To evaluate the relationship of UmtDNA to measures of renal mitochondrial integrity in AKI, mice were subjected to sham surgery or varying degrees of ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. UmtDNA increased in mice after 10-15 minutes of ischemia and positively correlated with ischemia time. Furthermore, UmtDNA was predictive of AKI in the mouse model. Finally, UmtDNA levels were negatively correlated with renal cortical mtDNA and mitochondrial gene expression. These translational studies demonstrate that UmtDNA is associated with recovery from AKI following cardiac surgery by serving as an indicator of mitochondrial integrity. Thus, UmtDNA may serve as valuable biomarker for the development of mitochondrial targeted therapies in AKI. PMID:26287315

  19. Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes allow adaptation of mitochondrial metabolism to glucose availability in the liver.

    PubMed

    Theurey, Pierre; Tubbs, Emily; Vial, Guillaume; Jacquemetton, Julien; Bendridi, Nadia; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Alam, Muhammad Rizwan; Le Romancer, Muriel; Vidal, Hubert; Rieusset, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAM) play a key role in mitochondrial dynamics and function and in hepatic insulin action. Whereas mitochondria are important regulators of energy metabolism, the nutritional regulation of MAM in the liver and its role in the adaptation of mitochondria physiology to nutrient availability are unknown. In this study, we found that the fasted to postprandial transition reduced the number of endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contact points in mouse liver. Screening of potential hormonal/metabolic signals revealed glucose as the main nutritional regulator of hepatic MAM integrity both in vitro and in vivo Glucose reduced organelle interactions through the pentose phosphate-protein phosphatase 2A (PP-PP2A) pathway, induced mitochondria fission, and impaired respiration. Blocking MAM reduction counteracted glucose-induced mitochondrial alterations. Furthermore, disruption of MAM integrity mimicked effects of glucose on mitochondria dynamics and function. This glucose-sensing system is deficient in the liver of insulin-resistant ob/ob and cyclophilin D-KO mice, both characterized by chronic disruption of MAM integrity, mitochondrial fission, and altered mitochondrial respiration. These data indicate that MAM contribute to the hepatic glucose-sensing system, allowing regulation of mitochondria dynamics and function during nutritional transition. Chronic disruption of MAM may participate in hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction associated with insulin resistance. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Localized translation near the mitochondrial outer membrane: An update.

    PubMed

    Lesnik, Chen; Golani-Armon, Adi; Arava, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    Local synthesis of proteins near their activity site has been demonstrated in many biological systems, and has diverse contributions to cellular functions. Studies in recent years have revealed that hundreds of mitochondria-destined proteins are synthesized by cytosolic ribosomes near the mitochondrial outer membrane, indicating that localized translation also occurs at this cellular locus. Furthermore, in the last year central factors that are involved in this process were identified in yeast, Drosophila, and human cells. Herein we review the experimental evidence for localized translation on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane; in addition, we describe the factors that are involved in this process and discuss the conservation of this mechanism among various species. We also describe the relationship between localized translation and import into the mitochondria and suggest avenues of study that look beyond cotranslational import. Finally we discuss future challenges in characterizing the mechanisms for localized translation and its physiological significance.

  1. Spermicidal efficacy of VRP, a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide, inducing apoptosis and membrane disruption.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Prasanta; Bhoumik, Arpita; Saha, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sandipan; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Ghosh, Jimut K; Dungdung, Sandhya R

    2017-04-14

    Presently available contraceptives are mostly hormonal or detergent in nature with numerous side effects like irritation, lesion, inflammation in vagina, alteration of body homeostasis, etc. Antimicrobial peptides with spermicidal activity but without adverse effects may be suitable alternatives. In the present study, spermicidal activity of a cationic antimicrobial peptide VRP on human spermatozoa has been elucidated. Progressive forward motility of human spermatozoa was instantly stopped after 100 μM VRP treatment and at 350 μM, all kinds of sperm motility ceased within 20 s as assessed by the Sander-Cramer assay. The spermicidal effect was confirmed by eosin-nigrosin assay and HOS test. VRP treatment (100 μM) in human spermatozoa induced both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis. TUNEL assay showed VRP treatment significantly disrupted the DNA integrity and changed the mitochondrial membrane permeability as evident from MPTP assay. AFM and SEM results depicted ultra structural changes including disruption of the acrosomal cap and plasma membrane of the head and midpiece region after treatment with 350 μM VRP. MTT assay showed after treatments with 100 and 350 μM of VRP for 24 hr, a substantial amount of Lactobacillus acidophilus (about 90% and 75%, respectively) remained viable. Hence, VRP being a small synthetic peptide with antimicrobial and spermicidal activity but tolerable to normal vaginal microflora, may be a suitable target for elucidating its contraceptive potentiality. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Azidothymidine-triphosphate impairs mitochondrial dynamics by disrupting the quality control system.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Ryosuke; Sato, Takeya; Sato, Yuka; Medin, Jeffrey A; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki

    2017-10-01

    Highly active anti-retrovirus therapy (HAART) has been used to block the progression and symptoms of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Although it decreases morbidity and mortality, clinical use of HAART has also been linked to various adverse effects such as severe cardiomyopathy resulting from compromised mitochondrial functioning. However, the mechanistic basis for these effects remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a key component of HAART, 3ꞌ-azido-3ꞌ-deoxythymidine (AZT), particularly, its active metabolite AZT-triphosphate (AZT-TP), caused mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to induction of cell death in H9c2 cells derived from rat embryonic myoblasts, which serve as a model for cardiomyopathy. Specifically, treatment with 100µM AZT for 48h disrupted the mitochondrial tubular network via accumulation of AZT-TP. The mRNA expression of dynamin-related protein (Drp)1 and the Drp1 receptor mitochondrial fission factor (Mff) was upregulated whereas that of optic atrophy 1 (Opa1) was downregulated following AZT treatment. Increased mitochondrial translocation of Drp1, Mff upregulation, and decreased functional Opa1 expression induced by AZT impaired the balance of mitochondrial fission vs. fusion. These data demonstrate that AZT-TP causes cell death by altering mitochondrial dynamics. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Declining NAD+ Induces a Pseudohypoxic State Disrupting Nuclear-Mitochondrial Communication during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ana P.; Price, Nathan L.; Ling, Alvin J.Y.; Moslehi, Javid J.; Montgomery, Magdalene K.; Rajman, Luis; White, James P.; Teodoro, João S.; Wrann, Christiane D.; Hubbard, Basil P.; Mercken, Evi M.; Palmeira, Carlos M.; de Cabo, Rafael; Rolo, Anabela P.; Turner, Nigel; Bell, Eric L.; Sinclair, David A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Ever since eukaryotes subsumed the bacterial ancestor of mitochondria, the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes have had to closely coordinate their activities, as each encode different subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of aging, but its causes are debated. We show that, during aging, there is a specific loss of mitochondrial, but not nuclear, encoded OXPHOS subunits. We trace the cause to an alternate PGC-1α/β-independent pathway of nuclear-mitochondrial communication that is induced by a decline in nuclear NAD+ and the accumulation of HIF-1α under normoxic conditions, with parallels to Warburg reprogramming. Deleting SIRT1 accelerates this process, whereas raising NAD+ levels in old mice restores mitochondrial function to that of a young mouse in a SIRT1-dependent manner. Thus, a pseudohypoxic state that disrupts PGC-1α/β-independent nuclear-mitochondrial communication contributes to the decline in mitochondrial function with age, a process that is apparently reversible. PMID:24360282

  4. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative status disruption in brainstem of weaned rats: Immediate response to maternal protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Diorginis José Soares; da Silva Pedroza, Anderson Apolônio; Braz, Glauber Ruda Feitoza; da Silva-Filho, Reginaldo Correia; Lima, Talitta Arruda; Fernandes, Mariana Pinheiro; Doi, Sonia Q; Lagranha, Claudia Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial bioenergetics dysfunction has been postulated as an important mechanism associated to a number of cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. One of the hypotheses is that this is caused by the metabolic challenge generated by the mismatch between prenatal predicted and postnatal reality. Perinatal low-protein diet produces several effects that are manifested in the adult animal, including altered sympathetic tone, increased arterial blood pressure and oxidative stress in the brainstem. The majority of the studies related to nutritional programming postulates that the increased risk levels for non-communicable diseases are associated with the incompatibility between prenatal and postnatal environment. However, little is known about the immediate effects of maternal protein restriction on the offspring's brainstem. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that a maternal low-protein diet causes tissue damage immediately after exposure to the nutritional insult that can be assessed in the brainstem of weaned offspring. In this regard, a series of assays was conducted to measure the mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative stress biomarkers in the brainstem, which is the brain structure responsible for the autonomic cardiovascular control. Pregnant Wistar rats were fed ad libitum with normoprotein (NP; 17% casein) or low-protein (LP; 8% casein) diet throughout pregnancy and lactation periods. At weaning, the male offsprings were euthanized and the brainstem was quickly removed to assess the mitochondria function, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane electric potential (ΔΨm), oxidative biomarkers, antioxidant defense and redox status. Our data demonstrated that perinatal LP diet induces an immediate mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the protein restriction induced a marked increase in ROS production, with a decrease in antioxidant defense and redox status. Altogether, our findings suggest that LP-fed animals may be at

  5. The CT20 peptide causes detachment and death of metastatic breast cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial aggregation and cytoskeletal disruption.

    PubMed

    Lee, M W; Bassiouni, R; Sparrow, N A; Iketani, A; Boohaker, R J; Moskowitz, C; Vishnubhotla, P; Khaled, A S; Oyer, J; Copik, A; Fernandez-Valle, C; Perez, J M; Khaled, A R

    2014-05-22

    Metastasis accounts for most deaths from breast cancer, driving the need for new therapeutics that can impede disease progression. Rationally designed peptides that take advantage of cancer-specific differences in cellular physiology are an emerging technology that offer promise as a treatment for metastatic breast cancer. We developed CT20p, a hydrophobic peptide based on the C terminus of Bax that exhibits similarities with antimicrobial peptides, and previously reported that CT20p has unique cytotoxic actions independent of full-length Bax. In this study, we identified the intracellular actions of CT20p which precede cancer cell-specific detachment and death. Previously, we found that CT20p migrated in the heavy membrane fractions of cancer cell lysates. Here, using MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, we demonstrated that CT20p localizes to the mitochondria, leading to fusion-like aggregation and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization. As a result, the distribution and movement of mitochondria in CT20p-treated MDA-MB-231 cells was markedly impaired, particularly in cell protrusions. In contrast, CT20p did not associate with the mitochondria of normal breast epithelial MCF-10A cells, causing little change in the mitochondrial membrane potential, morphology or localization. In MDA-MB-231 cells, CT20p triggered cell detachment that was preceded by decreased levels of α5β1 integrins and reduced F-actin polymerization. Using folate-targeted nanoparticles to encapsulate and deliver CT20p to murine tumors, we achieved significant tumor regression within days of peptide treatment. These results suggest that CT20p has application in the treatment of metastatic disease as a cancer-specific therapeutic peptide that perturbs mitochondrial morphology and movement ultimately culminating in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, cell detachment, and loss of cell viability.

  6. Contribution of liver mitochondrial membrane-bound glutathione transferase to mitochondrial permeability transition pores

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Ulziikhishig, Enkhbaatar; Lee, Kang Kwang; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Aniya, Yoko

    2009-02-15

    We recently reported that the glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1) is activated by S-glutathionylation and the activated mtMGST1 contributes to the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore and cytochrome c release from mitochondria [Lee, K.K., Shimoji, M., Quazi, S.H., Sunakawa, H., Aniya, Y., 2008. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Toxcol. Appl. Pharmacol. 232, 109-118]. In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generator gallic acid (GA) and GST inhibitors on mtMGST1 and the MPT. When rat liver mitochondria were incubated with GA, mtMGST1 activity was increased to about 3 fold and the increase was inhibited with antioxidant enzymes and singlet oxygen quenchers including 1,4-diazabicyclo [2,2,2] octane (DABCO). GA-mediated mtMGST1 activation was prevented by GST inhibitors such as tannic acid, hematin, and cibacron blue and also by cyclosporin A (CsA). In addition, GA induced the mitochondrial swelling which was also inhibited by GST inhibitors, but not by MPT inhibitors CsA, ADP, and bongkrekic acid. GA also released cytochrome c from the mitochondria which was inhibited completely by DABCO, moderately by GST inhibitors, and somewhat by CsA. Ca{sup 2+}-mediated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were inhibited by MPT inhibitors but not by GST inhibitors. When the outer mitochondrial membrane was isolated after treatment of mitochondria with GA, mtMGST1 activity was markedly increased and oligomer/aggregate of mtMGST1 was observed. These results indicate that mtMGST1 in the outer mitochondrial membrane is activated by GA through thiol oxidation leading to protein oligomerization/aggregation, which may contribute to the formation of ROS-mediated, CsA-insensitive MPT pore, suggesting a novel mechanism for regulation of the MPT by mtMGST1.

  7. The Structure of the Mitochondrial Membrane: Inferences from Permeability Properties

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi, Henry

    1959-01-01

    Mitochondria possess a semipermeable membrane with properties similar to the cell membrane. Despite the presence of a limiting membrane, mitochondria swell approximately 4 to 5 times their original volume without lysis or loss of internal solute. For this reason, it has been argued that the membrane might be convoluted. The present kinetic study of the permeability of isolated mitochondria was undertaken to clarify this question. A photometric method described previously was used. In the case of highly lipid soluble penetrants, the results suggest that neither the permeability nor the surface area available for penetration varies significantly during considerable swelling. These results may be interpreted to mean that the mitochondrial membrane is convoluted. For highly polar compounds, the permeability of the membrane also remains unchanged during swelling, but the surface area available to penetration increases. These results may be interpreted to mean that in this latter case, the surface of the convolutions becomes available only after they are unfolded by swelling. The simplest model that can explain the permeability properties of this membrane consists of a bimolecular lipid layer where the inner monomolecular layer is convoluted. PMID:13837259

  8. The oxidized phospholipid PazePC promotes permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes by Bax.

    PubMed

    Lidman, Martin; Pokorná, Šárka; Dingeldein, Artur P G; Sparrman, Tobias; Wallgren, Marcus; Šachl, Radek; Hof, Martin; Gröbner, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in programmed cell death via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, which is tightly regulated by the B-cell CLL/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein family. Intracellular oxidative stress causes the translocation of Bax, a pro-apoptotic family member, to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) where it induces membrane permeabilization. Oxidized phospholipids (OxPls) generated in the MOM during oxidative stress directly affect the onset and progression of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Here we use MOM-mimicking lipid vesicles doped with varying concentrations of 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PazePC), an OxPl species known to significantly enhance Bax-membrane association, to investigate three key aspects of Bax's action at the MOM: 1) induction of Bax pores in membranes without additional mediator proteins, 2) existence of a threshold OxPl concentration required for Bax-membrane action and 3) mechanism by which PazePC disturbs membrane organization to facilitate Bax penetration. Fluorescence leakage studies revealed that Bax-induced leakage, especially its rate, increased with the vesicles' PazePC content without any detectable threshold neither for OxPl nor Bax. Moreover, the leakage rate correlated with the Bax to lipid ratio and the PazePC content. Solid state NMR studies and calorimetric experiments on the lipid vesicles confirmed that OxPl incorporation disrupted the membrane's organization, enabling Bax to penetrate into the membrane. In addition, 15N cross polarization (CP) and insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer (INEPT) MAS NMR experiments using uniformly (15)N-labeled Bax revealed dynamically restricted helical segments of Bax embedded in the membrane, while highly flexible protein segments were located outside or at the membrane surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ubiquilins Chaperone and Triage Mitochondrial Membrane Proteins for Degradation.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Eisuke; Zavodszky, Eszter; Shao, Sichen; Wohlever, Matthew L; Keenan, Robert J; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-07-07

    We investigated how mitochondrial membrane proteins remain soluble in the cytosol until their delivery to mitochondria or degradation at the proteasome. We show that Ubiquilin family proteins bind transmembrane domains in the cytosol to prevent aggregation and temporarily allow opportunities for membrane targeting. Over time, Ubiquilins recruit an E3 ligase to ubiquitinate bound clients. The attached ubiquitin engages Ubiquilin's UBA domain, normally bound to an intramolecular UBL domain, and stabilizes the Ubiquilin-client complex. This conformational change precludes additional chances at membrane targeting for the client, while simultaneously freeing Ubiquilin's UBL domain for targeting to the proteasome. Loss of Ubiquilins by genetic ablation or sequestration in polyglutamine aggregates leads to accumulation of non-inserted mitochondrial membrane protein precursors. These findings define Ubiquilins as a family of chaperones for cytosolically exposed transmembrane domains and explain how they use ubiquitin to triage clients for degradation via coordinated intra- and intermolecular interactions. Copyright © 2016 MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analytical study of microsomes and isolated subcellular membranes from rat liver VIII. Subfractionation of preparations enriched with plasma membranes, outer mitochondrial membranes, or Golgi complex membranes

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Preparations enriched with plasmalemmal, outer mitochondrial, or Golgi complex membranes from rat liver were subfractionated by isopycnic centrifugation, without or after treatment with digitonin, to establish the subcellular distribution of a variety of enzymes. The typical plasmalemmal enzymes 5'-nucleotidase, alkaline phosphodiesterase I, and alkaline phosphatase were markedly shifted by digitonin toward higher densities in all three preparations. Three glycosyltransferases, highly purified in the Golgi fraction, were moderately shifted by digitonin in both this Golgi complex preparation and the microsomal fraction. The outer mitochondrial membrane marker, monoamine oxidase, was not affected by digitonin in the outer mitochondrial membrane marker, monoamine oxidase, was not affected by digitonin in the out mitochondrial membrane preparation, in agreement wit its behavior in microsomes. With the exception of NADH cytochrome c reductase (which was concentrated in the outer mitochondrial membrane preparation), typical microsomal enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase, esterase, and NADPH cytochrome c reductase) displayed low specific activities in the three preparations; except for part of the glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the plasma membrane preparation, their density distributions were insensitive to digitonin, as they were in microsomes. The influence of digitonin on equilibrium densities was correlated with its morphological effects. Digitonin induced pseudofenestrations in plasma membranes. In Golgi and outer mitochondrial membrane preparations, a few similarly altered membranes were detected in subfractions enriched with 5'-nucleotidase and alkaline phosphodiesterase I. The alterations of Golgi membranes were less obvious and seemingly restricted to some elements in the Golgi preparation. No morphological modification was detected in digitonin-treated outer mitochondrial membranes. These results indicate that each enzyme is associated with the same membrane

  11. Mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors modulate the metal-induced inner mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Elena A

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the protective action of stigmatellin (an inhibitor of complex III of mitochondrial electron transport chain, mtETC) against the heavy metal-induced cytotoxicity, we tested its effectiveness against mitochondrial membrane permeabilization produced by heavy metal ions Cd²(+), Hg²(+), Cu²(+) and Zn²(+), as well as by Ca²(+) (in the presence of P(i)) or Se (in form of Na₂SeO₃) using isolated rat liver mitochondria. It was shown that stigmatellin modulated mitochondrial swelling produced by these metals/metalloids in the isotonic sucrose medium in the presence of ascorbate plus tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (complex IV substrates added for energization of the mitochondria). It was found that stigmatellin and other mtETC inhibitors enhanced the mitochondrial swelling induced by selenite. However, in the same medium, all the mtETC inhibitors tested as well as cyclosporin A and bongkrekic acid did not significantly affect Cu²(+)-induced swelling. In contrast, the high-amplitude swelling produced by Cd²(+), Hg²(+), Zn²(+), or Ca²(+) plus P(i) was significantly depressed by these inhibitors. Significant differences in the action of these metals/metalloids on the redox status of pyridine nucleotides, transmembrane potential and mitochondrial respiration were also observed. In the light of these results as well as the data from the recent literature, our hypothesis on a possible involvement of the respiratory supercomplex, formed by complex I (P-site) and complex III (S-site) in the mitochondrial permeabilization mediated by the mitochondrial transition pore, is updated.

  12. Calcium Flux across Plant Mitochondrial Membranes: Possible Molecular Players.

    PubMed

    Carraretto, Luca; Checchetto, Vanessa; De Bortoli, Sara; Formentin, Elide; Costa, Alex; Szabó, Ildikó; Teardo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, have evolved the ability to integrate external stimuli into metabolic and developmental signals. A wide variety of signals, including abiotic, biotic, and developmental stimuli, were observed to evoke specific spatio-temporal Ca(2+) transients which are further transduced by Ca(2+) sensor proteins into a transcriptional and metabolic response. Most of the research on Ca(2+) signaling in plants has been focused on the transport mechanisms for Ca(2+) across the plasma- and the vacuolar membranes as well as on the components involved in decoding of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals, but how intracellular organelles such as mitochondria are involved in the process of Ca(2+) signaling is just emerging. The combination of the molecular players and the elicitors of Ca(2+) signaling in mitochondria together with newly generated detection systems for measuring organellar Ca(2+) concentrations in plants has started to provide fruitful grounds for further discoveries. In the present review we give an updated overview of the currently identified/hypothesized pathways, such as voltage-dependent anion channels, homologs of the mammalian mitochondrial uniporter (MCU), LETM1, a plant glutamate receptor family member, adenine nucleotide/phosphate carriers and the permeability transition pore (PTP), that may contribute to the transport of Ca(2+) across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes in plants. We briefly discuss the relevance of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis for ensuring optimal bioenergetic performance of this organelle.

  13. Calcium Flux across Plant Mitochondrial Membranes: Possible Molecular Players

    PubMed Central

    Carraretto, Luca; Checchetto, Vanessa; De Bortoli, Sara; Formentin, Elide; Costa, Alex; Szabó, Ildikó; Teardo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, have evolved the ability to integrate external stimuli into metabolic and developmental signals. A wide variety of signals, including abiotic, biotic, and developmental stimuli, were observed to evoke specific spatio-temporal Ca2+ transients which are further transduced by Ca2+ sensor proteins into a transcriptional and metabolic response. Most of the research on Ca2+ signaling in plants has been focused on the transport mechanisms for Ca2+ across the plasma- and the vacuolar membranes as well as on the components involved in decoding of cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, but how intracellular organelles such as mitochondria are involved in the process of Ca2+ signaling is just emerging. The combination of the molecular players and the elicitors of Ca2+ signaling in mitochondria together with newly generated detection systems for measuring organellar Ca2+ concentrations in plants has started to provide fruitful grounds for further discoveries. In the present review we give an updated overview of the currently identified/hypothesized pathways, such as voltage-dependent anion channels, homologs of the mammalian mitochondrial uniporter (MCU), LETM1, a plant glutamate receptor family member, adenine nucleotide/phosphate carriers and the permeability transition pore (PTP), that may contribute to the transport of Ca2+ across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes in plants. We briefly discuss the relevance of the mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis for ensuring optimal bioenergetic performance of this organelle. PMID:27065186

  14. Photoaffinity labeling of uncoupler binding sites on mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Kurup, C K; Sanadi, D R

    1977-02-01

    3H 2-azido-4-nitrophenol, a photoactive uncoupler, has been synthesized, and its uncoupling action on oxidative phosphorylation and its binding to the mitochondrial membrane have been studied. The uncoupler bound covalently to the mitochondrial membrane on photoirradiation was 3-4 times that bound reversibly in the absence of light. When irradiation was carried out in the presence of serum albumin, covalent binding was significantly depressed. The pattern of loss of ATP-Pi exchange activity with increasing amounts of the uncoupler suggests that serum albumin prevents the binding of the uncoupler to the functional sites as well. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of photoaffinity labeled submitochondrial particles in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate revealed that a 9000 dalton peptide bound high levels of uncoupler. Other proteins in the molecular weight range of 20,000-40,000 and 55,000 were also labeled. Photolysis in the presence of serum albumin or ATP decreased the covalent binding of the uncoupler to all the proteins, but particularly to the 20,000 dalton component. Soluble ATPase and the mitochondrial proteolipid purified from labeled mitochondria showed the presence of label.

  15. The hydrophobic proteome of mitochondrial membranes from Arabidopsis cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Brugière, Sabine; Kowalski, Solène; Ferro, Myriam; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Miras, Stéphane; Salvi, Daniel; Ravanel, Stéphane; d'Hérin, Pierre; Garin, Jérôme; Bourguignon, Jacques; Joyard, Jacques; Rolland, Norbert

    2004-06-01

    The development of mitochondria and the integration of their function within a plant cell rely on the presence of a complex biochemical machinery located within their limiting membranes. The aim of the present work was: (1) to enhance our understanding of the biochemical machinery of mitochondrial membranes and (2) to test the versatility of the procedure developed for the identification of the hydrophobic proteome of the chloroplast envelope [Molecular and Cellular Proteomics 2 (2003) 325-345]. A proteomic analysis was performed, to provide the most exhaustive view of the protein repertoire of these membranes. For this purpose, highly purified mitochondria were prepared from Arabidopsis cultured cells and membrane proteins were extracted. To get a more exhaustive array of membrane proteins from Arabidopsis mitochondria, from the most to the less hydrophobic ones, various extraction procedures (chloroform/methanol extraction, alkaline or saline treatments) were applied. LC-MS/MS analyses were then performed on each membrane subfraction, leading to the identification of more than 110 proteins. The identification of these proteins is discussed with respect to their mitochondrial localization, their physicochemical properties and their implications in the metabolism of mitochondria. In order to provide a new overview of the biochemical machinery of the plant mitochondria, proteins identified during this work were compared to the lists of proteins identified during previous proteomic analyses performed on plant and algae mitochondria (Arabidopsis, pea, Chlamydomonas, rice, etc.). A total of 502 proteins are listed. About 40% of the 114 proteins identified during this work were not identified during previous proteomic studies performed on mitochondria.

  16. Role of Pterocarpus santalinus against mitochondrial dysfunction and membrane lipid changes induced by ulcerogens in rat gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Shoba; Devi, R S; Devi, C S Shyamala

    2007-11-20

    Free radicals produced by ulcerogenic agents affect the TCA cycle enzymes located in the outer membrane of the mitochondria. Upon induction with ulcerogens, peroxidation of membrane lipids bring about alterations in the mitochondrial enzyme activity. This indicates an increase in the permeability levels of the mitochondrial membrane. The ability of PSE to scavenge the reactive oxygen species results in restoration of activities of TCA cycle enzymes. NSAIDs interfere with the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo, resulting in uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation process. This usually results in diminished cellular ATP production. The recovery of gastric mucosal barrier function through maintenance of energy metabolism results in maintenance of ATP levels, as observed in this study upon treatment with PSE. Membrane integrity altered by peroxidation is known to have a modified fatty acid composition, a disruption of permeability, a decrease in electrical resistance, and increase in flip-flopping between monolayers and inactivated cross-linked proteins. The severe depletion of arachidonic acid in ulcer induced groups was prevented upon treatment with PSE. The acid inhibitory property of the herbal extract enables the maintenance of GL activity upon treatment with PSE. The ability to prevent membrane peroxidation has been traced to the presence of active constituents in the PSE. In essence, PSE has been found to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction, provide mitochondrial cell integrity, through the maintenance of lipid bilayer by its ability to provide a hydrophobic character to the gastric mucosa, further indicating its ability to reverse the action of NSAIDs and mast cell degranulators in gastric mucosa.

  17. Rows of ATP Synthase Dimers in Native Mitochondrial Inner Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Buzhynskyy, Nikolay; Sens, Pierre; Prima, Valerie; Sturgis, James N.; Scheuring, Simon

    2007-01-01

    The ATP synthase is a nanometric rotary machine that uses a transmembrane electrochemical gradient to form ATP. The structures of most components of the ATP synthase are known, and their organization has been elucidated. However, the supramolecular assembly of ATP synthases in biological membranes remains unknown. Here we show with submolecular resolution the organization of ATP synthases in the yeast mitochondrial inner membranes. The atomic force microscopy images we have obtained show how these molecules form dimers with characteristic 15 nm distance between the axes of their rotors through stereospecific interactions of the membrane embedded portions of their stators. A different interaction surface is responsible for the formation of rows of dimers. Such an organization elucidates the role of the ATP synthase in mitochondrial morphology. Some dimers have a different morphology with 10 nm stalk-to-stalk distance, in line with ATP synthases that are accessible to IF1 inhibition. Rotation torque compensation within ATP synthase dimers stabilizes the ATP synthase structure, in particular the stator-rotor interaction. PMID:17557793

  18. Effect of mitochondrial apoptotic activation through the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore on yak meat tenderness during postmortem aging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Han, Ling; Ma, Xiu-Li; Yu, Qun-Li; Zhao, Suo-Nan

    2017-11-01

    The effect of membrane permeability transition pore dependent mitochondrial apoptotic activation on yak meat tenderness was investigated. Results indicate that MPTP opening increased significantly and the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased markedly in the early aging process (P<0.05). Cytochrome c was released from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm via the MPTP in the early period. Meanwhile, the activation of procaspase-9 occurred earlier than that of procaspase-3. Cyclosporin A suppressed the MPTP opening, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3, apoptosis rate, myofibril fragmentation index, reactive oxygen species generation, and Ca(2+) levels. These results demonstrated that MPTP mediated the release of cytochrome c in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, yak meat tenderness was improved by mitochondrial apoptotic pathway during aging. MPTP opening may be influenced by the ROS generation and Ca(2+) overloading in yak meat during postmortem aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A new model for mitochondrial membrane potential production and storage.

    PubMed

    Bagkos, Georgios; Koufopoulos, Kostas; Piperi, Christina

    2014-08-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) is the most reliable indicator of mitochondrial function. The MMP value range of -136 to -140mV has been considered optimal for maximum ATP production for all living organisms. Even small changes from the above range result in a large fall in ATP production and a large increase in ROS production. The resulting bioenergetic deregulation is considered as the causative agent for numerous major human diseases. Normalization of MMP value improves mitochondrial function and gives excellent therapeutic results. In order for a systematic effective treatment of these diseases to be developed, a detailed knowledge of the mechanism of MMP production is absolutely necessary. However, despite the long-standing research efforts, a concrete mechanism for MMP production has not been found yet. The present paper proposes a novel mechanism of MMP production based on new considerations underlying the function of the two basic players of MMP production, the electron transport chain (ETC) and the F1F0 ATP synthase. Under normal conditions, MMP is almost exclusively produced by the electron flow through ETC complexes I-IV, creating a direct electric current that stops in subunit II of complex IV and gradually charges MMP. However, upon ETC dysfunction F1F0 ATP synthase reverses its action and starts to hydrolyze ATP. ATP hydrolysis further produces electric energy which is transferred, in the form of a direct electric current, from F1 to F0 where is used to charge MMP. This new model is expected to redirect current experimental research on mitochondrial bioenergetics and indicate new therapeutic schemes for mitochondrial disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Disruption of actin filaments induces mitochondrial Ca2+ release to the cytoplasm and [Ca2+]c changes in Arabidopsis root hairs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqing; Zhu, Yingfang; Ling, Yu; Zhang, Haiyan; Liu, Peng; Baluska, Frantisek; Samaj, Jozef; Lin, Jinxing; Wang, Qinli

    2010-03-24

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that move along actin filaments, and serve as calcium stores in plant cells. The positioning and dynamics of mitochondria depend on membrane-cytoskeleton interactions, but it is not clear whether microfilament cytoskeleton has a direct effect on mitochondrial function and Ca2+ storage. Therefore, we designed a series of experiments to clarify the effects of actin filaments on mitochondrial Ca2+ storage, cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c), and the interaction between mitochondrial Ca2+ and cytoplasmic Ca2+ in Arabidopsis root hairs. In this study, we found that treatments with latrunculin B (Lat-B) and jasplakinolide (Jas), which depolymerize and polymerize actin filaments respectively, decreased membrane potential and Ca2+ stores in the mitochondria of Arabidopsis root hairs. Simultaneously, these treatments induced an instantaneous increase of cytoplasmic Ca2+, followed by a continuous decrease. All of these effects were inhibited by pretreatment with cyclosporin A (Cs A), a representative blocker of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Moreover, we found there was a Ca2+ concentration gradient in mitochondria from the tip to the base of the root hair, and this gradient could be disrupted by actin-acting drugs. Based on these results, we concluded that the disruption of actin filaments caused by Lat-B or Jas promoted irreversible opening of the mPTP, resulting in mitochondrial Ca2+ release into the cytoplasm, and consequent changes in [Ca2+]c. We suggest that normal polymerization and depolymerization of actin filaments are essential for mitochondrial Ca2+ storage in root hairs.

  1. Role of the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system in membrane architecture and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rampelt, Heike; Zerbes, Ralf M; van der Laan, Martin; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2017-04-01

    The elaborate membrane architecture of mitochondria is a prerequisite for efficient respiration and ATP generation. The cristae membranes, invaginations of the inner mitochondrial membrane, represent a specialized compartment that harbors the complexes of the respiratory chain and the F1Fo-ATP synthase. Crista junctions form narrow openings that connect the cristae membranes to the inner boundary membrane. The mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) is located at crista junctions where it stabilizes membrane curvature and forms contact sites between the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes. MICOS is a large machinery, consisting of two dynamic subcomplexes that are anchored in the inner membrane and expose domains to the intermembrane space. The functions of MICOS in mitochondrial membrane architecture and biogenesis are influenced by numerous interaction partners and the phospholipid environment.

  2. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H.; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM. PMID:26627837

  4. Phylogenetic Analysis of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane β-Barrel Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Jąkalski, Marcin; Pieńkowska, Joanna R.; Stobienia, Olgierd; Karachitos, Andonis; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Weiner, January; Kmita, Hanna; Makałowski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Transport of molecules across mitochondrial outer membrane is pivotal for a proper function of mitochondria. The transport pathways across the membrane are formed by ion channels that participate in metabolite exchange between mitochondria and cytoplasm (voltage-dependent anion-selective channel, VDAC) as well as in import of proteins encoded by nuclear genes (Tom40 and Sam50/Tob55). VDAC, Tom40, and Sam50/Tob55 are present in all eukaryotic organisms, encoded in the nuclear genome, and have β-barrel topology. We have compiled data sets of these protein sequences and studied their phylogenetic relationships with a special focus on the position of Amoebozoa. Additionally, we identified these protein-coding genes in Acanthamoeba castellanii and Dictyostelium discoideum to complement our data set and verify the phylogenetic position of these model organisms. Our analysis show that mitochondrial β-barrel channels from Archaeplastida (plants) and Opisthokonta (animals and fungi) experienced many duplication events that resulted in multiple paralogous isoforms and form well-defined monophyletic clades that match the current model of eukaryotic evolution. However, in representatives of Amoebozoa, Chromalveolata, and Excavata (former Protista), they do not form clearly distinguishable clades, although they locate basally to the plant and algae branches. In most cases, they do not posses paralogs and their sequences appear to have evolved quickly or degenerated. Consequently, the obtained phylogenies of mitochondrial outer membrane β-channels do not entirely reflect the recent eukaryotic classification system involving the six supergroups: Chromalveolata, Excavata, Archaeplastida, Rhizaria, Amoebozoa, and Opisthokonta. PMID:22155732

  5. Mitochondrial glycerol-3-P acyltransferase 1 is most active in outer mitochondrial membrane but not in mitochondrial associated vesicles (MAV).

    PubMed

    Pellon-Maison, Magalí; Montanaro, Mauro A; Coleman, Rosalind A; Gonzalez-Baró, María R

    2007-07-01

    Glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase-1 (GPAT1), catalyzes the committed step in phospholipid and triacylglycerol synthesis. Because both GPAT1 and carnitine-palmitoyltransferase 1 are located on the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) it has been suggested that their reciprocal regulation controls acyl-CoA metabolism at the OMM. To determine whether GPAT1, like carnitine-palmitoyltransferase 1, is enriched in both mitochondrial contact sites and OMM, and to correlate protein location and enzymatic function, we used Percoll and sucrose gradient fractionation of rat liver to obtain submitochondrial fractions. Most GPAT1 protein was present in a vesicular membrane fraction associated with mitochondria (MAV) but GPAT specific activity in this fraction was low. In contrast, highest GPAT1 specific activity was present in purified mitochondria. Contact sites from crude mitochondria, which contained markers for both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, also showed high expression of GPAT1 protein but low specific activity, whereas contact sites isolated from purified mitochondria lacked ER markers and expressed highly active GPAT1. To determine how GPAT1 is targeted to mitochondria, recombinant protein was synthesized in vitro and its incorporation into crude and purified mitochondria was assayed. GPAT1 was rapidly incorporated into mitochondria, but not into microsomes. Incorporation was ATP-driven, and lack of GPAT1 removal by alkali and a chaotropic agent showed that GPAT1 had become an integral membrane protein after incorporation. These results demonstrate that two pools of GPAT1 are present in rat liver mitochondria: an active one, located in OMM and a less active one, located in membranes (ER-contact sites and mitochondrial associated vesicles) associated with both mitochondria and ER.

  6. Chemical synthesis of yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase membranous subunit 8.

    PubMed

    Goetz, M; Schmitter, J M; Geoffre, S; Dufourc, E J

    1999-06-01

    Chemical synthesis of highly hydrophobic peptides and proteins remains a challenging problem. Strong interchain associations within the peptide-resin matrix have to be overcome. A synthetic strategy for solid phase peptide synthesis is proposed, mainly based on prolonged coupling time using aprotic polar solvent mixtures. A tailored chromatographic purification was required to obtain a sample sufficiently pure for structural analysis. In this work, the total chemical synthesis of the membrane-embedded yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit 8 is described. The quality of the synthetic protein was checked by electrospray mass spectrometry, its tendency to adopt alpha-helical secondary structure is evidenced by circular dichroism spectroscopy.

  7. Disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis in organic acidurias: insights from human and animal studies.

    PubMed

    Wajner, Moacir; Goodman, Stephen I

    2011-02-01

    Organic acidurias or organic acidemias constitute a group of inherited disorders caused by deficient activity of specific enzymes of amino acids, carbohydrates or lipids catabolism, leading to large accumulation and excretion of one or more carboxylic (organic) acids. Affected patients usually present neurologic symptoms and abnormalities, sometimes accompanied by cardiac and skeletal muscle alterations, whose pathogenesis is poorly known. However, in recent years growing evidence has emerged indicating that mitochondrial dysfunction is directly or indirectly involved in the pathology of various organic acidemias. Mitochondrial impairment in some of these diseases are generally due to mutations in nuclear genes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle or oxidative phosphorylation, while in others it seems to result from toxic influences of the endogenous organic acids to the mitochondrion. In this minireview, we will briefly summarize the present knowledge obtained from human and animal studies showing that disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis may represent a relevant pathomechanism of tissue damage in selective organic acidemias. The discussion will focus on mitochondrial alterations found in patients affected by organic acidemias and by the deleterious effects of the accumulating organic acids on mitochondrial pathways that are crucial for ATP formation and transfer. The elucidation of the mechanisms of toxicity of these acidic compounds offers new perspectives for potential novel adjuvant therapeutic strategies in selected disorders of this group.

  8. Geldanamycin disrupts platelet-membrane structure, leading to membrane permeabilization and inhibition of platelet aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Suttitanamongkol, S; Gear, A R; Polanowska-Grabowska, R

    2000-01-01

    Geldanamycin (GA), a benzoquinoid ansamycin antibiotic, has been used as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and an anti-tumour agent and is known to bind to heat-shock protein 90. In the present study on human platelets we have found that GA inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP, thrombin and the thrombin-receptor-activating peptide and caused platelet plasma-membrane damage, detected by leakage of adenine nucleotides as well as serotonin. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that platelet exposure to GA led to the formation of holes or fenestrations in the platelet plasma membrane, confirming GA's ability to initiate membrane damage. In addition, GA itself caused both the dephosphorylation and phosphorylation of proteins in resting platelets and prevented agonist-induced phosphorylation of pleckstrin, the 20-kDa myosin light chain and other proteins. Another ansamycin, herbimycin A, also inhibited platelet aggregation, but caused minimal membrane permeabilization, as detected by (3)H release from platelets labelled previously with [(3)H]adenine, and much less membrane damage, revealed by SEM. Overall, GA is able to disrupt membrane structure and inhibit platelet aggregation, an ability which may be linked to alterations in the activity of protein kinases and phosphatases. PMID:10620508

  9. Sulfite disrupts brain mitochondrial energy homeostasis and induces mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening via thiol group modification.

    PubMed

    Grings, Mateus; Moura, Alana P; Amaral, Alexandre U; Parmeggiani, Belisa; Gasparotto, Juciano; Moreira, José C F; Gelain, Daniel P; Wyse, Angela T S; Wajner, Moacir; Leipnitz, Guilhian

    2014-09-01

    Sulfite oxidase (SO) deficiency is biochemically characterized by the accumulation of sulfite, thiosulfate and S-sulfocysteine in tissues and biological fluids of the affected patients. The main clinical symptoms include severe neurological dysfunction and brain abnormalities, whose pathophysiology is still unknown. The present study investigated the in vitro effects of sulfite and thiosulfate on mitochondrial homeostasis in rat brain mitochondria. It was verified that sulfite per se, but not thiosulfate, decreased state 3, CCCP-stimulated state and respiratory control ratio in mitochondria respiring with glutamate plus malate. In line with this, we found that sulfite inhibited the activities of glutamate and malate (MDH) dehydrogenases. In addition, sulfite decreased the activity of a commercial solution of MDH, that was prevented by antioxidants and dithiothreitol. Sulfite also induced mitochondrial swelling and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, Ca(2+) retention capacity, NAD(P)H pool and cytochrome c immunocontent when Ca(2+) was present in the medium. These alterations were prevented by ruthenium red, cyclosporine A (CsA) and ADP, supporting the involvement of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) in these effects. We further observed that N-ethylmaleimide prevented the sulfite-elicited swelling and that sulfite decreased free thiol group content in brain mitochondria. These findings indicate that sulfite acts directly on MPT pore containing thiol groups. Finally, we verified that sulfite reduced cell viability in cerebral cortex slices and that this effect was prevented by CsA. Therefore, it may be presumed that disturbance of mitochondrial energy homeostasis and MPT induced by sulfite could be involved in the neuronal damage characteristic of SO deficiency.

  10. The yeast dynamin-like protein, Mgm1p, functions on the mitochondrial outer membrane to mediate mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Shepard, K A; Yaffe, M P

    1999-02-22

    The mdm17 mutation causes temperature-dependent defects in mitochondrial inheritance, mitochondrial morphology, and the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Defects in mitochondrial transmission to daughter buds and changes in mitochondrial morphology were apparent within 30 min after shifting cells to 37 degrees C, while loss of the mitochondrial genome occurred after 4-24 h at the elevated temperature. The mdm17 lesion mapped to MGM1, a gene encoding a dynamin-like GTPase previously implicated in mitochondrial genome maintenance, and the cloned MGM1 gene complements all of the mdm17 mutant phenotypes. Cells with an mgm1-null mutation displayed aberrant mitochondrial inheritance and morphology. A version of mgm1 mutated in a conserved residue in the putative GTP-binding site was unable to complement any of the mutant defects. It also caused aberrant mitochondrial distribution and morphology when expressed at high levels in cells that also contained a wild-type copy of the gene. Mgm1p was localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane and fractionated as a component of a high molecular weight complex. These results indicate that Mgm1p is a mitochondrial inheritance and morphology component that functions on the mitochondrial surface.

  11. Lipid Composition Dependent Membrane Fragmentation and Pore-forming Mechanisms of Membrane Disruption by Pexiganan (MSI-78)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Kuk; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Sciacca, Michele F.M.; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Yu, Changsu; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    The potency and selectivity of many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are correlated with their ability to interact with and disrupt the bacterial cell membrane. In vitro experiments using model membranes have been used to determine the mechanism of membrane disruption of AMPs. Since the mechanism of action of an AMP depends on the ability of the model membrane to accurately mimic the cell membrane, it is important to understand the effect of membrane composition. Anionic lipids which are present in the outer membrane of prokaryotes but are less common in eukaryotic membranes are usually considered key for the bacterial selectivity of AMPs. We show by fluorescence measurements of peptide-induced membrane permeabilization that the presence of anionic lipids at high concentrations can actually inhibit membrane disruption by the AMP MSI-78 (pexiganan), a representative of a large class of highly cationic AMPs. Paramagnetic quenching studies suggest MSI-78 is in a surface-associated inactive mode in anionic SDS micelles, but is in a deeply buried and presumably more active mode in zwitterionic DPC micelles. Furthermore, a switch in mechanism occurs with lipid composition. Membrane fragmentation with MSI-78 is observable in mixed vesicles containing both anionic and zwitterionic lipids but not in vesicles composed of a single lipid of either type. These findings suggest membrane affinity and membrane permeabilization are not always correlated, and additional effects can be seen as the complexity of the model membranes is increased that may be more reflective of the actual cellular environment. PMID:23590672

  12. Controls and constrains of the membrane disrupting action of Aurein 1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmiri, Mahdi; Enciso, Marta; Mechler, Adam

    2015-11-01

    Aurein 1.2 is a 13 residue antimicrobial peptide secreted by the Australian tree frog Litoria Aurea. It is a surface-acting membrane disrupting peptide that permeabilizes bacterial membranes via the carpet mechanism; the molecular details of this process are mostly unknown. Here the mechanism of action of Aurein 1.2 was investigated with an emphasis on the role of membrane charge and C-terminal amidation of the peptide. Using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) fingerprinting it was found that the membrane charge correlates with membrane affinity of the peptide, however the binding and the membrane disrupting processes are not charge driven; increased membrane charge reduces the membrane disrupting activity. Coarse grain simulations revealed that phenylalanine residues act as membrane anchors. Accordingly Aurein 1.2 has the ability to bind to any membrane. Furthermore, bundling precludes membrane disruption in case of wild type peptides, while non C-terminal amidated peptides form random aggregates leading to detachment from the membrane. Hence C-terminal amidation is crucial for Aurein 1.2 action. Our results suggest that Aurein 1.2 acts via aggregation driven membrane penetration. The concomitant change in the tension of the outer leaflet imposes a spontaneous curvature on the membrane, leading to disintegration.

  13. Bacterial tail anchors can target to the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Lutfullahoğlu-Bal, Güleycan; Keskin, Abdurrahman; Seferoğlu, Ayşe Bengisu; Dunn, Cory D

    2017-07-24

    During the generation and evolution of the eukaryotic cell, a proteobacterial endosymbiont was re-fashioned into the mitochondrion, an organelle that appears to have been present in the ancestor of all present-day eukaryotes. Mitochondria harbor proteomes derived from coding information located both inside and outside the organelle, and the rate-limiting step toward the formation of eukaryotic cells may have been development of an import apparatus allowing protein entry to mitochondria. Currently, a widely conserved translocon allows proteins to pass from the cytosol into mitochondria, but how proteins encoded outside of mitochondria were first directed to these organelles at the dawn of eukaryogenesis is not clear. Because several proteins targeted by a carboxyl-terminal tail anchor (TA) appear to have the ability to insert spontaneously into the mitochondrial outer membrane (OM), it is possible that self-inserting, tail-anchored polypeptides obtained from bacteria might have formed the first gate allowing proteins to access mitochondria from the cytosol. Here, we tested whether bacterial TAs are capable of targeting to mitochondria. In a survey of proteins encoded by the proteobacterium Escherichia coli, predicted TA sequences were directed to specific subcellular locations within the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Importantly, TAs obtained from DUF883 family members ElaB and YqjD were abundantly localized to and inserted at the mitochondrial OM. Our results support the notion that eukaryotic cells are able to utilize membrane-targeting signals present in bacterial proteins obtained by lateral gene transfer, and our findings make plausible a model in which mitochondrial protein translocation was first driven by tail-anchored proteins. This article was reviewed by Michael Ryan and Thomas Simmen.

  14. Human MIEF1 recruits Drp1 to mitochondrial outer membranes and promotes mitochondrial fusion rather than fission.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Liu, Tong; Jin, Shaobo; Wang, Xinming; Qu, Mingqi; Uhlén, Per; Tomilin, Nikolay; Shupliakov, Oleg; Lendahl, Urban; Nistér, Monica

    2011-06-24

    Mitochondrial morphology is controlled by two opposing processes: fusion and fission. Drp1 (dynamin-related protein 1) and hFis1 are two key players of mitochondrial fission, but how Drp1 is recruited to mitochondria and how Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission is regulated in mammals is poorly understood. Here, we identify the vertebrate-specific protein MIEF1 (mitochondrial elongation factor 1; independently identified as MiD51), which is anchored to the outer mitochondrial membrane. Elevated MIEF1 levels induce extensive mitochondrial fusion, whereas depletion of MIEF1 causes mitochondrial fragmentation. MIEF1 interacts with and recruits Drp1 to mitochondria in a manner independent of hFis1, Mff (mitochondrial fission factor) and Mfn2 (mitofusin 2), but inhibits Drp1 activity, thus executing a negative effect on mitochondrial fission. MIEF1 also interacts with hFis1 and elevated hFis1 levels partially reverse the MIEF1-induced fusion phenotype. In addition to inhibiting Drp1, MIEF1 also actively promotes fusion, but in a manner distinct from mitofusins. In conclusion, our findings uncover a novel mechanism which controls the mitochondrial fusion-fission machinery in vertebrates. As MIEF1 is vertebrate-specific, these data also reveal important differences between yeast and vertebrates in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics.

  15. Mode of action of pyrazinamide: disruption of Mycobacterium tuberculosis membrane transport and energetics by pyrazinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wade, Mary Margaret; Scorpio, Angelo; Zhang, Hao; Sun, Zhonghe

    2003-11-01

    Pyrazinamide is an important sterilizing drug that shortens tuberculosis (TB) therapy. However, the mechanism of action of pyrazinamide is poorly understood because of its unusual properties. Here we show that pyrazinoic acid, the active moiety of pyrazinamide, disrupted membrane energetics and inhibited membrane transport function in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The preferential activity of pyrazinamide against old non-replicating bacilli correlated with their low membrane potential and the disruption of membrane potential by pyrazinoic acid and acid pH. Inhibitors of membrane energetics increased the antituberculous activity of pyrazinamide. These findings shed new light on the mode of action of pyrazinamide and may help in the design of new drugs that shorten therapy.

  16. OXPHOS-Dependent Cells Identify Environmental Disruptors of Mitochondrial Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with numerous chronic diseases including metabolic syndrome. Environmental chemicals can impair mitochondrial function through numerous mechanisms such as membrane disruption, complex inhibition and electron transport chain uncoupling. Curr...

  17. OXPHOS-Dependent Cells Identify Environmental Disruptors of Mitochondrial Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with numerous chronic diseases including metabolic syndrome. Environmental chemicals can impair mitochondrial function through numerous mechanisms such as membrane disruption, complex inhibition and electron transport chain uncoupling. Curr...

  18. Ethanol influences on Bax associations with mitochondrial membrane proteins in neonatal rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Marieta Barrow; Siler-Marsiglio, Kendra; Paiva, Michael; Kotler, Alexandra; Rogozinski, Jonathan; Kubovec, Stacey; Coursen, Mary; Madorsky, Vladimir

    2013-02-01

    These studies investigated interactions taking place at the mitochondrial membrane in neonatal rat cerebellum following ethanol exposure and focused on interactions between proapoptotic Bax and proteins of the permeability transition pore (PTP), voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) of the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes, respectively. Cultured cerebellar granule cells were used to assess the role of these interactions in ethanol neurotoxicity. Analyses were made at the age of maximal cerebellar ethanol vulnerability (P4), compared to the later age of relative resistance (P7), to determine whether differential ethanol sensitivity was mirrored by differences in these molecular interactions. We found that, following ethanol exposure, Bax proapoptotic associations with both VDAC and ANT were increased, particularly at the age of greater ethanol sensitivity, and these interactions were sustained at this age for at least 2 h postexposure. Since Bax:VDAC interactions disrupt protective VDAC interactions with mitochondrial hexokinase (HXK), we also assessed VDAC:HXK associations following ethanol treatment and found such interactions were altered by ethanol treatment, but only at 2 h postexposure and only in the P4, ethanol-sensitive cerebellum. Ethanol neurotoxicity in cultured neuronal preparations was abolished by pharmacological inhibition of both VDAC and ANT interactions with Bax but not by a Bax channel blocker. Therefore, we conclude that, at this age, within the constraints of our experimental model, a primary mode of Bax-induced initiation of the apoptosis cascade following ethanol insult involves interactions with proteins of the PTP complex and not channel formation independent of PTP constituents. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Bax oligomerization in mitochondrial membranes requires tBid (caspase-8-cleaved Bid) and a mitochondrial protein.

    PubMed Central

    Roucou, Xavier; Montessuit, Sylvie; Antonsson, Bruno; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2002-01-01

    In response to various apoptotic stimuli, Bax, a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, is oligomerized and permeabilizes the mitochondrial outer membrane to apoptogenic factors, including cytochrome c. Bax oligomerization can also be induced by incubating isolated mitochondria containing endogenous Bax with recombinant tBid (caspase-8-cleaved Bid) in vitro. The mechanism by which Bax oligomerizes under these conditions is still unknown. To address this question, recombinant human full-length Bax was purified as a monomeric protein. Bax failed to oligomerize spontaneously in isolated mitochondria or in liposomes composed of either cardiolipin or lipids extracted from mitochondria. However, in the presence of tBid, the protein formed large complexes in mitochondrial membranes and induced the release of cytochrome c. tBid also induced Bax oligomerization in isolated mitochondrial outer membranes, but not in other membranes, such as plasma membranes or microsomes. Moreover, tBid-induced Bax oligomerization was inhibited when mitochondria were pretreated with protease K. The presence of the voltage-dependent anion channel was not required either for Bax oligomerization or for Bax-induced cytochrome c release. Finally, Bax oligomerization was reconstituted in proteoliposomes made from mitochondrial membrane proteins. These findings imply that tBid is necessary but not sufficient for Bax oligomerization; a mitochondrial protein is also required. PMID:12193163

  20. Cationic peptide exposure enhances pulsed-electric-field-mediated membrane disruption.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Stephen M; Aiken, Erik J; Beres, Kaytlyn A; Hahn, Adam R; Kamin, Samantha J; Hagness, Susan C; Booske, John H; Murphy, William L

    2014-01-01

    The use of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to irreversibly electroporate cells is a promising approach for destroying undesirable cells. This approach may gain enhanced applicability if the intensity of the PEF required to electrically disrupt cell membranes can be reduced via exposure to a molecular deliverable. This will be particularly impactful if that reduced PEF minimally influences cells that are not exposed to the deliverable. We hypothesized that the introduction of charged molecules to the cell surfaces would create regions of enhanced transmembrane electric potential in the vicinity of each charged molecule, thereby lowering the PEF intensity required to disrupt the plasma membranes. This study will therefore examine if exposure to cationic peptides can enhance a PEF's ability to disrupt plasma membranes. We exposed leukemia cells to 40 μs PEFs in media containing varying concentrations of a cationic peptide, polyarginine. We observed the internalization of a membrane integrity indicator, propidium iodide (PI), in real time. Based on an individual cell's PI fluorescence versus time signature, we were able to determine the relative degree of membrane disruption. When using 1-2 kV/cm, exposure to >50 μg/ml of polyarginine resulted in immediate and high levels of PI uptake, indicating severe membrane disruption, whereas in the absence of peptide, cells predominantly exhibited signatures indicative of no membrane disruption. Additionally, PI entered cells through the anode-facing membrane when exposed to cationic peptide, which was theoretically expected. Exposure to cationic peptides reduced the PEF intensity required to induce rapid and irreversible membrane disruption. Critically, peptide exposure reduced the PEF intensities required to elicit irreversible membrane disruption at normally sub-electroporation intensities. We believe that these cationic peptides, when coupled with current advancements in cell targeting techniques will be useful tools in

  1. Cationic Peptide Exposure Enhances Pulsed-Electric-Field-Mediated Membrane Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Stephen M.; Aiken, Erik J.; Beres, Kaytlyn A.; Hahn, Adam R.; Kamin, Samantha J.; Hagness, Susan C.; Booske, John H.; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to irreversibly electroporate cells is a promising approach for destroying undesirable cells. This approach may gain enhanced applicability if the intensity of the PEF required to electrically disrupt cell membranes can be reduced via exposure to a molecular deliverable. This will be particularly impactful if that reduced PEF minimally influences cells that are not exposed to the deliverable. We hypothesized that the introduction of charged molecules to the cell surfaces would create regions of enhanced transmembrane electric potential in the vicinity of each charged molecule, thereby lowering the PEF intensity required to disrupt the plasma membranes. This study will therefore examine if exposure to cationic peptides can enhance a PEF’s ability to disrupt plasma membranes. Methodology/Principal Findings We exposed leukemia cells to 40 μs PEFs in media containing varying concentrations of a cationic peptide, polyarginine. We observed the internalization of a membrane integrity indicator, propidium iodide (PI), in real time. Based on an individual cell’s PI fluorescence versus time signature, we were able to determine the relative degree of membrane disruption. When using 1–2 kV/cm, exposure to >50 μg/ml of polyarginine resulted in immediate and high levels of PI uptake, indicating severe membrane disruption, whereas in the absence of peptide, cells predominantly exhibited signatures indicative of no membrane disruption. Additionally, PI entered cells through the anode-facing membrane when exposed to cationic peptide, which was theoretically expected. Conclusions/Significance Exposure to cationic peptides reduced the PEF intensity required to induce rapid and irreversible membrane disruption. Critically, peptide exposure reduced the PEF intensities required to elicit irreversible membrane disruption at normally sub-electroporation intensities. We believe that these cationic peptides, when coupled with

  2. Disruption of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA in hybrid mussels (Mytilus edulis x M. galloprovincialis).

    PubMed

    Wood, A R; Turner, G; Skibinski, D O F; Beaumont, A R

    2003-10-01

    Blue mussels of the genus Mytilus have an unusual mode of mitochondrial DNA inheritance termed doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI). Females are homoplasmic for the F mitotype which is inherited maternally, whereas males are heteroplasmic for this and the paternally inherited M mitotype. In areas where species distributions overlap a varying degree of hybridization occurs; yet genetic differences between allopatric populations are maintained. Observations from natural populations and previous laboratory experiments suggest that DUI may be disrupted by hybridization, giving rise to heteroplasmic females and homoplasmic males. We carried out controlled laboratory crosses between Mytilus edulis and M. galloprovincialis to produce pure species and hybrid larvae of known parentage. DNA markers were used to follow the fate of the F and M mitotypes through larval development. Disruption of the mechanism which determines whether the M mitotype is retained or eliminated occurred in an estimated 38% of M. edulis x M. galloprovincialis hybrid larvae, a level double that previously observed in adult mussels from a natural M. edulis x M. galloprovincialis hybrid population. Furthermore, reciprocal hybrid crosses exhibited contrasting types of DUI disruption. The results indicate that disruption of DUI in hybrid mussels may be associated with increased mortality and hence could be a factor in the maintenance of genetic integrity for each species.

  3. Deficiency in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp21) gene increases ischemic brain damage and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Mehta, Suresh L.; Lu, Baisong; Andy Li, P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in mediating ischemic brain damage. Immp2l is an inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase that processes mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 (Cyc1). Homozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove or Immp2l−/−) elevates mitochondrial membrane potential, increases superoxide (•O2−) production in the brain and impairs fertility. The objectives of this study are to explore the effects of heterozygous mutation of lmmp2l (Immp2l+/−) on ischemic outcome and to determine the influence of Immp2l deficiency on brain mitochondria after stroke. Male Immp2l+/− and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 1-h focal cerebral ischemia. Their brains were harvested after 5 and 24-h of reperfusion. The results showed that infarct volume and DNA oxidative damage significantly increased in the Immp2l+/− mice. There were no obvious cerebral vasculature abnormalities between the two types of mice viewed by Indian ink perfusion. The increased damage in Immp2l+/− mice was associated with early increase in •O2− production. Mitochondrial respiratory rate, total mitochondrial respiratory capacity and mitochondrial respiratory complex activities were decreased at 5-h of recirculation in Immp2l+/− mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that lmmp2l deficiency increases ischemic brain damage by enhancing •O2− production and damaging mitochondrial functional performance. PMID:21824519

  4. Deficiency in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp21) gene increases ischemic brain damage and impairs mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Mehta, Suresh L; Lu, Baisong; Li, P Andy

    2011-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in mediating ischemic brain damage. Immp2l is an inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase that processes mitochondrial protein cytochrome c1 (Cyc1). Homozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2l(Tg(Tyr)979Ove) or Immp2l(-/-)) elevates mitochondrial membrane potential, increases superoxide (O(2)(-)) production in the brain and impairs fertility. The objectives of this study are to explore the effects of heterozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2l(+/-)) on ischemic outcome and to determine the influence of Immp2l deficiency on brain mitochondria after stroke. Male Immp2l(+/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 1-h focal cerebral ischemia. Their brains were harvested after 5 and 24-h of reperfusion. The results showed that infarct volume and DNA oxidative damage significantly increased in the Immp2l(+/-) mice. There were no obvious cerebral vasculature abnormalities between the two types of mice viewed by Indian ink perfusion. The increased damage in Immp2l(+/-) mice was associated with early increase in O(2)(-) production. Mitochondrial respiratory rate, total mitochondrial respiratory capacity and mitochondrial respiratory complex activities were decreased at 5-h of recirculation in Immp2l(+/-) mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that Immp2l deficiency increases ischemic brain damage by enhancing O(2)(-) production and damaging mitochondrial functional performance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Mitochondrial membrane potential: a trait involved in organelle inheritance?

    PubMed

    Milani, Liliana

    2015-10-01

    Which mitochondria are inherited across generations? Are transmitted mitochondria functionally silenced to preserve the integrity of their genetic information, or rather are those mitochondria with the highest levels of function (as indicated by membrane potential Δψm) preferentially transmitted? Based on observations of the unusual system of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria and of the common strictly maternal inheritance mode, I formulate a general hypothesis to explain which mitochondria reach the primordial germ cells (PGCs), and how this happens. Several studies indicate that mitochondrial movements are driven by microtubules and that mitochondria with high Δψm are preferentially transported. This can be applied also to the mitochondria that eventually populate embryonic PGCs, so I propose that Δψm may be a trait that allows for the preferential transmission of the most active (and healthy) mitochondria. The topics discussed here are fundamental in cell biology and genetics but remain controversial and a subject of heated debate; I propose an explanation for how a Δψm-dependent mechanism can cause the observed differences in mitochondrial transmission.

  6. Ceramide forms channels in mitochondrial outer membranes at physiologically relevant concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Siskind, Leah J.; Kolesnick, Richard N.; Colombini, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the ability of ceramides to induce apoptosis is due to a direct action on mitochondria. Mitochondria are known to contain enzymes responsible for ceramide synthesis and hydrolysis and mitochondrial ceramide levels have been shown to be elevated prior to the mitochondrial phase of apoptosis. Ceramides have been reported to induce the release of intermembrane space proteins from mitochondria, which has been linked to their ability to form large channels in membranes. The aim of this study was to determine if the membrane concentration of ceramide required for the formation of protein permeable channels is within the range that is present in mitochondria during the induction phase of apoptosis. Only a very small percentage of the ceramide actually inserts into the mitochondrial membranes. The permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane correlates directly with the level of ceramide in the membrane. Importantly, the concentration of ceramide at which significant channel formation occurs is consistent with the level of mitochondrial ceramide that occurs during the induction phase of apoptosis (4 pmol ceramide/nanomole phospholipid). Similar results were obtained with short- and long-chain ceramide. Ceramide channel formation is specific to mitochondrial membranes in that no channel formation occurs in the plasma membranes of erythrocytes even at concentrations 20 times higher than those required for channel formation in mitochondrial outer membranes. Thus, ceramide channels are good candidates for the pathway by which proapoptotic proteins are released from mitochondria during the induction phase of apoptosis. PMID:16713754

  7. Reactive gamma-ketoaldehydes formed via the isoprostane pathway disrupt mitochondrial respiration and calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stavrovskaya, Irina G; Baranov, Sergei V; Guo, Xiaofeng; Davies, Sean S; Roberts, L Jackson; Kristal, Bruce S

    2010-08-15

    Isoketals (IsoKs) are gamma-ketoaldehydes formed via the isoprostane pathway of arachidonic acid peroxidation and are among the most reactive by-products of lipid peroxidation. IsoKs selectively adduct to protein lysine residues and are highly cytotoxic, but the targets and molecular events involved in IsoK-induced cell death are poorly defined. Our previous work established that physiologically relevant aldehydes induce mitochondrial dysfunction (Kristal et al., J. Biol. Chem.271:6033-6038; 1996). We therefore examined whether IsoKs induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Incubation of mitochondria with synthetic IsoKs in the presence or absence of Ca(2+) was associated with alterations in mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential (DeltaPsi), and pyridine nucleotide redox state. IsoKs dose dependently (0.5-4microM) accelerated liver mitochondria swelling induced by low concentrations of Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) or by the prooxidant tert-butylhydroperoxide, and release of cytochrome c, with similar observations in heart/brain mitochondria. The mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) inhibitor cyclosporine A delayed IsoK-induced mitochondria dysfunction. The actions of IsoKs are consistent with interactions with cytochrome c, a protein rich in lysine residues. Direct reaction of IsoKs with select lysines in cytochrome c was demonstrated using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Overall, these results suggest that IsoKs may, in part, mediate their cytotoxic effects through induction of the mPT and subsequent activation of downstream cell death cascades.

  8. Development of a no-wash assay for mitochondrial membrane potential using the styryl dye DASPEI.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian H R; Rekling, Jens C

    2010-10-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of several diseases and may also result from drugs with unwanted side effects on mitochondrial biochemistry. The mitochondrial membrane potential is a good indicator of mitochondrial function. Here, the authors have developed a no-wash mitochondrial membrane potential assay using 2-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-ethylpyridinium iodide (DASPEI), a rarely used mitochondrial potentiometric probe, in a 96-well format using a fluorescent plate reader. The assay was validated using 2 protonophores (CCCP, DNP), which are known uncouplers, and the neuroleptic thioridazine, which is a suspected mitochondrial toxicant. CCCP and DNP have short-term depolarizing effects, and thioridazine has long-term hyperpolarizing effects on the mitochondrial membrane potential of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The assay also detected changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential in CHO cells exposed to cobalt (mimicking hypoxia) and in PC12 cells exposed to amyloid β, demonstrating that the assay can be used in cellular models of hypoxia and Alzheimer's disease. The assay needs no washing steps, has a Z' value >0.5, can be used on standard fluorometers, has good post liquid-handling stability, and thus is suitable for large-scale screening efforts. In summary, the DASPEI assay is simple and rapid and may be of use in toxicological testing, drug target discovery, and mechanistic models of diseases involving mitochondrial dysfunction.

  9. Photodynamic action of chlorin e6 on thymocyte plasmatic and mitochondrial membrane potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulkhandanyan, Grigor V.

    2005-08-01

    Transmembrane potentials appear to be cell state sensitive characteristics and can give information about cell damage initial stage. Photodynamic action of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 on plasmatic and mitochondrial membrane potentials of the rat thymus lymphocytes was studied using voltage-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G. It has been revealed that mitochondrial membrane potential is more sensitive characteristic of membrane disfunction than plasmatic one at the cell photodamage.

  10. Sodium/proton antiporters in the mitochondrial inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Garlid, K D

    1988-01-01

    The two mitochondrial Na+/H+ antiporters differ in several important respects, and the most physiologically significant of these may be their differences in regulation. The Mg2+-dependent Na+/H+ antiporter controls mitochondrial volume in a dangerous, high-K+ environment. To play this vital role, this porter must always lie poised far from K+/H+ equilibrium; i.e., it must be under dynamic regulation, as proposed in the Mg2+ carrier-brake hypothesis (7). Being regulated, it is not necessary for this antiporter to be cation-selective, since all electroneutral cation movements will be followed by redistributions of anions and water. On the other hand, there is no indication at present that the Mg2+-independent Na+/H+ antiporter is regulated. This transporter is therefore required to exhibit high discrimination against K+ in order to prevent the collapse of matrix volume dueto uncontrolled loss of K+ salts and water (4). Do the properties of the mitochondrial Na+/H+ antiporters help us in any way to understand the plasmalemmal Na+/H+ antiporters? I believe they do, if we allow that there are a limited number of ways in which nature constructs such porters. The difference in cation selectivities very likely reflects a fundamental structural difference between the two mitochondrial antiporters, and this difference appears to be mirrored in two types of plasmalemmal Na+/H+ antiporters. Thus, the Mg2+-independent Na+/H+ antiporter resembles the renal tubular Na+/H+ antiporter in its discrimination against K+ and its competitive inhibition by Li+. On the other hand, the Mg2+-dependent Na+/H+ antiporter resembles a cardiac sarcolemmal Na+/H+ antiporter which transports all alkali cations, including Na+ and K+, and which is inhibited by DCCD and amphiphilic amines (S. Kakar, A. Askari and K. Garlid, in preparation). The existence of the latter class of antiporter in plasmalemma may seem unlikely at first glance, since it would tend to catalyze Na+/K+ exchange and dissipate

  11. Distinct Membrane Disruption Pathways Are Induced by 40-Residue β-Amyloid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Dennis A; Doherty, Katelynne; Cheng, Qinghui; Kim, Hyeongeun; Xu, Dawei; Dong, He; Grewer, Christof; Qiang, Wei

    2016-06-03

    Cellular membrane disruption induced by β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides has been considered one of the major pathological mechanisms for Alzheimer disease. Mechanistic studies of the membrane disruption process at a high-resolution level, on the other hand, are hindered by the co-existence of multiple possible pathways, even in simplified model systems such as the phospholipid liposome. Therefore, separation of these pathways is crucial to achieve an in-depth understanding of the Aβ-induced membrane disruption process. This study, which utilized a combination of multiple biophysical techniques, shows that the peptide-to-lipid (P:L) molar ratio is an important factor that regulates the selection of dominant membrane disruption pathways in the presence of 40-residue Aβ peptides in liposomes. Three distinct pathways (fibrillation with membrane content leakage, vesicle fusion, and lipid uptake through a temporarily stable ionic channel) become dominant in model liposome systems under specific conditions. These individual systems are characterized by both the initial states of Aβ peptides and the P:L molar ratio. Our results demonstrated the possibility to generate simplified Aβ-membrane model systems with a homogeneous membrane disruption pathway, which will benefit high-resolution mechanistic studies in the future. Fundamentally, the possibility of pathway selection controlled by P:L suggests that the driving forces for Aβ aggregation and Aβ-membrane interactions may be similar at the molecular level. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Deoxycholic acid modulates cell death signaling through changes in mitochondrial membrane properties[S

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Tânia; Castro, Rui E.; Pinto, Sandra N.; Coutinho, Ana; Lucas, Susana D.; Moreira, Rui; Rodrigues, Cecília M. P.; Prieto, Manuel; Fernandes, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic bile acids, such as deoxycholic acid (DCA), are responsible for hepatocyte cell death during intrahepatic cholestasis. The mechanisms responsible for this effect are unclear, and recent studies conflict, pointing to either a modulation of plasma membrane structure or mitochondrial-mediated toxicity through perturbation of mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) properties. We conducted a comprehensive comparative study of the impact of cytotoxic and cytoprotective bile acids on the membrane structure of different cellular compartments. We show that DCA increases the plasma membrane fluidity of hepatocytes to a minor extent, and that this effect is not correlated with the incidence of apoptosis. Additionally, plasma membrane fluidity recovers to normal values over time suggesting the presence of cellular compensatory mechanisms for this perturbation. Colocalization experiments in living cells confirmed the presence of bile acids within mitochondrial membranes. Experiments with active isolated mitochondria revealed that physiologically active concentrations of DCA change MOM order in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and that these changes preceded the mitochondrial permeability transition. Importantly, these effects are not observed on liposomes mimicking MOM lipid composition, suggesting that DCA apoptotic activity depends on features of mitochondrial membranes that are absent in protein-free mimetic liposomes, such as the double-membrane structure, lipid asymmetry, or mitochondrial protein environment. In contrast, the mechanism of action of cytoprotective bile acids is likely not associated with changes in cellular membrane structure. PMID:26351365

  13. The intra-operative radius joystick test to diagnose complete disruption of the interosseous membrane.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, M; Ciais, G; Wassermann, V; Kalouche, I; Biau, D; Dumontier, C; Gagey, O

    2011-10-01

    Disruption of the interosseous membrane is easily missed in patients with Essex-Lopresti syndrome. None of the imaging techniques available for diagnosing disruption of the interosseous membrane are completely dependable. We undertook an investigation to identify whether a simple intra-operative test could be used to diagnose disruption of the interosseous membrane during surgery for fracture of the radial head and to see if the test was reproducible. We studied 20 cadaveric forearms after excision of the radial head, ten with and ten without disruption of the interosseous membrane. On each forearm, we performed the radius joystick test: moderate lateral traction was applied to the radial neck with the forearm in maximal pronation, to look for lateral displacement of the proximal radius indicating that the interosseous membrane had been disrupted. Each of six surgeons (three junior and three senior) performed the test on two consecutive days. Intra-observer agreement was 77% (95% confidence interval (CI) 67 to 85) and interobserver agreement was 97% (95% CI 92 to 100). Sensitivity was 100% (95% CI 97 to 100), specificity 88% (95% CI 81 to 93), positive predictive value 90% (95% CI 83 to 94), and negative predictive value 100%). This cadaveric study suggests that the radius joystick test may be useful for detecting disruption of the interosseous membrane in patients undergoing open surgery for fracture of the radial head and is reproducible. A confirmatory study in vivo is now required.

  14. Mutation of C20orf7 Disrupts Complex I Assembly and Causes Lethal Neonatal Mitochondrial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugiana, Canny; Pagliarini, David J.; McKenzie, Matthew; Kirby, Denise M.; Salemi, Renato; Abu-Amero, Khaled K.; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; Hutchison, Wendy M.; Vascotto, Katherine A.; Smith, Stacey M.; Newbold, Robert F.; Christodoulou, John; Calvo, Sarah; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Ryan, Michael T.; Thorburn, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the first and largest multimeric complex of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Human complex I comprises seven subunits encoded by mitochondrial DNA and 38 nuclear-encoded subunits that are assembled together in a process that is only partially understood. To date, mutations causing complex I deficiency have been described in all 14 core subunits, five supernumerary subunits, and four assembly factors. We describe complex I deficiency caused by mutation of the putative complex I assembly factor C20orf7. A candidate region for a lethal neonatal form of complex I deficiency was identified by homozygosity mapping of an Egyptian family with one affected child and two affected pregnancies predicted by enzyme-based prenatal diagnosis. The region was confirmed by microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and 11 candidate genes encoding potential mitochondrial proteins were sequenced. A homozygous missense mutation in C20orf7 segregated with disease in the family. We show that C20orf7 is peripherally associated with the matrix face of the mitochondrial inner membrane and that silencing its expression with RNAi decreases complex I activity. C20orf7 patient fibroblasts showed an almost complete absence of complex I holoenzyme and were defective at an early stage of complex I assembly, but in a manner distinct from the assembly defects caused by mutations in the assembly factor NDUFAF1. Our results indicate that C20orf7 is crucial in the assembly of complex I and that mutations in C20orf7 cause mitochondrial disease. PMID:18940309

  15. Destabilization of the Outer and Inner Mitochondrial Membranes by Core and Linker Histones

    PubMed Central

    Cascone, Annunziata; Bruelle, Celine; Lindholm, Dan; Bernardi, Paolo; Eriksson, Ove

    2012-01-01

    Background Extensive DNA damage leads to apoptosis. Histones play a central role in DNA damage sensing and may mediate signals of genotoxic damage to cytosolic effectors including mitochondria. Methodology/Principal Findings We have investigated the effects of histones on mitochondrial function and membrane integrity. We demonstrate that both linker histone H1 and core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 bind strongly to isolated mitochondria. All histones caused a rapid and massive release of the pro-apoptotic intermembrane space proteins cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, indicating that they permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. In addition, linker histone H1, but not core histones, permeabilized the inner membrane with a collapse of the membrane potential, release of pyridine nucleotides, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Conclusions We conclude that histones destabilize the mitochondrial membranes, a mechanism that may convey genotoxic signals to mitochondria and promote apoptosis following DNA damage. PMID:22523586

  16. Destabilization of the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes by core and linker histones.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Annunziata; Bruelle, Celine; Lindholm, Dan; Bernardi, Paolo; Eriksson, Ove

    2012-01-01

    Extensive DNA damage leads to apoptosis. Histones play a central role in DNA damage sensing and may mediate signals of genotoxic damage to cytosolic effectors including mitochondria. We have investigated the effects of histones on mitochondrial function and membrane integrity. We demonstrate that both linker histone H1 and core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 bind strongly to isolated mitochondria. All histones caused a rapid and massive release of the pro-apoptotic intermembrane space proteins cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, indicating that they permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. In addition, linker histone H1, but not core histones, permeabilized the inner membrane with a collapse of the membrane potential, release of pyridine nucleotides, and mitochondrial fragmentation. We conclude that histones destabilize the mitochondrial membranes, a mechanism that may convey genotoxic signals to mitochondria and promote apoptosis following DNA damage.

  17. Human Mitochondrial DNA-Protein Complexes Attach to a Cholesterol-Rich Membrane Structure

    PubMed Central

    Gerhold, Joachim M.; Cansiz-Arda, Şirin; Lõhmus, Madis; Engberg, Oskar; Reyes, Aurelio; van Rennes, Helga; Sanz, Alberto; Holt, Ian J.; Cooper, Helen M.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.

    2015-01-01

    The helicase Twinkle is indispensable for mtDNA replication in nucleoids. Previously, we showed that Twinkle is tightly membrane-associated even in the absence of mtDNA, which suggests that Twinkle is part of a membrane-attached replication platform. Here we show that this platform is a cholesterol-rich membrane structure. We fractionated mitochondrial membrane preparations on flotation gradients and show that membrane-associated nucleoids accumulate at the top of the gradient. This fraction was shown to be highly enriched in cholesterol, a lipid that is otherwise low abundant in mitochondria. In contrast, more common mitochondrial lipids, and abundant inner-membrane associated proteins concentrated in the bottom-half of these gradients. Gene silencing of ATAD3, a protein with proposed functions related to nucleoid and mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis, modified the distribution of cholesterol and nucleoids in the gradient in an identical fashion. Both cholesterol and ATAD3 were previously shown to be enriched in ER-mitochondrial junctions, and we detect nucleoid components in biochemical isolates of these structures. Our data suggest an uncommon membrane composition that accommodates platforms for replicating mtDNA, and reconcile apparently disparate functions of ATAD3. We suggest that mtDNA replication platforms are organized in connection with ER-mitochondrial junctions, facilitated by a specialized membrane architecture involving mitochondrial cholesterol. PMID:26478270

  18. Mitochondrial matrix delivery using MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that specifies fusion with mitochondrial membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondria are the principal producers of energy in cells of higher organisms. It was recently reported that mutations and defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with various mitochondrial diseases including a variety of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases. Therefore, an effective mitochondrial gene therapy and diagnosis would be expected to have great medical benefits. To achieve this, therapeutic agents need to be delivered into the innermost mitochondrial space (mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We previously reported on the development of MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargos into mitochondria via membrane fusion. In this study, we provide a demonstration of mitochondrial matrix delivery and the visualization of mitochondrial genes (mtDNA) in living cells using the MITO-Porter. We first prepared MITO-Porter containing encapsulated propidium iodide (PI), a fluorescent dye used to stain nucleic acids to detect mtDNA. We then confirmed the emission of red-fluorescence from PI by conjugation with mtDNA, when the carriers were incubated in the presence of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Finally, intracellular observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy clearly verified that the MITO-Porter delivered PI to the mitochondrial matrix.

  19. Mitochondrial matrix delivery using MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that specifies fusion with mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondria are the principal producers of energy in cells of higher organisms. It was recently reported that mutations and defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with various mitochondrial diseases including a variety of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases. Therefore, an effective mitochondrial gene therapy and diagnosis would be expected to have great medical benefits. To achieve this, therapeutic agents need to be delivered into the innermost mitochondrial space (mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We previously reported on the development of MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargos into mitochondria via membrane fusion. In this study, we provide a demonstration of mitochondrial matrix delivery and the visualization of mitochondrial genes (mtDNA) in living cells using the MITO-Porter. We first prepared MITO-Porter containing encapsulated propidium iodide (PI), a fluorescent dye used to stain nucleic acids to detect mtDNA. We then confirmed the emission of red-fluorescence from PI by conjugation with mtDNA, when the carriers were incubated in the presence of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Finally, intracellular observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy clearly verified that the MITO-Porter delivered PI to the mitochondrial matrix.

  20. Selective sorting and destruction of mitochondrial membrane proteins in aged yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adam L; Hughes, Casey E; Henderson, Kiersten A; Yazvenko, Nina; Gottschling, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of aging, and underlies the development of many diseases. Cells maintain mitochondrial homeostasis through a number of pathways that remodel the mitochondrial proteome or alter mitochondrial content during times of stress or metabolic adaptation. Here, using yeast as a model system, we identify a new mitochondrial degradation system that remodels the mitochondrial proteome of aged cells. Unlike many common mitochondrial degradation pathways, this system selectively removes a subset of membrane proteins from the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes, while leaving the remainder of the organelle intact. Selective removal of preexisting proteins is achieved by sorting into a mitochondrial-derived compartment, or MDC, followed by release through mitochondrial fission and elimination by autophagy. Formation of MDCs requires the import receptors Tom70/71, and failure to form these structures exacerbates preexisting mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that the MDC pathway provides protection to mitochondria in times of stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13943.001 PMID:27097106

  1. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein hFis1 regulates mitochondrial morphology and fission through self-interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serasinghe, Madhavika N.; Yoon, Yisang

    2008-11-15

    Mitochondrial fission in mammals is mediated by at least two proteins, DLP1/Drp1 and hFis1. DLP1 mediates the scission of mitochondrial membranes through GTP hydrolysis, and hFis1 is a putative DLP1 receptor anchored at the mitochondrial outer membrane by a C-terminal single transmembrane domain. The cytosolic domain of hFis1 contains six {alpha}-helices ({alpha}1-{alpha}6) out of which {alpha}2-{alpha}5 form two tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) folds. In this study, by using chimeric constructs, we demonstrated that the cytosolic domain contains the necessary information for hFis1 function during mitochondrial fission. By using transient expression of different mutant forms of the hFis1 protein, we found that hFis1 self-interaction plays an important role in mitochondrial fission. Our results show that deletion of the {alpha}1 helix greatly increased the formation of dimeric and oligomeric forms of hFis1, indicating that {alpha}1 helix functions as a negative regulator of the hFis1 self-interaction. Further mutational approaches revealed that a tyrosine residue in the {alpha}5 helix and the linker between {alpha}3 and {alpha}4 helices participate in hFis1 oligomerization. Mutations causing oligomerization defect greatly reduced the ability to induce not only mitochondrial fragmentation by full-length hFis1 but also the formation of swollen ball-shaped mitochondria caused by {alpha}1-deleted hFis1. Our data suggest that oligomerization of hFis1 in the mitochondrial outer membrane plays a role in mitochondrial fission, potentially through participating in fission factor recruitment.

  2. Oligopolyphenylenevinylene-conjugated oligoelectrolyte membrane insertion molecules selectively disrupt cell envelopes of Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hinks, Jamie; Poh, Wee Han; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Loo, Joachim Say Chye; Bazan, Guillermo C; Hancock, Lynn E; Wuertz, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The modification of microbial membranes to achieve biotechnological strain improvement with exogenous small molecules, such as oligopolyphenylenevinylene-conjugated oligoelectrolyte (OPV-COE) membrane insertion molecules (MIMs), is an emerging biotechnological field. Little is known about the interactions of OPV-COEs with their target, the bacterial envelope. We studied the toxicity of three previously reported OPV-COEs with a selection of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms and demonstrated that Gram-positive bacteria are more sensitive to OPV-COEs than Gram-negative bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that these MIMs disrupt microbial membranes and that this occurred to a much greater degree in Gram-positive organisms. We used a number of mutants to probe the nature of MIM interactions with the microbial envelope but were unable to align the membrane perturbation effects of these compounds to previously reported membrane disruption mechanisms of, for example, cationic antimicrobial peptides. Instead, the data support the notion that OPV-COEs disrupt microbial membranes through a suspected interaction with diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), a major component of Gram-positive membranes. The integrity of model membranes containing elevated amounts of DPG was disrupted to a greater extent by MIMs than those prepared from Escherichia coli total lipid extracts alone.

  3. Oligopolyphenylenevinylene-Conjugated Oligoelectrolyte Membrane Insertion Molecules Selectively Disrupt Cell Envelopes of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Wee Han; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Loo, Joachim Say Chye; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Hancock, Lynn E.

    2015-01-01

    The modification of microbial membranes to achieve biotechnological strain improvement with exogenous small molecules, such as oligopolyphenylenevinylene-conjugated oligoelectrolyte (OPV-COE) membrane insertion molecules (MIMs), is an emerging biotechnological field. Little is known about the interactions of OPV-COEs with their target, the bacterial envelope. We studied the toxicity of three previously reported OPV-COEs with a selection of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms and demonstrated that Gram-positive bacteria are more sensitive to OPV-COEs than Gram-negative bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that these MIMs disrupt microbial membranes and that this occurred to a much greater degree in Gram-positive organisms. We used a number of mutants to probe the nature of MIM interactions with the microbial envelope but were unable to align the membrane perturbation effects of these compounds to previously reported membrane disruption mechanisms of, for example, cationic antimicrobial peptides. Instead, the data support the notion that OPV-COEs disrupt microbial membranes through a suspected interaction with diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), a major component of Gram-positive membranes. The integrity of model membranes containing elevated amounts of DPG was disrupted to a greater extent by MIMs than those prepared from Escherichia coli total lipid extracts alone. PMID:25576607

  4. Expression of a Mitochondrial Progesterone Receptor (PR-M) in Leiomyomata and Association With Increased Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Quanling; Crochet, John R.; Dai, Qunsheng; Leppert, Phyllis C.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical evidence supports a role for progestins in the growth of leiomyomata (fibroids). The mechanism(s) for this is thought to involve gene regulation via the nuclear progesterone receptors. Recently a mitochondrial progesterone receptor (PR-M) has been identified with evidence of a progesterone/progestin-dependent increase in cellular respiration. This observation raises a possible new mechanism whereby progesterone/progestin may affect the growth of fibroids. Objective: The goals of this research were to determine differential expression of PR-M in normal myometrium compared with the edge of a fibroid within the same uterus, to demonstrate a progestin-dependent increase in mitochondria membrane potential using an immortalized human myometrial cell line and to examine mitochondrial membrane potential in transfected cells expressing the complete coding sequence of PR-M. Design: Protein levels of PR-M, PR-B, PR-A, mitochondrial porin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in the myometrium and adjacent edge of a fibroid in 10 subjects undergoing hysterectomy for benign indications. Mitochondrial membrane potential was determined by fluorescent emission of 5,5′,6,6′-tetrachloro-1,1′,3,3′-tetraethylbenzimidazolecarbocyanide iodine in hTERT-HM cells treated with R5020 and in transfected hTERT-HM cells determined by the fluorescent emission of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester. Results: Higher levels of PR-M and mitochondrial porin were found in the fibroid edge compared with adjacent myometrium. Progestin increased mitochondrial membrane potential in hTERT-HM cells, which was not affected by a translation inhibitor. This effect was exaggerated in hTERT-HM cells expressing PR-M after transient transfection. Conclusion: These studies suggest a mechanism whereby progesterone/progestin may affect the growth of fibroids by altering mitochondrial activity. PMID:24423317

  5. Yeast mitochondrial fission proteins induce antagonistic Gaussian membrane curvatures to regulate apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Michelle; Hwee Lai, Ghee; Schmidt, Nathan; Xian, Wujing; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondria form a dynamic and interconnected network, which disintegrates during apoptosis to generate numerous smaller mitochondrial fragments. This process is at present not well understood. Yeast mitochondrial fission machinery proteins, Dnm1 and Fis1, are believed to regulate programmed cell death in yeast. Yeast Dnm1 has been previously shown to promote mitochondrial fragmentation and degradation characteristic of apoptotic cells, while yeast Fis1 inhibits cell death by limiting the mitochondrial fission induced by Dnm1 [Fannjiang et al, Genes & Dev. 2004. 18: 2785-2797]. To better understand the mechanisms of these antagonistic fission proteins, we use synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate their interaction with model cell membranes. The relationship between each protein, Dnm1 and Fis1, and protein-induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. Through the comparison of the membrane rearrangement and phase behavior induced by each protein, we will discuss their respective roles in the regulation of mitochondrial fission.

  6. Simultaneous evaluation of plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential in bovine spermatozoa by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Chihiro; Kang, Sung-Sik; Kitade, Yasuyuki; Yanagawa, Yojiro; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to develop an objective evaluation procedure to estimate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bull spermatozoa simultaneously by flow cytometry. Firstly, we used frozen-thawed semen mixed with 0, 25, 50, 75 or 100% dead spermatozoa. Semen was stained using three staining solutions: SYBR-14, propidium iodide (PI), and phycoerythrin-conjugated peanut agglutinin (PE-PNA), for the evaluation of plasma membrane integrity and acrosomal integrity. Then, characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were compared. Characteristics of spermatozoa (viability and acrosomal integrity) evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were found to be similar. Secondly, we attempted to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and also mitochondrial membrane potential of spermatozoa by flow cytometry using conventional staining with three dyes (SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA) combined with MitoTracker Deep Red (MTDR) staining (quadruple staining). The spermatozoon characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry using quadruple staining were then compared with those of staining using SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA and staining using SYBR-14 and MTDR. There were no significant differences in all characteristics (viability, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential) evaluated by quadruple staining and the other procedures. In conclusion, quadruple staining using SYBR-14, PI, PE-PNA, and MTDR for flow cytometry can be used to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bovine spermatozoa simultaneously.

  7. Parkin mediates proteasome-dependent protein degradation and rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Saori R; Kishi, Chieko; Ishihara, Naotada; Mizushima, Noboru

    2011-06-03

    Upon mitochondrial depolarization, Parkin, a Parkinson disease-related E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates from the cytosol to mitochondria and promotes their degradation by mitophagy, a selective type of autophagy. Here, we report that in addition to mitophagy, Parkin mediates proteasome-dependent degradation of outer membrane proteins such as Tom20, Tom40, Tom70, and Omp25 of depolarized mitochondria. By contrast, degradation of the inner membrane and matrix proteins largely depends on mitophagy. Furthermore, Parkin induces rupture of the outer membrane of depolarized mitochondria, which also depends on proteasomal activity. Upon induction of mitochondrial depolarization, proteasomes are recruited to mitochondria in the perinuclear region. Neither proteasome-dependent degradation of outer membrane proteins nor outer membrane rupture is required for mitophagy. These results suggest that Parkin regulates degradation of outer and inner mitochondrial membrane proteins differently through proteasome- and mitophagy-dependent pathways.

  8. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>500) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitochondrial...

  9. Monitoring of relative mitochondrial membrane potential in living cells by fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Permeant cationic fluorescent probes are shown to be selectively accumulated by the mitochondria of living cells. Mitochondria-specific interaction of such molecules is apparently dependent on the high trans- membrane potential (inside negative) maintained by functional mitochondria. Dissipation of the mitochondrial trans-membrane and potential by ionophores or inhibitors of electron transport eliminates the selective mitochondrial association of these compounds. The application of such potential-dependent probes in conjunction with fluorescence microscopy allows the monitoring of mitochondrial membrane potential in individual living cells. Marked elevations in mitochondria- associated probe fluorescence have been observed in cells engaged in active movement. This approach to the analysis of mitochondrial membrane potential should be of value in future investigations of the control of energy metabolism and energy requirements of specific biological functions at the cellular level. PMID:6783667

  10. Phytosphingosine kills Candida albicans by disrupting its cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Veerman, Enno C I; Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van't Hof, Wim; Nazmi, Kamran; van Marle, Jan; Amerongen, Arie V Nieuw

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of action of phytosphingosine (PHS), a member of the sphingosine family which has candidacidal activity when added externally, was investigated. Previously, it has been reported that the fungicidal activity of PHS is based on the induction of caspase-independent apoptosis. In contrast, we found that addition of PHS causes a direct permeabilization of the plasma membrane of yeast, highlighted by the influx of the membrane probe propidium iodide, and the efflux of small molecules (i.e., adenine nucleotides) as well as large cellular constituents such as proteins. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed that PHS treatment causes severe damage of the plasma membrane of the cell, which seems to have lost its integrity completely. We also found that PHS reverts the azide-induced insensitivity to histatin 5 (Hst5) of Candida albicans. In a previous study, we had found that the decreased sensitivity to Hst5 of energy-depleted cells is due to rigidification of the plasma membrane, which could be reverted by the membrane fluidizer benzyl alcohol. In line with the increased membrane permeabilization and ultrastructural damage, this reversal of the azide-induced insensitivity by PHS also points to a direct interaction between PHS and the cytoplasmic membrane of C. albicans.

  11. Identification of a novel mitochondrial uncoupler that does not depolarize the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Kenwood, Brandon M; Weaver, Janelle L; Bajwa, Amandeep; Poon, Ivan K; Byrne, Frances L; Murrow, Beverley A; Calderone, Joseph A; Huang, Liping; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Tomsig, Jose L; Okabe, Kohki; Lo, Ryan H; Cameron Coleman, G; Columbus, Linda; Yan, Zhen; Saucerman, Jeffrey J; Smith, Jeffrey S; Holmes, Jeffrey W; Lynch, Kevin R; Ravichandran, Kodi S; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Santos, Webster L; Rogers, George W; Okusa, Mark D; Bayliss, Douglas A; Hoehn, Kyle L

    2014-04-01

    Dysregulation of oxidative phosphorylation is associated with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and some of the most prevalent human diseases including obesity, cancer, diabetes, neurodegeneration, and heart disease. Chemical 'mitochondrial uncouplers' are lipophilic weak acids that transport protons into the mitochondrial matrix via a pathway that is independent of ATP synthase, thereby uncoupling nutrient oxidation from ATP production. Mitochondrial uncouplers also lessen the proton motive force across the mitochondrial inner membrane and thereby increase the rate of mitochondrial respiration while decreasing production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mitochondrial uncouplers are valuable chemical tools that enable the measurement of maximal mitochondrial respiration and they have been used therapeutically to decrease mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. However, the most widely used protonophore uncouplers such as carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and 2,4-dinitrophenol have off-target activity at other membranes that lead to a range of undesired effects including plasma membrane depolarization, mitochondrial inhibition, and cytotoxicity. These unwanted properties interfere with the measurement of mitochondrial function and result in a narrow therapeutic index that limits their usefulness in the clinic. To identify new mitochondrial uncouplers that lack off-target activity at the plasma membrane we screened a small molecule chemical library. Herein we report the identification and validation of a novel mitochondrial protonophore uncoupler (2-fluorophenyl){6-[(2-fluorophenyl)amino](1,2,5-oxadiazolo[3,4-e]pyrazin-5-yl)}amine, named BAM15, that does not depolarize the plasma membrane. Compared to FCCP, an uncoupler of equal potency, BAM15 treatment of cultured cells stimulates a higher maximum rate of mitochondrial respiration and is less cytotoxic. Furthermore, BAM15 is bioactive in vivo and dose

  12. Mitochondrial membrane potential: a novel biomarker of oxidative environmental stress.

    PubMed Central

    Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Kreps, Sarah E; Adrie, Christophe; Dall'Ava, Josette; Christiani, David; Polla, Barbara S

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiologic analyses, traditionally based on long-term cohort or case-control studies, provide retrospective causal associations between exposure to a particular environmental stressor and an exposure-related disease end point. Recent research initiatives have propelled a shift toward exploring molecular epidemiology and molecular biological markers (biomarkers) as a means of providing more immediate, quantitative risk assessment of potentially deleterious environmental exposures. We compared, in normal human monocytes isolated from the blood of healthy donors, variations in Hsp70 expression and mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi m) in response to exposure to either tobacco smoke or gamma-irradiation, two models for environmentally mediated oxidant exposure. On the basis of its mechanistic specificity for oxidants and little baseline variation in cells from distinct individuals, we propose that delta psi m represents a selective in vitro and in vivo biomarker for oxidant exposure. delta psi m may be used to gauge risks associated with oxidant-mediated air pollution and radiation. PMID:11882482

  13. Reoxygenation-induced mitochondrial damage is caused by the Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial inner membrane permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Hakoda, S; Takeyama, N

    1998-07-01

    Anoxia/reoxygenation injury of isolated rat liver mitochondria was investigated. During anoxia of up to 60 min, the membrane potential was largely preserved and mitochondrial swelling was not observed. Reoxygenation of anoxic mitochondria rapidly caused swelling, cyclosporin A-sensitive Ca2+ efflux, [14C]sucrose trapping, and loss of the membrane potential along with increased generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). Although pretreatment with catalase and superoxide dismutase completely abolished reoxygenation-induced generation of ROI, mitochondrial damage was not prevented, as indicated by swelling, loss of the membrane potential, a decrease of the ATP content, and cyclosporin A-sensitive Ca2+ efflux. However, addition of the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A or addition of ADP completely prevented the mitochondrial damage induced by reoxygenation. The same protective effect was noted when Ca2+ cycling was prevented, either by chelating Ca2+ with EGTA or by inhibiting Ca2+ reuptake with ruthenium red. These findings indicate that mitochondrial anoxia/reoxygenation injury is caused by the cyclosporin A-sensitive and Ca2+-dependent membrane permeability transition. In contrast, reoxygenation injury does not appear to be triggered by the enhanced production of ROI.

  14. CO2 and HCO3- Permeability of the Rat Liver Mitochondrial Membrane.

    PubMed

    Arias-Hidalgo, Mariela; Hegermann, Jan; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Across the mitochondrial membrane an exceptionally intense exchange of O2 and CO2 occurs. We have asked, 1) whether the CO2 permeability, PM,CO2, of this membrane is also exceptionally high, and 2) whether the mitochondrial membrane is sufficiently permeable to HCO3- to make passage of this ion an alternative pathway for exit of metabolically produced CO2. The two permeabilities were measured using the previously published mass spectrometric 18O exchange technique to study suspensions of mitochondria freshly isolated from rat livers. The mitochondria were functionally and morphologically in excellent condition. The intramitochondrial CA activity was exclusively localized in the matrix. PM,CO2 of the inner mitochondrial membrane was 0.33 (SD ± 0.03) cm/s, which is the highest value reported for any biological membrane, even two times higher than PM,CO2 of the red cell membrane. PM,HCO3- was 2· 10-6 (SD ± 2· 10-6) cm/s and thus extremely low, almost 3 orders of magnitude lower than PM,HCO3- of the red cell membrane. The inner mitochondrial membrane is almost impermeable to HCO3- but extremely permeable to CO2. Since gas channels are absent, this membrane constitutes a unique example of a membrane of very high gas permeability due to its extremely low content of cholesterol. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Biochemical and molecular characterization of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase in Heteropneustes fossilis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Suman; Mishra, Rajnikant

    2016-05-01

    The two predominant forms of arginase, cytosolic Arginase-I and mitochondrial Arginase-II, catalyze hydrolysis of arginine into ornithine and urea. Based on presence of arginase activity in extracts using potassium chloride (KCl), mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase has also been suggested. However, the activity of arginase in fractions obtained after KCl-treatment may be either due to leakage of mitochondrial arginase or release of adhered cytosolic arginase to cell organelles having altered net charge. Therefore, it has been intended to analyse impact of KCl on ultra-structural properties of mitochondria, and biochemical analysis of mitochondrial membrane-bound proteins and arginase of Heteropneustes fossilis. Liver of H. fossilis was used for isolating mitochondria for analysis of ultrastructural properties, preparing cytosolic, mitochondrial, and mitochondrial-membrane bound extracts after treatment of KCl. Extracts were analysed for arginase activity assay, protein profiling through SDS-PAGE and MALDI MS/MS. The KCl-mediated modulation in polypeptides and arginase were also evaluated by PANTHER, MitoProt and IPSORT servers. The effects of KCl on ultra-structural integrity of mitochondria, activity of arginase, modulation on mitochondrial proteins and enzymes including arginase were observed. The 48 kDa polypeptide of mitochondrial fraction, that showed KCl-dependent alteration matched with Myb binding protein and 30 kDa bands resembles to arginase after MALDI MS/MS analysis. Results indicate KCl-dependent ultrastructural changes in mitochondria and release of mitochondrial arginase. The proposed membrane bound mitochondrial arginase could be mitochondrial arginase-II or altered form of cytosolic arginase-I contributing to KCl-induced arginase activity in H. fossilis.

  16. The antimicrobial peptide aurein 1.2 disrupts model membranes via the carpet mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David I; Le Brun, Anton P; Whitwell, Thomas C; Sani, Marc-Antoine; James, Michael; Separovic, Frances

    2012-12-05

    The membrane interactions of the antimicrobial peptide aurein 1.2 were studied using a range of biophysical techniques to determine the location and the mechanism of action in DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) and DMPC/DMPG (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) model membranes that mimic characteristics of eukaryotic and prokaryotic membranes, respectively. Neutron reflectometry and solid-state NMR revealed subtle changes in membrane structure caused by the peptide. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, vesicle dye leakage and atomic force microscopy measurements were used to investigate the global mode of peptide interaction. Aurein 1.2 displayed an enhanced interaction with the anionic DMPC/DMPG membrane while exhibiting primarily a surface interaction with both types of model membranes, which led to bilayer disruption and membrane lysis. The antimicrobial peptide interaction is consistent with the carpet mechanism for aurein 1.2 with discrete structural changes depending on the type of phospholipid membrane.

  17. Toward high-content screening of mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in living cells.

    PubMed

    Iannetti, Eligio F; Willems, Peter H G M; Pellegrini, Mina; Beyrath, Julien; Smeitink, Jan A M; Blanchet, Lionel; Koopman, Werner J H

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are double membrane organelles involved in various key cellular processes. Governed by dedicated protein machinery, mitochondria move and continuously fuse and divide. These "mitochondrial dynamics" are bi-directionally linked to mitochondrial and cell functional state in space and time. Due to the action of the electron transport chain (ETC), the mitochondrial inner membrane displays a inside-negative membrane potential (Δψ). The latter is considered a functional readout of mitochondrial "health" and required to sustain normal mitochondrial ATP production and mitochondrial fusion. During the last decade, live-cell microscopy strategies were developed for simultaneous quantification of Δψ and mitochondrial morphology. This revealed that ETC dysfunction, changes in Δψ and aberrations in mitochondrial structure often occur in parallel, suggesting they are linked potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we discuss how combining high-content and high-throughput strategies can be used for analysis of genetic and/or drug-induced effects at the level of individual organelles, cells and cell populations. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  18. Mitochondrial membrane potential probes and the proton gradient: a practical usage guide.

    PubMed

    Perry, Seth W; Norman, John P; Barbieri, Justin; Brown, Edward B; Gelbard, Harris A

    2011-02-01

    Fluorescent probes for monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential are frequently used for assessing mitochondrial function, particularly in the context of cell fate determination in biological and biomedical research. However, valid interpretation of results obtained with such probes requires careful consideration of numerous controls, as well as possible effects of non-protonic charges on dye behavior. In this context, we provide an overview of some of the important technical considerations, controls, and parallel complementary assays that can be employed to help ensure appropriate interpretation of results, thus providing a practical usage guide for monitoring mitochondrial membrane potentials with cationic probes. In total, this review will help illustrate both the strengths and potential pitfalls of common mitochondrial membrane potential dyes, and highlight best-usage approaches for their efficacious application in life sciences research.

  19. Preliminary crystallographic studies of yeast mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein Tim44p

    SciTech Connect

    Josyula, Ratnakar; Jin, Zhongmin; McCombs, Deborah; DeLucas, Lawrence; Sha, Bingdong

    2006-02-01

    Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p has been crystallized. Protein translocations across mitochondrial membranes play critical roles in mitochondrion biogenesis. Protein transport from the cell cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix is carried out by the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex and the translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complexes. Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein and a major component of the TIM23 translocon. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 3.2 Å using a synchrotron X-ray source and belong to space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.25, c = 77.83 Å. There is one Tim44p molecule in one asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 43%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way.

  20. Disrupting mitochondrial-nuclear coevolution affects OXPHOS complex I integrity and impacts human health.

    PubMed

    Gershoni, Moran; Levin, Liron; Ovadia, Ofer; Toiw, Yasmin; Shani, Naama; Dadon, Sara; Barzilai, Nir; Bergman, Aviv; Atzmon, Gil; Wainstein, Julio; Tsur, Anat; Nijtmans, Leo; Glaser, Benjamin; Mishmar, Dan

    2014-09-22

    The mutation rate of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is higher by an order of magnitude as compared with the nuclear genome, enforces tight mitonuclear coevolution to maintain mitochondrial activities. Interruption of such coevolution plays a role in interpopulation hybrid breakdown, speciation events, and disease susceptibility. Previously, we found an elevated amino acid replacement rate and positive selection in the nuclear DNA-encoded oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex I subunit NDUFC2, a phenomenon important for the direct interaction of NDUFC2 with the mtDNA-encoded complex I subunit ND4. This finding underlines the importance of mitonuclear coevolution to physical interactions between mtDNA and nuclear DNA-encoded factors. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether this interaction is important for the stability and activity of complex I. Here, we show that siRNA silencing of NDUFC2 reduced growth of human D-407 retinal pigment epithelial cells, significantly diminished mitochondrial membrane potential, and interfered with complex I integrity. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis of a positively selected amino acid in NDUFC2 significantly interfered with the interaction of NDUFC2 with its mtDNA-encoded partner ND4. Finally, we show that a genotype combination involving this amino acid (NDUFC2 residue 46) and the mtDNA haplogroup HV likely altered susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in Ashkenazi Jews. Therefore, mitonuclear coevolution is important for maintaining mitonuclear factor interactions, OXPHOS, and for human health. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. Omega-3 supplementation alters mitochondrial membrane composition and respiration kinetics in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Herbst, E A F; Paglialunga, S; Gerling, C; Whitfield, J; Mukai, K; Chabowski, A; Heigenhauser, G J F; Spriet, L L; Holloway, G P

    2014-03-15

    Studies have shown increased incorporation of omega-3 fatty acids into whole skeletal muscle following supplementation, although little has been done to investigate the potential impact on the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes and the functional consequences on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Therefore, we supplemented young healthy male subjects (n = 18) with fish oils [2 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 1 g docosahexanoic acid (DHA) per day] for 12 weeks and skeletal muscle biopsies were taken prior to (Pre) and following (Post) supplementation for the analysis of mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition and various assessments of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Total EPA and DHA content in mitochondrial membranes increased (P < 0.05) ∼450 and ∼320%, respectively, and displaced some omega-6 species in several phospholipid populations. Mitochondrial respiration, determined in permeabilized muscle fibres, demonstrated no change in maximal substrate-supported respiration, or in the sensitivity (apparent Km) and maximal capacity for pyruvate-supported respiration. In contrast, mitochondrial responses during ADP titrations demonstrated an enhanced ADP sensitivity (decreased apparent Km) that was independent of the creatine kinase shuttle. As the content of ANT1, ANT2, and subunits of the electron transport chain were unaltered by supplementation, these data suggest that prolonged omega-3 intake improves ADP kinetics in human skeletal muscle mitochondria through alterations in membrane structure and/or post-translational modification of ATP synthase and ANT isoforms. Omega-3 supplementation also increased the capacity for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species emission without altering the content of oxidative products, suggesting the absence of oxidative damage. The current data strongly emphasize a role for omega-3s in reorganizing the composition of mitochondrial membranes while promoting improvements in ADP sensitivity.

  2. Superresolution Imaging Identifies That Conventional Trafficking Pathways Are Not Essential for Endoplasmic Reticulum to Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein Transport.

    PubMed

    Salka, Kyle; Bhuvanendran, Shivaprasad; Wilson, Kassandra; Bozidis, Petros; Mehta, Mansi; Rainey, Kristin; Sesaki, Hiromi; Patterson, George H; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M

    2017-12-01

    Most nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins traffic from the cytosol to mitochondria. Some of these proteins localize at mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM), where mitochondria are closely apposed with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that the human cytomegalovirus signal-anchored protein known as viral mitochondria-localized inhibitor of apoptosis (vMIA) traffics from the ER to mitochondria and clusters at the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM). Here, we have examined the host pathways by which vMIA traffics from the ER to mitochondria and clusters at the OMM. By disruption of phosphofurin acidic cluster sorting protein 2 (PACS-2), mitofusins (Mfn1/2), and dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1), we find these conventional pathways for ER to the mitochondria trafficking are dispensable for vMIA trafficking to OMM. Instead, mutations in vMIA that change its hydrophobicity alter its trafficking to mitochondria. Superresolution imaging showed that PACS-2- and Mfn-mediated membrane apposition or hydrophobic interactions alter vMIA's ability to organize in nanoscale clusters at the OMM. This shows that signal-anchored MAM proteins can make use of hydrophobic interactions independently of conventional ER-mitochondria pathways to traffic from the ER to mitochondria. Further, vMIA hydrophobic interactions and ER-mitochondria contacts facilitate proper organization of vMIA on the OMM.

  3. The role of the mitochondrial ribosome in human disease: searching for mutations in 12S mitochondrial rRNA with high disruptive potential

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul M.; Elson, Joanna L.; Greaves, Laura C.; Wortmann, Saskia B.; Rodenburg, Richard J.T.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M.A.; Taylor, Robert W.; Vila-Sanjurjo, Antón

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of mitochondrial DNA are linked to many human diseases. Despite the identification of a large number of variants in the mitochondrially encoded rRNA (mt-rRNA) genes, the evidence supporting their pathogenicity is, at best, circumstantial. Establishing the pathogenicity of these variations is of major diagnostic importance. Here, we aim to estimate the disruptive effect of mt-rRNA variations on the function of the mitochondrial ribosome. In the absence of direct biochemical methods to study the effect of mt-rRNA variations, we relied on the universal conservation of the rRNA fold to infer their disruptive potential. Our method, named heterologous inferential analysis or HIA, combines conservational information with functional and structural data obtained from heterologous ribosomal sources. Thus, HIA's predictive power is superior to the traditional reliance on simple conservation indexes. By using HIA, we have been able to evaluate the disruptive potential for a subset of uncharacterized 12S mt-rRNA variations. Our analysis revealed the existence of variations in the rRNA component of the human mitoribosome with different degrees of disruptive power. In cases where sufficient information regarding the genetic and pathological manifestation of the mitochondrial phenotype is available, HIA data can be used to predict the pathogenicity of mt-rRNA mutations. In other cases, HIA analysis will allow the prioritization of variants for additional investigation. Eventually, HIA-inspired analysis of potentially pathogenic mt-rRNA variations, in the context of a scoring system specifically designed for these variants, could lead to a powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:24092330

  4. Astrocytic mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization following extended oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Korenić, Andrej; Boltze, Johannes; Deten, Alexander; Peters, Myriam; Andjus, Pavle; Radenović, Lidija

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes can tolerate longer periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) as compared to neurons. The reasons for this reduced vulnerability are not well understood. Particularly, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) in astrocytes, an indicator of the cellular redox state, have not been investigated during reperfusion after extended OGD exposure. Here, we subjected primary mouse astrocytes to glucose deprivation (GD), OGD and combinations of both conditions varying in duration and sequence. Changes in Δψ(m), visualized by change in the fluorescence of JC-1, were investigated within one hour after reconstitution of oxygen and glucose supply, intended to model in vivo reperfusion. In all experiments, astrocytes showed resilience to extended periods of OGD, which had little effect on Δψ(m) during reperfusion, whereas GD caused a robust Δψ(m) negativation. In case no Δψ(m) negativation was observed after OGD, subsequent chemical oxygen deprivation (OD) induced by sodium azide caused depolarization, which, however, was significantly delayed as compared to normoxic group. When GD preceded OD for 12 h, Δψ(m) hyperpolarization was induced by both GD and subsequent OD, but significant interaction between these conditions was not detected. However, when GD was extended to 48 h preceding OGD, hyperpolarization enhanced during reperfusion. This implicates synergistic effects of both conditions in that sequence. These findings provide novel information regarding the role of the two main substrates of electron transport chain (glucose and oxygen) and their hyperpolarizing effect on Δψ(m) during substrate deprivation, thus shedding new light on mechanisms of astrocyte resilience to prolonged ischemic injury.

  5. Increased androgen levels in rats impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongdong; Wang, Xiaping; Zhu, Yunxia; Chen, Fang; Sun, Yujie; Han, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Although insulin resistance is recognized to contribute to the reproductive and metabolic phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), pancreatic beta cell dysfunction plays an essential role in the progression from PCOS to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the role of insulin secretory abnormalities in PCOS has received little attention. In addition, the precise changes in beta cells and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we therefore attempted to elucidate potential mechanisms involved in beta cell alterations in a rat model of PCOS. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was measured in islets isolated from DHT-treated and control rats. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR), ATP production, and mitochondrial copy number were assayed to evaluate mitochondrial function. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is significantly decreased in islets from DHT-treated rats. On the other hand, significant reductions are observed in the expression levels of several key genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and in mitochondrial OCR and ATP production in DHT-treated rat islets. Meanwhile, we found that androgens can directly impair beta cell function by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro in an androgen receptor dependent manner. For the first time, our study demonstrates that increased androgens in female rats can impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion partly through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function. This work has significance for hyperandrogenic women with PCOS: excess activation of the androgen receptor by androgens may provoke beta cell dysfunction via mitochondrial dysfunction.

  6. Phenotypes of gene disruptants in relation to a putative mitochondrial malate-citrate shuttle protein in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Ueda, Yuka; Hattori, Takasumi

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial citrate transport protein (CTP) functions as a malate-citrate shuttle catalyzing the exchange of citrate plus a proton for malate between mitochondria and cytosol across the inner mitochondrial membrane in higher eukaryotic organisms. In this study, for functional analysis, we cloned the gene encoding putative CTP (ctpA) of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L. The gene ctpA encodes a polypeptide consisting 296 amino acids conserved active residues required for citrate transport function. Only in early-log phase, the ctpA disruptant DCTPA-1 showed growth delay, and the amount of citric acid produced by strain DCTPA-1 was smaller than that by parental strain WU-2223L. These results indicate that the CTPA affects growth and thereby citric acid metabolism of A. niger changes, especially in early-log phase, but not citric acid-producing period. This is the first report showing that disruption of ctpA causes changes of phenotypes in relation to citric acid production in A. niger.

  7. Metaxin deficiency alters mitochondrial membrane permeability and leads to resistance to TNF-induced cell killing.

    PubMed

    Ono, Koh; Wang, Xiaofei; Kim, Sung Ouk; Armstrong, Lucas C; Bornstein, Paul; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-02-01

    Metaxin, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, is critical for TNF-induced cell death in L929 cells. Its deficiency, caused by retroviral insertion-mediated mutagenesis, renders L929 cells resistance to TNF killing. In this study, we further characterized metaxin deficiency-caused TNF resistance in parallel with Bcl-X(L) overexpression-mediated death resistance. We did not find obvious change in mitochondria membrane potential in metaxin-deficient (Met(mut)) and Bcl-X(L)-overexpressing cells, but we did find an increase in the release rate of the mitochondrial membrane potential probe rhodamine 123 (Rh123) that was preloaded into mitochondria. In addition, overexpression of a function-interfering mutant of metaxin (MetaΔTM/C) or Bcl-X(L) in MCF-7.3.28 cells also resulted in an acquired resistance to TNF killing and a faster rate of Rh123 release, indicating a close correlation between TNF resistance and higher rates of the dye release from the mitochondria. The release of Rh123 can be controlled by the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (PT) pore, as targeting an inner membrane component of the PT pore by cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibited Rh123 release. However, metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression apparently affect Rh123 release from a site(s) different from that of CsA, as CsA can overcome their effect. Though both metaxin and Bcl-X(L) appear to function on the outer mitochondrial membrane, they do not interact with each other. They may use different mechanisms to increase the permeability of Rh123, since previous studies have suggested that metaxin may influence certain outer membrane porins while Bcl-X(L) may form pores on the outer membrane. The alteration of the mitochondrial outer membrane properties by metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression, as indicated by a quicker Rh123 release, may be helpful in maintaining mitochondrial integrity.

  8. Increased mitochondrial ROS formation by acetaminophen in human hepatic cells is associated with gene expression changes suggesting disruption of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Briedé, Jacob J; Jennen, Danyel G J; Van Summeren, Anke; Saritas-Brauers, Karen; Schaart, Gert; Kleinjans, Jos C S; de Kok, Theo M C M

    2015-04-16

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdosage results in hepatotoxicity, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still not completely understood. In the current study, we focused on mitochondrial-specific oxidative liver injury induced by APAP exposure. Owning to genetic polymorphisms in the CYP2E1 gene or varying inducibility by xenobiotics, the CYP2E1 mRNA level and protein activity vary extensively among individuals. As CYP2E1 is a known ROS generating enzyme, we chose HepG2 to minimize CYP2E1-induced ROS formation, which will help us better understand the APAP induced mitochondrial-specific hepatotoxicity in a subpopulation with low CYP2E1 activity. HepG2 cells were exposed to a low and toxic dose (0.5 and 10mM) of APAP and analyzed at four time points for genome-wide gene expression. Mitochondria were isolated and electron spin resonance spectroscopy was performed to measure the formation of mitochondrial ROS. The yield of ATP was measured to confirm the impact of the toxic dose of APAP on cellular energy production. Our results indicate that 10mM APAP significantly influences the expression of mitochondrial protein-encoding genes in association with an increase in mitochondrial ROS formation. Additionally, 10mM APAP affects the expression of genes encoding the subunits of electron transport chain (ETC) complexes, which may alter normal mitochondrial functions by disrupting the assembly, stability, and structural integrity of ETC complexes, leading to a measurable depletion of ATP, and cell death. The expression of mitochondrium-specific antioxidant enzyme, SOD2, is reduced which may limit the ROS scavenging ability and cause imbalance of the mitochondrial ROS homeostasis. Overall, transcriptome analysis reveals the molecular processes involved in the observed APAP-induced increase of mitochondrial ROS formation and the associated APAP-induced oxidative stress.

  9. Decavanadate induces mitochondrial membrane depolarization and inhibits oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Soares, S S; Gutiérrez-Merino, C; Aureliano, M

    2007-05-01

    Decavanadate induced rat liver mitochondrial depolarization at very low concentrations, half-depolarization with 39 nM decavanadate, while it was needed a 130-fold higher concentration of monomeric vanadate (5 microM) to induce the same effect. Decavanadate also inhibits mitochondrial repolarization induced by reduced glutathione in vitro, with an inhibition constant of 1 microM, whereas no effect was observed up to 100 microM of monomeric vanadate. The oxygen consumption by mitochondria is also inhibited by lower decavanadate than monomeric vanadate concentrations, i.e. 50% inhibition is attained with 99 M decavanadate and 10 microM monomeric vanadate. Thus, decavanadate is stronger as mitochondrial depolarization agent than as inhibitor of mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Up to 5 microM, decavanadate does not alter mitochondrial NADH levels nor inhibit neither F(O)F(1)-ATPase nor cytochrome c oxidase activity, but it induces changes in the redox steady-state of mitochondrial b-type cytochromes (complex III). NMR spectra showed that decameric vanadate is the predominant vanadate species in decavanadate solutions. It is concluded that decavanadate is much more potent mitochondrial depolarization agent and a more potent inhibitor of mitochondrial oxygen consumption than monomeric vanadate, pointing out the importance to take into account the contribution of higher oligomeric species of vanadium for the biological effects of vanadate solutions.

  10. The Role of Cationic Group Structure in Membrane Binding and Disruption by Amphiphilic Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Edmund F.; Lee, Dong-Kuk; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    Cationic, amphiphilic polymers are currently being used as antimicrobial agents which disrupt biomembranes, although their mechanism(s) remain poorly understood. Herein, membrane association and disruption by amphiphilic polymers bearing primary, tertiary, or quaternary ammonium salt groups reveals the role of cationic group structure in the polymer-membrane interaction. The dissociation constants of polymers to liposomes of POPC were obtained by a fluorometric assay, exploiting the environmental sensitivity of dansyl moieties in the polymer end groups. Dye leakage from liposomes and solid-state NMR provided further insights into the polymer-induced membrane disruption. Interestingly, the polymers with primary amine groups induced reorganization of the bilayer structure to align lipid headgroups perpendicular to the membrane. The results showed that polymers bearing primary amines exceed the tertiary and quaternary ammonium counterparts in membrane binding and disrupting abilities. This is likely due to enhanced complexation of primary amines to the phosphate groups in the lipids, through a combination of hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions. PMID:21171655

  11. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency disrupts endocytosis, neuritogenesis, and mitochondrial protein pathways in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    English, Jane A.; Harauma, Akiko; Föcking, Melanie; Wynne, Kieran; Scaife, Caitriona; Cagney, Gerard; Moriguchi, Toru; Cotter, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid (n-3 FA) deficiency is an environmental risk factor for schizophrenia, yet characterization of the consequences of deficiency at the protein level in the brain is limited. We aimed to identify the protein pathways disrupted as a consequence of chronic n-3 deficiency in the hippocampus of mice. Fatty acid analysis of the hippocampus following chronic dietary deficiency revealed a 3-fold decrease (p < 0.001) in n-3 FA levels. Label free LC-MS/MS analysis identified and profiled 1008 proteins, of which 114 were observed to be differentially expressed between n-3 deficient and control groups (n = 8 per group). The cellular processes that were most implicated were neuritogenesis, endocytosis, and exocytosis, while specific protein pathways that were most significantly dysregulated were mitochondrial dysfunction and clathrin mediated endocytosis (CME). In order to characterize whether these processes and pathways are ones influenced by antipsychotic medication, we used LC-MS/MS to test the differential expression of these 114 proteins in the hippocampus of mice chronically treated with the antipsychotic agent haloperidol. We observed 23 of the 114 proteins to be differentially expressed, 17 of which were altered in the opposite direction to that observed following n-3 deficiency. Overall, our findings point to disturbed synaptic function, neuritogenesis, and mitochondrial function as a consequence of dietary deficiency in n-3 FA. This study greatly aids our understanding of the molecular mechanism by which n-3 deficiency impairs normal brain function, and provides clues as to how n-3 FA exert their therapeutic effect in early psychosis. PMID:24194745

  12. Membrane raft disruption promotes axonogenesis in n2a neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Petro, Kimberly A; Schengrund, Cara-Lynne

    2009-01-01

    Membrane rafts are discrete microdomains found in cell membranes that contain cholesterol and glycosphingolipids such as gangliosides. As cholesterol is a major component of membrane rafts, its sequestration by the polyene filipin can be used to disrupt them. In previous work we observed that membrane raft disruption by filipin treatment of murine neuroblastoma N2a cells led to changes in expression of cell processes. In this study, we determined the type of process formation induced by filipin treatment as well as whether their expression was accompanied by changes in ganglioside content or subcellular distribution. The results indicate that the processes formed were axonal in nature and their expression was accompanied by changes in both ganglioside content as well as the subcellular localization of GM1.

  13. Cytosolic BNIP3 Dimer Interacts with Mitochondrial BAX Forming Heterodimers in the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane under Basal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B; Esfeld, Sonja; Rudi, Katharina; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Klare, Johann P; Rassaf, Tienush

    2017-03-23

    The primary function of mitochondria is energy production, a task of particular importance especially for cells with a high energy demand like cardiomyocytes. The B-cell lymphoma (BCL-2) family member BCL-2 adenovirus E1B 19 kDa-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) is linked to mitochondrial targeting after homodimerization, where it functions in inner membrane depolarization and permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) mediating cell death. We investigated the basal distribution of cardiac BNIP3 in vivo and its physical interaction with the pro-death protein BCL2 associated X, apoptosis regulator (BAX) and with mitochondria using immunoblot analysis, co-immunoprecipitation, and continuous wave and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques. We found that BNIP3 is present as a dimer in the cytosol and in the outer membrane of cardiac mitochondria under basal conditions. It forms disulfide-bridged, but mainly non-covalent dimers in the cytosol. Heterodimers with BAX are formed exclusively in the MOM. Furthermore, our results suggest that BNIP3 interacts with the MOM directly via mitochondrial BAX. However, the physical interactions with BAX and the MOM did not affect the membrane potential and cell viability. These findings suggest that another stimulus other than the mere existence of the BNIP3/BAX dimer in the MOM is required to promote BNIP3 cell-death activity; this could be a potential disturbance of the BNIP3 distribution homeostasis, namely in the direction of the mitochondria.

  14. Mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system: A central player in membrane shaping and crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Wollweber, Florian; von der Malsburg, Karina; van der Laan, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Mitochondria are multifunctional metabolic factories and integrative signaling organelles of eukaryotic cells. The structural basis for their numerous functions is a complex and dynamic double-membrane architecture. The outer membrane connects mitochondria to the cytosol and other organelles. The inner membrane is composed of a boundary region and highly folded cristae membranes. The evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) connects the two inner membrane domains via formation and stabilization of crista junction structures. Moreover, MICOS establishes contact sites between inner and outer mitochondrial membranes by interacting with outer membrane protein complexes. MICOS deficiency leads to a grossly altered inner membrane architecture resulting in far-reaching functional perturbations in mitochondria. Consequently, mutations affecting the function of MICOS are responsible for a diverse spectrum of human diseases. In this article, we summarize recent insights and concepts on the role of MICOS in the organization of mitochondrial membranes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Contact Sites edited by Christian Ungermann and Benoit Kornmann. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein MDI promotes local protein synthesis and mtDNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Xu, Hong

    2016-05-17

    Early embryonic development features rapid nuclear DNA replication cycles, but lacks mtDNA replication. To meet the high-energy demands of embryogenesis, mature oocytes are furnished with vast amounts of mitochondria and mtDNA However, the cellular machinery driving massive mtDNA replication in ovaries remains unknown. Here, we describe a Drosophila AKAP protein, MDI that recruits a translation stimulator, La-related protein (Larp), to the mitochondrial outer membrane in ovaries. The MDI-Larp complex promotes the synthesis of a subset of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins by cytosolic ribosomes on the mitochondrial surface. MDI-Larp's targets include mtDNA replication factors, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and electron-transport chain subunits. Lack of MDI abolishes mtDNA replication in ovaries, which leads to mtDNA deficiency in mature eggs. Targeting Larp to the mitochondrial outer membrane independently of MDI restores local protein synthesis and rescues the phenotypes of mdi mutant flies. Our work suggests that a selective translational boost by the MDI-Larp complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane might be essential for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial biogenesis during oogenesis. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Palmitoleic acid induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Eri; Uchida, Masataka; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Miyachi, Motohiko; Yamaguchi, Hidetaka; Nagami, Kuniatsu; Utsumi, Kozo; Yano, Hiromi

    Although palmitoleic acid (C16:1) is associated with arrhythmias, and increases in an age-dependent matter, the effects of L-carnitine, which is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria, are unclear. It has been postulated that L-carnitine may attenuate palmitate (C16:0)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the activity of L-carnitine in the prevention of the palmitoleic acid-induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and cytochrome c release using isolated cardiac mitochondria from rats. Palmitoleoyl-CoA-induced mitochondrial respiration was not accelerated by L-carnitine treatment, and this respiration was slightly inhibited by oligomycin, which is an inhibitor of ATP synthase. Despite pretreatment with L-carnitine, the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased and mitochondrial swelling was induced by palmitoleoyl-CoA. In the presence of a combination of L-carnitine and tiron, a free radical scavenger, there was attenuated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release following palmitoleoyl-CoA treatment. We concluded that palmitoleic acid, but not palmitate, induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

  17. The fusogenic lipid phosphatidic acid promotes the biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane protein Ugo1

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael; Taskin, Asli A.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Guan, Xue Li; Prinz, Claudia; Opalińska, Magdalena; Zorzin, Carina; van der Laan, Martin; Wenk, Markus R.; Schubert, Rolf; Wiedemann, Nils; Holzer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Import and assembly of mitochondrial proteins depend on a complex interplay of proteinaceous translocation machineries. The role of lipids in this process has been studied only marginally and so far no direct role for a specific lipid in mitochondrial protein biogenesis has been shown. Here we analyzed a potential role of phosphatidic acid (PA) in biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vivo remodeling of the mitochondrial lipid composition by lithocholic acid treatment or by ablation of the lipid transport protein Ups1, both leading to an increase of mitochondrial PA levels, specifically stimulated the biogenesis of the outer membrane protein Ugo1, a component of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. We reconstituted the import and assembly pathway of Ugo1 in protein-free liposomes, mimicking the outer membrane phospholipid composition, and found a direct dependency of Ugo1 biogenesis on PA. Thus, PA represents the first lipid that is directly involved in the biogenesis pathway of a mitochondrial membrane protein. PMID:26347140

  18. The presequence pathway is involved in protein sorting to the mitochondrial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Opaliński, Łukasz; Schuler, Max-Hinderk; Ellenrieder, Lars; Ieva, Raffaele; Böttinger, Lena; Qiu, Jian; van der Laan, Martin; Wiedemann, Nils; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains integral α-helical and β-barrel proteins that are imported from the cytosol. The machineries importing β-barrel proteins have been identified, however, different views exist on the import of α-helical proteins. It has been reported that the biogenesis of Om45, the most abundant signal-anchored protein, does not depend on proteinaceous components, but involves direct insertion into the outer membrane. We show that import of Om45 occurs via the translocase of the outer membrane and the presequence translocase of the inner membrane. Assembly of Om45 in the outer membrane involves the MIM machinery. Om45 thus follows a new mitochondrial biogenesis pathway that uses elements of the presequence import pathway to direct a protein to the outer membrane. PMID:24781695

  19. Loss of Prohibitin Membrane Scaffolds Impairs Mitochondrial Architecture and Leads to Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Merkwirth, Carsten; Morbin, Michela; Brönneke, Hella S.; Jordan, Sabine D.; Rugarli, Elena I.; Langer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Fusion and fission of mitochondria maintain the functional integrity of mitochondria and protect against neurodegeneration, but how mitochondrial dysfunctions trigger neuronal loss remains ill-defined. Prohibitins form large ring complexes in the inner membrane that are composed of PHB1 and PHB2 subunits and are thought to function as membrane scaffolds. In Caenorhabditis elegans, prohibitin genes affect aging by moderating fat metabolism and energy production. Knockdown experiments in mammalian cells link the function of prohibitins to membrane fusion, as they were found to stabilize the dynamin-like GTPase OPA1 (optic atrophy 1), which mediates mitochondrial inner membrane fusion and cristae morphogenesis. Mutations in OPA1 are associated with dominant optic atrophy characterized by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells, highlighting the importance of OPA1 function in neurons. Here, we show that neuron-specific inactivation of Phb2 in the mouse forebrain causes extensive neurodegeneration associated with behavioral impairments and cognitive deficiencies. We observe early onset tau hyperphosphorylation and filament formation in the hippocampus, demonstrating a direct link between mitochondrial defects and tau pathology. Loss of PHB2 impairs the stability of OPA1, affects mitochondrial ultrastructure, and induces the perinuclear clustering of mitochondria in hippocampal neurons. A destabilization of the mitochondrial genome and respiratory deficiencies manifest in aged neurons only, while the appearance of mitochondrial morphology defects correlates with tau hyperphosphorylation in the absence of PHB2. These results establish an essential role of prohibitin complexes for neuronal survival in vivo and demonstrate that OPA1 stability, mitochondrial fusion, and the maintenance of the mitochondrial genome in neurons depend on these scaffolding proteins. Moreover, our findings establish prohibitin-deficient mice as a novel genetic model for tau pathologies

  20. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Baccouch, Riadh; Modine, Thomas; Preau, Sebastien; Zannis, Konstantinos; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve; Neviere, Remi

    2010-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 muM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dt{sub max} of 105 +- 8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49 +- 7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0 +- 0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2 +- 0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24 +- 1 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14 +- 3 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

  1. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Baccouch, Riadh; Modine, Thomas; Preau, Sebastien; Zannis, Konstantinos; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve; Neviere, Remi

    2010-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 microM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dt(max) of 105+/-8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49+/-7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; p<0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0+/-0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2+/-0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; p<0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24+/-1 microM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14+/-3 microM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; p<0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Air Bubble Contact with Endothelial Cells Causes a Calcium-Independent Loss in Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewski, Peter; Kandel, Judith; Eckmann, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Gas microembolism remains a serious risk associated with surgical procedures and decompression. Despite this, the signaling consequences of air bubbles in the vasculature are poorly understood and there is a lack of pharmacological therapies available. Here, we investigate the mitochondrial consequences of air bubble contact with endothelial cells. Methods and Results Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were loaded with an intracellular calcium indicator (Fluo-4) and either a mitochondrial calcium indicator (X-Rhod-1) or mitochondrial membrane potential indicator (TMRM). Contact with 50–150 µm air bubbles induced concurrent rises in intracellular and mitochondrial calcium, followed by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Pre-treating cells with 1 µmol/L ruthenium red, a TRPV family calcium channel blocker, did not protect cells from the mitochondrial depolarization, despite blocking the intracellular calcium response. Mitigating the interactions between the air-liquid interface and the endothelial surface layer with 5% BSA or 0.1% Pluronic F-127 prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Finally, inhibiting protein kinase C-α (PKCα), with 5 µmol/L Gö6976, protected cells from mitochondrial depolarization, but did not affect the intracellular calcium response. Conclusions Our results indicate that air bubble contact with endothelial cells activates a novel, calcium-independent, PKCα-dependent signaling pathway, which results in mitochondrial depolarization. As a result, mitochondrial dysfunction is likely to be a key contributor to the pathophysiology of gas embolism injury. Further, this connection between the endothelial surface layer and endothelial mitochondria may also play an important role in vascular homeostasis and disease. PMID:23091614

  3. Characterization of the mitochondrial inner membrane protein translocator Tim17 from Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Ujjal K.; Peprah, Emmanuel; Williams, Shuntae; Walker, Robert; Saha, Lipi; Chaudhuri, Minu

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein translocation machinery in the kinetoplastid parasites, like Trypanosoma brucei, has been characterized poorly. In T. brucei genome data base, one homolog for a protein translocator of mitochondrial inner membrane (Tim) has been found, which is closely related to Tim17 from other species. The T. brucei Tim17 (TbTim17) has a molecular mass 16.2 kDa and it possesses four characteristic transmembrane domains. The protein is localized in the mitochondrial inner membrane. The level of TbTim17 protein is 6–7 fold higher in the procyclic form that has a fully active mitochondrion, than in the mammalian bloodstream form of T. brucei, where many of the mitochondrial activities are suppressed. Knockdown of TbTim17 expression by RNAi caused a cessation of cell growth in the procyclic form and reduced growth rate in the bloodstream form. Depletion of TbTim17 decreased mitochondrial membrane potential more in the procyclic than bloodstream form. However, TbTim17 knockdown reduced the expression level of several nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in both the forms. Furthermore, import of presequence containing nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins was significantly reduced in TbTim17 depleted mitochondria of the procyclic as well as the bloodstream form, confirming that TbTim17 is critical for mitochondrial protein import in both developmental forms. Together, these show that TbTim17 is the translocator of nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins and its expression is regulated according to mitochondrial activities in T. brucei. PMID:18325611

  4. Air bubble contact with endothelial cells causes a calcium-independent loss in mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Sobolewski, Peter; Kandel, Judith; Eckmann, David M

    2012-01-01

    Gas microembolism remains a serious risk associated with surgical procedures and decompression. Despite this, the signaling consequences of air bubbles in the vasculature are poorly understood and there is a lack of pharmacological therapies available. Here, we investigate the mitochondrial consequences of air bubble contact with endothelial cells. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were loaded with an intracellular calcium indicator (Fluo-4) and either a mitochondrial calcium indicator (X-Rhod-1) or mitochondrial membrane potential indicator (TMRM). Contact with 50-150 µm air bubbles induced concurrent rises in intracellular and mitochondrial calcium, followed by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Pre-treating cells with 1 µmol/L ruthenium red, a TRPV family calcium channel blocker, did not protect cells from the mitochondrial depolarization, despite blocking the intracellular calcium response. Mitigating the interactions between the air-liquid interface and the endothelial surface layer with 5% BSA or 0.1% Pluronic F-127 prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Finally, inhibiting protein kinase C-α (PKCα), with 5 µmol/L Gö6976, protected cells from mitochondrial depolarization, but did not affect the intracellular calcium response. Our results indicate that air bubble contact with endothelial cells activates a novel, calcium-independent, PKCα-dependent signaling pathway, which results in mitochondrial depolarization. As a result, mitochondrial dysfunction is likely to be a key contributor to the pathophysiology of gas embolism injury. Further, this connection between the endothelial surface layer and endothelial mitochondria may also play an important role in vascular homeostasis and disease.

  5. Biophysical significance of the inner mitochondrial membrane structure on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Maurer, Laura L; Lu, Wei; Philbert, Martin A; Sastry, Ann Marie

    2013-12-01

    The available literature supports the hypothesis that the morphology of the inner mitochondrial membrane is regulated by different energy states, that the three-dimensional morphology of cristae is dynamic, and that both are related to biochemical function. Examination of the correlation between the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) structure and mitochondrial energetic function is critical to an understanding of the links between mesoscale morphology and function in progressive mitochondrial dysfunction such as aging, neurodegeneration, and disease. To investigate this relationship, we develop a model to examine the effects of three-dimensional IMM morphology on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria. The two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method is used to simulate mitochondrial electric potential and proton concentration distribution. This simulation model demonstrates that the proton motive force (Δp) produced on the membranes of cristae can be higher than that on the inner boundary membrane. The model also shows that high proton concentration in cristae can be induced by the morphology-dependent electric potential gradient along the outer side of the IMM. Furthermore, simulation results show that a high Δp is induced by the large surface-to-volume ratio of an individual crista, whereas a high capacity for ATP synthesis can primarily be achieved by increasing the surface area of an individual crista. The mathematical model presented here provides compelling support for the idea that morphology at the mesoscale is a significant driver of mitochondrial function.

  6. Biophysical significance of the inner mitochondrial membrane structure on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Maurer, Laura L.; Lu, Wei; Philbert, Martin A.; Sastry, Ann Marie

    2013-12-01

    The available literature supports the hypothesis that the morphology of the inner mitochondrial membrane is regulated by different energy states, that the three-dimensional morphology of cristae is dynamic, and that both are related to biochemical function. Examination of the correlation between the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) structure and mitochondrial energetic function is critical to an understanding of the links between mesoscale morphology and function in progressive mitochondrial dysfunction such as aging, neurodegeneration, and disease. To investigate this relationship, we develop a model to examine the effects of three-dimensional IMM morphology on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria. The two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method is used to simulate mitochondrial electric potential and proton concentration distribution. This simulation model demonstrates that the proton motive force (Δp) produced on the membranes of cristae can be higher than that on the inner boundary membrane. The model also shows that high proton concentration in cristae can be induced by the morphology-dependent electric potential gradient along the outer side of the IMM. Furthermore, simulation results show that a high Δp is induced by the large surface-to-volume ratio of an individual crista, whereas a high capacity for ATP synthesis can primarily be achieved by increasing the surface area of an individual crista. The mathematical model presented here provides compelling support for the idea that morphology at the mesoscale is a significant driver of mitochondrial function.

  7. Liposomal membrane disruption by means of miniaturized dielectric-barrier discharge in air: liposome characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svarnas, P.; Asimakoulas, L.; Katsafadou, M.; Pachis, K.; Kostazos, N.; Antimisiaris, S. G.

    2017-08-01

    The increasing interest of the plasma community in the application of atmospheric-pressure cold plasmas to bio-specimen treatment has led to the creation of the emerging field of plasma biomedicine. Accordingly, plasma setups based on dielectric-barrier discharges have already been widely tested for the inactivation of various cells. Most of these systems refer to the plasma jet concept where noble gases penetrate atmospheric air and are subjected to the influence of high electric fields, thus forming guided streamers. Following the original works of our group where liposomal membranes were proposed as models for studying the interaction between plasma jets and cells, we present herein a study on liposomal membrane disruption by means of miniaturized dielectric-barrier discharge running in atmospheric air. Liposomal membranes of various lipid compositions, lamellarities, and sizes are treated at different times. It is shown that the dielectric-barrier discharge of low mean power leads to efficient liposomal membrane disruption. The latter is achieved in a controllable manner and depends on liposome properties. Additionally, it is clearly demonstrated that liposomal membrane disruption takes place even after plasma extinction, i.e. during post-treatment, resembling thus an ‘apoptosis’ effect, which is well known today mainly for cell membranes. Thus, the adoption of the present concept would be beneficial for tailoring studies on plasma-treated cell-mimics. Finally, the liposome treatment is discussed with respect to possible physicochemical mechanisms and potential discharge modification due to the various compositions of the liquid electrode.

  8. Separate fusion of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes

    PubMed Central

    Malka, Florence; Guillery, Olwenn; Cifuentes-Diaz, Carmen; Guillou, Emmanuelle; Belenguer, Pascale; Lombès, Anne; Rojo, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria are enveloped by two closely apposed boundary membranes with different properties and functions. It is known that they undergo fusion and fission, but it has remained unclear whether outer and inner membranes fuse simultaneously, coordinately or separately. We set up assays for the study of inner and outer membrane fusion in living human cells. Inner membrane fusion was more sensitive than outer membrane fusion to inhibition of glycolysis. Fusion of the inner membrane, but not of the outer membrane, was abolished by dissipation of the inner membrane potential with K+ (valinomycin) or H+ ionophores (cccp). In addition, outer and inner membrane fusion proceeded separately in the absence of any drug. The separate fusion of outer and inner membranes and the different requirements of these fusion reactions point to the existence of fusion machineries that can function separately. PMID:16113651

  9. SV40 late protein VP4 forms toroidal pores to disrupt membranes for viral release

    PubMed Central

    Raghava, Smita; Giorda, Kristina M.; Romano, Fabian B.; Heuck, Alejandro P.; Hebert, Daniel N.

    2014-01-01

    Nonenveloped viruses are generally released from the cell by the timely lysis of host cell membranes. SV40 has been used as a model virus for the study of the lytic nonenveloped virus life cycle. The expression of SV40 VP4 at later times during infection is concomitant with cell lysis. To investigate the role of VP4 in viral release and its mechanism of action, VP4 was expressed and purified from bacteria as a fusion protein for use in membrane disruption assays. Purified VP4 perforated membranes as demonstrated by the release of fluorescent markers encapsulated within large unilamellar vesicles or liposomes. Dynamic light scattering results found that VP4 treatment did not cause membrane lysis or change the size of the liposomes. Liposomes encapsulated with bodipy-labeled streptavidin were used to show that VP4 formed stable pores in membranes. These VP4 pores had an inner diameter of between 1 and 5 nm. Asymmetrical liposomes containing pyrene-labeled lipids in the outer monolayer were employed to monitor transbilayer lipid diffusion. Consistent with VP4 forming toroidal pore structures in membranes, VP4 induced transbilayer lipid diffusion or lipid flip-flop. Altogether, these studies support a central role for VP4 acting as a viroporin in the disruption of cellular membranes to trigger SV40 viral release by forming toroidal pores that unite the outer and inner leaflets of membrane bilayers. PMID:23651212

  10. The Drosophila inner-membrane protein PMI controls crista biogenesis and mitochondrial diameter.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Marc; El Fissi, Najla; Tufi, Roberta; Bentobji, Mélanie; Liévens, Jean-Charles; Martins, L Miguel; Royet, Julien; Rival, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Cristae are mitochondrial inner-membrane structures that concentrate respiratory chain complexes and hence regulate ATP production. Mechanisms controlling crista morphogenesis are poorly understood and few crista determinants have been identified. Among them are the Mitofilins that are required to establish crista junctions and ATP-synthase subunits that bend the membrane at the tips of the cristae. We report here the phenotypic consequences associated with the in vivo inactivation of the inner-membrane protein Pantagruelian Mitochondrion I (PMI) both at the scale of the whole organism, and at the level of mitochondrial ultrastructure and function. We show that flies in which PMI is genetically inactivated experience synaptic defects and have a reduced life span. Electron microscopy analysis of the inner-membrane morphology demonstrates that loss of PMI function increases the average length of mitochondrial cristae in embryonic cells. This phenotype is exacerbated in adult neurons in which cristae form a dense tangle of elongated membranes. Conversely, we show that PMI overexpression is sufficient to reduce crista length in vivo. Finally, these crista defects are associated with impaired respiratory chain activity and increases in the level of reactive oxygen species. Since PMI and its human orthologue TMEM11 are regulators of mitochondrial morphology, our data suggest that, by controlling crista length, PMI influences mitochondrial diameter and tubular shape.

  11. Ca2+ acting at the external side of the inner mitochondrial membrane can stimulate mitochondrial permeability transition induced by phenylarsine oxide.

    PubMed

    Kowaltowski, A J; Castilho, R F

    1997-12-15

    Mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) induced by the thiol cross-linker phenylarsine oxide (PhAsO) in Ca(2+)-depleted mitochondria incubated in the presence of ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the Ca2+ uniporter, is stimulated by the addition of extramitochondrial Ca2+. The presence of extramitochondrial Ca2+ stimulates the reaction of mitochondrial membrane protein thiol groups with PhAsO. Both Ca(2+)-induced increase in mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and protein thiol group reaction with PhAsO are dependent on time (5-10 min to be complete) and the concentration of Ca2+ (1-25 microM). Mitochondrial permeabilization induced by PhAsO (15 microM) and extramitochondrial Ca2+ is inhibited by ADP, cyclosporin A, dibucaine and Mg2+, while mitochondrial permeabilization induced by high concentrations of PhAsO (60 microM) in the absence of Ca2+ is inhibited only by ADP and cyclosporin A. These results suggest that dibucaine and Mg2+ can inhibit mitochondrial permeabilization by antagonizing the effect of Ca2+ on the mitochondrial membrane. Once mitochondrial permeabilization induced by 15 microM PhAsO and extramitochondrial Ca2+ has already occurred, the addition of the Ca2+ chelator EGTA restores mitochondrial membrane potential (MPT pore closure), suggesting that the presence of Ca2+ is essential for the maintenance of the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane to protons (MPT pore opening). In conclusion, the results presented indicate that low Ca2+ concentrations acting at the external side of the inner mitochondrial membrane can stimulate mitochondrial permeability transition induced by PhAsO, due to increased accessibility of protein thiol groups to the reaction with PhAsO and increased probability of MPT pore opening.

  12. 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 located on the mitochondrial membrane and functionally regulated mitochondrial functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingyi; Zhang, Huiyuan; Xu, Hao; Guo, Dongqing; Shi, Hui; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Weiwei; Gu, Yuchun

    2016-01-01

    5-HT has been reported to possess significant effects on cardiac activities, but activation of 5-HTR on the cell membrane failed to illustrate the controversial cardiac reaction. Because 5-HT constantly comes across the cell membrane via 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) into the cytoplasm, whether 5-HTR is functional present on the cellular organelles is unknown. Here we show 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 were located in cardiac mitochondria, and regulated mitochondrial activities and cellular functions. Knock down 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 in neonatal cardiomyocytes resulted in significant increase of cell damage in response to hypoxia, and also led to alternation in heart beating. Activation of 5-HTR4 attenuated mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake under the both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, whereas 5-HTR3 augmented Ca2+ uptake only under hypoxia. 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 exerted the opposite effects on the mitochondrial respiration: 5-HTR3 increased RCR (respiration control ratio), but 5-HTR4 reduced RCR. Moreover, activation of 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 both significantly inhibited the opening of mPTP. Our results provided the first evidence that 5-HTR as a GPCR and an ion channel, functionally expressed in mitochondria and participated in the mitochondria function and regulation to maintain homeostasis of mitochondrial [Ca2+], ROS, and ATP generation efficiency in cardiomyocytes in response to stress and O2 tension. PMID:27874067

  13. Mitochondrial morphology, topology, and membrane interactions in skeletal muscle: a quantitative three-dimensional electron microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    White, Kathryn; Turnbull, Douglass M.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic remodeling of mitochondrial morphology through membrane dynamics are linked to changes in mitochondrial and cellular function. Although mitochondrial membrane fusion/fission events are frequent in cell culture models, whether mitochondrial membranes dynamically interact in postmitotic muscle fibers in vivo remains unclear. Furthermore, a quantitative assessment of mitochondrial morphology in intact muscle is lacking. Here, using electron microscopy (EM), we provide evidence of interacting membranes from adjacent mitochondria in intact mouse skeletal muscle. Electron-dense mitochondrial contact sites consistent with events of outer mitochondrial membrane tethering are also described. These data suggest that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo among mitochondria, possibly to induce morphology transitions, for kiss-and-run behavior, or other processes involving contact between mitochondrial membranes. Furthermore, a combination of freeze-fracture scanning EM and transmission EM in orthogonal planes was used to characterize and quantify mitochondrial morphology. Two subpopulations of mitochondria were studied: subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF), which exhibited significant differences in morphological descriptors, including form factor (means ± SD for SS: 1.41 ± 0.45 vs. IMF: 2.89 ± 1.76, P < 0.01) and aspect ratio (1.97 ± 0.83 vs. 3.63 ± 2.13, P < 0.01) and circularity (0.75 ± 0.16 vs. 0.45 ± 0.22, P < 0.01) but not size (0.28 ± 0.31 vs. 0.27 ± 0.20 μm2). Frequency distributions for mitochondrial size and morphological parameters were highly skewed, suggesting the presence of mechanisms to influence mitochondrial size and shape. In addition, physical continuities between SS and IMF mitochondria indicated mixing of both subpopulations. These data provide evidence that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo in mouse skeletal muscle and that factors may be involved in regulating skeletal muscle mitochondrial morphology. PMID:23104694

  14. Mitochondrial morphology, topology, and membrane interactions in skeletal muscle: a quantitative three-dimensional electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Picard, Martin; White, Kathryn; Turnbull, Douglass M

    2013-01-15

    Dynamic remodeling of mitochondrial morphology through membrane dynamics are linked to changes in mitochondrial and cellular function. Although mitochondrial membrane fusion/fission events are frequent in cell culture models, whether mitochondrial membranes dynamically interact in postmitotic muscle fibers in vivo remains unclear. Furthermore, a quantitative assessment of mitochondrial morphology in intact muscle is lacking. Here, using electron microscopy (EM), we provide evidence of interacting membranes from adjacent mitochondria in intact mouse skeletal muscle. Electron-dense mitochondrial contact sites consistent with events of outer mitochondrial membrane tethering are also described. These data suggest that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo among mitochondria, possibly to induce morphology transitions, for kiss-and-run behavior, or other processes involving contact between mitochondrial membranes. Furthermore, a combination of freeze-fracture scanning EM and transmission EM in orthogonal planes was used to characterize and quantify mitochondrial morphology. Two subpopulations of mitochondria were studied: subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF), which exhibited significant differences in morphological descriptors, including form factor (means ± SD for SS: 1.41 ± 0.45 vs. IMF: 2.89 ± 1.76, P < 0.01) and aspect ratio (1.97 ± 0.83 vs. 3.63 ± 2.13, P < 0.01) and circularity (0.75 ± 0.16 vs. 0.45 ± 0.22, P < 0.01) but not size (0.28 ± 0.31 vs. 0.27 ± 0.20 μm(2)). Frequency distributions for mitochondrial size and morphological parameters were highly skewed, suggesting the presence of mechanisms to influence mitochondrial size and shape. In addition, physical continuities between SS and IMF mitochondria indicated mixing of both subpopulations. These data provide evidence that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo in mouse skeletal muscle and that factors may be involved in regulating skeletal muscle mitochondrial morphology.

  15. Intrinsic mitochondrial membrane potential and associated tumor phenotype are independent of MUC1 over-expression.

    PubMed

    Houston, Michele A; Augenlicht, Leonard H; Heerdt, Barbara G

    2011-01-01

    We have established previously that minor subpopulations of cells with stable differences in their intrinsic mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) exist within populations of mammary and colonic carcinoma cells and that these differences in Δψm are linked to tumorigenic phenotypes consistent with increased probability of participating in tumor progression. However, the mechanism(s) involved in generating and maintaining stable differences in intrinsic Δψm and how they are linked to phenotype are unclear. Because the mucin 1 (MUC1) oncoprotein is over-expressed in many cancers, with the cytoplasmic C-terminal fragment (MUC1 C-ter) and its integration into the outer mitochondrial membrane linked to tumorigenic phenotypes similar to those of cells with elevated intrinsic Δψm, we investigated whether endogenous differences in MUC1 levels were linked to stable differences in intrinsic Δψm and/or to the tumor phenotypes associated with the intrinsic Δψm. We report that levels of MUC1 are significantly higher in subpopulations of cells with elevated intrinsic Δψm derived from both mammary and colonic carcinoma cell lines. However, using siRNA we found that down-regulation of MUC1 failed to significantly affect either the intrinsic Δψm or the tumor phenotypes associated with increased intrinsic Δψm. Moreover, whereas pharmacologically mediated disruption of the Δψm was accompanied by attenuation of tumor phenotype, it had no impact on MUC1 levels. Therefore, while MUC1 over-expression is associated with subpopulations of cells with elevated intrinsic Δψm, it is not directly linked to the generation or maintenance of stable alterations in intrinsic Δψm, or to intrinsic Δψm associated tumor phenotypes. Since the Δψm is the focus of chemotherapeutic strategies, these data have important clinical implications in regard to effectively targeting those cells within a tumor cell population that exhibit stable elevations in intrinsic Δψm and are most

  16. Bax assembles into large ring-like structures remodeling the mitochondrial outer membrane in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Große, Lena; Wurm, Christian A; Brüser, Christian; Neumann, Daniel; Jans, Daniel C; Jakobs, Stefan

    2016-02-15

    The Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bak are essential for the execution of many apoptotic programs. During apoptosis, Bax translocates to the mitochondria and mediates the permeabilization of the outer membrane, thereby facilitating the release of pro-apoptotic proteins. Yet the mechanistic details of the Bax-induced membrane permeabilization have so far remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate that activated Bax molecules, besides forming large and compact clusters, also assemble, potentially with other proteins including Bak, into ring-like structures in the mitochondrial outer membrane. STED nanoscopy indicates that the area enclosed by a Bax ring is devoid of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins such as Tom20, Tom22, and Sam50. This strongly supports the view that the Bax rings surround an opening required for mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Even though these Bax assemblies may be necessary for MOMP, we demonstrate that at least in Drp1 knockdown cells, these assemblies are not sufficient for full cytochrome c release. Together, our super-resolution data provide direct evidence in support of large Bax-delineated pores in the mitochondrial outer membrane as being crucial for Bax-mediated MOMP in cells. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  17. [HOMOCYSTEINE-INDUCED MEMBRANE CURRENTS, CALCIUM RESPONSES AND CHANGES OF MITOCHONDRIAL POTENTIAL IN RAT CORTICAL NEURONS].

    PubMed

    Abushik, P A; Karelina, T V; Sibarov, D A; Stepanenko, J D; Giniatullin, R; Antonov, S M

    2015-01-01

    Homocysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, exhibits neurotoxic effects and is involved in the pathogenesis of several major neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to well studied excitoxicity of glutamate, the mechanism of homocysteine neurotoxicity is not clearly understood. By using whole-cell patch-clamp, calcium imaging (fluo-3) and measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (rhodamine 123) we studied transmembrane currents, calcium signals and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential induced by homocysteine versus responses induced by NMDA and glutamate in cultured rat cortical neurons. L-homocysteine (50 µM) induced inward currents that could be completely blocked by the selective antagonist of NMDA receptors - AP-5. In contrast to NMDA-induced currents, homocysteine-induced currents had a smaller steady-state amplitude. Comparison of calcium responses to homocysteine, NMDA or glutamate demonstrated that in all cortical neurons homocysteine elicited short, oscillatory-type calcium responses, whereas NMDA or glutamate induced sustained increase of intracellular calcium. Analysis of mitochondrial changes demonstrated that in contrast to NMDA homocysteine did not cause a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential at the early stages of action. However, after its long-term action, as in the case of NMDA and glutamate, the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were comparable with the full drop of respiratory chain induced by protonophore FCCP. Our data suggest that in cultured rat cortical neuron homocysteine at the first stages of action induces neurotoxic effects through activation of NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors with strong calcium influx through the channels of these receptors. The long-term action of homocysteine may lead to mitochondrial disfuction and appears as a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential.

  18. Mechanism of action of cytotoxic cyclotides: cycloviolacin O2 disrupts lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Svangård, Erika; Burman, Robert; Gunasekera, Sunithi; Lövborg, Henrik; Gullbo, Joachim; Göransson, Ulf

    2007-04-01

    In recent years, the cyclotides have emerged as the largest family of naturally cyclized proteins. Cyclotides display potent cytotoxic activity that varies with the structure of the proteins, and combined with their unique structure, they represent novel cytotoxic agents. However, their mechanism of action is yet unknown. In this work we show that disruption of cell membranes plays a crucial role in the cytotoxic effect of the cyclotide cycloviolacin O2 (1), which has been isolated from Viola odorata. Cell viability and morphology studies on the human lymphoma cell line U-937 GTB showed that cells exposed to 1 displayed disintegrated cell membranes within 5 min. Functional studies on calcein-loaded HeLa cells and on liposomes showed rapid concentration-dependent release of their respective internal contents. The present results show that cyclotides have specific membrane-disrupting activity.

  19. Permeabilized myocardial fibers as model to detect mitochondrial dysfunction during sepsis and melatonin effects without disruption of mitochondrial network.

    PubMed

    Doerrier, Carolina; García, José A; Volt, Huayqui; Díaz-Casado, María E; Luna-Sánchez, Marta; Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Escames, Germaine; López, Luis C; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of mitochondrial function is crucial to understand their involvement in a given disease. High-resolution respirometry of permeabilized myocardial fibers in septic mice allows the evaluation of the bioenergetic system, maintaining mitochondrial ultrastructure and intracellular interactions, which are critical for an adequate functionality. OXPHOS and electron transport system (ETS) capacities were assessed using different substrate combinations. Our findings show a severe septic-dependent impairment in OXPHOS and ETS capacities with mitochondrial uncoupling at early and late phases of sepsis. Moreover, sepsis triggers complex III (CIII)-linked alterations in supercomplexes structure, and loss of mitochondrial density. In these conditions, melatonin administration to septic mice prevented sepsis-dependent mitochondrial injury in mitochondrial respiration. Likewise, melatonin improved cytochrome b content and ameliorated the assembly of CIII in supercomplexes. These results support the use of permeabilized fibers to identify properly the respiratory deficits and specific melatonin effects in sepsis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  20. [Development of the MITO-porter, a nano device for mitochondrial drug delivery via membrane fusion].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma

    2014-01-01

    Many human diseases have been reported to be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, mitochondrial therapy would be expected to be useful and productive in the treatment of various diseases. To achieve such an innovative therapy, it will be necessary to deliver therapeutic agents into mitochondria. However, only a limited number of methods are available for accomplishing this. We previously developed the MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that permits macromolecular cargos to be transported into mitochondria via membrane fusion. Intracellular observations using the green fluorescence protein as a model macromolecule confirmed the mitochondrial delivery of a macromolecule by the MITO-Porter. Moreover, when we attempted the mitochondrial delivery of bongkrekic acid (BKA), an antiapoptosis agent, the MITO-Porter enhanced the antiapoptosis effect compared with naked BKA. To construct a device with enhanced performance, the MITO-Porter was coated with cell membrane-fusogenic outer envelopes to produce the dual function (DF)-MITO-Porter. Intracellular observations indicated that the DF-MITO-Porter was more effective in delivering exogenous macromolecules into mitochondria than the conventional MITO-Porter. Furthermore, when biomacromolecules were delivered using the DF-MITO-Porter to estimate the mitochondrial gene targeting of the carrier, the results confirmed that the MITO-Porter system has the potential for use in therapies aimed at mitochondrial DNA. This paper sumarizes our findings on mitochondrial drug delivery systems that are directed toward mitochondrial medicine development and mitochondrial gene therapy. It is expected that the MITO-Porter system will open new research areas in mitochondrial drug delivery systems and have a significant impact on the medical and life sciences.

  1. Detergent disruption of bacterial inner membranes and recovery of protein translocation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, K.; Wickner, W.T. )

    1989-11-01

    Isolation of the integral membrane components of protein translocation requires methods for fractionation and functional reconstitution. The authors treated inner-membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli with mixtures of octyl {beta}-D-glucoside, phospholipids, and an integral membrane carrier protein under conditions that extract most of the membrane proteins into micellar solution. Upon dialysis, proteoliposomes were reconstituted that supported translocation of radiochemically pure ({sup 35}S)pro-OmpA (the precursor of outer membrane protein A). Translocation into these proteoliposomes required ATP hydrolysis and membrane proteins, indicating that the reaction is that of the inner membrane. The suspension of membranes in detergent was separated into supernatant and pellet fractions by ultracentrifugation. After reconstitution, translocation activity was observed in both fractions, but processing by leader peptidase of translocated pro-OmpA to OmpA was not detectable in the reconstituted pellet fraction. Processing activity was restored by addition of pure leader peptidase as long as this enzyme was added before detergent removal, indicating that the translocation activity is not associated with detergent-resistant membrane vesicles. These results show that protein translocation activity can be recovered from detergent-disrupted membrane vesicles, providing a first step towards the goal of isolating the solubilized components.

  2. Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa2 toxin disrupts cell membranes by forming large protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Tharad, Sudarat; Toca-Herrera, José L.; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Krittanai, Chartchai

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cyt2Aa2 showed toxicity against Dipteran insect larvae and in vitro lysis activity on several cells. It has potential applications in the biological control of insect larvae. Although pore-forming and/or detergent-like mechanisms were proposed, the mechanism underlying cytolytic activity remains unclear. Analysis of the haemolytic activity of Cyt2Aa2 with osmotic stabilizers revealed partial toxin inhibition, suggesting a distinctive mechanism from the putative pore formation model. Membrane permeability was studied using fluorescent dye entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) at various protein/lipid molar ratios. Binding of Cyt2Aa2 monomer to the lipid membrane did not disturb membrane integrity until the critical protein/lipid molar ratio was reached, when Cyt2Aa2 complexes and cytolytic activity were detected. The complexes are large aggregates that appeared as a ladder when separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. Interaction of Cyt2Aa2 with Aedes albopictus cells was investigated by confocal microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRF). The results showed that Cyt2Aa2 binds on the cell membrane at an early stage without cell membrane disruption. Protein aggregation on the cell membrane was detected later which coincided with cell swelling. Cyt2Aa2 aggregations on supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) were visualized by AFM. The AFM topographic images revealed Cyt2Aa2 aggregates on the lipid bilayer at low protein concentration and subsequently disrupts the lipid bilayer by forming a lesion as the protein concentration increased. These results supported the mechanism whereby Cyt2Aa2 binds and aggregates on the lipid membrane leading to the formation of non-specific hole and disruption of the cell membrane. PMID:27612497

  3. Alcohol-induced oxidative/nitrosative stress alters brain mitochondrial membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vaddi Damodara; Padmavathi, Pannuru; Kavitha, Godugu; Saradamma, Bulle; Varadacharyulu, Nallanchakravarthula

    2013-03-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes numerous biochemical and biophysical changes in the central nervous system, in which mitochondria is the primary organelle affected. In the present study, we hypothesized that alcohol alters the mitochondrial membrane properties and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction via mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Alcohol-induced hypoxia further enhances these effects. Administration of alcohol to rats significantly increased the mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation with decreased SOD2 mRNA and protein expression was decreased, while nitric oxide (NO) levels and expression of iNOS and nNOS in brain cortex were increased. In addition, alcohol augmented HIF-1α mRNA and protein expression in the brain cortex. Results from this study showed that alcohol administration to rats decreased mitochondrial complex I, III, IV activities, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and cardiolipin content with increased anisotropic value. Cardiolipin regulates numerous enzyme activities, especially those related to oxidative phosphorylation and coupled respiration. In the present study, decreased cardiolipin could be ascribed to ROS/RNS-induced damage. In conclusion, alcohol-induced ROS/RNS is responsible for the altered mitochondrial membrane properties, and alcohol-induced hypoxia further enhance these alterations, which ultimately leads to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  4. Applying Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy to Investigate Peptide-Induced Membrane Disruption.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas R; Andresen, Thomas L

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding the interactions of antimicrobial peptides with phospholipid membranes. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful experimental technique that can be used to gain insight into these interactions. Specifically, FCS can be used to quantify leakage of fluorescent molecules of different sizes from large unilamellar lipid vesicles, thereby providing a tool for estimating the size of peptide-induced membrane disruptions. If fluorescently labeled lipids are incorporated into the membranes of the vesicles, FCS can also be used to obtain information about whether leakage occurs due to localized membrane perturbations or global membrane destabilization. Here, we outline a detailed step-by-step protocol on how to optimally implement an FCS-based leakage assay. To make the protocol easily accessible to other researchers, it has been supplemented with a number of practical tips and tricks.

  5. Protective action of methylglyoxal bis (guanylhydrazone) on the mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Toninello, A; Siliprandi, D; Castagnini, P; Novello, M C; Siliprandi, N

    1988-09-15

    At low concentrations (0.5-1.0 mM) methylglyoxal bis (guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) exhibited a clearcut protection of rat liver mitochondria against the deenergizing action of either Ca2+, or oxidizing agents (butylhydroperoxide and oxaloacetate). Such a protection resulted from the prevention of transmembrane potential decay, discharge of accumulated Ca2+, release of mitochondrial Mg2+, adenine nucleotides and pyridine nucleotides and mitochondrial swelling. At high concentrations (5-10 mM) MGBG induced functional alterations of mitochondria (decrease of transmembrane potential, lower capability to accumulate and to retain Ca2+) which can be reversed by resuspension of mitochondria in a MGBG free medium. These reversible mitochondrial alterations by high MGBG concentrations are interpreted as a consequence of an aggregation and coprecipitation of suspended mitochondria.

  6. Interactions of mitochondrial presequence peptides with the mitochondrial outer membrane preprotein translocase TOM.

    PubMed

    Romero-Ruiz, Mercedes; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R; Eckert, Reiner; Winterhalter, Mathias; Nussberger, Stephan

    2010-08-04

    TOM protein-conducting channels serve as the main entry sites into mitochondria for virtually all mitochondrial proteins. When incorporated into lipid bilayers, they form large, relatively nonspecific ion channels that are blocked by peptides derived from mitochondrial precursor proteins. Using single-channel electrical recordings, we analyzed the interactions of mitochondrial presequence peptides with single TOM pores. The largest conductance state of the translocon represents the likely protein-conducting conformation of the channel. The frequency (but not the duration) of the polypeptide-induced blockage is strongly modulated by the substrate concentration. Structural differences between substrates are reflected in characteristic blockage frequencies and duration of blockage. To our knowledge, this study provides first quantitative data regarding the kinetics of polypeptide interaction with the mitochondrial TOM machinery. 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuropeptide Y damages the integrity of mitochondrial structure and disrupts energy metabolism in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guochang; Xu, Xuehua; Guo, Wei; Luo, Chengliang; Wang, Hao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Zhu, Shaohua; Wei, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases including stress cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, heart failure, diabetic cardiomyopathy, hypertension, and so on. However, inconsistent results related to the role of NPY in the different types of cardiomyopathies make the exact involvement of the peptide elusive. Considering these effects are known to be involved in energy balance, as the hearts energy producer, the mitochondria, should be investigated, and not only mitochondrial structure but also its potential. Up to now, the impact of NPY on energy metabolism and mitochondria in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes has not been reported. The main objective of our study was to test the role of NPY in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. After 24-h stimulation of NPY, the ATP content and activity of the cardiomyocytes were determined by Cell Counting Kit-8 and ATP-dependent bioluminescence assay kit, respectively. To further measure these effects, mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by JC-1 staining, the change of mitochondrial structure was detected by transmission electron microscopy, and the levels of PGC-1α (a marker of mitochondrial energy metabolism) mRNA and protein expression were determined by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The results showed that after 24-h stimulation of NPY, ATP content and activity in the cardiomyocytes were decreased. Moreover, cardiomyocyte mitochondria were changed in morphology. Further, a decline of mitochondrial membrane potential was induced in a dose-dependent manner and the levels of PGC-1α mRNA and protein expression were up-regulated after being treated by different dose of NPY. The results indicate that energy metabolism is suppressed, mitochondrial structure and membrane potential damaged, and PGC-α is changed in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes after being treated by NPY. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The anticancer agent doxorubicin disrupts mitochondrial energy metabolism and redox balance in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Laura A A; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Lin, Chien-Te; Maples, Jill M; Cathey, Brook L; Neufer, P Darrell

    2013-12-01

    The combined loss of muscle strength and constant fatigue are disabling symptoms for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Doxorubicin, a standard chemotherapy drug used in the clinic, causes skeletal muscle dysfunction and premature fatigue along with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). As mitochondria represent a primary source of oxidant generation in muscle, we hypothesized that doxorubicin could negatively affect mitochondria by inhibiting respiratory capacity, leading to an increase in H2O2-emitting potential. Here we demonstrate a biphasic response of skeletal muscle mitochondria to a single doxorubicin injection (20mg/kg). Initially at 2h doxorubicin inhibits both complex I- and II-supported respiration and increases H2O2 emission, both of which are partially restored after 24h. The relationship between oxygen consumption and membrane potential (ΔΨ) is shifted to the right at 24h, indicating elevated reducing pressure within the electron transport system (ETS). Respiratory capacity is further decreased at a later time point (72 h) along with H2O2-emitting potential and an increased sensitivity to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. These novel findings suggest a role for skeletal muscle mitochondria as a potential underlying cause of doxorubicin-induced muscle dysfunction. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The anticancer agent doxorubicin disrupts mitochondrial energy metabolism and redox balance in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gilliam, Laura A. A.; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Lin, Chien-Te; Maples, Jill M.; Cathey, Brook L.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2013-01-01

    The combined loss of muscle strength and constant fatigue are disabling symptoms for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Doxorubicin, a standard chemotherapy drug used in the clinic, causes skeletal muscle dysfunction and premature fatigue along with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). As mitochondria represent a primary source of oxidant generation in muscle, we hypothesized doxorubicin could negatively effect mitochondria by inhibiting respiratory capacity, leading to an increase in H2O2 emitting potential. Here we demonstrate a biphasic response of skeletal muscle mitochondria to a single doxorubicin injection (20 mg/kg). Initially at 2 h doxorubicin inhibits both complex I- and II-supported respiration and increases H2O2 emission, both of which are partially restored after 24 h. The relationship between oxygen consumption and membrane potential (Δψ) is shifted to the right at 24 h, indicating elevated reducing pressure within the electron transport system (ETS). Respiratory capacity is further decreased at a later timepoint (72 h) along with H2O2 emitting potential and an increased sensitivity to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. These novel findings suggest a role for skeletal muscle mitochondria as a potential underlying cause of doxorubicin-induced muscle dysfunction. PMID:24017970

  10. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Mitochondrial Membrane Permeability Waves during Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhola, Patrick D.; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Change in the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane to proteins (cytochrome c and Smac) and protons is a critical step in apoptosis. Although the time from the induction of apoptosis to the change of mitochondrial permeability is variable over a period of hours, the release of proteins is an “all or none” phenomenon that is completed in an individual cell within minutes. Here, using single-cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that the release of cytochrome c from a single mitochondrion occurs in a single step. However, this increased permeability of the outer membrane to cytochrome c propagates throughout the cell as a slower, spatially coordinated wave. The permeability of the outer membrane to Smac propagates with the same spatial pattern but lagging in time. This is followed by a wave of increased permeability of the inner membrane to protons. Only afterward do the mitochondria fission. The spatial dependence of the permeability wave was inhibited by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum calcium pumps, but buffering cytosolic calcium had no effect. These results show that the trigger for apoptosis is spatially localized, initiating at one or only a few mitochondria preceding the loss of mitochondrial energetics, and the subsequent temporal propagation of mitochondrial membrane permeability is calcium-dependent. PMID:19843454

  11. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Yamaoka, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs), while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles). Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN). The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence.

  12. Increasing levels of cardiolipin differentially influence packing of phospholipids found in the mitochondrial inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Zeczycki, Tonya N; Whelan, Jarrett; Hayden, William Tyler; Brown, David A; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2014-07-18

    It is essential to understand the role of cardiolipin (CL) in mitochondrial membrane organization given that changes in CL levels contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction in type II diabetes, ischemia-reperfusion injury, heart failure, breast cancer, and aging. Specifically, there are contradictory data on how CL influences the molecular packing of membrane phospholipids. Therefore, we determined how increasing levels of heart CL impacted molecular packing in large unilamellar vesicles, modeling heterogeneous lipid mixtures found within the mitochondrial inner membrane, using merocyanine (MC540) fluorescence. We broadly categorized lipid vesicles of equal mass as loosely packed, intermediate, and highly packed based on peak MC540 fluorescence intensity. CL had opposite effects on loosely versus highly packed vesicles. Exposure of loosely packed vesicles to increasing levels of CL dose-dependently increased membrane packing. In contrast, increasing amounts of CL in highly packed vesicles decreased the packing in a dose-dependent manner. In vesicles that were categorized as intermediate packing, CL had either no effect or decreased packing at select doses in a dose-independent manner. Altogether, the results aid in resolving some of the discrepant data by demonstrating that CL displays differential effects on membrane packing depending on the composition of the lipid environment. This has implications for mitochondrial protein activity in response to changing CL levels in microdomains of varying composition.

  13. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Yamaoka, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs), while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles). Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN). The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence. PMID:26752045

  14. Disruption of cell membranes via laser-activated, acoustically active, carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holguin, Stefany; Prausnitz, Mark; Thadhani, Naresh

    2015-06-01

    Physical drug delivery methods provide an avenue to overcome the selectivity of the cell membrane via physical forces that disrupt cell membranes and drive drug molecules into the cytosol. When carbon black nanoparticles in suspension with cells and drug molecules are exposed to nanosecond-pulsed laser light, high uptake and cell viability are observed. This laser-carbon nanoparticle interaction causes thermal expansion and local vaporization that results in the release of acoustic waves into the surrounding medium. These combined energy transduction mechanisms, phenomena called transient nanoparticle energy transduction (TNET), are responsible for disruption of the cell membrane and subsequent efficient intracellular drug uptake while maintaining high cell viability. The overall objective of this work is to investigate TNET and the bioeffects associated with physical disruption of cell membranes for drug delivery via laser-carbon nanoparticle interactions. For example, varying and quantifying energy input to carbon nanoparticles by way of laser beam manipulation, assists in the understanding and assessment of subsequent bioeffects. Results of work performed to date will be presented. National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. 0946809, Georgia Tech University Center of Exemplary Mentoring (UCEM) & the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

  15. Polypeptide and phospholipid composition of the membrane of rat liver peroxisomes: comparison with endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial membranes

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Membranes were isolated from highly purified peroxisomes, mitochondria, and rough and smooth microsomes of rat liver by the one-step Na2CO3 procedure described in the accompanying paper (1982, J. Cell Biol. 93:97-102). The polypeptide compositions of these membranes were determined by SDS PAGE and found to be greatly dissimilar. The peroxisomal membrane contains 12% of the peroxisomal protein and consists of three major polypeptides (21,700, 67,700 and 69,700 daltons) as well as some minor polypeptides. The major peroxisomal membrane proteins as well as most of the minor ones are absent from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Conversely, most ER proteins are absent from peroxisomes. By electron microscopy, purified peroxisomal membranes are approximately 6.8 nm thick and have a typical trilaminar appearance. The phospholipid/protein ratio of peroxisomal membranes is approximately 200 nmol/mg; the principal phospholipids are phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine as in ER and mitochondrial membranes. In contrast to the mitochondria, peroxisomal membranes contain no cardiolipin. All the membranes investigated contain a polypeptide band with a molecular mass of approximately 15,000 daltons. Whether this represents an exceptional common membrane protein or a coincidence is unknown. The implications of these results for the biogenesis of peroxisomes are discussed. PMID:7068748

  16. KCl-Dependent Release of Mitochondrial Membrane-Bound Arginase Appears to Be a Novel Variant of Arginase-II

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Mishra; Rajnikant, Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Arginase regulates arginine metabolism, ornithine-urea cycle, and immunological surveillance. Arginase-I is predominant in cytosol, and arginase-II is localised in the mitochondria. A mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase has also been proposed to be adsorbed with outer membrane of mitochondria which gets released by 150 mM potassium chloride (KCl). It is presumed that inclusion of 150 mM KCl in the homogenization medium would not only facilitate release of arginase bound with outer membrane of mitochondria but also affect functional anatomy of mitochondria, mitochondrial enzymes, and proteins. Therefore, it has been intended to characterize KCl-dependent release of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase from liver of mice. Results provide advancement in the area of arginase biology and suggest that fraction of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase contains mitochondrial arginase-II and a variant of arginase-II. PMID:27293971

  17. Variations in mitochondrial membrane potential correlate with malic acid production by natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake strains.

    PubMed

    Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Kichise, Yuki; Izumoto, Eiji; Nakayama, Shunichi; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Research on the relationship between mitochondrial membrane potential and fermentation profile is being intensely pursued because of the potential for developing advanced fermentation technologies. In the present study, we isolated naturally occurring strains of yeast from sake mash that produce high levels of malic acid and demonstrate that variations in mitochondrial membrane potential correlate with malic acid production. To define the underlying biochemical mechanism, we determined the activities of enzymes required for malic acid synthesis and found that pyruvate carboxylase and malate dehydrogenase activities in strains that produce high levels of malic acid were elevated compared with the standard sake strain K901. These results inspired us to hypothesize that decreased mitochondrial membrane potential was responsible for increased malic acid synthesis, and we present data supporting this hypothesis. Thus, the mitochondrial membrane potential of high malic acid producers was lower compared with standard strains. We conclude that mitochondrial membrane potential correlates with malic acid production.

  18. Alteration in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake disrupts insulin signaling in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Tomás; Parra, Valentina; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Pennanen, Christian; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Vasquez-Trincado, César; Morales, Pablo E; Lopez-Crisosto, Camila; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Chiong, Mario; Rothermel, Beverly A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-11-07

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by alterations in both cardiac bioenergetics and insulin sensitivity. Insulin promotes glucose uptake by cardiomyocytes and its use as a substrate for glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidation in order to maintain the high cardiac energy demands. Insulin stimulates Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum, however, how this translates to changes in mitochondrial metabolism in either healthy or hypertrophic cardiomyocytes is not fully understood. In the present study we investigated insulin-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) signaling in normal and norepinephrine or insulin like growth factor-1-induced hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. Using mitochondrion-selective Ca(2+)-fluorescent probes we showed that insulin increases mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels. This signal was inhibited by the pharmacological blockade of either the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor or the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter, as well as by siRNA-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter knockdown. Norepinephrine-stimulated cardiomyocytes showed a significant decrease in endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial contacts compared to either control or insulin like growth factor-1-stimulated cells. This resulted in a reduction in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, Akt activation, glucose uptake and oxygen consumption in response to insulin. Blocking mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake was sufficient to mimic the effect of norepinephrine-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy on insulin signaling. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is a key event in insulin signaling and metabolism in cardiomyocytes.

  19. Rat liver mitochondrial membrane characteristics and mitochondrial functions are more profoundly altered by dietary lipid quantity than by dietary lipid quality: effect of different nutritional lipid patterns.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Manar; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Fouret, Gilles; Chabi, Béatrice; Crouzier, David; Ferreri, Carla; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal; Cristol, Jean Paul; Carbonneau, Marie-Annette; Coudray, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Dietary lipids are known to affect the composition of the biological membrane and functions that are involved in cell death and survival. The mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes are membrane protein complexes whose function depends on the composition and fluidity of the mitochondrial membrane lipid. The present study aimed at investigating the impact of different nutritional patterns of dietary lipids on liver mitochondrial functions. A total of forty-eight Wistar male rats were divided into six groups and fed for 12 weeks with a basal diet, lard diet or fish oil diet, containing either 50 or 300 g lipid/kg. The 30 % lipid intake increased liver NEFA, TAG and cholesterol levels, increased mitochondrial NEFA and TAG, and decreased phospholipid (PL) levels. SFA, PUFA and unsaturation index (UI) increased, whereas MUFA and trans-fatty acids (FA) decreased in the mitochondrial membrane PL in 30 % fat diet-fed rats compared with 5 % lipid diet-fed rats. PL UI increased with fish oil diet v. basal and lard-rich diets, and PL trans-FA increased with lard diet v. basal and fish oil diets. The 30 % lipid diet intake increased mitochondrial membrane potential, membrane fluidity, mitochondrial respiration and complex V activity, and decreased complex III and IV activities. With regard to lipid quality effects, β-oxidation decreased with the intake of basal or fish oil diets compared with that of the lard diet. The intake of a fish oil diet decreased complex III and IV activities compared with both the basal and lard diets. In conclusion, the characteristics and mitochondrial functions of the rat liver mitochondrial membrane are more profoundly altered by the quantity of dietary lipid than by its quality, which may have profound impacts on the pathogenesis and development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  20. Mitochondrial Sirtuin Network Reveals Dynamic SIRT3-Dependent Deacetylation in Response to Membrane Depolarization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Nagasawa, Koji; Münch, Christian; Xu, Yingjie; Satterstrom, Kyle; Jeong, Seungmin; Hayes, Sebastian D; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Vyas, F Sejal; Zaganjor, Elma; Guarani, Virginia; Ringel, Alison E; Gygi, Steven P; Harper, J Wade; Haigis, Marcia C

    2016-11-03

    Mitochondrial sirtuins, SIRT3-5, are NAD(+)-dependent deacylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases that are critical for stress responses. However, a comprehensive understanding of sirtuin targets, regulation of sirtuin activity, and the relationships between sirtuins remains a key challenge in mitochondrial physiology. Here, we employ systematic interaction proteomics to elucidate the mitochondrial sirtuin protein interaction landscape. This work reveals sirtuin interactions with numerous functional modules within mitochondria, identifies candidate sirtuin substrates, and uncovers a fundamental role for sequestration of SIRT3 by ATP synthase in mitochondrial homeostasis. In healthy mitochondria, a pool of SIRT3 binds ATP synthase, but upon matrix pH reduction with concomitant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, SIRT3 dissociates. This release correlates with rapid deacetylation of matrix proteins, and SIRT3 is required for recovery of membrane potential. In vitro reconstitution experiments, as well as analysis of CRISPR/Cas9-engineered cells, indicate that pH-dependent SIRT3 release requires H135 in the ATP5O subunit of ATP synthase. Our SIRT3-5 interaction network provides a framework for discovering novel biological functions regulated by mitochondrial sirtuins.

  1. MICOS coordinates with respiratory complexes and lipids to establish mitochondrial inner membrane architecture

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jonathan R; Mourier, Arnaud; Yamada, Justin; McCaffery, J Michael; Nunnari, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    The conserved MICOS complex functions as a primary determinant of mitochondrial inner membrane structure. We address the organization and functional roles of MICOS and identify two independent MICOS subcomplexes: Mic27/Mic10/Mic12, whose assembly is dependent on respiratory complexes and the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and Mic60/Mic19, which assembles independent of these factors. Our data suggest that MICOS subcomplexes independently localize to cristae junctions and are connected via Mic19, which functions to regulate subcomplex distribution, and thus, potentially also cristae junction copy number. MICOS subunits have non-redundant functions as the absence of both MICOS subcomplexes results in more severe morphological and respiratory growth defects than deletion of single MICOS subunits or subcomplexes. Mitochondrial defects resulting from MICOS loss are caused by misdistribution of respiratory complexes in the inner membrane. Together, our data are consistent with a model where MICOS, mitochondrial lipids and respiratory complexes coordinately build a functional and correctly shaped mitochondrial inner membrane. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07739.001 PMID:25918844

  2. Ethanol Influences on Bax Translocation, Mitochondrial Membrane Potential, and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation are Modulated by Vitamin E and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Marieta Barrow; Paiva, Michael; Siler-Marsiglio, Kendra

    2011-01-01

    Background This study investigated ethanol influences on intracellular events which predispose developing neurons toward apoptosis, and the capacity of the antioxidant α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to modulate these effects. Assessments were made of the following: (1) ethanol-induced translocation of the pro-apoptotic Bax protein to the mitochondrial membrane, a key upstream event in the initiation of apoptotic cell death; (2) disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) as a result of ethanol exposure, an important process in triggering the apoptotic cascade; and (3) generation of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a function of ethanol exposure. Methods These interactions were investigated in cultured postnatal day 8 neonatal rat cerebellar granule cells, a population vulnerable to developmental ethanol exposure in vivo and in vitro. Bax mitochondrial translocation was analyzed via subcellular fractionation followed by Western blot, and mitochondrial membrane integrity was determined using the lipophilic dye, JC-1, which exhibits potential-dependent accumulation in the mitochondrial membrane as a function of the MMP. Results Brief ethanol exposure in these preparations precipitated Bax translocation, but both vitamin E and BDNF reduced this effect to control levels. Ethanol treatment also resulted in a disturbance of the MMP, and this effect was blunted by the antioxidant and the neurotrophin. ROS generation was enhanced by a short ethanol exposure in these cells, but the production of these harmful free radicals was diminished to control levels by co-treatment with either vitamin E or BDNF. Conclusions These results indicate that both antioxidants and neurotrophic factors have the potential to ameliorate ethanol neurotoxicity, and suggest possible interventions which could be implemented in preventing or lessening the severity of the damaging effects of ethanol in the developing central

  3. Palmitoylation of the Immunity Related GTPase, Irgm1: Impact on Membrane Localization and Ability to Promote Mitochondrial Fission

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Stanley C.; Schmidt, Elyse A.; Fessler, Michael B.; Taylor, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The Immunity-Related GTPases (IRG) are a family of large GTPases that mediate innate immune responses. Irgm1 is particularly critical for immunity to bacteria and protozoa, and for inflammatory homeostasis in the intestine. Although precise functions for Irgm1 have not been identified, prior studies have suggested roles in autophagy/mitophagy, phagosome remodeling, cell motility, and regulating the activity of other IRG proteins. These functions ostensibly hinge on the ability of Irgm1 to localize to intracellular membranes, such as those of the Golgi apparatus and mitochondria. Previously, it has been shown that an amphipathic helix, the αK helix, in the C-terminal portion of the protein partially mediates membrane binding. However, in absence of αK, there is still substantial binding of Irgm1 to cellular membranes, suggesting the presence of other membrane binding motifs. In the current work, an additional membrane localization motif was found in the form of palmitoylation at a cluster of cysteines near the αK. An Irgm1 mutant possessing alanine to cysteine substitutions at these amino acids demonstrated little residual palmitoylation, yet it displayed only a small decrease in localization to the Golgi and mitochondria. In contrast, a mutant containing the palmitoylation mutations in combination with mutations disrupting the amphipathic character of the αK displayed a complete loss of apparent localization to the Golgi and mitochondria, as well as an overall loss of association with cellular membranes in general. Additionally, Irgm1 was found to promote mitochondrial fission, and this function was undermined in Irgm1 mutants lacking the palmitoylation domain, and to a greater extent in those lacking the αK, or the αK and palmitoylation domains combined. Our data suggest that palmitoylation together with the αK helix firmly anchor Irgm1 in the Golgi and mitochondria, thus facilitating function of the protein. PMID:24751652

  4. A Rapid and Quantitative Flow Cytometry Method for the Analysis of Membrane Disruptive Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien-Simpson, Neil M.; Pantarat, Namfon; Attard, Troy J.; Walsh, Katrina A.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a microbial flow cytometry method that quantifies within 3 hours antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity, termed Minimum Membrane Disruptive Concentration (MDC). Increasing peptide concentration positively correlates with the extent of bacterial membrane disruption and the calculated MDC is equivalent to its MBC. The activity of AMPs representing three different membranolytic modes of action could be determined for a range of Gram positive and negative bacteria, including the ESKAPE pathogens, E. coli and MRSA. By using the MDC50 concentration of the parent AMP, the method provides high-throughput, quantitative screening of AMP analogues. A unique feature of the MDC assay is that it directly measures peptide/bacteria interactions and lysed cell numbers rather than bacteria survival as with MIC and MBC assays. With the threat of multi-drug resistant bacteria, this high-throughput MDC assay has the potential to aid in the development of novel antimicrobials that target bacteria with improved efficacy. PMID:26986223

  5. Membrane Incorporation, Channel Formation, and Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis by Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Masahiro; Ohtsuka, Isao; Yokoyama, Shoko; Kato-Negishi, Midori; Sadakane, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Oligomerization, conformational changes, and the consequent neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's β-amyloid protein (AβP) play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mounting evidence suggests that oligomeric AβPs cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis, eventually leading to neuronal death. We have demonstrated that oligomeric AβPs directly incorporate into neuronal membranes, form cation-sensitive ion channels (“amyloid channels”), and cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis via the amyloid channels. Other disease-related amyloidogenic proteins, such as prion protein in prion diseases or α-synuclein in dementia with Lewy bodies, exhibit similarities in the incorporation into membranes and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. Here, based on our experimental results and those of numerous other studies, we review the current understanding of the direct binding of AβP into membrane surfaces and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. The implication of composition of membrane lipids and the possible development of new drugs by influencing membrane properties and attenuating amyloid channels for the treatment and prevention of AD is also discussed. PMID:21547225

  6. Cephalochromin induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549 human non-small-cell lung cancer cells by inflicting mitochondrial disruption.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Che-Jen; Hsiao, George; Chen, Wei-Lin; Wang, Shih-Wei; Chiang, Chun-Ping; Liu, Li-Ya; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Chung, Chi-Li

    2014-04-25

    The fungus-derived compound cephalochromin, isolated from the fermented broth of Cosmospora vilior YMJ89051501, shows growth-inhibitory and apoptotic activity against human lung cancer A549 cells in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 2.8 μM at 48 h. Cephalochromin induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase through down-regulation of cyclin D1, cyclin E, Cdk 2, and Cdk 4 expressions. Cephalochromin markedly increased the hypodiploid sub-G1 phase (apoptosis) of the cell cycle at 48 h as measured by flow cytometric analysis. Reactive oxygen species generation and loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were also markedly induced by cephalochromin. Moreover, the immunoblotting assays showed that cephalochromin reduced survivin and Bcl-xL expression and induced the activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3 and the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, indicating the involvement of a caspase signaling cascade. The caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk significantly suppressed cephalochromin-induced apoptosis. Cephalochromin also triggered LC3 II, autophagic marker, expression. Taken together, this is the first report that cephalochromin induced an antiproliferative effect on human lung cancer cells through mitochondrial disruption and down-regulation of survivin, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, loss of MMP, and subsequently apoptotic cell death.

  7. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>600) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitoc...

  8. Cytochrome c is rapidly reduced in the cytosol after mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Ripple, Maureen O.; Abajian, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Visible spectroscopy was used to measure real-time changes in the oxidation state of cytochrome c (cyt c) and the a-cytochromes (cyt aa3) of cytochrome oxidase during mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) initiated by anisomycin in HL-60 cells. The oxidation state of mitochondrial cyt c was found to be ≈62% oxidized before MOMP and became ≈70% oxidized after MOMP. In contrast, the cytosolic pool of cyt c was found to be almost fully reduced. This oxidation change allows cyt c release to be continuously and quantitatively monitored in real time. Anoxia and antimycin were used to fully reduce and fully oxidize, respectively, the mitochondrial pool of cyt c and it was found that the release of cyt c was independent of it oxidation state consistent with a simple model of cyt c passively diffusing down a concentration gradient through a pore or tear in the outer membrane. After MOMP was complete, the flux of cyt c diffusing back into the mitochondria was measured from the residual mitochondrial oxygen consumption after complete inhibition of the bc1 with antimycin and myxothiazol. The outer membrane was found to be highly permeable after MOMP implying that the reduction of cyt c in the cytosol must be very rapid. The permeability of the outer membrane measured in this study would result in the release of cyt c with a time constant of less than 1 s. PMID:20094799

  9. Assessment of mitochondrial membrane potential using an on-chip microelectrode in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae-Sun; Dávila, Antonio; Wallace, Douglas C; Burke, Peter

    2010-07-07

    The mitochondrial membrane potential is used to generate and regulate energy in living systems, driving the conversion of ADP to ATP, regulating ion homeostasis, and controlling apoptosis, all central to human health and disease. Therefore, there is a need for tools to study its regulation in a controlled environment for potential clinical and scientific applications. For this aim, an on-chip tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP(+)) selective microelectrode sensor was constructed in a microfluidic environment. The concentration of isolated mitochondria (Heb7A) used in a membrane potential measurement was 0.3 ng microL(-1), four orders of magnitude smaller than the concentration used in conventional assays (3 microg microL(-1)). In addition, the volume of the chamber (85 microL) is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than traditional experiments. As a demonstration, changes in the membrane potential are clearly measured in response to a barrage of well-known substrates and inhibitors of the electron transport chain. This general approach, which to date has not been demonstrated for study of mitochondrial function and bio-energetics in generally, can be instrumental in advancing the field of mitochondrial research and clinical applications by allowing high throughput studies of the regulation, dynamics, and statistical properties of the mitochondrial membrane potential in response to inhibitors and inducers of apoptosis in a controlled (microfluidic) chemical environment.

  10. Synchronism in mitochondrial ROS flashes, membrane depolarization and calcium sparks in human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Javadov, Sabzali; Saks, Valdur; Margreiter, Raimund; Grimm, Michael

    2017-03-06

    Mitochondria are major producers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in many cells including cancer cells. However, complex interrelationships between mitochondrial ROS (mitoROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and Ca(2+) are not completely understood. Using human carcinoma cells, we further highlight biphasic ROS dynamics: - gradual mitoROS increase followed by mitoROS flash. Also, we demonstrate heterogeneity in rates of mitoROS generation and flash initiation time. Comparing mitochondrial and near-extra-mitochondrial signals, we show that mechanisms of mitoROS flashes in single mitochondria, linked to mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening (ΔΨm collapse) and calcium sparks, may involve flash triggering by certain levels of external ROS released from the same mitochondria. In addition, mitochondria-mitochondria interactions can produce wave propagations of mitoROS flashes and ΔΨm collapses in cancer cells similar to phenomena of ROS-induced ROS release (RIRR). Our data suggest that in cancer cells RIRR, activation of mitoROS flashes and mitochondrial depolarization may involve participation of extramitochondrial-ROS produced either by individual mitochondria and/or by neighboring mitochondria. This could represent general mechanisms in ROS-ROS signaling with suggested role in both mitochondrial and cellular physiology and signaling.

  11. Disruption of a Mitochondrial MutS DNA Repair Enzyme Homolog Confers Drug Resistance in the Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Erin M.; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY MutS homologs (MSHs) are critical components of the eukaryotic mismatch repair machinery. In addition to repairing mismatched DNA, mismatch repair enzymes are known in higher eukaryotes to directly signal cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damaging agents. Accordingly, mammalian cells lacking certain MSHs are resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, we have discovered that the disruption of TgMSH-1, an MSH in the pathogenic parasite, T. gondii, confers drug resistance. Through a genetic selection for T. gondii mutants resistant to the antiparasitic drug monensin, we have isolated a strain that is resistant not only to monensin but also to salinomycin and the alkylating agent, methylnitrosourea. We have shown that this phenotype is due to the disruption of TgMSH-1 as the multi-drug resistance phenotype is complemented by a wild-type copy of TgMSH-1 and is recapitulated by a directed disruption of this gene in a wild-type strain. We have also shown that, unlike previously described MSHs involved in signaling, TgMSH-1 localizes to the parasite mitochondrion. These results provide the first example of a mitochondrial MutS Homolog that is involved in drug sensitivity and implicate the induction of mitochondrial stress as a mode of action of the widely used drug, monensin. PMID:19291232

  12. Simulations of Membrane-Disrupting Peptides II: AMP Piscidin 1 Favors Surface Defects over Pores.

    PubMed

    Perrin, B Scott; Fu, Riqiang; Cotten, Myriam L; Pastor, Richard W

    2016-09-20

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that disrupt bacterial membranes are promising therapeutics against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The mechanism of membrane disruption by the AMP piscidin 1 was examined with multimicrosecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The primary simulation was initialized with 20 peptides in four barrel-stave pores in a fully hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol bilayer. The four pores relaxed to toroidal by 200 ns, only one porelike structure containing two transmembrane helices remained at 26 μs, and none of the 18 peptides released to the surface reinserted to form pores. The simulation was repeated at 413 K with an applied electric field and all peptides were surface-bound by 200 ns. Trajectories of surface-bound piscidin with and without applied fields at 313 and 413 K and totaling 6 μs show transient distortions of the bilayer/water interface (consistent with (31)P NMR), but no insertion to transmembrane or pore states. (15)N chemical shifts confirm a fully surface-bound conformation. Taken together, the simulation and experimental results imply that transient defects rather than stable pores are responsible for membrane disruption by piscidin 1, and likely other AMPs.

  13. DLK-1, SEK-3 and PMK-3 Are Required for the Life Extension Induced by Mitochondrial Bioenergetic Disruption in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Munkácsy, Erin; Khan, Maruf H; Lane, Rebecca K; Borror, Megan B; Park, Jae H; Bokov, Alex F; Fisher, Alfred L; Link, Christopher D; Rea, Shane L

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction underlies numerous age-related pathologies. In an effort to uncover how the detrimental effects of mitochondrial dysfunction might be alleviated, we examined how the nematode C. elegans not only adapts to disruption of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, but in many instances responds with extended lifespan. Studies have shown various retrograde responses are activated in these animals, including the well-studied ATFS-1-dependent mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt). Such processes fall under the greater rubric of cellular surveillance mechanisms. Here we identify a novel p38 signaling cascade that is required to extend life when the mitochondrial electron transport chain is disrupted in worms, and which is blocked by disruption of the Mitochondrial-associated Degradation (MAD) pathway. This novel cascade is defined by DLK-1 (MAP3K), SEK-3 (MAP2K), PMK-3 (MAPK) and the reporter gene Ptbb-6::GFP. Inhibition of known mitochondrial retrograde responses does not alter induction of Ptbb-6::GFP, instead induction of this reporter often occurs in counterpoint to activation of SKN-1, which we show is under the control of ATFS-1. In those mitochondrial bioenergetic mutants which activate Ptbb-6::GFP, we find that dlk-1, sek-3 and pmk-3 are all required for their life extension.

  14. DLK-1, SEK-3 and PMK-3 Are Required for the Life Extension Induced by Mitochondrial Bioenergetic Disruption in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Rebecca K.; Borror, Megan B.; Bokov, Alex F.; Link, Christopher D.; Rea, Shane L.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction underlies numerous age-related pathologies. In an effort to uncover how the detrimental effects of mitochondrial dysfunction might be alleviated, we examined how the nematode C. elegans not only adapts to disruption of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, but in many instances responds with extended lifespan. Studies have shown various retrograde responses are activated in these animals, including the well-studied ATFS-1-dependent mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt). Such processes fall under the greater rubric of cellular surveillance mechanisms. Here we identify a novel p38 signaling cascade that is required to extend life when the mitochondrial electron transport chain is disrupted in worms, and which is blocked by disruption of the Mitochondrial-associated Degradation (MAD) pathway. This novel cascade is defined by DLK-1 (MAP3K), SEK-3 (MAP2K), PMK-3 (MAPK) and the reporter gene Ptbb-6::GFP. Inhibition of known mitochondrial retrograde responses does not alter induction of Ptbb-6::GFP, instead induction of this reporter often occurs in counterpoint to activation of SKN-1, which we show is under the control of ATFS-1. In those mitochondrial bioenergetic mutants which activate Ptbb-6::GFP, we find that dlk-1, sek-3 and pmk-3 are all required for their life extension. PMID:27420916

  15. Photodynamic therapy-induced apoptosis in epidermoid carcinoma cells. Reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Lam, M; Oleinick, N L; Nieminen, A L

    2001-12-14

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a novel and promising cancer treatment that employs a combination of a photosensitizing chemical and visible light, induces apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. However, the precise mechanism of PDT-induced apoptosis is not well characterized. To dissect the pathways of PDT-induced apoptosis, we investigated the involvement of mitochondrial damage by examining a second generation photosensitizer, the silicon phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4). By using laser-scanning confocal microscopy, we found that Pc 4 localized to cytosolic membranes primarily, but not exclusively, in mitochondria. Formation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected within minutes when cells were exposed to Pc 4 and 670-675 nm light. This was followed by mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization, depolarization and swelling, cytochrome c release, and apoptotic death. Desferrioxamine prevented mitochondrial ROS production and the events thereafter. Cyclosporin A plus trifluoperazine, blockers of the mitochondrial permeability transition, inhibited mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization and depolarization without affecting mitochondrial ROS generation. These data indicate that the mitochondrial ROS are critical in initiating mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization, which leads to mitochondrial swelling, cytochrome c release to the cytosol, and apoptotic death during PDT with Pc 4.

  16. Tuning the activity of mitochondria-penetrating peptides for delivery or disruption.

    PubMed

    Horton, Kristin L; Pereira, Mark P; Stewart, Kelly M; Fonseca, Sonali B; Kelley, Shana O

    2012-02-13

    Mitochondrially targeted agents have the capacity to be both vehicles for the delivery of bioactive agents and mitochondrial disrupters and show promise for the treatment of various diseases. Engineering these agents to specifically accumulate or disrupt the mitochondrion is challenging, as there is a fine line between characteristics of the molecules that accomplish each task. Here, we assess the physicochemical properties governing mitochondrial matrix accumulation or membrane disruption caused by mitochondria-penetrating peptides. Increases in peptide length and hydrophobicity were uncovered as the dominant factors in deriving membrane disruptive activity. Shorter, less hydrophobic peptides did not disrupt the mitochondrial membrane, but rather accumulated in the mitochondrial matrix without interfering with cellular activity. These shorter peptides, however, can trigger cytochrome c release through activation of the permeability transition pore complex (PTPC), but only at very high concentrations. This study illustrates that the activity of a mitochondria-localizing agent can be controlled through alterations in peptide hydrophobicity and dosing concentrations.

  17. Mitochondrial metabolic states and membrane potential modulate mtNOS activity.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Laura B; Zaobornyj, Tamara; Boveris, Alberto

    2006-03-01

    The mitochondrial metabolic state regulates the rate of NO release from coupled mitochondria: NO release by heart, liver and kidney mitochondria was about 40-45% lower in state 3 (1.2, 0.7 and 0.4 nmol/min mg protein) than in state 4 (2.2, 1.3 and 0.7 nmol/min mg protein). The activity of mtNOS, responsible for NO release, appears driven by the membrane potential component and not by intramitochondrial pH of the proton motive force. The intramitochondrial concentrations of the NOS substrates, L-arginine (about 310 microM) and NADPH (1.04-1.78 mM) are 60-1000 times higher than their KM values. Moreover, the changes in their concentrations in the state 4-state 3 transition are not enough to explain the changes in NO release. Nitric oxide release was exponentially dependent on membrane potential as reported for mitochondrial H2O2 production [S.S. Korshunov, V.P. Skulachev, A.A. Satarkov, High protonic potential actuates a mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria. FEBS Lett. 416 (1997) 15-18.]. Agents that decrease or abolish membrane potential minimize NO release while the addition of oligomycin that produces mitochondrial hyperpolarization generates the maximal NO release. The regulation of mtNOS activity, an apparently voltage-dependent enzyme, by membrane potential is marked at the physiological range of membrane potentials.

  18. Bioavailability of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs): Liposome-water partitioning and lipid membrane permeation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jung-Hwan

    The bioavailability of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is a function of a number of parameters including the ability of the chemical to partition into organic tissue and reach receptor sites within an organism. In this dissertation, equilibrium partition coefficients between water and lipid membrane vesicles and artificial lipid membrane permeability were investigated for evaluating bioavailability of aqueous pollutants. Structurally diverse endocrine disrupting chemicals were chosen as model compounds for partitioning experiments and simple hydrophobic organic chemicals were used for the evaluation of a parallel artificial membrane device developed to mimic bioconcentration rates in fish. Hydrophobic interactions represented by octanol/water partition coefficients (KOWs) were not appropriate for estimating lipid membrane/water partition coefficients (Klipws) for the selected EDCs having a relatively large molar liquid volume (MLV) and containing polar functional groups. Correlations that include MLV and polar surface area (PSA) reduce the predicted value of log K lipw, suggesting that lipid membranes are less favorable than 1-octanol for a hydrophobic solute because of the changes in membrane fluidity and the amount of cholesterol in the lipid bilayers. These results suggested that KOW alone has limited potential for estimating K lipw, and MLV or PSA may be used as additional descriptors for developing quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs). The poor correlations between KOW and Klipw observed in this research may be due to the highly organized structure of lipid bilayers. Measured thermodynamic constants demonstrated that the entropy contribution becomes more dominant for more organized liposomes having saturated lipid tails. This implies that entropy-driven partitioning process makes Klipw different from KOW especially for more saturated lipid bilayer membranes. In the parallel artificial membrane system developed, a membrane filter

  19. Definition of the mitochondrial proteome by measurement of molecular masses of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Joe; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2006-10-31

    The covalent structure of a protein is incompletely defined by its gene sequence, and mass spectrometric analysis of the intact protein is needed to detect the presence of any posttranslational modifications. Because most membrane proteins are purified in detergents that are incompatible with mass spectrometric ionization techniques, this essential measurement has not been made on many hydrophobic proteins, and so proteomic data are incomplete. We have extracted membrane proteins from bovine mitochondria and detergent-purified NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) with organic solvents, fractionated the mixtures by hydrophilic interaction chromatography, and measured the molecular masses of the intact membrane proteins, including those of six subunits of complex I that are encoded in mitochondrial DNA. These measurements resolve long-standing uncertainties about the interpretation of the mitochondrial genome, and they contribute significantly to the definition of the covalent composition of complex I.

  20. Modulation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Permeabilization and Apoptosis by Ceramide Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rego, António; Costa, Margarida; Chaves, Susana Rodrigues; Matmati, Nabil; Pereira, Helena; Sousa, Maria João; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Costa, Vítor; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a mitochondrial-dependent programmed cell death in response to different stimuli, such as acetic acid, with features similar to those of mammalian apoptosis. However, the upstream signaling events in this process, including those leading to mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, are still poorly characterized. Changes in sphingolipid metabolism have been linked to modulation of apoptosis in both yeast and mammalian cells, and ceramides have been detected in mitochondria upon apoptotic stimuli. In this study, we aimed to characterize the contribution of enzymes involved in ceramide metabolism to apoptotic cell death induced by acetic acid. We show that isc1Δ and lag1Δ mutants, lacking inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C and ceramide synthase, respectively, exhibited a higher resistance to acetic acid that was associated with lower levels of some phytoceramide species. Consistently, these mutant cells displayed lower levels of ROS production and reduced mitochondrial alterations, such as mitochondrial fragmentation and degradation, and decreased translocation of cytochrome c into the cytosol in response to acetic acid. These results suggest that ceramide production contributes to cell death induced by acetic acid, especially through hydrolysis of complex sphingolipids catalyzed by Isc1p and de novo synthesis catalyzed by Lag1p, and provide the first in vivo indication of its involvement in mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization in yeast. PMID:23226203

  1. A nuclear restorer-of-fertility mutation disrupts accumulation of mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit alpha in developing pollen of S male-sterile maize.

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Lanying; Ruesch, Kimberly L; Ortega, Victor M; Kamps, Terry L; Gabay-Laughnan, Susan; Chase, Christine D

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis and function depend upon the interaction of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Forward genetic analysis of mitochondrial function presents a challenge in organisms that are obligated to respire. In the S-cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS-S) system of maize, expression of mitochondrial open reading frames (orf355-orf77) conditions collapse of developing haploid pollen. Nuclear restorer-of-fertility mutations that circumvent pollen collapse are often homozygous lethal. These spontaneous mutations potentially result from disruption of nuclear genes required for mitochondrial gene expression, in contrast to homozygous-viable restorer-of-fertility alleles that function to block or compensate for the expression of mitochondrial CMS genes. Consistent with this hypothesis, the homozygous-lethal restoring allele historically designated RfIII was shown to be recessive in diploid pollen produced by tetraploid CMS-S plants. Accordingly, the symbol for this allele has been changed to restorer-of-fertility lethal 1 (rfl1). In haploid rfl1 pollen, orf355-orf77 transcripts and mitochondrial transcripts encoding the alpha-subunit of the ATP synthase (ATPA) were decreased in abundance. Haploid rfl1 pollen failed to accumulate wild-type levels of ATPA protein, indicating that functional requirements for mitochondrial protein accumulation are relaxed in maize pollen. The CMS-S system and rfl mutations therefore allow for the selection of nuclear mutations disrupting mitochondrial biogenesis in a multicellular eukaryote. PMID:14573487

  2. Impaired Mitochondrial Transcription Termination Disrupts the Stromal Redox Poise in Chlamydomonas1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Uhmeyer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    In photosynthetic eukaryotes, the metabolite exchange between chloroplast and mitochondria ensures efficient photosynthesis under saturating light conditions. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant stm6 is devoid of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor MOC1 and aberrantly expresses the mitochondrial genome, resulting in enhanced photosynthetic hydrogen production and diminished light tolerance. We analyzed the modulation of mitochondrial and chlororespiration during the acclimation of stm6 and the MOC1-complemented strain to excess light. Although light stress stimulated mitochondrial respiration via the energy-conserving cytochrome c pathway in both strains, the mutant was unable to fine-tune the expression and activity of oxidative phosphorylation complex I in excess light, which was accompanied by an increased mitochondrial respiration via the alternative oxidase pathway. Furthermore, stm6 failed to fully activate chlororespiration and cyclic electron flow due to a more oxidized state of the chloroplast stroma, which is caused by an increased mitochondrial electron sink capacity. Increased susceptibility to photoinhibition of PSII in stm6 demonstrates that the MOC1-dependent modulation of mitochondrial respiration helps control the stromal redox poise as a crucial part of high-light acclimation in C. reinhardtii. PMID:28500267

  3. Caspase cleavage of cytochrome c1 disrupts mitochondrial function and enhances cytochrome c release.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yushan; Li, Min; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Haijing; Liu, Shusen; Xu, Jianxin; Chen, Quan

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial catastrophe can be the cause or consequence of apoptosis and is associated with a number of pathophysiological conditions. The exact relationship between mitochondrial catastrophe and caspase activation is not completely understood. Here we addressed the underlying mechanism, explaining how activated caspase could feedback to attack mitochondria to amplify further cytochrome c (cyto.c) release. We discovered that cytochrome c1 (cyto.c1) in the bc1 complex of the mitochondrial respiration chain was a novel substrate of caspase 3 (casp.3). We found that cyto.c1 was cleaved at the site of D106, which is critical for binding with cyto.c, following apoptotic stresses or targeted expression of casp.3 into the mitochondrial intermembrane space. We demonstrated that this cleavage was closely linked with further cyto.c release and mitochondrial catastrophe. These mitochondrial events could be effectively blocked by expressing non-cleavable cyto.c1 (D106A) or by caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Our results demonstrate that the cleavage of cyto.c1 represents a critical step for the feedback amplification of cyto.c release by caspases and subsequent mitochondrial catastrophe.

  4. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function to Identify Compounds that Acutely Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Huang, Ruili; Michael, Sam; Witt, Kristine L.; Richard, Ann; Tice, Raymond R.; Simeonov, Anton; Austin, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding whether different environmental chemicals and druglike molecules impact mitochondrial function represents an initial step in predicting exposure-related toxicity and defining a possible role for such compounds in the onset of various diseases. Objectives: We sought to identify individual chemicals and general structural features associated with changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Methods: We used a multiplexed [two end points in one screen; MMP and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content] quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) approach combined with informatics tools to screen the Tox21 library of 10,000 compounds (~ 8,300 unique chemicals) at 15 concentrations each in triplicate to identify chemicals and structural features that are associated with changes in MMP in HepG2 cells. Results: Approximately 11% of the compounds (913 unique compounds) decreased MMP after 1 hr of treatment without affecting cell viability (ATP content). In addition, 309 compounds decreased MMP over a concentration range that also produced measurable cytotoxicity [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) in MMP assay/IC50 in viability assay ≤ 3; p < 0.05]. More than 11% of the structural clusters that constitute the Tox21 library (76 of 651 clusters) were significantly enriched for compounds that decreased the MMP. Conclusions: Our multiplexed qHTS approach allowed us to generate a robust and reliable data set to evaluate the ability of thousands of drugs and environmental compounds to decrease MMP. The use of structure-based clustering analysis allowed us to identify molecular features that are likely responsible for the observed activity. Citation: Attene-Ramos MS, Huang R, Michael S, Witt KL, Richard A, Tice RR, Simeonov A, Austin CP, Xia M. 2015. Profiling of the Tox

  5. Making heads or tails of mitochondrial membranes in longevity and aging: a role for comparative studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play vital roles in metabolic energy transduction, intermediate molecule metabolism, metal ion homeostasis, programmed cell death and regulation of the production of reactive oxygen species. As a result of their broad range of functions, mitochondria have been strongly implicated in aging and longevity. Numerous studies show that aging and decreased lifespan are also associated with high reactive oxygen species production by mitochondria, increased mitochondrial DNA and protein damage, and with changes in the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes. It is possible that the extent of fatty acid unsaturation of the mitochondrial membrane determines susceptibility to lipid oxidative damage and downstream protein and genome toxicity, thereby acting as a determinant of aging and lifespan. Reviewing the vast number of comparative studies on mitochondrial membrane composition, metabolism and lifespan reveals some evidence that lipid unsaturation ratios may correlate with lifespan. However, we caution against simply relating these two traits. They may be correlative but have no functional relation. We discuss an important methodology for body mass and phylogenetic correction in comparative studies. PMID:24588808

  6. Control of the ornithine cycle in Neurospora crassa by the mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R H; Ristow, J L

    1983-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa, the mitochondrial membrane separates ornithine used in arginine biosynthesis from ornithine used in the arginine degradative pathway in the cytosol. Ornithine easily exchanges across the mitochondrial membrane under conditions appropriate for synthesis of the immediate biosynthetic product, citrulline. Neither of the two mitochondrial enzymes required for the ornithine-to-citrulline conversion is feedback inhibitable in vitro. Nevertheless, when arginine is added to cells and cytosolic ornithine increases as arginine degradation begins, the rate of citrulline synthesis drops immediately to about 20% of normal (B. J. Bowman and R. H. Davis, Bacteriol. 130:285-291, 1977). We have studied this phenomenon in citrulline-accumulating strains carrying the arg-1 mutation. Citrulline accumulation is blocked when arginine is added to an arg-1 strain but not to an arg-1 strain carrying a mutation conferring insensitivity of intramitochondrial ornithine synthesis to arginine. Thus, ornithine is evidently unable to enter mitochondria in normal (feedback-sensitive) cells. Other experiments show that cytosolic ornithine enters mitochondria readily except when arginine or other basic amino acids are present at high levels in the cells. We conclude that in N. crassa, the mitochondrial membrane has evolved as a secondary site of feedback inhibition in arginine synthesis and that this prevents a wasteful cycling of catabolic ornithine back through the anabolic pathway. This is compared to the quite different mechanism by which the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae prevents a futile ornithine cycle. PMID:6222031

  7. Lipopolysaccharide Disrupts Mitochondrial Physiology in Skeletal Muscle via Disparate Effects on Sphingolipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Melissa E; Simmons, Kurtis J; Tippetts, Trevor S; Thatcher, Mikayla O; Saito, Rex R; Hubbard, Sheryl T; Trumbull, Annie M; Parker, Brian A; Taylor, Oliver J; Bikman, Benjamin T

    2015-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are prevalent pathogenic molecules that are found within tissues and blood. Elevated circulating LPS is a feature of obesity and sepsis, both of which are associated with mitochondrial abnormalities that are key pathological features of LPS excess. However, the mechanism of LPS-induced mitochondrial alterations remains poorly understood. Herein we demonstrate the necessity of sphingolipid accrual in mediating altered mitochondrial physiology in skeletal muscle following LPS exposure. In particular, we found LPS elicited disparate effects on the sphingolipids dihydroceramides (DhCer) and ceramides (Cer) in both cultured myotubes and in muscle of LPS-injected mice. Although LPS-treated myotubes had reduced DhCer and increased Cer as well as increased mitochondrial respiration, muscle from LPS-injected mice manifested a reverse trend, namely elevated DhCer, but reduced Cer as well as reduced mitochondrial respiration. In addition, we found that LPS treatment caused mitochondrial fission, likely via dynamin-related protein 1, and increased oxidative stress. However, inhibition of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis via myriocin protected normal mitochondrial function in spite of LPS, but inhibition of DhCer desaturase 1, which increases DhCer, but not Cer, exacerbated mitochondrial respiration with LPS. In an attempt to reconcile the incongruent effects of LPS in isolated muscle cells and whole muscle tissue, we incubated myotubes with conditioned medium from treated macrophages. In contrast to direct myotube LPS treatment, conditioned medium from LPS-treated macrophages reduced myotube respiration, but this was again mitigated with sphingolipid inhibition. Thus, macrophage sphingolipid production appears to be necessary for LPS-induced mitochondrial alterations in skeletal muscle tissue.

  8. Disruption of the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) plays a central role in palmitic acid-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Shinjo, Satoko; Jiang, Shuying; Nameta, Masaaki; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kanai, Mai; Nomura, Yuta; Goda, Nobuhito

    2017-10-01

    The mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) is a specialized subdomain of ER that physically connects with mitochondria. Although disruption of inter-organellar crosstalk via the MAM impairs cellular homeostasis, its pathological significance in insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus remains unclear. Here, we reveal the importance of reduced MAM formation in the induction of fatty acid-evoked insulin resistance in hepatocytes. Palmitic acid (PA) repressed insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in HepG2 cells within 12h. Treatment with an inhibitor of the ER stress response failed to restore PA-mediated suppression of Akt activation. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production did not increase in PA-treated cells. Even short-term exposure (3h) to PA reduced the calcium flux from ER to mitochondria, followed by a significant decrease in MAM contact area, suggesting that PA suppressed the functional interaction between ER and mitochondria. Forced expression of mitofusin-2, a critical component of the MAM, partially restored MAM contact area and ameliorated the PA-elicited suppression of insulin sensitivity with Ser473 phosphorylation of Akt selectively improved. These results suggest that loss of proximity between ER and mitochondria, but not perturbation of homeostasis in the two organelles individually, plays crucial roles in PA-evoked Akt inactivation in hepatic insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene disruption of dematin causes precipitous loss of erythrocyte membrane stability and severe hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunzhe; Hanada, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Yuko; Nwankwo, Jennifer O; Wieschhaus, Adam J; Hartwig, John; Huang, Sha; Han, Jongyoon; Chishti, Athar H

    2016-07-07

    Dematin is a relatively low abundance actin binding and bundling protein associated with the spectrin-actin junctions of mature erythrocytes. Primary structure of dematin includes a loosely folded core domain and a compact headpiece domain that was originally identified in villin. Dematin's actin binding properties are regulated by phosphorylation of its headpiece domain by cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. Here, we used a novel gene disruption strategy to generate the whole body dematin gene knockout mouse model (FLKO). FLKO mice, while born at a normal Mendelian ratio, developed severe anemia and exhibited profound aberrations of erythrocyte morphology and membrane stability. Having no apparent effect on primitive erythropoiesis, FLKO mice show significant enhancement of erythroblast enucleation during definitive erythropoiesis. Using membrane protein analysis, domain mapping, electron microscopy, and dynamic deformability measurements, we investigated the mechanism of membrane instability in FLKO erythrocytes. Although many membrane and cytoskeletal proteins remained at their normal levels, the major peripheral membrane proteins spectrin, adducin, and actin were greatly reduced in FLKO erythrocytes. Our results demonstrate that dematin plays a critical role in maintaining the fundamental properties of the membrane cytoskeleton complex. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Arabidopsis chloroplast lipid transport protein TGD2 disrupts membranes and is part of a large complex.

    PubMed

    Roston, Rebecca; Gao, Jinpeng; Xu, Changcheng; Benning, Christoph

    2011-06-01

    In most plants the assembly of the photosynthetic thylakoid membrane requires lipid precursors synthesized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Thus, the transport of lipids from the ER to the chloroplast is essential for biogenesis of the thylakoids. TGD2 is one of four proteins in Arabidopsis required for lipid import into the chloroplast, and was found to bind phosphatidic acid in vitro. However, the significance of phosphatidic acid binding for the function of TGD2 in vivo and TGD2 interaction with membranes remained unclear. Developing three functional assays probing how TGD2 affects lipid bilayers in vitro, we show that it perturbs membranes to the point of fusion, causes liposome leakage and redistributes lipids in the bilayer. By identifying and characterizing five new mutant alleles, we demonstrate that these functions are impaired in specific mutants with lipid phenotypes in vivo. At the structural level, we show that TGD2 is part of a protein complex larger than 500 kDa, the formation of which is disrupted in two mutant alleles, indicative of the biological relevance of this TGD2-containing complex. Based on the data presented, we propose that TGD2, as part of a larger complex, forms a lipid transport conduit between the inner and outer chloroplast envelope membranes, with its N terminus anchored in the inner membrane and its C terminus binding phosphatidic acid in the outer membrane.

  11. Gene disruption of dematin causes precipitous loss of erythrocyte membrane stability and severe hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yunzhe; Hanada, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Yuko; Nwankwo, Jennifer O.; Wieschhaus, Adam J.; Hartwig, John; Huang, Sha; Han, Jongyoon

    2016-01-01

    Dematin is a relatively low abundance actin binding and bundling protein associated with the spectrin–actin junctions of mature erythrocytes. Primary structure of dematin includes a loosely folded core domain and a compact headpiece domain that was originally identified in villin. Dematin’s actin binding properties are regulated by phosphorylation of its headpiece domain by cyclic adenosine monophosphate–dependent protein kinase. Here, we used a novel gene disruption strategy to generate the whole body dematin gene knockout mouse model (FLKO). FLKO mice, while born at a normal Mendelian ratio, developed severe anemia and exhibited profound aberrations of erythrocyte morphology and membrane stability. Having no apparent effect on primitive erythropoiesis, FLKO mice show significant enhancement of erythroblast enucleation during definitive erythropoiesis. Using membrane protein analysis, domain mapping, electron microscopy, and dynamic deformability measurements, we investigated the mechanism of membrane instability in FLKO erythrocytes. Although many membrane and cytoskeletal proteins remained at their normal levels, the major peripheral membrane proteins spectrin, adducin, and actin were greatly reduced in FLKO erythrocytes. Our results demonstrate that dematin plays a critical role in maintaining the fundamental properties of the membrane cytoskeleton complex. PMID:27073223

  12. Loss of Drp1 function alters OPA1 processing and changes mitochondrial membrane organization

    SciTech Connect

    Moepert, Kristin; Hajek, Petr; Frank, Stephan; Chen, Christiane; Kaufmann, Joerg; Santel, Ansgar

    2009-08-01

    RNAi mediated loss of Drp1 function changes mitochondrial morphology in cultured HeLa and HUVEC cells by shifting the balance of mitochondrial fission and fusion towards unopposed fusion. Over time, inhibition of Drp1 expression results in the formation of a highly branched mitochondrial network along with 'bulge'-like structures. These changes in mitochondrial morphology are accompanied by a reduction in levels of Mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and 2 (Mfn2) and a modified proteolytic processing of OPA1 isoforms, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, our data imply that bulge formation is driven by Mfn1 action along with particular proteolytic short-OPA1 (s-OPA1) variants: Loss of Mfn2 in the absence of Drp1 results in an increase of Mfn1 levels along with processed s-OPA1-isoforms, thereby enhancing continuous 'fusion' and bulge formation. Moreover, bulge formation might reflect s-OPA1 mitochondrial membrane remodeling activity, resulting in the compartmentalization of cytochrome c deposits. The proteins Yme1L and PHB2 appeared not associated with the observed enhanced OPA1 proteolysis upon RNAi of Drp1, suggesting the existence of other OPA1 processing controlling proteins. Taken together, Drp1 appears to affect the activity of the mitochondrial fusion machinery by unbalancing the protein levels of mitofusins and OPA1.

  13. Radiation inactivation method provides evidence that membrane-bound mitochondrial creatine kinase is an oligomer

    SciTech Connect

    Quemeneur, E.; Eichenberger, D.; Goldschmidt, D.; Vial, C.; Beauregard, G.; Potier, M.

    1988-06-30

    Lyophilized suspensions of rabbit heart mitochondria have been irradiated with varying doses of gamma rays. Mitochondrial creatine kinase activity was inactivated exponentially with a radiation inactivation size of 352 or 377 kDa depending upon the initial medium. These values are in good agreement with the molecular mass previously deduced from by permeation experiments: 357 kDa. This is the first direct evidence showing that the native form of mitochondrial creatine kinase is associated to the inner membrane as an oligomer, very likely an octamer.

  14. Alterations in Lipid Levels of Mitochondrial Membranes Induced by Amyloid-β: A Protective Role of Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio A.; Lopez-Armas, Gabriela; Cruz-Ramos, Jose; Melnikov, Valery G.; Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Munoz, Ruben; Reiter, Russel J.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer pathogenesis involves mitochondrial dysfunction, which is closely related to amyloid-β (Aβ) generation, abnormal tau phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Alterations in membranal components, including cholesterol and fatty acids, their characteristics, disposition, and distribution along the membranes, have been studied as evidence of cell membrane alterations in AD brain. The majority of these studies have been focused on the cytoplasmic membrane; meanwhile the mitochondrial membranes have been less explored. In this work, we studied lipids and mitochondrial membranes in vivo, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ). The purpose was to determine how Aβ may be responsible for beginning of a vicious cycle where oxidative stress and alterations in cholesterol, lipids and fatty acids, feed back on each other to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We observed changes in mitochondrial membrane lipids, and fatty acids, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar Aβ in aged Wistar rats. Melatonin, a well-known antioxidant and neuroimmunomodulator indoleamine, reversed some of these alterations and protected mitochondrial membranes from obvious damage. Additionally, melatonin increased the levels of linolenic and n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid, in the same site where amyloid β was injected, favoring an endogenous anti-inflammatory pathway. PMID:22666620

  15. Function of the mitochondrial outer membrane as a diffusion barrier in health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Gellerich, F N; Trumbeckaite, S; Opalka, J R; Seppet, E; Rasmussen, H N; Neuhoff, C; Zierz, S

    2000-02-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane separates the intermembrane space from the cytosol. The whole exchange of metabolites, cations and information between mitochondria and the cell occurs through the outer membrane. Experimental evidence is reviewed supporting the hypothesis of dynamic ADP compartmentation within the intermembrane space. The outer membrane creates a diffusion barrier for small molecules (adenine nucleotides, creatine phosphate, creatine etc.) causing rate-dependent concentration gradients as a prerequisite for the action of ADP shuttles via creatine kinases or adenylate kinases. If the outer membrane becomes leaky, cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor can be released, leading to apoptosis, and as a bioenergetic consequence the cytosolic phosphorylation potential decreases. Leaky outer membranes can be detected in saponin-skinned fibres with spectrophotometric and oxygraphic methods. This is of special interest in respect to acute impairment of mitochondria during ischaemia/reperfusion.

  16. Disruption of Renal Tubular Mitochondrial Quality Control by Myo-Inositol Oxygenase in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Ming; Usman, Irtaza M.; Sun, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is associated with oxidative stress and mitochondrial injury. Myo-inositol oxygenase (MIOX), a tubular-specific enzyme, modulates redox imbalance and apoptosis in tubular cells in diabetes, but these mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the role of MIOX in perturbation of mitochondrial quality control, including mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy/mitophagy, under high-glucose (HG) ambience or a diabetic state. HK-2 or LLC-PK1 cells subjected to HG exhibited an upregulation of MIOX accompanied by mitochondrial fragmentation and depolarization, inhibition of autophagy/mitophagy, and altered expression of mitochondrial dynamic and mitophagic proteins. Furthermore, dysfunctional mitochondria accumulated in the cytoplasm, which coincided with increased reactive oxygen species generation, Bax activation, cytochrome C release, and apoptosis. Overexpression of MIOX in LLC-PK1 cells enhanced the effects of HG, whereas MIOX siRNA or d-glucarate, an inhibitor of MIOX, partially reversed these perturbations. Moreover, decreasing the expression of MIOX under HG ambience increased PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 expression and the dependent mitofusin-2–Parkin interaction. In tubules of diabetic mice, increased MIOX expression and mitochondrial fragmentation and defective autophagy were observed. Dietary supplementation of d-glucarate in diabetic mice decreased MIOX expression, attenuated tubular damage, and improved renal functions. Notably, d-glucarate administration also partially attenuated mitochondrial fragmentation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis and restored autophagy/mitophagy in the tubular cells of these mice. These results suggest a novel mechanism linking MIOX to impaired mitochondrial quality control during tubular injury in the pathogenesis of DKD and suggest d-glucarate as a potential therapeutic agent for the amelioration of DKD. PMID:25270067

  17. A dimeric equilibrium intermediate nucleates Drp1 reassembly on mitochondrial membranes for fission.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Patrick J; Stepanyants, Natalia; Mehrotra, Niharika; Mears, Jason A; Qi, Xin; Sesaki, Hiromi; Ramachandran, Rajesh

    2014-06-15

    The GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) catalyzes mitochondrial division, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Much of what is attributed to Drp1's mechanism of action in mitochondrial membrane fission parallels that of prototypical dynamin in endocytic vesicle scission. Unlike the case for dynamin, however, no lipid target for Drp1 activation at the mitochondria has been identified. In addition, the oligomerization properties of Drp1 have not been well established. We show that the mitochondria-specific lipid cardiolipin is a potent stimulator of Drp1 GTPase activity, as well as of membrane tubulation. We establish further that under physiological conditions, Drp1 coexists as two morphologically distinct polymeric species, one nucleotide bound in solution and the other membrane associated, which equilibrate via a dimeric assembly intermediate. With two mutations, C300A and C505A, that shift Drp1 polymerization equilibria in opposite directions, we demonstrate that dimers, and not multimers, potentiate the reassembly and reorganization of Drp1 for mitochondrial membrane remodeling both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. An essential novel component of the noncanonical mitochondrial outer membrane protein import system of trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Pusnik, Mascha; Mani, Jan; Schmidt, Oliver; Niemann, Moritz; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schnarwiler, Felix; Warscheid, Bettina; Lithgow, Trevor; Meisinger, Chris; Schneider, André

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane protein Tom40 is the general entry gate for imported proteins in essentially all eukaryotes. Trypanosomatids lack Tom40, however, and use instead a protein termed the archaic translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (ATOM). Here we report the discovery of pATOM36, a novel essential component of the trypanosomal outer membrane protein import system that interacts with ATOM. pATOM36 is not related to known Tom proteins from other organisms and mediates the import of matrix proteins. However, there is a group of precursor proteins whose import is independent of pATOM36. Domain-swapping experiments indicate that the N-terminal presequence-containing domain of the substrate proteins at least in part determines the dependence on pATOM36. Secondary structure profiling suggests that pATOM36 is composed largely of α-helices and its assembly into the outer membrane is independent of the sorting and assembly machinery complex. Taken together, these results show that pATOM36 is a novel component associated with the ATOM complex that promotes the import of a subpopulation of proteins into the mitochondrial matrix. PMID:22787278

  19. Superresolution Fluorescence Imaging of Mitochondrial Nucleoids Reveals Their Spatial Range, Limits, and Membrane Interaction ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Timothy A.; Tkachuk, Ariana N.; Shtengel, Gleb; Kopek, Benjamin G.; Bogenhagen, Daniel F.; Hess, Harald F.; Clayton, David A.

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental objective in molecular biology is to understand how DNA is organized in concert with various proteins, RNA, and biological membranes. Mitochondria maintain and express their own DNA (mtDNA), which is arranged within structures called nucleoids. Their functions, dimensions, composition, and precise locations relative to other mitochondrial structures are poorly defined. Superresolution fluorescence microscopy techniques that exceed the previous limits of imaging within the small and highly compartmentalized mitochondria have been recently developed. We have improved and employed both two- and three-dimensional applications of photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM and iPALM, respectively) to visualize the core dimensions and relative locations of mitochondrial nucleoids at an unprecedented resolution. PALM reveals that nucleoids differ greatly in size and shape. Three-dimensional volumetric analysis indicates that, on average, the mtDNA within ellipsoidal nucleoids is extraordinarily condensed. Two-color PALM shows that the freely diffusible mitochondrial matrix protein is largely excluded from the nucleoid. In contrast, nucleoids are closely associated with the inner membrane and often appear to be wrapped around cristae or crista-like inner membrane invaginations. Determinations revealing high packing density, separation from the matrix, and tight association with the inner membrane underscore the role of mechanisms that regulate access to mtDNA and that remain largely unknown. PMID:22006021

  20. Ergosterol content specifies targeting of tail-anchored proteins to mitochondrial outer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Krumpe, Katrin; Frumkin, Idan; Herzig, Yonatan; Rimon, Nitzan; Özbalci, Cagakan; Brügger, Britta; Rapaport, Doron; Schuldiner, Maya

    2012-01-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins have a single C-terminal transmembrane domain, making their biogenesis dependent on posttranslational translocation. Despite their importance, no dedicated insertion machinery has been uncovered for mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) TA proteins. To decipher the molecular mechanisms guiding MOM TA protein insertion, we performed two independent systematic microscopic screens in which we visualized the localization of model MOM TA proteins on the background of mutants in all yeast genes. We could find no mutant in which insertion was completely blocked. However, both screens demonstrated that MOM TA proteins were partially localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in ∆spf1 cells. Spf1, an ER ATPase with unknown function, is the first protein shown to affect MOM TA protein insertion. We found that ER membranes in ∆spf1 cells become similar in their ergosterol content to mitochondrial membranes. Indeed, when we visualized MOM TA protein distribution in yeast strains with reduced ergosterol content, they phenocopied the loss of Spf1. We therefore suggest that the inherent differences in membrane composition between organelle membranes are sufficient to determine membrane integration specificity in a eukaryotic cell. PMID:22918956

  1. Polyhydroxybutyrate targets mammalian mitochondria and increases permeability of plasmalemmal and mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Elustondo, Pia A; Angelova, Plamena R; Kawalec, Michał; Michalak, Michał; Kurcok, Piotr; Abramov, Andrey Y; Pavlov, Evgeny V

    2013-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a polyester of 3-hydroxybutyric acid (HB) that is ubiquitously present in all organisms. In higher eukaryotes PHB is found in the length of 10 to 100 HB units and can be present in free form as well as in association with proteins and inorganic polyphosphate. It has been proposed that PHB can mediate ion transport across lipid bilayer membranes. We investigated the ability of PHB to interact with living cells and isolated mitochondria and the effects of these interactions on membrane ion transport. We performed experiments using a fluorescein derivative of PHB (fluo-PHB). We found that fluo-PHB preferentially accumulated inside the mitochondria of HeLa cells. Accumulation of fluo-PHB induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization. This membrane depolarization was significantly delayed by the inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore - Cyclosporin A. Further experiments using intact cells as well as isolated mitochondria confirmed that the effects of PHB directly linked to its ability to facilitate ion transport, including calcium, across the membranes. We conclude that PHB demonstrates ionophoretic properties in biological membranes and this effect is most profound in mitochondria due to the selective accumulation of the polymer in this organelle.

  2. Polyhydroxybutyrate Targets Mammalian Mitochondria and Increases Permeability of Plasmalemmal and Mitochondrial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Elustondo, Pia A.; Angelova, Plamena R.; Kawalec, Michał; Michalak, Michał; Kurcok, Piotr; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Pavlov, Evgeny V.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a polyester of 3-hydroxybutyric acid (HB) that is ubiquitously present in all organisms. In higher eukaryotes PHB is found in the length of 10 to 100 HB units and can be present in free form as well as in association with proteins and inorganic polyphosphate. It has been proposed that PHB can mediate ion transport across lipid bilayer membranes. We investigated the ability of PHB to interact with living cells and isolated mitochondria and the effects of these interactions on membrane ion transport. We performed experiments using a fluorescein derivative of PHB (fluo-PHB). We found that fluo-PHB preferentially accumulated inside the mitochondria of HeLa cells. Accumulation of fluo-PHB induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization. This membrane depolarization was significantly delayed by the inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore - Cyclosporin A. Further experiments using intact cells as well as isolated mitochondria confirmed that the effects of PHB directly linked to its ability to facilitate ion transport, including calcium, across the membranes. We conclude that PHB demonstrates ionophoretic properties in biological membranes and this effect is most profound in mitochondria due to the selective accumulation of the polymer in this organelle. PMID:24086638

  3. The application of membrane bioreactors as decentralised systems for removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals and pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Le-Minh, N; Coleman, H M; Khan, S J; van Luer, Y; Trang, T T T; Watkins, G; Stuetz, R M

    2010-01-01

    The concentrations of some important endocrine disrupting chemicals and pharmaceuticals after various stages of wastewater treatment were investigated. The endocrine disrupting chemicals included natural and synthetic estrogenic and androgenic steroids. The pharmaceuticals included a series of sulfonamide antibiotics and trimethoprim. The removal efficiency of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) was investigated and compared with a conventional activated sludge (CAS) system. Samples were analysed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that the MBR and CAS systems effectively removed steroidal estrogens and androgens, but only partially eliminated the target antibiotics from wastewater. The MBR was shown to be more effective than the CAS system which was possibly attributed to the high solid retention time and concentration of biosolids in the MBR. The results highlight the potential wider application of MBRs for the removal of trace chemical contaminants in wastewater and their potential for use as decentralised wastewater treatment systems.

  4. Mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential after low-flow ischemia are not affected by ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Boengler, Kerstin; Gres, Petra; Dodoni, Giuliano; Konietzka, Ina; Di Lisa, Fabio; Heusch, Gerd; Schulz, Rainer

    2007-11-01

    Mitochondrial function following prolonged ischemia and subsequent reperfusion is better preserved by ischemic preconditioning (IP). In the present study, we analyzed whether or not IP has an impact on mitochondrial function at the end of a sustained ischemic period. Göttinger minipigs were subjected to 90-min low-flow ischemia without (n=5) and with (n=5) a preconditioning cycle of 10-min ischemia and 15-min reperfusion. Mitochondria were isolated from the ischemic or preconditioned anterior wall (AW) and the control posterior wall (PW) at the end of ischemia. Basal mitochondrial respiration was not different between AW and PW. The ADP-stimulated (state 3) respiration in AW mitochondria compared to PW mitochondria was equally decreased in non-preconditioned and preconditioned pigs. The uncoupled respiration as well as the membrane potential (rhodamine 123 fluorescence) were not significantly different between groups. However, the recovery of the membrane potential (Delta rhodamine 123 fluorescence/s) after the addition of ADP was delayed in mitochondria obtained from AW compared to PW, both in non-preconditioned and in preconditioned pig hearts. Neither the amount of marker proteins for complexes of the electron transport chain nor the level of reactive oxygen species were affected by ischemia without or with IP. State 3 respiration and recovery of membrane potential were impaired in pig mitochondria after 90 min of low-flow ischemia. IP did not improve mitochondrial function during ischemia. Therefore, the preservation of mitochondrial function by IP may occur during reperfusion rather than during the sustained ischemic period.

  5. Structural and functional alterations in mitochondrial membrane in picrotoxin-induced epileptic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Munjal M; Katyare, Surendra S

    2005-03-01

    Mitochondrial function is a key determinant of both excitability and viability of neurons. Present studies were carried out to decipher cerebral mitochondrial oxidative energy metabolism and membrane function in the chronic condition of generalized seizures induced by picrotoxin (PTX) in rats. PTX-induced convulsions resulted in decreased respiration rates (14-41%) with glutamate, pyruvate + malate, and succinate as substrate. The ADP phosphorylation rates were drastically reduced by 44-65%. An opposite trend was observed with ascorbate + N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine [corrected] (TMPD) as substrate. In general, uncoupling of the mitochondrial electron transport was observed after PTX treatment. Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities were decreased by 20-80%; also, there was significant reduction in cytochrome b content after PTX treatment, while the F(o)F(1) ATPase (complex V) activity increased in basal and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-stimulated condition, indicating increased membrane fragility. The substrate kinetics analysis had shown that K(m) and V(max) of the higher affinity kinetic component of ATPase increased significantly by 1.2- to 1.4-fold in epileptic condition. Temperature kinetic analysis revealed 1.2-fold increase in energies of activation with decreased transition temperature. The total phospholipid (TPL) and cholesterol (CHL) contents decreased significantly with lowering of diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidylserine (PS), while lysophospholipid (lyso), sphingomyelin (SPM), and phosphatidylcholine components were found to be elevated. Brain mitochondrial membrane was somewhat more fluidized in epileptic animals. Possible consequences of mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) dysfunction are discussed. In conclusion, impairment of MRC function along with structural alterations suggests novel pathophysiological mechanisms important for

  6. Disruption of the mitochondrial thioredoxin system as a cell death mechanism of cationic triphenylmethanes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Zheng, Yujuan; Fried, Levi E; Du, Yatao; Montano, Sergio J; Sohn, Allie; Lefkove, Benjamin; Holmgren, Lars; Arbiser, Jack L; Holmgren, Arne; Lu, Jun

    2011-04-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial structure and function are a hallmark of cancer cells compared to normal cells and thus targeting mitochondria has emerged as an novel approach to cancer therapy. The mitochondrial thioredoxin 2 (Trx2) system is critical for cell viability, but its role in cancer biology is not well understood. Recently some cationic triphenylmethanes such as brilliant green (BG) and gentian violet were shown to have antitumor and antiangiogenic activity with unknown mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that BG killed cells at nanomolar concentrations and targeted mitochondrial Trx2, which was oxidized and degraded. HeLa cells were more sensitive to BG than fibroblasts. In HeLa cells, Trx2 down-regulation by siRNA resulted in increased sensitivity to BG, whereas for fibroblasts, the same treatments had no effect. BG was observed to accumulate in mitochondria and cause a rapid and dramatic decrease in mitochondrial Trx2 protein. With a redox Western blot method, we found that treatment with BG caused oxidation of both Trx1 and Trx2, followed by release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria into the cytosol. Moreover, this treatment resulted in an elevation of the mRNA level of Lon protease, a protein quality control enzyme in the mitochondrial matrix, suggesting that the oxidized Trx2 may be degraded by Lon protease.

  7. MitoQ regulates autophagy by inducing a pseudo-mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Liu, Xiongxiong; Di, Cuixia; Wang, Zhenhua; Mi, Xiangquan; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Qiuyue; Mao, Aihong; Chen, Weiqiang; Gan, Lu; Zhang, Hong

    2017-04-03

    During the process of oxidative phosphorylation, protons are pumped into the mitochondrial intermembrane space to establish a mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). The electrochemical gradient generated allows protons to return to the matrix through the ATP synthase complex and generates ATP in the process. MitoQ is a lipophilic cationic drug that is adsorbed to the inner mitochondrial membrane; however, the cationic moiety of MitoQ remains in the intermembrane space. We found that the positive charges in MitoQ inhibited the activity of respiratory chain complexes I, III, and IV, reduced proton production, and decreased oxygen consumption. Therefore, a pseudo-MMP (PMMP) was formed via maintenance of exogenous positive charges. Proton backflow was severely impaired, leading to a decrease in ATP production and an increase in AMP production. Excess AMP activates AMP kinase, which inhibits the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway and induces macroautophagy/autophagy. Therefore, we conclude that MitoQ increases PMMP via proton displacement with exogenous positive charges. In addition, PMMP triggered autophagy in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells via modification of mitochondrial bioenergetics pathways.

  8. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane.

  9. The anti-cancer agent guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane: Ensuing energetic and oxidative stress implications

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L.; Tudella, Valeria G.

    2011-06-15

    Guttiferone-A (GA) is a natural occurring polyisoprenylated benzophenone with cytotoxic action in vitro and anti-tumor action in rodent models. We addressed a potential involvement of mitochondria in GA toxicity (1-25 {mu}M) toward cancer cells by employing both hepatic carcinoma (HepG2) cells and succinate-energized mitochondria, isolated from rat liver. In HepG2 cells GA decreased viability, dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential, depleted ATP and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In isolated rat-liver mitochondria GA promoted membrane fluidity increase, cyclosporine A/EGTA-insensitive membrane permeabilization, uncoupling (membrane potential dissipation/state 4 respiration rate increase), Ca{sup 2+} efflux, ATP depletion, NAD(P)H depletion/oxidation and ROS levels increase. All effects in cells, except mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, as well as NADPH depletion/oxidation and permeabilization in isolated mitochondria, were partly prevented by the a NAD(P)H regenerating substrate isocitrate. The results suggest the following sequence of events: 1) GA interaction with mitochondrial membrane promoting its permeabilization; 2) mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation; 3) NAD(P)H oxidation/depletion due to inability of membrane potential-sensitive NADP{sup +} transhydrogenase of sustaining its reduced state; 4) ROS accumulation inside mitochondria and cells; 5) additional mitochondrial membrane permeabilization due to ROS; and 6) ATP depletion. These GA actions are potentially implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds. - Graphical abstract: Guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane and induces cancer cell death Display Omitted Highlights: > We addressed the involvement of mitochondria in guttiferone (GA) toxicity toward cancer cells. > GA promoted membrane permeabilization, membrane potential dissipation, NAD(P)H depletion, ROS accumulation and ATP depletion. > These actions

  10. Disrupted mitochondrial function in the Opa3L122P mouse model for Costeff Syndrome impairs skeletal integrity

    PubMed Central

    Navein, Alice E.; Cooke, Esther J.; Davies, Jennifer R.; Smith, Terence G.; Wells, Lois H. M.; Ohazama, Atsushi; Healy, Christopher; Sharpe, Paul T.; Evans, Sam L.; Evans, Bronwen A. J.; Votruba, Marcela; Wells, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction connects metabolic disturbance with numerous pathologies, but the significance of mitochondrial activity in bone remains unclear. We have, therefore, characterized the skeletal phenotype in the Opa3L122P mouse model for Costeff syndrome, in which a missense mutation of the mitochondrial membrane protein, Opa3, impairs mitochondrial activity resulting in visual and metabolic dysfunction. Although widely expressed in the developing normal mouse head, Opa3 expression was restricted after E14.5 to the retina, brain, teeth and mandibular bone. Opa3 was also expressed in adult tibiae, including at the trabecular surfaces and in cortical osteocytes, epiphyseal chondrocytes, marrow adipocytes and mesenchymal stem cell rosettes. Opa3L122P mice displayed craniofacial abnormalities, including undergrowth of the lower mandible, accompanied in some individuals by cranial asymmetry and incisor malocclusion. Opa3L122P mice showed an 8-fold elevation in tibial marrow adiposity, due largely to increased adipogenesis. In addition, femoral length and cortical diameter and wall thickness were reduced, the weakening of the calcified tissue and the geometric component of strength reducing overall cortical strength in Opa3L122P mice by 65%. In lumbar vertebrae reduced vertebral body area and wall thickness were accompanied by a proportionate reduction in marrow adiposity. Although the total biomechanical strength of lumbar vertebrae was reduced by 35%, the strength of the calcified tissue (σmax) was proportionate to a 38% increase in trabecular number. Thus, mitochondrial function is important for the development and maintenance of skeletal integrity, impaired bone growth and strength, particularly in limb bones, representing a significant new feature of the Costeff syndrome phenotype. PMID:27106103

  11. Apricot Melanoidins Prevent Oxidative Endothelial Cell Death by Counteracting Mitochondrial Oxidation and Membrane Depolarization

    PubMed Central

    Giordo, Roberta; Emanueli, Costanza; Sanguinetti, Anna Maria; Piscopo, Amalia; Poiana, Marco; Capobianco, Giampiero; Piga, Antonio; Pintus, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    The cardiovascular benefits associated with diets rich in fruit and vegetables are thought to be due to phytochemicals contained in fresh plant material. However, whether processed plant foods provide the same benefits as unprocessed ones is an open question. Melanoidins from heat-processed apricots were isolated and their presence confirmed by colorimetric analysis and browning index. Oxidative injury of endothelial cells (ECs) is the key step for the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), therefore the potential protective effect of apricot melanoidins on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative mitochondrial damage and cell death was explored in human ECs. The redox state of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial compartments was detected by using the redox-sensitive, fluorescent protein (roGFP), while the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was assessed with the fluorescent dye, JC-1. ECs exposure to hydrogen peroxide, dose-dependently induced mitochondrial and cytoplasmic oxidation. Additionally detected hydrogen peroxide-induced phenomena were MMP dissipation and ECs death. Pretreatment of ECs with apricot melanoidins, significantly counteracted and ultimately abolished hydrogen peroxide-induced intracellular oxidation, mitochondrial depolarization and cell death. In this regard, our current results clearly indicate that melanoidins derived from heat-processed apricots, protect human ECs against oxidative stress. PMID:23144984

  12. Ca(2+) and mitochondrial ROS: Both hero and villain in membrane repair.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sandra T

    2017-09-05

    Membrane repair is a symphony of signaling, conducted principally by the steep influx of Ca(2+) through an injured membrane. In this issue of Science Signaling, Horn et al reveal unique interplay between Ca(2+) influx and mitochondrially generated reactive oxygen species (mtROS) to enhance actin-mediated wound closure for survival of injured mammalian muscle and nonmuscle cells. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  13. Two Plant-Derived Aporphinoid Alkaloids Exert Their Antifungal Activity by Disrupting Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Siddharth K; Xu, Tao; Feng, Qin; Avula, Bharathi; Shi, Xiaomin; Pan, Xuewen; Mask, Melanie M; Baerson, Scott R; Jacob, Melissa R; Ravu, Ranga Rao; Khan, Shabana I; Li, Xing-Cong; Khan, Ikhlas A; Clark, Alice M; Agarwal, Ameeta K

    2017-08-18

    Eupolauridine and liriodenine are plant-derived aporphinoid alkaloids that exhibit potent inhibitory activity against the opportunistic fungal pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans However, the molecular mechanism of this antifungal activity is unknown. In this study, we show that eupolauridine 9591 (E9591), a synthetic analog of eupolauridine, and liriodenine methiodide (LMT), a methiodide salt of liriodenine, mediate their antifungal activities by disrupting mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster synthesis. Several lines of evidence supported this conclusion. First, both E9591 and LMT elicited a transcriptional response indicative of iron imbalance, causing the induction of genes that are required for iron uptake and for the maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis. Second, a genome-wide fitness profile analysis showed that yeast mutants with deletions in iron homeostasis-related genes were hypersensitive to E9591 and LMT. Third, treatment of wild-type yeast cells with E9591 or LMT generated cellular defects that mimicked deficiencies in mitochondrial Fe-S cluster synthesis including an increase in mitochondrial iron levels, a decrease in the activities of Fe-S cluster enzymes, a decrease in respiratory function, and an increase in oxidative stress. Collectively, our results demonstrate that E9591 and LMT perturb mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis; thus, these two compounds target a cellular pathway that is distinct from the pathways commonly targeted by clinically used antifungal drugs. Therefore, the identification of this pathway as a target for antifungal compounds has potential applications in the development of new antifungal therapies. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Neurovascular Unit Dysfunction in Diabetic Mice: Protection with the Mitochondrial Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitor Topiramate.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Therese S; Shah, Gul N; Price, Tulin O; Hayden, Melvin R; Banks, William A

    2016-12-01

    All forms of diabetes mellitus are characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, resulting in the development of a number of microvascular and macrovascular pathologies. Diabetes is also associated with changes in brain microvasculature, leading to dysfunction and ultimately disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). These changes are correlated with a decline in cognitive function. In diabetes, BBB damage is associated with increased oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species. This occurs because of the increased oxidative metabolism of glucose caused by hyperglycemia. Decreasing the production of bicarbonate with the use of a mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (mCAi) limits oxidative metabolism and the production of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we have demonstrated that 1) streptozotocin-induced diabetes resulted in BBB disruption, 2) ultrastructural studies showed a breakdown of the BBB and changes to the neurovascular unit (NVU), including a loss of brain pericytes and retraction of astrocytes, the two cell types that maintain the BBB, and 3) treatment with topiramate, a mCAi, attenuated the effects of diabetes on BBB disruption and ultrastructural changes in the neurovascular unit.

  15. Prooxidants open both the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and a low-conductance channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Kushnareva, Y E; Sokolove, P M

    2000-04-15

    Mitochondria can be induced by a variety of agents/conditions to undergo a permeability transition (MPT), which nonselectively increases the permeability of the inner membrane (i.m.) to small (<1500 Da) solutes. Prooxidants are generally considered to trigger the MPT, but some investigators suggest instead that prooxidants open a Ca(2+)-selective channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane and that the opening of this channel, when coupled with Ca(2+) cycling mediated by the Ca(2+) uniporter, leads ultimately to the observed increase in mitochondrial permeability [see, e.g., Schlegel et al. (1992) Biochem. J. 285, 65]. S. A. Novgorodov and T. I. Gudz [J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. (1996) 28, 139] propose that the i.m. contains a pore that, upon exposure to prooxidants, can open to two states, one of which conducts only H(+) and one of which is the classic MPT pore. Given the current interest in increased mitochondrial permeability as a factor in apoptotic cell death, it is important to determine whether i.m. permeability is regulated in one or multiple ways and, in the latter event, to characterize each regulatory mechanism in detail. This study examined the effects of the prooxidants diamide and t-butylhydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) on the permeability of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Under the experimental conditions used, t-BuOOH induced mitochondrial swelling only in the presence of exogenous Ca(2+) (>2 microM), whereas diamide was effective in its absence. In the absence of exogenous inorganic phosphate (P(i)), (1) both prooxidants caused a collapse of the membrane potential (DeltaPsi) that preceded the onset of mitochondrial swelling; (2) cyclosporin A eliminated the swelling induced by diamide and dramatically slowed that elicited by t-BuOOH, without altering prooxidant-induced depolarization; (3) collapse of DeltaPsi was associated with Ca(2+) efflux but not with efflux of glutathione; (4) neither Ca(2+) efflux nor DeltaPsi collapse was sensitive to ruthenium red; (5

  16. A collection of yeast mutants selectively resistant to ionophores acting on mitochondrial inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Petrezselyova, Silvia; Lalakova, Jana; Abelovska, Lenka; Klobucnikova, Vlasta; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2008-03-01

    Valinomycin and nigericin are potassium ionophores acting selectively on the mitochondrial inner membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Kovac, L., Bohmerova, E., Butko, P., 1982a. Ionophores and intact cells. I. Valinomycin and nigericin act preferentially on mitochondria and not on the plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 721, 341-348]. However, the molecular mechanism of their action is not understood. Here we show that their selective effect on mitochondrial membranes is not caused by the pleiotropic drug resistance system. To identify the molecular components mediating the action of ionophores we isolated several mutants specifically resistant to valinomycin and/or nigericin. In contrast to the parental strain, these mutants do not form respiratory-deficient cells in the presence of ionophores. Moreover, all mutants harbor extensively fragmented mitochondria and these morphological defects can be alleviated by the ionophores. Interestingly, we observed that these mitochondrial defects may be accompanied by changes in vacuolar dynamics. Our results demonstrate that the classical genetic approach can provide a starting point for the analysis of components involved in the action of ionophores on mitochondria-related processes in eukaryotic cell.

  17. Toxicity and Loss of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Induced by Alkyl Gallates in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Andréo, Rogério; Regasini, Luís Octávio; Petrônio, Maicon Segalla; Chiari-Andréo, Bruna Galdorfini; Tansini, Aline; Silva, Dulce Helena Siqueira; Cicarelli, Regina Maria Barretto

    2015-01-01

    American trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease is a debilitating disease representing an important social problem that affects, approximately, 10 million people in the world. The main aggravating factor of this situation is the lack of an effective drug to treat the different stages of this disease. In this context, the search for trypanocidal substances isolated from plants, synthetic or semi synthetic molecules, is an important strategy. Here, the trypanocidal potential of gallates was assayed in epimastigotes forms of T. cruzi and also, the interference of these substances on the mitochondrial membrane potential of the parasites was assessed, allowing the study of the mechanism of action of the gallates in the T. cruzi organisms. Regarding the preliminary structure-activity relationships, the side chain length of gallates plays crucial role for activity. Nonyl, decyl, undecyl, and dodecyl gallates showed potent antitrypanosomal effect (IC50 from 1.46 to 2.90 μM) in contrast with benznidazole (IC50 = 34.0 μM). Heptyl gallate showed a strong synergistic activity with benznidazole, reducing by 105-fold the IC50 of benznidazole. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by these esters was revealed. Tetradecyl gallate induced a loss of 53% of the mitochondrial membrane potential, at IC50 value. PMID:27347554

  18. Fluctuations of the proton-electromotive force across the inner mitochondrial membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procopio, Joaquim; Fornés, José A.

    1997-05-01

    The intermembrane mitochondrial space (IMMS) is delimited by the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes and defines a region of molecular dimension where fluctuations of the number of free protons and of transmembrane voltage can give rise to fluctuations in the proton-electromotive force EPMF across the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). We have applied the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of a resistor Rm in parallel with a capacitor Cm representing the passive electrical properties of the IMM, in series with another capacitor Cb representing the proton-buffering power of the IMMS fluid. An access resistance Ra was defined as a link between the capacitor Cb and the membrane. Average EPMF fluctuations across the IMM were calculated for different assumptions concerning the intermembrane space dimensions. The calculated average EPMF fluctuations were in the vicinity of 100 mV for relaxation times in the few-microseconds range. The corresponding fluctuational protonic free energy is about 10 kJ/mole, which is comparable to the binding energy for protons in different transporters. This suggests that fluctuations in EPMF can be of relevance in the universe of forces influencing the molecular machinery embedded in the IMM.

  19. Two distinct membrane potential-dependent steps drive mitochondrial matrix protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Schendzielorz, Alexander Benjamin; Schulz, Christian; Lytovchenko, Oleksandr; Clancy, Anne; Guiard, Bernard; Ieva, Raffaele; van der Laan, Martin; Rehling, Peter

    2017-01-02

    Two driving forces energize precursor translocation across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Although the membrane potential (Δψ) is considered to drive translocation of positively charged presequences through the TIM23 complex (presequence translocase), the activity of the Hsp70-powered import motor is crucial for the translocation of the mature protein portion into the matrix. In this study, we show that mitochondrial matrix proteins display surprisingly different dependencies on the Δψ. However, a precursor's hypersensitivity to a reduction of the Δψ is not linked to the respective presequence, but rather to the mature portion of the polypeptide chain. The presequence translocase constituent Pam17 is specifically recruited by the receptor Tim50 to promote the transport of hypersensitive precursors into the matrix. Our analyses show that two distinct Δψ-driven translocation steps energize precursor passage across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The Δψ- and Pam17-dependent import step identified in this study is positioned between the two known energy-dependent steps: Δψ-driven presequence translocation and adenosine triphosphate-driven import motor activity.

  20. Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins Assist Bid in Bax-mediated Lipidic Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Blanca; Quispe, Joel; Choudhary, Vineet; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Ajero, Teddy G.; Du, Han; Schneiter, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) is a critical step in apoptosis and is regulated by Bcl-2 family proteins. In vitro systems using cardiolipin-containing liposomes have demonstrated the key features of MOMP induced by Bax and cleaved Bid; however, the nature of the “pores” and how they are formed remain obscure. We found that mitochondrial outer membranes contained very little cardiolipin, far less than that required for liposome permeabilization, despite their responsiveness to Bcl-2 family proteins. Strikingly, the incorporation of isolated mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) proteins into liposomes lacking cardiolipin conferred responsiveness to cleaved Bid and Bax. Cardiolipin dependence was observed only when permeabilization was induced with cleaved Bid but not with Bid or Bim BH3 peptide or oligomerized Bax. Therefore, we conclude that MOM proteins specifically assist cleaved Bid in Bax-mediated permeabilization. Cryoelectron microscopy of cardiolipin-liposomes revealed that cleaved Bid and Bax produced large round holes with diameters of 25–100 nm, suggestive of lipidic pores. In sum, we propose that activated Bax induces lipidic pore formation and that MOM proteins assist cleaved Bid in this process in the absence of cardiolipin. PMID:19244344

  1. The mechanisms of fatty acid-induced proton permeability of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, L; Wieckowski, M R

    1999-10-01

    Nonesterified long-chain fatty acids have long been known as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. They are efficient protonophores in the inner mitochondrial membrane but not so in artificial phospholipid membranes. In the un-ionized form, they undergo a rapid spontaneous transbilayer movement (flip-flop). However, the transbilayer passage of the dissociated (anionic) form is hindered by the negatively charged hydrophilic carboxylic group. In the inner mitochondrial membrane, the transfer of fatty acid anions is mediated by the adenine nucleotide translocase, the dicarboxylate carrier, and the glutamate/aspartate carrier. As a result, the passage of protons and electric charges is a concerted effect of the spontaneous flip-flop of the undissociated (protonated) form in one direction and carrier-facilitated transfer of the ionized (deprotonated) form in the other direction. In addition, fatty acids also promote opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, presumably due to their interaction with one of its constituents, the adenine nucleotide translocase, thus forming an additional route for dissipation of the proton gradient. Structural prerequisites for these proton-conducting mechanisms are (1) a weakly ionized carboxylic group and (2) a hydrocarbon chain of appropriate length without substituents limiting its mobility and hydrophobicity.

  2. Proteomic Analysis of the Yeast Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Reveals Accumulation of a Subclass of PreproteinsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Zahedi, Rene P.; Sickmann, Albert; Boehm, Andreas M.; Winkler, Christiane; Zufall, Nicole; Schönfisch, Birgit; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondria consist of four compartments–outer membrane, intermembrane space, inner membrane, and matrix—with crucial but distinct functions for numerous cellular processes. A comprehensive characterization of the proteome of an individual mitochondrial compartment has not been reported so far. We used a eukaryotic model organism, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to determine the proteome of highly purified mitochondrial outer membranes. We obtained a coverage of ∼85% based on the known outer membrane proteins. The proteome represents a rich source for the analysis of new functions of the outer membrane, including the yeast homologue (Hfd1/Ymr110c) of the human protein causing Sjögren–Larsson syndrome. Surprisingly, a subclass of proteins known to reside in internal mitochondrial compartments were found in the outer membrane proteome. These seemingly mislocalized proteins included most top scorers of a recent genome-wide analysis for mRNAs that were targeted to mitochondria and coded for proteins of prokaryotic origin. Together with the enrichment of the precursor form of a matrix protein in the outer membrane, we conclude that the mitochondrial outer membrane not only contains resident proteins but also accumulates a conserved subclass of preproteins destined for internal mitochondrial compartments. PMID:16407407

  3. Mitochondrial calcium ion and membrane potential transients follow the pattern of epileptiform discharges in hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Richard; Kardos, Julianna; Heinemann, Uwe; Kann, Oliver

    2005-04-27

    Emerging evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Recurrent mitochondrial Ca2+ ion load during seizures might act on mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim) and proton motive force. By using electrophysiology and confocal laser-scanning microscopy, we investigated the effects of epileptiform activity, as induced by low-Mg2+ ion perfusion in hippocampal slice cultures, on changes in DeltaPsim and in mitochondrial Ca2+ ion concentration ([Ca2+]m). The mitochondrial compartment was identified by monitoring DeltaPsim in the soma and dendrites of patched CA3 pyramidal cells using the mitochondria-specific voltage-sensitive dye rhodamine-123 (Rh-123). Interictal activity was accompanied by localized mitochondrial depolarization that was restricted to a few mitochondria in small dendrites. In contrast, robust Rh-123 release into the cytosol was observed during seizure-like events (SLEs), indicating simultaneous depolarization of mitochondria. This was critically dependent on Ca2+ ion uptake and extrusion, because inhibition of the mitochondrial Ca2+ ion uniporter by Ru360 and the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ ion exchanger by 7-chloro-5-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,5-dihydro-4,1-benzothiazepin-2(3H)-one but not the inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition pore, cyclosporin A, decreased the SLE-associated mitochondrial depolarization. The Ca2+ ion dependence of simultaneous mitochondrial depolarization suggested enhanced Ca2+ ion cycling across mitochondrial membranes during epileptiform activity. Indeed, [Ca2+]m fluctuated during interictal activity in single dendrites, and these fluctuations spread over the entire mitochondrial compartment during SLEs, as revealed using mitochondria-specific dyes (rhod-2 and rhod-ff) and spatial frequency-based image analysis. These findings strengthen the hypothesis that epileptic activity results in Ca2+ ion-dependent changes in mitochondrial function that might contribute to the

  4. Disruption of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Lactobacillus sakei cellular membranes by plant oil aromatics.

    PubMed

    Gill, A O; Holley, R A

    2006-04-15

    The role of membrane disruption in the bactericidal activity of the plant oil aromatic compounds eugenol, carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde was investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy, changes in ATP levels and cell viability. In 25 mM HEPES buffer pH 7 at 20 degrees C, 10 mM eugenol or carvacrol increased uptake of propidium iodide by Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Lactobacillus sakei over a 10-min period. The same treatments resulted in lowered viability, rapid depletion of cellular ATP and release of ATP, with the exception of Lb. sakei treated with carvacrol. Eugenol or carvacrol at 5 mM to 10 mM inhibited E. coli and L. monocytogenes motility. Lb. sakei was resistant to cinnamaldehyde. Thus, its effects were only studied on E. coli and L. monocytogenes. At 10 mM, cinnamaldehyde caused a slight but statistically significant increase in propidium iodide staining of E. coli, but had no effect on L. monocytogenes. Cinnamaldehyde treatment of E. coli at 10 mM and L. monocytogenes at 40 mM resulted in decreased cellular ATP, but there was no concomitant release of ATP. Cinnamaldehyde at 5 and 10 mM inhibited E. coli and L. monocytogenes motility. Results for eugenol and carvacrol are consistent with non-specific permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane. Evidence for increased membrane permeability by cinnamaldehyde is less conclusive. The release of ATP from eugenol and carvacrol-treated cells and absence of release from cinnamaldehyde-treated cells could indicate that eugenol and carvacrol possess ATPase inhibiting activity. Secondary effects would also be consistent with membrane disruption.

  5. Large Plasma Membrane Disruptions Are Rapidly Resealed by Ca2+-dependent Vesicle–Vesicle Fusion Events

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.

    1997-01-01

    A microneedle puncture of the fibroblast or sea urchin egg surface rapidly evokes a localized exocytotic reaction that may be required for the rapid resealing that follows this breach in plasma membrane integrity (Steinhardt, R.A,. G. Bi, and J.M. Alderton. 1994. Science (Wash. DC). 263:390–393). How this exocytotic reaction facilitates the resealing process is unknown. We found that starfish oocytes and sea urchin eggs rapidly reseal much larger disruptions than those produced with a microneedle. When an ∼40 by 10 μm surface patch was torn off, entry of fluorescein stachyose (FS; 1,000 mol wt) or fluorescein dextran (FDx; 10,000 mol wt) from extracellular sea water (SW) was not detected by confocal microscopy. Moreover, only a brief (∼5–10 s) rise in cytosolic Ca2+ was detected at the wound site. Several lines of evidence indicate that intracellular membranes are the primary source of the membrane recruited for this massive resealing event. When we injected FS-containing SW deep into the cells, a vesicle formed immediately, entrapping within its confines most of the FS. DiI staining and EM confirmed that the barrier delimiting injected SW was a membrane bilayer. The threshold for vesicle formation was ∼3 mM Ca2+ (SW is ∼10 mM Ca2+). The capacity of intracellular membranes for sealing off SW was further demonstrated by extruding egg cytoplasm from a micropipet into SW. A boundary immediately formed around such cytoplasm, entrapping FDx or FS dissolved in it. This entrapment did not occur in Ca2+-free SW (CFSW). When egg cytoplasm stratified by centrifugation was exposed to SW, only the yolk platelet–rich domain formed a membrane, suggesting that the yolk platelet is a critical element in this response and that the ER is not required. We propose that plasma membrane disruption evokes Ca2+ regulated vesicle–vesicle (including endocytic compartments but possibly excluding ER) fusion reactions. The function in resealing of this cytoplasmic fusion

  6. Isolation of hepatic mitochondrial contact sites: previously unrecognized inner membrane components.

    PubMed

    Hoppel, Charles; Kerner, Janos; Turkaly, Peter; Minkler, Paul; Tandler, Bernard

    2002-03-01

    An improved, fast, and relatively simple procedure for isolation of hepatic mitochondrial contact sites is described. These contact sites include conventional outer membrane, but the inner membrane component (which we term fusion patches) has a unique biochemical composition characterized by a clustering of three specific inner membrane proteins of 54, 52, and 31 kDa identified by proteomics, respectively, as the alpha and beta subunits of ATP synthase and the liver isoform of adenine nucleotide transferase. The contact site fraction was prepared using a discontinuous sucrose gradient from crude outer membranes derived from swollen/shrunk rat liver mitochondria. The resultant contact sites were analyzed using a continuous sucrose density gradient, revealing an apparent heterogeneity due to varying amounts of retained fusion patches in relation to the unvarying outer membrane component. By electron microscopy, contact sites consist of small vacuoles that contain one or several tiny vesicles, many of which are composed of multiple, closely packed lamellae. The contact site subfraction morphology is consistent with the biochemical variation. Thus, contact sites are not haphazard fusions of outer and inner membrane, but consist in part of regions of inner membrane of novel composition (fusion patches) and of conventional outer membrane.

  7. Oral administration of fumonisin B1 and T-2 individually and in combination affects hepatic total and mitochondrial membrane lipid profile of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Szabó, A; Szabó-Fodor, J; Fébel, H; Mézes, M; Bajzik, G; Kovács, M

    2016-09-01

    Weaned rabbits were fed diets contaminated with 2 mg/kg diet T-2 toxin alone, or 10 mg/kg diet fumonisin B1 (FB1) alone, and both toxins in combination (2 + 10 mg/kg, respectively) compared to a toxin-free control diet. Samplings were performed after 4 weeks (blood and liver). Bodyweight of T-2-fed group was lower after 4 weeks; the liver weight was increased dramatically (threefold of control). Liver total phospholipids (PLs) provided slight alterations in the fatty acid (FA) composition; all three toxin-treated groups showed a decrease in palmitoleic acid (C16:1 n7) proportion. In the liver mitochondrial PL FA composition, margaric acid (C17:0) proportion decreased in the separated toxin treatments compared to the combined setting. Oleic acid (C18:1 n9) proportion was increased and arachidonic acid (C20:4 n6) was decreased in the FB1-treated group, while docosapentaenoic acid (C22:5 n3) was decreased in the separated treatments. The total monounsaturation was significantly higher in the FB1 group's mitochondrial PL FA profile. After 4 weeks, all toxin treatments decreased the blood plasma reduced glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activity, and FB1 increased the plasma sphinganine/sphingosine ratio. Both mycotoxins seem to cross the hepatocellular and the hepatic mitochondrial membrane, without drastic membrane disruption, as assessed from the PL FA composition, but inducing detectable lipid peroxidation.

  8. MPV17 encodes an inner mitochondrial membrane protein and is mutated in infantile hepatic mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Spinazzola, Antonella; Viscomi, Carlo; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Carrara, Franco; D'Adamo, Pio; Calvo, Sarah; Marsano, René Massimiliano; Donnini, Claudia; Weiher, Hans; Strisciuglio, Pietro; Parini, Rossella; Sarzi, Emmanuelle; Chan, Alicia; DiMauro, Salvatore; Rötig, Agnes; Gasparini, Paolo; Ferrero, Iliana; Mootha, Vamsi K; Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2006-05-01

    The mitochondrial (mt) DNA depletion syndromes (MDDS) are genetic disorders characterized by a severe, tissue-specific decrease of mtDNA copy number, leading to organ failure. There are two main clinical presentations: myopathic (OMIM 609560) and hepatocerebral (OMIM 251880). Known mutant genes, including TK2, SUCLA2, DGUOK and POLG, account for only a fraction of MDDS cases. We found a new locus for hepatocerebral MDDS on chromosome 2p21-23 and prioritized the genes on this locus using a new integrative genomics strategy. One of the top-scoring candidates was the human ortholog of the mouse kidney disease gene Mpv17. We found disease-segregating mutations in three families with hepatocerebral MDDS and demonstrated that, contrary to the alleged peroxisomal localization of the MPV17 gene product, MPV17 is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein, and its absence or malfunction causes oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) failure and mtDNA depletion, not only in affected individuals but also in Mpv17-/- mice.

  9. A mitochondrial-focused genetic interaction map reveals a scaffold-like complex required for inner membrane organization in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hoppins, Suzanne; Collins, Sean R; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Hummel, Eric; Devay, Rachel M; Lackner, Laura L; Westermann, Benedikt; Schuldiner, Maya; Weissman, Jonathan S; Nunnari, Jodi

    2011-10-17

    To broadly explore mitochondrial structure and function as well as the communication of mitochondria with other cellular pathways, we constructed a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map (the MITO-MAP) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MITO-MAP provides a comprehensive view of mitochondrial function including insights into the activity of uncharacterized mitochondrial proteins and the functional connection between mitochondria and the ER. The MITO-MAP also reveals a large inner membrane-associated complex, which we term MitOS for mitochondrial organizing structure, comprised of Fcj1/Mitofilin, a conserved inner membrane protein, and five additional components. MitOS physically and functionally interacts with both outer and inner membrane components and localizes to extended structures that wrap around the inner membrane. We show that MitOS acts in concert with ATP synthase dimers to organize the inner membrane and promote normal mitochondrial morphology. We propose that MitOS acts as a conserved mitochondrial skeletal structure that differentiates regions of the inner membrane to establish the normal internal architecture of mitochondria.

  10. A mutation in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like gene (Immp2l) affects mitochondrial function and impairs fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Baisong; Poirier, Christophe; Gaspar, Tamas; Gratzke, Christian; Harrison, Wilbur; Busija, David; Matzuk, Martin M; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Overbeek, Paul A; Bishop, Colin E

    2008-04-01

    The mitochondrion is involved in energy generation, apoptosis regulation, and calcium homeostasis. Mutations in genes involved in mitochondrial processes often result in a severe phenotype or embryonic lethality, making the study of mitochondrial involvement in aging, neurodegeneration, or reproduction challenging. Using a transgenic insertional mutagenesis strategy, we generated a mouse mutant, Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove, with a mutation in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) gene. The mutation affected the signal peptide sequence processing of mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase 2. The inefficient processing of mitochondrial membrane proteins perturbed mitochondrial function so that mitochondria from mutant mice manifested hyperpolarization, higher than normal superoxide ion generation, and higher levels of ATP. Homozygous Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove females were infertile due to defects in folliculogenesis and ovulation, whereas mutant males were severely subfertile due to erectile dysfunction. The data suggest that the high superoxide ion levels lead to a decrease in the bioavailability of nitric oxide and an increase in reactive oxygen species stress, which underlies these reproductive defects. The results provide a novel link between mitochondrial dysfunction and infertility and suggest that superoxide ion targeting agents may prove useful for treating infertility in a subpopulation of infertile patients.

  11. Bilirubin and amyloid-beta peptide induce cytochrome c release through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, C. M.; Solá, S.; Silva, R.; Brites, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of bilirubin encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease appears to result from accumulation of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) and amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, respectively, which may cause apoptosis. Permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane, with release of intermembrane proteins, has been strongly implicated in cell death. Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability is one pathway by which ursodeoxycholate (UDC) and tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC) protect against apoptosis in hepatic and nonhepatic cells. In this study, we further characterize UCB- and Abeta-induced cytotoxicty in isolated neural cells, and investigate membrane perturbation during incubation of isolated mitochondria with both agents. In addition, we evaluate whether the anti-apoptotic drugs UDC and TUDC prevent any changes from occurring. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Primary rat neuron and astrocyte cultures were incubated with UCB or Abeta peptide, either alone or in the presence of UDC. Apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation and nuclear morphological changes. Isolated mitochondria were treated with each toxic, either alone or in combination with UDC, TUDC, or cyclosporine A. Mitochondrial swelling was measured spectrophotometrically and cytochrome c protein levels determined by Western blot. RESULTS: Incubation of neural cells with both UCB and Abeta induced apoptosis (p < 0.01). Coincubation with UDC reduced apoptosis by > 50% (p < 0.05). Both toxins caused membrane permeabilization in isolated mitochondria (p < 0.001); whereas, pretreatment with UDC was protective (p < 0.05). TUDC was even more effective at preventing matrix swelling mediated by Abeta (p < 0.01). UDC and TUDC markedly reduced cytochrome c release associated with mitochondrial permeabilization induced by UCB and Abeta, respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, cyclosporine A significantly inhibited mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c efflux mediated by UCB (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: UCB and Abeta peptide

  12. Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) enhance cytotoxicity of cisplatin to hepatocellular cells by microdomain disruption on plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shengyong; Chen, Xinhua; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Guo, Danjing; Xu, Yuning; Wu, Liming; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-08-15

    Previous studies showed nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) can ablate solid tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but its effect on cell membrane is not fully understood. We hypothesized nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on outer-cellular membrane with direct mechanical force and as a result the plasma membrane permeability increases to facilitate the small molecule intake. Three HCC cells were pulsed one pulse per minute, an interval longer than nanopore resealing time. The cationized ferritin was used to mark up the electronegative microdomains, propidium iodide (PI) for membrane permeabilization, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for the negative cell surface charge and cisplatin for inner-cellular cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that the ferritin marked-microdomain and negative cell surface charge were disrupted by nsPEF caused-mechanical force. The cell uptake of propidium and cytotoxicity of DNA-targeted cisplatin increased with a dose effect. Cisplatin gains its maximum inner-cellular cytotoxicity when combining with nsPEF stimulation. We conclude that nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on the outer cellular membrane directly and increase the membrane permeabilization for PI and cisplatin. The microdomain disruption and membrane infiltration changes are caused by the mechanical force from the changes of negative cell surface charge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Restoration of Deoxycholate-Disrupted Membrane Oxidases of Micrococcus lysodeikticus1

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Membrane-associated l-malate and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidase complexes of Micrococcus lysodeikticus were inactivated with deoxycholate. Reactivation of NADH oxidase by addition of Mg2+ occurred in these detergent-membrane mixtures, but reactivation of l-malate oxidase did not occur in the presence of deoxycholate. Removal of detergent by gel filtration allowed Mg2+-dependent restoration of both l-malate and NADH oxidases. Maximal NADH and l-malate oxidase restoration required 10 min and 40 min, respectively, at 30 mm MgSO4. Maximal restoration of both oxidases required at least 12 mm MgSO4 in an incubation period of 1 hr. Reduced-minus-oxidized difference spectra of Mg2+-restored membrane oxidases showed participation of cytochromes b, c, and a when either l-malate or NADH served as reductant; addition of dithionite did not increase the α- and β-region absorbancy maxima of these hemoproteins when restored membranes were first reduced with the physiological substrates l-malate or NADH. Not all divalent cations tested were equally effective for reactivation of both oxidases. l-Malate oxidase was restored by both Mn2+ and Ca2+. NADH oxidase was not activated by Mn2+ and only slightly stimulated by Ca2+. Separation of deoxycholate-disrupted membranes (detergent removed) into soluble and particulate fractions showed that both fractions were required for Mg2+-dependent oxidase activities. Electron micrographs indicated conditions of detergent treatment did not destroy the vesicular nature of protoplast ghost membranes. Images PMID:4109869

  14. Ion conductance pathways in potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Matkovic, Karolina; Koszela-Piotrowska, Izabela; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Szewczyk, Adam

    2011-03-01

    Single-ion channel activities were measured after reconstitution of potato tuber mitochondrial inner membranes into planar lipid bilayers. In addition to the recently described large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel activity (Koszela-Piotrowska et al., 2009), the following mitochondrial ion conductance pathways were recorded: (i) an ATP-regulated potassium channel (mitoK(ATP) channel) activity with a conductance of 164+/-8pS, (ii) a large-conductance Ca(2+)-insensitive iberiotoxin-sensitive potassium channel activity with a conductance of 312 pS+/-23, and (iii) a chloride 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS)-inhibited channel activity with a conductance of 117 pS+/-4. In isolated non-phosphorylating potato tuber mitochondria, individual and combined potassium channel activities caused significant (up to 14mV) but not collapsing K(+)-influx-induced membrane potential depolarisation. Under phosphorylating conditions, the coupling parameters were unchanged in the presence of high K(+) level, indicating that plant K(+) channels function as energy-dissipating systems that are not able to divert energy from oxidative phosphorylation. A potato tuber K(+) channel that is ATP-, 5-hydroxydecanonic acid-, glybenclamide-inhibited and diazoxide-stimulated caused low cation flux, modestly decreasing membrane potential (up to a few mV) and increasing respiration in non-phosphorylating mitochondria. Immunological analysis with antibodies raised against the mammalian plasma membrane ATP-regulated K(+) channel identified a pore-forming subunit of the Kir-like family in potato tuber mitochondrial inner membrane. These results suggest that a mitoK(ATP) channel similar to that of mammalian mitochondria is present in potato tuber mitochondria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. High fat diet-induced modifications in membrane lipid and mitochondrial-membrane protein signatures precede the development of hepatic insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, M.; Schäfer, A.; Seelig, A.; Schultheiß, J.; Wu, M.; Aichler, M.; Leonhardt, J.; Rathkolb, B.; Rozman, J.; Sarioglu, H.; Hauck, S.M.; Ueffing, M.; Wolf, E.; Kastenmueller, G.; Adamski, J.; Walch, A.; Hrabé de Angelis, M.; Neschen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Excess lipid intake has been implicated in the pathophysiology of hepatosteatosis and hepatic insulin resistance. Lipids constitute approximately 50% of the cell membrane mass, define membrane properties, and create microenvironments for membrane-proteins. In this study we aimed to resolve temporal alterations in membrane metabolite and protein signatures during high-fat diet (HF)-mediated development of hepatic insulin resistance. Methods We induced hepatosteatosis by feeding C3HeB/FeJ male mice an HF enriched with long-chain polyunsaturated C18:2n6 fatty acids for 7, 14, or 21 days. Longitudinal changes in hepatic insulin sensitivity were assessed via the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, in membrane lipids via t-metabolomics- and membrane proteins via quantitative proteomics-analyses, and in hepatocyte morphology via electron microscopy. Data were compared to those of age- and litter-matched controls maintained on a low-fat diet. Results Excess long-chain polyunsaturated C18:2n6 intake for 7 days did not compromise hepatic insulin sensitivity, however, induced hepatosteatosis and modified major membrane lipid constituent signatures in liver, e.g. increased total unsaturated, long-chain fatty acid-containing acyl-carnitine or membrane-associated diacylglycerol moieties and decreased total short-chain acyl-carnitines, glycerophosphocholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, or sphingolipids. Hepatic insulin sensitivity tended to decrease within 14 days HF-exposure. Overt hepatic insulin resistance developed until day 21 of HF-intervention and was accompanied by morphological mitochondrial abnormalities and indications for oxidative stress in liver. HF-feeding progressively decreased the abundance of protein-components of all mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, inner and outer mitochondrial membrane substrate transporters independent from the hepatocellular mitochondrial volume in liver. Conclusions We assume HF-induced modifications in membrane lipid

  16. Interactive HIV-1 Tat and Morphine-Induced Synaptodendritic Injury Is Triggered through Focal Disruptions in Na+ Influx, Mitochondrial Instability, and Ca2+ Overload

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Pamela E.; Zou, Shiping; Marks, William D.; Bowers, M. Scott; Akbarali, Hamid I.; Hauser, Kurt F.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptodendritic injury is thought to underlie HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and contributes to exaggerated inflammation and cognitive impairment seen in opioid abusers with HIV-1. To examine events triggering combined transactivator of transcription (Tat)- and morphine-induced synaptodendritic injury systematically, striatal neuron imaging studies were conducted in vitro. These studies demonstrated nearly identical pathologic increases in dendritic varicosities as seen in Tat transgenic mice in vivo. Tat caused significant focal increases in intracellular sodium ([Na+]i) and calcium ([Ca2+]i) in dendrites that were accompanied by the emergence of dendritic varicosities. These effects were largely, but not entirely, attenuated by the NMDA and AMPA receptor antagonists MK-801 and CNQX, respectively. Concurrent morphine treatment accelerated Tat-induced focal varicosities, which were accompanied by localized increases in [Ca2+]i and exaggerated instability in mitochondrial inner membrane potential. Importantly, morphine's effects were prevented by the μ-opioid receptor antagonist CTAP and were not observed in neurons cultured from μ-opioid receptor knock-out mice. Combined Tat- and morphine-induced initial losses in ion homeostasis and increases in [Ca2+]i were attenuated by the ryanodine receptor inhibitor ryanodine, as well as pyruvate. In summary, Tat induced increases in [Na+]i, mitochondrial instability, excessive Ca2+ influx through glutamatergic receptors, and swelling along dendrites. Morphine, acting via μ-opioid receptors, exacerbates these excitotoxic Tat effects at the same subcellular locations by mobilizing additional [Ca2+]i and by further disrupting [Ca2+]i homeostasis. We hypothesize that the spatiotemporal relationship of μ-opioid and aberrant AMPA/NMDA glutamate receptor signaling is critical in defining the location and degree to which opiates exacerbate the synaptodendritic injury commonly observed in neuroAIDS. PMID:25232120

  17. Ultrastructural Transformations in Bean Inner Mitochondrial Membranes 1

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R. H.; Thurston, E. L.; Mitchell, R.

    1973-01-01

    The ultrastructure of inner membrane-matrix mitochondria isolated from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) shoots was examined in different metabolic states. Gross ultrastructural transformations analogous to the condensed-to-orthodox configurational changes reported in mammalian mitochondria are observed on transistion from nonrespiring to respiring metabolism. With the induction of oxidative phosphorylation, the particles remain in the orthodox configurational state. The reverse orthodox-to-condensed configurational changes observed in mammalian preparations does not occur. Optically monitored absorbancy studies with bean particles show a substrate-supported Pi-induced swelling under the same conditions that induce the condensed-to-orthodox ultrastructural transformation. The swelling is associated with the net uptake of K+ and Pi as well as a small Pi-induced respiratory stimulation. When phosphorylation is initiated with these swollen particles, the optically monitored volume remains unchanged. Thus a positive correlation exists between the ultrastructural configuration and the osmotic volume changes, which supports the conclusion that configurational changes reflect internal osmotic adjustments. Images PMID:16658291

  18. Mitochondrial-dependent Autoimmunity in Membranous Nephropathy of IgG4-related Disease.

    PubMed

    Buelli, Simona; Perico, Luca; Galbusera, Miriam; Abbate, Mauro; Morigi, Marina; Novelli, Rubina; Gagliardini, Elena; Tentori, Chiara; Rottoli, Daniela; Sabadini, Ettore; Saito, Takao; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Saeki, Takako; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-05-01

    The pathophysiology of glomerular lesions of membranous nephropathy (MN), including seldom-reported IgG4-related disease, is still elusive. Unlike in idiopathic MN where IgG4 prevails, in this patient IgG3 was predominant in glomerular deposits in the absence of circulating anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibodies, suggesting a distinct pathologic process. Here we documented that IgG4 retrieved from the serum of our propositus reacted against carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) at the podocyte surface. In patient's biopsy, glomerular CAII staining increased and co-localized with subepithelial IgG4 deposits along the capillary walls. Patient's IgG4 caused a drop in cell pH followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, excessive ROS production and cytoskeletal reorganization in cultured podocytes. These events promoted mitochondrial superoxide-dismutase-2 (SOD2) externalization on the plasma membrane, becoming recognizable by complement-binding IgG3 anti-SOD2. Among patients with IgG4-related disease only sera of those with IgG4 anti-CAII antibodies caused low intracellular pH and mitochondrial alterations underlying SOD2 externalization. Circulating IgG4 anti-CAII can cause podocyte injury through processes of intracellular acidification, mitochondrial oxidative stress and neoantigen induction in patients with IgG4 related disease. The onset of MN in a subset of patients could be due to IgG4 antibodies recognizing CAII with consequent exposure of mitochondrial neoantigen in the context of multifactorial pathogenesis of disease.

  19. Mitochondrial-dependent Autoimmunity in Membranous Nephropathy of IgG4-related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Buelli, Simona; Perico, Luca; Galbusera, Miriam; Abbate, Mauro; Morigi, Marina; Novelli, Rubina; Gagliardini, Elena; Tentori, Chiara; Rottoli, Daniela; Sabadini, Ettore; Saito, Takao; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Saeki, Takako; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of glomerular lesions of membranous nephropathy (MN), including seldom-reported IgG4-related disease, is still elusive. Unlike in idiopathic MN where IgG4 prevails, in this patient IgG3 was predominant in glomerular deposits in the absence of circulating anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibodies, suggesting a distinct pathologic process. Here we documented that IgG4 retrieved from the serum of our propositus reacted against carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) at the podocyte surface. In patient's biopsy, glomerular CAII staining increased and co-localized with subepithelial IgG4 deposits along the capillary walls. Patient's IgG4 caused a drop in cell pH followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, excessive ROS production and cytoskeletal reorganization in cultured podocytes. These events promoted mitochondrial superoxide-dismutase-2 (SOD2) externalization on the plasma membrane, becoming recognizable by complement-binding IgG3 anti-SOD2. Among patients with IgG4-related disease only sera of those with IgG4 anti-CAII antibodies caused low intracellular pH and mitochondrial alterations underlying SOD2 externalization. Circulating IgG4 anti-CAII can cause podocyte injury through processes of intracellular acidification, mitochondrial oxidative stress and neoantigen induction in patients with IgG4 related disease. The onset of MN in a subset of patients could be due to IgG4 antibodies recognizing CAII with consequent exposure of mitochondrial neoantigen in the context of multifactorial pathogenesis of disease. PMID:26137589

  20. Fluorescent probe environment and the structural and charge changes in energy coupling of mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Chance, B

    1970-10-01

    The use of fluorescent probes to give continuous readouts of the structural states of mitochondrial membranes during energy coupling seems a logical extension of their use in the study of protein structural changes. A clear correlation of the probes' fluorescence characteristics with the acquisition of energy coupling can be demonstrated in fragmented and natural membrane using 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) and ethidium bromide respectively. The present contribution attempts to bring together contemporary viewpoints of this and other laboratories and the recent experimental data and give some detailed information on probe environment and on the structural or charge changes occurring upon energization. The energy-dependent region of the membrane is located at an aqueous interface between an outer layer of proteins (presumably cytochromes) and the membrane permeability barrier; the aromatic portion of ANS appears to be located in the lipid phase and the sulfonic acid group in the aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is probably a structured water region near paramagnetic membrane components such as cytochrome. Membrane energization arising from altered redox potential changes of cytochromes (b(T)) is communicated to the water structure through altered structural states of the hemoproteins, causing a decreased volume of the structured water region and increased interaction with the paramagnetic components in the energized state. Attendant alterations of protonic equilibria of membrane components induce both local and transmembrane changes in charge distribution, with consequent movements of ions, including the probe molecules themselves.

  1. Studies of membrane topology of mitochondrial cholesterol hydroxylases CYPs 27A1 and 11A1

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Natalia; Liao, Wei-Li; Turko, Illarion V.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP or P450, EC 1.14.13.15) play an important role in metabolism of cholesterol. CYP27A1 hydroxylates cholesterol at position 27 and, thus, initiates cholesterol removal from many extrahepatic tissues. CYP11A1 is a steroidogenic P450 that converts cholesterol to pregnenolone, the first step in the biosynthesis of all steroid hormones. We utilized a new approach to study membrane topology of CYPs 27A1 and 11A1. This approach involves heterologous expression of membrane-bound P450 in E. coli, isolation of the P450-containing E. coli membranes, treatment of the membranes with protease, removal of the digested soluble portion and extraction of the membrane-associated peptides, which are then identified by mass spectrometry. By using this approach, we found four membrane-interacting peptides in CYP27A1, and two peptides in CYP11A1. Peptides in CYP27A1 represent a contiguous portion of the polypeptide chain (residues 210-251) corresponding to the putative F-G loop and adjacent portions of the F and G helices. Peptides in CYP11A1 are from the putative F-G loop (residues 218-225) and the C-terminal portion of the G helix (residues 238-250). This data is consistent with those obtained previously by us and others and provide new information about membrane topology of CYPs 27A1 and 11A1. PMID:18791760

  2. Examination of bioenergetic function in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Manish S.; Zhou, Yu; Molina, Anthony J.; Criswell, Tracy; Lu, Baisong

    2014-01-01

    Inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (IMMP2L) protein is a mitochondrial inner membrane peptidase that cleaves the signal peptide sequences of cytochrome c1 (CYC1) and mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD2). Immp2l mutant mice show infertility and early signs of aging. It is unclear whether mitochondrial respiratory deficiency underlies this phenotype. Here we show that the intermediate forms of GPD2 and CYC1 have normal expression levels and enzymatic function in Immp2l mutants. Mitochondrial respiration is not diminished in isolated mitochondria and cells from mutant mice. Our data suggest that respiratory deficiency is not the cause of the observed Immp2l mutant phenotypes. PMID:25460737

  3. Examination of bioenergetic function in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Manish S; Zhou, Yu; Molina, Anthony J; Criswell, Tracy; Lu, Baisong

    2014-01-01

    Inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (IMMP2L) protein is a mitochondrial inner membrane peptidase that cleaves the signal peptide sequences of cytochrome c1 (CYC1) and mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD2). Immp2l mutant mice show infertility and early signs of aging. It is unclear whether mitochondrial respiratory deficiency underlies this phenotype. Here we show that the intermediate forms of GPD2 and CYC1 have normal expression levels and enzymatic function in Immp2l mutants. Mitochondrial respiration is not diminished in isolated mitochondria and cells from mutant mice. Our data suggest that respiratory deficiency is not the cause of the observed Immp2l mutant phenotypes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mitochondrial membrane protein thiol reactivity with N-ethylmaleimide or mersalyl is modified by Ca2+: correlation with mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Kowaltowski, A J; Vercesi, A E; Castilho, R F

    1997-02-15

    The content of mitochondrial membrane protein thiol groups accessible to react with the monofunctional thiol reagents mersalyl or N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) was determined using Ellman's reagent. Deenergized mitochondria incubated in the presence of Ca2+ (0-500 microM) undergo a very significant decrease in the content of membrane protein thiols accessible to NEM, and an increase in the content of thiols accessible to mersalyl. This process is time-dependent and inhibited by Mg2+, ruthenium red and ADP, but not by cyclosporin A. This suggests that Ca2+ binding to the inner mitochondrial membrane promotes extensive alterations in the conformation of membrane proteins that result in location changes of thiol groups. The relationship between these alterations and mitochondrial membrane permeability transition was studied through the effect of NEM and mersalyl on mitochondrial swelling induced by Ca2+ plus t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-bOOH) or Ca2+ plus the thiol cross-linkers 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) or phenylarsine oxide (PhAsO). We observed that the hydrophobic thiol reagent NEM inhibits the effects of t-bOOH, DIDS and PhAsO, while the hydrophilic thiol reagent mersalyl inhibits only the effect of DIDS. Permeability transition in all the situations studied is accompanied by a significant decrease in the total membrane protein thiol content. In addition, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization induced by PhAsO is inhibited by EGTA, but not by ruthenium red. This result suggests that PhAsO leads to permeability transition through a mechanism independent of intramitochondrial Ca2(+)-induced alterations of thiol group reactivity, but dependent on Ca2+ binding to an extramitochondrial site. This site is sensitive to extramitochondrial Ca2+ concentrations in range of 1-50 microM.

  5. Polyphenols protect mitochondrial membrane against permeabilization induced by HEWL oligomers: Possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Roqanian, Shaqayeq; Meratan, Ali Akbar; Ahmadian, Shahin; Shafizadeh, Mahshid; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Karami, Leila

    2017-10-01

    Increasing body of evidence suggests that polyphenols frequently interacting with amyloid aggregates and/or interfering with aggregate species to bind biomembranes may serve as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of amyloid-related diseases. Hence, in the present study, the possible effects of three naturally occurring polyphenols including Curcumin, Quercetin, and Resveratrol on mitochondrial membrane permeabilization induced by Hen Egg White Lysozyme (HEWL) oligomers were investigated. Our results indicated that pre-incubation of mitochondrial homogenate with polyphenols considerably inhibit membrane permeabilization in a concentration dependent manner. In parallel, HEWL oligomers, which were co-incubated with the polyphenols, showed less effectiveness on membrane permeabilization, suggesting that toxicity of oligomers was hindered. Using a range of techniques including fluorescence quenching, Nile red binding assay, zeta potential and size measurements, CD (far- and near-UV) spectroscopy, and molecular docking, we found that the polyphenols, structure-dependently, interact with and induce conformational changes in HEWL oligomers, thereby inhibit their toxicity. We proposed a mechanism by which selected polyphenols induce their protective effects through binding to mitochondria and interfering with HEWL oligomer-membrane interactions and/or by direct interaction with HEWL oligomers, induction of conformational changes, and generating far less toxic species. However, additional studies are needed to elucidate the detailed mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ethanol reduces mitochondrial membrane integrity and thereby impacts carbon metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyung-Mi; Lee, Na-Rae; Woo, Ji-Min; Choi, Wonja; Zimmermann, Martin; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    2012-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent ethanol producer, but is rather sensitive to high concentration of ethanol. Here, influences of ethanol on cellular membrane integrity and carbon metabolism of S. cerevisiae were investigated to rationalize mechanism involved in ethanol toxicity. Addition of 5% (v/v) ethanol did neither significantly change the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane of the reference strain S. cerevisiae BY4741 nor of the ethanol-tolerant strain iETS3. However, the addition of ethanol resulted in a marked decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential and in increased concentrations of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The carbon flux was redistributed under these conditions from mainly ethanol production to the TCA cycle. This redistribution was possibly a result of increased energy demand for cell maintenance that increased from about zero to 20-40 mmol ATP (g(CDW)  h)(-1) . This increase in maintenance energy might be explained by the ethanol-induced reduction of the proton motive force and the required removal of ROS. Thus, the stability of the mitochondrial membrane and subsequently the capacity to keep ROS levels low could be important factors to improve tolerance of S. cerevisiae against ethanol. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Crystal and microparticle effects on MDCK cell superoxide production: oxalate-specific mitochondrial membrane potential changes.

    PubMed

    Meimaridou, Eirini; Jacobson, Jake; Seddon, Alan M; Noronha-Dutra, Alberto A; Robertson, William G; Hothersall, John S

    2005-06-15

    We have previously shown that crystals of calcium oxalate (COM) elicit a superoxide (O2-) response from mitochondria. We have now investigated: (i) if other microparticles can elicit the same response, (ii) if processing of crystals is involved, and (iii) at what level of mitochondrial function oxalate acts. O2- was measured in digitonin-permeabilized MDCK cells by lucigenin (10 microM) chemiluminescence. [(14)C]-COM dissociation was examined with or without EDTA and employing alternative chelators. Whereas mitochondrial O2- in COM-treated cells was three- to fourfold enhanced compared to controls, other particulates (uric acid, zymosan, and latex beads) either did not increase O2- or were much less effective (hydroxyapatite +50%, p < 0.01), with all at 28 microg/cm(2). Free oxalate (750 microM), at the level released from COM with EDTA (1 mM), increased O2- (+50%, p < 0.01). Omitting EDTA abrogated this signal, which was restored completely by EGTA and partially by ascorbate, but not by desferrioxamine or citrate. Omission of phosphate abrogated O2-, implicating phosphate-dependent mitochondrial dicarboxylate transport. COM caused a time-related increase in the mitochondrial membrane potential (deltapsi(m)) measured using TMRM fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Application of COM to Fura 2-loaded cells induced rapid, large-amplitude cytosolic Ca(2+) transients, which were inhibited by thapsigargin, indicating that COM induces release of Ca(2+) from internal stores. Thus, COM-induced mitochondrial O2- requires the release of free oxalate and contributes to a synergistic response. Intracellular dissociation of COM and the mitochondrial dicarboxylate transporter are important in O2- production, which is probably regulated by deltapsi(m).

  8. Mitochondrial membrane potential is reduced in copper-deficient C2C12 cells in the absence of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulian; Medeiros, Denis M; Jennings, Dianne

    2005-07-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential is reduced in copper-deficient rat hearts, but it is uncertain if this will lead to the onset of apoptosis. To determine if copper deficiency per se leads to apoptosis, C2C12 cells were made copper deficient by treatment with the copper chelator tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). In TEPA-treated cells, the activity of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase and cytochrome-c oxidase decreased dramatically. The protein levels of nuclear-encoded subunits of the cytochromie-c oxidase decreased, but the mitochondrial-encoded subunits remained unchanged. Decreased mitochondrial membrane potential was indicated in TEPA-treated cells, but further investigation of the potential induction of apoptosis by measuring caspase-3 activity, protein concentrations of Bcl-2 and Bax, and DNA fragmentation suggested that apoptosis is not induced in TEPA-treated C2C12 cells. Cells with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were not destined to apoptosis as a result of copper deficiency.

  9. Heat shock induces production of reactive oxygen species and increases inner mitochondrial membrane potential in winter wheat cells.

    PubMed

    Fedyaeva, A V; Stepanov, A V; Lyubushkina, I V; Pobezhimova, T P; Rikhvanov, E G

    2014-11-01

    Heat shock leads to oxidative stress. Excessive ROS (reactive oxygen species) accumulation could be responsible for expression of genes of heat-shock proteins or for cell death. It is known that in isolated mammalian mitochondria high protonic potential on the inner membrane actuates the production of ROS. Changes in viability, ROS content, and mitochondrial membrane potential value have been studied in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultured cells under heat treatment. Elevation of temperature to 37-50°C was found to induce elevated ROS generation and increased mitochondrial membrane potential, but it did not affect viability immediately after treatment. More severe heat exposure (55-60°C) was not accompanied by mitochondrial potential elevation and increased ROS production, but it led to instant cell death. A positive correlation between mitochondrial potential and ROS production was observed. Depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane by the protonophore CCCP inhibited ROS generation under the heating conditions. These data suggest that temperature elevation leads to mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization in winter wheat cultured cells, which in turn causes the increased ROS production.

  10. A mitochondrial-focused genetic interaction map reveals a scaffold-like complex required for inner membrane organization in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Hoppins, Suzanne; Collins, Sean R.; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Hummel, Eric; DeVay, Rachel M.; Lackner, Laura L.; Westermann, Benedikt; Schuldiner, Maya

    2011-01-01

    To broadly explore mitochondrial structure and function as well as the communication of mitochondria with other cellular pathways, we constructed a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map (the MITO-MAP) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MITO-MAP provides a comprehensive view of mitochondrial function including insights into the activity of uncharacterized mitochondrial proteins and the functional connection between mitochondria and the ER. The MITO-MAP also reveals a large inner membrane–associated complex, which we term MitOS for mitochondrial organizing structure, comprised of Fcj1/Mitofilin, a conserved inner membrane protein, and five additional components. MitOS physically and functionally interacts with both outer and inner membrane components and localizes to extended structures that wrap around the inner membrane. We show that MitOS acts in concert with ATP synthase dimers to organize the inner membrane and promote normal mitochondrial morphology. We propose that MitOS acts as a conserved mitochondrial skeletal structure that differentiates regions of the inner membrane to establish the normal internal architecture of mitochondria. PMID:21987634

  11. Apoptotic pore formation is associated with in-plane insertion of Bak or Bax central helices into the mitochondrial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Dana; Dewson, Grant; Menard, Marie; Frederick, Paul; Iyer, Sweta; Bartolo, Ray; Gibson, Leonie; Czabotar, Peter E.; Smith, Brian J.; Adams, Jerry M.; Kluck, Ruth M.

    2014-01-01

    The pivotal step on the mitochondrial pathway to apoptosis is permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) by oligomers of the B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family members Bak or Bax. However, how they disrupt MOM integrity is unknown. A longstanding model is that activated Bak and Bax insert two α-helices, α5 and α6, as a hairpin across the MOM, but recent insights on the oligomer structures question this model. We have clarified how these helices contribute to MOM perforation by determining that, in the oligomers, Bak α5 (like Bax α5) remains part of the protein core and that a membrane-impermeable cysteine reagent can label cysteines placed at many positions in α5 and α6 of both Bak and Bax. The results are inconsistent with the hairpin insertion model but support an in-plane model in which α5 and α6 collapse onto the membrane and insert shallowly to drive formation of proteolipidic pores. PMID:25228770

  12. High-fat Diet Accelerates Intestinal Tumorigenesis Through Disrupting Intestinal Cell Membrane Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi-Young; Kim, Min Young; Seo, Young Rok; Kim, Jong-Sang; Sung, Mi-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Excess energy supply induces chronic low-grade inflammation in association with oxidative stress in various tissues including intestinal epithelium. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of high-fat diet (HFD) on intestinal cell membrane integrity and intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice. Methods: Mice were fed with either normal diet (ND) or HFD for 12 weeks. The number of intestinal tumors were counted and biomarkers of endotoxemia, oxidative stress, and inflammation were determined. Changes in intestinal integrity was measured by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran penetration and membrane gap junction protein expression. Results: HFD group had significantly higher number of tumors compared to ND group (P < 0.05). Blood total antioxidant capacity was lower in HFD group, while colonic 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine level, a marker of oxidative damage, was higher in HFD group compared to that of ND group (P < 0.05). The penetration of FITC-dextran was substantially increased in HFD group (P < 0.05) while the expressions of membrane gap junction proteins including zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and occludin were lower in HFD group (P < 0.05) compared to those in ND group. Serum concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor (CD14) and colonic toll-like receptor 4 (a LPS receptor) mRNA expression were significantly higher in HFD group than in ND group (P < 0.05), suggesting that significant endotoxemia may occur in HFD group due to the increased membrane permeability. Serum interleukin-6 concentration and myeloperoxidase activity were also higher in HFD group compared to those of ND group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: HFD increases oxidative stress disrupting intestinal gap junction proteins, thereby accelerating membrane permeability endotoxemia, inflammation, and intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:27390738

  13. Cristae remodeling causes acidification detected by integrated graphene sensor during mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Ted D.; Pham, Phi Q.; Li, Jinfeng; Letai, Anthony G.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Burke, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic apoptotic pathway and the resultant mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) via BAK and BAX oligomerization, cytochrome c (cytc) release, and caspase activation are well studied, but their effect on cytosolic pH is poorly understood. Using isolated mitochondria, we show that MOMP results in acidification of the surrounding medium. BAK conformational changes associated with MOMP activate the OMA1 protease to cleave OPA1 resulting in remodeling of the cristae and release of the highly concentrated protons within the cristae invaginations. This was revealed by utilizing a nanomaterial graphene as an optically clear and ultrasensitive pH sensor that can measure ionic changes induced by tethered mitochondria. With this platform, we have found that activation of mitochondrial apoptosis is accompanied by a gradual drop in extra-mitochondrial pH and a decline in membrane potential, both of which can be rescued by adding exogenous cytc. These findings have importance for potential pharmacological manipulation of apoptosis, in the treatment of cancer. PMID:27786282

  14. TSPO, a Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Protein, Controls Ethanol-Related Behaviors in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ran; Rittenhouse, Danielle; Sweeney, Katelyn; Potluri, Prasanth; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The heavy consumption of ethanol can lead to alcohol use disorders (AUDs) which impact patients, their families, and societies. Yet the genetic and physiological factors that predispose humans to AUDs remain unclear. One hypothesis is that alterations in mitochondrial function modulate neuronal sensitivity to ethanol exposure. Using Drosophila genetics we report that inactivation of the mitochondrial outer membrane translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, affects ethanol sedation and tolerance in male flies. Knockdown of dTSPO in adult male neurons results in increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation, and this effect requires the dTSPO depletion-mediated increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of caspase activity in fly heads. Systemic loss of dTSPO in male flies blocks the development of tolerance to repeated ethanol exposures, an effect that is not seen when dTSPO is only inactivated in neurons. Female flies are naturally more sensitive to ethanol than males, and female fly heads have strikingly lower levels of dTSPO mRNA than males. Hence, mitochondrial TSPO function plays an important role in ethanol sensitivity and tolerance. Since a large array of benzodiazepine analogues have been developed that interact with the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, the mitochondrial TSPO might provide an important new target for treating AUDs. PMID:26241038

  15. Mammea E/BB, an isoprenylated dihydroxycoumarin protonophore that potently uncouples mitochondrial electron transport, disrupts hypoxic signaling in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Lin; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2010-11-29

    The mammea-type coumarin mammea E/BB (1) was found to inhibit both hypoxia-induced and iron chelator-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation in human breast tumor T47D cells with IC(50) values of 0.96 and 0.89 μM, respectively. Compound 1 suppressed the hypoxic induction of secreted VEGF protein (T47D cells) and inhibited cell viability/proliferation in four human tumor cell lines. Compound 1 (at 5 and 20 μM) inhibited human breast tumor MDA-MB-231 cell migration. While the mechanisms that underlie their biological activities have remained unknown, prenylated mammea coumarins have been shown to be cytotoxic to human tumor cells, suppress tumor growth in animal models, and display a wide variety of antimicrobial effects. Mechanistic studies revealed that 1 appears to exert an assemblage of cellular effects by functioning as an anionic protonophore that potently uncouples mitochondrial electron transport and disrupts mitochondrial signaling in human tumor cell lines.

  16. Mammea E/BB, An Isoprenylated Dihydroxycoumarin Protonophore that Potently Uncouples Mitochondrial Electron Transport Disrupts Hypoxic Signaling in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lin; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    The mammea-type coumarin mammea E/BB (1) was found to inhibit both hypoxia-induced and iron chelator-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation in human breast tumor T47D cells with IC50 values of 0.96 and 0.89 µM, respectively. Compound 1 suppressed the hypoxic induction of secreted VEGF protein (T47D cells) and inhibited cell viability/proliferation in four human tumor cell lines. Compound 1 (at 5 and 20 µM) inhibited human breast tumor MDA-MB-231 cell migration. While the mechanisms that underlay their biological activities have remained unknown, prenylated mammea coumarins have been shown to be cytotoxic to human tumor cells, suppress tumor growth in animal models, and display a wide variety of antimicrobial effects. Mechanistic studies revealed that 1 appears to exert an assemblage of cellular effects by functioning as an anionic protonophore that potently uncouples mitochondrial electron transport and disrupts mitochondrial signaling in human tumor cell lines. PMID:20929261

  17. Mechanics of membrane bulging during cell-wall disruption in Gram-negative bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Kristopher E.; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2011-04-01

    The bacterial cell wall is a network of sugar strands crosslinked by peptides that serve as the primary structure for bearing osmotic stress. Despite its importance in cellular survival, the robustness of the cell wall to network defects has been relatively unexplored. Treatment of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli with the antibiotic vancomycin, which disrupts the crosslinking of new material during growth, leads to the development of pronounced bulges and eventually of cell lysis. Here, we model the mechanics of the bulging of the cytoplasmic membrane through pores in the cell wall. We find that the membrane undergoes a transition between a nearly flat state and a spherical bulge at a critical pore radius of ~20 nm. This critical pore size is large compared to the typical distance between neighboring peptides and glycan strands, and hence pore size acts as a constraint on network integrity. We also discuss the general implications of our model to membrane deformations in eukaryotic blebbing and vesiculation in red blood cells.

  18. Comparative Analysis of the Bacterial Membrane Disruption Effect of Two Natural Plant Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Attila; Maróti, Gergely; Kereszt, Attila; Kondorosi, Éva

    2017-01-01

    In the Medicago truncatula genome about 700 genes code for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) small peptides that are expressed in the symbiotic organ, the root nodule, where they control terminal differentiation of the endosymbiotic rhizobium bacteria to nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Cationic NCR peptides were predicted to have antimicrobial activities. Here antibacterial activities of NCR247, NCR335, polymyxin B (PMB), and streptomycin were investigated and compared on two foodborne pathogens Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes as representatives of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The integrity of the bacterial membrane was seriously compromised by these NCR peptides. Different localization was observed for NCR247 and NCR335 in the treated bacteria, the peptides mostly accumulated in the cytosol in S. enterica while they remained in the bacterial membrane in L. monocytogenes. Scanning electron microscopy revealed distinct membrane morphology of the peptide-treated bacteria. Complete cell disruption was induced by PMB and NCR335 in S. enterica while NCR247 treatment resulted in extensive budding observed on the cell surface of Salmonella. PMB had no effect on L. monocytogenes while NCR335 and NCR247 provoked morphological changes on this bacterium, the whole Listeria cell content was released in response to NCR335 treatment. PMID:28167938

  19. Mdm31 and Mdm32 are inner membrane proteins required for maintenance of mitochondrial shape and stability of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids in yeast.

    PubMed

    Dimmer, Kai Stefan; Jakobs, Stefan; Vogel, Frank; Altmann, Katrin; Westermann, Benedikt

    2005-01-03

    The MDM31 and MDM32 genes are required for normal distribution and morphology of mitochondria in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. They encode two related proteins located in distinct protein complexes in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Cells lacking Mdm31 and Mdm32 harbor giant spherical mitochondria with highly aberrant internal structure. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is instable in the mutants, mtDNA nucleoids are disorganized, and their association with Mmm1-containing complexes in the outer membrane is abolished. Mutant mitochondria are largely immotile, resulting in a mitochondrial inheritance defect. Deletion of either one of the MDM31 and MDM32 genes is synthetically lethal with deletion of either one of the MMM1, MMM2, MDM10, and MDM12 genes, which encode outer membrane proteins involved in mitochondrial morphogenesis and mtDNA inheritance. We propose that Mdm31 and Mdm32 cooperate with Mmm1, Mmm2, Mdm10, and Mdm12 in maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and mtDNA.

  20. Calcium-mediated fusion to produce ultra large osmotically active mitochondrial inner membranes of controlled protein density.

    PubMed

    Chazotte, B; Wu, E S; Höchli, M; Hackenbrock, C R

    1985-08-08

    We have developed a new membrane fusion method which produces ultra large, spherical mitochondrial inner membranes attached to microscope slides. The fused inner membranes measured up to 200 microns in diameter. The technique fuses native inner membranes as well as inner membranes in which the protein density has been varied by enriching with exogenous phospholipid. The fusion process is accomplished through the use of calcium, low pH and elevated temperature. Characterization of the fused membranes was carried out using phase, fluorescence, and freeze-fracture electron microscopy. These ultra large, fused inner membranes were found to model the inner membranes from which they were formed. The fused inner membranes were found to be osmotically active and are large enough for measuring the lateral diffusion of membrane components by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and are large enough for microelectrode impalement.

  1. Evaluation of mitochondrial function and membrane integrity by dual fluorescent staining for assessment of sperm status in rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masashi; Makino, Sachiko; Kimura, Hitoshi; Ota, Takao; Furuhashi, Tadakazu; Nagamura, Yoichi

    2002-02-01

    Dual fluorescent staining (DFS) with calcein acetoxy methyl ester (CAM), which labels the cellular esterase activity that is a major component of energy metabolism in cellular mitochondria, and with ethidium homodimer-1 (EthD-1) was used to evaluate mitochondrial function and membrane integrity in rat spermatozoa. The spermatozoa stained by DFS could be classified into three different populations microscopically when excited at 490 nm after 60 min incubation. 1) Spermatozoa, which were stained with CAM alone and had maintained either mitochondrial function or membrane integrity, were identified as live during incubation. 2) Spermatozoa, which were stained with EthD-1 alone and had lost either mitochondrial function or membrane integrity, were identified as already dead at the beginning of incubation. 3) Spermatozoa, which were stained with both CAM and EthD-1 and had maintained mitochondrial function with membrane breached, were identified as having died during incubation. Two toxicological tests, an in vitro triton X-100 experiment and an in vivo nitrobenzene experiment, were done. All spermatozoa were immobilized and lost either mitochondrial function or membrane integrity by 1.0% triton X-100 treatment. Almost no motile sperm were found at 0.1% in the triton X-100 group and in the groups treated with 60 and 40 mg/kg/day of nitrobenzene, and these spermatozoa maintained their mitochondrial function but had their membrane breached. In conclusion, the DFS procedure, which uses CAM and EthD-1, can clearly and visually identify the population of viable and dead spermatozoa simultaneously by fluorescence microscopy in rats. This is a useful technique to characterize sperm status, which is determined by the mitochondrial function assessed by CAM and membrane integrity evaluated by EthD-1.

  2. Role of charge screening and delocalization for lipophilic cation permeability of model and mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Trendeleva, Tatiana A; Sukhanova, Evgenia I; Rogov, Anton G; Zvyagilskaya, Renata A; Seveina, Inna I; Ilyasova, Tatiana M; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2013-09-01

    The effects of the mitochondria-targeted lipophilic cation dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (C12TPP, the charge is delocalized and screened by bulky hydrophobic residues) and those of lipophilic cations decyltriethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (C10TEA and C16TMA, the charges are localized and screened by less bulky residues) on bilayer planar phospholipid membranes and tightly-coupled mitochondria from the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica have been compared. In planar membranes, C12TPP was found to generate a diffusion potential as if it easily penetrates these membranes. In the presence of palmitate, C12TPP induced H(+) permeability like plastoquinonyl decyltriphenilphosphonium that facilitates transfer of fatty acid anions (Severin et al., PNAS, 2010, 107, 663-668). C12TPP was shown to stimulate State 4 respiration of mitochondria and caused a mitochondrial membrane depolarization with a half-maximal effect at 6μM. Besides, C12TPP profoundly potentiated the uncoupling effect of endogenous or added fatty acids. C10TEA and C16TMA inhibited State 4 respiration and decreased the membrane potential, though at much higher concentrations than C12TPP, and they did not promote the uncoupling action of fatty acids. These relationships were modeled by molecular dynamics. They can be explained by different membrane permeabilities for studied cations, which in turn are due to different availabilities of the positive charge in these cations to water dipoles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 3-Methylcrotonylglycine disrupts mitochondrial energy homeostasis and inhibits synaptic Na(+),K (+)-ATPase activity in brain of young rats.

    PubMed

    Moura, Alana Pimentel; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; Zanatta, Ângela; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Wajner, Moacir

    2012-03-01

    Deficiency of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase activity is an inherited metabolic disease biochemically characterized by accumulation and high urinary excretion of 3-methylcrotonylglycine (3MCG), and also of 3-hydroisovalerate in lesser amounts. Affected patients usually have neurologic dysfunction, brain abnormalities and cardiomyopathy, whose pathogenesis is still unknown. The present study investigated the in vitro effects of 3MCG on important parameters of energy metabolism, including CO(2) production from labeled acetate, enzyme activities of the citric acid cycle, as well as of the respiratory chain complexes I-IV (oxidative phosphorylation), creatine kinase (intracellular ATP transfer), and synaptic Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (neurotransmission) in brain cortex of young rats. 3MCG significantly reduced CO(2) production, implying that this compound compromises citric acid cycle activity. Furthermore, 3MCG diminished the activities of complex II-III of the respiratory chain, mitochondrial creatine kinase and synaptic membrane Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Furthermore, antioxidants were able to attenuate or fully prevent the inhibitory effect of 3MCG on creatine kinase and synaptic membrane Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activities. We also observed that lipid peroxidation was elicited by 3MCG, suggesting the involvement of free radicals on 3MCG-induced effects. Considering the importance of the citric acid cycle and the electron flow through the respiratory chain for brain energy production, creatine kinase for intracellular energy transfer, and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase for the maintenance of the cell membrane potential, the present data indicate that 3MCG potentially impairs mitochondrial brain energy homeostasis and neurotransmission. It is presumed that these pathomechanisms may be involved in the neurological damage found in patients affected by 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency.

  4. Consequences of defective vitamin A transportation on mitochondrial membrane integrity during protein depletion.

    PubMed

    Olowookere, J O

    1986-01-01

    The relationships between the structural integrity and functionality of rat liver mitochondrial membranes, and different levels of dietary protein and vitamin A transportation during protein depletion in animals have been investigated. Although the vitamin A content of the protein-depleted diet was 1680 +/- 35 IU/kg diet, and that of the control diet was 1,650 +/- 30 IU/kg diet, the vitamin A content of the liver of depleted rats was reduced to 16.7% of controls. The hepatic mitochondria of rats fed a protein-depleted diet showed excessive passive swelling (about 3-fold of controls) in isotonic solutions. Whereas a seemingly inverse relationship existed between the vitamin A content of the liver and the osmotic behaviour of hepatic mitochondria of rats fed a protein-depleted diet, there is a direct relationship between their hepatic mitochondrial vitamin A and the respiratory control ratio. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  5. Disruption of Membranes of Extracellular Vesicles Is Necessary for ELISA Determination of Urine AQP2: Proof of Disruption and Epitopes of AQP2 Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Nameta, Masaaki; Saijo, Yoko; Ohmoto, Yasukazu; Katsuragi, Kiyonori; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Sasaki, Sei

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is present in urine extracellular vesicles (EVs) and is a useful biomarker for water balance disorders. We previously found that pre-treatment of urine with alkali/detergent or storage at −25 °C is required for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measurement. We speculated that disruptions of EVs membranes are necessary to allow for the direct contact of antibodies with their epitopes. Human urine EVs were prepared using an ultracentrifugation method. Urine EV samples were stored at different temperatures for a week. Electron microscopy showed abundant EVs with diameters of 20–100 nm, consistent with those of exosomes, in normal urine, whereas samples from alkali/detergent pre-treated urine showed fewer EVs with large swollen shapes and frequent membrane disruptions. The abundance and structures of EVs were maintained during storage at −80 °C, but were severely damaged at −25 °C. Binding and competitive inhibition assays showed that epitopes of monoclonal antibody and polyclonal antibody were the hydrophilic Loop D and C-terminus of AQP2, respectively, both of which are present on the inner surface of EVs. Thus, urine storage at −25 °C or pre-treatment with alkali/detergent disrupt EVs membranes and allow AQP2 antibodies to bind to their epitopes located inside EVs. PMID:27681727

  6. Vanadate induces necrotic death in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes through mitochondrial membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Soares, Sandra Sofia; Henao, Fernando; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2008-03-01

    Besides the well-known inotropic effects of vanadium in cardiac muscle, previous studies have shown that vanadate can stimulate cell growth or induce cell death. In this work, we studied the toxicity to neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (cardiomyocytes) of two vanadate solutions containing different oligovanadates distribution, decavanadate (containing decameric vanadate, V 10) and metavanadate (containing monomeric vanadate and also di-, tetra-, and pentavanadate). Incubation for 24 h with decavanadate or metavanadate induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes, without significant caspase-3 activation. Only 10 microM total vanadium of either decavanadate (1 microM V 10) or metavanadate (10 microM total vanadium) was needed to produce 50% loss of cell viability after 24 h (assessed with MTT and propidium iodide assays). Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that vanadium accumulation in cardiomyocytes after 24 h was the same when incubation was done with decavanadate or metavanadate. A decrease of 75% of the rate of mitochondrial superoxide anion generation, monitored with dihydroethidium, and a sustained rise of cytosolic calcium (monitored with Fura-2-loaded cardiomyocytes) was observed after 24 h of incubation of cardiomyocytes with decavanadate or metavanadate concentrations close to those inducing 50% loss of cell viability produced. In addition, mitochondrial membrane depolarization within cardiomyocytes, monitored with tetramethylrhodamine ethyl esther or with 3,3',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide, were observed after only 6 h of incubation with decavanadate or metavanadate. The concentration needed for 50% mitochondrial depolarization was 6.5 +/- 1 microM total vanadium for both decavanadate (0.65 microM V 10) and metavanadate. In conclusion, mitochondrial membrane depolarization was an early event in decavanadate- and monovanadate-induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes.

  7. Bovine adenovirus 3 core protein precursor pVII localizes to mitochondria, and modulates ATP synthesis, mitochondrial Ca2+ and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sanjeev K; Gaba, Amit; Singh, Jaswant; Tikoo, Suresh K

    2014-02-01

    Viruses modulate the functions of mitochondria by translocating viral proteins to the mitochondria. Subcellular fractionation and sensitivity to proteinase K/Triton X-100 treatment of mitochondrial fractions of bovine adenovirus (BAdV)-3-infected/transfected cells suggested that core protein pVII localizes to the mitochondria and contains a functional mitochondrial localization signal. Moreover, mitochondrial localization of BAdV-3 pVII appears to help in the retention of mitochondrial Ca(2+), inducing a significant increase in the levels of ATP and maintaining the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in transfected cells. In contrast, mitochondrial localization of BAdV-3 pVII has no significant effect on the levels of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species production in the transfected cells. Consistent with these results, expression of pVII in transfected cells treated with staurosporine decreased significantly the activation of caspase-3. Our results suggested that BAdV-3 pVII localizes to mitochondria, and interferes with apoptosis by inhibiting loss of the MMP and by increasing mitochondrial Ca(2+) and ATP production.

  8. The force exerted by the membrane potential during protein import into the mitochondrial matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Ghosal, Sandip; Matouschek, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The force exerted on a targeting sequence by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane is calculated on the basis of continuum electrostatics. The force is found to vary from 3.0 pN to 2.2 pN (per unit elementary charge) as the radius of the inner membrane pore (assumed aqueous) is varied from 6.5 to 12 A, its measured range. In the present model, the decrease in force with increasing pore width arises from the shielding effect of water. Since the pore is not very much wider than the distance between water molecules, the full shielding effect of water may not be present; the extreme case of a purely membranous pore without water gives a force of 3.2 pN per unit charge, which should represent an upper limit. When applied to mitochondrial import experiments on the protein barnase, these results imply that forces between 11 +/- 2 pN and 13.5 +/- 2.5 pN catalyze the unfolding of barnase in those experiments. A comparison of these results with unfolding forces measured using atomic force microscopy is made.

  9. The force exerted by the membrane potential during protein import into the mitochondrial matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Ghosal, Sandip; Matouschek, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The force exerted on a targeting sequence by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane is calculated on the basis of continuum electrostatics. The force is found to vary from 3.0 pN to 2.2 pN (per unit elementary charge) as the radius of the inner membrane pore (assumed aqueous) is varied from 6.5 to 12 A, its measured range. In the present model, the decrease in force with increasing pore width arises from the shielding effect of water. Since the pore is not very much wider than the distance between water molecules, the full shielding effect of water may not be present; the extreme case of a purely membranous pore without water gives a force of 3.2 pN per unit charge, which should represent an upper limit. When applied to mitochondrial import experiments on the protein barnase, these results imply that forces between 11 +/- 2 pN and 13.5 +/- 2.5 pN catalyze the unfolding of barnase in those experiments. A comparison of these results with unfolding forces measured using atomic force microscopy is made.

  10. Stimulation of mitochondrial proton conductance by hydroxynonenal requires a high membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Parker, Nadeene; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Brand, Martin D

    2008-04-01

    Mild uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, caused by a leak of protons back into the matrix, limits mitochondrial production of ROS (reactive oxygen species). This proton leak can be induced by the lipid peroxidation products of ROS, such as HNE (4-hydroxynonenal). HNE activates uncoupling proteins (UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3) and ANT (adenine nucleotide translocase), thereby providing a negative feedback loop. The mechanism of activation and the conditions necessary to induce uncoupling by HNE are unclear. We have found that activation of proton leak by HNE in rat and mouse skeletal muscle mitochondria is dependent on incubation with respiratory substrate. In the presence of HNE, mitochondria energized with succinate became progressively more leaky to protons over time compared with mitochondria in the absence of either HNE or succinate. Energized mitochondria must attain a high membrane potential to allow HNE to activate uncoupling: a drop of 10-20 mV from the resting value is sufficient to blunt induction of proton leak by HNE. Uncoupling occurs through UCP3 (11%), ANT (64%) and other pathways (25%). Our findings have shown that exogenous HNE only activates uncoupling at high membrane potential. These results suggest that both endogenous HNE production and high membrane potential are required before mild uncoupling will be triggered to attenuate mitochondrial ROS production.

  11. Circulating IgM Requires Plasma Membrane Disruption to Bind Apoptotic and Non-Apoptotic Nucleated Cells and Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Emily E; Dransfield, Ian; Kluth, David C; Hughes, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity is associated with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. IgM deficient mice exhibit an autoimmune phenotype consistent with a role for circulating IgM antibodies in apoptotic cell clearance. We have extensively characterised IgM binding to non-apoptotic and apoptotic mouse thymocytes and human Jurkat cells using flow cytometry, confocal imaging and electron microscopy. We demonstrate strong specific IgM binding to a subset of Annexin-V (AnnV)+PI (Propidium Iodide)+ apoptotic cells with disrupted cell membranes. Electron microscopy studies indicated that IgM+AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells exhibited morphologically advanced apoptosis with marked plasma membrane disruption compared to IgM-AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells, suggesting that access to intracellular epitopes is required for IgM to bind. Strong and comparable binding of IgM to permeabilised non-apoptotic and apoptotic cells suggests that IgM bound epitopes are 'apoptosis independent' such that IgM may bind any cell with profound disruption of cell plasma membrane integrity. In addition, permeabilised erythrocytes exhibited significant IgM binding thus supporting the importance of cell membrane epitopes. These data suggest that IgM may recognize and tag damaged nucleated cells or erythrocytes that exhibit significant cell membrane disruption. The role of IgM in vivo in conditions characterized by severe cell damage such as ischemic injury, sepsis and thrombotic microangiopathies merits further exploration.

  12. A novel algorithm identifies stress-induced alterations in mitochondrial connectivity and inner membrane structure from confocal images.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Mathieu; Guillebaud, Gérald; Gervais, Valerie; Lupien St-Pierre, David; Germain, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondria exist as a highly interconnected network that is exquisitely sensitive to variations in nutrient availability, as well as a large array of cellular stresses. Changes in length and connectivity of this network, as well as alterations in the mitochondrial inner membrane (cristae), regulate cell fate by controlling metabolism, proliferation, differentiation, and cell death. Given the key roles of mitochondrial dynamics, the process by which mitochondria constantly fuse and fragment, the measure of mitochondrial length and connectivity provides crucial information on the health and activity of various cell populations. However, despite the importance of accurately measuring mitochondrial networks, the tools required to rapidly and accurately provide this information are lacking. Here, we developed a novel probabilistic approach to automatically measure mitochondrial length distribution and connectivity from confocal images. This method accurately identified mitochondrial changes caused by starvation or the inhibition of mitochondrial function. In addition, we successfully used the algorithm to measure changes in mitochondrial inner membrane/matrix occurring in response to Complex III inhibitors. As cristae rearrangements play a critical role in metabolic regulation and cell survival, this provides a rapid method to screen for proteins or compounds affecting this process. The algorithm will thus provide a robust tool to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the key roles of mitochondria in the regulation of cell fate.

  13. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  14. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  15. Disruption of CEP290 microtubule/membrane-binding domains causes retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Drivas, Theodore G; Holzbaur, Erika L F; Bennett, Jean

    2013-10-01

    Mutations in the gene centrosomal protein 290 kDa (CEP290) cause an array of debilitating and phenotypically distinct human diseases, ranging from the devastating blinding disease Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) to Senior-Løken syndrome, Joubert syndrome, and the lethal Meckel-Gruber syndrome. Despite its critical role in biology and disease, very little is known about CEP290's function. Here, we have identified 4 functional domains of the protein. We found that CEP290 directly binds to cellular membranes through an N-terminal domain that includes a highly conserved amphipathic helix motif and to microtubules through a domain located within its myosin-tail homology domain. Furthermore, CEP290 activity was regulated by 2 autoinhibitory domains within its N and C termini, both of which were found to play critical roles in regulating ciliogenesis. Disruption of the microtubule-binding domain in a mouse model of LCA was sufficient to induce significant deficits in cilium formation, which led to retinal degeneration. These data implicate CEP290 as an integral structural and regulatory component of the cilium and provide insight into the pathological mechanisms of LCA and related ciliopathies. Further, these data illustrate that disruption of particular CEP290 functional domains may lead to particular disease phenotypes and suggest innovative strategies for therapeutic intervention.

  16. NMDA-induced calcium loads recycle across the mitochondrial inner membrane of hippocampal neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang Jian; Thayer, Stanley A

    2002-02-01

    Mitochondria sequester N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced Ca(2+) loads and regulate the shape of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) responses in neurons. When isolated mitochondria are exposed to high [Ca(2+)](,) Ca(2+) enters the matrix via the uniporter and returns to the cytosol by Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. Released Ca(2+) may re-enter the mitochondrion recycling across the inner membrane dissipating respiratory energy. Ca(2+) recycling, the continuous uptake and release of Ca(2+) by mitochondria, has not been described in intact neurons. Here we used single-cell microfluorimetry to measure [Ca(2+)](i) and mitochondrially targeted aequorin to measure matrix Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](mt)) to determine whether Ca(2+) recycles across the mitochondrial inner membrane in intact neurons following treatment with NMDA. We used ruthenium red and CGP 37157 to block uptake via the uniporter and release via Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange, respectively. As predicted by the Ca(2+) recycling hypothesis, blocking the uniporter immediately following challenge with 200 microM NMDA produced a rapid and transient increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) without a corresponding increase in matrix Ca(2+). Blocking mitochondrial Ca(2+) release produced the opposite effect, depressing cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and prolonging the time for matrix Ca(2+) levels to recover. The Ca(2+) recycling hypothesis uniquely predicts these reciprocal changes in the Ca(2+) levels between the two compartments. Ca(2+) recycling was not detected following treatment with 20 microM NMDA. Thus Ca(2+) recycling across the inner membrane was more pronounced following treatment with a high relative to a low concentration of NMDA, consistent with a role in Ca(2+)-dependent neurotoxicity.

  17. The cytotoxic effects of VE-3N, a novel 1,4-dihydropyridine derivative, involve the mitochondrial bioenergetic disruption via uncoupling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Marín-Prida, Javier; Pardo Andreu, Gilberto L; Rossignoli, Camila Pederiva; Durruthy, Michael González; Rodríguez, Estael Ochoa; Reyes, Yamila Verdecia; Acosta, Roberto Fernández; Uyemura, Sergio A; Alberici, Luciane C

    2017-03-29

    Several 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives overcome the multidrug resistance in tumors, but their intrinsic cytotoxic mechanisms remain unclear. Here we addressed if mitochondria are involved in the cytotoxicity of the novel 1,4-dihydropyridine derivative VE-3N [ethyl 6-chloro-5-formyl-2-methyl-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-1,4-dihydropyridine-3-carboxylate] towards cancer cells by employing hepatic carcinoma (HepG2) cells and isolated rat liver mitochondria. In HepG2 cells, VE-3N induced mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, ATP depletion, annexin V/propidium iodide double labeling, and Hoechst staining; events indicating apoptosis induction. In isolated rat liver mitochondria, VE-3N promoted mitochondrial uncoupling by exerting protonophoric actions and by increasing membrane fluidity. Mitochondrial uncoupling was evidenced by an increase in resting respiration, dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibition of Ca(2+) uptake, stimulation of Ca(2+) release, decrease in ATP synthesis, and swelling of valinomycin-treated organelles in hyposmotic potassium acetate media. Furthermore, uncoupling concentrations of VE-3N in the presence of Ca(2+) plus ruthenium red induced the mitochondrial permeability transition process. These results indicate that mitochondrial uncoupling is potentially involved in the VE-3N cytotoxic actions towards HepG2 cells. Considering that hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common form of liver cancer, our findings may open a new avenue for the development of VE-3N-based cancer therapies, and help to unravel the cytotoxic mechanisms of 1,4-dihydropyridines towards cancer cells.

  18. High-Content Imaging Assays for Identifying Compounds that Generate Superoxide and Impair Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Adherent Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Billis, Puja; Will, Yvonne; Nadanaciva, Sashi

    2014-02-19

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly produced in cells as a result of aerobic metabolism. When there is an excessive production of ROS and the cell's antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, oxidative stress occurs. The superoxide anion is a type of ROS that is produced primarily in mitochondria but is also generated in other regions of the cell including peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane, and cytosol. Here, a high-content imaging assay using the dye dihydroethidium is described for identifying compounds that generate superoxide in eukaryotic cells. A high-content imaging assay using the fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester is also described to identify compounds that impair mitochondrial membrane potential in eukaryotic cells. The purpose of performing both assays is to identify compounds that (1) generate superoxide at lower concentrations than they impair mitochondrial membrane potential, (2) impair mitochondrial membrane potential at lower concentrations than they generate superoxide, (3) generate superoxide and impair mitochondrial function at similar concentrations, and (4) do not generate superoxide or impair mitochondrial membrane potential during the duration of the assays.

  19. Copper effects on key metabolic enzymes and mitochondrial membrane potential in gills of the estuarine crab Neohelice granulata at different salinities.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Mariana Machado; de Oliveira, Camila Bento; Yano, Natalia Lie Inocencio; Bianchini, Adalto

    2012-11-01

    The estuarine crab Neohelice granulata was exposed (96 h) to a sublethal copper concentration under two different physiological conditions (hyperosmoregulating crabs: 2 ppt salinity, 1 mg Cu/L; isosmotic crabs: 30 ppt salinity, 5 mg Cu/L). After exposure, gills (anterior and posterior) were dissected and activities of enzymes involved in glycolysis (hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase), Krebs cycle (citrate synthase), and mitochondrial electron transport chain (cytochrome c oxidase) were analyzed. Membrane potential of mitochondria isolated from anterior and posterior gill cells was also evaluated. In anterior gills of crabs acclimated to 2 ppt salinity, copper exposure inhibited hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and citrate synthase activity, increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, and reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential. In posterior gills, copper inhibited hexokinase and pyruvate kinase activity, and increased citrate synthase activity. In anterior gills of crabs acclimated to 30 ppt salinity, copper exposure inhibited phosphofructokinase and citrate synthase activity, and increased hexokinase activity. In posterior gills, copper inhibited phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase activity, and increased hexokinase and lactate dehydrogenase activity. Copper did not affect cytochrome c oxidase activity in either anterior or posterior gills of crabs acclimated to 2 and 30 ppt salinity. These findings indicate that exposure to a sublethal copper concentration affects the activity of enzymes involved in glycolysis and Krebs cycle, especially in anterior (respiratory) gills of hyperosmoregulating crabs. Changes observed indicate a switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, characterizing a situation of functional hypoxia. In this case, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential would suggest a decrease in ATP production. Although gills of isosmotic crabs were also affected by copper exposure, changes

  20. Lipidomics reveals mitochondrial membrane remodeling associated with acute thermoregulation in a rodent with a wide thermoneutral zone.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qian; Li, Min; Shi, Yao-Long; Liu, Huwei; Speakman, John R; Wang, De-Hua

    2014-07-01

    Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) have high physiological flexibility in response to acute temperature changes, and have the widest thermoneutral zone (TNZ, 26.5-38.9 °C) reported among small mammals. At the upper critical temperature (T(uc), 38.9 °C), body temperatures of gerbils were significantly increased (39-41 °C) while metabolic rates were maintained at the basal level. In contrast, below the lower critical temperature (T(lc), 26.5 °C), metabolism was elevated and body temperature stable. Rapid changes in mitochondrial membrane lipidome were hypothesized to play an important role during acute thermoregulation of gerbils. Taking advantage of a recent lipidomic technique, we examined changes in the membrane phospholipids environment and free fatty acids (FFA) production in mitochondria between 38 and 27 °C (in the TNZ), and between 27 and 16 °C (below the TNZ). At 38 °C, acute heat stress elicited distinct remodeling in mitochondrial membrane lipidome which related to a potential decrease in mitochondrial respiration and membrane fluidity compared to 27 °C. At 16 °C, a sharply decreased unsaturation index and increased chain lengths were detected in mitochondrial FFA production both in muscle and brown adipose tissue. Our results suggest that mitochondrial membrane lipid remodeling may stabilize membrane function and activity of respiration related membrane protein to maintain a stable metabolic rate at T(uc), and improve heat production by decomposing less fluid fatty acid conjugates of membrane lipids under acute cold exposure. These data therefore imply an important role of membrane remodeling during acute thermoregulation in a non-hibernating endotherm.

  1. The anti-cancer agent guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane: ensuing energetic and oxidative stress implications.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L; Nuñez-Figueredo, Yanier; Tudella, Valeria G; Cuesta-Rubio, Osmany; Rodrigues, Fernando P; Pestana, Cezar R; Uyemura, Sérgio A; Leopoldino, Andreia M; Alberici, Luciane C; Curti, Carlos

    2011-06-15

    Guttiferone-A (GA) is a natural occurring polyisoprenylated benzophenone with cytotoxic action in vitro and anti-tumor action in rodent models. We addressed a potential involvement of mitochondria in GA toxicity (1-25 μM) toward cancer cells by employing both hepatic carcinoma (HepG2) cells and succinate-energized mitochondria, isolated from rat liver. In HepG2 cells GA decreased viability, dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential, depleted ATP and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In isolated rat-liver mitochondria GA promoted membrane fluidity increase, cyclosporine A/EGTA-insensitive membrane permeabilization, uncoupling (membrane potential dissipation/state 4 respiration rate increase), Ca²⁺ efflux, ATP depletion, NAD(P)H depletion/oxidation and ROS levels increase. All effects in cells, except mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, as well as NADPH depletion/oxidation and permeabilization in isolated mitochondria, were partly prevented by the a NAD(P)H regenerating substrate isocitrate. The results suggest the following sequence of events: 1) GA interaction with mitochondrial membrane promoting its permeabilization; 2) mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation; 3) NAD(P)H oxidation/depletion due to inability of membrane potential-sensitive NADP+ transhydrogenase of sustaining its reduced state; 4) ROS accumulation inside mitochondria and cells; 5) additional mitochondrial membrane permeabilization due to ROS; and 6) ATP depletion. These GA actions are potentially implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibril-Induced Membrane Disruption Is Enhanced by Endosomal Lipids and Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Sophia C.; Sheynis, Tania; Thompson, Rebecca; Tipping, Kevin W.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Ranson, Neil A.; Beales, Paul A.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of amyloidoses are not well understood, the interaction between amyloid proteins and cell membranes is thought to play a role in several amyloid diseases. Amyloid fibrils of β2-microglobulin (β2m), associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), have been shown to cause disruption of anionic lipid bilayers in vitro. However, the effect of lipid composition and the chemical environment in which β2m-lipid interactions occur have not been investigated previously. Here we examine membrane damage resulting from the interaction of β2m monomers and fibrils with lipid bilayers. Using dye release, tryptophan fluorescence quenching and fluorescence confocal microscopy assays we investigate the effect of anionic lipid composition and pH on the susceptibility of liposomes to fibril-induced membrane damage. We show that β2m fibril-induced membrane disruption is modulated by anionic lipid composition and is enhanced by acidic pH. Most strikingly, the greatest degree of membrane disruption is observed for liposomes containing bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) at acidic pH, conditions likely to reflect those encountered in the endocytic pathway. The results suggest that the interaction between β2m fibrils and membranes of endosomal origin may play a role in the molecular mechanism of β2m amyloid-associated osteoarticular tissue destruction in DRA. PMID:25100247

  3. Models of plasma membrane organization can be applied to mitochondrial membranes to target human health and disease with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Raza Shaikh, Saame; Brown, David A

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), abundant in fish oil, have potential for treating symptoms associated with inflammatory and metabolic disorders; therefore, it is essential to determine their fundamental molecular mechanisms. Recently, several labs have demonstrated the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts anti-inflammatory effects by targeting the molecular organization of plasma membrane microdomains. Here we briefly review the evidence that DHA reorganizes the spatial distribution of microdomains in several model systems. We then emphasize how models on DHA and plasma membrane microdomains can be applied to mitochondrial membranes. We discuss the role of DHA acyl chains in regulating mitochondrial lipid-protein clustering, and how these changes alter several aspects of mitochondrial function. In particular, we summarize effects of DHA on mitochondrial respiration, electron leak, permeability transition, and mitochondrial calcium handling. Finally, we conclude by postulating future experiments that will augment our understanding of DHA-dependent membrane organization in health and disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mitochondrial outer-membrane E3 ligase MUL1 ubiquitinates ULK1 and regulates selenite-induced mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Qi, Wei; Chen, Guo; Feng, Du; Liu, Jinhua; Ma, Biao; Zhou, Changqian; Mu, Chenglong; Zhang, Weilin; Chen, Quan; Zhu, Yushan

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria serve as membrane sources and signaling platforms for regulating autophagy. Accumulating evidence has also shown that damaged mitochondria are removed through both selective mitophagy and general autophagy in response to mitochondrial and oxidative stresses. Protein ubiquitination through mitochondrial E3 ligases plays an integrative role in mitochondrial outer membrane protein degradation, mitochondrial dynamics, and mitophagy. Here we showed that MUL1, a mitochondria-localized E3 ligase, regulates selenite-induced mitophagy in an ATG5 and ULK1-dependent manner. ULK1 partially translocated to mitochondria after selenite treatment and interacted with MUL1. We also demonstrated that ULK1 is a novel substrate of MUL1. These results suggest the association of mitochondria with autophagy regulation and provide a new mechanism for the beneficial effects of selenium as a chemopreventive agent. PMID:26018823

  5. Anti-Candida activity of geraniol involves disruption of cell membrane integrity and function.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Y; Khan, L A; Manzoor, N

    2016-09-01

    Candidiasis is a major problem in immunocompromised patients. Candida, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, is a major health concern today as conventional drugs are highly toxic with undesirable side effects. Their fungistatic nature is responsible for drug resistance in continuously evolving strains. Geraniol, an acyclic monoterpene alcohol, is a component of several plant essential oils. In the present study, an attempt has been made to understand the antifungal activity of geraniol at the cell membrane level in three Candida species. With an MIC of 30-130μg/mL, this natural compound was fungicidal at concentrations 2×MIC. There was complete suppression of fungal growth at MIC values (growth curves) and encouragingly geraniol is non-toxic even at the concentrations approaching 5×MIC (hemolysis assay). Exposed cells showed altered morphology, wherein the cells appeared either broken or shrivelled up (SEM studies). Significant reduction was seen in ergosterol levels at sub-MIC and glucose-induced H(+) efflux at concentrations>MIC values. Our results suggest that geraniol disrupts cell membrane integrity by interfering with ergosterol biosynthesis and inhibiting the very crucial PM-ATPase. It may hence be used in the management and treatment of both superficial and invasive candidiasis but further studies are required to elaborate its mode of action.

  6. Removal of typical endocrine disrupting chemicals by membrane bioreactor: in comparison with sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yingjun; Huang, Xia; Zhou, Haidong; Chen, Jianhua; Xue, Wenchao

    2011-01-01

    The removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) by a laboratory-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) fed with synthetic sewage was evaluated and moreover, compared with that by a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) operated under same conditions in parallel. Eight kinds of typical EDCs, including 17β-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), estriol (E3), 17α-ethynilestradiol (EE2), 4-octylphenol (4-OP), 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPnEO), were spiked into the feed. Their concentrations in influent, effluent and supernatant were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The overall estrogenecity was evaluated as 17β-estradiol equivalent quantity (EEQ), determined via yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay. E2, E3, BPA and 4-OP were well removed by both MBR and SBR, with removal rates more than 95% and no significant differences between the two reactors. However, with regard to the other four EDCs, of which the removal rates were lower, MBR performed better. Comparison between supernatant and effluent of the two reactors indicated that membrane separation of sludge and effluent, compared with sedimentation, can relatively improve elimination of target EDCs and total estrogenecity. By applying different solids retention times (SRTs) (5, 10, 20 and 40 d) to the MBR, 10 and 5 d were found to be the lower critical SRTs for efficient target EDCs and EEQ removal, respectively.

  7. Cell penetrating peptide TAT can kill cancer cells via membrane disruption after attachment of camptothecin.

    PubMed

    Song, Jingjing; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaoli; Ma, Panpan; Zhang, Bangzhi; Liu, Beijun; Ni, Jingman; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Attachment of traditional anticancer drugs to cell penetrating peptides is an effective strategy to improve their application in cancer treatment. In this study, we designed and synthesized the conjugates TAT-CPT and TAT-2CPT by attaching camptothecin (CPT) to the N-terminus of the cell penetrating peptide TAT. Interestingly, we found that TAT-CPT and especially TAT-2CPT could kill cancer cells via membrane disruption, which is similar to antimicrobial peptides. This might be because that CPT could perform as a hydrophobic residue to increase the extent of membrane insertion of TAT and the stability of the pores. In addition, TAT-CPT and TAT-2CPT could also kill cancer cells by the released CPT after they entered cells. Taken together, attachment of CPT could turn cell penetrating peptide TAT into an antimicrobial peptide with a dual mechanism of anticancer action, which presents a new strategy to develop anticancer peptides based on cell penetrating peptides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dilated cardiomyopathy-induced disruption of basement membrane alters the lever systems acting on the heart.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Iman A; El-Badri, Nagwa; Zaher, Amr

    2017-06-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is considered the most common form of non-ischemic heart diseases. DCM, occurs in response to both non-genetic and genetic factors, and has been associated with cytoskeletal protein mutations, impairing the contractile apparatus of cardiac myocytes. However, the pathology underlying the marked left ventricular dilatation remains unclear. Moreover, patients with end-stage DCM show alterations in the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM), and myocardial fibrosis even when the cardiac myocytes are intact. Therefore we hypothesize that DCM is a disease of basement membrane, which functions to support sarcomeric interactions with the ECM, and not only impaired cardiac contractility. We propose that under physiological conditions, the heart could be considered a second-class lever system. Disruption of the basement membrane in DCM would cause disarray in the alignment of cardiac myocytes and alteration in the second-class lever system of the heart. Thus, current inotropic agents show minimal or no effect on therapy as they target cardiac contractility rather than cardiac architecture and the lever systems of the heart. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A new method for evaluating stallion sperm viability and mitochondrial membrane potential in fixed semen samples.

    PubMed

    Peña, F J; Ball, B A; Squires, E L

    2016-12-29

    Multiparametric assessment of stallion sperm quality using flow cytometry can be a useful adjunct in semen evaluation; however, the availability of flow cytometers in veterinary practice is limited. The ability to preserve and transport sperm samples for later flow cytometric analysis using fixable probes would potentially facilitate this process. In the current study, we validated the combination of live/dead Zombie Green(®) (a fixable dye used to assess live and dead sperm) and MitoTracker Deep Red(®) (used to assess mitochondrial membrane potential). The assay was validated against classic, non-fixable, membrane assays (SYBR-14/PI). Our results demonstrated the feasibility of the assay. In conclusion, stained and fixed semen samples stored for 72 h obtained equivalent results to the exam on the same day; this new protocol shall facilitate the wider use of flow cytometry in stallion andrology in the future. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  10. [Peroxidation of lipids in mitochondrial membranes, induced by enzymatic deamination of biogenic amines].

    PubMed

    Kagan, V E; Smirnov, A V; Savov, V M; Gorkin, V Z

    1984-01-01

    In presence of ferrous cations and ascorbate lipid peroxidation in mitochondrial membranes has been induced by incubation of fragments of the membrane devoid of catalase activity with amines which are substrates of monoamine oxidases of the B type (2-phenyl ethylamine, benzylamine) or transformed monoamine oxidases of type A (cadaverine). In the samples containing both cadaverine and benzylamine the highest stimulation of lipid peroxidation was noted. To the contrary, a substrate of the monoamine oxidases of the type A (serotonin) caused under the same conditions an antioxidative effect. The following conditions are obligatory to induce lipid peroxidation in mitochondria by incubation with amines: I. absence of catalase activity in the biomembranes; 2. presence of physiological concentrations of Fe2+. Physiological concentrations of ascorbate or alterations of pH in the samples caused additional stimulation of the lipid peroxidation.

  11. Lipid peroxidation in mitochondrial membranes induced by enzymatic deamination of biogenic amines.

    PubMed

    Kagan, V E; Smirnov, A V; Savov, V M; Prilipko, L L; Gorkin, V Z

    1983-01-01

    In the presence of Fe2+ and ascorbate lipid peroxidation in mitochondrial membranes is induced by incubation of membrane fragments devoid of catalase activity with amines which are the substrates of monoamine oxidases of the type B (2-phenylethylamine, benzylamine) or transformed monoamine oxidases of the type A (cadaverine). The highest stimulation of lipid peroxidation is observed in the samples containing both cadaverine and benzylamine. On the contrary, the substrate of the monoamine oxidases of the type A, serotonin, causes an antioxidative effect under these conditions. The necessary prerequisites for lipid peroxidation induction in mitochondria during their incubation with amines are i) the absence of catalase activity in the biomembranes and, ii) the presence of physiological concentrations of Fe2+. Physiological concentrations of ascorbate or pH shifts cause additional stimulation of lipid peroxidation.

  12. Plasma and mitochondrial membrane perturbation induced by aluminum in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Skarabahatava, Aliaksandra Sergeevna; Lukyanenko, Ludmila Michaylovna; Slobozhanina, Ekaterina Ivanovna; Falcioni, Maria Letizia; Orlando, Patrick; Silvestri, Sonia; Tiano, Luca; Falcioni, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum is a redox-inert element that could induce cell damage via activation of oxidative stress. In this work, the effect of aluminum on different cellular compartments of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was studied. The presence of aluminum induced a lipid peroxidation and physico-chemical modifications at the membrane level. A decrease in fluorescence anisotropy of TMA-DPH and in the polarity of the lipid bilayer with a concomitant shift toward a gel phase was observed, while the pyrene excimerization coefficient (Kex) increased. Flow cytometry measurements, using JC-1, Rhodamine 123 and H2-DCFDA as fluorescent probes, indicated that aluminum induces a slight mitochondrial membrane depolarization that was associated with a moderate increase in reactive oxygen species production. A significative influence on these parameters was measured only at high aluminum concentration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Disruption of CR6-interacting factor-1 (CRIF1) in mouse islet beta cells leads to mitochondrial diabetes with progressive beta cell failure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Kyung; Joung, Kyong Hye; Ryu, Min Jeong; Kim, Soung Jung; Kim, Hyeongseok; Chung, Hyo Kyun; Lee, Min Hee; Lee, Seong Eun; Choi, Min Jeong; Chang, Joon Young; Hong, Hyun Jung; Kim, Koon Soon; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Kim, Hail; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Hyun Jin; Shong, Minho

    2015-04-01

    Although mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) dysfunction is believed to be responsible for beta cell dysfunction in insulin resistance and mitochondrial diabetes, the mechanisms underlying progressive beta cell failure caused by defective mitochondrial OxPhos are largely unknown. We examined the in vivo phenotypes of beta cell dysfunction in beta cell-specific Crif1 (also known as Gadd45gip1)-deficient mice. CR6-interacting factor-1 (CRIF1) is a mitochondrial protein essential for the synthesis and formation of the OxPhos complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Crif1(beta-/-) mice exhibited impaired glucose tolerance with defective insulin secretion as early as 4 weeks of age without defects in islet structure. At 11 weeks of age, Crif1(beta-/-) mice displayed characteristic ultrastructural mitochondrial abnormalities as well as severe glucose intolerance. Furthermore, islet area and insulin content was decreased by approximately 50% compared with wild-type mice. Treatment with the glucoregulatory drug exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist, was not sufficient to preserve beta cell function in Crif1(beta-/-) mice. Our results indicate that mitochondrial OxPhos dysfunction triggers progressive beta cell failure that is not halted by treatment with a GLP-1 agonist. The Crif1(beta-/-) mouse is a useful model for the study of beta cell failure caused by mitochondrial OxPhos dysfunction.

  14. Dimethyl sulfoxide damages mitochondrial integrity and membrane potential in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chan; Gao, Junying; Guo, Jichao; Bai, Lei; Marshall, Charles; Cai, Zhiyou; Wang, Linmei; Xiao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a polar organic solvent that is used to dissolve neuroprotective or neurotoxic agents in neuroscience research. However, DMSO itself also has pharmacological and pathological effects on the nervous system. Astrocytes play a central role in maintaining brain homeostasis, but the effect and mechanism of DMSO on astrocytes has not been studied. The present study showed that exposure of astrocyte cultures to 1% DMSO for 24 h did not significantly affect cell survival, but decreased cell viability and glial glutamate transporter expression, and caused mitochondrial swelling, membrane potential impairment and reactive oxygen species production, and subsequent cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. DMSO at concentrations of 5% significantly inhibited cell variability and promoted apoptosis of astrocytes, accompanied with more severe mitochondrial damage. These results suggest that mitochondrial impairment is a primary event in DMSO-induced astrocyte toxicity. The potential cytotoxic effects on astrocytes need to be carefully considered during investigating neuroprotective or neurotoxic effects of hydrophobic agents dissolved by DMSO.

  15. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Damages Mitochondrial Integrity and Membrane Potential in Cultured Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chan; Gao, Junying; Guo, Jichao; Bai, Lei; Marshall, Charles; Cai, Zhiyou; Wang, Linmei; Xiao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a polar organic solvent that is used to dissolve neuroprotective or neurotoxic agents in neuroscience research. However, DMSO itself also has pharmacological and pathological effects on the nervous system. Astrocytes play a central role in maintaining brain homeostasis, but the effect and mechanism of DMSO on astrocytes has not been studied. The present study showed that exposure of astrocyte cultures to 1% DMSO for 24 h did not significantly affect cell survival, but decreased cell viability and glial glutamate transporter expression, and caused mitochondrial swelling, membrane potential impairment and reactive oxygen species production, and subsequent cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. DMSO at concentrations of 5% significantly inhibited cell variability and promoted apoptosis of astrocytes, accompanied with more severe mitochondrial damage. These results suggest that mitochondrial impairment is a primary event in DMSO-induced astrocyte toxicity. The potential cytotoxic effects on astrocytes need to be carefully considered during investigating neuroprotective or neurotoxic effects of hydrophobic agents dissolved by DMSO. PMID:25238609

  16. Ocean acidification impacts on sperm mitochondrial membrane potential bring sperm swimming behaviour near its tipping point.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Peter; Binet, Monique T; Havenhand, Jonathan N; Doyle, Christopher J; Williamson, Jane E

    2015-04-01

    Broadcast spawning marine invertebrates are susceptible to environmental stressors such as climate change, as their reproduction depends on the successful meeting and fertilization of gametes in the water column. Under near-future scenarios of ocean acidification, the swimming behaviour of marine invertebrate sperm is altered. We tested whether this was due to changes in sperm mitochondrial activity by investigating the effects of ocean acidification on sperm metabolism and swimming behaviour in the sea urchin Centrostephanus rodgersii. We used a fluorescent molecular probe (JC-1) and flow cytometry to visualize mitochondrial activity (measured as change in mitochondrial membrane potential, MMP). Sperm MMP was significantly reduced in ΔpH -0.3 (35% reduction) and ΔpH -0.5 (48% reduction) treatments, whereas sperm swimming behaviour was less sensitive with only slight changes (up to 11% decrease) observed overall. There was significant inter-individual variability in responses of sperm swimming behaviour and MMP to acidified seawater. We suggest it is likely that sperm exposed to these changes in pH are close to their tipping point in terms of physiological tolerance to acidity. Importantly, substantial inter-individual variation in responses of sperm swimming to ocean acidification may increase the scope for selection of resilient phenotypes, which, if heritable, could provide a basis for adaptation to future ocean acidification. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Eukaryote-wide sequence analysis of mitochondrial β-barrel outer membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The outer membranes of mitochondria are thought to be homologous to the outer membranes of Gram negative bacteria, which contain 100's of distinct families of β-barrel membrane proteins (BOMPs) often forming channels for transport of nutrients or drugs. However, only four families of mitochondrial BOMPs (MBOMPs) have been confirmed to date. Although estimates as high as 100 have been made in the past, the number of yet undiscovered MBOMPs is an open question. Fortunately, the recent discovery of a membrane integration signal (the β-signal) for MBOMPs gave us an opportunity to look for undiscovered MBOMPs. Results We present the results of a comprehensive survey of eukaryotic protein sequences intended to identify new MBOMPs. Our search employs recent results on β-signals as well as structural information and a novel BOMP predictor trained on both bacterial and mitochondrial BOMPs. Our principal finding is circumstantial evidence suggesting that few MBOMPs remain to be discovered, if one assumes that, like known MBOMPs, novel MBOMPs will be monomeric and β-signal dependent. In addition to this, our analysis of MBOMP homologs reveals some exceptions to the current model of the β-signal, but confirms its consistent presence in the C-terminal region of MBOMP proteins. We also report a β-signal independent search for MBOMPs against the yeast and Arabidopsis proteomes. We find no good candidates MBOMPs in yeast but the Arabidopsis results are less conclusive. Conclusions Our results suggest there are no remaining MBOMPs left to discover in yeast; and if one assumes all MBOMPs are β-signal dependent, few MBOMP families remain undiscovered in any sequenced organism. PMID:21272379

  18. Anomalous diffusion induced by cristae geometry in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Sukhorukov, Valerii M; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion of inner membrane proteins is a prerequisite for correct functionality of mitochondria. The complicated structure of tubular, vesicular or flat cristae and their small connections to the inner boundary membrane impose constraints on the mobility of proteins making their diffusion a very complicated process. Therefore we investigate the molecular transport along the main mitochondrial axis using highly accurate computational methods. Diffusion is modeled on a curvilinear surface reproducing the shape of mitochondrial inner membrane (IM). Monte Carlo simulations are carried out for topologies resembling both tubular and lamellar cristae, for a range of physiologically viable crista sizes and densities. Geometrical confinement induces up to several-fold reduction in apparent mobility. IM surface curvature per se generates transient anomalous diffusion (TAD), while finite and stable values of projected diffusion coefficients are recovered in a quasi-normal regime for short- and long-time limits. In both these cases, a simple area-scaling law is found sufficient to explain limiting diffusion coefficients for permeable cristae junctions, while asymmetric reduction of the junction permeability leads to strong but predictable variations in molecular motion rate. A geometry-based model is given as an illustration for the time-dependence of diffusivity when IM has tubular topology. Implications for experimental observations of diffusion along mitochondria using methods of optical microscopy are drawn out: a non-homogenous power law is proposed as a suitable approach to TAD. The data demonstrate that if not taken into account appropriately, geometrical effects lead to significant misinterpretation of molecular mobility measurements in cellular curvilinear membranes.

  19. Anomalous Diffusion Induced by Cristae Geometry in the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sukhorukov, Valerii M.; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion of inner membrane proteins is a prerequisite for correct functionality of mitochondria. The complicated structure of tubular, vesicular or flat cristae and their small connections to the inner boundary membrane impose constraints on the mobility of proteins making their diffusion a very complicated process. Therefore we investigate the molecular transport along the main mitochondrial axis using highly accurate computational methods. Diffusion is modeled on a curvilinear surface reproducing the shape of mitochondrial inner membrane (IM). Monte Carlo simulations are carried out for topologies resembling both tubular and lamellar cristae, for a range of physiologically viable crista sizes and densities. Geometrical confinement induces up to several-fold reduction in apparent mobility. IM surface curvature per se generates transient anomalous diffusion (TAD), while finite and stable values of projected diffusion coefficients are recovered in a quasi-normal regime for short- and long-time limits. In both these cases, a simple area-scaling law is found sufficient to explain limiting diffusion coefficients for permeable cristae junctions, while asymmetric reduction of the junction permeability leads to strong but predictable variations in molecular motion rate. A geometry-based model is given as an illustration for the time-dependence of diffusivity when IM has tubular topology. Implications for experimental observations of diffusion along mitochondria using methods of optical microscopy are drawn out: a non-homogenous power law is proposed as a suitable approach to TAD. The data demonstrate that if not taken into account appropriately, geometrical effects lead to significant misinterpretation of molecular mobility measurements in cellular curvilinear membranes. PMID:19242541

  20. Interaction of fullerene nanoparticles with biomembranes: from the partition in lipid membranes to effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sandra M; Dinis, Augusto M; Peixoto, Francisco; Ferreira, Lino; Jurado, Amália S; Videira, Romeu A

    2014-03-01

    Partition and localization of C60 and its derivative C60(OH)18-22 in lipid membranes and their impact on mitochondrial activity were studied, attempting to correlate those events with fullerene characteristics (size, surface chemistry, and surface charge). Fluorescence quenching studies suggested that C60(OH)18-22 preferentially populated the outer regions of the bilayer, whereas C60 preferred to localize in deeper regions of the bilayer. Partition coefficient values indicated that C60 exhibited higher affinity for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and mitochondrial membranes than C60(OH)18-22. Both fullerenes affected the mitochondrial function, but the inhibitory effects promoted by C60 were more pronounced than those induced by C60(OH)18-22 (up to 20 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein). State 3 and p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone-uncoupled respirations are inhibited by both fullerenes when glutamate/malate or succinate was used as substrate. Phosphorylation system and electron transport chain of mitochondria are affected by both fullerenes, but only C60 increased the inner mitochondrial membrane permeability to protons, suggesting perturbations in the structure and dynamics of that membrane. At concentrations of C60(OH)18-22 above 20 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, the activity of FoF1-ATP synthase was also decreased. The evaluation of transmembrane potential showed that the mitochondria phosphorylation cycle decreased upon adenosine diphosphate addition with increasing fullerenes concentration and the time of the repolarization phase increased as a function of C60(OH)18-22 concentration. Our results suggest that the balance between hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity resulting from the surface chemistry of fullerene nanoparticles, rather than the cluster size or the surface charge acquired by fullerenes in water, influences their membrane interactions and consequently their effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics.

  1. Dietary Tocotrienol/γ-Cyclodextrin Complex Increases Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and ATP Concentrations in the Brains of Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schloesser, Anke; Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Dose, Janina; Ikuta, Naoko; Okamoto, Hinako; Ishida, Yoshiyuki; Terao, Keiji; Matsugo, Seiichi; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Brain aging is accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial function. In vitro studies suggest that tocotrienols, including γ- and δ-tocotrienol (T3), may exhibit neuroprotective properties. However, little is known about the effect of dietary T3 on mitochondrial function in vivo. In this study, we monitored the effect of a dietary T3/γ-cyclodextrin complex (T3CD) on mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels in the brain of 21-month-old mice. Mice were fed either a control diet or a diet enriched with T3CD providing 100 mg T3 per kg diet for 6 months. Dietary T3CD significantly increased mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels compared to those of controls. The increase in MMP and ATP due to dietary T3CD was accompanied by an increase in the protein levels of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM). Furthermore, dietary T3CD slightly increased the mRNA levels of superoxide dismutase, γ-glutamyl cysteinyl synthetase, and heme oxygenase 1 in the brain. Overall, the present data suggest that T3CD increases TFAM, mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP synthesis in the brains of aged mice. PMID:26301044

  2. Improved Mitochondrial Function with Diet-Induced Increase in Either Docosahexaenoic Acid or Arachidonic Acid in Membrane Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Khairallah, Ramzi J.; Kim, Junhwan; O'Shea, Karen M.; O'Connell, Kelly A.; Brown, Bethany H.; Galvao, Tatiana; Daneault, Caroline; Rosiers, Christine Des; Polster, Brian M.; Hoppel, Charles L.; Stanley, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria can depolarize and trigger cell death through the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). We recently showed that an increase in the long chain n3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n3) and depletion of the n6 PUFA arachidonic acid (ARA; 20:4n6) in mitochondrial membranes is associated with a greater Ca2+ load required to induce MPTP opening. Here we manipulated mitochondrial phospholipid composition by supplementing the diet with DHA, ARA or combined DHA+ARA in rats for 10 weeks. There were no effects on cardiac function, or respiration of isolated mitochondria. Analysis of mitochondrial phospholipids showed DHA supplementation increased DHA and displaced ARA in mitochondrial membranes, while supplementation with ARA or DHA+ARA increased ARA and depleted linoleic acid (18:2n6). Phospholipid analysis revealed a similar pattern, particularly in cardiolipin. Tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin was depleted by 80% with ARA or DHA+ARA supplementation, with linoleic acid side chains replaced by ARA. Both the DHA and ARA groups had delayed Ca2+-induced MPTP opening, but the DHA+ARA group was similar to the control diet. In conclusion, alterations in mitochondria membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition caused by dietary DHA or ARA was associated with a greater cumulative Ca2+ load required to induced MPTP opening. Further, high levels of tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin were not essential for normal mitochondrial function if replaced with very-long chain n3 or n6 PUFAs. PMID:22479624

  3. Effects of Insecticides on the Fluidity of Mitochondrial Membranes of the Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella, Resistant and Susceptible to Avermectin

    PubMed Central

    Hu, J.; Liang, P.; Shi, X.; Gao, X.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of various insecticides on the fluidity of mitochondrial membranes and cross-resistance were investigated in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) using strains that were both resistant and susceptible to avermectin. The resistant strain of P. xylostella, AV-R, developed 1078-fold resistance to avermetins with a high level of cross-resistance to the analogs of avermectins, ivermectin and emamectin benzoate. It had more than 1000 times greater resistance when compared with the avermectin-susceptible strain, XH-S. Mitochondrial membrane fluidity was measured by detecting fluorescence polarization using DPH (1,6-Diphenyl -1,3,5-hexatriene) as the fluorescence probe. Abamectin, emamectin benzoate, ivermectin, cypermethrin and fenvalerate decreased the fluidity of mitochondrial membranes in the XH-S strain at 25°C. However, fipronil and acephate did not change the fluidity of mitochondrial membrane when the concentration of these insecticides was 1×10-4 mol/L. Membrane fluidity increased as the temperature increased. The thermotropic effect on the polarization value of DPH increased as the insecticide concentration was increased. There was a significant difference of mitochondrial membrane fluidity between both XH-S and AV-R when temperature was less than 25°C and no difference was observed when the temperature was more than 25°C. The low-dose abamectin (0.11 mg/L) in vivo treatment caused a significant change of membrane fluidity in the XH-S strain and no change in the AV-R strain. However, a high-dose abamectin (11.86 mg/L) resulted in 100% mortality of the XH-S strain. In vivo treatment may cause a significant change of membrane fluidity in the AV-R strain PMID:20345311

  4. Lipid, membrane, and mitochondrial characteristics of Ustilago maydis following exposure to ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Waterfield, W.F. III

    1986-01-01

    Pencoazole at 0.5 ..mu..g/ml inhibited ergosterol biosynthesis in U. maydis. Polar lipids of sporidia grown with 0.5 ..mu..g/ml penconazole for 7.5 or 22 hr or 1.0 ..mu..g/ml fenarimol for 7.5 hr contained more 18:2 than 18:1 fatty acids. There was usually more 18:1 than 18:2 fatty acids in polar lipids of untreated sporidia but this ratio was influenced by culture cell density. The high 18:2 to 18:1 ratio in the polar lipids from penconazole grown cells was unaffected by cell density. There was an increase in free fatty acids and these were enriched with 18:2 members in cells grown with 0.5 ..mu..g/ml penconazole for 22 hr. Unsaturation of triglycerides fatty acids did not differ appreciably from that of untreated sporidia. Untreated WT U. maydis protoplasts lysed more slowly in 0.3 M sorbitol than those prepared from WT sporidia grown for 16 hr with 1.0 ..mu..g/ml penconazole or 2.0 ..mu..g/ml fenarimol or from untreated erg-40 sporidia. Protoplasts were more permeable to crystal violet than were those from untreated WT sporidia. Mitochondria from untreated WT sporidia oxidizing pyruvate plus malate or succinate yielded higher ADP/O rations than mitochondria from erg-40 or penconazole grown WT sporidia. The mitochondrial ATPase of control cells had a Km of 0.8 mM ATP whereas the mitochondrial ATPase of penconazole grown WT and erg-40 had a Km value of 3.7 and 3.2 mM ATP, respectively. When the mitochondrial catalytic subunit of the ATPase from these mitochondria were solubilized, the Km did not differ. These studies suggest that changes in sterols and membrane fatty acids resulting from treatments with EBI fungicides cause increased membrane fluidity which affects membrane stability, permeability and activity of the mitochondrial ATPase.

  5. Glutathionylation of Adenine Nucleotide Translocase Induced by Carbon Monoxide Prevents Mitochondrial Membrane Permeabilization and Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Queiroga, Cláudia S. F.; Almeida, Ana S.; Martel, Cécile; Brenner, Catherine; Alves, Paula M.; Vieira, Helena L. A.

    2010-01-01

    The present work demonstrates the ability of CO to prevent apoptosis in a primary culture of astrocytes. For the first time, the antiapoptotic behavior can be clearly attributed to the inhibition of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP), a key event in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In isolated non-synaptic mitochondria, CO partially inhibits (i) loss of potential, (ii) the opening of a nonspecific pore through the inner membrane, (iii) swelling, and (iv) cytochrome c release, which are induced by calcium, diamide, or atractyloside (a ligand of ANT). CO directly modulates ANT function by enhancing ADP/ATP exchange and prevents its pore-forming activity. Additionally, CO induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and its prevention by β-carotene decreases CO cytoprotection in intact cells as well as in isolated mitochondria, revealing the key role of ROS. On the other hand, CO induces a slight increase in mitochondrial oxidized glutathione, which is essential for apoptosis modulation by (i) delaying astrocytic apoptosis, (ii) decreasing MMP, and (iii) enhancing ADP/ATP translocation activity of ANT. Moreover, CO and GSSG trigger ANT glutathionylation, a post-translational process regulating protein function in response to redox cellular changes. In conclusion, CO protects astrocytes from apoptosis by preventing MMP, acting on ANT (glutathionylation and inhibition of its pore activity) via a preconditioning-like process mediated by ROS and GSSG. PMID:20348099

  6. The Force Exerted by the Membrane Potential During Protein Import into the Mitochondrial Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Ghosal, Sandip; Matouschek, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    The electrostatic force exerted on a targeting sequence by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane is calculated and found to vary from 1.4 pN to 2.2 pN (per unit elementary charge) as the radius of the inner membrane pore (assumed aqueous) is varied from 12 to 6.5 Angstroms, its measured range. Since the pore is not very much wider than the distance between water molecules, the full shielding effect of water may not be present; the extreme case of a nonaqueous pore gives a force of 3.1 pN per unit charge, which represents an upper limit. When applied to mitochondrial import experiments on the protein harness, these results imply that a force of 11 plus or minus 4 pN is sufficient to catalyze the unfolding of harness during import. Comparison of these results with unfolding forces measured using atomic force microscopy suggests that the two are not inconsistent.

  7. Yeast Vps13 promotes mitochondrial function and is localized at membrane contact sites

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Sook; Thorsness, Mary K.; Policastro, Robert; McGoldrick, Luke L.; Hollingsworth, Nancy M.; Thorsness, Peter E.; Neiman, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    The Vps13 protein family is highly conserved in eukaryotic cells. Mutations in human VPS13 genes result in a variety of diseases, such as chorea acanthocytosis (ChAc), but the cellular functions of Vps13 proteins are not well defined. In yeast, there is a single VPS13 orthologue, which is required for at least two different processes: protein sorting to the vacuole and sporulation. This study demonstrates that VPS13 is also important for mitochondrial integrity. In addition to preventing transfer of DNA from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, VPS13 suppresses mitophagy and functions in parallel with the endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondrion encounter structure (ERMES). In different growth conditions, Vps13 localizes to endosome–mitochondrion contacts and to the nuclear–vacuole junctions, indicating that Vps13 may function at membrane contact sites. The ability of VPS13 to compensate for the absence of ERMES correlates with its intracellular distribution. We propose that Vps13 is present at multiple membrane contact sites and that separation-of-function mutants are due to loss of Vps13 at specific junctions. Introduction of VPS13A mutations identified in ChAc patients at cognate sites in yeast VPS13 are specifically defective in compensating for the lack of ERMES, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction might be the basis for ChAc. PMID:27280386

  8. Heterogeneity in mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential is independent of the nuclear division cycle in multinucleate fungal cells.

    PubMed

    Gerstenberger, John P; Occhipinti, Patricia; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2012-03-01

    In the multinucleate filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii, nuclei divide asynchronously in a common cytoplasm. We hypothesize that the division cycle machinery has a limited zone of influence in the cytoplasm to promote nuclear autonomy. Mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells undergo cell cycle-specific changes in morphology and membrane potential and therefore can serve as a reporter of the cell cycle state of the cytoplasm. To evaluate if the cell cycle state of nuclei in A. gossypii can influence the adjacent cytoplasm, we tested whether local mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in A. gossypii are associated with the division state of a nearby nucleus. We found that mitochondria exhibit substantial heterogeneity in both morphology and membrane potential within a single multinucleated cell. Notably, differences in mitochondrial morphology or potential are not associated with a specific nuclear division state. Heterokaryon mutants with a mixture of nuclei with deletions of and wild type for the mitochondrial fusion/fission genes DNM1 and FZO1 exhibit altered mitochondrial morphology and severe growth and sporulation defects. This dominant effect suggests that the gene products may be required locally near their expression site rather than diffusing widely in the cell. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial dynamics are essential in these large syncytial cells, yet morphology and membrane potential are independent of nuclear cycle state.

  9. Dynamin-related Protein 1 Oligomerization in Solution Impairs Functional Interactions with Membrane-anchored Mitochondrial Fission Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, Ryan W.; Francy, Christopher A.; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Qi, Xin; Mears, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission is a crucial cellular process mediated by the mechanoenzymatic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). During mitochondrial division, Drp1 is recruited from the cytosol to the outer mitochondrial membrane by one, or several, integral membrane proteins. One such Drp1 partner protein, mitochondrial fission factor (Mff), is essential for mitochondrial division, but its mechanism of action remains unexplored. Previous studies have been limited by a weak interaction between Drp1 and Mff in vitro. Through refined in vitro reconstitution approaches and multiple independent assays, we show that removal of the regulatory variable domain (VD) in Drp1 enhances formation of a functional Drp1-Mff copolymer. This protein assembly exhibits greatly stimulated cooperative GTPase activity in solution. Moreover, when Mff was anchored to a lipid template, to mimic a more physiologic environment, significant stimulation of GTPase activity was observed with both WT and ΔVD Drp1. Contrary to recent findings, we show that premature Drp1 self-assembly in solution impairs functional interactions with membrane-anchored Mff. Instead, dimeric Drp1 species are selectively recruited by Mff to initiate assembly of a functional fission complex. Correspondingly, we also found that the coiled-coil motif in Mff is not essential for Drp1 interactions, but rather serves to augment cooperative self-assembly of Drp1 proximal to the membrane. Taken together, our findings provide a mechanism wherein the multimeric states of both Mff and Drp1 regulate their collaborative interaction. PMID:26578514

  10. The hepatitis B virus X protein disrupts innate immunity by downregulating mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein.

    PubMed

    Wei, Congwen; Ni, Caifei; Song, Ting; Liu, Yu; Yang, XiaoLi; Zheng, Zirui; Jia, Yongxia; Yuan, Yuan; Guan, Kai; Xu, Yang; Cheng, Xiaozhong; Zhang, Yanhong; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Youliang; Wen, Chaoyang; Wu, Qing; Shi, Wei; Zhong, Hui

    2010-07-15

    Previous studies have shown that both hepatitis A virus and hepatitis C virus inhibit innate immunity by cleaving the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein, an essential component of the virus-activated signaling pathway that activates NF-kappaB and IFN regulatory factor-3 to induce the production of type I IFN. For human hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis B s-Ag, hepatitis B e-Ag, or HBV virions have been shown to suppress TLR-induced antiviral activity with reduced IFN-beta production and subsequent induction of IFN-stimulated genes. However, HBV-mediated suppression of the RIG-I-MDA5 pathway is unknown. In this study, we found that HBV suppressed poly(deoxyadenylate-thymidylate)-activated IFN-beta production in hepatocytes. Specifically, hepatitis B virus X (HBX) interacted with MAVS and promoted the degradation of MAVS through Lys(136) ubiquitin in MAVS protein, thus preventing the induction of IFN-beta. Further analysis of clinical samples revealed that MAVS protein was downregulated in hepatocellular carcinomas of HBV origin, which correlated with increased sensitivities of primary murine hepatocytes isolated from HBX knock-in transgenic mice upon vesicular stomatitis virus infections. By establishing a link between MAVS and HBX, this study suggests that HBV can target the RIG-I signaling by HBX-mediated MAVS downregulation, thereby attenuating the antiviral response of the innate immune system.

  11. Kalkitoxin Inhibits Angiogenesis, Disrupts Cellular Hypoxic Signaling, and Blocks Mitochondrial Electron Transport in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J. Brian; Liu, Yang; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Gerwick, William H.; Valeriote, Frederick A.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2015-01-01

    The biologically active lipopeptide kalkitoxin was previously isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (Lyngbya majuscula). Kalkitoxin exhibited N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated neurotoxicity and acted as an inhibitory ligand for voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Subsequent studies revealed that kalkitoxin generated a delayed form of colon tumor cell cytotoxicity in 7-day clonogenic cell survival assays. Cell line- and exposure time-dependent cytostatic/cytotoxic effects were previously observed with mitochondria-targeted inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). The transcription factor HIF-1 functions as a key regulator of oxygen homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated the ability of kalkitoxin to inhibit hypoxic signaling in human tumor cell lines. Kalkitoxin potently and selectively inhibited hypoxia-induced activation of HIF-1 in T47D breast tumor cells (IC50 5.6 nM). Mechanistic studies revealed that kalkitoxin inhibits HIF-1 activation by suppressing mitochondrial oxygen consumption at electron transport chain (ETC) complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Further studies indicate that kalkitoxin targets tumor angiogenesis by blocking the induction of angiogenic factors (i.e., VEGF) in tumor cells. PMID:25803180

  12. Critical roles of Rho-associated kinase in membrane blebbing and mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis caused by 1-butanol.

    PubMed

    Noritake, Kanako; Aki, Toshihiko; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Unuma, Kana; Nara, Akina; Kato, Chizuru; Uemura, Koichi

    2012-09-01

    Alcohols are widely used as industrial solvents and chemical intermediates but can cause serious damage to human health. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed the molecular mechanisms underlying the cytotoxicity of industrial alcohols, with the notable exception of ethanol. The goal of our current study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of cytotoxicity caused by primary alcohols containing longer carbon chains than ethanol. We find that 1-butanol induces morphological changes in H9c2 cardiomyoblastoma including nuclear condensation and membrane blebbing, both of which are features of apoptotic response. Moreover, a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, the cytosolic release of cytochrome c, and the activation of caspase 9 and 3 was observed, thus revealing the activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by 1-butanol. The addition of Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), suppressed the membrane blebbing and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In comparison z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, did not inhibit membrane blebbing but did prevent cell death following exposure to 1-butanol. These results indicate that mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis and membrane blebbing are parallel phenomena that occur downstream of ROCK. This kinase thus plays an essential role in 1-butanol cytotoxicity and subsequent cell death in H9c2 cells.

  13. A novel antimicrobial peptide derived from fish goose type lysozyme disrupts the membrane of Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Bhatt, Prasanth; Ganesh, Munuswamy-Ramanujam; Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Arasu, MariadhasValan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Marimuthu, Kasi; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2015-12-01

    In aquaculture, accumulation of antibiotics resulted in development of resistance among bacterial pathogens. Consequently, it became mandatory to find alternative to synthetic antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) which are described as evolutionary ancient weapons have been considered as promising alternates in recent years. In this study, a novel antimicrobial peptide had been derived from goose type lysozyme (LyzG) which was identified from the cDNA library of freshwater fish Channa striatus (Cs). The identified lysozyme cDNA contains 585 nucleotides which encodes a protein of 194 amino acids. CsLyzG was closely related to Siniperca chuatsi with 92.8% homology. The depicted protein sequence contained a GEWL domain with conserved GLMQ motif, 7 active residues and 2 catalytic residues. Gene expression analysis revealed that CsLyzG was distributed in major immune organs with highest expression in head kidney. Results of temporal expression analysis after bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) and fungal (Aphanomyces invadans) challenges indicated a stimulant-dependent expression pattern of CsLyzG. Two antimicrobial peptides IK12 and TS10 were identified from CsLyzG and synthesized. Antibiogram showed that IK12 was active against Salmonella enterica, a major multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogen which produces beta lactamase. The IK12 induced loss of cell viability in the bacterial pathogen. Flow cytometry assay revealed that IK12 disrupt the membrane of S. enterica which is confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis that reveals blebs around the bacterial cell membrane. Conclusively, CsLyzG is a potential innate immune component and the identified antimicrobial peptide has great caliber to be used as an ecofriendly antibacterial substance in aquaculture.

  14. Decreased Levels of Proapoptotic Factors and Increased Key Regulators of Mitochondrial Biogenesis Constitute New Potential Beneficial Features of Long-lived Growth Hormone Receptor Gene–Disrupted Mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Decreased somatotrophic signaling is among the most important mechanisms associated with extended longevity. Mice homozygous for the targeted disruption of the growth hormone (GH) receptor gene (GH receptor knockout; GHRKO) are obese and dwarf, are characterized by a reduced weight and body size, undetectable levels of GH receptor, high concentration of serum GH, and greatly reduced plasma levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I, and are remarkably long lived. Recent results suggest new features of GHRKO mice that may positively affect longevity—decreased levels of proapoptotic factors and increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. The alterations in levels of the proapoptotic factors and key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis were not further improved by two other potential life-extending interventions—calorie restriction and visceral fat removal. This may attribute the primary role to GH resistance in the regulation of apoptosis and mitochondrial biogenesis in GHRKO mice in terms of increased life span. PMID:23197187

  15. Removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) using low pressure reverse osmosis membrane (LPROM).

    PubMed

    Razak, A R A; Ujang, Z; Ozaki, H

    2007-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are the focus of current environmental issues, as they can cause adverse health effects to animals and human, subsequent to endocrine function. The objective of this study was to remove a specific compound of EDCs (i.e. pentachlorophenol, C(6)OCL(5)Na, molecular weight of 288 g/mol) using low pressure reverse osmosis membrane (LPROM). A cross flow module of LPROM was used to observe the effects of operating parameters, i.e. pH, operating pressure and temperature. The design of the experiment was based on MINITAB(TM) software, and the analysis of results was conducted by factorial analysis. It was found that the rejection of pentachlorophenol was higher than 80% at a recovery rate of 60 to 70%. The rejection was subjected to increase with the increase of pH. The flux was observed to be increased with the increase of operating pressure and temperature. This study also investigated the interaction effects between operating parameters involved.

  16. Supplementation of T3 Recovers Hypothyroid Rat Liver Cells from Oxidatively Damaged Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Leading to Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sutapa; Samanta, Luna; Roy, Anita; Bhanja, Shravani; Chainy, Gagan B. N.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a growing medical concern. There are conflicting reports regarding the mechanism of oxidative stress in hypothyroidism. Mitochondrial oxidative stress is pivotal to thyroid dysfunction. The present study aimed to delineate the effects of hepatic inner mitochondrial membrane dysfunction as a consequence of 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil-induced hypothyroidism in rats. Increased oxidative stress predominance in the submitochondrial particles (SMP) and altered antioxidant defenses in the mitochondrial matrix fraction correlated with hepatocyte apoptosis. In order to check whether the effects caused by hypothyroidism are reversed by T3, the above parameters were evaluated in a subset of T3-treated hypothyroid rats. Complex I activity was inhibited in hypothyroid SMP, whereas T3 supplementation upregulated electron transport chain complexes. Higher mitochondrial H2O2 levels in hypothyroidism due to reduced matrix GPx activity culminated in severe oxidative damage to membrane lipids. SMP and matrix proteins were stabilised in hypothyroidism but exhibited increased carbonylation after T3 administration. Glutathione content was higher in both. Hepatocyte apoptosis was evident in hypothyroid liver sections; T3 administration, on the other hand, exerted antiapoptotic and proproliferative effects. Hence, thyroid hormone level critically regulates functional integrity of hepatic mitochondria; hypothyroidism injures mitochondrial membrane lipids leading to hepatocyte apoptosis, which is substantially recovered upon T3 supplementation. PMID:24987693

  17. Supplementation of T3 recovers hypothyroid rat liver cells from oxidatively damaged inner mitochondrial membrane leading to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sutapa; Samanta, Luna; Roy, Anita; Bhanja, Shravani; Chainy, Gagan B N

    2014-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a growing medical concern. There are conflicting reports regarding the mechanism of oxidative stress in hypothyroidism. Mitochondrial oxidative stress is pivotal to thyroid dysfunction. The present study aimed to delineate the effects of hepatic inner mitochondrial membrane dysfunction as a consequence of 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil-induced hypothyroidism in rats. Increased oxidative stress predominance in the submitochondrial particles (SMP) and altered antioxidant defenses in the mitochondrial matrix fraction correlated with hepatocyte apoptosis. In order to check whether the effects caused by hypothyroidism are reversed by T3, the above parameters were evaluated in a subset of T3-treated hypothyroid rats. Complex I activity was inhibited in hypothyroid SMP, whereas T3 supplementation upregulated electron transport chain complexes. Higher mitochondrial H2O2 levels in hypothyroidism due to reduced matrix GPx activity culminated in severe oxidative damage to membrane lipids. SMP and matrix proteins were stabilised in hypothyroidism but exhibited increased carbonylation after T3 administration. Glutathione content was higher in both. Hepatocyte apoptosis was evident in hypothyroid liver sections; T3 administration, on the other hand, exerted antiapoptotic and proproliferative effects. Hence, thyroid hormone level critically regulates functional integrity of hepatic mitochondria; hypothyroidism injures mitochondrial membrane lipids leading to hepatocyte apoptosis, which is substantially recovered upon T3 supplementation.

  18. Direct Membrane Association Drives Mitochondrial Fission by the Parkinson Disease-associated Protein α-Synuclein*♦

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Ken; Nemani, Venu M.; Azarbal, Farnaz; Skibinski, Gaia; Levy, Jon M.; Egami, Kiyoshi; Munishkina, Larissa; Zhang, Jue; Gardner, Brooke; Wakabayashi, Junko; Sesaki, Hiromi; Cheng, Yifan; Finkbeiner, Steven; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Masliah, Eliezer; Edwards, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    The protein α-synuclein has a central role in Parkinson disease, but the mechanism by which it contributes to neural degeneration remains unknown. We now show that the expression of α-synuclein in mammalian cells, including neurons in vitro and in vivo, causes the fragmentation of mitochondria. The effect is specific for synuclein, with more fragmentation by α- than β- or γ-isoforms, and it is not accompanied by changes in the morphology of other organelles or in mitochondrial membrane potential. However, mitochondrial fragmentation is eventually followed by a decline in respiration and neuronal death. The fragmentation does not require the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and involves a direct interaction of synuclein with mitochondrial membranes. In vitro, synuclein fragments artificial membranes containing the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and this effect is specific for the small oligomeric forms of synuclein. α-Synuclein thus exerts a primary and direct effect on the morphology of an organelle long implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. PMID:21489994

  19. [Change in the lipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membranes in rat organs during adaptation to heat].

    PubMed

    Zubareva, E V; Seferova, R I; Denisova, N A

    1991-01-01

    Under conditions of adaptation to heating lipid composition in mitochondrial membranes of rat inner tissues was altered as follows: an increase in relative concentration of plasmalogenous forms of phospholipids (kidney, heart) and in content of saturated fatty acids (liver tissue), a decrease in the index of fatty acids unsaturation and in the ratio of fatty acids omega-3/omega-6. The alterations observed enabled the membranes to keep sufficient amount of liquidity essential for functional activity of mitochondria in heating.

  20. Molecular design of the voltage-dependent, anion-selective channel in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Guo, X W; Smith, P R; Cognon, B; D'Arcangelis, D; Dolginova, E; Mannella, C A

    1995-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains numerous copies of a channel protein, VDAC, that is thought to be the main permeability pathway through this membrane for polar molecules and ions. Low-dose electron microscopy has been used to obtain images of two-dimensional crystals of this channel (produced by treating outer membranes from fungal mitochondria with phospholipase A2) embedded in vitreous ice or aurothioglucose. The angular orientation of the channels in the unit cell of one type of array has been determined by rotational correlation analysis. The location of the amino-terminal segment of the protein (which, according to circular dichroism, forms an alpha-helix in nonpolar solvents and detergent solutions) has been determined by labeling arrays with Fab prepared from antibodies directed against residues 1-20. The three-dimensional structure of the channel has been obtained by applying Fourier reconstruction methods to projections of tilted crystals embedded in aurothioglucose, followed by averaging of the three non-symmetry-related channels in the unit cell. The results of this study indicate that the wall of VDAC's lumen has several irregular features (uneven height, grooves) and that the aminoterminal segment extends away from the lumen in this crystalline state.

  1. Thematic Review Series: Glycerolipids. Cardiolipin synthesis for the assembly of bacterial and mitochondrial membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Schlame, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the formation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cardiolipin is reviewed in light of its biological function. I begin with a detailed account of the structure of cardiolipin, its stereochemistry, and the resulting physical properties, and I present structural analogs of cardiolipin that occur in some organisms. Then I continue to discuss i) the de novo formation of cardiolipin, ii) its acyl remodeling, iii) the assembly of cardiolipin into biological membranes, and iv) the degradation of cardiolipin, which may be involved in apoptosis and mitochondrial fusion. Thus, this article covers the entire metabolic cycle of this unique phospholipid. It is shown that mitochondria produce cardiolipin species with a high degree of structural uniformity and molecular symmetry, among which there is often a dominant form with four identical acyl chains. The subsequent assembly of cardiolipin into functional membranes is largely unknown, but the analysis of crystal structures of membrane proteins has revealed a first glimpse into the underlying principles of cardiolipin-protein interactions. Disturbances of cardiolipin metabolism are crucial in the pathophysiology of human Barth syndrome and perhaps also play a role in diabetes and ischemic heart disease. PMID:18077827

  2. High membrane potential promotes alkenal-induced mitochondrial uncoupling and influences adenine nucleotide translocase conformation.

    PubMed

    Azzu, Vian; Parker, Nadeene; Brand, Martin D

    2008-07-15

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen species, whose downstream lipid peroxidation products, such as 4-hydroxynonenal, induce uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by increasing proton leak through mitochondrial inner membrane proteins such as the uncoupling proteins and adenine nucleotide translocase. Using mitochondria from rat liver, which lack uncoupling proteins, in the present study we show that energization (specifically, high membrane potential) is required for 4-hydroxynonenal to activate proton conductance mediated by adenine nucleotide translocase. Prolonging the time at high membrane potential promotes greater uncoupling. 4-Hydroxynonenal-induced uncoupling via adenine nucleotide translocase is prevented but not readily reversed by addition of carboxyatractylate, suggesting a permanent change (such as adduct formation) that renders the translocase leaky to protons. In contrast with the irreversibility of proton conductance, carboxyatractylate added after 4-hydroxynonenal still inhibits nucleotide translocation, implying that the proton conductance and nucleotide translocation pathways are different. We propose a model to relate adenine nucleotide translocase conformation to proton conductance in the presence or absence of 4-hydroxynonenal and/or carboxyatractylate.

  3. Mevalonolactone disrupts mitochondrial functions and induces permeability transition pore opening in rat brain mitochondria: Implications for the pathogenesis of mevalonic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Cecatto, Cristiane; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; da Silva, Janaína Camacho; Wajner, Alessandro; Godoy, Kálita Dos Santos; Ribeiro, Rafael Teixeira; Gonçalves, Aline de Mello; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Wajner, Moacir

    2017-03-09

    Mevalonic aciduria (MVA) is caused by severe deficiency of mevalonic kinase activity leading to tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of mevalonic acid (MA) and mevalonolactone (ML). Patients usually present severe neurologic symptoms whose pathophysiology is poorly known. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the major accumulating metabolites are toxic by investigating the in vitro effects of MA and ML on important mitochondrial functions in rat brain and liver mitochondria. ML, but not MA, markedly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), NAD(P)H content and the capacity to retain Ca(2+) in the brain, besides inducing mitochondrial swelling. These biochemical alterations were totally prevented by the classical inhibitors of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) cyclosporine A and ADP, as well as by ruthenium red in Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria, indicating the involvement of MPT and an important role for mitochondrial Ca(2+) in these effects. ML also induced lipid peroxidation and markedly inhibited aconitase activity, an enzyme that is highly susceptible to free radical attack, in brain mitochondrial fractions, indicating that lipid and protein oxidative damage may underlie some of ML-induced deleterious effects including MTP induction. In contrast, ML and MA did not compromise oxidative phosphorylation in the brain and all mitochondrial functions evaluated in the liver, evidencing a selective toxicity of ML towards the central nervous system. Our present study provides for the first time evidence that ML impairs essential brain mitochondrial functions with the involvement of MPT pore opening. It is therefore presumed that disturbance of brain mitochondrial homeostasis possibly contributes to the neurologic symptoms in MVA.

  4. Real-time imaging of laser-induced membrane disruption of a living cell observed with multifocus coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Niioka, Hirohiko; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate the real-time imaging of laser-induced disruption of the cellular membrane in a living HeLa cell and its cellular response with a multifocus coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope. A near-infrared pulsed laser beam tightly focused on the cellular membrane of a living cell induces ablation at the focal point causing a local disruption of the cellular membrane. After the membrane disruption a dark spot decreasing CARS intensity of 2840 cm(-1) Raman shift at the disrupted site appears. This dark spot immediately disappears and a strong CARS signal is observed around the disrupted site. This increase of the CARS signal might be caused by resealing of the disrupted site via aggregation of the patch lipid vesicles in the cytoplasm. The accumulation of lipids around the disrupted site is also confirmed with three-dimensional CARS images of a cell before and after membrane disruption. The temporal behavior of the CARS signal at the disrupted site is observed to detect the fusion dynamics of patch vesicles.

  5. Cardiac mitochondrial membrane stability after deep hypothermia using a xenon clathrate cryostasis protocol - an electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sheleg, Sergey; Hixon, Hugh; Cohen, Bruce; Lowry, David; Nedzved, Mikhail

    2008-01-01

    We investigated a new cryopreservation method using xenon, a clathrate-forming gas, under medium pressure (100psi). The objective of the study was to determine whether this cryostasis protocol could protect cardiac mitochondria at cryogenic temperatures (below 100 degrees Celsius).We analyzed transmission electron microscopy images to obtain information about changes in mitochondrial morphology induced by cryopreservation of the hearts. Our data showed absence of mitochondrial swelling, rupture of inner and outer membranes, and leakage of mitochondrial matrix into the cytoplasm after applying this cryostasis protocol. The electron microscopy results provided the first evidence that a cryostasis protocol using xenon as a clathrate-forming gas under pressure may have protective effects on intracellular membranes. This cryostasis technology may find applications in developing new approaches for long-term cryopreservation protocols.

  6. Positive Feedback Amplifies the Response of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential to Glucose Concentration in Clonal Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Gerencser, Akos A; Mookerjee, Shona A; Jastroch, Martin; Brand, Martin D

    2016-10-20

    Analysis of the cellular mechanisms of metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, is complicated by the large number of reactions and interactions in metabolic networks. Metabolic control analysis with appropriate modularization is a powerful method for simplifying and analyzing these networks. To analyze control of cellular energy metabolism in adherent cell cultures of the INS-1 832/13 pancreatic β-cell model we adapted our microscopy assay of absolute mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) to a fluorescence microplate reader format, and applied it in conjunction with cell respirometry. In these cells the sensitive response of ΔψM to extracellular glucose concentration drives glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Using metabolic control analysis we identified the control properties that generate this sensitive response. Force-flux relationships between ΔψM and respiration were used to calculate kinetic responses to ΔψM of processes both upstream (glucose oxidation) and downstream (proton leak and ATP turnover) of ΔψM. The analysis revealed that glucose-evoked ΔψM hyperpolarization is amplified by increased glucose oxidation activity caused by factors downstream of ΔψM. At high glucose, the hyperpolarized ΔψM is stabilized almost completely by the action of glucose oxidation, whereas proton leak also contributes to the homeostatic control of ΔψM at low glucose. These findings suggest a strong positive feedback loop in the regulation of β-cell energetics, and a possible regulatory role of proton leak in the fasting state. Analysis of islet bioenergetics from published cases of type 2 diabetes suggests that disruption of this feedback can explain the damaged bioenergetic response of β-cells to glucose.

  7. Glutaminolysis and glycolysis regulation by troglitazone in breast cancer cells: Relationship to mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Friday, Ellen; Oliver, Robert; Welbourne, Tomas; Turturro, Francesco

    2011-02-01

    We studied the roles of glycolysis and glutaminolysis following an acute reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψ(m)) induced by the thiazolidinedione troglitazone (TRO) and compared the responses with CCCP-induced depolarization in breast cancer derived MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells as well as in the MCF-10A normal breast cell line. TRO and CCCP both acutely reduced Ψ(m) but after 24 h TRO-treated cells had restored Ψ(m) associated with both increased glycolysis and glutaminolysis. In contrast, CCCP-treated cells exhibited only a partial restoration of Ψ(m) associated with increased glycolysis but decreased glutaminolysis. TRO-induced glutaminolysis was coupled to increased ammonium (GDH flux) and decreased alanine production (ALT flux) in all three cell lines. Both cancer cell lines exhibited a higher spontaneous GDH/ALT flux than the normal breast cell line associated with a reduced keto-acid pool. TRO's effect on GDH/ALT fluxes and mitochondrial keto-acid pool homeostasis was additive with glucose withdrawal suggesting limited intramitochondrial pyruvate availability. The TRO-induced acceleration in GDH flux supplies substrate for Complex I contributing to the restoration of Ψ(m) as well as Krebs cycle intermediates for biosynthesis. Inhibiting mitochondrial proton ATPase with oligomycin or nullifying the proton gradient with CCCP prevented both the TRO-induced recovery of Ψ(m) and accelerated GDH flux but restored ALT flux consonant with important roles for proton pumping in regulating GDH flux and Ψ(m) recovery. Blocking enhanced GDH flux reduced DNA synthesis consistent with glutaminolysis via GDH playing an important biosynthetic role in tumorigenesis. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. The effects of mercury ingestion on hepatic mitochondrial membranes of chicks.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, W E

    1976-11-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase activity was measured in livers of chicks receiving 0, 200,250 or 300 p.p.m. mercury (as HgC12) in the drinking water beginning at one week of age. In the first experiment treatment with 200 p.p.m. mercury for up to 4 weeks tended to increase the activity of cytochrome c oxidase and decrease the proportion of free (measured in untreated liver preparations) to total (measured in Triton X-100 treated liver preparations) enzyme activity as compared with controls. However, the differences, which appeared after 1 week of treatment were not always statistically significant. The fatty acid composition of mitochondrial lipids was not affected by treatment with 200 p.p.m. mercury for 4 weeks. In the second experiment, treatment with 300 p.p.m. mercury for 4 weeks resulted in significantly higher total cytochrome c oxidase specific activity and a significantly lower proportion of free to total enzyme activity as compared with controls. However, mitochondrial susceptibility to rupture by freezing and thawing was not affected. In the third experiment chicks were given 250 p.p.m. mercury in the drinking water from 1 through 9 weeks of age. The mercury-treated chicks exhibited severe tremors at 9 weeks while the controls were unaffected. Cytochome c oxidase total specific activity was significantly reduced in trembling chicks, and the proportion of free to total enzyme activity was significantly increased as was the susceptibility of isolated mitochondria to rupture by freezing and thawing. The data suggest that moderate levels of mercury administered over an 8 week period can affect adversely the integrity of mitochondrial membranes.

  9. Role of Pam16's degenerate J domain in protein import across the mitochondrial inner membrane.

    PubMed

    D'Silva, Patrick R; Schilke, Brenda; Walter, William; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2005-08-30

    Translocation of proteins across the mitochondrial inner membrane is an essential process requiring an import motor having mitochondrial Hsp70 (mtHsp70) at its core. The J protein partner of mtHsp70, Pam18, is an integral part of this motor, serving to stimulate the ATPase activity of mtHsp70. Pam16, an essential protein having an inactive J domain that is unable to stimulate mtHsp70's ATPase activity, forms a heterodimer with Pam18, but its function is unknown. We set out to test the importance of three properties of Pam16: (i) a stable interaction between Pam16 and Pam18, (ii) the inability of Pam16's degenerate J domain to stimulate Ssc1's ATPase domain, and (iii) the innately lower stimulatory activity of the Pam16:Pam18 heterodimer, compared to Pam18 alone. Neither substantial reduction in the ability of Pam18 to stimulate Ssc1's ATPase activity, nor the presence of an active J domain in Pam16, had deleterious effects on cell growth, indicating the lack of importance of two of these biochemical properties. However, a stable interaction between Pam16's degenerate J domain and Pam18's J domain was found to be critical for function. Alterations that destabilized the Pam16:Pam18 heterodimer had deleterious effects on cell growth and mitochondrial protein import; intragenic suppressors that restored robust growth also restored heterodimer stability. Our results support the idea that Pam16's J-like domain strongly interacts with Pam18's J domain, leading to a productive interaction of Pam18 with mtHsp70 at the import channel.

  10. Role of Pam16's degenerate J domain in protein import across the mitochondrial inner membrane

    PubMed Central

    D'Silva, Patrick R.; Schilke, Brenda; Walter, William; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2005-01-01

    Translocation of proteins across the mitochondrial inner membrane is an essential process requiring an import motor having mitochondrial Hsp70 (mtHsp70) at its core. The J protein partner of mtHsp70, Pam18, is an integral part of this motor, serving to stimulate the ATPase activity of mtHsp70. Pam16, an essential protein having an inactive J domain that is unable to stimulate mtHsp70's ATPase activity, forms a heterodimer with Pam18, but its function is unknown. We set out to test the importance of three properties of Pam16: (i) a stable interaction between Pam16 and Pam18, (ii) the inability of Pam16's degenerate J domain to stimulate Ssc1's ATPase domain, and (iii) the innately lower stimulatory activity of the Pam16:Pam18 heterodimer, compared to Pam18 alone. Neither substantial reduction in the ability of Pam18 to stimulate Ssc1's ATPase activity, nor the presence of an active J domain in Pam16, had deleterious effects on cell growth, indicating the lack of importance of two of these biochemical properties. However, a stable interaction between Pam16's degenerate J domain and Pam18's J domain was found to be critical for function. Alterations that destabilized the Pam16:Pam18 heterodimer had deleterious effects on cell growth and mitochondrial protein import; intragenic suppressors that restored robust growth also restored heterodimer stability. Our results support the idea that Pam16's J-like domain strongly interacts with Pam18's J domain, leading to a productive interaction of Pam18 with mtHsp70 at the import channel. PMID:16105940

  11. MitoLoc: A method for the simultaneous quantification of mitochondrial network morphology and membrane potential in single cells.

    PubMed

    Vowinckel, Jakob; Hartl, Johannes; Butler, Richard; Ralser, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria assemble into flexible networks. Here we present a simple method for the simultaneous quantification of mitochondrial membrane potential and network morphology that is based on computational co-localisation analysis of differentially imported fluorescent marker proteins. Established in, but not restricted to, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, MitoLoc reproducibly measures changes in membrane potential induced by the uncoupling agent CCCP, by oxidative stress, in respiratory deficient cells, and in ∆fzo1, ∆ref2, and ∆dnm1 mutants that possess fission and fusion defects. In combination with super-resolution images, MitoLoc uses 3D reconstruction to calculate six geometrical classifiers which differentiate network morphologies in ∆fzo1, ∆ref2, and ∆dnm1 mutants, under oxidative stress and in cells lacking mtDNA, even when the network is fragmented to a similar extent. We find that mitochondrial fission and a decline in membrane potential do regularly, but not necessarily, co-occur. MitoLoc hence simplifies the measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential in parallel to detect morphological changes in mitochondrial networks. Marker plasmid open-source software as well as the mathematical procedures are made openly available.

  12. Cytochrome c oxidase is regulated by modulations in protein expression and mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition in estivating African lungfish.

    PubMed

    Frick, N T; Bystriansky, J S; Ip, Y K; Chew, S F; Ballantyne, J S

    2010-03-01

    We examined some of the potential mechanisms lungfish (Protopterus dolloi) use to regulate cytochrome c oxidase (CCO), during metabolic depression. CCO activity was reduced by 67% in isolated liver mitochondria of estivating fish. This was likely accomplished, in part, by the 46% reduction in CCO subunit I protein expression in the liver. No change in the mRNA expression levels of CCO subunits I, II, III, and IV were found in the liver, suggesting CCO is under translational regulation; however, in the kidney, messenger limitation may be a factor as the expression of subunits I and II were depressed ( approximately 10-fold) during estivation, suggesting tissue-specific mechanisms of regulation. CCO is influenced by mitochondrial membrane phospholipids, particularly cardiolipin (CL). In P. dolloi, the phospholipid composition of the liver mitochondrial membrane changed during estivation, with a approximately 2.3-fold reduction in the amount of CL. Significant positive correlations were found between CCO activity and the amount of CL and phosphatidylethanolamine within the mitochondrial membrane. It appears CCO activity is regulated through multiple mechanisms in P. dolloi, and individual subunits of CCO are regulated independently, and in a tissue-specific manner. It is proposed that altering the amount of CL within the mitochondrial membrane may be a means of regulating CCO activity during metabolical depression in the African lungfish, P. dolloi.

  13. Effect of oral coadministration of artesunate with ferrous sulfate on rat liver mitochondrial membrane permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Fafowora, Mosebolatan V; Atanu, Francis; Sanya, Olayinka; Olorunsogo, Olufunso O; Erukainure, Ochuko L

    2011-07-01

    The recent resurgence of interest in the study of mitochondria has been fuelled in large part by the recognition that genetic and/or metabolic alterations in this organelle are causative or contributing factors in a variety of human diseases including cancer. This study hypothesizes that co-administration of artesunate and ferrous sulfate could induce apoptosis which can be targeted on cancerous cells in such a manner, thus providing a novel, viable and perhaps inexpensive way of dealing with the cancer scourge. Artesunate and Ferrous sulfate were co-administered to rats at various doses for seven days. At the end of the treatment, the rats were fasted overnight and sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Low ionic strength mitochondria were isolated from hepatic cells of the rats and assayed for protein content; changes in the absorbance of the liver mitochondria; and mitochondrial swelling. Co-administration of artesunate and ferrous sulfate resulted in a significant increase (P<0.05) in pore opening. The difference in pore opening was found to be statistically significant (P<0.05) when the artesunate and ferrous iron-treated groups were compared with the artesunate only treated group. Results from this study show that co-administration of artesunate and ferrous sulfate can cause an opening in the mitochondrial membrane transition pore. A combined dose of ferrous sulfate and artesunate may prove to be a more potent therapy for targeting cancerous cells.

  14. Mitochondrial outer-membrane protein FUNDC1 mediates hypoxia-induced mitophagy in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Feng, Du; Chen, Guo; Chen, Ming; Zheng, Qiaoxia; Song, Pingping; Ma, Qi; Zhu, Chongzhuo; Wang, Rui; Qi, Wanjun; Huang, Lei; Xue, Peng; Li, Baowei; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Haijing; Wang, Jun; Yang, Fuquan; Liu, Pingsheng; Zhu, Yushan; Sui, Senfang; Chen, Quan

    2012-01-22

    Accumulating evidence has shown that dysfunctional mitochondria can be selectively removed by mitophagy. Dysregulation of mitophagy is implicated in the development of neurodegenerative disease and metabolic disorders. How individual mitochondria are recognized for removal and how this process is regulated remain poorly understood. Here we report that FUNDC1, an integral mitochondrial outer-membrane protein, is a receptor for hypoxia-induced mitophagy. FUNDC1 interacted with LC3 through its typical LC3-binding motif Y(18)xxL(21), and mutation of the LC3-interaction region impaired its interaction with LC3 and the subsequent induction of mitophagy. Knockdown of endogenous FUNDC1 significantly prevented hypoxia-induced mitophagy, which could be reversed by the expression of wild-type FUNDC1, but not LC3-interaction-deficient FUNDC1 mutants. Mechanistic studies further revealed that hypoxia induced dephosphorylation of FUNDC1 and enhanced its interaction with LC3 for selective mitophagy. Our findings thus offer insights into mitochondrial quality control in mammalian cells.

  15. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.H.; Verma, A.; Trifiletti, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is a site identified by its nanomolar affinity for (/sup 3/H)diazepam, similar to the affinity of diazepam for the central-type benzodiazepine receptor in the brain. The peripheral type benzodiazepine receptor occurs in many peripheral tissues but has discrete localizations as indicated by autoradiographic studies showing uniquely high densities of the receptors in the adrenal cortex and in Leydig cells of the testes. Subcellular localization studies reveal a selective association of the receptors with the outer membrane of mitochondria. Photoaffinity labeling of the mitochondrial receptor with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam reveals two discrete labeled protein bands of 30 and 35 kDa, respectively. The 35-kDa band appears to be identical with the voltage-dependent anion channel protein porin. Fractionation of numerous peripheral tissues reveals a single principal endogenous ligand for the receptor, consisting of porphyrins, which display nanomolar affinity. Interactions of porphyrins with the mitochondrial receptor may clarify its physiological role and account for many pharmacological actions of benzodiazepines.

  16. Cerium oxide nanoparticles prevent apoptosis in primary cortical culture by stabilizing mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Arya, A; Sethy, N K; Das, M; Singh, S K; Das, A; Ujjain, S K; Sharma, R K; Sharma, M; Bhargava, K

    2014-07-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) of spherical shape have unique antioxidant capacity primarily due to alternating + 3 and + 4 oxidation states and crystal defects. Several studies revealed the protective efficacies of CNPs in cells and tissues against the oxidative damage. However, its effect on mitochondrial functioning, downstream effectors of radical burst and apoptosis remains unknown. In this study, we investigated whether CNPs treatment could protect the primary cortical cells from loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and Δψm-dependent cell death. CNPs with spherical morphology and size range 7-10 nm were synthesized and utilized at a concentration of 25 nM on primary neuronal culture challenged with 50 μM of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We showed that optimal dose of CNPs minimized ROS content of the cells and also curbed related surge in cellular calcium flux. Importantly, CNPs treatment prevented apoptotic loss of cell viability. Reduction in the apoptosis could be successfully attributed to the maintenance of Δψm and restoration of major redox equivalents NADH/NAD(+) ratio and cellular ATP. These findings, therefore, suggest possible route of CNPs protective efficacies in primary cortical culture.

  17. Germ-line specific variants of components of the mitochondrial outer membrane import machinery in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hwa, Jennifer J; Zhu, Alan J; Hiller, Mark A; Kon, Charlene Y; Fuller, Margaret T; Santel, Ansgar

    2004-08-13

    A search of the Drosophila genome for genes encoding components of the mitochondrial translocase of outer membrane (TOM) complex revealed duplication of genes encoding homologues of Tom20 and Tom40. Tom20 and Tom40 were represented by two differentially expressed homologues in the Drosophila genome. While dtom20 and dtom40 appeared to be expressed ubiquitously, the second variants, called tomboy20 and tomboy40, were expressed only in the male germ-line. Transcripts for tomboy20 and tomboy40 were detected in primary spermatocytes as well as post-meiotic stages. Transcription of tomboy20 and tomboy40 in spermatocytes was not dependent on the transcription factor Cannonball, which is responsible for controlling expression of gene products exclusively required for post-meiotic germ cell differentiation. Epitope-tagging and transient expression of dTom20 and Tomboy40 in mammalian cell culture showed proper targeting to mitochondria.

  18. Inorganic nanoparticles kill Toxoplasma gondii via changes in redox status and mitochondrial membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemi, Oluyomi Stephen; Murata, Yuho; Sugi, Tatsuki; Kato, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the anti-Toxoplasma gondii potential of gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles (NPs). Inorganic NPs (0.01–1,000 µg/mL) were screened for antiparasitic activity. The NPs caused >90% inhibition of T. gondii growth with EC50 values of ≤7, ≤1, and ≤100 µg/mL for gold, silver, and platinum NPs, respectively. The NPs showed no host cell cytotoxicity at the effective anti-T. gondii concentrations; the estimated selectivity index revealed a ≥20-fold activity toward the parasite versus the host cell. The anti-T. gondii activity of the NPs, which may be linked to redox signaling, affected the parasite mitochondrial membrane potential and parasite invasion, replication, recovery, and infectivity potential. Our results demonstrated the antiparasitic potential of NPs. The findings support the further exploration of NPs as a possible source of alternative and effective anti-T. gondii agents. PMID:28280332

  19. Inorganic nanoparticles kill Toxoplasma gondii via changes in redox status and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Oluyomi Stephen; Murata, Yuho; Sugi, Tatsuki; Kato, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the anti-Toxoplasma gondii potential of gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles (NPs). Inorganic NPs (0.01-1,000 µg/mL) were screened for antiparasitic activity. The NPs caused >90% inhibition of T. gondii growth with EC50 values of ≤7, ≤1, and ≤100 µg/mL for gold, silver, and platinum NPs, respectively. The NPs showed no host cell cytotoxicity at the effective anti-T. gondii concentrations; the estimated selectivity index revealed a ≥20-fold activity toward the parasite versus the host cell. The anti-T. gondii activity of the NPs, which may be linked to redox signaling, affected the parasite mitochondrial membrane potential and parasite invasion, replication, recovery, and infectivity potential. Our results demonstrated the antiparasitic potential of NPs. The findings support the further exploration of NPs as a possible source of alternative and effective anti-T. gondii agents.

  20. Multiple Lines of Evidence Localize Signaling, Morphology, and Lipid Biosynthesis Machinery to the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane of Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Owen; Taylor, Nicolas L.; Carrie, Chris; Eubel, Holger; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Zhang, Botao; Narsai, Reena; Millar, A. Harvey; Whelan, James

    2011-01-01

    The composition of the mitochondrial outer membrane is notoriously difficult to deduce by orthology to other organisms, and biochemical enrichments are inevitably contaminated with the closely associated inner mitochondrial membrane and endoplasmic reticulum. In order to identify novel proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we integrated a quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of highly enriched and prefractionated samples with a number of confirmatory biochemical and cell biology approaches. This approach identified 42 proteins, 27 of which were novel, more than doubling the number of confirmed outer membrane proteins in plant mitochondria and suggesting novel functions for the plant outer mitochondrial membrane. The novel components identified included proteins that affected mitochondrial morphology and/or segregation, a protein that suggests the presence of bacterial type lipid A in the outer membrane, highly stress-inducible proteins, as well as proteins necessary for embryo development and several of unknown function. Additionally, proteins previously inferred via orthology to be present in other compartments, such as an NADH:cytochrome B5 reductase required for hydroxyl fatty acid accumulation in developing seeds, were shown to be located in the outer membrane. These results also revealed novel proteins, which may have evolved to fulfill plant-specific requirements of the